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Sample records for experimental muscle pain

  1. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  2. Interaction between histamine-induced itch and experimental muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Wasner, G; Schwarz, K; Schattschneider, J; Binder, A; Jensen, T S; Baron, R

    2004-06-01

    Itch sensation can be inhibited by simultaneously applied cutaneous pain at the same skin site via a central mechanism. Deep muscle pain is often associated with sensory changes in the corresponding dermatome. We investigated whether experimentally induced muscle pain has any influence on histamine-induced itch and vice versa in a double blind placebo-controlled study. Experiments were performed in 18 healthy subjects. In nine individuals control iontophoresis of histamine into the forearm produced a distinct itch sensation. Another nine individuals participated in an additional experiment in which histamine and saline were iontophoresed on the forearm in a randomized double-blinded two-way crossover design after intramuscular injection of capsaicin into the ipsilateral brachioradial muscle. Capsaicin-induced muscle pain reduced itch sensation significantly. In contrast, capsaicin-induced muscle pain increased significantly after cutaneous histamine application compared to muscle pain after iontophoresis of saline (placebo). These novel data indicate that muscle pain inhibits itch and histamine increases muscle pain. A bi-directional interaction between cutaneous histamine-sensitive afferents and nociceptive muscle afferents via central mechanisms is suggested.

  3. Experimental neck muscle pain impairs standing balance in humans.

    PubMed

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    Impaired postural control has been reported in patients with chronic neck pain of both traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies, but whether painful stimulation of neck muscle per se can affect balance control during quiet standing in humans remains unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was thus to investigate the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on standing balance in young healthy adults. To achieve this goal, 16 male university students were asked to stand upright as still as possible on a force platform with their eyes closed in two conditions of No pain and Pain of the neck muscles elicited by experimental painful electrical stimulation. Postural control and postural performance were assessed by the displacements of the center of foot pressure (CoP) and of the center of mass (CoM), respectively. The results showed increased CoP and CoM displacements variance, range, mean velocity, and mean and median frequencies in the Pain relative to the No pain condition. The present findings emphasize the destabilizing effect of experimental neck muscle pain per se, and more largely stress the importance of intact neck neuromuscular function on standing balance.

  4. Effect of experimental chewing on masticatory muscle pain onset

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; SILVA, Rafael dos Santos; de ARAUJO, Carlos dos Reis Pereira; ROSSETI, Leylha Maria N.; YASSUDA, Shigueharu; da SILVA, Renato Oliveira Ferreira; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of a chewing exercise on pain intensity and pressurepain threshold in patients with myofascial pain. Methods Twenty-nine consecutive women diagnosed with myofascial pain (MFP) according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria comprised the experimental group and 15 healthy age-matched female were used as controls. Subjects were asked to chew a gum stick for 9 min and to stay at rest for another 9 min afterwards. Pain intensity was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS) every 3 min. At 0, 9 and 18 min, the pressure-pain threshold (PPT) was measured bilaterally on the masseter and the anterior, medium, and posterior temporalis muscles. Results Patients with myofascial pain reported increase (76%) and no change (24%) on the pain intensity measured with the VAS. A reduction of the PPT at all muscular sites after the exercise and a non-significant recovery after rest were also observed. Conclusion The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. there are at least two subtypes of patients with myofascial pain that respond differently to experimental chewing; 2. the chewing protocol had an adequate discriminative ability in distinguishing patients with myofascial pain from healthy controls. PMID:21437467

  5. Kinesthetic illusions attenuate experimental muscle pain, as do muscle and cutaneous stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gay, André; Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Roll, Jean-Pierre; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith

    2015-07-30

    In the present study, muscle pain was induced experimentally in healthy subjects by administrating hypertonic saline injections into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. We first aimed at comparing the analgesic effects of mechanical vibration applied to either cutaneous or muscle receptors of the TA or to both types simultaneously. Secondly, pain alleviation was compared in subjects in whom muscle tendon vibration evoked kinesthetic illusions of the ankle joint. Muscle tendon vibration, which primarily activated muscle receptors, reduced pain intensity by 30% (p<0.01). In addition, tangential skin vibration reduced pain intensity by 33% (p<0.01), primarily by activating cutaneous receptors. Concurrently stimulating both sensory channels induced stronger analgesic effects (-51%, p<0.01), as shown by the lower levels of electrodermal activity. The strongest analgesic effects of the vibration-induced muscle inputs occurred when illusory movements were perceived (-38%, p=0.01). The results suggest that both cutaneous and muscle sensory feedback reduce muscle pain, most likely via segmental and supraspinal processes. Further clinical trials are needed to investigate these new methods of muscle pain relief.

  6. Experimental muscle pain decreases the frequency threshold of electrically elicited muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Mariano; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Ge, Hong-You; Pierelli, Francesco; Sandrini, Giorgio; Farina, Dario

    2007-09-01

    This study in humans tested the hypothesis that nociceptive muscle afferent input facilitates the occurrence of muscle cramps. In 13 healthy adults, muscle cramps were experimentally induced in the foot by stimulating the tibialis posterior nerve at the ankle with 2-s bursts of stimuli separated by 30 s, with stimulation frequency increasing by 2-Hz increments from 10 Hz until the cramp appeared. The minimum stimulation frequency that induced the cramp was defined "cramp frequency threshold". In 2 days, elicitation of the cramp was performed in the two-feet with and without (baseline condition) injection of hypertonic (painful condition) or isotonic (control condition) saline into the deep midportion of the flexor hallucis brevis muscle, from where surface EMG signals were recorded. The cramp frequency threshold was lower for the painful condition with respect to its baseline (mean +/- SE, hypertonic saline: 25.7 +/- 2.1 Hz, corresponding baseline: 31.2 +/- 2.8 Hz; P < 0.01) while there was no difference between the threshold with isotonic injection with respect to baseline. EMG average rectified value and power spectral frequency were higher during the cramp than immediately before the stimulation that elicited the cramp (pre-cramp: 13.9 +/- 1.6 muV and 75.4 +/- 3.8 Hz, respectively; post-cramp: 19.9 +/- 3.2 muV and 101.6 +/- 6.0 Hz; P < 0.05). The results suggest that nociceptive muscle afferent activity induced by injection of hypertonic saline facilitates the generation of electrically elicited muscle cramps.

  7. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    PubMed

    Gizzi, Leonardo; Muceli, Silvia; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies). In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side) in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain) and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14); the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain). Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus) influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  8. Experimental muscle pain increases variability of neural drive to muscle and decreases motor unit coherence in tremor frequency band

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Utku Ş.; Negro, Francesco; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed that muscle pain influences force variability and low-frequency (<3 Hz) oscillations in the neural drive to muscle. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of experimental muscle pain on the neural control of muscle force at higher frequency bands, associated with afferent feedback (alpha band, 5–13 Hz) and with descending cortical input (beta band, 15–30 Hz). Single-motor unit activity was recorded, in two separate experimental sessions, from the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles with intramuscular wire electrodes, during isometric abductions of the fifth finger at 10% of maximal force [maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)] and ankle dorsiflexions at 25% MVC. The contractions were repeated under three conditions: no pain (baseline) and after intramuscular injection of isotonic (0.9%, control) and hypertonic (5.8%, painful) saline. The results showed an increase of the relative power of both the force signal and the neural drive at the tremor frequency band (alpha, 5–13 Hz) between the baseline and hypertonic (painful) conditions for both muscles (P < 0.05) but no effect on the beta band. Additionally, the strength of motor unit coherence was lower (P < 0.05) in the hypertonic condition in the alpha band for both muscles and in the beta band for the ADM. These results indicate that experimental muscle pain increases the amplitude of the tremor oscillations because of an increased variability of the neural control (common synaptic input) in the tremor band. Moreover, the concomitant decrease in coherence suggests an increase in independent input in the tremor band due to pain. PMID:26019314

  9. The effects of experimental muscle and skin pain on the static stretch sensitivity of human muscle spindles in relaxed leg muscles

    PubMed Central

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Burton, Alexander R; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that noxious inputs onto γ-motoneurons can cause an increase in the activity of muscle spindles, and it has been proposed that this causes a fusimotor-driven increase in muscle stiffness that is believed to underlie many chronic pain syndromes. To test whether experimental pain also acts on the fusimotor system in humans, unitary recordings were made from 19 spindle afferents (12 Ia, 7 II) located in the ankle and toe extensors or peronei muscles of awake human subjects. Muscle pain was induced by bolus intramuscular injection of 0.5 ml 5% hypertonic saline into tibialis anterior (TA); skin pain was induced by 0.2 ml injection into the overlying skin. Changes in fusimotor drive to the muscle spindles were inferred from changes in the mean discharge frequency and discharge variability of spindle endings in relaxed muscle. During muscle pain no afferents increased their discharge activity: seven afferents (5 Ia, 2 II) showed a decrease and six (4 Ia, 2 II) afferents were not affected. During skin pain of 13 afferents discharge rate increased in one (Ia) and decreased in two (1 Ia, 1 II). On average, the overall discharge rate decreased during muscle pain by 6.1% (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon), but remained essentially the same during skin pain. There was no detectable correlation between subjective pain level and the small change in discharge rate of muscle spindles. Irrespective of the type of pain, discharge variability parameters were not influenced (P > 0.05; Wilcoxon). We conclude that, contrary to the ‘vicious cycle’ hypothesis, acute activation of muscle or skin nociceptors does not cause a reflex increase in fusimotor drive in humans. Rather, our results are more aligned with the pain adaptation model, based on clinical studies predicting pain-induced reductions of agonist muscle activity. PMID:18403422

  10. The effect of experimental low back pain on lumbar muscle activity in people with a history of clinical low back pain: a muscle functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Danneels, Lieven; Cagnie, Barbara; D'hooge, Roseline; De Deene, Yves; Crombez, Geert; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Parlevliet, Thierry; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    In people with a history of low back pain (LBP), structural and functional alterations have been observed at several peripheral and central levels of the sensorimotor pathway. These existing alterations might interact with the way the sensorimotor system responds to pain. We examined this assumption by evaluating the lumbar motor responses to experimental nociceptive input of 15 participants during remission of unilateral recurrent LBP. Quantitative T2 images (muscle functional MRI) were taken bilaterally of multifidus, erector spinae, and psoas at several segmental levels (L3 upper and L4 upper and lower endplate) and during several conditions: 1) at rest, 2) upon trunk-extension exercise without pain, and 3) upon trunk-extension exercise with experimental induced pain at the clinical pain-side (1.5-ml intramuscular hypertonic saline injections in erector spinae). Following experimental pain induction, muscle activity levels similarly reduced for all three muscles, on both painful and nonpainful sides, and at multiple segmental levels (P = 0.038). Pain intensity and localization from experimental LBP were similar as during recalled clinical LBP episodes. In conclusion, unilateral and unisegmental experimental LBP exerts a generalized and widespread decrease in lumbar muscle activity during remission of recurrent LBP. This muscle response is consistent with previous observed patterns in healthy people subjected to the same experimental pain paradigm. It is striking that similar inhibitory patterns in response to pain could be observed, despite the presence of preexisting alterations in the lumbar musculature during remission of recurrent LBP. These results suggest that motor output can modify along the course of recurrent LBP.

  11. Experimentally induced masseter-pain changes masseter but not sternocleidomastoid muscle-related activity during mastication.

    PubMed

    Pasinato, Fernanda; Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C; Zeredo, Jorge Luis Lopes; Macedo, Sergio Bruzadelli; Corrêa, Eliane C R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of induced masseter-muscle pain on the amplitude of muscle activation, symmetry and coactivation of jaw- and neck-muscles during mastication. Twenty-eight male volunteers, mean age±SD 20.6±2.0years, participated in this study. Surface electromyography of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles was performed bilaterally during mastication of a gummy candy before and after injections of monosodium glutamate solution and isotonic saline solution. As a result, we observed a decrease in the amplitude of activation of the masseter muscle on the working side (p=0.009; d=0.34) and a reduction in the asymmetry between the working and the balancing side during mastication (p=0.007; d=0.38). No changes were observed either on the craniocervical electromyographic variables. In conclusion, experimentally induced pain reduced the masseter muscle activation on the working side, thereby reducing the physiological masseters' recruitment asymmetry between the two sides during mastication. No effects on SCM activity were detected. These results may partly explain the initial maladaptative changes underlying TMD conditions.

  12. The impact of neurodynamic testing on the perception of experimentally induced muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Coppieters, Michel W; Kurz, Kimberly; Mortensen, Thor Einar; Richards, Nicola L; Skaret, Ingrid A; McLaughlin, Laurie M; Hodges, Paul W

    2005-02-01

    Neurodynamic tests such as the straight leg raising (SLR) and slump test are frequently used for assessment of mechanosensitivity of neural tissues. However, there is ongoing debate in the literature regarding the contributions of neural and non-neural tissues to the elicited symptoms because many structures are affected by these tests. Sensitizing manoeuvres are limb or spinal movements added to neurodynamic tests, which aim to identify the origin of the symptoms by preferentially loading or unloading neural structures. A prerequisite for the use of sensitizing manoeuvres to identify neural involvement is that the addition of sensitizing manoeuvres has no impact on pain perception when the origin of the pain is non-neural. In this study, experimental muscle pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline in tibialis anterior or soleus in 25 asymptomatic, naive volunteers. A first experiment investigated the impact of hip adduction, abduction, medial and lateral rotation in the SLR position. In a second experiment, the different stages of the slump test were examined. The intensity and area of experimentally induced muscle pain did not increase when sensitizing manoeuvres were added to the SLR or throughout the successive stages of the slump test. The findings of this study lend support to the validity of the use of sensitizing manoeuvres during neurodynamic testing.

  13. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    ) participated in two sessions at a minimum interval of 1 wk. Microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to measure masseter muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any time point were observed between groups. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity. Qu-ATEBS, the 7-item evidence-based quality assessment tool, is reliable, exhibits face-validity, and has excellent discriminative validity. Tooth clenching was associated with pain, fatigue, and short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, but not with proprioceptive allodynia. It seems that tooth clenching is not directly related to delayed onset muscle soreness. In healthy subjects and in patients with M-TMD, levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate were unaltered after tooth clenching. But 5-HT levels were significantly higher and blood flows significantly lower in M-TMD patients than in healthy controls at all time points. These two factors may facilitate the release, and enhance the effects, of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  14. The effect of experimental muscle pain on the amplitude and velocity sensitivity of jaw closing muscle spindle afferents.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Capra, Norman

    2005-07-19

    The effect of experimental muscle pain on the amplitude and velocity sensitivity of muscle spindle primary afferent neurons in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) was examined. Extracellular recordings were made from 45 neurons designated as spindle primary- or secondary-like on the basis of their response to ramp-and-hold jaw movements. Velocity sensitivity was assessed in spindle primary-like afferents by calculating the mean dynamic index of each unit in response to three different velocities of jaw opening before and after intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline (HS, 5%, 100 microl). The amplitude sensitivity of all jaw muscle spindle afferents was assessed by calculating the mean firing rate of each unit in response to three different amplitudes of jaw openings during both the open and hold phases of the movement and with best-fit lines obtained, using linear regression analysis, before and after HS injection. The variance of the two regression lines obtained for each unit before and after the injection was compared using the coincidence test, and changes in intercept and slope were determined. Seventy-five percent of the primary-like units and 80% of the secondary-like units presented with changes in static behavior after HS injection. Thirty-six percent of the primary-like units showed changes in dynamic behavior. Injection of isotonic saline (control) did not alter the responses of the spindle afferent to jaw opening. Thus, our results demonstrate that the predominant effect of noxious stimulation was a shift in the amplitude sensitivity of both spindle primary-like and secondary-like afferents and, to a lesser extent, the velocity sensitivity of the spindle primary-like unit. In accordance with earlier studies in the cat hindlimb and neck muscles, these results suggest that the activation of masseter muscle nociceptor alters spindle afferent responses to stretch acting primarily through static gamma motor neurons.

  15. Effect of muscle relaxants on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes: a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way cross-over study was performed to investigate the effect of two muscle relaxants (tolperisone hydrochloride and pridinol mesilate) on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes. Fifteen healthy men participated in three randomised sessions separated by at least 1 week. In each session 300 mg tolperisone, 8 mg pridinol mesilate or placebo was administered orally as a single dose. One hour after drug administration 0.3 ml hypertonic saline (5.8%) was injected into the right masseter to produce muscle pain. Subjects continuously rated their perceived pain intensity on an electronic 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured and short-latency reflex responses were evoked in the pre-contracted (15% maximal voluntary contraction) masseter and temporalis muscles by a standardised stretch device (1 mm displacement, 10 ms ramp time) before (baseline), 1 h after medication (post-drug), during ongoing experimental muscle pain (pain-post-drug), and 15 min after pain had vanished (post-pain). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower VAS peak pain scores (5.9 +/- 0.4 cm) after administration of tolperisone hydrochloride compared with pridinol mesilate (6.8 +/- 0.4 cm) and placebo (6.6 +/- 0.4 cm) (P=0.020). Administration of pridinol mesilate was associated with a significant decrease in PPTs compared with tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo (P=0.002) after medication, but not after experimental jaw-muscle pain. The normalised peak-to-peak amplitude of the stretch reflexes were not significantly influenced by the test medication (P=0.762), but were in all sessions significantly facilitated during ongoing experimental jaw-muscle pain (P=0.034). In conclusion, tolperisone hydrochloride provides a small, albeit significant reduction in the perceived intensity of experimental jaw-muscle pain whereas the present dose had no effect on the short-latency jaw

  16. Vitamin D Status Is Not Associated with Outcomes of Experimentally-Induced Muscle Weakness and Pain in Young, Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Susan M.; Dannecker, Erin A.; Peterson, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D receptors have been identified in skeletal muscle; and symptoms of vitamin D deficiency include muscle weakness and pain. Moreover, increased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations have been associated with improved muscle function. To further clarify the importance of vitamin D to muscle, we examined the association between vitamin D status and exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness in healthy people. Muscle damage to the elbow flexors was induced with eccentric exercise (EE) in 48 individuals (22.5 ± 3.2 yrs). Muscle pain ratings following unloaded movement and peak isometric force (IF) were collected before EE and for 4 days post-EE. Linear regression was used to determine if serum 25(OH)D was a predictor of any outcome. In males, R2-values from 0.48 to 1.00. R2 for IF ranged from 0 to 0.02 and P-values from 0.48 to 1.00. In females, R2 for pain ratings ranged from 0.01 to 0.11 and P-values from 0.14 to 0.59. R2 for IF ranged from 0 to 0.04 and P-values from 0.41 to 0.90. In conclusion, vitamin D status did not predict muscle pain or strength after EE-induced muscle damage in young healthy men and women. PMID:21209718

  17. Craniofacial muscle pain: review of mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic surveys of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have demonstrated that a considerable proportion of the population--up to 5% or 6%--will experience persistent pain severe enough to seek treatment. Unfortunately, the current diagnostic classification of craniofacial muscle pain is based on descriptions of signs and symptoms rather than on knowledge of pain mechanisms. Furthermore, the pathophysiology and etiology of craniofacial muscle pain are not known in sufficient detail to allow causal treatment. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain cause-effect relationships; however, it is still uncertain what may be the cause of muscle pain and what is the effect of muscle pain. This article reviews the literature in which craniofacial muscle pain has been induced by experimental techniques in animals and human volunteers and in which the effects on somatosensory and motor function have been assessed under standardized conditions. This information is compared to the clinical correlates, which can be derived from the numerous cross-sectional studies in patients with craniofacial muscle pain. The experimental literature clearly indicates that muscle pain has significant effects on both somatosensory and craniofacial motor function. Typical somatosensory manifestations of experimental muscle pain are referred pain and increased sensitivity of homotopic areas. The craniofacial motor function is inhibited mainly during experimental muscle pain, but phase-dependent excitation is also found during mastication to reduce the amplitude and velocity of jaw movements. The underlying neurobiologic mechanisms probably involve varying combinations of sensitization of peripheral afferents, hyperexcitability of central neurons, and imbalance in descending pain modulatory systems. Reflex circuits in the brain stem seem important for the adjustment of sensorimotor function in the presence of craniofacial pain. Changes in somatosensory and motor function may therefore be

  18. Muscle pain inhibits cutaneous touch perception.

    PubMed

    Stohler, C S; Kowalski, C J; Lund, J P

    2001-06-01

    The processing of noxious and non-noxious sensations differs between chronic pain syndromes, and we believe that studies of sensory processing in the presence of pain will help to clarify the aetiology of the conditions. Here we measured in humans the threshold-level mechanosensitivity in tonic experimental muscle pain. We found (1) that muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline reduced cutaneous threshold-level mechanosensitivity at the site of pain and at the mirror site in the contralateral face, (2) that this effect outlasted the sensation of pain, (3) that it was more pronounced when the painful area was reported to be large, and (4) that the loss of mechanosensitivity was greater in males than females. Comparing our findings to results obtained with other pain models, all classes of nociceptors do not seem to have the same effect on cutaneous mechanosensitivity. The observed threshold-level hypoesthesia is consistent with the hypothesis that the increased mechanical thresholds found in clinic cases of temporomandibular disorders and cervicobrachialgia are a direct result of the activation of muscle nociceptors.

  19. Medicines to Treat Muscle Spasms and Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines to Treat Muscle Spasms and Pain Do you have a lot of muscle pain? Are your muscles extremely stiff and tense? If the answer is ... factsheet to learn about two conditions that cause muscle pain and stiffness, and the medicines used to ...

  20. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects.

  1. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle), muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle). Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain. PMID:21696603

  2. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  3. Muscle Cramp - A Common Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... within minutes and typically do not warrant medical attention. “You can usually treat muscle cramps with self-care measures,” says Dr. Quist. Here are a few of the methods: Stop doing whatever activity triggered the cramp. Gently ...

  4. Gum chewing and jaw muscle fatigue and pains.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T; Mohamed, S E

    1996-06-01

    To study possible associations between gum chewing and fatigue and pains in the jaw muscles, eight healthy adults performed prolonged idling, prolonged unilateral chewing of gum, and brief vigorous clenching of the teeth (MVC). Through surface electromyography (EMG), the authors monitored the cumulative (microV.s) as well as the average rates (microV.s-1) of contractile activities in the right and left masseter muscles. During 10 min of idling there was an absence of muscle fatigue and muscle pains when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 2% and 3%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric muscle pains through MVC. During 10 min of right-sided gum chewing at a rate of 1.2 Hz, the majority of subjects (75%) experienced weak jaw muscle fatigue-not jaw muscle pains-when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 38% and 19%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric pains through MVC. In comparison with 10 min of idling, the weak muscle fatigue of 10 min of unilateral gum chewing appeared when the total contractile activities of the right and left masseter muscles were increased by 1664% and 519%, respectively. It seemed as if prolonged unilateral gum chewing and previous pain-releasing MVC caused some sensitization of muscle nociceptors which, in turn, aggravated subsequent isometric jaw muscle pains elicited through MVC. Even though the right masseter muscle was the most frequent site of clinical fatigue and pains, the authors found no evidence supporting the theoretical foundation of the myofascial pain/dysfunction syndrome.

  5. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.

  6. Vicarious pain while observing another in pain: an experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, S.; Crombez, G.; Van Ryckeghem, D. M. L.; Brass, M.; Van Damme, S.; Goubert, L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at developing an experimental paradigm to assess vicarious pain experiences. We further explored the putative moderating role of observer's characteristics such as hypervigilance for pain and dispositional empathy. Methods: Two experiments are reported using a similar procedure. Undergraduate students were selected based upon whether they reported vicarious pain in daily life, and categorized into a pain responder group or a comparison group. Participants were presented a series of videos showing hands being pricked whilst receiving occasionally pricking (electrocutaneous) stimuli themselves. In congruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were applied to the same spatial location. In incongruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were in the opposite spatial location. Participants were required to report on which location they felt a pricking sensation. Of primary interest was the effect of viewing another in pain upon vicarious pain errors, i.e., the number of trials in which an illusionary sensation was reported. Furthermore, we explored the effect of individual differences in hypervigilance to pain, dispositional empathy and the rubber hand illusion (RHI) upon vicarious pain errors. Results: Results of both experiments indicated that the number of vicarious pain errors was overall low. In line with expectations, the number of vicarious pain errors was higher in the pain responder group than in the comparison group. Self-reported hypervigilance for pain lowered the probability of reporting vicarious pain errors in the pain responder group, but dispositional empathy and the RHI did not. Conclusion: Our paradigm allows measuring vicarious pain experiences in students. However, the prevalence of vicarious experiences of pain is low, and only a small percentage of participants display the phenomenon. It remains however unknown which variables affect its occurrence. PMID:23781187

  7. Myofascial origins of low back pain. 2. Torso muscles.

    PubMed

    Simons, D G; Travell, J G

    1983-02-01

    Trigger points (TPs) in muscles of the lower torso associated with the spine are an important cause of low back pain. The quadratus lumborum is the muscle most commonly involved, but TPs located there are often overlooked because of inadequate physical examination techniques. TPs in the lower rectus abdominis refer pain horizontally across the low back, and those in the iliopsoas refer pain in a vertical pattern, parallel to the lumbosacral spine. The pain pattern of TPs in the serratus posterior inferior is noted in the region of the muscle itself.

  8. Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of Facial Pain, Muscle Tension, and Stress.

    PubMed

    Glaros, A G; Marszalek, J M; Williams, K B

    2016-04-01

    The role of masticatory muscle activation on pain in temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJD) is controversial. This single-group, prospective panel study examined the relationships among masticatory muscle tension, emotional distress, and TMJD pain in a sample of 7,023 observations obtained from 171 individuals using longitudinal multilevel modeling. Three main hypotheses were tested. The first posited that emotional distress and muscle tension directly influenced pain (hypothesis 1a: Distress → TMJD Pain; hypothesis 1b: Muscle Tension → TMJD Pain). The second posited that emotional distress directly influenced muscle tension (Distress → Muscle Tension), and the third posited that the effect of emotional distress on pain was mediated by muscle tension (Distress → Muscle Tension → TMJD pain). We also examined the fit of the data to possible alternative models. All the data used in this study were collected via an experience sampling methodology. The fit of the preferred models was better than that of the alternative models, with the preferred models explaining large proportions of the data, especially for level 2 variance (hypothesis 1a = 41% variance; hypothesis 1b = 69% variance; hypothesis 2 = 48% variance). In the mediation model, the addition of muscle tension to the model reduced the impact of emotional distress. The findings support a causal role for masticatory muscle tension in TMJD pain. Clinically, the results suggest that addressing tension and other oral parafunctions in those diagnosed with TMJDs should be an important part of the conservative, noninvasive care of individuals diagnosed with the myofascial pain or arthralgia of TMJD.

  9. Assessment of avoidance behaviors in mouse models of muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Dane; Fuchs, Perry N.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Pain encompasses both a sensory as well as an affective dimension and these are differentially processed in the cortex. Animal models typically use reflexive behaviors to test nociceptive responses; these are thought to reflect the sensory dimension of pain. While several behavioral tests are available for examining the affective dimension of pain it is unclear if these are appropriate in animal models of muscle pain. We therefore tested the utility of existing paradigms as well as new avoidance paradigms in animal models of muscle pain in mice. Specifically we used an escape-avoidance test to noxious mechanical stimuli, a learned avoidance test to noxious mechanical stimuli, and avoidance of physical activity. We used three animal models of muscle pain: carrageenan-induced inflammation, non-inflammatory muscle pain, and exercise-enhanced pain. In the carrageenan model of inflammation mice developed escape-avoidance behaviors to mechanical stimuli, learned avoidance to mechanical stimulation and avoidance of physical activity – these models are associated with unilateral hyperalgesia. When both muscles were inflamed, escape-avoidance behaviors did not develop suggesting equivalent bilateral pain-behaviors cannot be tested with an escape-avoidance test. In the non-inflammatory muscle pain model mice did not show significant changes in escape-avoidance behaviors or learned avoidance, but did avoid physical activity. In the exercise-enhanced pain model, there were no changes in escape avoidance, learned avoidance of noxious or physical activity In conclusion, we developed several testing protocols that assess supraspinal processing of pain-behaviors in models of muscle pain and that are most sensitive in animals with unilateral hyperalgesia. PMID:23747349

  10. Muscle pain induces task-dependent changes in cervical agonist/antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Falla, D; Farina, D; Dahl, M Kanstrup; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2007-02-01

    This study examined the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on the EMG-force relationship of cervical agonist and antagonist muscles. Surface EMG signals were detected from the sternomastoid, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius muscles bilaterally from 14 healthy subjects during cervical flexion and extension contractions of linearly increasing force from 0 to 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Measurements were performed before and after injection of 0.5 ml hypertonic and isotonic saline into either the sternomastoid or splenius capitis in two experimental sessions. EMG average rectified value (ARV) of the sternomastoid, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius muscles and the muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) of the sternomastoid muscle were estimated at 5% MVC force increments. During cervical flexion with injection of hypertonic saline in sternomastoid, ARV of sternomastoid was lower on the side of pain in the force range 25-60% MVC (P < 0.05) and was associated with a bilateral reduction of splenius capitis and upper trapezius ARV (P < 0.01). During cervical extension, injection of hypertonic saline in splenius capitis resulted in lower estimates of splenius capitis ARV on the painful side from 45 to 60% MVC (P < 0.05), which was associated with a bilateral increase in upper trapezius ARV estimates from 50 to 60% MVC (P < 0.001). However, no significant change was identified for estimates of sternomastoid ARV. Experimentally induced neck muscle pain resulted in task-dependent changes in cervical agonist/antagonist activity without modifications in muscle fiber CV.

  11. Dynamic, but not static, pain sensitivity predicts exercise-induced muscle pain: Covariation of temporal sensory summation and pain intensity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D.; George, Steven Z.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-section studies suggest that measures of pain sensitivity, derived from quantitative sensory testing (QST), are elevated in persons with chronic pain conditions. However, little is known about whether development of chronic pain is preceded by elevated pain sensitivity or pain sensitivity increases as a result of prolonged experience of pain. Here we used QST to test static (single suprathreshold stimuli) and dynamic (temporal sensory summation) pain processing of thermal stimuli. Muscle pain was induced using high-intensity exercise (DOMS). Multi-level modeling approaches determined the daily covariation among static and dynamic QST measures and pain intensity. Variation in responses to static pain sensitivity was not associated with pain intensity from DOMS while, in contrast, variation in dynamic pain sensitivity was positively associated with variation in pain intensity from DOMS. This finding supports the use of TSS as a marker of the central pain state and potentially as an appropriate measure for treatment monitoring. PMID:22967843

  12. Effect of Deep Cervical Flexor Muscles Training Using Pressure Biofeedback on Pain and Disability of School Teachers with Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Rajan, Reena; Khan, Sohrab Ahmed; Alghadir, Ahmad H.

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The job of secondary school teachers involves a lot of head down posture as frequent reading, assignment correction, computer use and writing on a board put them at risk of developing occupational related neck pain. Available studies of neck pain experienced by teachers are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine whether training of deep cervical flexor muscles with pressure biofeedback has any significant advantage over conventional training for pain and disability experienced by school teachers with neck pain. [Subjects] Thirty teachers aged 25–45 years with neck pain and poor craniocervical flexion test participated in this study. [Methods] A pretest posttest experimental group design was used in which experimental group has received training with pressure biofeedback and conventional exercises while control group received conventional exercises only. Measurements of dependent variables were taken at baseline, and after 2 and 4 weeks of training. Pain intensity was assessed using a numeric pain rating scale and functional disability was assessed using the neck disability index. [Results] The data analysis revealed that there was significant improvement in pain and disability in both the groups and the results were better in the experimental group. [Conclusion] Addition of pressure biofeedback for deep cervical flexor muscles training gave a better result than conventional exercises alone. Feedback helps motor learning which is the set of processes associated with practice or experience leading to permanent changes in ability to respond. PMID:24259822

  13. Ultrasound guided, painful electrical stimulation of lumbar facet joint structures: an experimental model of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Søren; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Manniche, Claus; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative sensory testing has indicated generalized muscle hyperalgesia in patients with chronic low back pain. The temporal development of such hyperalgesia is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether generalized muscle hyperalgesia can develop within minutes of acute low back pain using a new experimental model of lumbar facet joint pain. Thirteen healthy volunteers were included and baseline pressure pain thresholds were assessed at eight separate sites, outside the area of evoked low back and referred pain. Using ultrasonography, two electrode needles were placed either side of a lumbar facet joint (right L3-4) and used to induce experimental low back pain for 10 min with continuous stimulation. Thresholds, stimulus-response relationships, distribution and quality of the electrically induced pain were recorded. Electrical facet joint stimulation induced low back pain and pain referral into the anterior leg, ipsilaterally, proximal to the knee, similar to what is observed clinically. Pressure pain thresholds did not change significantly before, during and after facet joint stimulation. In conclusion, we describe a novel model of acute experimental low back pain and demonstrate that generalized hyperalgesia did not develop within minutes of acute low back pain.

  14. Predictability of jaw muscle pains from surface electromyograms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T

    1996-04-01

    In seven (88%) of eight healthy subjects, weak to moderate pains were elicited in the masseter muscles through the isometric contractions of maximum voluntary teeth clenching. Integrated surface electromyograms of the right and left masseter muscles were used to quantify the absolute and relative contractile activities of the two muscles. The risk (relative probability) of inducing pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the larger amount of isometric activity was 2.5 times the risk of eliciting pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the lesser amount of isometric activity. However, as an aid in the diagnosis of pain onset, the method of masseteric surface electromyography had a false diagnostic ratio of 0.67.

  15. The effects of masseter muscle pain on biting performance.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Y Y; Peng, C C; Wen, S C; Lin, L D; Wang, J S; Lou, K L

    2003-10-01

    The present study applied a standardized test food of known hardness to evaluate the biting performance of 20 female patients who had pain mainly in the masseter muscle during palpation. Another 20 women of a similar age group who were pain-free during examination served as controls. Electromyograms (EMG) of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles and the jaw position were recorded and measured when the subjects were biting through two types of test foods with known hardness (hard type, 20 kg hardness and extra-hard type, 60 kg hardness). Pressure-pain-threshold (PPT) values of both the patients and the normal subjects were obtained with an algometer. It was found that the PPT of the patients with pain was significantly lower and that the extra-hard food took more masseter muscle activity and more working side jaw movement in both the pain and the normal groups. During both hard and extra-hard food biting, a significantly longer duration of masseter muscle activity was found in pain patients while the total muscle activity was not significantly stronger. Strong correlation existed between SCM and masseter muscle activity during both hard and extra-hard food biting in the patient group, while such correlation was very weak in the normal group. In conclusion, painful masseter muscles required longer masseter and SCM muscle contraction time for breaking through a hard food of 20 kg and more, and co-activation of SCM and masseter muscles existed and was more evident when the food was harder or the pain was more severe.

  16. The use of electromyography to quantify muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Myslinski, N R; Buxbaum, J D; Parente, F J

    1985-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the feasibility of using electromyography (EMG) to quantify muscle pain in patients suffering from chronic myofacial pain dysfunction (MPD). Ten patients were carefully selected to include those having mild to severe pain, but not any major psychological or other physiological dysfunction. Measurements of perceived pain and EMG frequency and amplitude were recorded before and after standard analgesic therapy. EMG recordings were collected bilaterally from the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles during the resting, swallowing, clenching and chewing modes of activity. Multiple regression (R) analysis indicated that changes in perceived pain are correlated with changes in the EMG and can be determined by using the following formula: delta P = (delta F) (0.405) + C where P = perceived pain level, F = EMG frequency, and C = 1.533. By computing the Phi coefficients, the highest correlation between EMG recordings and subjective pain ratings was demonstrated in the resting mode. In this mode, 64% (multiple R = 0.80) of the variance in perceived pain difference scores from pre- to post-therapy tests could be determined. A significant relationship exists between the change in perceived pain and the EMG (t = 2.525, p less than 0.05), whether pain levels increase or decrease. The implementation of this method to quantify expected changes in pain due to muscle spasm in uncomplicated individuals is discussed.

  17. Jaw muscle pain and its effect on gothic arch tracings.

    PubMed

    Obrez, A; Stohler, C S

    1996-04-01

    Perceived changes in occlusion and decreased range of motion are often expressed by patients with masticatory muscle pain. The adverse loading of craniomandibular tissues that results from an inadequate maxillomandibular relationship in combination with the coexisting dysfunction is widely regarded as the cause of pain. This study was designed to test whether pain can cause significant changes in position of the mandible and therefore form the basis for any perceived changes in the maxillomandibular relationship. A second objective was to determine whether pain can cause changes in the mandibular range of motion. Five subjects who rated pain intensity on a visual analog scale were used in a single-blind, randomized, repeated-measures study design. Tonic muscle pain was induced by infusion of 5% hypertonic saline solution into the central portion of the superficial masseter muscle. Isotonic saline solution was used as a control, with subjects blinded to the type of substance given. The effect of pain on the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing, the direction of the lateral mandibular border movements, and the mandibular range of motion was studied in a horizontal plane with minimal occlusal separation. Pain significantly affected the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing in anterior (F = 11.46, p = 0.03) and transverse (F = 35.0, p = 0.004) directions. Similarly, pain affected the orientation of the mandibular lateral border movements (F = 12.44, p = 0.02) and their magnitude (F = 14.97, p = 0.01). All pain-induced effects proved to be reversible. The observed effect of pain can explain the perceived change of bite that is frequently noted by patients with orofacial pain. This study provided evidence of an alternative causal relationship between pain and changes in occlusal relationship and questions occlusal therapy as treatment, directed toward the elimination of the underlying cause in patients with masticatory muscle pain.

  18. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    PubMed Central

    Witzeman, Kathryn; Nguyen, Ruby HN; Eanes, Alisa; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 8.3%—16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy. Objective To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD. Design In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity. Methods We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100) was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the highest level of pain. Results The lower vestibule’s mucosa 5.81 (standard deviation =2.83) was significantly more sensitive than the upper vestibule 2.52 (standard deviation =2.6) (P<0.01) on exam. However, mucosal sensitivity was not associated with intercourse pain, while muscle sensitivity was moderately associated with both average and highest intensity of intercourse pain (r=−0.46, P=0.01 and r=−0.42, P=0.02), respectively. Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that mucosal measures alone may not sufficiently capture the spectrum of clinical pain report in women with PVD, which is consistent with the empirical success of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26316805

  19. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  20. Sex Differences in Exercise-Induced Muscle Pain and Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Liu, Ying; Rector, R. Scott; Thomas, Tom R.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    There is uncertainty about sex differences in exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage due to several methodological weaknesses in the literature. This investigation tested the hypothesis that higher levels of exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage indicators would be found in women than men when several methodological improvements were executed in the same study. Participants (N = 33; 42% women) with an average age of 23 years (SD = 2.82) consented to participate. After a familiarization session, participants visited the laboratory before and across four days after eccentric exercise was completed to induce arm muscle pain and muscle damage. Our primary outcomes were arm pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds. However, we also measured the following indicators of muscle damage: arm girth; resting elbow extension; isometric elbow flexor strength; myoglobin (Mb); tumor necrosis factor (TNFa); interleukin 1beta (IL1b); and total nitric oxide (NO). Temporary induction of muscle damage was indicated by changes in all outcome measures except TNFa, and IL1b. In contrast to our hypotheses, women reported moderately lower and less frequent muscle pain than men. Also, women’s arm girth and Mb levels increased moderately less than men’s, but the differences were not significant. Few large sex differences were detected. PMID:23182229

  1. Experimental manipulations of pain catastrophizing influence pain levels in patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Kasch, Helge; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Pain catastrophizing (PC) has been related to pain levels in both patients experiencing acute or chronic pain and in healthy volunteers exposed to experimental pain. Still, it is unclear whether high levels of pain catastrophizing lead to high levels of pain or vice versa. We therefore tested whether levels of pain catastrophizing could be increased and decreased in the same participant through hypnotic suggestions and whether the altered level of situation-specific pain catastrophizing was related to increased and decreased pain levels, respectively. Using the spontaneous pain of 22 patients with chronic tension-type headache and experimentally induced pain in 22 healthy volunteers, participants were tested in 3 randomized sessions where they received 3 types of hypnotic suggestions: Negative (based on the 13 items in the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), Positive (coping-oriented reversion of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and Neutral (neutral sentence) hypnotic suggestions. The hypnotic suggestions significantly increased and decreased situation-specific PC in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Also, the levels of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were significantly altered in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Furthermore, regression analyses showed that changes in pain catastrophizing predicted changes in pain in patients (R = 0.204-0.304; P < 0.045) and in healthy volunteers (R = 0.328-0.252; P < 0.018). This is the first study to successfully manipulate PC in positive and negative directions in both patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers and to show that these manipulations significantly influence pain levels. These findings may have important theoretical and clinical implications.

  2. The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Shane Q.

    2015-03-01

    Robotic orthoses have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. These orthoses must be characterized by the naturally safe, reliable, and controlled motion of a human therapist's muscles. Such characteristics are only possible in the natural kingdom through the pain sensing realized by the interaction of an intelligent nervous system and muscles' embedded sensing organs. McKibben fluidic muscles or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) are a popular orthosis actuator because of their inherent compliance, high force, and muscle-like load-displacement characteristics. However, the circular cross-section of PMA increases their profile. PMA are also notoriously unreliable and difficult to control, lacking the intelligent pain sensing systems of their biological muscle counterparts. Here the Peano fluidic muscle, a new low profile yet high-force soft actuator is introduced. This muscle is smart, featuring bioinspired embedded pressure and soft capacitive strain sensors. Given this pressure and strain feedback, experimental validation shows that a lumped parameter model based on the muscle geometry and material parameters can be used to predict its force for quasistatic motion with an average error of 10 - 15N. Combining this with a force threshold pain sensing algorithm sets a precedent for flexible orthosis actuation that uses embedded sensors to prevent damage to the actuator and its environment.

  3. Craniofacial pain and jaw-muscle activity during sleep.

    PubMed

    Yachida, W; Castrillon, E E; Baad-Hansen, L; Jensen, R; Arima, T; Tomonaga, A; Ohata, N; Svensson, P

    2012-06-01

    This study compared the jaw-muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep in patients with craniofacial pain (n = 63) or no painful conditions (n = 52) and between patients with tension-type headache (TTH: n = 30) and healthy control individuals (n = 30). All participants used a portable single-channel EMG device (Medotech A/S) for four nights. There was no significant difference in EMG activity between craniofacial pain (24.5 ± 17.9 events/hr) and no painful conditions (19.7 ± 14.5), or between TTH (20.8 ± 15.0) and healthy control individuals (15.2 ± 11.6, p >.050). There were positive correlations between EMG activity and number of painful muscles (r = 0.188; p = 0.044), characteristic pain intensity (r = 0.187; p = 0.046), McGill Pain Questionnaire (r = 0.251; p = 0.008), and depression scores (r = 0.291; p = 0.002). Patients with painful conditions had significantly higher night-to-night variability compared with pain-free individuals (p < 0.050). This short-term observational study suggests that there are no major differences between patients with different craniofacial pain conditions and pain-free individuals in terms of jaw-muscle EMG activity recorded with a single-channel EMG device during sleep. However, some associations may exist between the level of EMG activity and various parameters of craniofacial pain. Longitudinal studies are warranted to further explore the relationship between sleep bruxism and craniofacial pain.

  4. Gender, variation in opioid receptor genes and sensitivity to experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain tolerance is subject to considerable inter-individual variation, which may be influenced by a number of genetic and non-genetic factors. The mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors play a role in pain perception and are thought to mediate different pain modalities. The aim of this study was to explore associations between pain thresholds and gender and genetic variants in the three opioid receptor genes (OPRM, OPRD and OPRK). Experimental multi-modal pain data from previously published studies carried out in healthy Caucasian volunteers were used in order to limit the number of confounders to the study outcome. Data on thermal skin pain (n=36), muscle pressure pain (n=31) and mechanical visceral pain (n=50)) tolerance thresholds were included. Results Nineteen genetic polymorphisms were included in linear regression modeling. Males were found to tolerate higher thermal and muscle pressure pain than females (p=0.003 and 0.02). Thirty four percent of variability in thermal skin pain was accounted for by a model consisting of OPRK rs6473799 and gender. This finding was just outside significance when correction for multiple testing was applied. Variability in muscle pressure pain tolerance was associated with OPRK rs7016778 and rs7824175. These SNPs accounted for 43% of variability in muscle pressure pain sensitivity and these findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. No association was found with mechanical visceral pain. Conclusion This is a preliminary and hypothesis generating study due to the relatively small study size. However, significant association between the opioid receptor genes and experimental pain sensitivity supports the influence of genetic variability in pain perception. These findings may be used to generate hypotheses for testing in larger clinical trials of patients with painful conditions. PMID:23570317

  5. Bunion: Strengthening Foot Muscles to Reduce Pain and Improve Mobility.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Foot pain discourages physical activity, and less activity harms overall health. Bunion, extra bone and tissue at the base of the big toe, is a frequent cause of foot pain. More than 64 million Americans have bunions that can lead to painful walking. Bunions affect some 35% of women over the age of 65. Bunions can be removed by surgery, which can reduce pain and improve your ability to walk and exercise, but up to 15% of bunions return. Weak muscles may play a role in bunion-related pain and movement problems. In a review of prior research and commentary on this topic published in the July 2016 issue of JOSPT, the author identifies muscle-strengthening exercises that may help people with bunions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):606. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0504.

  6. IB4(+) nociceptors mediate persistent muscle pain induced by GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Chen, Xiaojie; Bogen, Oliver; Green, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a well-known source of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which can produce mechanical hyperalgesia. Since some neuromuscular diseases are associated with both increased release of GDNF and intense muscle pain, we explored the role of GDNF as an endogenous mediator in muscle pain. Intramuscularly injected GDNF induced a dose-dependent (0.1–10 ng/20 μl) persistent (up to 3 wk) mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat. Once hyperalgesia subsided, injection of prostaglandin E2 at the site induced a prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia (>72 h) compared with naïve rats (<4 h; hyperalgesic priming). Selective neurotoxic destruction of IB4(+) nociceptors attenuated both GDNF hyperalgesia and hyperalgesic priming. Ergonomic muscular injury induced by eccentric exercise or mechanical vibration increased muscle GDNF levels at 24 h, a time point where rats also exhibited marked muscle hyperalgesia. Intrathecal antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to mRNA encoding GFRα1, the canonical binding receptor for GDNF, reversibly inhibited eccentric exercise- and mechanical vibration-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Finally, electrophysiological recordings from nociceptors innervating the gastrocnemius muscle in anesthetized rats, revealed significant increase in response to sustained mechanical stimulation after local GDNF injection. In conclusion, these data indicate that GDNF plays a role as an endogenous mediator in acute and induction of chronic muscle pain, an effect likely to be produced by GDNF action at GFRα1 receptors located in IB4(+) nociceptors. PMID:22914655

  7. Biopsychosocial Influence on Exercise-induced Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness at the Shoulder: Pain Catastrophizing and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Diplotype Predict Pain Ratings

    PubMed Central

    George, Steven Z.; Dover, Geoffrey C.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Sack, Brandon K.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Aydog, Ece; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The experience of pain is believed to be influenced by psychologic and genetic factors. A previous study suggested pain catastrophizing and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype influenced clinical pain ratings for patients seeking operative treatment of shoulder pain. This study investigated whether these same psychologic and genetic factors predicted responses to induced shoulder pain. Methods Participants (n=63) completed self-report questionnaires and had COMT genotype determined before performing a standardized fatigue protocol to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Then, shoulder pain ratings, self-report of upper-extremity disability ratings, and muscle torque production were reassessed 24, 48, and 72 hours later. Results This cohort consisted of 35 women and 28 men, with a mean age of 20.9 years (SD=1.7). The frequency of COMT diplotypes was 42 with “high COMT enzyme activity” (low pain sensitivity group) and 21 with “low COMT enzyme activity” (average pain sensitivity/high pain sensitivity group). A hierarchical regression model indicated that an interaction between pain catastrophizing and COMT diplotype was the strongest unique predictor of 72-hour pain ratings. The same interaction was not predictive of self-report of disability or muscle torque production at 72 hours. The pain catastrophizing × COMT diplotype interaction indicated that participants with high pain catastrophizing and low COMT enzyme activity (average pain sensitivity/high pain sensitivity group) were more likely (relative risk=3.5, P=0.025) to have elevated pain intensity ratings (40/100 or higher). Discussion These findings from an experimental model converge with those from a surgical cohort and provide additional evidence that the presence of elevated pain catastrophizing and COMT diplotype indicative of low COMT enzyme activity have the potential to increase the risk of developing chronic pain syndromes. PMID:18936597

  8. Role of muscle spindle in weightlessness-induced amyotrophia and muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Ali, Umar; Fan, Xiao-Li; You, Hao-Jun

    2009-10-01

    To date, the medium and long-term space flight is urgent in need and has become a major task of our manned space flight program. There is no doubt that medium and long-term space flight has serious damaging impact upon human physiological systems. For instance, atrophy of the lower limb anti-gravity muscle can be induced during the space flight. Muscle atrophy significantly affects the flight of astronauts in space. Most importantly, it influences the precise manipulation of the astronauts and their response capacity to emergencies on returning to the atmosphere from space. Muscle atrophy caused by weightlessness may also seriously disrupt the normal life and work of the astronauts during the re-adaptation period. Here we summarize the corresponding research concentrating on weightlessness-induced changes of muscular structure and function. By combining research on muscle pain, which is a common clinical pain disease, we further provide a hypothesis concerning a dynamic feedback model of "weightlessness condition right triple arrow muscular atrophy <--> muscle pain". This may be useful to explore the neural mechanisms underlying the occurrence and development of muscular atrophy and muscle pain, through the key study of muscle spindle, and furthermore provide more effective therapy for clinical treatment.

  9. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Pain Perception in Abdominal Surgery Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    subjects (36%) had cholecystectomies, one subject (9%) had an appendectomy, one subject (9%) had a hysterectomy, four subjects (36%) had tubal ligations ...hysterectomies, three subjects (30%) had tubal ligations or fulgarations, five subjects (50%) had diagnostic laparoscopies, and one subject (10%) was classified...muscle relaxation could decrease pain perception, analgesic use, and anxiety in post -operative abdominal surgery patients. Review of demographic data

  10. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  11. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (P<.01). Experimental low back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (P<.01) although force accuracy and tangential force variability was not affected. Increased variability in the tangential force composition was found during pain compared with the non-painful condition (P<.05). The immediate adaptation to pain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures.

  12. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. Sunil kumar; Naidu, M. U. R.; Rani, P. Usha; Rao, T. Ramesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical) can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding. PMID:23626642

  13. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  14. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness.

  15. Immediate effects of Graston Technique on hamstring muscle extensibility and pain intensity in patients with nonspecific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong Hoon; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Won, Young Sik; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of Graston Technique on hamstring extensibility and pain intensity in patients with nonspecific low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four patients with nonspecific low back pain (27–46 years of age) enrolled in the study. All participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Graston technique group (n=12) and a static stretching group (n=12). The Graston Technique was used on the hamstring muscles of the experimental group, while the static stretching group performed static stretching. Hamstring extensibility was recorded using the sit and reach test, and a visual analog scale was used to measure pain intensity. [Results] Both groups showed a significant improvement after intervention. In comparison to the static stretching group, the Graston technique group had significantly more improvement in hamstring extensibility. [Conclusion] The Graston Technique is a simple and effective intervention in nonspecific low back pain patients to improve hamstring extensibility and lower pain intensity, and it would be beneficial in clinical practice. PMID:28265144

  16. Heritability of pain catastrophizing and associations with experimental pain outcomes: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Trost, Zina; Strachan, Eric; Sullivan, Michael; Vervoort, Tine; Avery, Ally R; Afari, Niloofar

    2015-03-01

    This study used a twin paradigm to examine genetic and environmental contributions to pain catastrophizing and the observed association between pain catastrophizing and cold-pressor task (CPT) outcomes. Male and female monozygotic (n = 206) and dizygotic twins (n = 194) from the University of Washington Twin Registry completed a measure of pain catastrophizing and performed a CPT challenge. As expected, pain catastrophizing emerged as a significant predictor of several CPT outcomes, including cold-pressor Immersion Tolerance, Pain Tolerance, and Delayed Pain Rating. The heritability estimate for pain catastrophizing was found to be 37% with the remaining 63% of variance attributable to unique environmental influence. Additionally, the observed associations between pain catastrophizing and CPT outcomes were not found attributable to shared genetics or environmental exposure, which suggests a direct relationship between catastrophizing and experimental pain outcomes. This study is the first to examine the heritability of pain catastrophizing and potential processes by which pain catastrophizing is related to experimental pain response.

  17. Heart muscle performance after experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Adesanya, C O; Goldberg, A H; Phear, W P; Thorp, K A; Young, N A; Abelmann, W H

    1976-01-01

    As part of an inquiry into possible antecedents of idiopathic cardiomyopathy, acute experimental coxsackie virus myocarditis was studied for late structural and functional sequelae. Myocarditis was induced in 12- and 22-day-old hamsters by inoculation with coxsackie virus B3. Early viremia occurred, followed by virus replication in heart muscle. Maximum peak developed tension (Tpd) of isometrically contracting isolated heart muscle was depressed 17 and 43% in the animals inoculated at 12 days, and studied 18 and 90 days later, respectively, as compared to their uninoculated controls. In both infected groups, less muscle stretch was required to reach the length at which Tpd was produced. Animals studied 180 days after inoculation did not differ from controls. The muscles from animals inoculated at 22 days of age and studied 18 days later showed a 15% depression of Tpd compared to their controls. Glycerinated muscles from this infected group developed 50% less tension than their controls. The muscles of hamsters inoculated with virus at 22 days and studied 90 and 180 days later showed no change in Tpd. The data suggest that contractility and compliance of heart muscle are decreased 18 days after inoculation, but recover by 90 days if the animals are inoculated at age 22 days. However, if the animals are inoculated at a younger age (12 days), depression of myocardial performance persists for at least an additional 90 days. It is concluded that the inflammatory stage of experimental acute coxsackie virus B3 myocarditis in the Syrian golden hamster may be followed by residual alterations in contractile proteins and myocardial function. PMID:1249200

  18. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  19. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  20. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain. PMID:26957772

  1. Pain-related emotions modulate experimental pain perception and autonomic responses.

    PubMed

    Rainville, Pierre; Bao, Quoc Viet Huynh; Chrétien, Pablo

    2005-12-05

    The effect of emotions on pain perception is generally recognized but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, emotions related to pain were induced in healthy volunteers using hypnosis, during 1-min immersions of the hand in painfully hot water. In Experiment 1, hypnotic suggestions were designed to induce various positive or negative emotions. Compared to a control condition with hypnotic-relaxation, negative emotions produced robust increases in pain. In Experiment 2, induction of pain-related anger and sadness were found to increase pain. Pain increases were associated with increases in self-rated desire for relief and decreases in expectation of relief, and with increases in arousal, negative affective valence and decreases in perceived control. In Experiment 3, hypnotic suggestions specifically designed to increase and decrease the desire for relief produced increases and decreases in pain, respectively. In all three experiments, emotion-induced changes in pain were most consistently found on ratings of pain unpleasantness compared to pain intensity. Changes in pain-evoked cardiac responses (R-R interval decrease), measured in experiments 2 and 3, were consistent with changes in pain unpleasantness. Correlation and multiple regression analyses suggest that negative emotions and desire for relief influence primarily pain affect and that pain-evoked autonomic responses are strongly associated with pain affect. These results confirm the hypothesized influence of the desire for relief on pain perception, and particularly on pain affect, and support the functional relation between pain affect and autonomic nociceptive responses. This study provides further experimental confirmation that pain-related emotions influence pain perception and pain-related physiological responses.

  2. Role of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in facial pain: occlusion, muscle and TMJ pain.

    PubMed

    Rauhala, K; Oikarinen, K S; Raustia, A M

    1999-10-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) which comprise myogenic and arthralgic components have been reported to predispose subjects to headache and facial pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these components in patients with facial pain and to investigate the influence of treatment of TMD on pain of these patients. The subject group consisted of 25 patients suffering from facial pain. The clinical stomatognathic examination was performed before conservative treatment of TMD, and one-two weeks, three months and one year after treatment. The severity of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (AI) and clinical dysfunction (DI) indices of Helkimo. The intensity of pain was evaluated on a numerical rating scale (NRS). According to clinical findings the patients were classified to following diagnostic subgroups: TMD myo (mainly myogenic), TMD arthro (mainly arthrogenous) and TMD comb (both myogenic and arthrogenous components involved). Fifteen patients were classified in the TMD myo group, nine in the TMD comb group and one in the TMD arthro group. The DI index decreased significantly one-two weeks after treatment and remained at this level at three month and one year follow-up examinations. At the first examination the TMD myo group had the highest level of NRS index, which decreased significantly during the time of follow-up, while no significant changes were found in other groups. Bruxism reported by the patient had a positive correlation with the amount of painful muscles on the right side at first examination. The results show that facial pain combined with TMD may be mostly of myogenic origin, and myogenic pain seems to have most favorable response to conservative treatment of TMD.

  3. Range of Motion as a Predictor of Clinical Shoulder Pain During Recovery From Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A.; Parr, Jeffrey J.; Borsa, Paul A.; George, Steven Z.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers use clinical pain and range of motion (ROM) to gauge recovery after musculoskeletal injury. Limited evidence to date suggests which shoulder ROM measures can predict symptomatic relief and functional recovery after delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Objective: To determine whether shoulder passive internal rotation, passive external rotation, active abduction, and active flexion and evoked pain with abduction are associated with resting pain experienced after exercise-induced DOMS. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Controlled research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 110 healthy, right-hand–dominant participants (44 men: age = 25.39 ± 7.00 years, height = 178.93 ± 7.01 cm, weight = 78.59 ± 14.04 kg; 66 women: age = 22.98 ± 6.11 years, height = 164.64 ± 6.94 cm, weight = 61.86 ± 11.67 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed an exercise-induced DOMS protocol for the external rotators of the dominant shoulder to replicate muscle injury. Main Outcome Measure(s): Current resting pain was assessed daily for 96 hours using the Brief Pain Inventory. We evaluated functional recovery with measures of ROM in abduction, internal rotation, external rotation, and flexion. Evoked pain with active abduction was reported, and the pain rating served as the dependent variable in the regression model. Results: Impairment measures explained resting pain at 48 (R2 = 0.392) and 96 hours (R2 = 0.164). Abduction and internal-rotation ROM and evoked pain with abduction predicted resting pain at 48 hours (P < .001). At 96 hours, evoked pain with abduction of the injured arm (P < .001) was the significant contributor to resting pain. Conclusions: These models suggest that resting pain after experimentally induced DOMS occurs at 48 hours and is associated with specific ranges of motion and evoked pain with abduction. PMID:25658817

  4. Effect of exhalation exercise on trunk muscle activity and oswestry disability index of patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of exhalation exercises on trunk muscle activity and Oswestry Disability Index by inducing trunk muscle activity through increasing intra-abdominal pressure and activating muscles, contributing to spinal stability. [Subjects and Methods] This intervention program included 20 male patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 10 subjects each were randomly assigned to an exhalation exercise group as the experimental group and a spinal stabilization exercise group as the control group. [Results] There were significant differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles as well as in the Oswestry Disability Index within the experimental group. There were meaningful differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles and in the Oswestry Disability Index within the control group. In addition, there was a meaningful intergroup difference in transverse abdominis muscle activity alone and in the Oswestry Disability Index. [Conclusion] The breathing exercise effectively increased muscle activity by training gross and fine motor muscles in the trunk. Moreover, it was verified as a very important element for strengthening body stability because it both released and prevented low back pain. PMID:27390406

  5. Meta-analysis on brain representation of experimental dental pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-S; Niddam, D M; Hsu, M-L

    2014-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used for investigating the brain representation associated with dental pain evoked by pulpal electrical stimulation. However, because of the heterogeneity of experimental designs and the small sample size of individual studies, the common brain representation regarding dental pain has remained elusive. We used imaging meta-analysis to investigate six dental pain-related fMRI studies (n = 87) and tested 3 hypotheses: (1) Dental pain is associated with the 'core' pain-related network; (2) pain-related brain activation is somatotopically organized in the somatosensory cortex; and (3) dental pain is associated with the cognitive-affective network related to pain. Qualitative and quantitative meta-analyses revealed: (1) common activation of the core pain-related network, including the somatosensory cortex, the insula, and the cingulate cortex; (2) inconsistency in somatotopically organized activation of the primary somatosensory cortex; and (3) common activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, suggesting a role of re-appraisal and coping in the experience of dental pain. In conclusion, fMRI combined with pulpal stimulation can effectively evoke activity in the pain-related network. The dental pain-related brain representation disclosed the mechanisms of how sensory and cognitive-affective factors shape dental pain, which will help in the development of more effective customized methods for central pain control.

  6. Spontaneous Chronic Pain After Experimental Thoracotomy Revealed by Conditioned Place Preference: Morphine Differentiates Tactile Evoked Pain From Spontaneous Pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-09-01

    Chronic pain after surgery limits social activity, interferes with work, and causes emotional suffering. A major component of such pain is reported as resting or spontaneous pain with no apparent external stimulus. Although experimental animal models can simulate the stimulus-evoked chronic pain that occurs after surgery, there have been no studies of spontaneous chronic pain in such models. Here the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to reveal resting pain after experimental thoracotomy. Male Sprague Dawley rats received a thoracotomy with 1-hour rib retraction, resulting in evoked tactile hypersensitivity, previously shown to last for at least 9 weeks. Intraperitoneal injections of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) or gabapentin (40 mg/kg) gave equivalent 2- to 3-hour-long relief of tactile hypersensitivity when tested 12 to 14 days postoperatively. In separate experiments, single trial CPP was conducted 1 week before thoracotomy and then 12 days (gabapentin) or 14 days (morphine) after surgery, followed the next day by 1 conditioning session with morphine or gabapentin, both versus saline. The gabapentin-conditioned but not the morphine-conditioned rats showed a significant preference for the analgesia-paired chamber, despite the equivalent effect of the 2 agents in relieving tactile allodynia. These results show that experimental thoracotomy in rats causes spontaneous pain and that some analgesics, such as morphine, that reduce evoked pain do not also relieve resting pain, suggesting that pathophysiological mechanisms differ between these 2 aspects of long-term postoperative pain. Perspective: Spontaneous pain, a hallmark of chronic postoperative pain, is demonstrated here in a rat model of experimental postthoracotomy pain, further validating the use of this model for the development of analgesics to treat such symptoms. Although stimulus-evoked pain was sensitive to systemic morphine, spontaneous pain was not, suggesting different mechanistic

  7. Can Fear, Pain, and Muscle Tension Discriminate Vaginismus from Dyspareunia/Provoked Vestibulodynia? Implications for the New DSM-5 Diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lahaie, Marie-Andrée; Amsel, Rhonda; Khalifé, Samir; Boyer, Stephanie; Faaborg-Andersen, Marie; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2015-08-01

    Fear has been suggested as the crucial diagnostic variable that may distinguish vaginismus from dyspareunia. Unfortunately, this has not been systematically investigated. The primary purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether fear as evaluated by subjective, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures could differentiate women with vaginismus from those with dyspareunia/provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) and controls. A second aim was to re-examine whether genital pain and pelvic floor muscle tension differed between vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD sufferers. Fifty women with vaginismus, 50 women with dyspareunia/PVD, and 43 controls participated in an experimental session comprising a structured interview, pain sensitivity testing, a filmed gynecological examination, and several self-report measures. Results demonstrated that fear and vaginal muscle tension were significantly greater in the vaginismus group as compared to the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Moreover, behavioral measures of fear and vaginal muscle tension were found to discriminate the vaginismus group from the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Genital pain did not differ significantly between the vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD groups; however, genital pain was found to discriminate both clinical groups from controls. Despite significant statistical differences on fear and vaginal muscle tension variables between women suffering from vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD, a large overlap was observed between these conditions. These findings may explain the great difficulty health professionals experience in attempting to reliably differentiate vaginismus from dyspareunia/PVD. The implications of these data for the new DSM-5 diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder are discussed.

  8. Amantadine sulfate reduces experimental sensitization and pain in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kleinböhl, Dieter; Görtelmeyer, Roman; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Hölzl, Rupert

    2006-03-01

    We investigated if established psychophysical measures of enhanced experimental sensitization in chronic musculoskeletal pain can be reduced by adjuvant treatment with a N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, amantadine sulfate, and whether a reduction in sensitization might be accompanied by a concurrent improvement in clinical pain. Sensitization was evaluated by an experimental tonic heat model of short-term sensitization with concurrent subjective and behavioral psychophysical scaling. Twenty-six patients with chronic back pain were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and received daily dosages of either placebo or 100 mg of amantadine sulfate during a 1-wk treatment. Participants completed quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds and experimental sensitization before and after treatment and clinical pain ratings before, during, and after treatment. Experimental sensitization and clinical pain were reduced in patients receiving verum. Initially, experimental sensitization was enhanced in patients, with early sensitization at nonpainful intensities of contact heat and enhanced sensitization at painful intensities, as shown previously. After 1 wk of treatment, experimental sensitization was reduced with amantadine sulfate but not with placebo. We conclude that adjuvant chronic pain treatment with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists might be beneficial for chronic pain if enhanced sensitization is involved and that the quantitative sensory test of temporal summation may be used to verify this.

  9. Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Thiago R. T.; Oliveira, Bárbara A.; Ocarino, Juliana M.; Holt, Kenneth G.; Fonseca, Sérgio T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1) to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2) to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength. PMID:26039034

  10. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27313363

  11. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  12. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Material and Methods Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. Results A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (p<0,05) in both muscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (p<0,05) in EMG activity in the masseter muscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (p<0,05) in sessions two, three, and four. Conclusions EMG-biofeedback training produces a decrease in EMG activity in both masseter and temporal muscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle

  13. Voluntary and reflex control of human back muscles during induced pain

    PubMed Central

    Zedka, Milan; Prochazka, Arthur; Knight, Brian; Gillard, Debby; Gauthier, Michel

    1999-01-01

    Back pain is known to change motor patterns of the trunk. The purpose of this study was to examine the motor output of the erector spinae (ES) muscles during pain in the lumbar region. First, their voluntary activation was assessed during flexion and re-extension of the trunk. Second, effects of cutaneous and muscle pain on the ES stretch reflex were measured, since increased stretch reflex gain has been suggested to underlie increased muscle tone in painful muscles. The trunk movement and electromyographical (EMG) signals from the right and left ES during pain were compared with values before pain. Controlled muscle pain was induced by infusion of 5% saline into the right lumbar ES. Cutaneous pain was elicited by mechanical or electrical stimulation of the dorsal lumbar skin. The stretch reflex was evoked by rapidly indenting the right lumbar ES with a servo-motor prodder. The results from the voluntary task show that muscle pain decreased the modulation depth of ES EMG activity. This pattern was associated with a decreased range and velocity of motion of the painful body segment, which would normally serve to avoid further injury. Interestingly, when subjects overcame this guarding tendency and made exactly the same movements during pain as before pain, the EMG modulation depth was still reduced. The results seem to reconcile the controversy of previous studies, in which both hyper- and hypoactivity of back muscles in pain have been reported. In the tapped muscle, the EMG response consisted of two peaks (latency 19.3 ± 2.1 and 44.6 ± 2.5 ms, respectively) followed by a trough. On the contralateral side the first response was a trough (26.2 ± 3.2 ms) while the second (46.4 ± 4.3 ms) was a peak, similar to the second peak on the tapped side. Cutaneous pain had no effect on the short-latency response but significantly increased the second response on the tapped side. Surprisingly, deep muscle pain had no effect on the stretch reflex. A short-latency reciprocal

  14. Analysis of scapular muscle EMG activity in patients with idiopathic neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Bostyn, Emma; Delemarre, Jolien; Lemahieu, Trees; Cagnie, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    It is proposed that altered scapular muscle function can contribute to abnormal loading of the cervical spine. However, it is not clear if patients with idiopathic neck pain show altered activity of the scapular muscles. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature regarding the differences or similarities in scapular muscle activity, measured by electromyography ( = EMG), between patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain compared to pain-free controls. Case-control (neck pain/healthy) studies investigating scapular muscle EMG activity (amplitude, timing and fatigue parameters) were searched in Pubmed and Web of Science. 25 articles were included in the systematic review. During rest and activities below shoulder height, no clear differences in mean Upper Trapezius ( = UT) EMG activity exist between patients with idiopathic neck pain and a healthy control group. During overhead activities, no conclusion for scapular EMG amplitude can be drawn as a large variation of results were reported. Adaptation strategies during overhead tasks are not the same between studies. Only one study investigated timing of the scapular muscles and found a delayed onset and shorter duration of the SA during elevation in patients with idiopathic neck pain. For scapular muscle fatigue, no definite conclusions can be made as a wide variation and conflicting results are reported. Further high quality EMG research on scapular muscles (broader than the UT) is necessary to understand/draw conclusions on how scapular muscles react in the presence of idiopathic neck pain.

  15. The role of neuroplasticity in experimental neck pain: a study of potential mechanisms impeding clinical outcomes of training.

    PubMed

    Rittig-Rasmussen, Bjarne; Kasch, Helge; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2014-08-01

    Training is a mainstay in the clinical management of neck pain, yet, effects of various training protocols are only small to moderate and improvements are required. Previous investigations of the nervous system indicate a correlation between neuroplastic adaptation to training and functional recovery. The interaction between neck pain and training thus needs further exploration. This was a randomized experimental study of the effects of experimental neck pain and training on corticomotor excitability. Healthy volunteers were randomized to training and experimental neck pain, training and no pain, and pain and no training. Primary endpoints were corticomotor excitability assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measured as changes in amplitudes and latencies of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), recorded at baseline and after 30 min, 1 h, and 1 week. Additionally, correlations between changes in MEPs and motor learning, effects of pain and concomitant neck training on pain, muscle strength, and fatigue were investigated. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA, paired t tests, Grubbs' outlier test and correlation coefficients. Results indicated that neck pain and training significantly enhanced the inhibition of the amplitudes of the MEPs for 1 week. The results indicate that moderate neck pain and training induce long-lasting inhibition of the corticomotor pathways. This inhibition may limit the outcome of neck training in painful conditions in contrast to pain-free training conditions.

  16. Verbally reinforcing pain reports: an experimental test of the operant model of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jolliffe, Christopher D; Nicholas, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    Effective treatments for chronic pain have been based on the operant model for chronic pain, which holds that pain behaviours can be operantly controlled by various reinforcers. Support for the operant model comes primarily from treatment/outcome studies which report significant reductions in pain behaviours in chronic pain patients, but fail to demonstrate the underlying operant thesis that various reinforcers play a significant role in the establishment and maintenance of pain behaviours. In an experimental test of this hypothesis, the pain reports of forty-six healthy undergraduate students were measured over two sets of fifteen trials, in which the pressure from a blood-pressure cuff applied to their arm either remained stable or decreased over time. Half of the subjects received positive verbal reinforcement from the experimenter after each trial if their report of pain intensity exceeded that of the previous trial. Overall, the mean pain reports of reinforced subjects were significantly greater than those of the non-reinforced subjects both when the intensity of the cuff was stable over trials, and when it decreased, as expected. These results provide support for the operant model of chronic pain. The clinical and theoretical implications of these results for the operant model of chronic pain are discussed, and suggestions for future research are made.

  17. The effects of isometric exercise types on pain and muscle activity in patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Hyun-Seung; Park, Hun-Kyung; Park, Jung-Sub; Park, Hye-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise types on low back pain (LBP) patients. Isometric exercise types were mat exercise and I-Zer exercise. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: LBP control group, LBP mat exercise group, and LBP I-Zer exercise group in 23–25 aged men. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the degree of pain and the muscle activity in LBP patients. Root mean square (RMS), median frequency (MDF), and mean frequency (MNF) were checked by EMG power spectrum analysis on longissimus thoracic (LT), iliocostalis lumborum (IL), mulitifidus (M), and rectus abdominis (RA). LBP mat exercise program and LBP I-Zer exercise program were conducted 5 sets once time, 3 times per week during 6 weeks. The two-way ANOVA with repeated measure was used to check the pain degree and muscle activity. The present results showed that muscle activity in the LBP I-Zer exercise group was increased compared to the LBP mat exercise group and LBP control group (P<0.05). LBP I-Zer exercise group and LBP mat exercise group showed increased mean frequency in LT, IL, M, and RA muscles than the LBP control group. Therefore, LBP patients performed isometric exercise may have positive effect to reduce pain degree and to increase muscle activity. Especially, LBP I-Zer exercise type showed more effectiveness in reducing pain degree and enhancing muscle activity. PMID:26331136

  18. The effect of combined exercise with slings and a flexi-bar on muscle activity and pain in rotator cuff repair patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Woon; Kim, Yong-Nam; Lee, Dong-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of combined exercise with slings and a Flexi-Bar on muscle activity and pain in rotator cuff repair patients. [Subjects and Methods] This research evaluated 20 rotator cuff repair patients divided randomly into groups of 10 as the control group and the experimental group. The experimental group performed combined exercise with slings and a Flexi-Bar. Both the experimental and control groups were treated with a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator and continuous passive motion. Muscle activity was measured with surface electromyography. Pain was measured with the visual analogue scale. The paired t-test was used to compare groups before and after the experiment. The independent t-test was used to assess the differences in the degree of change between the two groups before and after the experiment. [Results] Subjects of both the experimental group and control group showed significant differences in muscle activity and pain. However, as compared with the control group, there was significant differences in the muscle activity and pain in the experimental group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that combined exercise with slings and a Flexi-Bar is effective in improving muscle activity and decreasing pain in rotator cuff repair patients. PMID:27821956

  19. Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorder (TMJMD) - type pain and Co-morbid Pains in a National US Sample

    PubMed Central

    Plesh, O; Adams, SH; Gansky, SA

    2013-01-01

    Aims To compare prevalences of self-reported comorbid headaches, neck, back, and joint pains in respondents with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD)-type pain in the 2000–2005 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and to analyze these self-reported pains by gender and age for Non-Hispanic (NH) Whites (Caucasians), Hispanics and NH Blacks (African Americans). Methods Data from the 2000–2005 NHIS included information on gender, age, race, ethnicity, education, different common types of pain (specifically: TMJMD-type, severe headache/migraine, neck, and low back pains), changes in health status; and health care utilization. Estimates and test statistics (i.e. Pearson correlations, regressions and logistic models) were conducted using SAS survey analysis and SUDAAN software that take into account the complex sample design. Results A total of 189,977 people: 52% female and 48% males; 73% NH Whites, 12% Hispanic, 11% NH Blacks and 4% “Other” were included. A total of 4.6% reported TMJMD-type pain and only 0.77% overall reported it without any comorbid headache/migraine, neck, or low back pains; also 59% of the TMJMD-type pain (N = 8,964) reported ≥two comorbid pain. Females reported more comorbid pain than males (odds ratio (OR) = 1.41, p <0.001), Hispanic and NH Blacks reported more than NH Whites (OR = 1.56, p <0.001; OR = 1.38, p <0.001, respectively). In addition, 53% of those with TMJMD-type pain had severe headache/migraines; 54% had neck pain, 64% low back pain and 62% joint pain. Differences in gender, race by age patterns were detected. For females, headache/migraine pain with TMJMD-type pain peaked around age 40 and decreased thereafter regardless of race/ethnicity. Neck pain continued to increase up to about age 60, with higher prevalence for Hispanic women at younger ages, and more pronounced in males, being the highest in the non-Whites. Low back pain was higher in Black and Hispanic females across the age span and higher

  20. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain.

  1. Antihyperalgesic Effect of Tetrodotoxin in Rat Models of Persistent Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Levine, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent muscle pain is a common and disabling symptom for which available treatments have limited efficacy. Since tetrodotoxin (TTX) displays a marked antinociceptive effect in models of persistent cutaneous pain, we tested its local antinociceptive effect in rat models of muscle pain induced by inflammation, ergonomic injury and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While local injection of TTX (0.03-1 μg) into the gastrocnemius muscle did not affect mechanical nociceptive threshold in naïve rats, exposure to the inflammogen carrageenan produced a marked muscle mechanical hyperalgesia, which was dose-dependently inhibited by TTX. This antihyperalgesic effect was still significant at 24 hours. TTX also displayed a robust antinociceptive effect on eccentric exercise-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in the gastrocnemius muscle, a model of ergonomic pain. Finally, TTX produced a small but significant inhibition of neuropathic muscle pain induced by systemic administration of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin. These results indicate that TTX-sensitive sodium currents in nociceptors play a central role in diverse states of skeletal muscle nociceptive sensitization, supporting the suggestion that therapeutic interventions based on TTX may prove useful in the treatment of muscle pain. PMID:26548414

  2. Study on contraction and relaxation of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles: Comparison with dystrophic muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takamori, M.; Tsujihata, M.; Mori, M.; Hazama, R.; Ide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The contraction-relaxation mechanism of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles of the rabbit is examined. Results are compared with those of human dystrophic muscles, in order to elucidate the role and extent of the neurotrophic factor, and the role played by the intrinsic activity of muscle in connection with pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this disease.

  3. Referred pain from trapezius muscle trigger points shares similar characteristics with chronic tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2007-05-01

    Referred pain and pain characteristics evoked from the upper trapezius muscle was investigated in 20 patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) and 20 age- and gender-matched controls. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks in order to confirm the diagnosis and record the pain history. Both upper trapezius muscles were examined for the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in a blinded fashion. The local and referred pain intensities, referred pain pattern, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were recorded. The results show that referred pain was evoked in 85% and 50% on the dominant and non-dominant sides in CTTH patients, much higher than 55% and 25% in controls (P<0.01). Referred pain spread to the posterior-lateral aspect of the neck ipsi-lateral to the stimulated muscle in both patients and controls, with additional referral to the temple in most patients, but none in controls. Nearly half of the CTTH patients (45%) recognized the referred pain as their usual headache sensation, i.e. active TrPs. CTTH patients with active TrPs in the right upper trapezius muscle showed greater headache intensity and frequency, and longer headache duration than those with latent TrPs. CTTH patients with bilateral TrPs reported significantly decreased PPT than those with unilateral TrP (P<0.01). Our results showed that manual exploration of TrPs in the upper trapezius muscle elicited referred pain patterns in both CTTH patients and healthy subjects. In CTTH patients, the evoked referred pain and its sensory characteristics shared similar patterns as their habitual headache pain, consistent with active TrPs. Our results suggest that spatial summation of perceived pain and mechanical pain sensitivity exists in CTTH patients.

  4. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P < 0.05). Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing.

  5. Effects of Tai Chi on Pain and Muscle Activity in Young Males with Acute Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, YongHo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the effects of tai chi on low back pain in young males. [Subjects and Methods] Forty males in their 20s with low back pain were randomly assigned to two groups. Tai chi was applied to one group, and stretching was applied to the other group. The subjects conducted exercise for one hour, three times per week for four weeks. They performed warm-up exercises for 10 min at the beginning and end of the sessions and conducted the main exercise for 40 minutes. Wireless surface electromyography (sEMG) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were employed to measure muscle activity and pain, respectively. [Results] There were significant differences between the two groups in pain and muscle activity. The tai chi group’s VAS decreased from 3.1 to 2.1, and its muscle activity decreased from 21.5% maximum voluntary isomeric contraction (MVIC) to 16.4% MVIC. The stretching group’s VAS decreased from 3.4 to 2.8, and its muscle activity decreased from 24.1% MVIC to 22.1% MVIC. [Conclusion] Tai chi is more effective for low back pain in males in their 20s than stretching. Tai chi can be considered an effective method to reduce low back pain in males in their 20s. PMID:24926131

  6. Musculoskeletal Sensitization and Sleep: Chronic Muscle Pain Fragments Sleep of Mice without Altering Its Duration

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Musculoskeletal pain in humans is often associated with poor sleep quality. We used a model in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced by injection of acidified saline into muscle to study the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of mice. Design: A one month pre-clinical study was designed to determine the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of C57BL/6J mice. Methods: We instrumented mice with telemeters to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature. We used an established model of musculoskeletal sensitization in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0). The injections were given into the gastrocnemius muscle and spaced five days apart. EEG and body temperature recordings started prior to injections (baseline) and continued for three weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization was induced by the second injection. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed using von Frey filaments at baseline (before any injections) and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the second injection. Results: Mice injected with acidified saline developed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity at the hind paws as measured by von Frey testing and as compared to control mice and baseline data. Sleep during the light period was fragmented in experimental mice injected with acidified saline, and EEG spectra altered. Musculoskeletal sensitization did not alter the duration of time spent in wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal sensitization in this model results in a distinct sleep phenotype in which sleep is fragmented during the light period, but the overall duration of sleep is not changed. This study suggests the consequences of musculoskeletal pain include sleep disruption, an observation that has been made in the clinical literature but has yet to be studied using preclinical models. Citation: Sutton BC

  7. Effects of caffeinated chewing gum on muscle pain during submaximal isometric exercise in individuals with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Kempka, Laura; Weatherby, Amy; Greenlee, Brennan; Mansion, Kimberly

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity is important to manage symptom of fibromyalgia (FM); however, individuals with FM typically experience augmented muscle pain during exercise. This study examined the effects of caffeinated chewing gum on exercise-induced muscle pain in individuals with FM. This study was conducted with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Twenty-three patients with FM completed a caffeine condition where they consumed a caffeinated chewing gum that contains 100mg of caffeine, and a placebo condition where they consumed a non-caffeinated chewing gum. They completed isometric handgrip exercise at 25% of their maximal strength for 3 min, and muscle pain rating (MPR) was recorded every 30s during exercise. Clinical pain severity was assessed in each condition using a pain questionnaire. The order of the two conditions was randomly determined. MPR increased during exercise, but caffeinated chewing gum did not attenuate the increase in MPR compared to placebo gum. Clinical pain severity was generally associated with the average MPR and the caffeine effects on MPR, calculated as difference in the average MPR between the two conditions. The results suggest that more symptomatic individuals with FM may experience greater exercise-induced muscle pain, but benefit more from caffeinated chewing gum to reduce exercise-induced muscle pain.

  8. Activity of masticatory muscles in subjects with different orofacial pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Bodéré, Céline; Téa, Say Hack; Giroux-Metges, Marie Agnes; Woda, Alain

    2005-07-01

    The existence of a pathophysiological link between tonic muscle activity and chronic muscle pain is still being debated. The purpose of this retrospective, controlled study was to evaluate the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masticatory muscles in subjects with different orofacial pain conditions. The temporal and masseter EMG activity at rest and the masseteric reflex were recorded in two groups of patients with either myofascial pain (n=33) or neuropathic pain (n=20), one group of non-pain patients with disc derangement disorders (n=27) and one control group of healthy, asymptomatic subjects (n=32). The EMG activities of both muscles at rest were significantly higher in the pain patient groups compared to the asymptomatic control group. There was no significant difference between the disc derangement disorder group and the control group. The masseteric reflex amplitude was reduced in all patient groups when compared with the control group. In pain patient groups, the increased EMG activity at rest and the reduction of the masseteric reflex amplitude were equally distributed in the pain and non-pain sides. In addition, subjects presenting with bilateral pain showed higher EMG activity at rest than those with unilateral pain. These results suggested that the modulation of muscle activity was not the direct consequence of a peripheral nociceptive mechanism and seemed to indicate that a central mechanism was at work. The contrast between the increased EMG activity at rest and the reduction of the masseteric reflex amplitude may reflect modulations of motoneurones that differed in tonic versus phasic conditions in chronic pain patients.

  9. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-10-01

    A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes.

  10. Atrophy of the quadriceps muscle in children with a painful hip.

    PubMed

    Robben, S G; Lequin, M H; Meradji, M; Diepstraten, A F; Hop, W C

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the degree of muscle wasting of various components of the quadriceps muscle in children with a painful hip. Between January 1994 and September 1997, 327 consecutive children with a unilateral painful hip and/or limping were evaluated prospectively with ultrasonography. Quadriceps thickness was measured on both sides. Moreover, muscle thickness was measured in 59 control subjects. The patients were divided into eight groups; transient synovitis (n = 134), Perthes' disease (n = 35), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (n = 5), osteomyelitis (n = 4), aspecific synovitis (n = 5), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 3) and miscellaneous (n = 16). In 125 patients, no sonographic and radiological abnormalities were found and during follow-up the symptoms disappeared ('no pathology' group). Ipsilateral muscle wasting was present in all patient groups, whereas the control subjects showed no significant difference in muscle thickness between legs. The degree of muscle wasting was compared between transient synovitis, the 'no pathology' group, Perthes' disease and control subjects. For both quadriceps and vastus intermedius muscles, there was a significant difference between these groups, except between control subjects and the 'no pathology' group. For the rectus femoris muscle, there was a significant difference between these groups, except between transient synovitis and 'no pathology'. Muscle wasting showed a positive correlation with duration of symptoms and pre-existing muscle mass. In conclusion, different diseases show different degrees of muscle wasting, and there are different patterns of muscle wasting of various components of the quadriceps femoris muscle.

  11. Specific proteins of the trapezius muscle correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity – an explorative multivariate proteomic study of the trapezius muscle in women with chronic widespread pain

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Patrik; Ghafouri, Bijar; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Gerdle, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) including fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) has a high prevalence and is associated with prominent negative consequences. CWP/FMS exhibits morphological and functional alterations in the central nervous system. The importance of peripheral factors for maintaining the central alterations are under debate. In this study, the proteins from biopsies of the trapezius muscle from 18 female CWP/FMS patients and 19 healthy female controls were analyzed. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the trapezius muscles were registered. Twelve proteins representing five different groups of proteins were important regressors of pain intensity in CWP/FMS (R2=0.99; P<0.001). In the regression of PPT in CWP/FMS, it was found that 16 proteins representing six groups of proteins were significant regressors (R2=0.95, P<0.05). Many of the important proteins were stress and inflammation proteins, enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, and proteins associated with muscle damage, myopathies, and muscle recovery. The altered expression of these proteins may reflect both direct and indirect nociceptive/inflammatory processes as well as secondary changes. The relative importance of the identified proteins and central alterations in CWP need to be investigated in future research. Data from this and the previous study concerning the same cohorts give support to the suggestion that peripheral factors are of importance for maintaining pain aspects in CWP/FMS. PMID:27330327

  12. Masticatory muscle pain and progressive mouth opening limitation caused by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pang, Kang Mi; Park, Ji Woon

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a case of masticatory muscle pain and progressive limited mouth opening secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), popularly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The symptoms were first mistaken as those of temporomandibular disorders, before fatty degeneration of all masticatory muscles were discovered on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ALS should be considered in the differential diagnosis process when the patient presents with longstanding progressive mouth opening limitation associated with pain. MRI could facilitate the diagnostic process.

  13. The role of TRPA1 in muscle pain and mechanical hypersensitivity under inflammatory conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Asgar, J; Zhang, Y; Saloman, J L; Wang, S; Chung, M-K; Ro, J Y

    2015-12-03

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) is expressed in muscle afferents and direct activation of these receptors induces acute mechanical hypersensitivity. However, the functional role of TRPA1 under pathological muscle pain conditions and mechanisms by which TRPA1 mediate muscle pain and hyperalgesia are not clearly understood. Two rodent behavioral models validated to assess craniofacial muscle pain conditions were used to study ATP- and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced acute mechanical hypersensitivity and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced persistent mechanical hypersensitivity. The rat grimace scale (RGS) was utilized to assess inflammation-induced spontaneous muscle pain. Behavioral pharmacology experiments were performed to assess the effects of AP18, a selective TRPA1 antagonist under these conditions. TRPA1 expression levels in trigeminal ganglia (TG) were examined before and after CFA treatment in the rat masseter muscle. Pre-treatment of the muscle with AP18 dose-dependently blocked the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity induced by NMDA and α,β-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβmeATP), a specific agonist for NMDA and P2X3 receptor, respectively. CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and spontaneous muscle pain responses were significantly reversed by post-treatment of the muscle with AP18 when CFA effects were most prominent. CFA-induced myositis was accompanied by significant up-regulation of TRPA1 expression in TG. Our findings showed that TRPA1 in muscle afferents plays an important role in the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity and in the maintenance of persistent muscle pain and hypersensitivity. Our data suggested that TRPA1 may serve as a downstream target of pro-nociceptive ion channels, such as P2X3 and NMDA receptors in masseter afferents, and that increased TRPA1 expression under inflammatory conditions may contribute to the maintenance of persistent muscle pain

  14. Trunk muscle activation in low-back pain patients, an analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Dieën, Jaap H; Selen, Luc P J; Cholewicki, Jacek

    2003-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the literature on trunk muscle recruitment in low-back pain patients. Two models proposed in the literature, the pain-spasm-pain model and the pain adaptation model, yield conflicting predictions on how low- back pain would affect trunk muscle recruitment in various activities. The two models are outlined and evidence for the two from neurophsysiological studies is reviewed. Subsequently, specific predictions with respect to changes in activation of the lumbar extensor musculature are derived from both models. These predictions are compared to the results from 30 clinical studies and three induced pain studies retrieved in a comprehensive literature search. Neither of the two models is unequivocally supported by the literature. These data and further data on timing of muscle activity and load sharing between muscles suggest an alternative model to explain the alterations of trunk muscle recruitment due to low-back pain. It is proposed that motor control changes in patients are functional in that they enhance spinal stability.

  15. Decreased pain sensitivity among people with schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of experimental pain induction studies.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Brendon; Thompson, Trevor; Acaster, Sarah; Vancampfort, Davy; Gaughran, Fiona; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-11-01

    Patients with schizophrenia report reduced pain sensitivity in clinical studies, but experimental studies are required to establish pain sensitivity as a potential endophenotype. We conducted a systematic review of electronic databases from database inception until April 15, 2015, including experimental studies investigating pain among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder vs healthy controls. A random-effect meta-analysis yielding Hedges' g ±95% confidence intervals (CIs) as the effect size (ES) measure was conducted. Primary outcome was a pooled composite of pain threshold and pain tolerance; secondary outcomes included these parameters individually, plus sensory threshold, physiological pain response, and pain intensity or unpleasantness. Across 17 studies, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 387; age, 30.7 ± 6.9 years; females, 31.9%; illness duration, 7.0 ± 5.7 years) were compared with controls (n = 483; age, 29.5 ± 7.4 years; females, 31.0%). Patients had elevated pain threshold/pain tolerance vs controls (ES = 0.583; 95% CI, 0.212-0.954; P = 0.002; studies = 15). Results were similar in antipsychotic-free individuals (ES = 0.599; 95% CI, 0.291-0.907; P < 0.0001; studies = 8), with trend-level significance in antipsychotic-treated individuals (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, -0.007 to 1.125; P = 0.047; studies = 9). Likewise, patients with schizophrenia had increased pain tolerance (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, 0.235-0.897; P = 0.0001; studies = 6), sensory threshold (ES = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.505-1.727; P < 0.0001; studies = 5), and pain threshold (ES = 0.696; 95% CI, 0.407-0.986; P < 0.001; studies = 9), as well as reduced physiological response to noxious stimuli (ES = 0.456; 95% CI, 0.131-0.783; P = 0.006) and pain intensity/unpleasantness ratings (ES = 0.547; 95% CI, 0.146-0.949; P = 0.008). Findings were similarly significant in antipsychotic-free patients with schizophrenia (analysable parameters = 4) and antipsychotic-treated individuals (analysable

  16. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  17. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone. PMID:25729190

  18. Motor adaptations to local muscle pain during a bilateral cyclic task.

    PubMed

    Brøchner Nielsen, Niels-Peter; Tucker, Kylie; Dorel, Sylvain; Guével, Arnaud; Hug, François

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how unilateral pain, induced in two knee extensor muscles, affects muscle coordination during a bilateral pedaling task. Fifteen participants performed a 4-min pedaling task at 130 W in two conditions (Baseline and Pain). Pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of one leg. Force applied throughout the pedaling cycle was measured using an instrumented pedal and used to calculate pedal power. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from eight muscles to assess changes in muscle activation strategies. Compared to Baseline, during the Pain condition, EMG amplitude of muscles of the painful leg (VL and VM-the painful muscles, and RF-another quadriceps muscle with no pain) was lower during the extension phase [(mean ± SD): VL: -22.5 ± 18.9%; P < 0.001; VM: -28.8 ± 19.9%; P < 0.001, RF: -20.2 ± 13.9%; P < 0.001]. Consistent with this, pedal power applied by the painful leg was also lower during the extension phase (-16.8 ± 14.2 W, P = 0.001) during Pain compared to Baseline. This decrease was compensated for by an 11.3 ± 8.1 W increase in pedal power applied by the non-painful leg during its extension phase (P = 0.04). These results support pain adaptation theories, which suggest that when there is a clear opportunity to compensate, motor adaptations to pain occur to decrease load within the painful tissue. Although the pedaling task offered numerous possibilities for compensation, only between-leg compensations were systematically observed. This finding is discussed in relation to the mechanical and neural constraints of the pedaling task.

  19. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  20. The genetic influences on oxycodone response characteristics in human experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anne E; Sato, Hiroe; Nielsen, Lecia M; Staahl, Camilla; Droney, Joanne; Gretton, Sophy; Branford, Ruth; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Riley, Julia; Ross, Joy

    2015-08-01

    Human experimental pain studies are of value to study basic pain mechanisms under controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variation across selected mu-, kappa- and delta-opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1and OPRD1, respectively) influenced analgesic response to oxycodone in healthy volunteers. Experimental multimodal, multitissue pain data from previously published studies carried out in Caucasian volunteers were used. Data on thermal skin pain tolerance threshold (PTT) (n = 37), muscle pressure PTT (n = 31), mechanical visceral PTT (n = 43) and thermal visceral PTT (n = 41) were included. Genetic associations with pain outcomes were explored. Nineteen opioid receptor genetic polymorphisms were included in this study. Variability in oxycodone response to skin heat was associated with OPRM1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs589046 (P < 0.0001) and rs563649 (P < 0.0001). Variability in oxycodone response to visceral pressure was associated with four OPRM1 SNPs: rs589046 (P = 0.015), rs1799971 (P = 0.045), rs9479757 (P = 0.009) and rs533586 (P = 0.046). OPRM1 SNPs were not associated with oxycodone visceral heat threshold, however, one OPRD1 rs419335 reached significance (P = 0.015). Another OPRD1 SNP rs2234918 (P = 0.041) was associated with muscle pressure. There were no associations with OPRK1 SNPs and oxycodone response for any of the pain modalities. Associations were found between analgesic effects of oxycodone and OPRM1 and OPRD1 SNPs; therefore, variation in opioid receptor genes may partly explain responder characteristics to oxycodone.

  1. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F.; Driban, Jeffrey B.; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A.; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined the relationships between lower extremity muscle strength, power and perceived disease severity in participants with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Methods We used baseline data from a randomized controlled trial in 190 participants with knee OA (age: 60.2 ± 10.4 yrs; BMI: 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m2). Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index and health-related quality of life using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. Results In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P < 0.02). It was also significantly and positively associated with SF-36 physical component scores (PCS) (r = 0.16, P < 0.05). After adjusting for multiple covariates, muscle power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS (P ≤ 0.04). However, strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Conclusions Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. PMID:26315282

  2. Effect of Experimental Cutaneous Hand Pain on Corticospinal Excitability and Short Afferent Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Catherine; Gagné, Martin; Reilly, Karen T.; Bouyer, Laurent J.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration is altered in people with chronic pain. While there is substantial evidence that pain interferes with neural activity in primary sensory and motor cortices, much less is known about its impact on integrative sensorimotor processes. Here, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) paradigm was used to assess sensorimotor integration in the presence and absence of experimental cutaneous heat pain applied to the hand. Ulnar nerve stimulation was combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation to condition motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Four interstimulus intervals (ISI) were tested, based on the latency of the N20 component of the afferent sensory volley (N20−5 ms, N20+2 ms, N20+4 ms, N20+10 ms). In the PAIN condition, MEPs were smaller compared to the NEUTRAL condition (p = 0.005), and were modulated as a function of the ISI (p = 0.012). Post-hoc planned comparisons revealed that MEPs at N20+2 and N20+4 were inhibited compared to unconditioned MEPs. However, the level of inhibition (SAI) was similar in the PAIN and NEUTRAL conditions. This suggests that the interplay between pain and sensorimotor integration is not mediated through direct and rapid pathways as assessed by SAI, but rather might involve higher-order integrative areas. PMID:27690117

  3. The initial effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold of healthy adults: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Ji, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on delayed onset muscle soreness. [Subjects] Forty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: a nerve mobilization group (experimental) and a control group. [Methods] The subjects of the experimental group were administered a median nerve mobilization technique and ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. The subjects in the control group were only administered ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue and the pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in all variables, compared to pre-intervention. Furthermore, the control group showed significant improvements in the pressure pain threshold, compared to pre-intervention. Significant differences in the post-intervention gains in muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold were found between the experimental group and the control group. [Conclusion] Application of the upper extremity neural mobilization technique is considered to have a positive effect on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:27134351

  4. Effects of hypnotic analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    DeBenedittis, G; Panerai, A A; Villamira, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia are still poorly understood and conflicting data are reported regarding the underlying neurochemical correlates. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hypnotically induced analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain, taking into account pain and distress tolerance as well as the neurochemical correlates. 11 high hypnotizable Ss and 10 low hypnotizable Ss, as determined by scores on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1962), were administered an ischemic pain test in both waking and hypnotic conditions. The following variables were measured: (a) pain and distress tolerance, (b) anxiety levels, and (c) plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Results confirmed significant increases of pain and distress tolerance during hypnosis as compared to the waking state, with positive correlations between pain and distress relief and hypnotizability. Moreover, a hypnotically induced dissociation between the sensory-discriminative and the affective-motivational dimensions of pain experience was found, but only in high hypnotizable Ss. Hypnotic analgesia was unrelated to anxiety reduction and was not mediated either by endorphins or by ACTH.

  5. Function and structure of the deep cervical extensor muscles in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Schomacher, Jochen; Falla, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    The deep cervical extensors are anatomically able to control segmental movements of the cervical spine in concert with the deep cervical flexors. Several investigations have confirmed changes in cervical flexor muscle control in patients with neck pain and as a result, effective evidence-based therapeutic exercises have been developed to address such dysfunctions. However, knowledge on how the deep extensor muscles behave in patients with neck pain disorders is scare. Structural changes such as higher concentration of fat within the muscle, variable cross-sectional area and higher proportions of type II fibres have been observed in the deep cervical extensors of patients with neck pain compared to healthy controls. These findings suggest that the behaviour of the deep extensors may be altered in patients with neck pain. Consistent with this hypothesis, a recent series of studies confirm that patients display reduced activation of the deep cervical extensors as well as less defined activation patterns. This article provides an overview of the various different structural and functional changes in the deep neck extensor muscles documented in patients with neck pain. Relevant recommendations for the management of muscle dysfunction in patients with neck pain are presented.

  6. IB4-Saporin Attenuates Acute and Eliminates Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Gear, Robert W.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    The function of populations of nociceptors in muscle pain syndromes remain poorly understood. We compared the contribution of two major classes, isolectin B4-positive (IB4(+)) and IB4-negative (IB4(−)) nociceptors, in acute and chronic inflammatory and ergonomic muscle pain. Baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold was assessed in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats treated with IB4-saporin, which selectively destroys IB4(+) nociceptors. Rats were then submitted to models of acute inflammatory (intramuscular carrageenan)- or ergonomic intervention (eccentric exercise or vibration)-induced muscle pain, and each of the three models also evaluated for the transition from acute to chronic pain, manifest as prolongation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced hyperalgesia, after recovery from the hyperalgesia induced by acute inflammation or ergonomic interventions. IB4-saporin treatment did not affect baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold. However, compared to controls, IB4-saporin treated rats exhibited shorter duration mechanical hyperalgesia in all three models and attenuated peak hyperalgesia in the ergonomic pain models. And, IB4-saporin treatment completely prevented prolongation of PGE2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, IB4(+) and IB4(−) neurons contribute to acute muscle hyperalgesia induced by diverse insults. However, only IB4+ nociceptors participate in the long term consequence of acute hyperalgesia. Finally, using retrograde labelling we found that approximately 70% of sensory neurons innervating the gastrocnemius muscle are IB4(+). PMID:22206923

  7. Role for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the induction of chronic muscle pain in the rat.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Pedro; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2014-06-01

    While raised levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) have been observed in patients with chronic muscle pain, direct evidence for its role as an algogen in skeletal muscle is still lacking. In the rat, MCP-1 induces a dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia lasting for up to 6weeks. Following recovery, rats exhibited a markedly prolonged hyperalgesia to an intramuscular injection of prostaglandin E2, hyperalgesic priming. Intrathecal pretreatment with isolectin B4 (IB4)-saporin, which selectively destroys IB4-positive (IB4+) nociceptors, markedly decreased MCP-1-induced hyperalgesia and prevented the subsequent development of priming. To evaluate the involvement of MCP-1 in stress-induced chronic pain we administered, intrathecally, antisense (AS) or mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides directed against CCR2 (the canonical receptor for MCP-1) mRNA, during the exposure to water-avoidance stress, a model of stress-induced persistent muscle pain. The AS treatment attenuated this hyperalgesia, whereas IB4-saporin abolished water-avoidance stress-induced muscle hyperalgesia and prevented stress-induced hyperalgesic priming. These results indicate that MCP-1 induces persistent muscle hyperalgesia and a state of latent chronic sensitization to other algogens, by action on its cognate receptor on IB4+ nociceptors. Because MCP-1 also contributes to stress-induced widespread chronic muscle pain, it should be considered as a player in chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

  8. Randomized Clinical Trial of Acupuncture for Myofascial Pain of the Jaw Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yoshi F.; Younger, Jarred; Goddard, Greg; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating symptoms associated with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. Methods Twenty-eight subjects over the age of 18 and diagnosed with chronic myofascial pain of the jaw muscles were randomized to receive real (n = 16) or sham (n = 12) acupuncture. Prior to treatment, each subject clenched his or her teeth for 2 minutes. Acupuncture or sham acupuncture was then administered at the Hegu large intestine 4 (LI4) acupoint for 15 minutes. Real acupuncture was given by penetrating the needle through a sticky foam pad at the acupoint. Sham acupuncture was conducted by pricking the skin, without penetration, with a shortened, blunted acupuncture needle through a foam pad placed away from the acupoint. General head and neck pain ratings were obtained before and after treatment on a numerical rating scale. A mechanical pain stimulus on the masseter muscle was given before and after treatment and rated on a visual analog scale to measure pain tolerance level. Paired t tests were performed to detect significant changes in pain levels. Results Subjects receiving real acupuncture experienced a significant reduction in jaw pain (P = .04), jaw/face tightness (P = .04), and neck pain (P = .04), and a significant increase in pain tolerance of the masseter muscle (P = .001). Subjects were not able to determine whether they received real or sham acupuncture (P = .69). No significant pain reductions were observed in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion A single acupuncture session using one acupoint at Hegu large intestine 4 significantly reduced most myofascial pain endpoints when compared to sham acupuncture. PMID:19888488

  9. Botulinum Toxin A Injection into the Subscapularis Muscle to Treat Intractable Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injection into the subscapularis muscle on intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. Methods Six stroke patients with intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain were included. Botulinum toxin A was injected into the subscapularis muscle. Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale. Pain-free range of motion was assessed for shoulder abduction and external rotation. The spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator was measured using the modified Ashworth scale. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, and, if possible, 8 weeks. Results Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was improved (p=0.004) after botulinum toxin injection into the subscapularis muscle. Restricted shoulder abduction (p=0.003), external rotation (p=0.005), and spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator (p=0.005) were also improved. Improved hemiplegic shoulder pain was correlated with improved shoulder abduction (r=–1.0, p<0.001), external rotation (r=–1.0, p<0.001), and spasticity of the internal rotator (r=1.0, p<0.001). Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injection into the subscapularis muscle appears to be valuable in the management of intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. PMID:27606265

  10. Involvement of central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors on antinociceptive effect of tetrahydrocannabinol in muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Bagüés, Ana; Martín, M Isabel; Sánchez-Robles, Eva M

    2014-12-15

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors have emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for pain management in recent years and the interest in the use of cannabinoids is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where conventional treatments fail. Muscle pain is a major clinical problem and new pharmacological approaches are being studied. Recently, we have demonstrated that cannabinoid synthetic agonists are useful to reduce muscular pain in two animal models, where the local administration is effective. Now, we want to know if tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid natural derivative with therapeutic use in humans, is also effective in reducing acute muscle pain. The antinociceptive effect of THC by systemic (i.p.) and local (i.m.) administration was tested in two animal models of acute muscle pain, rat masseter and gastrocnemius, induced by hypertonic saline (HS) injection. The drugs used were the non-selective agonist THC and two selective cannabinoid antagonists, AM251 (CB1) and AM630 (CB2). THC, i.p. and i.m. administered, reduced the nociceptive behaviours induced by HS in both muscular pain models. The antinociceptive effect induced by the systemic administration of THC was mediated by CB1 receptors in the masseter muscle whereas in gastrocnemius both CB1 and CB2 receptors participated. When THC was administered locally, only CB2 receptors were involved in the antinociceptive effect in both muscles. This study suggests that THC could be a future pharmacological option in the treatment of muscle pain. The local administration of THC could be an interesting option to treat this type of pain avoiding the central adverse effects.

  11. IL17 Mediates Pelvic Pain in Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen F.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Done, Joseph; Wong, Larry; Bell-Cohn, Ashlee; Roman, Kenny; Cashy, John; Ohlhausen, Michelle; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is the most common form of prostatitis, accounting for 90–95% of all diagnoses. It is a complex multi-symptom syndrome with unknown etiology and limited effective treatments. Previous investigations highlight roles for inflammatory mediators in disease progression by correlating levels of cytokines and chemokines with patient reported symptom scores. It is hypothesized that alteration of adaptive immune mechanisms results in autoimmunity and subsequent development of pain. Mouse models of CPPS have been developed to delineate these immune mechanisms driving pain in humans. Using the experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) in C57BL/6 mice model of CPPS we examined the role of CD4+T-cell subsets in the development and maintenance of prostate pain, by tactile allodynia behavioral testing and flow cytometry. In tandem with increased CD4+IL17A+ T-cells upon EAP induction, prophylactic treatment with an anti-IL17 antibody one-day prior to EAP induction prevented the onset of pelvic pain. Therapeutic blockade of IL17 did not reverse pain symptoms indicating that IL17 is essential for development but not maintenance of chronic pain in EAP. Furthermore we identified a cytokine, IL7, to be associated with increased symptom severity in CPPS patients and is increased in patient prostatic secretions and the prostates of EAP mice. IL7 is fundamental to development of IL17 producing cells and plays a role in maturation of auto-reactive T-cells, it is also associated with autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes. More recently a growing body of research has pointed to IL17’s role in development of neuropathic and chronic pain. This report presents novel data on the role of CD4+IL17+ T-cells in development and maintenance of pain in EAP and CPPS. PMID:25933188

  12. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-09-01

    Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM.

  13. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM. PMID:27152691

  14. Experimental orofacial pain and sensory deprivation lead to perceptual distortion of the face in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dagsdóttir, Lilja Kristín; Skyt, Ina; Vase, Lene; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Patients suffering from persistent orofacial pain may sporadically report that the painful area feels "swollen" or "differently," a phenomenon that may be conceptualized as a perceptual distortion because there are no clinical signs of swelling present. Our aim was to investigate whether standardized experimental pain and sensory deprivation of specific orofacial test sites would lead to changes in the size perception of these face areas. Twenty-four healthy participants received either 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (HS) or local anesthetics (LA) into six regions (buccal, mental, lingual, masseter muscle, infraorbital and auriculotemporal nerve regions). Participants estimated the perceived size changes in percentage (0 % = no change, -100 % = half the size or +100 % = double the size), and somatosensory function was checked with tactile stimuli. The pain intensity was rated on a 0-10 Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS), and sets of psychological questionnaires were completed. HS and LA were associated with significant self-reported perceptual distortions as indicated by consistent increases in perceived size of the adjacent face areas (P ≤ 0.050). Perceptual distortion was most pronounced in the buccal region, and the smallest increase was observed in the auriculotemporal region. HS was associated with moderate levels of pain VNRS = 7.3 ± 0.6. Weak correlations were found between HS-evoked perceptual distortion and level of dissociation in two regions (P < 0.050). Experimental pain and transient sensory deprivation evoked perceptual distortions in all face regions and overall demonstrated the importance of afferent inputs for the perception of the face. We propose that perceptual distortion may be an important phenomenon to consider in persistent orofacial pain conditions.

  15. The psoas muscle as cause of low back pain in infantile cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Camoriano, R.; Valle, M.; Boero, S.

    2008-01-01

    Psoas muscle spasticity is hypothesised as a rare cause of low back pain in patients with infantile cerebral palsy. The authors describe a new manoeuvre for the study of psoas tenderness and ultrasound (US)-guided transabdominal botulinum toxin injection technique. A possible causal relationship between psoas tension and low back pain was found incidentally in two examined cases. In subsequent patients, botulinum toxin was injected and, in cases of disappearance of symptoms, the psoas tendon was sectioned at the pelvic brim with definitive disappearance of pain. The relationship between psoas tension and low back pain in patients with infantile cerebral palsy seems likely, given the result in the four patients. PMID:19384481

  16. Acute caffeine ingestion enhances strength performance and reduces perceived exertion and muscle pain perception during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Parkhouse, Natalie; Cook, Kathryn; Smith, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of caffeine ingestion in enhancing aerobic performance is well established. However, despite suggestions that caffeine may enhance resistance exercise performance, research is equivocal on the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on resistance exercise performance. It has also been suggested that dampened perception of perceived exertion and pain perception might be an explanation for any possible enhancement of resistance exercise performance due to caffeine ingestion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of caffeine ingestion on repetitions to failure, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and muscle pain perception during resistance exercise to failure. Eleven resistance trained individuals (9 males, 2 females, mean age±SD=26.4±6.4 years), took part in this double-blind, randomised cross-over experimental study whereby they ingested a caffeinated (5 mg kg(-1)) or placebo solution 60 minutes before completing a bout of resistance exercise. Experimental conditions were separated by at least 48 hours. Resistance exercise sessions consisted of bench press, deadlift, prone row and back squat exercise to failure at an intensity of 60% 1 repetition maximum. Results indicated that participants completed significantly greater repetitions to failure, irrespective of exercise, in the presence of caffeine (p=0.0001). Mean±S.D of repetitions to failure was 19.6±3.7 and 18.5±4.1 in caffeine and placebo conditions, respectively. There were no differences in peak heart rate or peak blood lactate values across conditions (both p >0.05). RPE was significantly lower in the caffeine compared to the placebo condition (p=0.03) and was significantly higher during lower body exercises compared to upper body exercises irrespective of substance ingested (p=0.0001). For muscle pain perception, a significant condition by exercise interaction (p=0.027) revealed that muscle pain perception was lower in the caffeine condition, irrespective of exercise

  17. Experimental comparisons between McKibben type artificial muscles and straight fibers type artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Taro

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes experimental comparison between a conventional McKibben type artificial muscle and a straight fibers type artificial muscle developed by the authors. A wearable device and a rehabilitation robot which assists a human muscle should have characteristics similar to those of human muscle. In addition, because the wearable device and the rehabilitation robot should be light, an actuator with a high power/weight ratio is needed. At present, the McKibben type is widely used as an artificial muscle, but in fact its physical model is highly nonlinear. Further, the heat and mechanical loss of this actuator are large because of the friction caused by the expansion and contraction of the sleeve. Therefore, the authors have developed an artificial muscle tube in which high strength glass fibers have been built into the tube made from natural latex rubber. As results, experimental results demonstrated that the developed artificial muscle is more effective regarding its fundamental characteristics than that of the McKibben type; the straight fibers types of artificial muscle have more contraction ratio and power, longer lifetime than the McKibben types. And it has almost same characteristics of human muscle for isotonic and isometric that evaluate it dynamically.

  18. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J.; Newton, Michael J.; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Context: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. Objective: To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy, untrained men (21–39 years). Intervention(s): Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Main Outcome Measure(s): Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Results: Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P < .05). The PPT was lower in the medial region before exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P < .05). The VAS was correlated with the CR-10 scale (r = 0.91, P < .05) but not with the PPT (r = −0.28, P = .45). Conclusions: The way in which muscles are assessed affects the pain level score. This finding suggests that pain level and pain threshold cannot be used

  19. Acute caffeine ingestion enhances performance and dampens muscle pain following resistance exercise to failure.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Oxford, S W

    2012-06-01

    This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effects of acute caffeine ingestion on perceptions of muscle pain following a bout of high-intensity, upper-body resistance exercise to failure. Moderately trained males (N.=18) ingested a dose of caffeine (5 mg · kg-1) or placebo in a randomised and counterbalanced order and 1 hour later completed bench press exercise to failure at an intensity of 60% 1 repetition maximum. Repetitions completed was taken as a measure of performance, peak heart rate was determined via heart rate telemetry during the exercise bout, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and upper body muscle pain was recorded immediately upon failure of the exercise task and peak blood lactate concentration was determined post-exercise. Caffeine resulted in improved repetitions to failure (t [17]=3.119, P=0.006), greater peak blood lactate (t [17] =5.080, P=0.0001) and lower RPE (t 17=-3.431, P=0.003) compared to placebo. Muscle pain perception was also significantly lower in the caffeine condition compared to placebo (t [17]=-2.567, P=0.04). These results support prior studies using aerobic based exercise modes in suggesting that caffeine ingestion can dampen exercise-induced muscle pain. Specifically, caffeine ingestion enhances muscular strength performance and reduces upper body muscle pain perception immediately following a bout of high-intensity resistance exercise to failure.

  20. Muscle relaxation for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment: possible effects regarding anxiety and pain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Faye; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Chen, Ching; Hsieh, Yu-Lian; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Hung, Chi-Fa; Lin, Shu-Ching; Tsai, Hsiu-Huang; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Effectively managing pain is vital for the well-being and satisfaction of patients undergoing dermatologic treatments involving lasers. This study investigates the potential outcome of using muscle relaxation techniques to reduce pain among people having their tattoos removed with laser treatment. This study consists of 56 participants (mean age 18.1 ± 2.1 years) that had tattoos removed using the principle of selective photothermolysis. These participants underwent muscle relaxation before receiving the laser treatment. Their peripheral skin temperatures (PST) were measured both at the beginning and the end of the muscle relaxation period. Then, the Beck Anxiety Inventory was applied to evaluate anxiety levels. Once the laser treatment was completed, pain levels were measured using a visual analogue scale. A total of 125 person-sessions of laser treatment and psychometric assessments were performed in this study. The muscle relaxation method significantly increased the PST of the participants while reducing the levels of anxiety and pain throughout the course of the laser treatment procedure. The PST, anxiety scores, and pain scores all showed significant correlations with one another. According to the results obtained, this study proposes that muscle relaxation techniques be considered possibly auxiliary treatment options for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment. Additional studies with a comparison group and a larger sample size are required in the future to confirm the effectiveness of such intervention.

  1. Ultrasonic Tissue Characterization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle in Patients with Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P.; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in skeletal muscle that produce symptomatic referred pain when palpated. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Objective characterization and quantitative measurement of the properties of MTrPs can improve their localization and diagnosis, as well as lead to clinical outcome measures. MTrPs associated with soft tissue neck pain are often found in the upper trapezius muscle. We have previously demonstrated that MTrPs can be visualized using ultrasound imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether texture-based image analysis can differentiate structural heterogeneity of symptomatic MTrPs and normal muscle. Patients with chronic (>3 months) neck pain with spontaneously painful, palpable MTrPs (active MTrPs) and healthy volunteers without spontaneous pain (normal) were recruited for this study. Entropy filtering was performed on B-mode images of the upper trapezius and mean entropy values of symptomatic muscles were compared with healthy ones. Entropy analysis was also used to evaluate the size of regions with low entropy. We found that sites with active MTrPs have significantly lower entropy (p<0.05), i.e. they have more homogenous texture, than asymptomatic ones. PMID:23366899

  2. The effects of topical Arnica on performance, pain and muscle damage after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Pumpa, Kate L; Fallon, Kieran E; Bensoussan, Alan; Papalia, Shona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if topical Arnica is effective in reducing pain, indicators of inflammation and muscle damage, and in turn improve performance in well-trained males experiencing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty well-trained males matched by maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 Max) completed a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Topical Arnica was applied to the skin superficial to the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles immediately after a downhill running protocol designed to induce DOMS. Topical Arnica was reapplied every 4 waking hours for the duration of the study. Performance measures (peak torque, countermovement and squat jump), pain assessments (visual analogue scale (VAS) and muscle tenderness) and blood analysis (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, myoglobin and creatine kinase) were assessed at seven time points over five days (pre-, post-, 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the downhill run). Participants in the topical Arnica group reported less pain as assessed through muscle tenderness and VAS 72 hours post-exercise. The application of topical Arnica did not affect any performance assessments or markers of muscle damage or inflammation. Topical Arnica used immediately after intense eccentric exercise and for the following 96 hours did not have an effect on performance or blood markers. It did however demonstrate the possibility of providing pain relief three days post-eccentric exercise.

  3. Effects of experimental craniofacial pain on fine jaw motor control: a placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Trulsson, Mats; Svensson, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the experiment was to test the hypothesis that experimental pain in the masseter muscle or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) would perturb the oral fine motor control, reflected in bigger variability of bite force values and jaw muscle activity, during repeated splitting of food morsels. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in four sessions. An intervention was made by injection of either 0.2 ml of monosodium glutamate/isotonic saline (MSG/IS) (randomized) in either the masseter or TMJ (randomized). The participants were asked to hold and split a flat-faced placebo tablet with their anterior teeth, thirty times each at baseline, during intervention and post-intervention. Pain was measured using a 0-10 visual analog scale. The force applied by the teeth to "hold" and "split" the tablet along with the corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity of the jaw muscles and subject-based reports on perception of pain was recorded. The data analysis included a three-way analysis of variance model. The peak pain intensity was significantly higher during the painful MSG injections in the TMJ (6.1 ± 0.4) than the injections in masseter muscle (5.5 ± 0.5) (P = 0.037). Variability of hold force was significantly smaller during the MSG injection than IS injection in the masseter (P = 0.024). However, there was no significant effect of intervention on the variability of split force during the masseter injections (P = 0.769) and variability of hold and split force during the TMJ injections (P = 0.481, P = 0.545). The variability of the EMG activity of the jaw muscles did not show significant effects of intervention. Subject-based reports revealed that pain did not interfere in the ability to hold the tablet in 57.9 and 78.9 %, and the ability to split the tablet in 78.9 and 68.4 %, of the participants, respectively, during painful masseter and TMJ injections. Hence, experimental pain in the masseter muscle or TMJ did not have any robust effect in terms of bigger

  4. Ultrasonic characterization of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Zaazhoa, Maryam; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-04-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in taut bands of skeletal muscle that are painful on compression. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Localization, diagnosis, and clinical outcome measures of painful MTrPs can be improved by objectively characterizing and quantitatively measuring their properties. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound imaging and elastography can differentiate symptomatic (active) MTrPs from normal muscle. Patients with chronic (>3 months) neck pain with spontaneously painful, palpable (i.e., active) MTrPs and healthy volunteers without spontaneous pain (having palpably normal muscle tissue) were recruited for this study. The upper trapezius muscles in all subjects were imaged, and the echotexture was analyzed using entropy filtering of B-mode images. Vibration elastography was performed by vibrating the muscle externally at 100 Hz. Color Doppler variance imaging was used to quantify the regions of color deficit exhibiting low vibration amplitude. The imaging measures were compared against the clinical findings of a standardized physical exam. We found that sites with active MTrPs (n = 14) have significantly lower entropy (p < 0.05) and significantly larger nonvibrating regions (p < 0.05) during vibration elastography compared with normal, uninvolved muscle (n = 15). A combination of both entropy analysis and vibration elastography yielded 69% sensitivity and 81% specificity in discriminating active MTrPs from normal muscle. These results suggest that active MTrPs have more homogeneous texture and heterogeneous stiffness when compared with normal, unaffected muscle. Our methods enabled us to improve the imaging contrast between suspected MTrPs and surrounding muscle. Our results indicate that in subjects with chronic neck pain and active MTrPs, the abnormalities are not confined to discrete isolated nodules

  5. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P.; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Zaazhoa, Maryam; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in taut bands of skeletal muscle that are painful on compression. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Localization, diagnosis, and clinical outcome measures of painful MTrPs can be improved by objectively characterizing and quantitatively measuring their properties. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound imaging and elastography can differentiate symptomatic (active) MTrPs from normal muscle. Patients with chronic (>3 months) neck pain with spontaneously painful, palpable (i.e., active) MTrPs and healthy volunteers without spontaneous pain (having palpably normal muscle tissue) were recruited for this study. The upper trapezius muscles in all subjects were imaged, and the echotexture was analyzed using entropy filtering of B-mode images. Vibration elastography was performed by vibrating the muscle externally at 100 Hz. Color Doppler variance imaging was used to quantify the regions of color deficit exhibiting low vibration amplitude. The imaging measures were compared against the clinical findings of a standardized physical exam. We found that sites with active MTrPs (n = 14) have significantly lower entropy (p < 0.05) and significantly larger nonvibrating regions (p < 0.05) during vibration elastography compared with normal, uninvolved muscle (n = 15). A combination of both entropy analysis and vibration elastography yielded 69% sensitivity and 81% specificity in discriminating active MTrPs from normal muscle. These results suggest that active MTrPs have more homogeneous texture and heterogeneous stiffness when compared with normal, unaffected muscle. Our methods enabled us to improve the imaging contrast between suspected MTrPs and surrounding muscle. Our results indicate that in subjects with chronic neck pain and active MTrPs, the abnormalities are not confined to discrete isolated nodules

  6. Involvement of nitric oxide system in experimental muscle crush injury.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, I; Abassi, Z; Coleman, R; Milman, F; Winaver, J; Better, O S

    1998-01-01

    Muscle crush injury is often complicated by hemodynamic shock, electrolyte disorders, and myoglobinuric renal failure. In this study, we examined the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) system in the development of muscle damage in an experimental model of crush injury induced by exertion of standardized mechanical pressure on tibialis muscle of rat. The intact limb served as a control. Four days after injury, the crushed muscle was characterized by extreme capillary vasodilatation as demonstrated by histological morphometric analysis. These changes were accompanied by muscle hyperperfusion as evaluated by measurements of femoral blood flow (ultrasonic flowmetry) and capillary blood flow (laser-doppler flowmetry). Treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, largely decreased the hyperperfusion. Furthermore, the expression of the different NOS isoforms, assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and immunoreactive levels, determined by Western blot, revealed a remarkable induction of the inducible NOS in the crushed limb. Similarly, endothelial NOS mRNA increased gradually after the induction of muscle damage. In contrast, the major muscular NOS, i.e., neuronal isoform remained unchanged. In line with the alterations in the mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed parallel changes in the immunoreactive levels of the various NOS. These findings indicate that muscle crush is associated with activation of the NO system mainly due to enhancement of iNOS. This may contribute to NO-dependent extreme vasodilatation in the injured muscle and aggravate the hypovolemic shock after crush injury. PMID:9502774

  7. Evaluation of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation (MENS) effectiveness on muscle pain in temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Garcia, Alicio Rosalino; Turcio, Karina Helga Leal; Hamata, Marcelo Matida

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Microcurrent Electrical Nerve Stimulation (MENS) was evaluated and compared with occlusal splint therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients with muscle pain. Twenty TMD patients were divided into four groups. One received occlusal splint therapy and MENS (I); other received splints and placebo MENS (II); the third, only MENS (III) and the last group, placebo MENS (IV). Sensitivity derived from muscle palpation was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Results were submitted to analysis of variance (p<0.05). There was reduction of pain level in all groups: group I (occlusal splint and MENS) had a 47.7% reduction rate; group II (occlusal splint and placebo MENS), 66.7%; group III (MENS), 49.7% and group IV (placebo MENS), 16.5%. In spite of that, there was no statistical difference (analysis of variance / p<0.05) between MENS and occlusal splint therapy regarding muscle pain reduction in TMD patients after four weeks.

  8. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in skeletal muscle that produce symptomatic referred pain when palpated. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Objective characterization and quantitative measurement of the properties of MTrPs can improve their localization and diagnosis, as well as lead to clinical outcome measures. MTrPs associated with soft tissue neck pain are often found in the upper trapezius muscle. We have previously demonstrated that MTrPs can be visualized using ultrasound imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether texture-based image analysis can differentiate structural heterogeneity of symptomatic MTrPs and normal muscle.

  9. Experimentally induced pain perception is acutely reduced by aerobic exercise in people with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Shepanski, Melissa A; Mackenzie, Sean P; Clifford, Philip S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether subjects with chronic low back pain demonstrate exercise-induced analgesia to experimentally induced pressure pain. We employed a repeated measures design to study eight subjects with chronic low back pain (mean +/- standard deviation age = 40 +/- 10, duration of pain = 7 +/- 4 years). Pain ratings were measured immediately before and 2 minutes and 32 minutes after 25 minutes of cycle ergometry (5 minutes at 50% peak oxygen uptake, then 20 minutes at 70% peak oxygen uptake). We based the pain ratings on subject input on a visual analog scale at 10-second intervals during the 2-minute pressure pain stimulus to the nondominant index finger. Compared with preexercise values, pain ratings were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after exercise at both 2 and 32 minutes postexercise. We conclude that pressure pain perception can be reduced for more than 30 minutes following aerobic exercise from leg cycling among people with chronic low back pain.

  10. Efficacy of thiocolchicoside in Indian patients suffering from low back pain associated with muscle spasm.

    PubMed

    Soonawalla, Darius F; Joshi, Niteen

    2008-05-01

    Low back pain (LBP), a high prevalent condition among middle aged population, is usually associated with 'muscle spasm' that is responsible for giving rise to pain as well as its persistence. Muscle spasm is an involuntary, painful contraction of muscles that interferes with the function and cause of muscular disorder. Therefore centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxants, also called lissive drugs, are commonly used for its treatment. Sometimes these are combined with NSAIDs. The use of centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxants, though efficacious, is associated with frequent development of dose-related adverse drug reactions like sedation, impairment of voluntary motor functions and ataxia. So there is an urgent need for newer better drugs for treatment of conditions associated with muscle spasm. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of oral thiocolchicoside (TC), a natural glycoside as compared to an adrenergic alpha 2 agonist tizanidine (TZ) in the Indian patients with LBP accompanied by muscle spasm. In this randomised, non-cross over clinical study, 60 adult Indians aged between 18 and 65 years with clinical diagnosis of muscle spasm associated with low back pain were enrolled. Patients satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were either treated with TC and TZ for one week duration. Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain at rest and VAS for tiredness, drowsiness, dizziness and alertness was used as the self-rated primary efficacy and safety variable. Pain was also assessed by mobility assessment; muscle spasm assessment and analgesic consumption. Data obtained from 58 patients (those who completed the study) indicated that in this one week study both TC and TZ provided sustained symptoms relief compared with the baseline. There was statistically significant reduction in severity of symptoms from day 0 to day 7 in both the groups. Patients were followed up on 3rd and 7th day and severity score of various parameters was

  11. Muscle Trigger Points and Pressure Pain Sensitivity Maps of the Feet in Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tornero-Caballero, Maria C; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Cigarán-Méndez, Margarita; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Madeleine, Pascal; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in feet musculature and topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the feet as well as the relationship between TrPs, pressure pain maps, and clinical variables in women with fibromyalgia (FMS). METHODS : Fifty-one FMS women and 24 comparable healthy women participated. TrPs within the flexor hallucis brevis, adductor hallucis, dorsal interossei, extensor digitorum brevis, and quadratus plantae, as well as external and internal gastrocnemius, were explored. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed in a blind manner over seven locations on each foot. Topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the plantar region were generated using the averaged PPT of each location. RESULTS : The prevalence rate of foot pain was 63% (n = 32). The number of active TrPs for each FMS woman with foot pain was 5 ± 1.5 without any latent TrPs. Women with FMS without foot pain and healthy controls had only latent TrPs (2.2 ± 0.8 and 1.5 ± 1.3, respectively). Active TrPs in the flexor hallucis brevis and adductor hallucis muscles were the most prevalent. Topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps revealed that FMS women with foot pain had lower PPT than FMS women without pain and healthy controls, and higher PPT on the calcaneus bone (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS : The presence of foot pain in women with FMS is high. The referred pain elicited by active TrPs in the foot muscles reproduced the symptoms in these patients. FMS women suffering foot pain showed higher pressure hypersensitivity in the plantar region than those FMS women without pain.

  12. In-field masticatory muscle activity in subjects with pain-related TMD diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, S.N.; McCall, W.; Dunford, R.; Nickel, J.C.; Iwasaki, L.R.; Crow, H.C.; Gonzalez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pain-related Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent conditions among TMDs. There is contrasting evidence available for association of pain-related TMD and masticatory muscle activity (MMA). The present investigation assesses the associations between MMA levels of masseter and temporalis muscles during awake and sleep among pain-related TMD diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population The department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo. Twenty females and 6 males participated in this study. Material & Methods Using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC-TMD), participants were diagnostically categorized. Subjects used a custom monitoring system, which recorded in–field muscle activities. A factorial model tested for association between independent variable (muscle, time period, MMA level, diagnostic group) effects and the logarithm of MMA. Greenhouse–Geisser test was used to determine any statistically significant associations (p ≤ 0.003). Results No statistically significant association was found among four-way, three-way, and two-way analyses. However, among the main effects, range of magnitudes was the only variable to be statistically significant. Although the data suggest a trend of increased masseter MMA in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group both during awake and sleep time periods, such observation is not maintained for the temporalis muscle. In addition, temporalis MMA was found to be higher in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group only at extreme activity levels (<25% and ≥80% ranges). Conclusion This data support the association between masticatory muscle hyperactivity and painful-TMD conditions. PMID:25865542

  13. Pain and soreness associated with a percutaneous electrical stimulation muscle cramping protocol.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin C; Knight, Kenneth L

    2007-11-01

    Muscle cramps are difficult to study scientifically because of their spontaneity and unpredictability. Various laboratory techniques to induce muscle cramps have been explored but the best technique for inducing cramps is unclear. Electrical stimulation appears to be the most reliable, but there is a perception that it is extremely painful. Data to support this perception are lacking. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation is a tolerable method of inducing cramps with few side effects. We measured cramp frequency (HZ), pain during electrical stimulation, and soreness before, at 5 s, and 30, 60, and 90 min after cramp induction using a 100-mm visual analog scale. Group 1 received tibial nerve stimulation on 5 consecutive days; Group 2 received it on alternate days for five total treatments. Pain and soreness were mild. The highest ratings occurred on Day 1 and decreased thereafter. Intersession reliability was high. Our study showed that electrical stimulation causes little pain or soreness and is a reliable method for inducing cramps.

  14. Effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain and fatigue in human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Martina, R

    2001-04-01

    Gum chewing has been accepted as an adjunct to oral hygiene, as salivary stimulant and vehicle for various agents, as well as for jaw muscle training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain, fatigue and pressure tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Fifteen women without temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were requested to perform one of the following chewing tasks in three separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and empty-chewing with no bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 40 min at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, perceived muscle pain and masticatory fatigue were rated on visual analog scales (VAS) before, throughout, and after the chewing task. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were assessed before and immediately after the chewing tasks, and again after 24 h. The VAS scores for pain and fatigue significantly increased only during the hard gum chewing, and after 10 min of recovery VAS scores had decreased again, almost to their baseline values. No significant changes were found for PPTs either after hard or soft gum chewing. The findings indicate that the jaw muscles recover quickly from prolonged chewing activity in subjects without TMD.

  15. Changes in jaw muscle EMG activity and pain after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Ernberg, M; Schopka, J H; Fougeront, N; Svensson, P

    2007-01-01

    Limited jaw-opening capacity is frequently encountered following third molar surgery and may impair function. The aim of this study was to investigate the electromyographic (EMG) activity in jaw muscles after third molar surgery to obtain more insight into the mechanisms of restrictions in jaw opening. Twenty subjects were examined before, 24 h and 1 week after surgery. Ten healthy controls were subjected to the same examination at two different occasions for intersession variability. The EMG activity of the masseter and anterior digastricus muscles was recorded at different jaw positions and during maximum voluntary clenching. Pain intensity was assessed at rest and during movements. The EMG activity in the jaw muscles increased with opening level (P < 0.01), but did not change after surgery. In contrast, the EMG activity during clenching was decreased in all muscles after surgery (P < 0.05). The pain intensity after surgery increased with jaw opening level (P < 0.001), but was in general not correlated to EMG level. Pain intensity during clenching was increased after surgery (P < 0.001), but not correlated to EMG level. The EMG activity did not change between visits in the control group. In conclusion, the results indicate that third molar surgery does not influence the EMG activity in the masseter and anterior digastricus muscles during various levels of static jaw opening, but decreases the EMG activity during clenching. However, these changes are not influenced by pain intensity. The results have implications for the understanding of the phenomenon of trismus.

  16. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Serratus Anterior Muscle Pain Syndrome: Description of Technique and Case Series.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell; Nowakowsky, Michal; Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Cogan, Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    Chronic chest pain is a challenge, and serratus anterior muscle pain syndrome (SAMPS) is often overlooked. We have developed an ultrasound-guided technique for infiltrating local anesthetics and steroids in patients with SAMPS. In 8 patients, the duration of chronic pain was approximately 19 months. Three months after treatment, all patients had experienced a significant reduction in pain. Infiltration for SAMPS confirms the diagnosis and provides adequate pain relief.

  18. Influence of delayed muscle reflexes on spinal stability: model-based predictions allow alternative interpretations of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Anne; Puta, Christian; Anders, Christoph; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Wagner, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    Model-based calculations indicate that reflex delay and reflex gain are both important for spinal stability. Experimental results demonstrate that chronic low back pain is associated with delayed muscle reflex responses of trunk muscles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of such time-delayed reflexes on the stability using a simple biomechanical model. Additionally, we compared the model-based predictions with experimental data from chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls using surface-electromyography. Linear stability methods were applied to the musculoskeletal model, which was extended with a time-delayed reflex model. Lateral external perturbations were simulated around equilibrium to investigate the effects of reflex delay and gain on the stability of the human lumbar spine. The model simulations predicted that increased reflex delays require a reduction of the reflex gain to avoid spinal instability. The experimental data support this dependence for the investigated abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects. Reflex time-delay and gain dependence showed that a delayed reflex latency could have relevant influence on spinal stability, if subjects do not adapt their reflex amplitudes. Based on the model and the experimental results, the relationship between muscle reflex response latency and the maximum of the reflex amplitude should be considered for evaluation of (patho) physiological data. We recommend that training procedures should focus on speeding up the delayed reflex response as well as on increasing the amplitude of these reflexes.

  19. Concentration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Pelvic Floor Muscles: An Experimental Comparative Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. Materials and Methods We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Results Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Conclusion Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle. PMID:24954342

  20. Dysfunction of endogenous pain inhibition during exercise with painful muscles in patients with shoulder myalgia and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Lannersten, Lisa; Kosek, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise influenced endogenous pain modulation in healthy controls, shoulder myalgia patients and fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Twenty-one healthy subjects, 20 shoulder myalgia patients and 20 FM patients, all females, participated. They performed standardized static contractions, that is, outward shoulder rotation (m. infraspinatus) and knee extension (m. quadriceps). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were determined bilaterally at m. infraspinatus and m. quadriceps. During contractions PPTs were assessed at the contracting muscle, the resting homologous contralateral muscle and contralaterally at a distant site (m. infraspinatus during contraction of m. quadriceps and vice versa). Myalgia patients had lower PPTs compared to healthy controls at m. infraspinatus bilaterally (p<0.01), but not at m. quadriceps. FM patients had lower PPTs at all sites compared to healthy controls (p<0.001) and myalgia patients (p<0.001). During contraction of m. infraspinatus PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.003), but not in myalgia or FM patients. During contraction of m. quadriceps PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.001) and myalgia patients (all sites: p<0.02), but not in FM patients. In conclusion, we found a normal activation of endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms in myalgia patients during contraction of the non-afflicted m. quadriceps, but a lack of pain inhibition during contraction of the painful m. infraspinatus. FM patients failed to activate their pain inhibitory mechanisms during all contractions.

  1. Muscle Functions and Functional Performance among Older Persons with and without Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare muscle functions and functional performances between older persons with and without low back pain (LBP) and to determine the association between muscle functions and functional performances. This is a cross-sectional study, involving 95 older persons (age = 70.27 ± 7.26 years). Anthropometric characteristics, muscle functions, and functional performances were measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and multiple linear regression. The functional performances showed no significant differences (females LBP versus non-LBP, males LBP versus non-LBP) (p < 0.05). For muscle functions, significant differences were found (females LBP versus non-LBP) for abdominal muscle strength (p = 0.006) and back muscle strength (p = 0.07). In the LBP group, significant correlations were found between back and abdominal muscle strength and hand grip strength (r = 0.377 and r = 0.396, resp.), multifidus control and lower limb function (r = 0.363) in females, and back muscle strength and lower limb function (r = 0.393) in males (all p < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that abdominal and back muscle strengths were significant predictors of hand grip strength (p = 0.041 and p = 0.049, resp.), and multifidus control was a significant predictor of lower limb function in females (p = 0.047). This study demonstrates that older women with LBP exhibit poorer muscle functions compared to older women without LBP. PMID:27872641

  2. Immediate Effect of Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation on Pain and Muscle Activation in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Glaviano, Neal R.; Saliba, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  For individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP), altered muscle activity and pain are common during functional tasks. Clinicians often seek interventions to improve muscle activity and reduce impairments. One intervention that has not been examined in great detail is electrical stimulation. Objective:  To determine whether a single patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation (PENS) treatment would alter muscle activity and pain in individuals with PFP during 2 functional tasks, a single-legged squat and a lateral step down. Design:  Cohort study. Setting:  Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients of Other Participants:  A total of 22 individuals with PFP (15 women, 7 men; age = 26.0 ± 7.9 years, height = 173.8 ± 8.1 cm, mass = 75.1 ± 17.9 kg). Intervention(s):  Participants were randomized into 2 intervention groups: a 15-minute PENS treatment that produced a strong motor response or a 15-minute 1-mA subsensory (sham) treatment. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Before and immediately after the intervention, we assessed normalized electromyography amplitude, percentage of activation time across functional tasks, and onset of activation for the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, adductor longus, biceps femoris, and medial gastrocnemius muscles during a single-legged squat and a lateral step down. Scores on the visual analog scale for pain were recorded before and after the intervention. Results:  After a single treatment of PENS, the percentage of gluteus medius activation increased (0.024) during the lateral step down. Visual analog scores decreased during both the single-legged squat (PENS: preintervention = 2.7 ± 1.9, postintervention = 0.9 ± 0.7; sham: preintervention = 3.2 ± 1.6, postintervention = 2.8 ± 1.9; group × time interaction: P = .041) and lateral step down (PENS: preintervention = 3.4 ± 2.4, postintervention = 1.1 ± 0.8; sham: preintervention = 3.9 ± 1.7, postintervention = 3.3 ± 2.0; group

  3. Entropy measures of back muscles EMG for subjects with and without pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurcher, Ulrich; Kaufman, Miron; Vyhnalek, Bryan; Sung, Paul

    2007-10-01

    We have previously reported that the time-dependent entropy S(t) calculated from electromyography time series of low back muscles exhibit plateau-like behavior for intermediate times [50 ,ms < t < 0.5 ,s]. We proposed that the plateau value can be used to characterize the sEMG signal of subjects with low back pain [J. Rehab. Res. Dev. 44, 599 (2007)]. We report results of a larger study, and compare the entropies for the left -and right thoracic and left- and right lumbar muscles. We also compare entropies from muscles before and after physical therapy intervention.

  4. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles. PMID:27738508

  5. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles.

  6. The normal and the painful shoulders during the breaststroke. Electromyographic and cinematographic analysis of twelve muscles.

    PubMed

    Ruwe, P A; Pink, M; Jobe, F W; Perry, J; Scovazzo, M L

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and compare electrical activity patterns in 12 shoulder muscles during the breaststroke in 25 competitive swimmers who had normal shoulders and in 14 who had painful shoulders while they performed this stroke in a pool. The electromyographic analysis was synchronized with high-speed cinematography to discern phases of the breaststroke. Means, standard deviations, and t-tests were done for each phase. The differences in muscle activity between the two groups of swimmers demonstrated an increase in the internal rotators in the group with painful shoulders. They also demonstrated a decrease in the teres minor, supraspinatus, and the upper trapezius muscles. These factors increase the risk of impingement. Both the serratus anterior and teres minor muscles in the swimmers with normal shoulders consistently fired at or above 15% manual muscle test throughout the breaststroke cycle and were thus subject to fatigue. Based on these results, exercises for the breaststroke swimmer should be directed toward endurance training of the serratus anterior and teres minor muscles while balancing the internal and external rotators of the shoulder as well as the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles.

  7. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  8. Palmitoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels in the interstitium of the trapezius muscle of women with chronic widespread pain and chronic neck-shoulder pain correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, Nazdar; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Britt; Stensson, Niclas; Fowler, Christopher J; Gerdle, Björn

    2013-09-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a complex condition characterized by central hyperexcitability and altered descending control of nociception. However, nociceptive input from deep tissues is suggested to be an important drive. N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in regulation of inflammation and pain. Previously we have reported elevated levels of the 2 NAEs, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-α ligand N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA) in chronic neck/shoulder pain (CNSP). In the present study, the levels of PEA and SEA in women with CWP (n=18), CNSP (n=34) and healthy controls (CON, n=24) were investigated. All subjects went through clinical examination, pressure pain threshold measurements and induction of experimental pain in the tibialis anterior muscle. Microdialysis dialysate of the trapezius was collected before and after subjects performed a repetitive low-force exercise and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP were significantly higher post exercise compared with CWP, and both pre and post exercise compared with CON. Levels of both NAEs decreased significantly pre to post exercise in CWP. Intercorrelations existed between aspects of pain intensity and sensitivity and the level of the 2 NAEs in CWP and CNSP. This is the first study demonstrating that CNSP and CWP differ in levels of NAEs in response to a low-force exercise which induces pain. Increases in pain intensity as a consequence of low-force exercise were associated with low levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP and CWP. These results indicate that PEA and SEA have antinociceptive roles in humans.

  9. Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Muscles Located at the Site of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ato Ampomah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the location of the MTSS pain (posteromedial border of tibia) and the muscles that originate from that site. Method. The study was conducted in the Department of Anatomy of the School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, and involved the use of 22 cadaveric legs (9 paired and 4 unpaired) from 11 males and 2 females. Findings. The structures that were thus observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia were the soleus, the flexor digitorum longus, and the deep crural fascia. The soleus and flexor digitorum longus muscles were observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia. The tibialis posterior muscle had no attachment to this site. Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that if traction is the cause of MTSS then soleus and the flexor digitorum muscles and not the tibialis posterior muscle are the likely cause of MTSS. PMID:27066291

  10. Central Projection of Pain Arising from Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Leidl, Caroline; Kaschka, Miriam; Carr, Richard W.; Terekhin, Pavel; Handwerker, Hermann O.; Forster, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a subacute pain state arising 24–48 hours after a bout of unaccustomed eccentric muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the patterns of cortical activation arising during DOMS-related pain in the quadriceps muscle of healthy volunteers evoked by either voluntary contraction or physical stimulation. The painful movement or physical stimulation of the DOMS-affected thigh disclosed widespread activation in the primary somatosensory and motor (S1, M1) cortices, stretching far beyond the corresponding areas somatotopically related to contraction or physical stimulation of the thigh; activation also included a large area within the cingulate cortex encompassing posteroanterior regions and the cingulate motor area. Pain-related activations were also found in premotor (M2) areas, bilateral in the insular cortex and the thalamic nuclei. In contrast, movement of a DOMS-affected limb led also to activation in the ipsilateral anterior cerebellum, while DOMS-related pain evoked by physical stimulation devoid of limb movement did not. PMID:23056613

  11. Pain-Related Brain Activity Evoked by Active and Dynamic Arm Movement: Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness as a Promising Model for Studying Movement-Related Pain in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Kan, Shigeyuki; Uematsu, Hironobu; Shibata, Masahiko; Fujino, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a suitable model for the study of movement-evoked pain, we attempted to identify brain regions specifically involved in pain evoked by active and dynamic movement under DOMS condition. Subject Twelve healthy volunteers Methods DOMS was induced in the left upper-arm flexor muscles by an eccentric elbow contraction exercise. Movement-evoked pain in the affected muscles was evaluated just before (day 0) and after (days 1–7 and 30) the exercise using a visual analog scale. Subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans while performing repeated elbow flexion on day 2 (DOMS condition) and day 30 (painless condition). We compared brain activity between the DOMS and painless conditions. Results Movement-evoked pain reached peak intensity on day 2 and disappeared by day 30 in all subjects. No subject felt pain at rest on either of these days. Contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), parietal operculum and bilateral presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) showed greater activity during active and dynamic arm movement with DOMS than during the same movement without pain. There was no difference in activation of brain regions known collectively as the “pain matrix,” except for the parietal operculum, between the two conditions. Conclusion Active and dynamic movement with pain selectively evoked activation of M1, pre-SMA, and parietal operculum, as assessed using DOMS. Our results demonstrate that DOMS is a promising experimental model for the study of movement-evoked pain in humans. PMID:25929675

  12. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; p<0.0001/p=0.015). Conclusions These results suggest that strength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  13. Does Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Training Affect Pain Pressure Thresholds of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain? A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Evdokia; Papanikolaou, Dimitra-Tania; Koutsojannis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background. We need to understand more about how DNF performs in different contexts and whether it affects the pain threshold over myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Purpose. The objectives were to investigate the effect of neck muscles training on disability and pain and on pain threshold over MTrPs in people with chronic neck pain. Methods. Patients with chronic neck pain were eligible for participation with a Neck Disability Index (NDI) score of over 5/50 and having at least one MTrP on either levator scapulae, upper trapezoid, or splenius capitis muscle. Patients were randomly assigned into either DNF training, superficial neck muscle exercise, or advice group. Generalized linear model (GLM) was used to detect differences in treatment groups over time. Results. Out of 67 participants, 60 (47 females, mean age: 39.45 ± 12.67) completed the study. Neck disability and neck pain were improved over time between and within groups (p < 0.05). However, no differences were found within and between the therapeutic groups (p < 0.05) in the tested muscles' PPTs and in cervicothoracic angle over a 7-week period. Conclusion. All three groups improved over time. This infers that the pain pathways involved in the neck pain relief are not those involved in pain threshold. PMID:27990302

  14. Development of a behavioral assessment of craniofacial muscle pain in lightly anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ro, Jin Y; Capra, Norman; Masri, Radi

    2003-07-01

    In this study, a new behavioral assessment of craniofacial muscle pain in the lightly anesthetized rat is described. Intramuscular injections with algesic agents in lightly anesthetized rats evoked a characteristic ipsilateral hindpaw shaking behavior for several minutes similar to previously described orofacial pain-induced grooming behavior in awake rats (Neurosci Lett 103 (1989) 349, Pain 62 (1995) 295). Eighty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in a series of experiments to study whether this behavior could serve as a valid measure of craniofacial muscle pain. First, we demonstrated that different algesic chemicals, mustard oil (20%), formalin (3%) or hypertonic saline (5%) injected in the mid-region of the masseter muscle effectively elicited the hindpaw shaking behavior. The behavior was only minimally evoked with vehicle injection. Repeated administrations of hypertonic saline, a short duration non-sensitizing algogen, demonstrated reproducibility of the assay. Second, we showed that the peak and overall magnitude of the shaking behavior evoked by injections with different concentrations of mustard oil (1 and 5%) changed in a concentration dependent manner. Finally, we showed that systemic administration of morphine sulfate (3 and 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) dose dependently attenuated mustard oil induced hindpaw-shaking behavior. Lidocaine injected locally 5 min prior to mustard oil injection also significantly decreased the hindpaw shaking behavior. Based on these results we concluded that ipsilateral hindpaw shaking in lightly anesthetized rats is a stereotypical behavior evoked by noxious muscle stimulation and can be used as a reliable behavioral measure to assess craniofacial muscle pain.

  15. Muscle pain perception and sympathetic nerve activity to exercise during opioid modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. B.; O'Connor, P. J.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of the endogenous opioid system on forearm muscle pain and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during dynamic fatiguing exercise. Twelve college-age men (24 +/- 4 yr) performed graded (1-min stages; 30 contractions/min) handgrip to fatigue 1 h after the ingestion of either 60 mg codeine, 50 mg naltrexone, or placebo. Pain (0-10 scale) and exertion (0-10 and 6-20 scales) intensities were measured during the last 15 s of each minute of exercise and every 15 s during recovery. MSNA was measured continuously from the peroneal nerve in the left leg. Pain threshold occurred earlier [1.8 +/- 1, 2. 2 +/- 1, 2.2 +/- 1 J: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively] and was associated with a lower rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (2.7 +/- 2, 3.6 +/- 2, 3.8 +/- 2: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively) in the codeine condition compared with either the naltrexone or placebo conditions. There were no main effects (i.e., drugs) or interaction (i.e., drugs x time) for either forearm muscle pain or RPE during exercise [pain: F (2, 22) = 0.69, P = 0.51]. There was no effect of drug on MSNA, heart rate, or blood pressure during baseline, exercise, or recovery. Peak exercise MSNA responses were 21 +/- 1, 21 +/- 2.0, and 21 +/- 2.0 bursts/30 s for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. Peak mean arterial pressure responses were 135 +/- 4, 131 +/- 3, and 132 +/- 4 mmHg for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. It is concluded that neither 60 mg codeine nor 50 mg naltrexone has an effect on forearm muscle pain, exertion, or MSNA during high- intensity handgrip to fatigue.

  16. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  17. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  18. [Bioelectric activity of paravertebral muscles in experimental scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, G I; Popov, S V

    1976-12-01

    The paper is concerned with a study of the bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles in 2 groups of rabbits with differently expressed degrees of experimental scoliosis and in a control group of intact animals. The results demonstrated an asymmetry in the tonic bioelectric activity in the paravertebral muscles in scoliosis, unlike the reactions of the control group of animals. The character of asymmetry depends upon the degree of deformation: in cases of moderately expressed scoliosis there is a prevalence of the tonic bioelectric activity on the level of the basic arc of distortion on the side of the concavity; in severely expressed scoliosis the tonic bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles on the concave side appears to be less than on the convex side. An asymmetry of the tonic activity takes place on the level of compensatory arcs as well. The authors come to the conclusion on the pathogenetical role of the muscular dysbalance in the genesis of scoliotic deformation.

  19. Suggestions to Reduce Clinical Fibromyalgia Pain and Experimentally Induced Pain Produce Parallel Effects on Perceived Pain but Divergent Functional MRI–Based Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, Stuart W.G.; Whalley, Matthew G.; Seah, Stanley T.H.; Oakley, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Hypnotic suggestion is an empirically validated form of pain control; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Methods Thirteen fibromyalgia patients received suggestions to alter their clinical pain, and 15 healthy controls received suggestions to alter experimental heat pain. Suggestions were delivered before and after hypnotic induction with blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) activity measured concurrently. Results Across groups, suggestion produced substantial changes in pain report (main effect of suggestion, F2, 312 = 585.8; p < .0001), with marginally larger changes after induction (main effect of induction, F1, 312 = 3.6; p = .060). In patients, BOLD response increased with pain report in regions previously associated with pain, including thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex. In controls, BOLD response decreased with pain report. All changes were greater after induction. Region-of-interest analysis revealed largely linear patient responses with increasing pain report. Control responses, however, were higher after suggestion to increase or decrease pain from baseline. Conclusions Based on behavioral report alone, the mechanism of suggestion could be interpreted as largely similar regardless of the induction or type of pain experience. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data, however, demonstrated larger changes in brain activity after induction and a radically different pattern of brain activity for clinical pain compared with experimental pain. These findings imply that induction has an important effect on underlying neural activity mediating the effects of suggestion, and the mechanism of suggestion in patients altering clinical pain differs from that in controls altering experimental pain. Patient responses imply that suggestions altered pain experience via corresponding changes in pain-related brain regions, whereas control responses imply suggestion engaged cognitive control. PMID:27490850

  20. Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers – an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Staahl, Camilla; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    AIM Experimental pain models may help to evaluate the mechanisms of action of analgesics and target the clinical indications for their use. This review addresses how the efficacy of opioids can be assessed in human volunteers using experimental pain models. The drawback with the different study designs is also discussed. METHOD A literature search was completed for randomized controlled studies which included human experimental pain models, healthy volunteers and opioids. RESULTS Opioids with a strong affinity for the µ-opioid receptor decreased the sensation in a variety of experimental pain modalities, but strong tonic pain was attenuated more than short lasting pain and non-painful sensations. The effects of opioids with weaker affinity for the µ-opioid receptor were detected by a more narrow range of pain models, and the assessment methods needed to be more sensitive. CONCLUSION The way the pain is induced, assessed and summarized is very important for the sensitivity of the pain models. This review gives an overview of how different opioids perform in experimental pain models. Generally experimental pain models need to be designed with careful consideration of pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. This knowledge can aid the decisions needed to be taken when designing experimental pain studies for compounds entering phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:19694733

  1. EXERCISE PREVENTS DEVELOPMENT OF AUTONOMIC DYSREGULATION AND HYPERALGESIA IN A MOUSE MODEL OF CHRONIC MUSCLE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic function. Regular physical activity prevents development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function in sedentary mice with CMP, and if exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. CMP was induced by two intramuscular injections of pH 5 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24h after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia that can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP. PMID:26313406

  2. Experimental pain phenotyping in community-dwelling individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Josue S; Riley, Joseph L; Glover, Toni; Sibille, Kimberly T; Bartley, Emily J; Goodin, Burel R; Bulls, Hailey W; Herbert, Matthew; Addison, Adriana S; Staud, Roland; Redden, David T; Bradley, Laurence A; Fillingim, Roger B; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel

    2016-09-01

    Pain among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with significant disability in older adults, and recent evidence demonstrates enhanced experimental pain sensitivity. Although previous research showed considerable heterogeneity in the OA clinical pain presentation, less is known regarding the variability in responses to experimental pain. The present study included individuals with knee OA (n = 292) who participated in the Understanding Pain and Limitations in Osteoarthritic Disease study and completed demographic and psychological questionnaires followed by a multimodal quantitative sensory testing (QST) session. Quantitative sensory testing measures were subjected to variable reduction procedures to derive pain sensitivity index scores, which in turn were entered into a cluster analysis. Five clusters were significantly different across all pain sensitivity index variables (P < 0.001) and were characterized by: (1) low pain sensitivity to pressure pain (N = 39); (2) average pain sensitivity across most modalities (N = 88); (3) high temporal summation of punctate pain (N = 38); (4) high cold pain sensitivity (N = 80); and (5) high sensitivity to heat pain and temporal summation of heat pain (N = 41). Clusters differed significantly by race, gender, somatic reactivity, and catastrophizing (P < 0.05). Our findings support the notion that there are distinct subgroups or phenotypes based on experimental pain sensitivity in community-dwelling older adults with knee OA, expanding previous findings of similar cluster characterizations in healthy adults. Future research is needed to further understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying pain within these subgroups, which may be of added value in tailoring effective treatments for people with OA.

  3. Experimental pain responses in children with chronic pain and in healthy children: How do they differ?

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie CI; Evans, Subhadra; Seidman, Laura C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extant research comparing laboratory pain responses of children with chronic pain with healthy controls is mixed, with some studies indicating lower pain responsivity for controls and others showing no differences. Few studies have included different pain modalities or assessment protocols. OBJECTIVES: To compare pain responses among 26 children (18 girls) with chronic pain and matched controls (mean age 14.8 years), to laboratory tasks involving thermal heat, pressure and cold pain. Responses to cold pain were assessed using two different protocols: an initial trial of unspecified duration and a second trial of specified duration. METHODS: Four trials of pressure pain and of thermal heat pain stimuli, all of unspecified duration, were administered, as well as the two cold pain trials. Heart rate and blood pressure were assessed at baseline and after completion of the pain tasks. RESULTS: Pain tolerance and pain intensity did not differ between children with chronic pain and controls for the unspecified trials. For the specified cold pressor trial, 92% of children with chronic pain completed the entire trial compared with only 61.5% of controls. Children with chronic pain exhibited a trend toward higher baseline and postsession heart rate and reported more anxiety and depression symptoms compared with control children. CONCLUSIONS: Contextual factors related to the fixed trial may have exerted a greater influence on pain tolerance in children with chronic pain relative to controls. Children with chronic pain demonstrated a tendency toward increased arousal in anticipation of and following pain induction compared with controls. PMID:22518373

  4. Contributions of peripheral and central opioid receptors to antinociception in rat muscle pain models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Eva Ma; Bagües, Ana; Martín, Ma Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Administration of hypertonic saline (HS) is an accepted model to study muscular pain. HS-induced nociceptive responses were tested in masseter, already described, and in two new pain models of spinally innervated muscles (gastrocnemius and triceps) developed in rats at our laboratory. HS administration in the masseter induced vigorous hindpaw shaking and in the gastrocnemius or triceps, paw withdrawal or flexing. Participation of the central and peripheral opioid receptors in HS-induced pain is compared in these muscles: masseter, innervated by trigeminal nerve, and gastrocnemius and triceps by spinal nerves. Morphine and loperamide were used to reveal peripheral and central components of opioid analgesia. Both agonists reduced HS-induced nociceptive behaviours in the masseter and were antagonised by the opioid antagonist naloxone and by naloxone methiodide, an opioid receptor antagonist that poorly penetrates the blood-brain barrier. Unexpectedly, in the gastrocnemius and triceps, morphine, but not loperamide, decreased the nociceptive behaviour and this effect was only reversed by naloxone. So, peripheral opioid receptors seem to participate in HS-induced masseter pain, whereas only central opioid receptors reduced the nociception in gastrocnemius and triceps. Our results suggest that the use of peripheral opioids can be more advantageous than central opioids for treatment of orofacial muscular pain.

  5. Autonomic responses to exercise: cortical and subcortical responses during post-exercise ischaemia and muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-03-01

    Sustained isometric contraction of skeletal muscle causes an increase in blood pressure, due to an increase in cardiac output and an increase in total peripheral resistance-brought about by an increase in sympathetically-mediated vasoconstriction. Both central command and reflex inputs from metaboreceptors in the contracting muscles have been shown to contribute to this sympathetically mediated increase in blood pressure. Occluding the blood supply and trapping the metabolites in the contracted muscle (post-exercise ischaemia) has shown that, while heart rate returns to baseline following exercise, the increase in MSNA and blood pressure persists in the absence of central command-sustained by peripheral inputs. Post-exercise ischaemia activates group III and IV muscle afferents, which are also activated during noxious stimulation. Indeed, post-exercise ischaemia is painful, so what is the role of pain in the increase in blood pressure? Intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline causes a deep dull ache, not unlike that produced by post-exercise ischaemia, and we have shown that this can cause a sustained increase in MSNA and blood pressure. We have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of the brain to identify the cortical and subcortical sites involved in the sensory processing of muscle pain, and in the generation of the autonomic responses to muscle pain, produced either by post-exercise ischaemia or intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline. During static hand-grip exercise there were parallel increases in signal intensity in the contralateral primary motor cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and cerebellar cortex that ceased at the end of the exercise, reflecting the start and end of central command. Progressive increases during the contraction phase occurred in the contralateral insula, as well as the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex, and continued during the period of post-exercise ischaemia. Decreases in signal intensity occurred in the

  6. Experimental reduction of pain catastrophizing modulates pain report but not spinal nociception as verified by mediation analyses.

    PubMed

    Terry, Ellen L; Thompson, Kathryn A; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2015-08-01

    Pain catastrophizing is associated with enhanced pain; however, the mechanisms by which it modulates pain are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that catastrophizing modulates supraspinal processing of pain but does not modulate spinal nociception (as assessed by nociceptive flexion reflex [NFR]). Unfortunately, most NFR studies have been correlational. To address this, this study experimentally reduced catastrophizing to determine whether it modulates spinal nociception (NFR). Healthy pain-free participants (N = 113) were randomly assigned to a brief 30-minute catastrophizing reduction manipulation or a control group that received pain education. Before and after manipulations, 2 types of painful stimuli were delivered to elicit (1) NFR (single trains of stimuli) and (2) temporal summation of NFR (3 stimulations at 2 Hz). After each set of stimuli, participants were asked to report their pain intensity and unpleasantness, as well as their situation-specific catastrophizing. Manipulation checks verified that catastrophizing was effectively reduced. Furthermore, pain intensity and unpleasantness to both stimulation types were reduced by the catastrophizing manipulation, effects that were mediated by catastrophizing. Although NFRs were not affected by the catastrophizing manipulation, temporal summation of NFR was reduced. However, this effect was not mediated by catastrophizing. These results indicate that reductions in catastrophizing lead to reductions in pain perception but do not modulate spinal nociception and provides further evidence that catastrophizing modulates pain at the supraspinal, not the spinal, level.

  7. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  8. Trunk strength and lumbar paraspinal muscle activity during isometric exercise in chronic low-back pain patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Cassisi, J E; Robinson, M E; O'Conner, P; MacMillan, M

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe trunk strength and lumbar paraspinal muscle activity across five angles of flexion during isometric exercise and rest in chronic low-back pain patients and control subjects. High muscle tension as measured by surface integrated electromyography is predicted by a muscle spasm model, and low muscle tension is predicted by a muscle deficiency model. Prior lumbar surgery had no affect on peak torque or maximum surface integrated electromyography data. Both groups produced greater torque and less surface integrated electromyography in more flexed positions. Chronic low-back pain patients exhibited lower peak torque and lower maximum surface integrated electromyography bilaterally during isometric extension effort across all angles. A muscle deficiency model of chronic low back pain was supported by these data and a muscle spasm model was not supported. Discriminant analyses indicated that monitoring maximum surface integrated electromyography of lumbar muscles during isometric effort facilitates classification of chronic low-back pain patients. Future directions are discussed in terms of applying psychophysiologic methods to pain rehabilitation.

  9. Elite swimmers with and without unilateral shoulder pain: mechanical hyperalgesia and active/latent muscle trigger points in neck-shoulder muscles.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Lozano, A; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Calderón-Soto, C; Domingo-Camara, A; Madeleine, P; Arroyo-Morales, M

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the presence of mechanical hypersensitivity and active trigger points (TrPs) in the neck-shoulder muscles in elite swimmers with/without unilateral shoulder pain. Seventeen elite swimmers with shoulder pain; 18 swimmers without shoulder pain; and 15 elite athletes matched controls were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the levator scapulae, sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, subscapularis and tibialis anterior muscles. TrPs in the levator scapulae, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, sternocleidomastoid and subscapularis muscles were also explored. Swimmers with shoulder pain showed significant lower PPT in all muscles compared with controls (P<0.01). No differences in PPT were found between swimmers with and without shoulder pain, underlining widespread mechanical hypersensitivity. The mean number of TrPs for elite swimmer with and without shoulder pain was, respectively, 4.7 ± 1 (2.1 ± 1.5 active; 2.6 ± 1.4 latent) and 4.7 ± 1.3 (1.3 ± 1.3 active; 3.4 ± 1.5 latent), whereas healthy athletes only showed latent TrPs (2.4 ± 1.2). Elite swimmers with shoulder pain showed higher number of active TrPs than swimmers without pain, whereas it was the opposite for the number of latent muscle TrP (P<0.05). The reported mechanical hypersensitivity suggests that active TrPs play a role in the development of shoulder pain in elite swimmers.

  10. Magnitude of spinal muscle damage is not statistically associated with exercise-induced low back pain intensity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D.; Horn, Maggie E.; Lott, Donovan J.; Arpan, Ishu; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Findings on imaging of noncontractile anatomic abnormalities and the intensity of low back pain have weak associations because of false-positive rates among asymptomatic individuals. This association might be stronger for contractile tissues. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between location and reports of pain intensity in the low back and exercise-induced muscle damage to the lumbar paraspinal muscles. STUDY DESIGN Nondiagnostic observational study in a laboratory setting. METHODS Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in the low back of healthy pain-free volunteers. Measures of pain intensity (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]) and location (area on the pain diagram) were taken before and 48 hours after exercise. Muscle damage was quantified using mechanical pain thresholds, motor performance deficits, and transverse relaxation time (T2)–weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Changes pre- to postexercise in signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging within the erector spinae, pain intensity, pain area, mechanical pain threshold, and isometric torque were assessed using paired t tests. Bivariate correlations were conducted to assess associations among muscle damage, pain intensity, and pain drawing area. RESULTS Twenty participants volunteered (11 women; average age, 22.3 years; average body mass index, 23.5) for study participation. Reports of pain intensity at 48 hours ranged from 0 to 59 mm on the VAS. Muscle damage was confirmed by reductions in mechanical threshold (p=.011) and motor performance (p<.001) and by changes in T2-weighted MRI (p=.007). This study was powered to find an association of at least r=0.5 to be statistically significant. Correlations of continuous variables revealed no significant correlations between pain intensity and measures of muscle damage (ranging between −0.075 and 0.151). There was a significant association between the remaining torque deficit at 48 hours and pain area

  11. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  12. Change the myofascial pain and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint following kinesio taping of latent myofascial trigger points in the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points.

  13. Chronic regional muscular pain in women with precise manipulation work. A study of pain characteristics, muscle function, and impact on daily activities.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, K G; Bäckman, E; Henriksson, C; de Laval, J H

    1996-01-01

    Pain characteristics, muscle function and impact on daily activities were studied in 39 women with chronic regional muscular pain (RMP). They were all blue-collar workers in work involving precise manipulations. The main location of the pain was in the neck-shoulder region. Nineteen age-matched women with fibromyalgia (FM) were studied in the same way as the RMP patients. Thirty-seven women with no pain and with the same age and weight as the RMP patients served as reference group with respect to muscle strength and endurance. A follow-up study was done with respect to pain distribution and other pain characteristics 20 months after the initial examination. The findings were of the same nature in the RMP and the FM groups. The intensity of pain, the lowering of pain threshold for pressure, and the degree of sleep disturbance were greater in the FM than in the RMP group. Isometric muscle strength and static muscular endurance were reduced in both FM and RMP compared to reference values. The reduction in strength and endurance was greater in FM than in RMP. Even if the impact on everyday activities were greater in FM than in RMP, the impact was substantial in RMP patients also, for example with regard to work capacity. There were no transitions from RMP to FM during the 20 months to follow-up. Three FM patients, however, did not meet the ACR criteria for FM at follow-up.

  14. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  15. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  16. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vaegter, Henrik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Pain biomarkers are warranted for individualized pain management. Based on different pain modulatory phenotypes, the objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups within patients with nonmalignant chronic pain and to investigate differences in clinical pain and pain hypersensitivity between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 patients with chronic pain to assess pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance, temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to 10 repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in cuff pressure pain threshold during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection and heat pain thresholds at clinical painful and nonpainful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM, 4 distinct groups were formed: group 1 (n = 85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP; group 2 (n = 148) had impaired CPM and normal TSP; group 3 (n = 45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP; and group 4 (n = 122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions than the other 3 groups (P < 0.001), indicating that impaired CPM and facilitated TSP play an important role in widespread pain. Groups 1 and 2 compared with group 4 had lower heat pain threshold at nonpainful areas and lower cuff pressure pain tolerance (P < 0.02), indicating that CPM plays a role for widespread hyperalgesia. Moreover, group 1 demonstrated higher clinical pain scores than group 4 (P < 0.05). Although not different between subgroups, patients were profiled on demographics, disability, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. Future research should investigate interventions tailored towards these subgroups.

  17. Chronic Low Back Pain in Women: Muscle Activation during Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fernanda G; Carmo, Carolina M; Fracini, América C; Pereira, Rita R P; Takara, Kelly S; Tanaka, Clarice

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the activities of the trunk and hip muscles in chronic low back pain (CLBP) women and asymptomatic subjects during the kneeling to half-kneeling task. [Subjects] Twenty-nine CLBP women and thirty asymptomatic subjects (C) participated in this study. [Methods] Electromyography activity (EMG) of the obliquus internus abdominis (OI), the lumbar erector spinae (LES) and the gluteus medius (GM) muscles was recorded bilaterally. The peak amplitude, the time of peak amplitude and the integrated linear envelope EMG for each muscle were obtained. [Results] The C group bilateral OI and GM muscles displayed higher peak amplitudes and earlier times of peak amplitude. They also had higher integrated linear envelope EMG values. The CLBP group bilateral LES muscles had higher peak amplitudes and earlier times of peak amplitude. They also showed an increased integrated linear envelope EMG values. [Conclusion] The CLBP women activate the LES muscles in the kneeling to half-kneeling task, showing different patterns of motor planning activity. PMID:24409022

  18. The Association between Imaging Parameters of the Paraspinal Muscles, Spinal Degeneration, and Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Carmeli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review investigated imaging parameters of the paraspinal muscles and their association with spinal degenerative features and low back pain (LBP) found in the literature. Three principal signs of muscle degeneration were detected on imaging: decreased muscle size, decreased radiographic density, and increased fat deposits. Men have a higher density of paraspinal muscles than women, younger individuals have a higher density than older ones, and lean individuals have a higher density than those with an increased body mass index. Fatty infiltration appears to be a late stage of muscular degeneration and can be measured noninvasively by an MRI scan. Fatty infiltration in the lumbar multifidus is common in adults and is strongly associated with LBP, especially in women, independent of body composition. Fatty infiltration develops in areas where most degenerative changes are found. MR spectroscopy studies have corroborated that the lumbar multifidus in LBP subjects has a significantly higher fat content than asymptomatic controls. There is a strong need for establishing uniform methods of evaluating normal parameters and degenerative changes of the paraspinal muscles. Additional imaging studies are needed to improve the understanding of the association and causal relationships between LBP, spinal degeneration, and changes in the paraspinal muscles.

  19. Sex differences in experimental measures of pain sensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bulls, Hailey W; Freeman, Emily L; Anderson, Austen JB; Robbins, Meredith T; Ness, Timothy J; Goodin, Burel R

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased pain sensitivity and disruption of endogenous pain inhibitory processes may account, at least in part, for the greater prevalence and severity of chronic pain in women compared to men. However, previous studies addressing this topic have produced mixed findings. This study examined sex differences in pain sensitivity and inhibition using quantitative sensory testing (QST), while also considering the influence of other important factors such as depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Healthy men (n=24) and women (n=24) each completed a QST battery. This battery included an ischemic pain task (IPT) that used a submaximal effort tourniquet procedure as well as a conditioned pain modulation (CPM) procedure for the assessment of endogenous pain inhibition. Prior to QST, participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Analyses revealed significant sex differences for the ischemic pain task and the conditioned pain modulation procedure, such that women tolerated the ischemic pain for a shorter amount of time and demonstrated less pain inhibition compared with men. This remained true even when accounting for sex differences in depressive symptoms and sleep quality. The results of this study suggest that women may be more pain sensitive and possess less-efficient endogenous pain inhibitory capacity compared with men. Whether interventions that decrease pain sensitivity and enhance pain inhibition in women ultimately improve their clinical pain outcomes is an area of research that deserves additional attention in the future. PMID:26170713

  20. Role of Kv 4.3 in vibration-induced muscle pain in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Lindsay; Alvarez, Pedro; Bogen, Oliver; Levine, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that changes in the expression of Kv4.3 contribute to the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by vibration injury, a rodent model for hand-arm vibration syndrome in humans. Here we show that the exposure of the gastrocnemius muscle to vibration injury induces muscle hyperalgesia that is accompanied by a significant down-regulation of Kv4.3 in affected sensory nerve fibers in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We additionally demonstrate that the intrathecal administration of antisense oligonucleotides for Kv4.3 mRNA itself induces muscle hyperalgesia in the rat. Our results suggest that attenuation in the expression of Kv4.3 may contribute to neuropathic pain in people affected by hand-arm vibration syndrome. PMID:26721612

  1. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength. PMID:27190430

  2. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength.

  3. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head and neck-shoulder muscles reproduces head pain features in children with chronic tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain pattern and areas from trigger points (TrPs) in head, neck, and shoulder muscles in children with chronic tension type headache (CTTH). Fifty children (14 boys, 36 girls, mean age: 8 ± 2) with CTTH and 50 age- and sex- matched children participated. Bilateral temporalis, masseter, superior oblique, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, and levator scapula muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the children's condition. TrPs were identified with palpation and considered active when local and referred pains reproduce headache pain attacks. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and also measured. The total number of TrPs was significantly greater in children with CTTH as compared to healthy children (P < 0.001). Active TrPs were only present in children with CTTH (P < 0.001). Within children with CTTH, a significant positive association between the number of active TrPs and headache duration (r (s) = 0.315; P = 0.026) was observed: the greater the number of active TrPs, the longer the duration of headache attack. Significant differences in referred pain areas between groups (P < 0.001) and muscles (P < 0.001) were found: the referred pain areas were larger in CTTH children (P < 0.001), and the referred pain area elicited by suboccipital TrPs was larger than the referred pain from the remaining TrPs (P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations between some headache clinical parameters and the size of the referred pain area were found. Our results showed that the local and referred pains elicited from active TrPs in head, neck and shoulder shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous CTTH in children, supporting a relevant role of active TrPs in CTTH in children.

  4. The Effect of Fibromyalgia and Widespread Pain on the Clinically Significant Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Pain Disorders - A Prospective 18-Month Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Velly, Ana Miriam; Look, John O.; Schiffman, Eric; Lenton, Patricia A.; Kang, Wenjun; Messner, Ronald P.; Holcroft, Christina A.; Fricton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Although most cases of Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) are mild and self-limiting, about 10% of TMJD patients develop severe disorders associated with chronic pain and disability. It has been suggested that fibromyalgia and widespread pain play a significant role in the Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) chronicity. This paper assessed the effects of fibromyalgia and widespread pain on clinically significant TMJD pain (GCPS II-IV). Four hundred eighty-five participants recruited from the Minneapolis/St. Paul area through media advertisements and local dentists received examinations and completed the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) at baseline and at 18th months. Baseline widespread pain (OR: 2.53, P=0.04) and depression (OR: 5.30, P=0.005) were associated with onset of clinically significant pain (GCPS II-IV) within 18 months after baseline. The risk associated with baseline fibromyalgia was moderate, but not significant (OR: 2.74, P=0.09). Persistence of clinically significant pain was related to fibromyalgia (OR: 2.48, P=0.02) and with depression (OR: 2.48, P=0.02). These results indicate that these centrally generated pain conditions play a role in the onset and persistence of clinically significant TMJD. PMID:20466595

  5. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period. PMID:26834359

  6. Influence of Polymorphisms in the HTR3A and HTR3B Genes on Experimental Pain and the Effect of the 5-HT3 Antagonist Granisetron

    PubMed Central

    Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Schalling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally if 5-HT3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) contribute to pain perception and efficacy of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron and sex differences. Sixty healthy participants were genotyped regarding HTR3A (rs1062613) and HTR3B (rs1176744). First, pain was induced by bilateral hypertonic saline injections (HS, 5.5%, 0.2 mL) into the masseter muscles. Thirty min later the masseter muscle on one side was pretreated with 0.5 mL granisetron (1 mg/mL) and on the other side with 0.5 mL placebo (isotonic saline) followed by another HS injection (0.2 mL). Pain intensity, pain duration, pain area and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed after each injection. HS evoked moderate pain, with higher intensity in the women (P = 0.023), but had no effect on PPTs. None of the SNPs influenced any pain variable in general, but compared to men, the pain area was larger in women carrying the C/C (HTR3A) (P = 0.015) and pain intensity higher in women with the A/C alleles (HTR3B) (P = 0.019). Pre-treatment with granisetron reduced pain intensity, duration and area to a lesser degree in women (P < 0.05), but the SNPs did not in general influence the efficacy of granisetron. Women carrying the C/T & T/T (HTR3A) genotype had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.041) and area (P = 0.005), and women with the C/C genotype (HTR3B) had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.030), duration (P = 0.030) and area compared to men (P = 0.017). In conclusion, SNPs did not influence experimental muscle pain or the effect of granisetron on pain variables in general, but there were some sex differences in pain variables that seem to be influenced by genotypes. However, due to the small sample size further research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:28002447

  7. Sex differences in experimental pain among healthy children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Birnie, Kathryn A; Caes, Line; Schinkel, Meghan; Chambers, Christine T

    2014-05-01

    Sex differences in response to experimental pain are commonly reported in systematic reviews in the adult literature. The objective of the present research was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of sex differences in healthy children's responses to experimental pain (e.g., cold pressor, heat pain, pressure pain) and, where possible, to conduct analyses separately for children and adolescents. A search was conducted of electronic databases for published papers in English of empirical research using experimental pain tasks to examine pain-related outcomes in healthy boys and girls between 0 and 18 years of age. Eighty articles were eligible for inclusion and were coded to extract information relevant to sex differences. The systematic review indicated that, across different experimental pain tasks, the majority of studies reported no significant differences between boys and girls on pain-related outcomes. However, the meta-analysis of available combined data found that girls reported significantly higher cold pressor pain intensity compared to boys in studies where the mean age of participants was greater than 12 years. Additionally, a meta-analysis of heat pain found that boys had significantly higher tolerance than girls overall, and boys had significantly higher heat pain threshold than girls in studies where the mean age of participants was 12 years or younger. These findings suggest that developmental stage may be relevant for understanding sex differences in pain.

  8. Assessment of knee joint pain in experimental rodent models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Piel, Margaret J; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Pain assessment in animal models of osteoarthritis is integral to interpretation of a model's utility in representing the clinical condition, and enabling accurate translational medicine. Here we describe two methods for behavioral pain assessments available for use in animal models of experimental osteoarthritic pain: Von Frey filaments and spontaneous activity monitoring.

  9. Posterior auricular pain caused by the trigger points in the sternocleidomastoid muscle aggravated by psychological factors -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Min, Sam Hong; Chang, Seong-Ho; Jeon, Se Keun; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Park, Ji-Yong; Shin, Hye Won

    2010-12-01

    Psychological factors play a significant role in the pain mechanism, and psychological approaches may be useful complements to traditional medical and surgical treatments in pain management. The authors report a case of recurrent severe posterior auricular pain caused by trigger points in the right sternocleidomastoid muscle and influenced by stressful psychological situations (e.g., family affairs, job loss) in a 50-year-old man.

  10. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482.

  11. Investigation of trunk muscle co-contraction and its association with low back pain development during prolonged sitting.

    PubMed

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Nairn, Brian C; Drake, Janessa D M

    2013-08-01

    Previous work has shown muscle activation differences between chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls in sitting postures, and between asymptomatic individuals who do (PDs: pain developers) and do not (NPDs: non-pain developers) develop transient back pain during prolonged standing (as determined using a visual analog scale). The current study aimed to investigate differences in trunk muscle co-contraction between PD and NPD individuals over 2h of prolonged sitting. Ten healthy males sat continuously for 2h while performing tasks that simulated computer-aided-drafting; four were classified as PDs, and six as NPDs. Co-contraction indices were calculated from EMG data collected from eight trunk muscles bilaterally, and compared between pain groups and over time. PDs exhibited higher levels of co-contraction than NPDs. Additionally, co-contraction tended to increase over time, and was significantly correlated to pain development. The relationship between co-contraction and back pain development may actually be circular, in that it is both causal and adaptive: high co-contraction initially predisposes to pain development, following which co-contraction further increases in an attempt to alleviate the pain, and the cycle perpetuates. Further work will be required to elucidate the exact nature of this relationship, and to confirm the generalizability to other populations.

  12. Muscle organization in individuals with and without pain and joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J C; Gonzalez, Y M; McCall, W D; Ohrbach, R; Marx, D B; Liu, H; Iwasaki, L R

    2012-06-01

    Central nervous system organization of masticatory muscles determines the magnitude of joint and muscle forces. Validated computer-assisted models of neuromuscular organization during biting were used to determine organization in individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Ninety-one individuals (47 women, 44 men) were assigned to one of four diagnostic groups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of pain (P) and bilateral temporomandibular joint disc displacement (DD). Electromyography and bite-forces were measured during right and left incisor and molar biting. Two three-dimensional models employing neuromuscular objectives of minimization of joint loads (MJL) or muscle effort (MME) simulated biting tasks. Evaluations of diagnostic group and gender effects on choice of best-fit model were by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests, evaluations of right-left symmetry were by Chi-square and Fisher's exact statistics, and evaluations of model accuracy were by within-subject linear regressions. MME was the best-fit during left molar biting in +DD individuals and incisor biting in men (all p < 0.03). Incisor biting symmetry in muscle organization was significantly higher (p < 0.03) in healthy individuals compared with those with TMD. Within-subject regressions showed that best-fit model errors were similar among groups: 8 to 15% (0.68 ≤ R(2) ≤ 0.74). These computer-assisted models predicted muscle organization during static biting in humans with and without TMDs.

  13. Muscle Organization in Individuals with and without Pain and Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J.C.; Gonzalez, Y.M.; McCall, W.D.; Ohrbach, R.; Marx, D.B.; Liu, H.; Iwasaki, L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system organization of masticatory muscles determines the magnitude of joint and muscle forces. Validated computer-assisted models of neuromuscular organization during biting were used to determine organization in individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Ninety-one individuals (47 women, 44 men) were assigned to one of four diagnostic groups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of pain (P) and bilateral temporomandibular joint disc displacement (DD). Electromyography and bite-forces were measured during right and left incisor and molar biting. Two three-dimensional models employing neuromuscular objectives of minimization of joint loads (MJL) or muscle effort (MME) simulated biting tasks. Evaluations of diagnostic group and gender effects on choice of best-fit model were by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests, evaluations of right-left symmetry were by Chi-square and Fisher’s exact statistics, and evaluations of model accuracy were by within-subject linear regressions. MME was the best-fit during left molar biting in +DD individuals and incisor biting in men (all p < 0.03). Incisor biting symmetry in muscle organization was significantly higher (p < 0.03) in healthy individuals compared with those with TMD. Within-subject regressions showed that best-fit model errors were similar among groups: 8 to 15% (0.68 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.74). These computer-assisted models predicted muscle organization during static biting in humans with and without TMDs. PMID:22522774

  14. Sex differences in parent and child pain ratings during an experimental child pain task.

    PubMed

    Moon, E C; Chambers, C T; Larochette, Anne-Claire; Hayton, K; Craig, K D; McGrath, P J

    2008-01-01

    Research in the field of pediatric pain has largely ignored the role of fathers in their children's pain experiences. The first objective of the present study was to examine the effect of the presence of mothers versus fathers on children's subjective ratings, facial expressions and physiological responses to acute pain. The second objective was to examine whether child and parent sex influence parents' proxy ratings of their children's pain. The final objective was to compare levels of agreement between mothers' and fathers' assessments of their children's pain. Participants included 73 children (37 boys, 36 girls), four to 12 years of age, along with 32 fathers and 41 mothers. Children undertook the cold pressor pain task while observed by one of their parents. During the task, the children's heart rates and facial expressions were recorded. Children provided self-reports and parents provided proxy reports of child pain intensity using the seven-point Faces Pain Scale. Neither child nor parent sex had a significant impact on children's subjective reports, facial expressions or heart rates in response to acute pain. Fathers gave their sons higher pain ratings than their daughters, whereas mothers' ratings of their sons' and daughters' pain did not differ. Kappa statistics and t tests revealed that fathers tended to be more accurate judges of their children's pain than mothers. Overall, this research highlights the importance of examining both parent and child sex differences in pediatric pain research.

  15. Neuromuscular electrostimulation techniques: historical aspects and current possibilities in treatment of pain and muscle waisting.

    PubMed

    Heidland, August; Fazeli, Gholamreza; Klassen, André; Sebekova, Katarina; Hennemann, Hans; Bahner, Udo; Di Iorio, Biagio

    2013-01-01

    ), acetylcholine and adenosine). The modern electrotherapy of neuromusculo- skeletal pain is based in particular on the following types: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS or electro-acupuncture) and spinal cord stimulation (SCS). In mild to moderate pain, TENS and PENS are effective methods, whereas SCS is very useful for therapy of refractory neuropathic or ischemic pain. In 2005, high tone external muscle stimulation (HTEMS) was introduced. In diabetic peripheral neuropathy, its analgesic action was more pronounced than TENS application. HTEMS appeared also to have value in the therapy of symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Besides its pain-relieving effect, electrical stimulation is of major importance for prevention or treatment of muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia. In controlled clinical studies electrical myostimulation (EMS) has been shown to be effective against the sarcopenia of patients with chronic congestive heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ESRD.

  16. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    PubMed

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology.

  17. Esophageal mucosal mast cell infiltration and changes in segmental smooth muscle contraction in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Park, S W; Lee, H; Lee, H J; Chung, H; Park, J C; Shin, S K; Lee, S K; Lee, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells release potent mediators that alter enteric nerve and smooth muscle functions and may contribute to the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The goal of this study was to determine if mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with smooth muscle segmental changes in esophageal contraction. All patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) were divided into two groups consisting of patients with non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain (FCP) according to the results of ambulatory 24 hours esophageal pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry. Pressure-volume (PV) was calculated by multiplying the length of the esophageal segment, duration of the contraction, and mean pressure over the entire space-time box (P mean). Quantification of mast cells was performed in five consecutive nonoverlapping immunostained sections. Spearman correlation analysis showed that the distal segment PV correlated with the mast cell count in all of the patients combined and in patients with FCP with correlation coefficients of 0.509 and 0.436, respectively (P = 0.004 and P = 0.042). Similar findings were observed for the segmental ratio of distal to proximal smooth muscle PV in all patients and in patients with FCP (correlation coefficients 0.566; P = 0.001 and correlation coefficients 0.525; P = 0.012, respectively). Mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with distal esophageal contraction as a key pathophysiologic factor of NCCP.

  18. Adult attachment and reports of pain in experimentally-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Nicole Emma; Meredith, Pamela Joy; Strong, Jenny

    2011-05-01

    Attachment theory has been proposed as a framework for understanding the development of chronic pain, with evidence supporting the overrepresentation of insecure attachment styles in chronic pain populations and links between insecure attachment and factors known to impact one's ability to cope with pain. The present study sought to extend two earlier studies exploring the relationships between adult attachment and communication of an acute pain experience, in anticipation of providing insight into individual differences in vulnerability in development of chronic pain. It was hypothesised that: (a) fearful attachment would be associated with perceptions of the pain as less intense, and (b) anxious attachment would be associated with lower pain thresholds. A convenience sample of 82 healthy adults completed self-report measures of attachment, neuroticism, and negative affect prior to taking part in a coldpressor pain inducement task. Results demonstrated that fearful attachment was associated with lower levels of pain intensity throughout the coldpressor task. In addition, dismissing attachment was also associated with less intense pain, as well as increased coldpressor endurance (tolerance) in the presence of a known assessor. These associations were retained after controlling for measures of neuroticism, negative affect, age, and social desirability. The results of this study are consistent with the proposition that fearful and dismissing individuals tend to mask their underlying distress caused by the pain experience, potentially leading to difficulties coping with pain over time.

  19. Effects of coping statements on experimental pain in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Roditi, Daniela; Robinson, Michael E; Litwins, Nola

    2009-08-19

    The present study measured the effects of catastrophizing self-statements and positive coping self-statements on cold pressor-induced pain. Participants were 58 adult chronic pain patients with current facial pain. It was hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to a decrease in pain endurance whereas positive coping would lead to an increase in pain endurance. It was also hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to an increase in peak pain intensity whereas positive coping would lead to a decrease in peak pain intensity. At pretest, participants submerged their nondominant hand in the cold pressor. Pain sensitivity ranges (PSR) were subsequently determined by calculating the difference between tolerance and threshold times. Ratings of peak pain intensity were measured using a pressure sensitive bladder/transducer. Participants underwent random assignment to either a catastrophizing group or a positive coping self-statement group. ANCOVA results revealed that on average, participants employing catastrophizing statements as a coping strategy experienced significantly lower PSR (M = 35.53, SD = 39.71) compared to participants employing positive coping self-statements (M = 73.70, SD = 86.14) when controlling for pretest PSR. Group assignment had no significant influence on peak pain intensity ratings. Thus, our results reveal that manipulation of coping causes changes in pain endurance.

  20. Stress in the Adult Rat Exacerbates Muscle Pain Induced by Early-Life Stress

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Early-life stress and exposure to stressful stimuli play a major role in the development of chronic widespread pain in adults. However, how they interact in chronic pain syndromes remains unclear. Methods Dams and neonatal litters were submitted to a restriction of nesting material (neonatal limited bedding, NLB) for one week. As adults, these rats were exposed to a painless sound stress protocol. The involvement of sympathoadrenal catecholamines, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) in nociception, was evaluated through of behavioral and ELISA assays, surgical interventions and intrathecal antisense treatments. Results Adult NLB rats exhibited mild muscle hyperalgesia, which was markedly aggravated by sound stress (peaking 15 days after exposure). Adrenal medullectomy did not modify hyperalgesia in NLB rats but prevented its aggravation by sound stress. Sustained administration of epinephrine to NLB rats mimicked sound stress effect. Intrathecal treatment with antisense directed to IL-6-receptor subunit gp130, but not to TNFα type 1 receptor (TNFR1), inhibited hyperalgesia in NLB rats. However, antisense against either gp130 or TNFR1 inhibited sound stress-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia. Compared to control rats, NLB rats exhibit increased plasma levels of IL-6 but decreased levels of TNFα, whereas sound stress increases IL-6 plasma levels in control but not in NLB rats. Conclusions Early-life stress induces a persistent elevation of IL-6, hyperalgesia and susceptibility to chronic muscle pain, which is unveiled by exposure to stress in adults. This probably depends on an interaction between adrenal catecholamines and pro-inflammatory cytokines acting at muscle nociceptor level. PMID:23706525

  1. Trunk muscle endurance and low back pain in female dance students.

    PubMed

    Swain, Christopher; Redding, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is often cited as a common condition at all levels of dance. Evidence suggests that reduced endurance of the trunk muscles can predispose an individual to LBP. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in trunk muscle endurance in a sample of tertiary level dance students with and without LBP. Seventeen full-time female dance students were divided into two groups: dance students with LBP (N = 11), and without LBP (N = 6). All participants provided informed consent, and the study was approved by an institutional ethics review board. Participants performed four isometric tests that assess trunk muscle endurance: the right and left side plank, double straight leg raise (DSLR), and the Sorensen test. A modified version of the Osaka City University test was used to assess the presence of LBP. A significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups was observed for the right and left side plank, as well as the DSLR test, and students with LBP displayed lower levels of endurance compared to those without. No other significant differences were found. This study offers some evidence that reduced trunk muscle endurance is present among dancers with LBP and provides direction for future research into back health among dancers.

  2. The Effects of Vibration and Muscle Fatigue on Trunk Sensorimotor Control in Low Back Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jacques; Nougarou, François; Normand, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in sensorimotor function and increased trunk muscle fatigability have been identified in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP). This study assessed the control of trunk force production in conditions with and without local erector spinae muscle vibration and evaluated the influence of muscle fatigue on trunk sensorimotor control. Methods Twenty non-specific cLBP patients and 20 healthy participants were asked to perform submaximal isometric trunk extension torque with and without local vibration stimulation, before and after a trunk extensor muscle fatigue protocol. Constant error (CE), variable error (VE) as well as absolute error (AE) in peak torque were computed and compared across conditions. Trunk extensor muscle activation during isometric contractions and during the fatigue protocol was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results Force reproduction accuracy of the trunk was significantly lower in the patient group (CE = 9.81 ± 2.23 Nm; AE = 18.16 ± 3.97 Nm) than in healthy participants (CE = 4.44 ± 1.68 Nm; AE = 12.23 ± 2.44 Nm). Local erector spinae vibration induced a significant reduction in CE (4.33 ± 2.14 Nm) and AE (13.71 ± 3.45 Nm) mean scores in the patient group. Healthy participants conversely showed a significant increase in CE (8.17 ± 2.10 Nm) and AE (16.29 ± 2.82 Nm) mean scores under vibration conditions. The fatigue protocol induced erector spinae muscle fatigue as illustrated by a significant decrease in sEMG median time-frequency slopes. Following the fatigue protocol, patients with cLBP showed significant decrease in sEMG root mean square activity at L4-5 level and responded in similar manner with and without vibration stimulation in regard to CE mean scores. Conclusions Patients with cLBP have a less accurate force reproduction sense than healthy participants. Local muscle vibration led to significant trunk neuromuscular control improvements in the cLBP patients before and after a muscle

  3. Sex, Gender, and Pain: A Review of Recent Clinical and Experimental Findings

    PubMed Central

    Fillingim, Roger B.; King, Christopher D.; Ribeiro-Dasilva, Margarete C.; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Riley, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Sex-related influences on pain and analgesia have become a topic of tremendous scientific and clinical interest, especially in the last 10 to 15 years. Members of our research group published reviews of this literature more than a decade ago, and the intervening time period has witnessed robust growth in research regarding sex, gender, and pain. Therefore, it seems timely to revisit this literature. Abundant evidence from recent epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrates that women are at substantially greater risk for many clinical pain conditions, and there is some suggestion that postoperative and procedural pain may be more severe among women than men. Consistent with our previous reviews, current human findings regarding sex differences in experimental pain indicate greater pain sensitivity among females compared with males for most pain modalities, including more recently implemented clinically relevant pain models such as temporal summation of pain and intramuscular injection of algesic substances. The evidence regarding sex differences in laboratory measures of endogenous pain modulation is mixed, as are findings from studies using functional brain imaging to ascertain sex differences in pain-related cerebral activation. Also inconsistent are findings regarding sex differences in responses to pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic pain treatments. The article concludes with a discussion of potential biopsychosocial mechanisms that may underlie sex differences in pain, and considerations for future research are discussed. Perspective This article reviews the recent literature regarding sex, gender, and pain. The growing body of evidence that has accumulated in the past 10 to 15 years continues to indicate substantial sex differences in clinical and experimental pain responses, and some evidence suggests that pain treatment responses may differ for women versus men. PMID:19411059

  4. Periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Long, Hu; Liao, Lina; Gao, Meiya; Ma, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2015-08-01

    Calcitonin-related gene peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in orofacial inflammatory pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Closed coil springs were used to deliver forces. Rats were euthanized on 0d, 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 14d following experimental tooth movement. Then, alveolar bones were obtained for immunostaining of periodontal tissues against CGRP. Two hours prior to euthanasia on each day, orofacial pain levels were assessed through rat grimace scale. CGRP and olcegepant (CGRP receptor antagonist) were injected into periodontal tissues to verify the roles of periodontal CGRP in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Periodontal CGRP expression levels and orofacial pain levels were elevated on 1d, 3d, 5d, and 7d following experimental tooth movement. The two indices were significantly correlated with each other and fitted into a dose-response model. Periodontal administration of CGRP could elevate periodontal CGRP expressions and exacerbate orofacial pain. Moreover, olcegepant administration could decrease periodontal CGRP expressions and alleviate orofacial pain. Therefore, periodontal CGRP plays an important role in pain transmission and modulation following experimental tooth movement. We suggest that it may participate in a positive feedback aiming to amplify orofacial pain signals.

  5. Experimental pain processing in individuals with cognitive impairment: current state of the science.

    PubMed

    Defrin, Ruth; Amanzio, Martina; de Tommaso, Marina; Dimova, Violeta; Filipovic, Sasa; Finn, David P; Gimenez-Llort, Lydia; Invitto, Sara; Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Oosterman, Joukje M; Petrini, Laura; Pick, Chaim G; Pickering, Gisele; Vase, Lene; Kunz, Miriam

    2015-08-01

    Cognitive impairment (CI) can develop during the course of ageing and is a feature of many neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Many individuals with CI have substantial, sustained, and complex health care needs, which frequently include pain. However, individuals with CI can have difficulty communicating the features of their pain to others, which in turn presents a significant challenge for effective diagnosis and treatment of their pain. Herein, we review the literature on responsivity of individuals with CI to experimental pain stimuli. We discuss pain responding across a large number of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders in which CI is typically present. Overall, the existing data suggest that pain processing is altered in most individuals with CI compared with cognitively intact matched controls. The precise nature of these alterations varies with the type of CI (or associated clinical condition) and may also depend on the type of pain stimulation used and the type of pain responses assessed. Nevertheless, it is clear that regardless of the etiology of CI, patients do feel noxious stimuli, with more evidence for hypersensitivity than hyposensitivity to these stimuli compared with cognitively unimpaired individuals. Our current understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning these alterations is limited but may be enhanced through the use of animal models of CI, which also exhibit alterations in nociceptive responding. Further research using additional behavioural indices of pain is warranted. Increased understanding of altered experimental pain processing in CI will facilitate the development of improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for pain in individuals with CI.

  6. Antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline on experimental inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Mariana L; Benevides, Verônica M; Sachs, Daniela; Brito, Gerly A C; da Rocha, Francisco A C; Poole, Stephen; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2004-01-01

    The antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline was investigated in three experimental pain models. Pentoxifylline (0.5–1.6 mg kg−1) given 30 min before the stimulus significantly inhibited the writhing response induced by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of either acetic acid (−90%) or zymosan (−83%), but not that of iloprost, in mice, as well as the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia in the zymosan arthritis in rats (−50%). Pentoxifylline also inhibited the mechanical hypernociception in rats induced by the intraplantar injection of either carrageenin (−81%), bradykinin (−56%) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α; −46%), but not that induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Pentoxifylline did not inhibit the nociceptive response in the hot plate test in mice. Further, the antinociceptive effect of pentoxifylline in the writhing test in mice and the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia were not reversed by the coadministration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Thus, pentoxifylline antinociceptive effect is probably not mediated at a central level. Pentoxifylline significantly reduced TNF-α (−43%) and IL-1β (−42%) concentrations in the joint exudates of rats stimulated by intra-articular injection of zymosan and the production of both cytokines (−66 and −86%, respectively) by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vivo with zymosan as well as the expression of TNF-α at the tissue level in carrageenin-injected rat paws. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of pentoxifylline is associated with the inhibition of the release of both TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:15520047

  7. Antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline on experimental inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Vale, Mariana L; Benevides, Verônica M; Sachs, Daniela; Brito, Gerly A C; da Rocha, Francisco A C; Poole, Stephen; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2004-12-01

    The antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline was investigated in three experimental pain models. Pentoxifylline (0.5-1.6 mg kg(-1)) given 30 min before the stimulus significantly inhibited the writhing response induced by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of either acetic acid (-90%) or zymosan (-83%), but not that of iloprost, in mice, as well as the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia in the zymosan arthritis in rats (-50%). Pentoxifylline also inhibited the mechanical hypernociception in rats induced by the intraplantar injection of either carrageenin (-81%), bradykinin (-56%) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha; -46%), but not that induced by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Pentoxifylline did not inhibit the nociceptive response in the hot plate test in mice. Further, the antinociceptive effect of pentoxifylline in the writhing test in mice and the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia were not reversed by the coadministration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Thus, pentoxifylline antinociceptive effect is probably not mediated at a central level. Pentoxifylline significantly reduced TNF-alpha (-43%) and IL-1beta (-42%) concentrations in the joint exudates of rats stimulated by intra-articular injection of zymosan and the production of both cytokines (-66 and -86%, respectively) by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vivo with zymosan as well as the expression of TNF-alpha at the tissue level in carrageenin-injected rat paws. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of pentoxifylline is associated with the inhibition of the release of both TNF-alpha and IL-1beta.

  8. Sex differences in pain: a brief review of clinical and experimental findings

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, E. J.; Fillingim, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent years have witnessed substantially increased research regarding sex differences in pain. The expansive body of literature in this area clearly suggests that men and women differ in their responses to pain, with increased pain sensitivity and risk for clinical pain commonly being observed among women. Also, differences in responsivity to pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain interventions have been observed; however, these effects are not always consistent and appear dependent on treatment type and characteristics of both the pain and the provider. Although the specific aetiological basis underlying these sex differences is unknown, it seems inevitable that multiple biological and psychosocial processes are contributing factors. For instance, emerging evidence suggests that genotype and endogenous opioid functioning play a causal role in these disparities, and considerable literature implicates sex hormones as factors influencing pain sensitivity. However, the specific modulatory effect of sex hormones on pain among men and women requires further exploration. Psychosocial processes such as pain coping and early-life exposure to stress may also explain sex differences in pain, in addition to stereotypical gender roles that may contribute to differences in pain expression. Therefore, this review will provide a brief overview of the extant literature examining sex-related differences in clinical and experimental pain, and highlights several biopsychosocial mechanisms implicated in these male–female differences. The future directions of this field of research are discussed with an emphasis aimed towards further elucidation of mechanisms which may inform future efforts to develop sex-specific treatments. PMID:23794645

  9. Prevalence of hyperactive digastric muscles during swallowing as measured by electromyography in patients with myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, L B; Last, F C; Salerno, V M

    1997-01-01

    One purpose of this clinical study is to establish a relationship between the hyper activity of the digastric muscles and predisposition of an individual to MPDS (myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome). If a population predisposed to MPD could be identified by an early diagnosis, intervention and treatment could eliminate potential pain in adulthood. Secondly, can the employment of electromyography to aid in the diagnosis of patients with MPD be helpful in establishing a program of prevention and treatment? Thirty-one patients, male and female, were randomly selected from among those routinely diagnosed as having myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome by the dental staff at the Long Island Center for Craniofacial Pain. Eighteen patients who did not experience any symptoms of facial pain comprised the control group in the study. This study demonstrated that the average trace readings which indicate the activity of the digastric muscles, as measured by the electromyogram from patients experiencing facial pain were significantly higher than those from patients without pain symptoms. In every instance, the correlation between facial pain and abnormal swallow patterns which are a cause of hyperactivity of the digastrics was confirmed.

  10. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J.; Giordano, James; Desai Dakoji, Kavita; Warmuth, Andrew; Daughtry, Cyndee; Schulz, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Primary pain disorders (formerly “functional pain syndromes”) are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition “chronic-on-acute pain.” We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1) rehabilitation; (2) integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3) psychology; and (4) normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy. PMID:27973405

  11. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints.

    PubMed

    Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J; Giordano, James; Desai Dakoji, Kavita; Warmuth, Andrew; Daughtry, Cyndee; Schulz, Craig A

    2016-12-10

    Primary pain disorders (formerly "functional pain syndromes") are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition "chronic-on-acute pain." We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1) rehabilitation; (2) integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3) psychology; and (4) normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy.

  12. Asians differ from non-Hispanic Whites in experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Lauren N; Mechlin, Beth; Ji, Ellen; Addamo, Michael; Girdler, Susan S

    2011-08-01

    This study examined differences between Asians and non-Hispanic Whites (Whites) in pain sensitivity, and its relationship to mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). In 30 Whites (50% female) and 30 Asians (50% female), experimental pain sensitivity was assessed with a hand cold pressor task, yielding measures of pain threshold, tolerance, intensity, and unpleasantness. Mean arterial pressure and HR measurements taken at rest and in response to speech stress were assessed. Perceived stress, anxiety, perfectionism, parental criticism, parental expectations and depressive symptoms were also measured. The results indicated that for the cold pain test, Asians demonstrated significantly lower pain threshold and tolerance levels than Whites. Although no ethnic differences were seen for MAP or HR responses to stress, for Whites higher stress MAP levels were correlated with reduced pain sensitivity, while for Asians higher baseline and stress HR levels were correlated with reduced pain sensitivity. Asians reported higher parental expectations and greater parental criticism than Whites. For Asians only, higher levels of perfectionism were related to more depressive symptoms, anxiety and perceived stress. These results indicate that Asian Americans are more sensitive to experimental pain than Whites and suggest ethnic differences in endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms (e.g. MAP and HR). The results may also have implications for understanding ethnic differences in clinical pain.

  13. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  14. Clinical Comparative Study: Efficacy and Tolerability of Tolperisone and Thiocolchicoside in Acute Low Back Pain and Spinal Muscle Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajeev; Panghate, Atul; Chandanwale, Ajay; Sardar, Indrajeet; Ghosh, Mriganka; Roy, Modan; Banerjee, Bireswar; Goswami, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We performed a multicentric, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg of Tolperisone thrice daily or 8 mg of Thiocolchicoside twice daily for 7 days. Purpose To assess the efficacy and tolerability of Tolperisone in comparison with Thiocolchicoside in the treatment of acute low back pain with spasm of spinal muscles. Overview of Literature No head on clinical trial of Tolperisone with Thiocolchicoside is available and so this study is done. Methods The assessment of muscle spasm was made by measuring the finger-to-floor distance (FFD), articular excursion in degrees on performing Lasegue's maneuver and modified Schober's test. Assessment of pain on movement and spontaneous pain (pain at rest) of the lumbar spine was made with the help of visual analogue scale score. Results The improvement in articular excursion on Lasegue's maneuver was significantly greater on day 3 (p = 0.017) and day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone as compared to Thiocolchicoside. The reduction in FFD score was greater on day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone. However there was no significant difference in improvement in Schober's test score on day 3 (p = 0.664) and day 7 (p = 0.192). The improvement in pain score at rest and on movement was significantly greater with Tolperisone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Tolperisone is an effective and well tolerated option for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle spasm associated with pain. PMID:22708015

  15. Spinal Disinhibition in Experimental and Clinical Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrew G; Lee-Kubli, Corinne; Azmi, Shazli; Zhang, Michael; Ferdousi, Maryam; Mixcoatl-Zecuatl, Teresa; Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Ponirakis, Georgios; Fineman, Mark S; Fadavi, Hassan; Frizzi, Katie; Tavakoli, Mitra; Jeziorska, Maria; Jolivalt, Corinne G; Boulton, Andrew J M; Efron, Nathan; Calcutt, Nigel A; Malik, Rayaz A

    2017-02-15

    Impaired rate dependent depression (RDD) of the Hoffman-reflex is associated with reduced dorsal spinal cord potassium chloride co-transporter expression and impaired spinal GABAA receptor function, indicative of spinal inhibitory dysfunction. We have investigated the pathogenesis of impaired RDD in diabetic rodents exhibiting features of painful neuropathy and the translational potential of this marker of spinal inhibitory dysfunction in human painful diabetic neuropathy. Impaired RDD and allodynia were present in type 1 and type 2 diabetic rats but not in rats with type 1 diabetes receiving insulin supplementation that did not restore normoglycemia. Impaired RDD in diabetic rats was rapidly normalized by spinal delivery of duloxetine acting via 5HT2A receptors and temporally coincident with the alleviation of allodynia. Deficits in RDD and corneal nerve density were demonstrated in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy when compared to healthy control subjects and patients with painless diabetic neuropathy. Spinal inhibitory dysfunction and peripheral small fibre pathology may contribute to the clinical phenotype in painful diabetic neuropathy. Deficits in RDD may help to identify patients with spinally mediated painful diabetic neuropathy who may respond optimally to therapies such as duloxetine.

  16. Is experimentally induced pain associated with socioeconomic status? Do poor people hurt more?

    PubMed Central

    Miljković, Ana; Stipčić, Ana; Braš, Marijana; Đorđević, Veljko; Brajković, Lovorka; Hayward, Caroline; Pavić, Arsen; Kolčić, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren

    2014-01-01

    Background The association of pain and socioeconomic status is widely reported, yet much less clearly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of experimentally induced pain threshold and tolerance with socioeconomic status. Material/Methods The study sample consisted of 319 adult subjects from the population of the island of Vis, Croatia, which was previously shown to have a high level of social homogeneity. A manual dolorimeter was used to measure mechanical pressure pain threshold (least stimulus intensity) and pain tolerance (maximum tolerance stimulus intensity) on both hands. Pain tolerance interval was defined as the difference between pain tolerance and threshold. Years of schooling and material status were used as socioeconomic estimates. Results Both of the socioeconomic estimates were significantly correlated with pain threshold, tolerance, and tolerance interval (P<0.001). The mixed modeling analysis, controlled for the effects of age, gender, and 4 psychological variables, indicated that education was not a significant predictor in any of the 3 models. However, lower material status was significantly associated with lower pain tolerance (P=0.038) and narrower pain tolerance interval (P=0.032), but not with pain threshold (P=0.506). The overall percentages of explained variance were lower in the tolerance interval model (20.2%) than in pain tolerance (23.1%) and threshold (33.1%), suggesting the increasing share of other confounding variables in pain tolerance and even more so in tolerance interval model. Conclusions These results suggest a significant association between experimentally induced pain tolerance and tolerance interval with material status, suggesting that poor people indeed do hurt more. PMID:25029965

  17. The effects of t’ai chi on muscle activity, pain, and balance in females in their 20s with acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jee-Hun; Cho, Tae-Yong; Cho, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted in order to examine the effects of t’ai chi on females in their 20s with acute low back pain. The subjects were 30 females in their 20s with acute low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] They were equally and randomly divided into a t’ai chi group and a stretching group. The intervention was applied three times per week, one hour each time, for a total of eight weeks. During the one hour, the subjects conducted warm-up exercises for 10 min, primary exercises for 40 min, and cool-down exercises for 10 min. In order to examine changes in low back pain in the patients according to the intervention method, muscle activity, pain, and balance elements (left and right side movement distance, forward and backward movement distance) were measured. [Results] Muscle activity and the visual analog scale score significantly decreased in both the t’ai chi group and the stretching group. Regarding changes in balance elements, the t’ai chi group’s left and right side movement distance decreased, which was statistically significant. However, the t’ai chi group’s forward and backward movement distance and the stretching group’s forward and backward movement distance and left and right side movement distance did not change. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, t’ai chi is considered an appropriate exercise program to reduce acute low back pain in females in their 20s. This is because when compared with stretching, it enables posture maintenance with lesser force due to decreased muscle activity, it is more helpful for improvements in balance ability, and it is effective in decreasing pain. PMID:25931717

  18. Effects of cervical deep muscle strengthening in a neck pain: a patient with klippel-feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify the effects of cervical deep muscle strengthening (CDS) on neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects was a 39 year-old woman with neck pain and KFS that included incomplete block vertebrae in the C2-3 segments and block vertebrae in the C6-7 segments. The subject performed an exercise program including cervical strengthening exercise (level 1) and CDS exercise (level 2) for 6 weeks. Neck pain intensity was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the pressure pain threshold (PPT). All measurements were obtained before and after the CDS exercise program. [Results] The VAS and PPT measurements decreased; range of motion in the cervical joint increased. [Conclusion] CDS exercises were effective interventions for reducing neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  19. Effects of Cervical Deep Muscle Strengthening in a Neck Pain: A Patient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify the effects of cervical deep muscle strengthening (CDS) on neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects was a 39 year-old woman with neck pain and KFS that included incomplete block vertebrae in the C2–3 segments and block vertebrae in the C6–7 segments. The subject performed an exercise program including cervical strengthening exercise (level 1) and CDS exercise (level 2) for 6 weeks. Neck pain intensity was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the pressure pain threshold (PPT). All measurements were obtained before and after the CDS exercise program. [Results] The VAS and PPT measurements decreased; range of motion in the cervical joint increased. [Conclusion] CDS exercises were effective interventions for reducing neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome. PMID:25540517

  20. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and conditions that cause pain and restrict motion. Neck pain causes include: Muscle strains. Overuse, such ... body then forms bone spurs that affect joint motion and cause pain. Nerve compression. Herniated disks or ...

  1. Effects of individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles on the nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint in a sedentary worker with nonspecific sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effects of individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles on the nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint in a sedentary worker with nonspecific sacroiliac joint pain. [Subject] A 36-year-old female complained of pain in the sacroiliac joints. [Methods] The subject performed individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles for nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint for 3 weeks. Pain-provocation tests and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were evaluated before and after the exercises. [Results] After performing the individual strengthening exercises for the erector spinae, rectus abdominis, and biceps femoris muscles for 3 weeks, the subject displayed no pain in the pain provocation tests, and the VAS score was 2/10. [Conclusion] The individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles of the sacroiliac joint performed in the present study appear to be effective for sedentary workers with sacroiliac joint pain.

  2. Tryptase - PAR2 axis in Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis, a model for Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Kenny; Done, Joseph D.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Murphy, Stephen F.; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) affects up to 15% of the male population and is characterized by pelvic pain. Mast cells are implicated in the murine experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) model as key to chronic pelvic pain development. The mast cell mediator tryptase-β and its cognate receptor protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) are involved in mediating pain in other visceral disease models. Prostatic secretions and urines from CP/CPPS patients were examined for the presence of mast cell degranulation products. Tryptase-β and PAR2 expression were examined in murine experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP). Pelvic pain and inflammation were assessed in the presence or absence of PAR2 expression and upon PAR2 neutralization. Tryptase-β and carboxypeptidase A3 were elevated in CP/CPPS compared to healthy volunteers. Tryptase-β was capable of inducing pelvic pain and was increased in EAP along with its receptor PAR2. PAR2 was required for the development of chronic pelvic pain in EAP. PAR2 signaling in dorsal root ganglia lead to ERK1/2 phosphorylation and calcium influx. PAR2 neutralization using antibodies attenuated chronic pelvic pain in EAP. The tryptase-PAR2 axis is an important mediator of pelvic pain in EAP and may play a role in the pathogenesis of CP/CPPS. PMID:24726923

  3. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  4. Antinociceptive Interaction of Tramadol with Gabapentin in Experimental Mononeuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Zanetta, Pilar; Castillo, Rodrigo; Aranda, Nicolás; Sierralta, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is the result of injury to the nervous system, and different animal models have been established to meet the manifestations of neuropathy. The pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain includes gabapentin and tramadol, but these are only partially effective when given alone. The aim of this study was to assess the antinociceptive interaction between both drugs using the isobolographic analysis and changes of the IL-1β concentration in a mouse model of neuropathic pain (partial sciatic nerve ligation or PSNL). The i.p. administration of gabapentin (5-100 mg/kg) or tramadol (12.5-100 mg/kg) displayed a dose-dependent antinociception in the hot plate assay of PSNL mice, and effects induced by gabapentin with tramadol were synergistic. Administration of gabapentin or tramadol reversed significantly the increase in the concentration of IL-1β induced by PSNL after either 7 or 14 days and their combination was significantly more potent in reversing the elevated concentration of IL-1β. The synergism obtained by the co-administration of gabapentin and tramadol is proposed to result from action on different mechanisms in pain pathways. Gabapentin or tramadol or their combination modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, in a model of mice PSNL which could be due to an inhibition of glial function.

  5. Flexion Relaxation Ratio Not Responsive to Acutely Induced Low Back Pain from a Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Maggie E.; Bishop, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) has been suggested as a measure of muscular performance in patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the FRR was responsive to acute LBP produced from a delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) protocol. Methods. Fifty-one pain-free volunteers performed DOMS to induce LBP. Current pain intensity, trunk flexion range of motion (ROM), and passive straight leg raise (SLR) were measured at baseline, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS. Participants were categorized into pain groups based on reported current pain intensity. Changes in FRR, trunk flexion ROM, and SLR ROM were examined using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results. Pain group was not found to have a significant effect on FRR (F1,29 = 0.054, P = 0.818), nor were there any two-way interactions for changes in FRR. The pain group had decreased trunk flexion ROM compared to the minimal pain group (F1,38 = 7.21, P = 0.011), but no decreases in SLR ROM (F1,38 = 3.51, P = 0.057) over time. Interpretation. There were no differences in FRR based on reported pain intensity of LBP from a DOMS protocol. The responsiveness of FRR might be limited in patients with acute onset LBP of muscular origin. PMID:27335879

  6. Experimenter Effects on Pain Reporting in Women Vary across the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Jacob M.; DiDomenico, Jared; Strenth, Chance; Coulombe, Patrick; Kruger, Eric; Mueller, Andrea A.; Guevara Beltran, Diego; Adams, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Separate lines of research have shown that menstrual cycling and contextual factors such as the gender of research personnel influence experimental pain reporting. Objectives. This study examines how brief, procedural interactions with female and male experimenters can affect experimentally reported pain (cold pressor task, CPT) across the menstrual cycle. Methods. Based on the menstrual calendars 94 naturally cycling women and 38 women using hormonal contraceptives (Mage = 19.83,  SD = 3.09) were assigned to low and high fertility groups. This assignment was based on estimates of their probability of conception given their current cycle day. Experimenters (12 males, 7 females) engaged in minimal procedural interactions with participants before the CPT was performed in solitude. Results. Naturally cycling women in the high fertility group showed significantly higher pain tolerance (81 sec, d = .79) following interactions with a male but not a female experimenter. Differences were not found for women in the low fertility or contraceptive groups. Discussion. The findings illustrate that menstrual functioning moderates the effect that experimenter gender has on pain reporting in women. Conclusion. These findings have implications for standardizing pain measurement protocols and understanding how basic biopsychosocial mechanisms (e.g., person-perception systems) can modulate pain experiences. PMID:25892990

  7. The effect of acute back muscle fatigue on postural control strategy in people with and without recurrent low back pain.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Ege; Brumagne, Simon; Janssens, Lotte; Pijnenburg, Madelon; Claeys, Kurt; Pääsuke, Mati

    2011-12-01

    Back muscle fatigue decreases the postural stability during quiet standing, but it is not known whether this fatigue-induced postural instability is due to an altered proprioceptive postural control strategy. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate if acute back muscle fatigue may be a mechanism to induce or sustain a suboptimal proprioceptive postural control strategy in people with and without recurrent low back pain (LBP). Postural sway was evaluated on a force platform in 16 healthy subjects and 16 individuals with recurrent LBP during a control (Condition 1) and a back muscle fatigue condition (Condition 2). Back muscle fatigue was induced by performing a modified Biering-Sørensen test. Ankle and back muscle vibration, a potent stimulus for muscle spindles, was used to differentiate proprioceptive postural control strategies during standing on a stable and unstable support surface, where the latter was achieved by placing a foam pad under the feet. Ankle signals were predominantly used for postural control in all subjects although, in each condition, their influence was greater in people with LBP compared to healthy subjects (p < 0.001). The latter group adapted their postural control strategy when standing on an unstable surface so that input from back muscles increased (p < 0.001). However, such adaptation was not observed when the back muscles were fatigued. Furthermore, people with LBP continued to rely strongly on ankle proprioception regardless of the testing conditions. In conclusion, these findings suggest that impaired back muscle function, as a result of acute muscle fatigue or pain, may lead to an inability to adapt postural control strategies to the prevailing conditions.

  8. Clinical pharmacology of analgesics assessed with human experimental pain models: bridging basic and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Bruno Georg; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    The medical impact of pain is such that much effort is being applied to develop novel analgesic drugs directed towards new targets and to investigate the analgesic efficacy of known drugs. Ongoing research requires cost-saving tools to translate basic science knowledge into clinically effective analgesic compounds. In this review we have re-examined the prediction of clinical analgesia by human experimental pain models as a basis for model selection in phase I studies. The overall prediction of analgesic efficacy or failure of a drug correlated well between experimental and clinical settings. However, correct model selection requires more detailed information about which model predicts a particular clinical pain condition. We hypothesized that if an analgesic drug was effective in an experimental pain model and also a specific clinical pain condition, then that model might be predictive for that particular condition and should be selected for development as an analgesic for that condition. The validity of the prediction increases with an increase in the numbers of analgesic drug classes for which this agreement was shown. From available evidence, only five clinical pain conditions were correctly predicted by seven different pain models for at least three different drugs. Most of these models combine a sensitization method. The analysis also identified several models with low impact with respect to their clinical translation. Thus, the presently identified agreements and non-agreements between analgesic effects on experimental and on clinical pain may serve as a solid basis to identify complex sets of human pain models that bridge basic science with clinical pain research. PMID:23082949

  9. Effects of restricted environmental stimulation: enhancement of hypnotizability for experimental and chronic pain control.

    PubMed

    Barabasz, A F; Barabasz, M

    1989-07-01

    Enhancement of hypnotizability and pain tolerance has been demonstrated using restricted environmental stimulation therapy (REST) with university students as Ss (A. F. Barabasz, 1982). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not similar results could be obtained with chronic pain patients. Ss consisted of outpatients in treatment for conditions in which pain is prominent who also demonstrated low hypnotizability after repeated hypnosis plateau sessions. 2 groups of Ss were exposed to REST. Situational demand characteristics (Orne, 1962) favored an increase in hypnotizability for REST Group 1 (high demand). REST Group 2 (low demand) was exposed to situational demand characteristics designed to disguise the experimental hypothesis. 2 groups of control Ss were exposed to the same alternative demand characteristic manipulations as the experimental groups, but environmental stimulation was maintained. The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) of Weitzenhoffer and E. R. Hilgard (1962), including a posthypnotic suggestion for an anesthetic reaction, and an ischemic pain test were administered prior to treatment and again immediately following treatment. After 6 hours of REST, significant increases in SHSS:C scores were found for high-demand and low-demand experimental Ss, as well as for high-demand control Ss. No such increase was found for low-demand controls. Significant decreases in pain scores were found for both high- and low-demand experimental groups. No significant pain score decreases were found for either control group, suggesting a relatively weak effect of demand characteristics. An independent postexperimental inquiry suggested all Ss believed they received active treatments. The inquiry, conducted 10-15 days after the experiment, also revealed a majority of experimental Ss were using hypnosis on a daily basis to reduce pain with a substantial decrease in pain medication. Only 2 control Ss (highest in hypnotizability

  10. Change in trunk muscle activities with prone bridge exercise in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong-soo; Park, Seol; Kweon, Mi-Gyong; Park, Ji-won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three different bridge exercises on internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and erector spinae activities. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five subjects with chronic low back pain participated in this study. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: supine bridge exercise, supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and prone bridge exercise. The activities of the transverse abdominis, internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. [Results] There were significant differences in the internal oblique, external oblique, and erector spinae according to the three kinds of bridging exercises. The internal oblique, external oblique and transverse abdominis activities were highest in the prone bridge exercise, followed by those in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and supine bridge exercises. The activity of erector spine was highest in the supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise followed by the supine bridge exercise and prone bridge exercise. [Conclusion] These results suggest that prone bridge exercise is more effective than conventional supine bridge exercise and supine bridge on Swiss ball in increasing trunk muscle activity of chronic low back pain patients. PMID:26957771

  11. Effect of opioid administration on cardiorespiratory and muscle oxygenation during lifting in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Yagesh; Gross, Douglas P; Haykowsky, Mark; Rashiq, Saifudin

    2010-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of opioid administration on the acute cardiorespiratory and muscle oxygenation responses during a repetitive lifting and lowering test (RLL) to voluntary fatigue in participants with chronic low back pain (LBP). Written informed consent was obtained from 27 LBP participants (mean age 50.9 +/- 16.4 years) who completed one testing session during which they were administered a saline placebo and opioid (1 microg/kg of fentanyl intravenously) in random order. The participants performed the RLL at a rate that they felt that they could sustain for an 8-h working day. Acute opioid administration increased the total lifting time and total work done during RLL by 35 and 48%, respectively (p < 0.05). However, the increased work capacity was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.05) increase in oxygen cost of 22% per unit amount of work done and significant (p < 0.05) increases in heart rate (7%) and ventilation rate (10%). Near infrared spectroscopic analysis of erector spinae oxygenation and blood volume responses during RLL indicated no significant (p > 0.05) differences between the opioid and placebo phases. These findings suggest that the increased energy cost of lifting as a result of opioid administration was due to enhanced central oxygen transport and not peripheral muscle oxygen extraction.

  12. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  13. Effects of exercise-induced low back pain on intrinsic trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflexes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily M; Bazrgari, Babak; Nussbaum, Maury A; Madigan, Michael L

    2013-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to (1) compare trunk neuromuscular behavior between individuals with no history of low back pain (LBP) and individuals who experience exercise-induced LBP (eiLBP) when pain free, and (2) investigate changes in trunk neuromuscular behavior with eiLBP. Seventeen young adult males participated including eight reporting recurrent, acute eiLBP and nine control participants reporting no history of LBP. Intrinsic trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex delay were determined in both groups using sudden trunk flexion position perturbations 1-2 days following exercise when the eiLBP participants were experiencing an episode of LBP (termed post-exercise) and 4-5 days following exercise when eiLBP had subsided (termed post-recovery). Post-recovery, when the eiLBP group was experiencing minimal LBP, trunk stiffness was 26% higher in the eiLBP group compared to the control group (p=0.033) and reflex delay was not different (p=0.969) between groups. Trunk stiffness did not change (p=0.826) within the eiLBP group from post-exercise to post-recovery, but decreased 22% within the control group (p=0.002). Reflex delay decreased 11% within the eiLBP group from post-exercise to post-recovery (p=0.013), and increased 15% within the control group (p=0.006). Although the neuromuscular mechanisms associated with eiLBP and chronic LBP may differ, these results suggest that previously-reported differences in trunk neuromuscular behavior between individuals with chronic LBP and healthy controls reflect a combination of inherent differences in neuromuscular behavior between these individuals as well as changes in neuromuscular behavior elicited by pain.

  14. Exercise-induced pain intensity predicted by pre-exercise fear of pain and pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D; Horn, Maggie E; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our primary goals were to determine whether pre-existing fear of pain and pain sensitivity contributed to post-exercise pain intensity. Methods Delayed onset muscle pain was induced in the trunk extensors of 60 healthy volunteers using an exercise paradigm. Levels of fear of pain and experimental pain sensitivity were measured before exercise. Pain intensity in the low back was collected at 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. Participants were grouped based on pain intensity. Group membership was used as the dependent variable in separate regression models for 24 and 48 hours. Predictor variables included fear, pain sensitivity, torque lost during the exercise protocol, and demographic variables. Results The final models predicting whether a participant reported clinically meaningful pain intensity at 24 hours only included baseline fear of pain at each level of pain intensity tested. The final model at 48 hours included average baseline pain sensitivity and the loss of muscle performance during the exercise protocol for one level of pain intensity tested (greater than 35mm out of 100). Discussion Combined, these findings suggest that the initial reports of pain after injury maybe more strongly influenced by fear while the inflammatory process and pain sensitivity may play a larger role for later pain intensity reports. PMID:21415719

  15. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    PubMed Central

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  16. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Chantal HP; Heuvel, Sylvia P van den; Staal, J Bart; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien CM; Hendriks, Erik JM

    2008-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle strength or endurance in patients with non-specific neck pain, which can be used in daily practice. Methods A computerised literature search was performed in the Medline, CINAHL and Embase databases from 1980 to January 2007. Two reviewers independently assessed the clinimetric properties of identified measurement methods, using a checklist of generally accepted criteria for reproducibility (inter- and intra-observer reliability and agreement), construct validity, responsiveness and feasibility. Results The search identified a total of 16 studies. The instruments or tests included were: muscle endurance tests for short neck flexors, craniocervical flexion test with an inflatable pressure biofeedback unit, manual muscle testing of neck musculature, dynamometry and functional lifting tests (the cervical progressive iso-inertial lifting evaluation (PILE) test and the timed weighted overhead test). All the articles included report information on the reproducibility of the tests. Acceptable intra- and inter-observer reliability was demonstrated for t enduranctest for short neck flexors and the cervical PILE test. Construct validity and responsiveness have hardly been documented for tests on muscle functioning. Conclusion The endurance test of the short neck flexors and the cervical PILE test can be regarded as appropriate instruments for measuring different aspects of neck muscle function in patients with non-specific neck pain. Common methodological flaws in the studies were their small sample size and an inappropriate description of the study design. PMID:18928568

  17. Myofascial pain of the jaw muscles: comparison of short-term effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections and fascial manipulation technique.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Stecco, Antonio; Stecco, Carla; Masiero, Stefano; Manfredini, Daniele

    2012-04-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the short-term effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections and physiatric treatment provided by means of Fascial Manipulation techniques in the management of myofascial pain of jaw muscles. Thirty patients with a Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) diagnosis of myofascial pain were randomized to receive either single-session botulinum toxin injections (Group A) or multiple-session Fascial Manipulation (Group B). Maximum pain levels (VAS ratings) and jaw range of motion in millimeters (maximum mouth opening, protrusion, right and left laterotrusion) were assessed at baseline, at the end of treatment, and at a three-month follow-up. Both treatment protocols provided significant improvement over time for pain symptoms. The two treatments seem to be almost equally effective, Fascial Manipulation being slightly superior to reduce subjective pain perception, and botulinum toxin injections being slightly superior to increase jaw range of motion. Differences between the two treatment protocols as to changes in the outcome parameters at the three-months follow-up were not relevant clinically. Findings from the present investigation are in line with literature data supporting the effectiveness of a wide spectrum of conservative treatment approaches to myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. Future studies on larger samples over a longer follow-up span are needed on the way to identify tailored treatment strategies.

  18. Sex differences in how social networks and relationship quality influence experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Rowell, Lauren N; Chouteau, Simone; Chavez, Alexandre; Jaramillo, Elisa; Neal, Michael; Waid, David

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to examine how both structural and functional components of individuals' social networks may moderate the association between biological sex and experimental pain sensitivity. One hundred and fifty-two healthy adults (mean age = 22yrs., 53% males) were measured for cold pressor task (CPT) pain sensitivity (i.e., intensity ratings) and core aspects of social networks (e.g., proportion of friends vs. family, affection, affirmation, and aid). Results showed consistent sex differences in how social network structures and intimate relationship functioning modulated pain sensitivity. Females showed higher pain sensitivity when their social networks consisted of a higher proportion of intimate types of relationship partners (e.g., kin vs. non kin), when they had known their network partners for a longer period of time, and when they reported higher levels of logistical support from their significant other (e.g., romantic partner). Conversely, males showed distinct patterns in the opposite direction, including an association between higher levels of logistical support from one's significant other and lower CPT pain intensity. These findings show for the first time that the direction of sex differences in exogenous pain sensitivity is likely dependent on fundamental components of the individual's social environment. The utility of a social-signaling perspective of pain behaviors for examining, comparing, and interpreting individual and group differences in experimental and clinical pain reports is discussed.

  19. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Sergio M.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J. C.; Vignoli, Josiane A.; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  20. Social comparison performance standards, threat, and tolerance for experimentally-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Todd; Phillips, Heath

    2011-11-01

    Social modelling experiments have illustrated how upward social comparisons (i.e., observing pain tolerant role models) can facilitate tolerance relative to downward social comparison (i.e., observing pain intolerant alternatives). However, because clinical studies suggest that people prefer to make downward social comparisons with less fortunate others when they are threatened or overwhelmed with pain or illness, it seems plausible that upward social comparisons confer fewer benefits when pain is appraised as threatening. To address this issue, we assessed effects of verbally-presented upward and downward social comparison standards on tolerance for cold pressor pain among 124 Australian adults (44 men, 80 women) primed with either more or less threatening orienting information about task-related pain sensations. As predicted, participants exposed to the lower threat orienting prime and upward comparison performance standard were significantly more pain tolerant than peers in all other conditions. Conversely, the average tolerance time for participants presented with the higher threat orienting prime and upward comparison standard did not differ from that of either downward comparison group. The research highlighted powerful situational influences on tolerance for experimental pain and identified conditions under which verbally-presented upward social comparison standards may facilitate and hinder the capacity to bear pain.

  1. Tryptase-PAR2 axis in experimental autoimmune prostatitis, a model for chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roman, Kenny; Done, Joseph D; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Murphy, Stephen F; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) affects up to 15% of the male population and is characterized by pelvic pain. Mast cells are implicated in the murine experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) model as key to chronic pelvic pain development. The mast cell mediator tryptase-β and its cognate receptor protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) are involved in mediating pain in other visceral disease models. Prostatic secretions and urines from CP/CPPS patients were examined for the presence of mast cell degranulation products. Tryptase-β and PAR2 expression were examined in murine EAP. Pelvic pain and inflammation were assessed in the presence or absence of PAR2 expression and upon PAR2 neutralization. Tryptase-β and carboxypeptidase A3 were elevated in CP/CPPS compared to healthy volunteers. Tryptase-β was capable of inducing pelvic pain and was increased in EAP along with its receptor PAR2. PAR2 was required for the development of chronic pelvic pain in EAP. PAR2 signaling in dorsal root ganglia led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation and calcium influx. PAR2 neutralization using antibodies attenuated chronic pelvic pain in EAP. The tryptase-PAR2 axis is an important mediator of pelvic pain in EAP and may play a role in the pathogenesis of CP/CPPS.

  2. Peripheral sensory neuron injury contributes to neuropathic pain in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ching; Chung, Chen-Yen; Liao, Fang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS)-induced neuropathic pain deteriorates quality of life in patients but is often refractory to treatment. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS, animals develop neuropathy and inflammation-induced tissue acidosis, which suggests the involvement of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Also, peripheral neuropathy is reported in MS patients. However, the involvement of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in MS neuropathic pain remains elusive. This study investigated the contribution of ASICs and peripheral neuropathy in MS-induced neuropathic pain. Elicited pain levels were as high in Asic1a−/−, Asic2−/− and Asic3−/− mice as wild-type mice even though only Asic1a−/− mice showed reduced EAE disease severity, which indicates that pain in EAE was independent of disease severity. We thus adopted an EAE model without pertussis toxin (EAEnp) to restrain activated immunity in the periphery and evaluate the PNS contribution to pain. Both EAE and EAEnp mice showed similar pain behaviors and peripheral neuropathy in nerve fibers and DRG neurons. Moreover, pregabalin significantly reduced neuropathic pain in both EAE and EAEnp mice. Our findings highlight the essential role of the PNS in neuropathic pain in EAE and pave the way for future development of analgesics without side effects in the CNS. PMID:28181561

  3. Individuals with chronic low back pain do not modulate the level of transversus abdominis muscle contraction across different postures.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takuya; Yamanaka, Masanori; Ukishiro, Kengo; Tohyama, Harukazu; Saito, Hiroshi; Samukawa, Mina; Kobayashi, Takumi; Ino, Takumi; Takeda, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) muscle in three basic postures in subjects with and without chronic low back pain. Subjects were classified into a chronic low back pain group (n = 27) and a healthy control group (n = 23). The thickness of the TrA muscle was measured at rest and during the abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) in supine, sitting and standing postures using B-mode ultrasound imaging. Contraction ratio (TrA thickness during the ADIM/TrA thickness at rest) was calculated for each posture. At rest, the TrA thickness in the sitting and standing postures was significantly greater than in the supine posture (p < 0.017) in the control group, but similar in all three postures in the low back pain group. TrA thickness was similar in the low back pain and control group in all three postures. During the ADIM, TrA thickness was significantly greater in the control group than in the chronic low back pain group in all three postures. The contraction ratio was also significantly higher in the control group than in the chronic low back pain group in all three postures. These results indicate that the automatic postural contraction of the TrA observed in the control subjects in the sitting and standing postures was not demonstrated in subjects with chronic low back pain. The present study revealed the one aspect of different response of the TrA muscle to changing posture between two groups.

  4. Isokinetic imbalance of adductor-abductor hip muscles in professional soccer players with chronic adductor-related groin pain.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, K; Meftah, S; Mahir, L; Lmidmani, F; Elfatimi, A

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to compare the isokinetic profile of hip abductor and adductor muscle groups between soccer players suffering from chronic adductor-related groin pain (ARGP), soccer players without ARGP and healthy volunteers from general population. Study included 36 male professional soccer players, who were randomly selected and followed-up over two years. Of the 21 soccer players eligible to participate in the study, 9 players went on to develop chronic ARGP and 12 players did not. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly selected from the general population as a control group. Comparison between the abductor and adductor muscle peak torques for players with and without chronic ARGP found a statistically significant difference on the dominant and non-dominant sides (p < .005), with the abductor muscle significantly stronger than the adductor muscle. In the group of healthy volunteers, the adductor muscle groups were significantly stronger than the abductor muscle groups on both dominant and non-dominant sides (p < .05). For the group of players who had developed chronic ARGP, abductor-adductor torque ratios were significantly higher on the affected side (p = .008). The adductor muscle strength was also significantly decreased on the affected side. This imbalance appears to be a risk factor for adductor-related groin injury. Therefore, restoring the correct relationship between these two agonist and antagonist hip muscles may be an important preventative measure that should be a primary concern of training and rehabilitation programmes.

  5. Demonstration of Muscle Injury in Experimental Bullet Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    was immersed in a freshly prepared alcoholic solution of saturated Bromothymol blue (4 mgms % BDH stain in 70% alcohol) 1 for 15 minutes at room...surrounding the missile track in which the muscle fibres stain blue with Giemsa in contrast with the pink staining of normal fibres. Further work...demonstrated that this blue staining seen microscopically was associated with structural changes in muscle fibres (Hopkinson 1964). This resuilt was

  6. The relationship between superficial muscle activity during the cranio-cervical flexion test and clinical features in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Shaun; Falla, Deborah; Jull, Gwendolen

    2011-10-01

    Changes in motor behavior are a known feature of chronic mechanical neck pain disorders. This study examined the strength of the association between reported levels of pain and disability from 84 individuals (63 women, 21 men) with chronic mechanical neck pain and levels of electromyographic activity recorded from superficial cervical flexor (sternocleidomastoid; SCM and anterior scalene; AS) muscles during progressive stages of the cranio-cervical flexion muscle test. A significant positive association was observed between superficial muscle activity and pain intensity (P < 0.003), but not pain duration (P > 0.5) or perceived disability (P > 0.21). The strongest relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity occurred at the final increment of the cranio-cervical flexion test (inner-range test position) for both the SCM and AS muscles (R(2) = 0.16). Although a positive and significant relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity was shown, the relationship was only modest (16% explained variance), indicating that multiple factors contribute to the altered motor function observed in individuals with chronic mechanical neck pain.

  7. Dry Needling Alters Trigger Points in the Upper Trapezius Muscle and Reduces Pain in Subjects with Chronic Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Lynn H.; Shah, Jay; Rosenberger, William; Armstrong, Kathryn; Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Heimur, Juliana; Thaker, Nikki; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether dry needling of an active myofascial trigger point (MTrP) reduces pain and alters the status of the trigger point to either a non-spontaneously tender nodule or its resolution. Design A prospective, non-randomized, controlled interventional clinical study Setting University campus Participants Fifty-six subjects with neck or shoulder girdle pain > 3 months duration and active MTrPs were recruited from a campus-wide, volunteer sample. Fifty-two completed the study (23 male/33 female) with mean age of 35.8 years. Interventions Three weekly dry needling treatments of a single active MTrP Main Outcome Measures Primary Outcomes: Baseline and post treatment evaluations of pain using the verbal analogue scale, the Brief Pain Inventory and the status of the MTrP as determined by digital palpation. Trigger points were rated: active (spontaneously painful), latent (requiring palpation to reproduce the characteristic pain) and resolved (no palpable nodule). Secondary Outcomes: Profile of Mood States, Oswestry Disability Index, Short Form 36, Cervical Range of Motion. Results Primary outcomes: 41 subjects had a change in trigger point status from active to latent or resolved; and 11 had no change (p < .001). Reduction in all pain scores was significant (p<.001). Secondary outcomes: significant improvement in post-treatment cervical rotational asymmetry in subjects with unilateral/bilateral MTrPs (p=.001, p=21, respectively); in pain pressure threshold in subjects with unilateral/bilateral MTrPs, (p=.006, p=.012), respectively; improvement in the SF-36 mental health and physical functioning subscales (p=.019, p=.03) respectively; decrease in the Oswestry disability scale (p=.003). Conclusions Dry needling reduces pain and changes MTrP status. Change in trigger point status is associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in pain. Reduction in pain is associated with improved mood, function and level of disability. PMID

  8. Gender role affects experimental pain responses: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Tabasam, G; Johnson, M I

    2012-10-01

    Gender role refers to the culturally and socially constructed meanings that describe how women and men should behave in certain situations according to feminine and masculine roles learned throughout life. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between gender role and experimental pain responses in healthy human participants. We searched computerized databases for studies published between January 1950 and May 2011 that had measured gender role in healthy human adults and pain response to noxious stimuli. Studies were entered into a meta-analysis if they calculated a correlation coefficient (r) for gender role and experimental pain. Searches yielded 4465 'hits' and 13 studies were eligible for review. Sample sizes were 67-235 participants and the proportion of female participants was 45-67%. Eight types of gender role instrument were used. Meta-analysis of six studies (406 men and 539 women) found a significant positive correlation between masculine and feminine personality traits and pain threshold and tolerance, with a small effect size (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Meta-analysis of four studies (263 men and 297 women) found a significant negative correlation between gender stereotypes specific to pain and pain threshold and tolerance, with a moderate effect size (r = -0.41, p < 0.001). In conclusion, individuals who considered themselves more masculine and less sensitive to pain than the typical man showed higher pain thresholds and tolerances. Gender stereotypes specific to pain scales showed stronger associations with sex differences in pain sensitivity response than masculine and feminine personality trait scales.

  9. No effect of a single session of transcranial direct current stimulation on experimentally induced pain in patients with chronic low back pain--an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Luedtke, Kerstin; May, Arne; Jürgens, Tim P

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical excitability. A small number of studies suggested that tDCS modulates the response to experimental pain paradigms. No trials have been conducted to evaluate the response of patients already suffering from pain, to an additional experimental pain before and after tDCS. The present study investigated the effect of a single session of anodal, cathodal and sham stimulation (15 mins/1 mA) over the primary motor cortex on the perceived intensity of repeated noxious thermal and electrical stimuli and on elements of quantitative sensory testing (thermal pain and perception thresholds) applied to the right hand in 15 patients with chronic low back pain. The study was conducted in a double-blind sham-controlled and cross-over design. No significant alterations of pain ratings were found. Modalities of quantitative sensory testing remained equally unchanged. It is therefore hypothesized that a single 15 mins session of tDCS at 1 mA may not be sufficient to alter the perception of experimental pain and in patients with chronic pain. Further studies applying repetitive tDCS to patients with chronic pain are required to fully answer the question whether experimental pain perception may be influenced by tDCS over the motor cortex.

  10. No Effect of a Single Session of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Experimentally Induced Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain – An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Luedtke, Kerstin; May, Arne; Jürgens, Tim P.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical excitability. A small number of studies suggested that tDCS modulates the response to experimental pain paradigms. No trials have been conducted to evaluate the response of patients already suffering from pain, to an additional experimental pain before and after tDCS. The present study investigated the effect of a single session of anodal, cathodal and sham stimulation (15 mins/1 mA) over the primary motor cortex on the perceived intensity of repeated noxious thermal and electrical stimuli and on elements of quantitative sensory testing (thermal pain and perception thresholds) applied to the right hand in 15 patients with chronic low back pain. The study was conducted in a double-blind sham-controlled and cross-over design. No significant alterations of pain ratings were found. Modalities of quantitative sensory testing remained equally unchanged. It is therefore hypothesized that a single 15 mins session of tDCS at 1 mA may not be sufficient to alter the perception of experimental pain and in patients with chronic pain. Further studies applying repetitive tDCS to patients with chronic pain are required to fully answer the question whether experimental pain perception may be influenced by tDCS over the motor cortex. PMID:23189136

  11. Deltoid muscle injury scratched by an osteophyte on the greater tuberosity of the humeral head: an unusual cause of shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong-Ik; Park, Jong-Hoon; Jung, Tae-Wan; Jeon, Jin-Ho; Jeong, Woong-Kyo

    2015-09-01

    Few reports to date have discussed acute deltoid muscle injury, including partial or complete deltoid muscle detachment from its origin. The present report describes a different pathomechanism and clinical manifestations of deltoid muscle injury. A 52-year-old man experienced acute severe pain in the right shoulder as a result of abrupt elevation of the arm. The deltoid muscle had apparently been scratched by an osteophyte on the greater tuberosity. After arthroscopic excision of the osteophyte, the symptoms resolved completely.

  12. Reduced task-induced variations in the distribution of activity across back muscle regions in individuals with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Falla, Deborah; Gizzi, Leonardo; Tschapek, Marika; Erlenwein, Joachim; Petzke, Frank

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated change in the distribution of lumbar erector spinae muscle activity and pressure pain sensitivity across the low back in individuals with low back pain (LBP) and healthy controls. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from multiple locations over the lumbar erector spinae muscle with a 13×5 grid of electrodes from 19 people with chronic nonspecific LBP and 17 control subjects as they performed a repetitive lifting task. The EMG root mean square (RMS) was computed for each location of the grid to form a map of the EMG amplitude distribution. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded before and after the lifting task over a similar area of the back. For the control subjects, the EMG RMS progressively increased more in the caudal region of the lumbar erector spinae during the repetitive task, resulting in a shift in the distribution of muscle activity. In contrast, the distribution of muscle activity remained unaltered in the LBP group despite an overall increase in EMG amplitude. PPT was lower in the LBP group after completion of the repetitive task compared to baseline (average across all locations: pre: 268.0±165.9 kPa; post: 242.0±166.7 kPa), whereas no change in PPT over time was observed for the control group (320.1±162.1 kPa; post: 322.0±179.5 kPa). The results demonstrate that LBP alters the normal adaptation of lumbar erector spinae muscle activity to exercise, which occurs in the presence of exercise-induced hyperalgesia. Reduced variability of muscle activity may have important implications for the provocation and recurrence of LBP due to repetitive tasks.

  13. Effects of a therapeutic climbing program on muscle activation and SF-36 scores of patients with lower back pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hun; Seo, Dong-Yel

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stability exercises on chronic lower back pain by using a therapeutic climbing program on lumbar muscle activity and function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult subjects with chronic back pain participated. The subjects were assigned to 2 exercise groups, namely the lumbar stabilization (Mat Ex) and therapeutic climbing exercise groups (TC Ex). Each group trained for 30 minutes, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Short-form 36-item Questionnaire (SF-36) was administered and the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activities of the lumbar muscles were measured. [Results] Both therapy groups showed significant increases in the SF-36 score, and the increase was greater in the TC Ex group. Significant increases in the sEMG activities of the lumbar muscles were found in both groups. The increases in the sEMG activities of the rectus abdominis and internal and external oblique muscles of the abdomen were greater in the TC Ex group than in the Mat Ex group. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that TC Ex, which is similar to normal lumbar stabilization exercise, is effective at activating and improving the function of the lumbar muscles. These results suggest that TC Ex has a positive impact on the stabilization of the lumbar region.

  14. Effects of a therapeutic climbing program on muscle activation and SF-36 scores of patients with lower back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Hun; Seo, Dong-Yel

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stability exercises on chronic lower back pain by using a therapeutic climbing program on lumbar muscle activity and function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult subjects with chronic back pain participated. The subjects were assigned to 2 exercise groups, namely the lumbar stabilization (Mat Ex) and therapeutic climbing exercise groups (TC Ex). Each group trained for 30 minutes, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Short-form 36-item Questionnaire (SF-36) was administered and the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activities of the lumbar muscles were measured. [Results] Both therapy groups showed significant increases in the SF-36 score, and the increase was greater in the TC Ex group. Significant increases in the sEMG activities of the lumbar muscles were found in both groups. The increases in the sEMG activities of the rectus abdominis and internal and external oblique muscles of the abdomen were greater in the TC Ex group than in the Mat Ex group. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that TC Ex, which is similar to normal lumbar stabilization exercise, is effective at activating and improving the function of the lumbar muscles. These results suggest that TC Ex has a positive impact on the stabilization of the lumbar region. PMID:25931721

  15. Notebook computer use with different monitor tilt angle: effects on posture, muscle activity and discomfort of neck pain users.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Wen-Ko; Chou, Wei-Ying; Chen, Bi-Hui

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the posture, muscle activities, and self reported discomforts of neck pain notebook computer users on three monitor tilt conditions: 100°, 115°, and 130°. Six subjects were recruited in this study to completed typing tasks. Results showed subjects have a trend to show the forward head posture in the condition that monitor was set at 100°, and the significant less neck and shoulder discomfort were noted in the condition that monitor was set at 130°. These result suggested neck pain notebook user to set their monitor tilt angle at 130°.

  16. Muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging and acute low back pain: a pilot study to characterize lumbar muscle activity asymmetries and examine the effects of osteopathic manipulative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian C; Walkowski, Stevan; Conatser, Robert R; Eland, David C; Howell, John N

    2009-01-01

    Background Muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) measures transverse relaxation time (T2), and allows for determination of the spatial pattern of muscle activation. The purposes of this pilot study were to examine whether MRI-derived T2 or side-to-side differences in T2 (asymmetries) differ in low back muscles between subjects with acute low back pain (LBP) compared to asymptomatic controls, and to determine if a single osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) session alters these T2 properties immediately and 48-hours after treatment. Methods Subjects with non-specific acute LBP (mean score on 1-10 visual analog score = 3.02 ± 2.81) and asymptomatic controls (n = 9/group) underwent an MRI, and subsequently the LBP subjects received OMT and then underwent another MRI. The LBP subjects reported back for an additional MRI 48-hours following their initial visit. T2 and T2 asymmetry were calculated from regions of interest for the psoas, quadratus lumborum (QL), multifidus, and iliocostalis lumborum/longissimus thoracis (IL/LT) muscles. Results No differences were observed between the groups when T2 was averaged for the left and right side muscles. However, the QL displayed a significantly greater T2 asymmetry in LBP subjects when compared to controls (29.1 ± 4.3 vs. 15.9 ± 4.1%; p = 0.05). The psoas muscle also displayed a relatively large, albeit non-significant, mean difference (22.7 ± 6.9 vs. 9.5 ± 2.8%; p = 0.11). In the subjects with LBP, psoas T2 asymmetry was significantly reduced immediately following OMT (25.3 ± 6.9 to 6.1 ± 1.8%, p = 0.05), and the change in LBP immediately following OMT was correlated with the change in psoas T2 asymmetry (r = 0.75, p = 0.02). Conclusion Collectively, this pilot work demonstrates the feasibility of mfMRI for quantification and localization of muscle abnormalities in patients with acute low back pain. Additionally, this pilot work provides insight into the mechanistic actions of OMT during acute LBP, as

  17. The effect of paracetamol and tropisetron on pain: experimental studies and a review of published data.

    PubMed

    Tiippana, Elina; Hamunen, Katri; Kontinen, Vesa; Kalso, Eija

    2013-02-01

    Experimental studies suggest that paracetamol-induced analgesia is mediated via central serotonergic pathways and attenuated by 5-HT3-antagonists. However, clinical studies do not support this, and 5-HT3-antagonists are expected to reduce pain by blocking the descending pronociceptive pathway. The current project tested whether tropisetron attenuates analgesia by paracetamol. Two randomized, double-blind, crossover studies with 18 healthy male volunteers in each were performed. Pain stimuli were cold water immersion (cold pressor test), contact heat pain (study 1) and electrical stimulation (study 2). In both studies, tropisetron 5 mg i.v. or saline was administered, followed by paracetamol 2 g i.v. 30 min. later. Individual changes in heat and cold pain intensity, cold pain tolerance and unpleasantness were recorded. The same thresholds were also expressed as scores (% of the individual score at baseline). Additionally, previously published findings on the effects of paracetamol and its interaction with 5HT3-antagonists in human experimental pain models were reviewed. After calculation of the sensory and pain scores (%), tropisetron seemed to amplify the analgesic action of paracetamol. Paracetamol 2 g i.v. did not show any statistically significant analgesia in thermal tests (study 1), or differences in sensory, pain detection or moderate pain thresholds of the electrical stimulus (study 2). As paracetamol did not have a measurable analgesic effect in these tests, no conclusions can be drawn about the interaction between paracetamol and tropisetron. However, tropisetron may have an analgesic effect of its own. Clinicians should not avoid using these drugs together, unless larger clinical studies indicate otherwise.

  18. Effect of analgesic standards on persistent postoperative pain evoked by skin/muscle incision and retraction (SMIR).

    PubMed

    Flatters, Sarah J L

    2010-06-14

    Various common surgeries such as thoracotomy and inguinal hernia repair involve essential prolonged tissue retraction, often causing persistent postoperative pain. A new model was developed to mimic this clinical scenario, whereby skin/muscle incision and retraction (SMIR) in the medial thigh evoked persistent postoperative pain (Flatters (2008) [Pain 135:119-130]). This study examines the response of SMIR-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity to analgesic standards commonly used as positive controls in behavioural pain studies. Rats were anaesthetised, the skin and superficial muscle of the medial thigh was then incised and retracted for 1h. In separate experiments, morphine, gabapentin and MK-801 were intraperitoneally administered to SMIR-operated rats, at maximally tolerated doses, on postoperative day 9-13. Mechanical hypersensitivity was measured by withdrawal responses to von Frey stimulation of the plantar hindpaws. Morphine (6mg/kg) and gabapentin (100mg/kg) elicited an almost complete reversal of SMIR-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity. In contrast, MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) did not affect SMIR-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity. Contralateral hindpaw responses to von Frey stimulation were unaffected by SMIR surgery or any drug treatment. In conclusion, the SMIR model displays persistent mechanical hypersensitivity that is reversible by morphine or gabapentin treatment. As previously demonstrated, SMIR-evoked pain is not driven by neuronal damage and these data show that NMDA receptor activation does not play a role in the maintenance of SMIR-evoked pain. This study further demonstrates the value of the SMIR model as a tool to understand persistent postoperative/postsurgical pain mechanisms and evaluate potential treatments.

  19. An electrophysiological method for monitoring blood flow in skeletal muscle. An experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L

    1989-01-01

    An experimental animal model was used to study the effects of occlusion of skeletal muscle blood flow on spontaneous denervation activity (fibrillation potentials). The aim was to investigate whether recording of fibrillation potentials could provide a valuable electrophysiological technique for monitoring muscle tissue circulation during free flap surgery. In both the fast-twitch anterior tibial muscle and the slow-twitch soleus, the number of fibrillation potentials decreased rapidly (within 30 sec) after occlusion of the blood flow and after 5 min only few fibrillation potentials were present. In the fast-twitch muscle, the fibrillation potentials disappeared within 10 min in most animals, but sporadic potentials were seen for up to 18 min in one animal after the blood vessels were clamped. In the slow-twitch muscle, sporadic single fibrillation potentials were seen for a longer time than in the anterior tibial muscle and fibrillation potentials were often observed for more than 20 min after clamping of the blood vessels. However, the initial decrease in the number of fibrillation potentials was rapid in both muscles. This means, if the same is true in human muscle, that the method is sufficiently rapid to permit restoration of the circulation so that the muscle flap can be saved if the blood flow is occluded after a muscle transfer operation. Thus, recording of fibrillation potentials may provide a powerful and simple technique for monitoring free flap circulation.

  20. Neuronal and immunological basis of action of antidepressants in chronic pain - clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Mika, Joanna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The current knowledge of the pharmacological actions of the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) has slowly evolved through their over 40-year history. Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems, and antidepressants are an essential part of the therapeutic strategy in addition to classical analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in chronic pain conditions; namely, headaches, low back pain, fibromyalgia, cancer pain and especially neuropathic pain. TCAs are traditionally the main type of depression medication used to treat chronic pain. Recently, new antidepressants were introduced into clinical use, with a significant reduction in side effects and equivalent efficacy on mood disorders. These new drugs that are effective for chronic pain belong to the tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs) group (amoxapine, maprotiline), the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) group (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and the atypical antidepressants group (bupropion, trazodone, mirtazapine, nefazodone). In this review, we present the available publications on TCAs (amitriptyline, doxepin, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline), TeCAs (amoxapine, maprotiline), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine), SNRIs (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and atypical antidepressants (bupropion) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We also review analgesics acting as both opioid receptor agonists and also acting as aminergic reuptake inhibitors. Existing data are insufficient to conclude which of these new classes of antidepressants has the best clinical profile and will be the most effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain; in addition, a lower incidence of side effects should be considered. Increased experimental and translational research is a key for further improvement of the treatment of chronic pain with antidepressants. However

  1. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  2. Antihypernociceptive activity of anethole in experimental inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alessandra M V; Domiciano, Talita P; Verri, Waldiceu A; Zarpelon, Ana Carla; da Silva, Lorena G; Barbosa, Carmem P; Natali, Maria Raquel M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2013-04-01

    Anethole has been reported to have antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiinflammatory, and anesthetic properties. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of anethole in two pain models of inflammatory origin: acute inflammation induced by carrageenan and persistent inflammation induced by Complete Freund's adjuvant. We evaluated the effects of anethole (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) on the development of paw oedema and mechanical hypernociception. The liver was collected for histological analysis. Paw skin was collected to determine the levels of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-17 (IL-17), and myeloperoxidase activity. Blood was collected to assess alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). The chemical composition of star anise oil was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), showing a presence of anethole of 98.1%. Oral pretreatment with anethole in mice inhibited paw oedema, mechanical pernociception, myelopewroxidase activity, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17 levels in acute and persistent inflammation models. Additionally, anethole treatment did not alter prostaglandin E2-induced mechanical hypernociception. Possible side effects were also examined. Seven-day anethole treatment did not alter plasma AST and ALT levels, and the histological profile of liver tissue was normal. The present study provides evidence of the antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of anethole in acute and persistent inflammation models.

  3. Shoulder and forearm oxygenation and myoelectric activity in patients with work-related muscle pain and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Elcadi, Guilherme H; Forsman, Mikael; Aasa, Ulrika; Fahlstrom, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G

    2013-05-01

    We tested hypotheses of (a) reduced oxygen usage, oxygen recovery, blood flow and oxygen consumption; and (b) increased muscle activity for patients diagnosed with work-related muscle pain (WRMP) in comparison to healthy controls. Oxygenation was measured with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and muscle activity with EMG for the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius descendens (TD) muscles. Eighteen patients with diffuse neck-shoulder-arm pain and 17 controls (matched in age and sex) were equipped with NIRS and EMG probes. After determining an individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force, short-term (20 s) isometric contractions for the ECR and TD of 10, 30, 50 and 70 % MVC generated ∆StO₂ and StO₂% recovery (Rslope) from NIRS, and RMS%max from EMG signals. In addition, upper arm venous (VO) and arterial (AO) occlusions generated slopes of total hemoglobin (HbTslope) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHbslope) for the resting ECR as surrogates of blood flow and oxygen consumption, respectively. Mixed model analyses, t tests, and Mann-Whitney test were used to assess differences between groups. There was no significant difference in MVC between groups for either muscle. Also, ∆StO₂%, Rslope for either muscle, and ECR-HbTslope were not different between groups, thus our hypotheses of reduced oxygen use, recovery, and blood flow for patients were not confirmed. However, patients had a significantly lower ECR-HHbslope confirming our hypothesis of reduced consumption. Further, there was no difference in RMS%max during contractions meaning that the hypothesis of increased activity for patients was not confirmed. When taking into account the number of NIRS variables studied, differences we found between our patient group and healthy controls (i.e., in forearm oxygen consumption and shoulder oxygen saturation level) may be considered modest. Overall our findings may have been impacted by the fact that our patients and controls were similar in muscle strength

  4. Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Kenneth; schraefel, mc; Andersen, Christoffer H; Ebbesen, Frederik S; Christiansen, David H; Skotte, Jørgen; Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles. Methods: 198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43·1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women, duration of pain 186 day during the previous year) were randomly allocated to 2- or 12 min of daily progressive resistance training with elastic tubing or to a control group receiving weekly information on general health. A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and at 10-week follow-up; participants performed maximal voluntary contractions at a static 90-degree shoulder joint angle. Rapid force development was determined as the rate of torque development and maximal muscle strength was determined as the peak torque. Results: Compared with the control group, rate of torque development increased 31·0 Nm s−1 [95% confidence interval: (1·33–11·80)] in the 2-min group and 33·2 Nm s−1 (1·66–12·33) in the 12-min group from baseline to 10-week follow-up, corresponding to an increase of 16·0% and 18·2% for the two groups, respectively. The increase was significantly different compared to controls (P<0·05) for both training groups. Maximal muscle strength increased only ∼5–6% [mean and 95% confidence interval for 2- and 12-min groups to control, respectively: 2·5 Nm (0·05–0·73) and 2·2 Nm (0·01–0·70)]. No significant differences between the 2- and 12-min groups were evident. A weak but significant relationship existed between changes in rapid force development and pain (r = 0·27, P<0·01), but not between changes in maximal muscle strength and pain. Conclusion: Small daily amounts of progressive resistance training in adults with frequent neck/shoulder pain increases rapid force development and, to a less extent, maximal force capacity. PMID:23758661

  5. Effects of Push-ups Plus Sling Exercise on Muscle Activation and Cross-sectional Area of the Multifidus Muscle in Patients with Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gye-Yeop; Kin, Se-Hun

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of lumbar stability exercises on chronic low back pain by using sling exercise and push-ups. [Subjects] Thirty adult subjects with chronic back pain participated, with 10 adults being assigned to each of 3 exercise groups: general physical therapy (PT), lumbar stability using sling exercises (Sling Ex), and sling exercise plus push-ups (Sling Ex+PU). Each group trained for 30 minutes 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity of the lumbar muscles, and cross-sectional area of the multifidus muscle on computed tomography (CT) were evaluated before and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks of therapy. [Results] A significant decrease in ODI was seen in all therapy groups, and this change was greater in the Sling Ex and Sling Ex+PU groups than in the PT group. No changes in sEMG activity were noted in the PT group, whereas significant increases in the sEMG activities of all lumbar muscles were found in the other 2 groups. The increases in the sEMG activities of the rectus abdominis and internal and external oblique muscles of the abdomen were greater in the Sling Ex+PU group than in the other 2 groups. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that Sling Ex+PU, similar to normal lumbar stabilization exercise, is effective in activating and improving the function of the lumbar muscles. These results suggest that Sling Ex+PU has a positive impact on stabilization of the lumbar region.

  6. Adult stem cell as new advanced therapy for experimental neuropathic pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Silvia; Castelli, Mara; Amodeo, Giada; Niada, Stefania; Ferrari, Daniela; Vescovi, Angelo; Brini, Anna Teresa; Panerai, Alberto Emilio; Sacerdote, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a highly invalidating disease resulting as consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. All the pharmacological treatments today in use give a long lasting pain relief only in a limited percentage of patients before pain reappears making NP an incurable disease. New approaches are therefore needed and research is testing stem cell usage. Several papers have been written on experimental neuropathic pain treatment using stem cells of different origin and species to treat experimental NP. The original idea was based on the capacity of stem cell to offer a totipotent cellular source for replacing injured neural cells and for delivering trophic factors to lesion site; soon the researchers agreed that the capacity of stem cells to contrast NP was not dependent upon their regenerative effect but was mostly linked to a bidirectional interaction between the stem cell and damaged microenvironment resident cells. In this paper we review the preclinical studies produced in the last years assessing the effects induced by several stem cells in different models of neuropathic pain. The overall positive results obtained on pain remission by using stem cells that are safe, of easy isolation, and which may allow an autologous transplant in patients may be encouraging for moving from bench to bedside, although there are several issues that still need to be solved.

  7. Genetic predictors for acute experimental cold and heat pain sensitivity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H; Mittal, D P; Iadarola, M J; Dionne, R A

    2006-01-01

    Background The genetic contribution to pain sensitivity underlies a complex composite of parallel pain pathways, multiple mechanisms, and diverse inter‐individual pain experiences and expectations. Methods Variations for genes encoding receptors related to cold and heat sensation, such as transient receptor potential A subtype 1 (TRPA1), M subtype 8 (TRPM8), V subtype 1 (TRPV1), δ opioid receptor subtype 1 (OPRD1), catechol O‐methyltransferase (COMT), and fatty acid amide hydrolyase (FAAH), were investigated in four major ethnic populations. Results We defined 13 haplotype blocks in European Americans, seven blocks in African Americans, seven blocks in Hispanic subjects, and 11 blocks in Asian Americans. Further study in European American subjects found significant associations between short duration cold pain sensitivity and variations in TRPA1, COMT, and FAAH in a gender dependent manner. Our observations demonstrate that genetic variations in TRPA1, COMT, and FAAH contribute gender specifically to individual variations in short duration cold pain sensitivity in a European American cohort. Conclusions The effects of TRPA1 variations on experimental short duration heat pain sensitivity may contribute to inter‐individual variation in pain sensitivity in humans. PMID:16882734

  8. The ratio of change in muscle thickness between superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test and a suggestion regarding clinical treatment of patients with musculoskeletal neck pain.

    PubMed

    Goo, Miran; Kim, Seong-Gil; Jun, Deokhoon

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test by using ultrasonography and to propose the optimal level of pressure in clinical craniocervical flexion exercise for people with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 18 students (9 males and 9 females) with neck pain at D University in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The change in muscle thickness in superficial and deep cervical flexor muscles during the craniocervical flexion test was measured using ultrasonography. The ratio of muscle thickness changes between superficial and deep muscles during the test were obtained to interpret the imbalance of muscle recruitment in cervical flexor muscles. [Results] The muscle thickness ratio of the sternocleidomastoid muscle/deep cervical flexor muscles according to the incremental pressure showed significant differences between 22 mmHg and 24 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 28 mmHg, between 24 mmHg and 30 mmHg, and between 26 mmHg and 28 mmHg. [Conclusion] Ultrasonography can be applied for examination of cervical flexor muscles in clinical environment, and practical suggestion for intervention exercise of craniocervical flexors can be expected on the pressure level between 24 mmHg and 26 mmHg enabling the smallest activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

  9. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  10. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  11. [Case of painful muscle spasm induced by thoracic vertebral fracture: successful treatment with lumbar sympathetic ganglia block].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Kawai, Motoharu; Koga, Michiaki; Ogasawara, Jun-ichi; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2008-10-01

    We report a 70-year-old man, who developed painful involuntary muscle contraction of the left leg after the lumbar discectomy, which exacerbated after a vertebral fracture of Th12. This involuntary movement was accompanied with the abnormal position of left leg simulating triple flexion response, and was induced by active or passive movement of his left knee and foot joints. Several drugs including benzodiazepines and dantrolene were ineffective, although treatment with baclofen or carbamazepine was effective. These findings suggest that hyperexcitability of the anterior horn cells following the disturbance of spinal inhibitory interneurons was involved. Electophysiological studies suggested the disturbance of left lumber nerve roots. The spinal root blocks from L3 to S1 were performed, after which the painful involuntary muscle spasm was resolved. The lumbar sympathetic ganglia block was also effective; suggesting that abnormal afferent neuronal input to spinal cord was caused by the nerve root trauma which triggered the formation of secondary abnormal network in the spine. Lumbar sympathetic ganglia block should be recommended to a therapeutic option for the refractory painful muscle spasm of the leg.

  12. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, Cold, and a Combination Treatment on Pain, Decreased Range of Motion, and Strength Loss Associated with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Perrin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Athletic trainers have a variety of therapeutic agents at their disposal to treat musculoskeletal pain, but little objective evidence exists of the efficacy of the modalities they use. In this study, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) served as a model for musculoskeletal injury in order to: (1) compare the changes in perceived pain, elbow extension range of motion, and strength loss in subjects experiencing DOMS in the elbow flexor muscle group following a single treatment with either transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), cold, a combination of TENS and cold, sham TENS, or 20 minutes of rest; (2) compare the effects of combining static stretching with these treatments; and (3) determine if decreased pain is accompanied by a restoration of strength. DOMS was induced in the non-dominant elbow flexor muscle group in 40 females (age = 22.0 ± 4.3 yr) with repeated eccentric contractions. Forty-eight hours following exercise, all subjects presented with pain, decreased elbow extension range of motion, and decreased strength consistent with DOMS. Subjects were randomly assigned to 20-minute treatments followed by static stretching. Cold, TENS, and the combined treatment resulted in significant decreases in perceived pain. Treatments with cold resulted in a significant increase in elbow extension range of motion. Static stretching also significantly reduced perceived pain. Only small, nonsignificant changes in muscle strength were observed following treatment or stretching, regardless of the treatment group. These results suggest that the muscle weakness associated with DOMS is not the result of inhibition caused by pain. The results suggest that these modalities are effective in treating the pain and muscle spasm associated with DOMS, and that decreased pain may not be an accurate indicator of the recovery of muscle strength. PMID:16558162

  13. Disability and back muscle fatigability changes following two therapeutic exercise interventions in participants with recurrent low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The level of disability and endurance of back muscles have been investigated, but there is conflicting evidence following specific exercise interventions for participants with recurrent low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to compare the level of disability and slope of median frequency (MF) of thoracic and lumbar erector spinae (ES) muscles following core stabilization exercise (CSE) and spinal flexibility exercise (SFE). Material/Methods In total, 46 individuals participated in this study. There were 25 participants in the CSE intervention group (average age of 47.7±8.9 years) and 21 participants in the SFE group (average age of 53.1±9.0 years). Each group participated in the specific exercise intervention program for 4 weeks while maintaining their current activity and/or exercise levels. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to measure the level of disability changes. The fatigability of the ES back muscles was measured by the slope of MF, using a modified Sorensen test. Results The disability level decreased significantly following CSE intervention (t=2.23, p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in muscle fatigability changes in the 4-week intervention period for either group. Conclusions The CSE intervention reduced disability level following the 4-week intervention period. Further studies are needed to investigate the effectiveness of specific back muscle exercises in longer intervention periods for back muscle fatigability. PMID:23314589

  14. The intra- and inter-rater reliability of five clinical muscle performance tests in patients with and without neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the reliability of muscle performance tests using cost- and time-effective methods similar to those used in clinical practice. When conducting reliability studies, great effort goes into standardising test procedures to facilitate a stable outcome. Therefore, several test trials are often performed. However, when muscle performance tests are applied in the clinical setting, clinicians often only conduct a muscle performance test once as repeated testing may produce fatigue and pain, thus variation in test results. We aimed to investigate whether cervical muscle performance tests, which have shown promising psychometric properties, would remain reliable when examined under conditions similar to those of daily clinical practice. Methods The intra-rater (between-day) and inter-rater (within-day) reliability was assessed for five cervical muscle performance tests in patients with (n = 33) and without neck pain (n = 30). The five tests were joint position error, the cranio-cervical flexion test, the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine and in a 45°-upright position and a new neck extensor test. Results Intra-rater reliability ranged from moderate to almost perfect agreement for joint position error (ICC ≥ 0.48-0.82), the cranio-cervical flexion test (ICC ≥ 0.69), the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine (ICC ≥ 0.68) and in a 45°-upright position (ICC ≥ 0.41) with the exception of a new test (neck extensor test), which ranged from slight to moderate agreement (ICC = 0.14-0.41). Likewise, inter-rater reliability ranged from moderate to almost perfect agreement for joint position error (ICC ≥ 0.51-0.75), the cranio-cervical flexion test (ICC ≥ 0.85), the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine (ICC ≥ 0.70) and in a 45°-upright position (ICC ≥ 0.56). However, only slight to fair agreement was found for the neck extensor test (ICC

  15. Differential RNA Expression Profile of Skeletal Muscle Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Henry J.; Himuro, Keiichi; Alshaikh, Jumana; Gong, Bendi; Cheng, Georgiana; Kusner, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    The differential susceptibility of skeletal muscle by myasthenia gravis (MG) is not well understood. We utilized RNA expression profiling of extraocular muscle (EOM), diaphragm (DIA), and extensor digitorum (EDL) of rats with experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) to evaluate the hypothesis that muscles respond differentially to injury produced by EAMG. EAMG was induced in female Lewis rats by immunization with acetylcholine receptor purified from the electric organ of the Torpedo. Six weeks later after rats had developed weakness and serum antibodies directed against the AChR, animals underwent euthanasia and RNA profiling performed on DIA, EDL, and EOM. Profiling results were validated by qPCR. Across the three muscles between the experiment and control groups, 359 probes (1.16%) with greater than 2-fold changes in expression in 7 of 9 series pairwise comparisons from 31,090 probes were identified with approximately two-thirds being increased. The three muscles shared 16 genes with increased expression and 6 reduced expression. Functional annotation demonstrated that these common expression changes fell predominantly into categories of metabolism, stress response, and signaling. Evaluation of specific gene function indicated that EAMG led to a change to oxidative metabolism. Genes related to muscle regeneration and suppression of immune response were activated. Evidence of a differential immune response among muscles was not evident. Each muscle had a distinct RNA profile but with commonality in gene categories expressed that are focused on muscle repair, moderation of inflammation, and oxidative metabolism. PMID:27891095

  16. Efficacy of massage treatment technique in masseter muscle hardness: robotic experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Yuichiro; Ariji, Yoshiko; Kise, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Shigemitsu; Kurita, Kenichi; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to clarify the masseter muscle hardness in patients with myofascial pain, to examine their changes after massage, and to analyze whether the hardness can be an index for massage treatment. Sixteen patients with myofascial pain (12 with unilateral and 4 with bilateral masseter muscle pain) and 24 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The masseter hardness between patients and the healthy volunteers was compared. The changes in the hardness in patients after massage were examined. The relation of the hardness with massage regimens and efficacies was analyzed. There was a significant right-and-left difference of the hardness in patients, although there was no difference in the healthy volunteers. The hardness decreased after massage. The pretreatment asymmetry index of the hardness showed a significant correlation with the massage pressure. It was concluded that there was a significant difference between the right and left masseter hardness in patients with myofascial pain. After massage treatment, the masseter hardness and right-and-left difference decreased. The hardness may be an index for determining the massage pressure.

  17. The Effects of Low Dose Buccal Administered Caffeine on RPE and Pain during an Upper Body Muscle Endurance Test and Lower Body Anaerobic Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellar, David M.; Judge, Lawrence W.; Kamimori, Gary H.; Glickman, Ellen L.

    2012-01-01

    To date there have been a number of studies that have assessed the effects of caffeine on Rated Perceived Exertion (RPE) and Pain Scale scores during continuous exercise. Presently there is little information about the effects of caffeine on RPE and Pain Scale scores during short term, anaerobic and muscle endurance activity. The purpose of the…

  18. Opioid treatment of experimental pain activates nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Peggy; Griffis, Charles; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Torrington, Matthew; Sadakane, Ryan; Tefera, Eshetu; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the independent and combined effects of pain and opioids on the activation of an early marker of inflammation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Design NF-κB activation was compared within-subjects following four randomly ordered experimental sessions of opioid-only (intravenous fentanyl 1 μg/kg), pain-only (cold-pressor), opioid + pain, and a resting condition. Setting University General Clinical Research Center. Participants Twenty-one (11 female) healthy controls. Interventions Following exposure to treatment (fentanyl administration and/or cold-pressor pain), blood samples for NF-kB analysis were obtained. Main outcome measures Intracellular levels of activated NF-κB, in unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells at 15 and 30 minutes. Results Neither pain nor opioid administration alone effected NF-κB levels in cell populations; however, the combination of treatments induced significant increases of NF-κB in stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell, lymphocytes, and monocytes. Conclusions The combination of acute pain with opioids, as occurs in clinical situations, activates a key transcription factor involved in proinflammatory responses. PMID:25901477

  19. Antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin type A on experimental abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Drinovac, Višnja; Bach-Rojecky, Lidija; Babić, Ana; Lacković, Zdravko

    2014-12-15

    Visceral pain, especially in the abdominal region, represents one of the most common types of pain. Its chronic form is usually very hard to treat by conventional analgesic agents and adjuvants. We investigated the antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in male Wistar rats in two models of visceral pain: peritonitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of 1% acetic acid and colitis induced by intracolonic instillation of 0.1% capsaicin. Pain was measured as the number of abdominal writhes. Additionally, referred mechanical sensitivity in the ventral abdominal area was evaluated by von Frey test and the extent of spinal c-Fos expression was immunohistochemically examined. BTX-A significantly reduced the number of abdominal writhes in both models of visceral pain after intrathecal application in a dose of 2 U/kg. In the experimental colitis model, BTX-A (2 U/kg) reduced both referred mechanical allodynia and c-Fos expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (S2/S3 segments). In contrast to intrathecal administration, BTX-A (2 U/kg) administered into the cisterna magna had no effect on pain suggesting that the primary site of its action is a spinal cord.

  20. Effects of static contraction and cold stimulation on cardiovascular autonomic indices, trapezius blood flow and muscle activity in chronic neck-shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Hallman, David M; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Arnetz, Bengt B; Lyskov, Eugene

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate reactions in trapezius muscle blood flow (MBF), muscle activity, heart rate variability (HRV) and systemic blood pressure (BP) to autonomic tests in subjects with chronic neck-shoulder pain and healthy controls. Changes in muscle activity and blood flow due to stress and unfavourable muscle loads are known underlying factors of work-related muscle pain. Aberration of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is considered a possible mechanism. In the present study, participants (n = 23 Pain, n = 22 Control) performed autonomic tests which included a resting condition, static hand grip test (HGT) at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, a cold pressor test (CPT) and a deep breathing test (DBT). HRV was analysed in time and frequency domains. MBF and muscle activity were recorded from the upper trapezius muscles using photoplethysmography and electromyography (EMG). The pain group showed reduced low frequency-HRV (LF) and SDNN during rest, as well as a blunted BP response and increased LF-HRV during HGT (∆systolic 22 mm Hg; ∆LF(nu) 27%) compared with controls (∆systolic 27; ∆LF(nu) 6%). Locally, the pain group had attenuated trapezius MBF in response to HGT (Pain 122% Control 140%) with elevated trapezius EMG following HGT and during CPT. In conclusion, only HGT showed differences between groups in systemic BP and HRV and alterations in local trapezius MBF and EMG in the pain group. Findings support the hypothesis of ANS involvement at systemic and local levels in chronic neck-shoulder pain.

  1. A Reduction in Maximal Incremental Exercise Test Duration 48 h Post Downhill Run Is Associated with Muscle Damage Derived Exercise Induced Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chrismas, Bryna C. R.; Taylor, Lee; Siegler, Jason C.; Midgley, Adrian W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and muscle soreness reduce treadmill maximal incremental exercise (MIE) test duration, and true maximal physiological performance as a consequence of exercise induced pain (EIP) and perceived effort. Methods: Fifty (14 female), apparently healthy participants randomly allocated into a control group (CON, n = 10), or experimental group (EXP, n = 40) visited the laboratory a total of six times: visit 1 (familiarization), visit 2 (pre 1), visit 3 (pre 2), visit 4 (intervention), visit 5 (24 h post) and visit 6 (48 h post). Both groups performed identical testing during all visits, except during visit 4, where only EXP performed a 30 min downhill run and CON performed no exercise. During visits 2, 3, and 6 all participants performed MIE, and the following measurements were obtained: time to exhaustion (TTE), EIP, maximal oxygen consumption (V·O2max), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), maximum heart rate (HRmax), maximum blood lactate (BLamax), and the contribution of pain to terminating the MIE (assessed using a questionnaire). Additionally during visits 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 the following markers of EIMD were obtained: muscle soreness, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), creatine kinase (CK). Results: There were no significant differences (p ≥ 0.32) between any trials for any of the measures obtained during MIE for CON. In EXP, TTE decreased by 34 s (3%), from pre 2 to 48 h post (p < 0.001). There was a significant association between group (EXP, CON) and termination of the MIE due to “pain” during 48 h post (χ2 = 14.7, p = 0.002). Conclusion: EIMD resulted in premature termination of a MIE test (decreased TTE), which was associated with EIP, MVC, and VA. The exact mechanisms responsible for this require further investigation. PMID:28337151

  2. Longitudinal (4 year) change of thigh muscle and adipose tissue distribution in chronically painful vs. painless knees – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ruhdorfer, Anja; Wirth, Wolfgang; Dannhauer, Torben; Eckstein, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate 4-year longitudinal change in thigh muscle and adipose tissue content in chronically painful versus painless knees. Methods Knees from Osteoarthritis Initiative participants with non-acceptable symptom status (numerical rating scale ≥4) and frequent pain (≥6 months at baseline, year 2 and year 4 follow-up) were studied. These were matched with painless controls (bilateral NRS pain intensity≤1 and ≤infrequent pain at all 3 timepoints). 4-year longitudinal changes in thigh muscle anatomical cross-sectional areas (CSAs), isometric muscle strength, and in subcutaneous (SCF) and intermuscular fat (IMF) CSAs were obtained from magnetic resonance images (MRI) and were compared between groups (paired t-tests). Results 43 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria of chronic pain, had complete thigh muscle MRI acquisitions and strength measurements, and a matched control. Quadriceps CSAs, but not extensor strength, showed a significant longitudinal decrease in chronically painful knees (-3.9%; 95%confidence interval [95 CI] -6.3%,-1.5%) and in painless controls (-2.4%; 95% CI -4.1%, -0.7%); the difference in change was not statistically significant (p=0.33). There was a significant 4-year gain in SCF in painful knees (8.1%; 95% CI 3.1%, 13%) but not in controls (0.0%; 95%CI -4.4%, +4.4%) with the difference in change being significant (p=0.03). The gain in IMF (∼5.2%) was similar between painful and painless knees. Conclusion This is the first paper to show a significant impact of (chronic) knee pain on longitudinal change in local subcutaneous adipose tissue. The effect of pain on subcutaneous fat appeared stronger than that on intermuscular adipose tissue and on muscle status. PMID:25887367

  3. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) or continuous unilateral distal experimental pain stimulation in healthy subjects does not bias visual attention towards one hemifield.

    PubMed

    Filippopulos, Filipp M; Grafenstein, Jessica; Straube, Andreas; Eggert, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In natural life pain automatically draws attention towards the painful body part suggesting that it interacts with different attentional mechanisms such as visual attention. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients who typically report on chronic distally located pain of one extremity may suffer from so-called neglect-like symptoms, which have also been linked to attentional mechanisms. The purpose of the study was to further evaluate how continuous pain conditions influence visual attention. Saccade latencies were recorded in two experiments using a common visual attention paradigm whereby orientating saccades to cued or uncued lateral visual targets had to be performed. In the first experiment saccade latencies of healthy subjects were measured under two conditions: one in which continuous experimental pain stimulation was applied to the index finger to imitate a continuous pain situation, and one without pain stimulation. In the second experiment saccade latencies of patients suffering from CRPS were compared to controls. The results showed that neither the continuous experimental pain stimulation during the experiment nor the chronic pain in CRPS led to an unilateral increase of saccade latencies or to a unilateral increase of the cue effect on latency. The results show that unilateral, continuously applied pain stimuli or chronic pain have no or only very limited influence on visual attention. Differently from patients with visual neglect, patients with CRPS did not show strong side asymmetries of saccade latencies or of cue effects on saccade latencies. Thus, neglect-like clinical symptoms of CRPS patients do not involve the allocation of visual attention.

  4. A Comparison of Surgical Invasions for Spinal Nerve Ligation with or without Paraspinal Muscle Removal in a Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Gang; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats is one of the most popular models for studying neuropathic pain because of its high reproducibility. During the surgery, a part of the L5 paraspinal muscle is usually removed, which produces extra trauma and may potentially affect the physiological processes involved in neuropathic pain. To reduce the surgical trauma, the paraspinal muscle retraction was developed for exposure of the spinal nerve. The current study was aimed at comparing the surgical invasions between the L5 SNL models with paraspinal muscle removal or retraction. The results showed that both methods induced similar neuropathic pain behavior. However, the paraspinal muscle retraction group exhibited an average of 2.7 mg less blood loss than the muscle removal group. This group also showed a significantly lower increase in serum myoglobin and creatine phosphokinase levels on postoperative days 1 and 2, as well as a lower increase in interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels on postoperative day 1. The paraspinal muscle maintained normal morphological features following paraspinal muscle retraction. Our results indicate that the SNL rat model with paraspinal muscle retraction is a reliable physiological model that is reproducible, readily available, and less invasive than the model with muscle removal. PMID:27597970

  5. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Vânia F.; Amorim, Juleimar S. C.; Pereira, Aline M.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years) who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: The regression models for the TrA, IO, and EO muscle thickness levels explained 2.0% (R2=0.02; F=0.47; p=0.628), 10.6% (R2=0.106; F=3.03; p=0.057), and 10.1% (R2=0.101; F=2.70; p=0.077) of the variability, respectively. None of the regression models developed for the abdominal muscles exhibited statistical significance. A significant and negative association (p=0.018; β=-0.0343) was observed only between UI and IO recruitment. Conclusion: These results suggest that age-related factors may have interfered with the findings of the study, thus emphasizing the need to perform ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly. PMID:25714438

  6. Regular physical activity prevents chronic pain by altering resident muscle macrophage phenotype and increasing IL-10 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Audrey; Gregory, Nicholas S.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity in healthy individuals prevents development of chronic musculoskeletal pain; however, the mechanisms underlying this exercise-induced analgesia are not well understood. Interleukin-10(IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine which can reduce nociceptor sensitization, increases during regular physical activity. Since macrophages play a major role in cytokine production and are present in muscle tissue, we propose that physical activity alters macrophage phenotype to increase IL-10 and prevent chronic pain. Physical activity was induced by allowing C57BL/6J mice free access to running wheels for 8 weeks and compared to sedentary mice with no running wheels. Using immunohistochemical staining of the gastrocnemius muscle to label regulatory (M2, secretes anti-inflammatory cytokines) and classical (M1, secretes proinflammatory cytokines) macrophages, the percentage of M2-macrophages increased significantly in physically active mice (68.5±4.6% of total) compared to sedentary mice (45.8±7.1% of total). Repeated acid injections into the muscle enhanced mechanical sensitivity of the muscle and paw in sedentary animals that does not occur in physically active mice; no sex differences occur in either sedentary or physically active mice. Blockade of IL-10 systemically or locally prevented the analgesia in physically active mice, i.e. mice developed hyperalgesia. Conversely, sedentary mice pretreated systemically or locally with IL-10 had reduced hyperalgesia after repeated acid injections. Thus, these results suggest that regular physical activity increases the percentage of regulatory macrophages in muscle and that IL-10 is an essential mediator in the analgesia produced by regular physical activity. PMID:26230740

  7. Effect of Individual Strengthening Exercises for Anterior Pelvic Tilt Muscles on Back Pain, Pelvic Angle, and Lumbar ROMs of a LBP Patient with Flat Back.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of individual strengthening exercises for the anterior pelvic tilt muscles on back pain, pelvic tilt angle, and lumbar ROM of a low back pain (LBP) patient with flat back. [Subject] A 37 year-old male, who complained of LBP pain at L3-5 levels with flat back, participated. [Methods] He performed the individual strengthening exercises for anterior pelvic tilt muscles (erector spinae,iliopsoas, rectus femoris). [Results] Pelvic tilt angles of the right and left sides were recovered to normal ranges. His lumbar ROMs increased, and low back pain decreased. [Conclusion] We suggest that individual resistance exercises are a necessary approach for effective and fast strengthening of pelvic anterior tilt muscles in LBP with flat back.

  8. Are cervical multifidus muscles active during whiplash and startle? An initial experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G; Brault, John R; Inglis, J Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Background The cervical multifidus muscles insert onto the lower cervical facet capsular ligaments and the cervical facet joints are the source of pain in some chronic whiplash patients. Reflex activation of the multifidus muscle during a whiplash exposure could potentially contribute to injuring the facet capsular ligament. Our goal was to determine the onset latency and activation amplitude of the cervical multifidus muscles to a simulated rear-end collision and a loud acoustic stimuli. Methods Wire electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were inserted unilaterally into the cervical multifidus muscles of 9 subjects (6M, 3F) at the C4 and C6 levels. Seated subjects were then exposed to a forward acceleration (peak acceleration 1.55 g, speed change 1.8 km/h) and a loud acoustic tone (124 dB, 40 ms, 1 kHz). Results Aside from one female, all subjects exhibited multifidus activity after both stimuli (8 subjects at C4, 6 subjects at C6). Neither onset latencies nor EMG amplitude varied with stimulus type or spine level (p > 0.13). Onset latencies and amplitudes varied widely, with EMG activity appearing within 160 ms of stimulus onset (for at least one of the two stimuli) in 7 subjects. Conclusion These data indicate that the multifidus muscles of some individuals are active early enough to potentially increase the collision-induced loading of the facet capsular ligaments. PMID:18534030

  9. Role of central sensitization in symptoms beyond muscle pain, and the evaluation of a patient with widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Muhammad B

    2007-06-01

    Patients with widespread pain or fibromyalgia syndrome have many symptoms besides musculoskeletal pain: e.g. fatigue, sleep difficulties, a swollen feeling in tissues, paresthesia, cognitive dysfunction, dizziness, and symptoms of overlapping conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and restless legs syndrome. There is evidence for central sensitization in these conditions, but further studies are needed. Anxiety, stress and depression are also present in 30-45% of patients. Other factors that may contribute to symptoms include endocrine dysfunction, psychosocial distress, trauma, and disrupted sleep. Evaluation of a patient presenting with widespread pain includes history and physical examination to diagnose both fibromyalgia and associated or concomitant conditions. Fibromyalgia should be diagnosed by its own characteristic features. Some patients with otherwise typical symptoms of fibromyalgia may have as few as four to six tender points in clinical practice. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus should be evaluated for fibromyalgia, since 20-30% of them have associated fibromyalgia, requiring a different treatment approach.

  10. Can palpation-induced muscle pain pattern contribute to the differential diagnosis among temporomandibular disorders, primary headaches phenotypes and possible bruxism?

    PubMed Central

    Porporatti, André-Luís; Calderon, Patrícia-dos-Santos; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2016-01-01

    Background The evaluation of possible differences in the distribution or characteristics of palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles could be valuable in terms of diagnostic assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different combinations of anterior temporalis (AT) and masseter palpation-induced pain in the diagnostic of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), primary headaches and bruxism. Material and Methods A total of 1200 dental records of orofacial pain adult patients were analyzed. The outcomes were dichotomously classified (presence/absence) as following: a) AT and/or masseter palpation-induced pain; b) myogenous TMD; c) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia (arthrogenous TMD); d) migraine; e) tension-type headache (TTH); f) self-reported bruxism. Binomial logistic regression model (α = 5%) was applied to the data considering the palpation-induced muscle pain as the dependent variable. Results Mean age (SD) were 35.7 years (13.4) for 635 included dental records (83% females). Myogenous and arthrogenous TMD, migraine, TTH and bruxism were mainly associated with, respectively, masseter palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=5.77, 95%CI 3.86-8.62), AT or masseter palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=2.39, 95%CI 1.57-3.63), bilateral AT palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=2.67, 95%CI 1.64-4.32), masseter and AT palpation-induced pain (p=0.009 - OR=1.62, 95%CI 1.12-2.33) and bilateral masseter palpation-induced pain (p=0.01 - OR=1.74, 95%CI 1.13-2.69). Conclusions Palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles may play a role in the differential diagnosis among painful TMD, primary headaches and bruxism. Key words:Diagnosis, temporomandibular joint disorders, migraine, tension-type headache, bruxism. PMID:26615507

  11. EFFECT OF USE OF BONE-MARROW CENTRIFUGATE ON MUSCLE INJURY TREATMENT: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Daniel Ferreira Fernandes; Guarniero, Roberto; Vaz, Carlos Eduardo Sanches; de Santana, Paulo José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bone-marrow centrifugate on the healing of muscle injuries in rabbits. Methods: This experimental study involved use of fifteen adult male New Zealand White rabbits. Each animal received a transverse lesion in the middle of the right tibialis anterior muscle, to which an absorbable collagen sponge, soaked in a centrifugate of bone marrow aspirate from the ipsilateral iliac bone, was added. The left hind limb was used as a control and underwent the same injury, but in this case only the absorbable collagen sponge. Thirty days later, the animals were sacrificed to study the muscle healing. These muscle areas were subjected to histological analysis with histomorphometry, with the aim of measuring the number of muscle cells per square micrometer undergoing regeneration and the proportion of resultant fibrosis. Results: The centrifugation method used in this study resulted in an average concentration of nucleated cells greater than the number of these cells in original aspirates, without causing significant cell destruction. Addition of the bone marrow centrifugate did not result in any significant increase in the number of muscle cells undergoing regeneration, in relation to the control group. There was also no significant difference in the proportion of resultant fibrosis, compared with the control group. Conclusion: Administration of the bone marrow centrifugate used in this study did not favor healing of muscle injuries in rabbits. PMID:27047832

  12. The effect of cognitive bias modification for interpretation on avoidance of pain during an acute experimental pain task.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma Blaisdale; Sharpe, Louise

    2014-08-01

    Research confirms that patients with chronic pain show a tendency to interpret ambiguous stimuli as pain related. However, whether modifying these interpretive pain biases impacts pain outcomes is unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate that interpretation biases towards pain can be modified, and that changing these biases influences pain outcomes in the cold pressor task. One hundred and six undergraduate students were randomly allocated to receive either threatening or reassuring information regarding the cold pressor. They also were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 conditions in the Ambiguous Scenarios Task, in which they were trained to have either a threatening interpretation of pain (pain bias condition) or a nonthreatening interpretation of pain (no pain bias condition). Therefore, the study had a 2 (threat/reassuring)×2 (pain bias/no pain bias) design. Analyses showed that a bias was induced contingent on condition, and that the threat manipulation was effective. Participants in the pain bias condition hesitated more before doing the cold pressor task than those in the no pain bias condition, as did those in the threat compared with the reassurance condition. The major finding was that interpretive bias mediated the relationship between bias condition and hesitance time, supporting the causal role of interpretive biases for avoidance behaviors in current chronic pain models. No differences were found on other pain outcomes regarding bias or threat, and the efficacy of the bias modification was not impacted by different levels of threat. These results suggest that cognitive bias modification should be further explored as a potential intervention in pain.

  13. Effects of Muscle Fatigue, Creep, and Musculoskeletal Pain on Neuromuscular Responses to Unexpected Perturbation of the Trunk: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jacques; Lardon, Arnaud; Boivin, Frédéric; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Trunk neuromuscular responses have been shown to adapt under the influence of muscle fatigue, as well as spinal tissue creep or even with the presence of low back pain (LBP). Despite a large number of studies exploring how these external perturbations affect the spinal stability, characteristics of such adaptations remains unclear. Aim: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the quality of evidence of studies investigating trunk neuromuscular responses to unexpected trunk perturbation. More specifically, the targeted neuromuscular responses were trunk muscle activity reflex and trunk kinematics under the influence of muscle fatigue, spinal creep, and musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A research of the literature was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and Sport-Discus databases using terms related to trunk neuromuscular reflex responses, measured by electromyography (baseline activity, reflex latency, and reflex amplitude) and/or trunk kinematic, in context of unexpected external perturbation. Moreover, independent variables must be either trunk muscle fatigue or spinal tissue creep or LBP. All included articles were scored for their electromyography methodology based on the “Surface Electromyography for the Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM)” and the “International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK)” recommendations whereas overall quality of articles was scored using a specific quality checklist modified from the Quality Index. Meta-analysis was performed on reflex latency variable. Results: A final set of 29 articles underwent quality assessments. The mean quality score was 79%. No effect of muscle fatigue on erector spinae reflex latency following an unexpected perturbation, nor any other distinctive effects was found for back muscle fatigue and reflex parameters. As for spinal tissue creep effects, no alteration was found for any of the trunk reflex variables. Finally, the meta-analysis revealed an increased

  14. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Anantharaman; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a “muscle synergy” based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings) and their control signals (termed synergy controls) have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements—movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of “simulated” synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1) synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution) (2) along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution). On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy) to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy) did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures. PMID:25520645

  15. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells.

  16. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  17. Back pain - returning to work

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain - work; Backache - work; Lumbar pain - work; Pain - back - chronic; Low back pain - work; Lumbago - work ... Exercise helps to prevent future back pain: Exercise a little ... keep your heart healthy and your muscles strong. If walking is ...

  18. The Haglund painful heel syndrome. Experimental investigation of cause and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, M A; Pavlov, H

    1984-01-01

    Haglund syndrome, a common cause of pain in the posterior heel, consists of a painful swelling of the local soft tissues (the so-called pump bump) and prominence of the calcaneal bursal projection. The condition is caused by compression of the distal Achilles tendon and surrounding soft tissue between the os calcis and the posterior shoe counter. Osseous plantar projections appear to be a critical etiologic factor in Haglund syndrome. With an experimental model, it has been demonstrated that osseous projections on the plantar surface of the calcaneus adversely influence the bone-soft tissue relation of the posterior heel. Shoe heel elevation has been shown to be clinically effective in alleviating symptoms. It is demonstrated with an experimental model that elevation of the shoe heel decreases the pitch angle. This diminishes the prominence of the bursal projection and allows the foot to slip forward, displacing the posterior calcaneus away from the shoe counter.

  19. IL-10 Cytokine Released from M2 Macrophages Is Crucial for Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Acupuncture in a Model of Inflammatory Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Morgana D.; Bobinski, Franciane; Sato, Karina L.; Kolker, Sandra J.; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Santos, Adair R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle pain is a common medical problem that is difficult to treat. One nonpharmacological treatment used is acupuncture, a procedure in which fine needles are inserted into body points with the intent of relieving pain and other symptoms. Here we investigated the effects of manual acu-puncture (MA) on modulating macrophage phenotype and interleukin-10 (IL-10) concentrations in animals with muscle inflammation. Carrageenan, injected in the gastrocnemius muscle of mice, induces an inflammatory response characterized by mechanical hyperalgesia and edema. The inflammation is initially a neutrophilic infiltration that converts to a macrophage-dominated inflammation by 48 h. MA of the Sanyinjiao or Spleen 6 (SP6) acupoint reduces nociceptive behaviors, heat, and mechanical hyperalgesia and enhanced escape/avoidance and the accompanying edema. SP6 MA increased muscle IL-10 levels and was ineffective in reducing pain behaviors and edema in IL-10 knockout (IL-10−/−) mice. Repeated daily treatments with SP6 MA induced a phenotypic switch of muscle macrophages with reduced M1 macrophages (pro-inflammatory cells) and an increase of M2 macrophages (anti-inflammatory cells and important IL-10 source). These findings provide new evidence that MA produces a phenotypic switch in macrophages and increases IL-10 concentrations in muscle to reduce pain and inflammation. PMID:24961568

  20. Pain in experimental autoimmune encephalitis: a comparative study between different mouse models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain can be one of the most severe symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) and develops with varying levels and time courses. MS-related pain is difficult to treat, since very little is known about the mechanisms underlying its development. Animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mimic many aspects of MS and are well-suited to study underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Yet, to date very little is known about the sensory abnormalities in different EAE models. We therefore aimed to thoroughly characterize pain behavior of the hindpaw in SJL and C57BL/6 mice immunized with PLP139-151 peptide or MOG35-55 peptide respectively. Moreover, we studied the activity of pain-related molecules and plasticity-related genes in the spinal cord and investigated functional changes in the peripheral nerves using electrophysiology. Methods We analyzed thermal and mechanical sensitivity of the hindpaw in both EAE models during the whole disease course. Qualitative and quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of pain-related molecules and plasticity-related genes was performed on spinal cord sections at different timepoints during the disease course. Moreover, we investigated functional changes in the peripheral nerves using electrophysiology. Results Mice in both EAE models developed thermal hyperalgesia during the chronic phase of the disease. However, whereas SJL mice developed marked mechanical allodynia over the chronic phase of the disease, C57BL/6 mice developed only minor mechanical allodynia over the onset and peak phase of the disease. Interestingly, the magnitude of glial changes in the spinal cord was stronger in SJL mice than in C57BL/6 mice and their time course matched the temporal profile of mechanical hypersensitivity. Conclusions Diverse EAE models bearing genetic, clinical and histopathological heterogeneity, show different profiles of sensory and pathological changes and thereby enable studying the mechanistic basis

  1. Strengthening of the Hip and Core Versus Knee Muscles for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Bolgla, Lori; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E.; Emery, Carolyn; Hamstra-Wright, Karrie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common injury in running and jumping athletes. Randomized controlled trials suggest that incorporating hip and core strengthening (HIP) with knee-focused rehabilitation (KNEE) improves PFP outcomes. However, no randomized controlled trials have, to our knowledge, directly compared HIP and KNEE programs. Objective: To compare PFP pain, function, hip- and knee-muscle strength, and core endurance between KNEE and HIP protocols after 6 weeks of rehabilitation. We hypothesized greater improvements in (1) pain and function, (2) hip strength and core endurance for patients with PFP involved in the HIP protocol, and (3) knee strength for patients involved in the KNEE protocol. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Four clinical research laboratories in Calgary, Alberta; Chicago, Illinois; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Augusta, Georgia. Patients or Other Participants: Of 721 patients with PFP screened, 199 (27.6%) met the inclusion criteria (66 men [31.2%], 133 women [66.8%], age = 29.0 ± 7.1 years, height = 170.4 ± 9.4 cm, weight = 67.6 ± 13.5 kg). Intervention(s): Patients with PFP were randomly assigned to a 6-week KNEE or HIP protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Primary variables were self-reported visual analog scale and Anterior Knee Pain Scale measures, which were conducted weekly. Secondary variables were muscle strength and core endurance measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. Results: Compared with baseline, both the visual analog scale and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale improved for patients with PFP in both the HIP and KNEE protocols (P < .001), but the visual analog scale scores for those in the HIP protocol were reduced 1 week earlier than in the KNEE group. Both groups increased in strength (P < .001), but those in the HIP protocol gained more in hip-abductor (P = .01) and -extensor (P = .01) strength and posterior core endurance (P = .05) compared with the KNEE group. Conclusions: Both the HIP and KNEE

  2. Endogenous Opioid Antagonism in Physiological Experimental Pain Models: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Mads U.; Pereira, Manuel P.; Andersen, Lars Peter H.; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double-blind studies using ʻinhibitoryʼ or ʻsensitizingʼ, physiological test paradigms in healthy human subjects. The databases PubMed and Embase were searched according to predefined criteria. Out of a total of 2,142 records, 63 studies (1,477 subjects [male/female ratio = 1.5]) were considered relevant. Twenty-five studies utilized ʻinhibitoryʼ test paradigms (ITP) and 38 studies utilized ʻsensitizingʼ test paradigms (STP). The ITP-studies were characterized as conditioning modulation models (22 studies) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation models (rTMS; 3 studies), and, the STP-studies as secondary hyperalgesia models (6 studies), ʻpainʼ models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and rTMS. In the remaining 14 conditioning modulation studies either absence of effects or ambiguous effects by MOR-antagonists, were observed. In the STP-studies, no effect of the opioid-blockade could be demonstrated in 5 out of 6 secondary hyperalgesia studies. The direction of MOR-antagonist dependent effects upon pain ratings, threshold assessments and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), did not appear consistent in 28 out of 32 ʻpainʼ model studies. In conclusion, only in 2 experimental human pain models, i.e., stress-induced analgesia and rTMS, administration of MOR-antagonist demonstrated a consistent effect, presumably mediated by an EOS-dependent mechanisms of analgesia and hyperalgesia. PMID:26029906

  3. Masticatory muscle disorders diagnostic criteria: the American Academy of Orofacial Pain versus the research diagnostic criteria/temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD).

    PubMed

    Reiter, S; Goldsmith, C; Emodi-Perlman, A; Friedman-Rubin, P; Winocur, E

    2012-12-01

    In this study, relevant cases were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who were diagnosed as suffering from myofascial pain only according to the research diagnostic criteria/temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) criteria, in order to examine whether or not they could fulfil the American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) diagnostic criteria for TMD-related masticatory muscle disorders. One hundred and twenty-seven patients, diagnosed according to the RDC/TMD criteria as having myofascial pain with or without limited jaw opening only, were allocated to two groups according to their answers to the RDC/TMD 'jaw disability checklist'. The two groups were compared for Axis I and II data taken from the RDC/TMD questionnaire. Thirty-eight of the patients (29·9%) did not associate their symptoms with jaw functions (e.g. chewing and yawning). This group was characterised by increased range of motion (ROM) and older average age. The AAOP diagnostic criteria for TMD require pain on function in all subtypes of TMD-related muscle disorders. An association between pain and jaw function is common and research is needed to determine whether this should be categorised differently to muscle pain unrelated to jaw function. There may well be different pathophysiological mechanisms and consequently different management strategies for these two pain conditions.

  4. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Keczmer, Przemysław; Łochowski, Rafał M.; Tomal, Paulina; Rychlik, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Aim Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP) and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects. Method Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images. Results Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (p<0.001), gluteus minimus (p<0.01) and piriformis (p<0.05)). The ICC values indicated that the inter-rater reproducibility was greater than 0.90 for all measurements (LBLP and healthy subjects), except for the measurement of the right gluteus medius muscle in LBLP patients, which was equal to 0.848. Conclusion More than 50% of LBLP subjects presented symptomatic gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscle atrophy. 3-D manual segmentation reliably measured muscle volume in all the measured pelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required. PMID:27459688

  5. A unilateral open door laminoplasty technique: prospective analysis of the relationship between midline extensor muscle preservation and postoperative neck pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hoon; Jeong, Eui-Kyun; Lee, Moon Kyu; Chul Rhim, Seung; Roh, Sung Woo; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2015-02-01

    Since laminoplasty was first introduced, several techniques have been developed to reduce postoperative neck pain and progressive kyphosis following this procedure. We describe the importance of deep muscle preservation to prevent postoperative neck pain following cervical posterior surgery, using the inter-muscular plane. We performed cervical laminoplasty on 10 patients from March to July 2012. The mean follow-up duration was 14.6 (range 12-18) months, and the mean age was 58.8 (48-68) years. There were eight men and two women in the study cohort, which consisted of eight cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and two cases of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and neck disability index (NDI) score were assessed before and at 6 and 12 months after surgery. The numeric rating scale (NRS) for neck pain was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. CT scan was performed immediately after the operation, and a radiograph was performed preoperatively and during the follow-up evaluation at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The preoperative JOA and NDI scores improved in all patients. Although there were two patients who complained of moderate postoperative neck pain (NRS 4 and 5), their condition gradually improved. Seven patients had mild or no neck pain (below NRS 3) at the 12 month follow-up. In addition, the cervical alignment was well maintained in all but one patient. Although larger prospective cohorts, longer follow-up periods, and comparative analyses are still needed, the clinical and radiological outcomes observed in the short 12 month period in this small cohort are promising.

  6. Manipulating the Placebo Response in Experimental Pain by Altering Doctor’s Performance Style

    PubMed Central

    Czerniak, Efrat; Biegon, Anat; Ziv, Amitai; Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Weiser, Mark; Alon, Uri; Citron, Atay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Performance is paramount in traditional healing rituals. From a Western perspective, such performative behavior can be understood principally as inducing patients’ faith in the performer’s supernatural healing powers and effecting positive changes through the same mechanisms attributed to the placebo response, which is defined as improvement of clinical outcome in individuals receiving inactive treatment. Here we examined the possibility of using theatrical performance tools, including stage directions and scripting, to reproducibly manipulate the style and content of a simulated doctor–patient encounter and influence the placebo response in experimental pain. Methods: A total of 122 healthy volunteers (18–45 years, 76 men) exposed to experimental pain (the cold pressor test) were assessed for pain threshold and tolerance before and after receiving a placebo cream from a “doctor” impersonated by a trained actor. The actor alternated between two distinct scripts and stage directions, i.e., performance styles created by a theater director/playwright, one emulating a standard doctor–patient encounter (scenario A) and the other emphasizing attentiveness and strong suggestion, elements also present in ritual healing (scenario B). The placebo response size was calculated as the %difference in pain threshold and tolerance after exposure relative to baseline. In addition, subjects demonstrating a ≥30% increase in pain threshold or tolerance relative to baseline were defined as responders. Each encounter was videotaped in its entirety. Results: Inspection of the videotapes confirmed the reproducibility and consistency of the distinct scenarios enacted by the “doctor”-performer. Furthermore, scenario B resulted in a significant increase in pain threshold relative to scenario A. Interestingly, this increase derived from the placebo responder subgroup; as shown by two-way analysis of variance (performance style, F = 4.30; p = 0.040; η2 = 0

  7. The Effects of Stabilization and Mckenzie Exercises on Transverse Abdominis and Multifidus Muscle Thickness, Pain, and Disability: A Randomized Controlled Trial in NonSpecific Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Hosseinifar, Mohammad; Akbari, Mohammad; Behtash, Hamid; Amiri, Mohsen; Sarrafzadeh, Javad

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effectiveness of stabilization and McKenzie exercises on pain, disability, and thickness of the transverse abdominis and multifidus muscles in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain. [Subjects] Thirty patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the McKenzie and stabilization exercise groups. [Methods] Before and after intervention, pain, disability, and thickness of the transverse abdominis and multifidus muscles were evaluated by visual analogue scale, functional rating index, and sonography, respectively. The training program was 18 scheduled sessions of individual training for both groups. [Results] After interventions, the pain score decreased in both groups. The disability score decreased only in the stabilization group. The thickness of the left multifidus was significantly increased during resting and contracting states in the stabilization group. The thickness of the right transverse abdominis during the abdominal draw-in maneuver, and thickness of the left transverse abdominis during the active straight leg raising maneuver were significantly increased in the stabilization group. The intensity of pain, disability score, thickness of the right transverse abdominis during the abdominal draw-in manouver, and thickness of the left transverse abdominis during active straight leg raising in the stabilization group were greater than those on the Mackenzie. [Conclusion] Stabilization exercises are more effective than McKenzie exercises in improving the intensity of pain and function score and in increasing the thickness of the transverse abdominis muscle.

  8. Role of calcium and vitamin D in the treatment of muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Raymond CR

    1985-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D deficiencies are associated with abnormal muscular functions including non-specific pain and weakness. A diet survey of a patient complaining of back pain showed a low calcium intake. Clinically patients may have low utilization of dietary calcium. In addition to the normal chiropractic treatments, the patient was given calcium and vitamin D supplements. These supplements greatly improved the recovery of the patient. The nutritional status of calcium and vitamin D in the general Canadian population is discussed.

  9. Time Course Analysis of the Effects of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Pain and Vasomotor Responses Evoked by Glutamate Injection into Human Temporalis Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt da Silva, Larissa; Kulas, Dolarose; Karshenas, Ali; Cairns, Brian E.; Bach, Flemming W.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    The effect of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) on glutamate-evoked temporalis muscle pain and vasomotor responses was investigated in healthy men and women over a 60 day time course. Subjects participated in a pre-BoNTA session where their responses to injection of glutamate (1 M, 0.2 mL) and saline (0.2 mL) into the temporalis muscles were assessed. On Day 1, BoNTA (5 U) was injected into one temporalis muscle and saline into the contralateral temporalis muscle, in a randomized order. Subjects then received intramuscular injections of glutamate (1 M, 0.2 mL) into the left and right temporalis muscles at 3 h and subsequently 7, 30 and 60 days post-injection of BoNTA. Pain intensity, pain area, and neurogenic inflammation (skin temperature and skin blood perfusion) were recorded. Prior to BoNTA treatment, glutamate evoked significantly greater pain and vasomotor reactions (P < 0.001) than saline. BoNTA significantly reduced glutamate-evoked pain intensity (P < 0.05), pain area (P < 0.01), skin blood perfusion (P < 0.05), and skin temperature (P < 0.001). The inhibitory effect of BoNTA was present at 3 h after injection, peaked after 7 days and returned to baseline by 60 days. Findings from the present study demonstrated a rapid action of BoNTA on glutamate-evoked pain and neurogenic inflammation, which is in line with animal studies. PMID:24517906

  10. Muscle performance, body fat, pain and function in the elderly with arthritis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Wagner Teixeira; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho; Mainenti, Míriam Raquel Meira

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To correlate muscule performance, body composition, pain and joint function in elderly people with gonarthrosis. Method: 21 elderly patients were submitted to bioelectrical impedance analysis, dynamometry associated with electromyographic (EMG) evaluation of isometric knee extension, in addition to pain assessment by the Numeric Pain Intensity Scale and function assessment, by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis (OA) questionnaire. Correlations were checked by the Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The sample characteristics were mean age 67.36 ± 4.21 years old, body fat percentage 40.57±6.15%, total WOMAC score 43.27 ± 16.32%, and maximum strength 19.95 ± 6.99 kgF. Pain during movement showed a statistical association with WOMAC physical activity domain (r = 0.47) and its general score (r = 0.51); pain intensity at night presented association with WOMAC stiffness domain (r = 0.55), in addition to the negative correlation with the slope values of the Medium Frequency of the EMG signal (r = - 0.57). Conclusion: pain intensity is correlated to functional incapacity in elderly people with knee OA and to a greater expression of fatigue in EMG signal. Levels of Evidence III, Study of non consecutive patients PMID:24644422

  11. Concept priming and pain: an experimental approach to understanding gender roles in sex-related pain differences.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Stephanie L; Rasinski, Heather M; Geers, Andrew L; Helfer, Suzanne G; France, Christopher R

    2011-04-01

    Prior research has found that sex differences in pain are partially due to individual variations in gender roles. In a laboratory study, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of covert gender role cues can also moderate the extent to which women and men experience pain. Specifically, we varied gender role cues by asking male and female participants to write about instances in which they behaved in a stereotypically feminine, masculine, or neutral manner. Pain and cardiovascular reactivity to the cold pressor task were then assessed. Results revealed that, when primed with femininity, men reported less pain and anxiety from the cold pressor task than women. However, no differences existed between the sexes in the masculine or neutral prime conditions. The results indicate that covert gender cues can alter pain reports. Further, at least in some situations, feminine role cues may be more influential on pain reports than masculine role cues.

  12. Handout on Health: Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... uterine tissue in places outside the uterus; and fibromyalgia, a condition of widespread muscle pain and fatigue. ... to be an uncommon cause of back pain. Fibromyalgia. A condition of widespread muscle pain, fatigue, and ...

  13. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  14. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders.

  15. Comparative evaluation of ambulation patterns and isokinetic muscle strength for the application of rehabilitation exercise in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soonyoung

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in the ambulation patterns and knee joint performance between people with and without patellofemoral pain. The present study also aimed to utilize these results as a basis for the development of pain-alleviating and performance-improving treatment programs. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects consisted of 32 adult females diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 25 adult females without patellofemoral pain (controls). Contact ratio patterns during ambulation and isokinetic muscle strength around the knee joint were measured in both groups and then compared. [Results] Ambulation patterns, specifically the contact ratios of the left forefoot and right forefoot, differed significantly between patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls. An isokinetic muscle strength test demonstrated that left and right knee extensor and flexor torques also significantly differed between these two groups. [Conclusion] Basic analysis based on ambulation patterns and muscle strength can be used to indicate functional recovery from patellofemoral pain syndrome and provide insight into improving the rehabilitation of patients.

  16. Comparative evaluation of ambulation patterns and isokinetic muscle strength for the application of rehabilitation exercise in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in the ambulation patterns and knee joint performance between people with and without patellofemoral pain. The present study also aimed to utilize these results as a basis for the development of pain-alleviating and performance-improving treatment programs. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects consisted of 32 adult females diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 25 adult females without patellofemoral pain (controls). Contact ratio patterns during ambulation and isokinetic muscle strength around the knee joint were measured in both groups and then compared. [Results] Ambulation patterns, specifically the contact ratios of the left forefoot and right forefoot, differed significantly between patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls. An isokinetic muscle strength test demonstrated that left and right knee extensor and flexor torques also significantly differed between these two groups. [Conclusion] Basic analysis based on ambulation patterns and muscle strength can be used to indicate functional recovery from patellofemoral pain syndrome and provide insight into improving the rehabilitation of patients. PMID:28174434

  17. JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition blocks skeletal muscle wasting downstream of IL-6 and in experimental cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Bonetto, Andrea; Aydogdu, Tufan; Jin, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zongxiu; Zhan, Rui; Puzis, Leopold; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Zimmers, Teresa A

    2012-08-01

    Cachexia, the metabolic dysregulation leading to sustained loss of muscle and adipose tissue, is a devastating complication of cancer and other chronic diseases. Interleukin-6 and related cytokines are associated with muscle wasting in clinical and experimental cachexia, although the mechanisms by which they might induce muscle wasting are unknown. One pathway activated strongly by IL-6 family ligands is the JAK/STAT3 pathway, the function of which has not been evaluated in regulation of skeletal muscle mass. Recently, we showed that skeletal muscle STAT3 phosphorylation, nuclear localization, and target gene expression are activated in C26 cancer cachexia, a model with high IL-6 family ligands. Here, we report that STAT3 activation is a common feature of muscle wasting, activated in muscle by IL-6 in vivo and in vitro and by different types of cancer and sterile sepsis. Moreover, STAT3 activation proved both necessary and sufficient for muscle wasting. In C(2)C(12) myotubes and in mouse muscle, mutant constitutively activated STAT3-induced muscle fiber atrophy and exacerbated wasting in cachexia. Conversely, inhibiting STAT3 pharmacologically with JAK or STAT3 inhibitors or genetically with dominant negative STAT3 and short hairpin STAT3 reduced muscle atrophy downstream of IL-6 or cancer. These results indicate that STAT3 is a primary mediator of muscle wasting in cancer cachexia and other conditions of high IL-6 family signaling. Thus STAT3 could represent a novel therapeutic target for the preservation of skeletal muscle in cachexia.

  18. IL-17 is not essential for inflammation and chronic pelvic pain development in an experimental model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Motrich, Ruben D; Breser, María L; Sánchez, Leonardo R; Godoy, Gloria J; Prinz, Immo; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-03-01

    Pain and inflammation in the absence of infection are hallmarks in chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) patients. The etiology of CP/CPPS is unclear, and autoimmunity has been proposed as a cause. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) models have long been used for studying CP/CPPS. Herein, we studied prostate inflammation induction and chronic pelvic pain development in EAP using IL-12p40-KO, IL-4-KO, IL-17-KO, and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice. Prostate antigen (PAg) immunization in C57BL/6 mice induced specific Th1 and Th17 immune responses and severe prostate inflammation and cell infiltration, mainly composed of CD4 T cells and macrophages. Moreover, chronic pelvic pain was evidenced by increased allodynia responses. In immunized IL-17-KO mice, the presence of a prominent PAg-specific Th1 immune response caused similar prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. Furthermore, markedly high PAg-specific Th1 immune responses, exacerbated prostate inflammation, and chronic pelvic pain were detected in immunized IL-4-KO mice. Conversely, immunized IL-12p40-KO mice developed PAg-specific Th2 immune responses, characterized by high IL-4 secretion and neither infiltration nor damage in the prostate. As observed in wild-type control animals, IL12p40-KO mice did not evidence tactile allodynia responses. Our results suggest that, as in patients, chronic pelvic pain is a consequence of prostate inflammation. After PAg immunization, a Th1-associated immune response develops and induces prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. The absence of Th1 or Th2 cytokines, respectively, diminishes or enhances EAP susceptibility. In addition, IL-17 showed not to be essential for pathology induction and chronic pelvic pain development.

  19. Effect of endocannabinoid degradation on pain: role of FAAH polymorphisms in experimental and postoperative pain in women treated for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cajanus, Kristiina; Holmström, Emil J; Wessman, Maija; Anttila, Verneri; Kaunisto, Mari A; Kalso, Eija

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) metabolizes the endocannabinoid anandamide, which has an important role in nociception. We investigated the role of common FAAH single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in experimentally induced and postoperative pain. One thousand women undergoing surgery for breast cancer participated in the study. They were tested for cold (n = 900) and heat pain (n = 1000) sensitivity. After surgery, their pain intensities and analgesic consumption were carefully registered. FAAH genotyping was performed using MassARRAY platform and genome-wide chip (n = 926). Association between 8 FAAH SNPs and 9 pain phenotypes was analyzed using linear regression models. The results showed that carrying 2 copies of a missense variant converting proline at position 129 to threonine (rs324420) resulted in significantly lower cold pain sensitivity and less need for postoperative analgesia. More specifically, rs324420 and another highly correlated SNP, rs1571138, associated significantly with cold pain intensity (corrected P value, 0.0014; recessive model). Patients homozygous for the minor allele (AA genotype) were less sensitive to cold pain (β = -1.48; 95% CI, -2.14 to -0.8). Two other SNPs (rs3766246 and rs4660928) showed nominal association with cold pain, and SNPs rs4141964, rs3766246, rs324420, and rs1571138 nominal association with oxycodone consumption. In conclusion, FAAH gene variation was shown to associate with cold pain sensitivity with P129T/rs324420 being the most likely causal variant as it is known to reduce the FAAH enzyme activity. The same variant showed nominal association with postoperative oxycodone consumption. Our conclusions are, however, limited by the lack of replication and the results should be replicated in an independent cohort.

  20. Evaluation of the Immediate Effect of Auricular Acupuncture on Pain and Electromyographic Activity of the Upper Trapezius Muscle in Patients with Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Sham-Controlled, Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andréia Cristina de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; dos Santos, Douglas Meira; Melo, Nivea Cristina De; Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Amorim, César Ferreira; Politti, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the present study was to assess the immediate effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the upper trapezius muscle and pain in nonspecific neck pain (NS-NP) patients. Twelve patients with NS-NP (NS-NP group) and 12 healthy subjects (HS Group) were enrolled in a randomized, single-blinded, crossover study. Each subject received a single session of AA and sham AA (SAA). Surface EMG activity was measured in the upper trapezius muscle at different “step contractions” of isometric shoulder elevation (15%, 20%, 25%, and 30% MVC). The outcome measure in patients with NS-NP was based on the numerical pain rating scale (NRS). AA treatment led to a significant decrease in EMG activity in both groups (NS-NP group: p = 0.0001; HS group: p < 0.0001—ANOVA test). This was not the case for the SAA treatment (NS-NP group: p = 0.71; HS group: p < 0.54). Significant decreases (p < 0.001) in the NRS were found for both treatments (AA and SAA). This study demonstrated the immediate effect of auricular acupuncture on the electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius muscle but the effect of this intervention on pain symptoms in patients with nonspecific neck pain was inconclusive. PMID:26451155

  1. Behavioural changes and muscle strength in Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected with Toxocara cati and T. canis.

    PubMed

    Santos, S V; Moura, J V L; Lescano, S A Z; Castro, J M; Ribeiro, M C S A; Chieffi, P P

    2015-07-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are nematode parasites in dogs and cats, respectively, transmitted by ingestion of embryonated eggs, transmammary and transplacental (T. canis) routes and paratenic host predation. Many parasites use mechanisms that change the behaviour of their hosts to ensure continued transmission. Several researchers have demonstrated behavioural changes in mouse models as paratenic hosts for T. canis. However, there have been no studies on behavioural changes in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) experimentally infected with T. cati. This study investigated behavioural changes and muscle strength in male and female rats experimentally infected with T. cati or T. canis in acute and chronic phases of infection. Regardless of sex, rats infected with T. cati showed a greater decrease in muscle strength 42 days post infection compared to rats infected with T. canis. However, behavioural changes were only observed in female rats infected with T. canis.

  2. Back Pain and Endurance Training of Back Muscles: Justification for Further Study in Helicopter Pilots.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    clinical trial [see comments]. Spine 1990Dec;15(12):1317-1320. 17. Dul J, Hildebrandt VH. Ergonomie guidelines for the prevention of low back pain at...Congress 1962;XI Congress, Madrid: 145-151. 56. Singh R. Backache in Chetak Crew and Suggested Ergonomie Improvements in Aircraft Seat Design

  3. Can personality traits and gender predict the response to morphine? An experimental cold pain study.

    PubMed

    Pud, Dorit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Rogowski, Zeev; Adler, Rivka; Eisenberg, Elon

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the possible role of personality traits, in accordance with Cloninger's theory, and gender, in the variability of responsiveness to opioids. Specifically, it was intended to test whether or not the three personality dimensions - harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence (RD) and novelty seeking (NS) - as suggested by Cloninger, can predict inter-personal differences in responsiveness to morphine after exposure to experimental cold pain. Thirty-four healthy volunteers (15 females, 19 males) were given the cold pressor test (CPT). Pain threshold, tolerance, and magnitude (VAS) were measured before and after (six measures, 30 min apart) the administration of either 0.5 mg/kg oral morphine sulphate (n=21) or 0.33 mg/kg oral active placebo (diphenhydramine) (n=13) in a randomized, double blind design. Assessment of the three personality traits, according to Cloninger's Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, was performed before the CPT. A high HA score (but not RD, NS, or baseline values of the three pain parameters) predicted a significantly larger pain relief following the administration of morphine sulphate (but not of the placebo). Women exhibited a larger response in response to both treatments, as indicated by a significantly increased threshold and tolerance following morphine sulphate as well as significantly increased tolerance and decreased magnitude following placebo administration. The present study confirms the existence of individual differences in response to analgesic treatment. It suggests that high HA personality trait is associated with better responsiveness to morphine treatment, and that females respond better than men to both morphine and placebo.

  4. Evaluation of ergonomic factors and postures that cause muscle pains in dentistry students’ bodies

    PubMed Central

    Shirzaei, Masoumeh; Khaje-Alizade, Ali; Mohammadi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Work-related musculoskeletal disorders commonly experienced by dental professionals are one of the main occupational health problem affecting their health and well-being.This study was conducted to evaluate ergonomic factors and profession-related postures and also investigate relationship between demographic factors and work condition with pain in dental students. Material and Methods 60 freshman and sophomore dentistry students were randomly chosen as the subjects of control group, and 60 of 5th and 6th-year students were selected as the members of exposure group. Data related to the subjects such as sex, doing exercise, severity of musculoskeletal pain were obtained through questionnaire. Students’ postures were directly observed while treating patients and they were scored by REBA method. Data were analyzed by SPSS software using Man-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Spearman and Kendall correlation tests. Results 80.8% of the subjects were not aware of the correct ergonomic postures for dental procedures. Severity of musculoskeletal pain in the exposure group (15.9± 4.2) was significantly higher than the control group (10.5 ±3.2), (p <0.001). Risk of the most subjects (84%) was at the medium level. Students who were more involved in clinical activities experienced more muscular pains. Conclusions The musculoskeletal disorders are probable prolonged in working hours in static positions, incorrect work postures, implying more force and even tools and instruments. Therefore, students who are aware of ergonomic principals of their own profession would be able to maintain their health through activities and lifelong. Key words:Posture, dentistry, students, musculoskeletal pain. PMID:26330941

  5. Corticomotor control of lumbar multifidus muscles is impaired in chronic low back pain: concurrent evidence from ultrasound imaging and double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is often associated with impaired control of deep trunk muscles and reorganization of the primary motor areas (M1). Precisely, functional changes of the lumbar multifidus muscles (MF) involved in spine stability may be of special interest in rehabilitation. Therefore, we tested MF corticomotor control using double transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms for the first time in this muscle and examined its link with MF volitional activation. Eleven individuals with lateralized CLBP and 13 pain-free participants were recruited. Ultrasound imaging enabled measurement of MF volitional isometric contraction in prone lying. TMS of MF M1 area was used to test hemispheric excitability and mechanisms in relation to motor programming, i.e., active motor threshold (AMT), amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and facilitation (SICF). In CLBP, SICI level was lower in the left hemisphere and MF volitional contraction was not related to AMT (M1 excitability), conversely to what was observed in the pain-free group. No other between-group difference was detected. These original findings support a plasticity of cortical maps controlling paravertebral muscles and likely including a different motor strategy for the control of MF. Changes of M1 function may thus underlie impaired motor control of lumbopelvic spine and pain persistence in CLBP.

  6. Sex differences in the contribution of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in trigeminal ganglia under an acute muscle pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Katelyn; Saloman, Jami L.; Zhang, Youping; Ro, Jin Y.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether functional subunits of the ATP-dependent K+ channel (KATP) are expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG), which contains sensory neurons that innervate oral and facial structures. We also investigated whether direct activation of the KATP effectively attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity in the context of an acute orofacial muscle pain condition. The KATP expression in TG and behavioral studies were conducted in age matched male and female Sprague Dawley rats. RT-PCR experiments showed that the mRNAs for the inwardly rectifying pore-forming subunits, Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, as well as the regulatory sulphonylurea subunits, SUR1 and SUR2, were reliably detected in TG. Subsequent western blot analysis confirmed that proteins for all 4 subunits are expressed in TG, and showed that Kir6.2 is expressed at a significantly higher level in male TG compared to that of female rats. This observation was confirmed by the immunohistochemical demonstration of higher percentages of Kir6 positive masseter afferents in female rats. Masseteric injection of capsaicin evokes a time dependent increase in masseter sensitivity to noxious mechanical stimulation. A specific KATP agonist, pinacidil, dose-dependently attenuated the capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in male rats. The dose of pinacidil (20µg) that completely blocked the capsaicin responses in male rats was ineffective in female rats regardless of their estrus phases. Only at the highest dose (300µg) we used, pinacidil was partially effective in female rats. Similarly, another KATP agonist, diazoxide which targets different KATP subunits also showed sex specific responses in attenuating capsaicin-induced masseter hypersensitivity. These data suggested that sex differences in functional KATP expression in TG may underlie sex specific responses to KATP agonists. The present study provided novel information on sex differences in KATP expression in TG and its contribution under an orofacial

  7. Occupation as a potential contributing factor for temporomandibular disorders, bruxism, and cervical muscle pain: a controlled comparative study.

    PubMed

    Emodi Perelman, Alona; Eli, Ilana; Rubin, Pessia F; Greenbaum, Tzvi; Heiliczer, Shimrit; Winocur, Ephraim

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of cervical muscle pain (CMP) and myogenic temporomandibular disorders (MFP) among female dentists, high-tech workers, and a group of subjects employed in other occupations; to investigate the associations among CMP, MFP, and bruxism in those groups; and to evaluate the influence of work-related stress on MFP and CMP. Evaluation was based on clinical examinations of MFP and CMP and self-reported questionnaires concerning pain and stress. The diagnosis of sleep bruxism was adapted using the validated diagnostic criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2), 2005, Westchester, IL), whilst the diagnosis of awake bruxism was made on the basis of a questionnaire. The odds of a subject with MFP experiencing concurrent CMP or bruxism (sleep and/or awake) ranged from 2.603 to 3.077. These results suggest that high-tech workers and dentists are at greater risk for developing temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and CMP when compared with general occupation workers, as defined in this study. Furthermore, the associations shown here between TMDs and CMP highlight the importance of palpating neck musculature as part of any routine examination of TMD.

  8. High infectivity of Toxocara cati larvae from muscles of experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kensuke; Yanagida, Tomonori; Akazawa, Naoko; Saitoh, Yasuhide

    2013-09-23

    The organ distribution of Toxocara cati larvae in albino rats Rattus norvegicus (n=6/group) experimentally inoculated with 1000 embryonated eggs was examined 1, 2, 3, 7, 30, 90, and 180 days post inoculation (dpi), and the infectivity of recovered larvae was evaluated by bioassay in mice. The intestines, liver, lungs, muscles (carcass) and other organs (heart, brain, spleen, kidneys and genital organs) were digested for larval recovery. Larvae were recovered from all rats, with the mean number of recovered larvae ranging from 13.3 at 1 dpi to 135.6 at 90 dpi. Most of the larvae recovered were detected in the intestines (56.3%) and liver (43.8%) at 1 dpi; liver (21.6%) and lungs (69.6%) at 2 dpi; muscles (45.9%) and lungs (36.9%) at 3 dpi. Subsequently, most of larvae were recovered from muscles at 7 dpi (92.5%), 30 dpi (97.8%), 90 dpi (99.4%) and 180 dpi (99.1%). In the mouse bioassay, 43.8% of 90-day-old larvae and 43.0% of 180-day-old larvae recovered from rats established in mice. The present study demonstrated that T. cati larvae persist predominantly in rat muscles and nearly half of them retain infective for at least half a year. The results indicate that R. norvegicus may be a suitable paratenic host of T. cati under natural conditions.

  9. Trunk Muscle Characteristics of the Multifidi, Erector Spinae, Psoas, and Quadratus Lumborum in Older Adults With and Without Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Sions, J Megan; Elliott, James M; Pohlig, Ryan T; Hicks, Gregory E

    2017-03-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To determine whether there are differences in trunk muscle characteristics between older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP), while controlling for age, sex, and body mass index. Background Muscle support for the trunk is provided by the multifidi, erector spinae, psoas, and quadratus lumborum. Trunk muscle characteristics may be altered with aging and/or chronic LBP. To date, most trunk muscle research has been conducted among younger adults. Given age-related muscle changes, such as reduced size and increased intramuscular fat, studies are needed in older adults, including those comparing older adults with and without LBP. Methods One hundred two older adults with (n = 53) and without (n = 49) chronic LBP were included. Cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements were taken by tracing inside the fascial borders on magnetic resonance images. Pixel intensity summaries were obtained to compute muscle-to-fat indices and relative muscle CSA, that is, CSA void of fat. Right/left averages for levels L2 through L5 were determined. Mixed-design analyses of covariance were used to test for differences between groups, based on LBP presence and sex, across levels (P≤.05). Results Older adults with LBP had a greater average multifidus muscle-to-fat index (0.51 versus 0.49) and smaller average erector spinae relative muscle CSA (8.56 cm(2) versus 9.26 cm(2)) when compared to control participants without LBP. No interactions between LBP status and average muscle characteristics were found for the psoas or quadratus lumborum (P>.05). Conclusion Up to 54% of older adult trunk muscle CSA may be fat. Women have smaller muscles and greater intramuscular fat (at lower spinal levels) than men. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):173-179. Epub 3 Feb 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7002.

  10. Striated muscle involvement in experimental oral infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, María Inés; Sanjuan, Norberto A

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most frequent causes of oral infection in humans, especially during early childhood. Several experimental models have been developed to study the pathogenesis of this virus but all of them employed adult animals. In this work, we developed an experimental model that uses mice younger than 4 days old, to more closely resemble human infection. Mice were infected subcutaneously with the prototype strain McIntyre of Herpes simplex-1, and the progression of infection was studied by immunoperoxidase. All animals died within 24-72 h post-infection, while viral antigens were found in the oral epithelium, nerves and brain. The most striking result was the finding of viral antigens in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells belonging to striated muscles. Organotypic cultures of striated muscles were performed, and viral replication was observed in them by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and viral isolation. We conclude that the infection of striated muscles is present from the onset of oral infection and, eventually, could explain some clinical observations in humans.

  11. Experimental basis of the hypotheses on the mechanism of skeletal muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Grazi, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Summary With time clever hypotheses may be accepted as “facts” without being supported by solid experimental evidence. In our opinion this happened with muscle contraction where pure suggestions still occupy the scene and delay the progress of the research. Among these suggestions are: 1. the believe that viscosity is irrelevant in the economy of muscle contraction, 2. the concept of the drag stroke, 3. some interpretations of the significance of the Huxley-Simmons manoeuvre, 4. the definition of the load as a force/cross-section without taking into consideration the possible, divergent effects of the infinite mass x acceleration couples. Technical questions are also raised since it is apparent that measuring equipments interfere with the measure itself. PMID:23738252

  12. The Effect of a New Neck Support Tying Method Using Thera-Band on Cervical ROM and Shoulder Muscle Pain after Overhead Work.

    PubMed

    Yoo, In-Gyu; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] This study proposed a new neck support tying (NST) method using Thera-Band for the prevention of neck and shoulder pain in workers doing overhead work. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the new NST method using Thera-Band on cervical ROM and shoulder pain after overhead work. [Subjects] Fourteen male subjects were recruited. [Methods] This study measured the cervical ROM and pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the upper and middle trapezius (UT and MT) muscles after the control and NST groups had performed overhead work. [Results] The cervical flexion, extension, and lateral flexion angles of the NST group were significantly larger than those of the control group. The PPTs of UT and MT of the NST group were significantly higher than those of the control group [Conclusion] The NST prevented ROM reduction and pain in the cervical and shoulder regions.

  13. Effect of experimental low back pain on neuromuscular control of the trunk in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Piché, Mathieu; Cantin, Vincent; Descarreaux, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Studies of electromyographic (EMG) activity and lumbopelvic rhythm have led to a better understanding of neuromuscular alterations in chronic low back pain (cLBP) patients. Whether these changes reflect adaptations to chronic pain or are induced by acute pain is still unclear. This work aimed to assess the effects of experimental LBP on lumbar erector spinae (LES) EMG activity and lumbopelvic kinematics during a trunk flexion-extension task in healthy volunteers and LBP patients. The contribution of disability to these effects was also examined. Twelve healthy participants and 14 cLBP patients performed flexion-extension tasks in three conditions; control, innocuous heat and noxious heat, applied on the skin over L5 or T7. The results indicated that noxious heat at L5 evoked specific increases in LES activity during static full trunk flexion and extension, irrespective of participants' group. Kinematic data suggested that LBP patients adopted a different movement strategy than controls when noxious heat was applied at the L5 level. Besides, high disability was associated with less kinematic changes when approaching and leaving full flexion. These results indicate that experimental pain can induce neuromechanical alterations in cLBP patients and healthy volunteers, and that higher disability in patients is associated with decreased movement pattern changes.

  14. HDAC inhibitors restore C-fibre sensitivity in experimental neuropathic pain model

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Yosuke; Araki, Kohei; Omotuyi, Olaposi idowu; Mukae, Takehiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hypoesthesia is a clinical feature of neuropathic pain. The feature is partly explained by the evidence of epigenetic repression of Nav1.8 sodium channel in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Experimental Approach We investigated the possibility of trichostatin A (TSA), valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) to reverse the unique C-fibre sensitivity observed following partial ligation of sciatic nerve in mice. Key Results Nerve injury-induced down-regulation of DRG Nav1.8 sodium channel and C-fibre-related hypoesthesia were reversed by TSA, VPA and SAHA treatments, which inhibit histone deacetylase (HDAC), and increase histone acetylation at the regulatory sequence of Nav1.8. Conclusions and Implications Taken together, these studies provide the evidence that hypoesthesia and underlying down-regulation of Nav1.8, negative symptoms observed in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain models are regulated by an epigenetic chromatin remodelling through HDAC-related machineries. PMID:24032674

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Myofascial Trigger Point Injection Into Brachialis Muscle for Rotator Cuff Disease Patients With Upper Arm Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. Methods A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). Results US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (ДVAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (ДVAS=-1.5) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with rotator cuff disease, US-guided trigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle. PMID:25379497

  16. QUADRICEPS LOW FREQUENCY FATIGUE AND MUSCLE PAIN ARE CONTRACTION TYPE DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masaki; Shields, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Eccentric contractions are thought to induce greater low frequency fatigue (LFF) and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) than concentric contractions. This study induced a similar amount of eccentric quadriceps muscle fatigue during either a concentric or eccentric fatigue task to compare LFF and DOMS. Methods Subjects (n=22) performed concentric or eccentric fatigue tasks using 75% of the pre-fatigue maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, and both tasks ended when the MVC eccentric torque decreased by 25% pre-fatigue. Results When subjects reached the failure criterion during the eccentric and concentric tasks, the concentric MVC was 78 ± 9.8% and 64 ± 8.4% of initial, respectively. LFF was greater after the concentric than the eccentric protocols (22 ± 12.4% and 15 ± 7.6% increase, respectively; p < 0.01). DOMS was over 100% greater for the eccentric protocol. Discussion These results indicate that DOMS is not dependent on the events that contribute to LFF. PMID:20544933

  17. Evaluation of plasma muscle enzyme activity as an indicator of lesion characteristics and prognosis in horses undergoing celiotomy for acute gastrointestinal pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In horses undergoing celiotomy for acute gastrointestinal pain, identification of variables correlating with lesion severity and location, and survival provide veterinarians and owners with information that aids in making informed decisions regarding appropriate treatment. Muscle enzyme activity is often increased in horses undergoing celiotomy for acute gastrointestinal pain and it is not known if muscle enzyme activity increase is specific to lesion type or impacts prognosis for survival. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of pre-operative increase in muscle enzyme activities with intestinal lesion characteristics, specifically lesion location (large versus small intestine) and whether it was strangulating versus nonstrangulating, and case survival in horses undergoing celiotomy for acute gastrointestinal pain. Methods Records of 241 horses undergoing exploratory laparotomy for colic were reviewed retrospectively. Evaluation of preoperative plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activities, fibrinogen and glucose concentrations, and hematocrit (HCT) and their association with gastrointestinal lesion characteristics and survival was performed. Results Pre-operative increase in plasma CK and AST activity, and HCT and decrease in plasma bilirubin concentration were significantly associated with presence of lesions resulting in intestinal ischemia. Increase in plasma CK activity and HCT were significantly associated with a decreased probability of survival to hospital discharge. Plasma GGT and SDH activity, and glucose and fibrinogen concentration were not significantly associated with survival or severity of disease in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Plasma muscle enyzme activity may be useful as a prognostic indicator in equine colic cases. Given that increases in plasma CK and AST activity were significantly associated with nonsurvival

  18. A model of dynamic sacro-iliac joint instability from malrecruitment of gluteus maximus and biceps femoris muscles resulting in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M; Nokes, L D M

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to propose a biomechanical model of sacro-iliac joint dysfunction as a cause of low back pain. Sacro-iliac joint is known to be a source of low back pain. We also know that it is a very stable joint with little mobility. Surrounding lower limb and back muscles contribute a major part of this stability. Gait analysis studies have revealed an orderly sequence of muscle activation when we walk - that contributes to efficient stabilisation of the joint and effective weight transfer to the lower limb. Gluteus maximus fibres-lying almost perpendicular to the joint surfaces are ideally oriented for this purpose. Biceps femoris is another important muscle that can also influence joint stability by its proximal attachment to sacrotuberous ligament. Altered pattern of muscle recruitment has been observed in patients with low back pain. But we do not know the exact cause-effect relationship. Because of its position as a key linkage in transmission of weight from the upper limbs to the lower, poor joint stability could have major consequences on weight bearing. It is proposed that sacro-iliac joint dysfunction can result from malrecruitment of gluteus maximus motor units during weight bearing. This results in compensatory biceps over activation. The resulting soft tissue strain and joint instability may manifest itself in low back pain. If our hypothesis holds true, it may have positive implications for patients with sacro-iliac joint dysfunction - who could be offered a definite diagnosis and targeted physiotherapy. It may be possible to identify patients early in a primary care setting and offer direct physio referral. They could benefit from exercises to improve strengthening and recruitment of the affected muscles.

  19. [Response mechanisms of the airway smooth muscle tissue in experimental bronchial spasm].

    PubMed

    Zashikhin, A L; Agafonov, Iu V; Barmina, A O

    2009-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at the complex evaluation of the reactivity mechanisms of bronchial smooth muscle tissue (SMT) in experimental bronchial spasm. Morphometric, cytospectrophotometric and electron microscopical analysis demonstrated the presence of three types of smooth muscle cells (SMC) within the bronchial SMT (small, medium, large), that differed in their linear and metabolic parameters. The findings of this study indicate that under the conditions of experimental bronchial spasm development, the ratios of SMC in bronchial SMT are changed with the increase in proportion of small SMC and the elimination of large SMC. In the dynamics of experimental bronchial spasm development, the activation of cytoplasmic synthesis as well as of DNA synthesis was detected mainly in group of small SMC. The reactive-dystrophic changes were marked at the subcellular level, that were most often identified in large SMC resulting in their elimination from population in the dynamics of an experiment. The data obtained suggest that one of the important mechanisms of airway SMT adaptation to the bronchial spasm development is a dynamic reorganization of SMC population.

  20. The JACS prospective cohort study of newly diagnosed women with breast cancer investigating joint and muscle pain, aches, and stiffness: pain and quality of life after primary surgery and before adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer affects one in eight UK women during their lifetime: many of these women now receive adjuvant chemotherapy and hormone therapy. Joint and muscle pains, aches, and stiffness are common but the natural history, aetiology and impact of these symptoms are unknown. A cohort study of newly diagnosed women with primary breast cancer was established to explore this. In this paper we present study methods and sample characteristics, describe participants’ experience of musculoskeletal pain at baseline interview, and explore its impact on quality of life. Methods Women with non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited following primary surgery into a multi-centre cohort study. They received questionnaires by post five times (baseline, 3, 6 , 9 and 12 months) to investigate prevalence, severity, location and correlates of musculoskeletal pain, and impact on quality-of-life. Pain was measured by the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire, the Brief Pain Inventory, and MSK-specific questions, and quality of life by the SF-36 and FACIT scales. Results 543 women (mean age 57 years, range 28–87, 64% postmenopausal) were recruited following surgery for primary breast cancer from breast cancer clinics in eight hospitals. Fifteen per cent of the eligible cohort was missed; 28% declined to participate. Joint or muscle aches, pains or stiffness were reported by 69% women with 28% specifically reporting joint pain/aches/stiffness. Quality of life, as measured by the FACT-B and adjusted for age, depression, surgery and analgesic use, is significantly worse in all domains in those with musculoskeletal problems than those without. Conclusions Our findings highlights the importance of a better understanding of these symptoms and their impact on the lives of women with primary breast cancer so that healthcare professionals are better equipped to support patients and to provide accurate information to inform treatment decisions. Further papers from this study will

  1. Ultrastructural studies of the mitochondriae in the striated muscles of birds with regard to experimental hypokinesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belak, M.; Kocisova, J.; Boda, K.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies were carried out on the mitochrondria of the transversely striated muscles with regard to experimental hypokinesia. As compared to the central group the mitochondria of m. pectoralis thoracicus and the m. iliotibialis posterior in hypokinetic birds reveal marked changes. In filamentous and ovoid mitochondria, vacuoles can be observed which in some cases produced larger light formations with following disappearance of the cristae and destruction of mitochondria. Fat particles located at the poles of the altered mitochondria, sporadically occurring also laterally, presented another finding. The Z-lines of the sarcomere did not form a continuous line, but were somewhat shifted.

  2. Psychophysical Investigations into the Role of Low-Threshold C Fibres in Non-Painful Affective Processing and Pain Modulation.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sumaiya; Nagi, Saad S; McGlone, Francis; Mahns, David A

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that C low-threshold mechanoreceptors (CLTMRs) contribute to touch-evoked pain (allodynia) during experimental muscle pain. Conversely, in absence of ongoing pain, the activation of CLTMRs has been shown to correlate with a diffuse sensation of pleasant touch. In this study, we evaluated (1) the primary afferent fibre types contributing to positive (pleasant) and negative (unpleasant) affective touch and (2) the effects of tactile stimuli on tonic muscle pain by varying affective attributes and frequency parameters. Psychophysical observations were made in 10 healthy participants. Two types of test stimuli were applied: stroking stimulus using velvet or sandpaper at speeds of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 cm/s; focal vibrotactile stimulus at low (20 Hz) or high (200 Hz) frequency. These stimuli were applied in the normal condition (i.e. no experimental pain) and following the induction of muscle pain by infusing hypertonic saline (5%) into the tibialis anterior muscle. These observations were repeated following the conduction block of myelinated fibres by compression of sciatic nerve. In absence of muscle pain, all participants reliably linked velvet-stroking to pleasantness and sandpaper-stroking to unpleasantness (no pain). Likewise, low-frequency vibration was linked to pleasantness and high-frequency vibration to unpleasantness. During muscle pain, the application of previously pleasant stimuli resulted in overall pain relief, whereas the application of previously unpleasant stimuli resulted in overall pain intensification. These effects were significant, reproducible and persisted following the blockade of myelinated fibres. Taken together, these findings suggest the role of low-threshold C fibres in affective and pain processing. Furthermore, these observations suggest that temporal coding need not be limited to discriminative aspects of tactile processing, but may contribute to affective attributes, which in turn predispose individual responses

  3. Experimental study of a metal hydride driven braided artificial pneumatic muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoff, Alexandra; Kim, Kwang J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental study of a new actuation system that couples a braided artificial pneumatic muscle (BAPM) with a metal hydride driven hydrogen compressor to create a compact, lightweight, noiseless system capable of high forces and smooth actuation. The results indicate that the metal hydride-BAPM system has relatively good second law efficiency average of 30% over the desorption cycle. The thermal efficiency is low, due mainly to the highly endothermic chemical reaction that releases the stored hydrogen gas from the metal hydride. The force to metal hydride weight is very high (~14 000 NForce/kgMH) considering that this system has not been optimized to use the minimum amount of metal hydride required for a full actuation stroke of the fluidic muscle. Also, a thermodynamic model for the complete system is developed. The analysis is restricted in some aspects concerning the complexity of the hydriding/dehydriding chemical process of the system and the three-dimensional geometry of the reactor, but it provides a useful comparison to other actuation devices and clearly reveals the parameters necessary for optimization of the actuation system in future work. The system shows comparable work output and has the benefits of biological muscle-like properties for potential use in robotic systems.

  4. Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes after Postisometric Muscle Relaxation or Kinesio Taping Application for Normalization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle Tone and the Pain Relief: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Slupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Kołcz-Trzęsicka, Anna; Zwierzchowski, Kamil; Halska, Urszula; Przestrzelska, Monika; Mucha, Dariusz; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the resting bioelectrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (the UT muscle) before and after one of the two interventions: postisometric muscle relaxation (PIR) and Kinesio Taping (KT). Moreover a comparison between group results was conducted. From the initial 61 volunteers, 52 were selected after exclusion criteria and were allocated randomly to 2 groups: PIR group and KT group. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and completion of the intervention. The primary outcome measure was change in bioelectrical activity of UT muscle evaluated by surface electromyography (sEMG). Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of pain using visual analogue scale (VAS). Significant differences were found only in KT group: the average resting bioelectrical activity decreased by 0.8 μV (p = 0.0237) and the average VAS result reduced by 2.0 points (p = 0.0001). Greater decrease of VAS results was recorded in KT group compared to PIR group (p = 0.0010). Both PIR and KT intervention did not influence significantly the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle. KT application was better for pain relief in the studied sample compared with PIR intervention. PMID:26347792

  5. Distribution patterns and predilection muscles of Trichinella zimbabwensis larvae in experimentally infected Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus Laurenti).

    PubMed

    La Grange, Louis J; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2014-02-21

    No controlled studies have been conducted to determine the predilection muscles of Trichinella zimbabwensis larvae in Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) or the influence of infection intensity on the distribution of the larvae in crocodiles. The distribution of larvae in muscles of naturally infected Nile crocodiles and experimentally infected caimans (Caiman crocodilus) and varans (Varanus exanthematicus) have been reported in literature. To determine the distribution patterns of T. zimbabwensis larvae and predilection muscles, 15 crocodiles were randomly divided into three cohorts of five animals each, representing high infection (642 larvae/kg of bodyweight average), medium infection (414 larvae/kg of bodyweight average) and low infection (134 larvae/kg of bodyweight average) cohorts. In the high infection cohort, high percentages of larvae were observed in the triceps muscles (26%) and hind limb muscles (13%). In the medium infection cohort, high percentages of larvae were found in the triceps muscles (50%), sternomastoid (18%) and hind limb muscles (13%). In the low infection cohort, larvae were mainly found in the intercostal muscles (36%), longissimus complex (27%), forelimb muscles (20%) and hind limb muscles (10%). Predilection muscles in the high and medium infection cohorts were similar to those reported in naturally infected crocodiles despite changes in infection intensity. The high infection cohort had significantly higher numbers of larvae in the sternomastoid, triceps, intercostal, longissimus complex, external tibial flexor, longissimus caudalis and caudal femoral muscles (p < 0.05) compared with the medium infection cohort. In comparison with the low infection cohort, the high infection cohort harboured significantly higher numbers of larvae in all muscles (p < 0.05) except for the tongue. The high infection cohort harboured significantly higher numbers of larvae (p < 0.05) in the sternomastoid, triceps, intercostal, longissimus complex

  6. Glucose Metabolic Changes in the Brain and Muscles of Patients with Nonspecific Neck Pain Treated by Spinal Manipulation Therapy: A [18F]FDG PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Inami, Akie; Ogura, Takeshi; Watanuki, Shoichi; Masud, Md. Mehedi; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Miyake, Masayasu; Matsuda, Rin; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Itoh, Masatoshi; Fuhr, Arlan W.; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in brain and muscle glucose metabolism that are not yet known, using positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG PET). Methods. Twenty-one male volunteers were recruited for the present study. [18F]FDG PET scanning was performed twice on each subject: once after the spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) intervention (treatment condition) and once after resting (control condition). We performed the SMT intervention using an adjustment device. Glucose metabolism of the brain and skeletal muscles was measured and compared between the two conditions. In addition, we measured salivary amylase level as an index of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, as well as muscle tension and subjective pain intensity in each subject. Results. Changes in brain activity after SMT included activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellar vermis, and somatosensory association cortex and deactivation of the prefrontal cortex and temporal sites. Glucose uptake in skeletal muscles showed a trend toward decreased metabolism after SMT, although the difference was not significant. Other measurements indicated relaxation of cervical muscle tension, decrease in salivary amylase level (suppression of sympathetic nerve activity), and pain relief after SMT. Conclusion. Brain processing after SMT may lead to physiological relaxation via a decrease in sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:28167971

  7. The effects of preseason trunk muscle training on low-back pain occurrence in women collegiate gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Durall, Christopher J; Udermann, Brian E; Johansen, Dana R; Gibson, Barbara; Reineke, David M; Reuteman, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) in women gymnasts is relatively common. This investigation was performed to evaluate the effects of a preseason training program for the trunk extensor, lateral flexor, and flexor muscles on LBP occurrence during the subsequent competitive season. The training group consisted of 15 collegiate women gymnasts. The control group consisted of 15 nonathlete collegiate women. Pre- and posttesting for all participants consisted of static endurance tests for the trunk extensors, lateral flexors, and flexors. After pretesting, the training group completed 10 weeks of biweekly training consisting of non-foot-supported back extensions and side bridges, in addition to their usual trunk flexor exercises. The control group did not perform any specialized trunk muscle training. Mean improvements in trunk endurance, based on multivariate analysis of variance at the 5% level of significance, were significantly greater in the training group than in the control group. Mean improvements in endurance in the training group were 47 seconds for the lateral trunk flexors, 34 seconds for the trunk extensors, and 80 seconds for the trunk flexors. During the subsequent gymnastics season, none of the gymnasts reported new episodes of LBP. One gymnast with chronic LBP reported a recurrence of LBP during the season. None of the gymnasts reported that the training program adversely affected their gymnastic performance. These data suggest that training the trunk musculature twice per week during a 10-week period with a relatively simple floor exercise protocol was an effective stimulus to improve trunk endurance measures. It is encouraging that none of the gymnasts reported new episodes of LBP during the subsequent competitive gymnastics season.

  8. Differences between two subgroups of low back pain patients in lumbopelvic rotation and symmetry in the erector spinae and hamstring muscles during trunk flexion when standing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-hee; Yoo, Won-gyu; Choi, Bo-ram

    2013-04-01

    The present study was performed to examine lumbopelvic rotation and to identify asymmetry of the erector spinae and hamstring muscles in people with and without low back pain (LBP). The control group included 16 healthy subjects, the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome LBP group included 17 subjects, and the lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP group included 14 subjects. Kinematic parameters were recorded using a 3D motion-capture system, and electromyography parameters were measured using a Noraxon TeleMyo 2400T. The two LBP subgroups showed significantly more lumbopelvic rotation during trunk flexion in standing than did the control group. The muscle activity and flexion-relaxation ratio asymmetries of the erector spinae muscles in the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome LBP group were significantly greater than those in the control group, and the muscle activity and flexion-relaxation ratio asymmetry of the hamstring muscles in the lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP group were significantly greater than those in the control group. Imbalance or asymmetry of passive tissue could lead to asymmetry of muscular activation. Muscle imbalance can cause asymmetrical alignment or movements such as unexpected rotation. The results showed a greater increase in lumbopelvic rotation during trunk flexion in standing among the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome and lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP groups compared with the control group. The differences between the two LBP subgroups may be a result of imbalance and asymmetry in erector spinae and hamstring muscle properties.

  9. Multimodal nociceptive mechanisms underlying chronic pelvic pain

    PubMed Central

    HELLMAN, Kevin M.; PATANWALA, Insiyyah Y.; POZOLO, Kristen E.; TU, Frank F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate candidate mechanisms underlying the pelvic floor dysfunction in women with chronic pelvic pain and/or painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Notably, prior studies have not consistently controlled for potential confounding by psychological or anatomical factors. Study Design As part of a larger study on pelvic floor pain dysfunction and bladder pain sensitivity, we compared a measure of mechanical pain sensitivity, pressure pain thresholds, between women with pelvic pain and pain-free controls. We also assessed a novel pain measure using degree and duration of post-exam pain aftersensation, and conducted structural and functional assessments of the pelvic floor to account for any potential confounding. Phenotypic specificity of pelvic floor measures was assessed with receiver-operator characteristic curves adjusted for prevalence. Results A total of 23 women with chronic pelvic pain, 23 painful bladder syndrome, and 42 pain-free controls completed the study. Women with chronic pelvic pain or painful bladder syndrome exhibited enhanced pain sensitivity with lower pressure pain thresholds (1.18 [interquartile range: 0.87–1.41] kg/cm2) than pain-free participants (1.48 [1.11–1.76] kg/cm2; p<0.001) and prolonged pain aftersensation (3.5 [0–9] vs 0 [0–1] minutes; p< 0.001). Although genital hiatus (p<0.01) was wider in women with chronic pelvic pain there were no consistently observed group differences in pelvic floor anatomy, muscle tone or strength. The combination of pressure pain thresholds and aftersensation duration correlated with severity of pelvic floor tenderness (R2 =41–51, p’s< 0.01). Even after adjustment for prevalence, the combined metrics discriminated pain-free controls from women with chronic pelvic pain or painful bladder syndrome (area under the curve=0.87). Conclusion Both experimental assessment of pelvic floor pain thresholds and measurement of sustained pain are independently associated with pelvic pain

  10. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  11. An experimental study of postoperative monitoring for innervated free muscle graft by the compound muscle action potential in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tan, Soo-Heong; Shigetomi, Mitsunori; Doi, Kazuteru

    2012-07-01

    This experiment establishes the principles of using the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as a possible postoperative monitor for free muscle grafts. Twenty rabbits were divided into two groups of ten each to investigate the effects of ischemia on CMAP of the muscles. Rectus femoris model was used and contralateral muscle was used as control. In all muscles total normothermic ischemia of 1.5 hours to mimic the time needed for transfer and inset of the flap was followed by occlusion of the artery in one group and vein in another group after 3 hours. During this ischemia of 1 hour, the CMAP amplitudes decreased and the latencies were prolonged. Latency prolongation was detected within 10 minutes of total, arterial, or venous ischemia. During the revascularization, both amplitude and latency improved, but not to the original values at the start. The results show that CMAP monitoring can provide easily detectable, objective indication of vascular compromise to a muscle graft within as early as 10 minutes of total, arterial, and venous ischemia. Changes in latency are more constant and predictable compared with amplitude changes. This method can provide continuous monitoring and can be used in buried muscle grafts.

  12. Occlusion and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Klineberg, I

    1978-02-01

    The role of the occlusion in the aetiology of reflex jaw muscle hyperactivity and myofacial pain is analysed. Neurological mechanisms are proposed to explain how variations in occlusal morphology of sufficient magnitude (segmental influences), and the presence of anxiety states (suprasegmental influences) affect jaw muscle activity and contribute to myofascial pain. Controlled occlusal therapy may alter the segmental neurological control of jaw muscle activity to facilitate resolution of muscle hyperactivity in acute myofascial pain. Chronic myofascial pain dysfunction is not primarily related to occlusal factors and a complex psychophysiological mechanism is involved in this type of pain problem.

  13. Assessment of pelvic floor muscle function in women with and without low back pain using transabdominal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Lorestani, Leila; Azari, Afsaneh

    2010-06-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction has been recently associated with the development of low back pain (LBP). Transabdominal ultrasound imaging has been established as an appropriate method for visualizing and measuring PFM function. No study has directly evaluated PFM function in individuals with and without LBP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the PFM function in women with and without LBP using transabdominal ultrasound. Convenience sample of 40 non-pregnant female participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: with LBP (n = 20) and without LBP (n = 20). The amount of bladder base movement on ultrasound (normalized to body mass index) was measured in all subjects and considered as an indicator of PFM function. Statistical analysis (Independent t-test) revealed significant difference in transabdominal ultrasound measurements for PFM function between the two groups (P = 0.04, 95% CI of difference: 0.002-0.27). The results of this study indicate PFM dysfunction in individuals with LBP compared to those without LBP. The results could be beneficial to clinicians when assessing and prescribing therapeutic exercises for patients with LBP.

  14. Ultrasound imaging of the lateral abdominal wall muscles in individuals with lumbopelvic pain and signs of concurrent hypocapnia.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Jackie L

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the change in thickness of transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles, during resting supine respiration, in individuals with lumbopelvic pain (LP) to those who in addition to LP, demonstrate signs of concurrent hypocapnia (LP&HYPO). B-mode ultrasound images were obtained at the height of inspiration, and at the end of expiration, over three subsequent breaths during a single session. The average percent change in thickness of TrA during resting respiration in the LP&HYPO group (20.8+/-7.6%) was found to be statistically greater (P<0.001) than that of the LP only group (1.3+/-5.8%), while the difference between the groups for the percent change in thickness of IO (LP&HYPO 9.2+/-8.1%, LP 2.0+/-7.2%) did not differ (P=0.073). These findings suggest that respiratory modulation of TrA thickness, as measured by ultrasound imaging, greater than 20%, detected in a resting supine position, may be associated with an episode of hypocapnia, and if present warrants further investigation.

  15. Reduced habituation to experimental pain in migraine patients: a CO(2) laser evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Valeriani, M; de Tommaso, M; Restuccia, D; Le Pera, D; Guido, M; Iannetti, G D; Libro, G; Truini, A; Di Trapani, G; Puca, F; Tonali, P; Cruccu, G

    2003-09-01

    The habituation to sensory stimuli of different modalities is reduced in migraine patients. However, the habituation to pain has never been evaluated. Our aim was to assess the nociceptive pathway function and the habituation to experimental pain in patients with migraine. Scalp potentials were evoked by CO(2) laser stimulation (laser evoked potentials, LEPs) of the hand and facial skin in 24 patients with migraine without aura (MO), 19 patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH), and 28 control subjects (CS). The habituation was studied by measuring the changes of LEP amplitudes across three consecutive repetitions of 30 trials each (the repetitions lasted 5 min and were separated by 5-min intervals). The slope of the regression line between LEP amplitude and number of repetitions was taken as an index of habituation. The LEPs consisted of middle-latency, low-amplitude responses (N1, contralateral temporal region, and P1, frontal region) followed by a late, high-amplitude, negative-positive complex (N2/P2, vertex). The latency and amplitude of these responses were similar in both patients and controls. While CS and CTTH patients showed a significant habituation of the N2/P2 response, in MO patients this LEP component did not develop any habituation at all after face stimulation and showed a significantly lower habituation than in CS after hand stimulation. The habituation index of the vertex N2/P2 complex exceeded the normal limits in 13 out of the 24 MO patients and in none of the 19 CTTH patients (P<0.0001; Fisher's exact test). Moreover, while the N1-P1 amplitude showed a significant habituation in CS after hand stimulation, it did not change across repetitions in MO patients. In conclusion, no functional impairment of the nociceptive pathways, including the trigeminal pathways, was found in either MO or CTTH patients. But patients with migraine had a reduced habituation, which probably reflects an abnormal excitability of the cortical areas involved in

  16. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O.; Costa Junior, Livio M.; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A.; Silva, Lucilene A.; Pereira, Wanderson S.; do Amaral, Flávia M. M.; Garcia, João Batista S.; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S.; Nascimento, Flávia R. F.

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor. PMID:26524084

  17. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Calado, Gustavo P; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O; Costa Junior, Livio M; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A; Silva, Lucilene A; Pereira, Wanderson S; Amaral, Flávia M M do; Garcia, João Batista S; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S; Nascimento, Flávia R F

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor.

  18. Effectiveness of Self-Hypnosis on the Relief of Experimental Dental Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluates the effectiveness of self-hypnosis on pain perception. Pain thresholds were measured, and a targeted, standardized pain stimulus was created by electrical stimulation of the dental pulp of an upper anterior tooth. Pain stimulus was rated by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain threshold under self-hypnosis was higher (57.1 ± 17.1) than without hypnotic intervention (39.5 ± 11.8) (p < .001). Pain was rated lower on the VAS with self-hypnosis (4.0 ± 3.8) than in the basal condition without self-hypnosis (7.1 ± 2.7) (p < .001). Self-hypnosis can be used in clinical practice as an adjunct to the gold standard of local anesthesia for pain management, as well as an alternative in individual cases.

  19. The effect of Reiki on pain and anxiety in women with abdominal hysterectomies: a quasi-experimental pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Anne T; O'Connor, Priscilla C

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare reports of pain and levels of state anxiety in 2 groups of women after abdominal hysterectomy. A quasi-experimental design was used in which the experimental group (n = 10) received traditional nursing care plus three 30-minute sessions of Reiki, while the control group (n = 12) received traditional nursing care. The results indicated that the experimental group reported less pain and requested fewer analgesics than the control group. Also, the experimental group reported less state anxiety than the control group on discharge at 72 hours postoperation. The authors recommend replication of this study with a similar population, such as women who require nonemergency cesarian section deliveries.

  20. Effect of a single session of muscle-biased therapy on pain sensitivity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Charles W; Alappattu, Meryl J; Coronado, Rogelio A; Horn, Maggie E; Bishop, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Background Muscle-biased therapies (MBT) are commonly used to treat pain, yet several reviews suggest evidence for the clinical effectiveness of these therapies is lacking. Inadequate treatment parameters have been suggested to account for inconsistent effects across studies. Pain sensitivity may serve as an intermediate physiologic endpoint helping to establish optimal MBT treatment parameters. The purpose of this review was to summarize the current literature investigating the short-term effect of a single dose of MBT on pain sensitivity in both healthy and clinical populations, with particular attention to specific MBT parameters of intensity and duration. Methods A systematic search for articles meeting our prespecified criteria was conducted using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and MEDLINE from the inception of each database until July 2012, in accordance with guidelines from the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis. Relevant characteristics from studies included type, intensity, and duration of MBT and whether short-term changes in pain sensitivity and clinical pain were noted with MBT application. Study results were pooled using a random-effects model to estimate the overall effect size of a single dose of MBT on pain sensitivity as well as the effect of MBT, dependent on comparison group and population type. Results Reports from 24 randomized controlled trials (23 articles) were included, representing 36 MBT treatment arms and 29 comparative groups, where 10 groups received active agents, 11 received sham/inert treatments, and eight received no treatment. MBT demonstrated a favorable and consistent ability to modulate pain sensitivity. Short-term modulation of pain sensitivity was associated with short-term beneficial effects on clinical pain. Intensity of MBT, but not duration, was linked with change in pain sensitivity. A meta-analysis was conducted on 17 studies that assessed the effect of

  1. The side of chronic low back pain matters: evidence from the primary motor cortex excitability and the postural adjustments of multifidi muscles.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2017-03-01

    Hemispheric lateralization of pain processing was reported with overactivation of the right frontal lobe. Specifically in chronic low back pain (CLBP), functional changes in the left primary motor cortex (M1) with impaired anticipatory postural activation (APA) of trunk muscles have been observed. Given the connections between frontal and M1 areas for motor planning, it is hypothesized that the pain side could differently influence M1 function and APA of paravertebral multifidus (MF) muscles. This study aimed at testing whether people with right- versus left-sided CLBP showed different M1 excitability and APA. Thirty-five individuals with lateralized CLBP (19 right-sided and 16 left-sided) and 13 pain-free subjects (normative values) were tested for the excitability of MF M1 area (active motor threshold-AMT) with transcranial magnetic stimulation and for the latency of MF APA during bilateral shoulder flexion and during unilateral hip extension in prone lying. In the right-sided CLBP group, the AMT of both M1 areas was lower than in the left-sided group and the pain-free subjects; the latency of MF APA was shorter in bilateral shoulder flexion and in the left hip extension tasks as compared to the left-sided group. In CLBP, an earlier MF APA was correlated with lower AMT in both tasks. People with right-sided CLBP presented with increased M1 excitability in both hemispheres and earlier MF APA. These results likely rely on cortical motor adaptation related to the tasks and axial muscles tested. Future studies should investigate whether CLBP side-related differences have a clinical impact, e.g. in diagnosis and intervention.

  2. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W; Shirley, Debra

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC(2,1) = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96-0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC(2,1) = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65-0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC(2,1) = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33-0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation.

  3. Effect of autologous platelet leukocyte rich plasma injections on atrophied lumbar multifidus muscle in low back pain patients with monosegmental degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohamed; Hussein, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar multifidus muscle dysfunction and chronic low back pain are strongly correlated. There is no consensus regarding treatment of chronic LBP. The effect of platelet leukocyte rich plasma (PLRP) injections on atrophied lumbar multifidus (LMF) muscle and chronic low back pain has never been studied before. Patients and methods: One hundred fifteen patients with chronic non-specific LBP fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Patients were treated with weekly PLRP injections for six weeks and followed up for 24 months. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures included Patient Satisfaction Index (PSI), modified MacNab criteria, and lumbar MRI at 12 months follow-up. Results: One hundred and four patients completed the trial. There were no serious complications. NRS significantly improved gradually from a mean of 8.8 ± 8 pre-injection to 3.45 ± 2.9 by 12 months and ODI significantly improved gradually from a mean of 36.7 ± 3.9 to 14.6 ± 12.8 by 12 months (P < 0.005). After reaching maximum improvement between 12 and 18 months, all outcome measures remained stable till the end of the 24 months follow-up period with statistically insignificant changes (P > 0.05). 87.8% (65/74) of the satisfied patients showed increased cross-sectional area and decreased fatty degeneration of LMF muscle on MRI at 12 months follow-up. Conclusion: PLRP injections into atrophied lumbar multifidus muscle represent a safe, effective method for relieving chronic low back pain and disability with long-term patient satisfaction and success rate of 71.2%. We recommend the use of the lumbar PLRP injections of LMF muscle to refine the inclusion criteria of lumbar fusion to avoid failed back syndrome. PMID:27163101

  4. Brain Network Response to Acupuncture Stimuli in Experimental Acute Low Back Pain: An fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Liu, Ziping; Zhang, Shanshan; Li, Qiang; Guo, Shigui; Yang, Jiangming; Wu, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Most neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can significantly modulate brain activation patterns in healthy subjects, while only a few studies have examined clinical pain. In the current study, we combined an experimental acute low back pain (ALBP) model and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the neural mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia. All ALBP subjects first underwent two resting state fMRI scans at baseline and during a painful episode and then underwent two additional fMRI scans, once during acupuncture stimulation (ACUP) and once during tactile stimulation (SHAM) pseudorandomly, at the BL40 acupoint. Our results showed that, compared with the baseline, the pain state had higher regional homogeneity (ReHo) values in the pain matrix, limbic system, and default mode network (DMN) and lower ReHo values in frontal gyrus and temporal gyrus; compared with the OFF status, ACUP yielded broad deactivation in subjects, including nearly all of the limbic system, pain status, and DMN, and also evoked numerous activations in the attentional and somatosensory systems; compared with SHAM, we found that ACUP induced more deactivations and fewer activations in the subjects. Multiple brain networks play crucial roles in acupuncture analgesia, suggesting that ACUP exceeds a somatosensory-guided mind-body therapy for ALBP.

  5. Muscle injuries: optimising recovery.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Tero A H; Järvinen, Teppo L N; Kääriäinen, Minna; Aärimaa, Ville; Vaittinen, Samuli; Kalimo, Hannu; Järvinen, Markku

    2007-04-01

    Muscle injuries are one of the most common traumas occurring in sports. Despite their clinical importance, there are only a few clinical studies on the treatment of muscle injuries. Lack of clinical studies is most probably attributable to the fact that there is not only a high heterogeneity in the severity of injuries, but also the injuries take place in different muscles, making it very demanding to carry out clinical trials. Accordingly, the current treatment principles of muscle injuries have either been derived from experimental studies or been tested empirically only. Clinically, first aid for muscle injuries follows the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation) principle. The objective of RICE is to stop the injury-induced bleeding into the muscle tissue and thereby minimise the extent of the injury. Clinical examination should be carried out immediately after the injury and 5-7 days after the initial trauma, at which point the severity of the injury can be assessed more reliably. At that time, a more detailed characterisation of the injury can be made using imaging diagnostic modalities (ultrasound or MRI) if desired. The treatment of injured skeletal muscle should be carried out by immediate immobilisation of the injured muscle (clinically, relative immobility/avoidance of muscle contractions). However, the duration of immobilisation should be limited to a period sufficient to produce a scar of sufficient strength to bear the forces induced by remobilisation without re-rupture and the return to activity (mobilisation) should then be started gradually within the limits of pain. Early return to activity is needed to optimise the regeneration of healing muscle and recovery of the flexibility and strength of the injured skeletal muscle to pre-injury levels. The rehabilitation programme should be built around progressive agility and trunk stabilisation exercises, as these exercises seem to yield better outcome for injured skeletal muscle than programmes based

  6. Botulinum neurotoxin type A injection of the pelvic floor muscle in pain due to spasticity: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Alka A; Puccini, Federica; Khullar, Vik; Elneil, Suzy; Digesu, G Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    The role of muscle spasm is not a new concept in the genesis of pain. Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) has been successfully employed in a variety of muscular and inflammatory conditions. The aim of our study was to review the published literature on the role of BoNTA injection of the pelvic floor muscle in the management of women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). A systematic search of the literature published up to June 2012 on the use of BoNTA in the treatment of female pelvic floor muscle spasm was carried out using relevant search terms in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The results were limited to full-text English language articles. Relevant trials as well as relevant reviews were selected and analyzed by two independent reviewers. Five studies (2 case reports, 1 prospective pilot study, 1 retrospective study and 1 randomised double-blind placebo controlled study) were included in this systematic review. Overall, BoNTA has shown to be beneficial in relieving CPP related to pelvic floor spasm. The role of BoNTA as a treatment of CPP has been recognized for more than 10 years. Although data are still scarce preliminary results are encouraging. BoNTA is an attractive option for refractory CPP related to pelvic floor muscle spasm, but further studies using validated and reproducible outcome measures are needed, to establish its effectiveness, safeness, technique, optimal dosage, and duration of symptom relief.

  7. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensional motion-analysis system, and the muscle activity of the bilateral internal oblique abdominis (IO), external oblique abdominis (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA) was recorded using surface electromyography (EMG). One-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine the rotation angles and muscle activity under the three conditions. [Results] The EMG activity of the ipsilateral IO, contralateral EO, and bilateral RA was greater and pelvic rotation was lower with the DPBUs than with no PBU or a single PBU. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that applying DPBUs during ASLR is effective in decreasing unwanted pelvic rotation and increasing abdominal muscle activity in women with chronic low back pain.

  8. High- and low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation does not reduce experimental pain in elderly individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron-Vézina, Kayla; Corriveau, Hélène; Martel, Marylie; Harvey, Marie-Philippe; Léonard, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite its widespread clinical use, the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) remains poorly documented in elderly individuals. In this randomized, double-blind crossover study, we compared the efficacy of high-frequency (HF), low-frequency (LF), and placebo (P) TENS in a group of 15 elderly adults (mean age: 67 ± 5 years). The effect of HF-, LF-, and P-TENS was also evaluated in a group of 15 young individuals (26 ± 5 years; same study design) to validate the effectiveness of the TENS protocols that were used in the elderly group. Each participant came to the laboratory on 3 separate occasions to receive, in random order, HF-, LF-, and P-TENS. Pain intensity and pain perception thresholds were assessed before, during, and after TENS, using an experimental heat pain paradigm. For the young group, there was a significant decrease in pain intensity during and after HF- and LF-TENS when compared with baseline, with both HF- and LF-TENS being superior to P-TENS. In the older group, HF- and LF-TENS did not reduce pain when compared with baseline and no difference was observed between the 2 active TENS sessions and P-TENS. High-frequency, LF-, and P-TENS all increased pain thresholds in young individuals, whereas in older individuals, only LF-TENS increased pain thresholds. Taken together, these results suggest that TENS is effective in young, but not in older, individuals. Future studies should be conducted to confirm these results in pain populations and to identify strategies that could enhance the effect of TENS in the elderly. PMID:26101836

  9. High- and low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation does not reduce experimental pain in elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Bergeron-Vézina, Kayla; Corriveau, Hélène; Martel, Marylie; Harvey, Marie-Philippe; Léonard, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use, the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) remains poorly documented in elderly individuals. In this randomized, double-blind crossover study, we compared the efficacy of high-frequency (HF), low-frequency (LF), and placebo (P) TENS in a group of 15 elderly adults (mean age: 67 ± 5 years). The effect of HF-, LF-, and P-TENS was also evaluated in a group of 15 young individuals (26 ± 5 years; same study design) to validate the effectiveness of the TENS protocols that were used in the elderly group. Each participant came to the laboratory on 3 separate occasions to receive, in random order, HF-, LF-, and P-TENS. Pain intensity and pain perception thresholds were assessed before, during, and after TENS, using an experimental heat pain paradigm. For the young group, there was a significant decrease in pain intensity during and after HF- and LF-TENS when compared with baseline, with both HF- and LF-TENS being superior to P-TENS. In the older group, HF- and LF-TENS did not reduce pain when compared with baseline and no difference was observed between the 2 active TENS sessions and P-TENS. High-frequency, LF-, and P-TENS all increased pain thresholds in young individuals, whereas in older individuals, only LF-TENS increased pain thresholds. Taken together, these results suggest that TENS is effective in young, but not in older, individuals. Future studies should be conducted to confirm these results in pain populations and to identify strategies that could enhance the effect of TENS in the elderly.

  10. Effect of Experimental Hand Pain on Training-Induced Changes in Motor Performance and Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Nicolas; Neige, Cécilia; Gagné, Martin; Reilly, Karen T.; Mercier, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Pain influences plasticity within the sensorimotor system and the aim of this study was to assess the effect of pain on changes in motor performance and corticospinal excitability during training for a novel motor task. A total of 30 subjects were allocated to one of two groups (Pain, NoPain) and performed ten training blocks of a visually-guided isometric pinch task. Each block consisted of 15 force sequences, and subjects modulated the force applied to a transducer in order to reach one of five target forces. Pain was induced by applying capsaicin cream to the thumb. Motor performance was assessed by a skill index that measured shifts in the speed–accuracy trade-off function. Neurophysiological measures were taken from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Overall, the Pain group performed better throughout the training (p = 0.03), but both groups showed similar improvements across training blocks (p < 0.001), and there was no significant interaction. Corticospinal excitability in the NoPain group increased halfway through the training, but this was not observed in the Pain group (Time × Group interaction; p = 0.01). These results suggest that, even when pain does not negatively impact on the acquisition of a novel motor task, it can affect training-related changes in corticospinal excitability. PMID:28165363

  11. Multiplicity of experimental approaches to therapy for genetic muscle diseases and necessity for population screening.

    PubMed

    Laing, Nigel G

    2008-01-01

    Currently a multiplicity of experimental approaches to therapy for genetic muscle diseases is being investigated. These include replacement of the missing gene, manipulation of the gene message, repair of the mutation, upregulation of an alternative gene and pharmacological interventions targeting a number of systems. A number of these approaches are in current clinical trials. There is considerable anticipation that perhaps more than one of the approaches will finally prove of clinical benefit, but there are many voices of caution. No matter which approaches might ultimately prove effective, there is a consensus that for most benefit to the patients it will be necessary to start treatment as early as possible. A consensus is also developing that the only way to do this is to implement population-based newborn screening to identify affected children shortly after birth. Population-based newborn screening is currently practised in very few places in the world and it brings with it implications for prevention rather than cure of genetic muscle diseases.

  12. Effects of perceived and exerted pain control on neural activity during pain relief in experimental heat hyperalgesia: a fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Mohr, C; Leyendecker, S; Petersen, D; Helmchen, C

    2012-04-01

    Perceived control over pain can attenuate pain perception by mechanisms of endogenous pain control and emotional reappraisal irrespective of whether this control is exerted or only perceived. Self-initiated termination of pain elicits different expectations of subsequent pain relief as compared to perceived pain control. It is unknown whether and how this perceived vs. exerted control on pain differs and affects subsequent pain relief. Using fMRI, we studied two factors of pain control on pain relief: the (i) sense of control (perceived control but no execution) and (ii) the execution of control (exerted control). To account for the impact of factual execution of pain control on pain relief we applied bearable short and hardly bearable long contact-heat stimuli which were applied either controllable or not. Using controllability as factor, there was dissociable neural activity during pain relief: following the perceived control condition neural activity was found in the orbitofrontal and mediofrontal cortex and, following the exerted control condition, in the anterolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. We conclude that (i) pain controllability has an impact on pain relief and (ii) the prefrontal cortex shows dissociable neural activity during pain relief following exerted vs. perceived pain control. This might reflect the higher grade of uncertainty during pain relief following perceived pain control mediated by the orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex and processes of working memory and updating expectations during pain relief following exerted control mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex.

  13. Vitamin E levels in soleus muscles of experimentally induced hyperthyroid rats differ consequent to feeding of edible oils.

    PubMed

    Merican, Z; Suboh, B; Marzuki, A; Khalid, B A

    1999-12-01

    It has been shown that lipid peroxidation product levels in the soleus muscles of rats fed palm olein were lower than in the soleus muscles of rats fed soya bean oil. A study was carried out to test our hypothesis that the lower level of lipid peroxidation products in the soleus muscle of palm olein-fed rats is due, at least partly, to the higher amount of vitamin E in their soleus muscles. Experimentally induced hyperthyroid rats were fed either ground rat chow or ground rat chow mixed with palm olein oil or soya bean oil for a period of 8 weeks. Euthyroid rats fed ground rat chow for a similar period served as controls. At the end of the 8-week period, the rats were sacrificed and the α-tocopherol and tocotrienol levels in their soleus muscles were measured using high pressure liquid chromatography. It was found that the levels of α-tocopherol (23.682 ± 0.363), α-tocotrienol (1.974 ± 0.040) and γ-tocotrienol (1.418 ± 0.054) in μg/g tissue wet weight in the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed palm olein oil were statistically significantly higher than those found in the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed soya bean oil, which were 14.299 ± 0.378, 0.053 ± 0.053 and 0.184 ± 0.120μg/g tissue wet weight, respectively. The result shows that the increased level of a-tocopherol and tocotrienols found in the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed palm olein oil is responsible, at least partly, for the lower amount of lipid peroxidation products in these muscles compared with the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed soya bean oil in our earlier study.

  14. Racial bias in pain perception and response: experimental examination of automatic and deliberate processes

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vani A.; Richeson, Jennifer A.; Paice, Judith A.; Muzyka, Michael; Chiao, Joan Y.

    2014-01-01

    Racial disparities in pain treatment pose a significant public health and scientific problem. Prior studies demonstrate clinicians and non-clinicians are less perceptive, and suggest less treatment for, the pain of African Americans, relative to European Americans. Here we investigate the effects of explicit/implicit patient race presentation, patient race, and perceiver race on pain perception and response. African American and European American participants rated pain perception, empathy, helping motivation, and treatment suggestion in response to vignettes about patients’ pain. Vignettes were accompanied by a rapid (implicit), or static (explicit) presentation of an African or European American patient’s face. Participants perceived and responded more to European American patients in the implicit prime condition, when the effect of patient race was below the level of conscious regulation. This effect was reversed when patient race was presented explicitly. Additionally, female participants perceived and responded more to the pain of all patients, relative to male participants, and in the implicit prime condition, African American participants were more perceptive and responsive than European Americans to the pain of all patients. Taken together, these results suggest that known disparities in pain treatment may be largely due to automatic (below the level of conscious regulation), rather than deliberate (subject to conscious regulation) biases. These biases were not associated with traditional implicit measures of racial attitudes, suggesting that biases in pain perception and response may be independent of general prejudice. Perspective Results suggest racial biases in pain perception and treatment are at least partially due to automatic processes. When the relevance of patient race is made explicit, however, biases are attenuated and even reversed. We also find preliminary evidence that African Americans may be more sensitive to the pain of others than

  15. Using leg muscles as shock absorbers: theoretical predictions and experimental results of drop landing performance.

    PubMed

    Minetti, A E; Ardigò, L P; Susta, D; Cotelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The use of muscles as power dissipators is investigated in this study, both from the modellistic and the experimental points of view. Theoretical predictions of the drop landing manoeuvre for a range of initial conditions have been obtained by accounting for the mechanical characteristics of knee extensor muscles, the limb geometry and assuming maximum neural activation. Resulting dynamics have been represented in the phase plane (vertical displacement versus speed) to better classify the damping performance. Predictions of safe landing in sedentary subjects were associated to dropping from a maximum (feet) height of 1.6-2.0 m (about 11 m on the moon). Athletes can extend up to 2.6-3.0 m, while for obese males (m = 100 kg, standard stature) the limit should reduce to 0.9-1.3 m. These results have been calculated by including in the model the estimated stiffness of the 'global elastic elements' acting below the squat position. Experimental landings from a height of 0.4, 0.7, 1.1 m (sedentary males (SM) and male (AM) and female (AF) athletes from the alpine ski national team) showed dynamics similar to the model predictions. While the peak power (for a drop height of about 0.7 m) was similar in SM and AF (AM shows a +40% increase, about 33 W/kg), AF stopped the downward movement after a time interval (0.219 +/- 0.030 s) from touch-down 20% significantly shorter than SM. Landing strategy and the effect of anatomical constraints are discussed in the paper.

  16. [Efficacy of levocarnitine for tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced painful muscle cramps in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Shimoyama, Saori; Ito, Ryo; Sugama, Yusuke; Sato, Ken; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Nakamura, Hajime; Hamaguchi, Kota; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Muscle cramps are side effects commonly associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Patients suffering from muscle cramps are treated with various medications such as calcium, magnesium and vitamin supplements, but these therapies are often ineffective. We report two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed muscle cramps caused by TKI. These patients were treated successfully with levocarnitine. Both of our cases revealed the beneficial effects of levocarnitine treatment on TKI-induced muscle cramps.

  17. Effect of adenoviral delivery of prodynorphin gene on experimental inflammatory pain induced by formalin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xionggang; Wang, Tingting; Lin, Caizhu; Chen, Baihong

    2014-01-01

    Circumstantial evidences suggest that dynorphins and their common precursor prodynorphin (PDYN) are involved in antinociception and neuroendocrine signaling. DREAM knockout mice had increased levels of PDYN and dynorphin expression, and reduced sensitivity to painful stimuli. However, some data support the notion that the up-regulation of spinal dynorphin expression is a common critical feature in neuropathic pain. It is not clear whether the production of dynorphin A can be increased when more PDYN is present. In this study we investigated the changes in pain behaviors, spinal PDYN mRNA expression and dynorphin A production on formalin-induced pain in rats receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN. Our results showed that the adenoviral transfer of PDYN gene was sufficient to reduce pain behaviors resulting from formalin injection, and the antinociceptive effect after receiving the pretreatment of adenoviral delivery of PDYN was mediated at the level of the spinal cord via KOR. PMID:25663984

  18. Core Muscle Activity during TRX Suspension Exercises with and without Kinesiology Taping in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Tam, Y. T.; Macfarlane, Duncan J.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Chan, Eleanor W. Y.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesiology taping (KT) and different TRX suspension workouts on the amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the core muscles among people with chronic low back pain (LBP). Each participant (total n = 21) was exposed to two KT conditions: no taping and taping, while performing four TRX suspension exercises: (1) hamstring curl, (2) hip abduction in plank, (3) chest press, and (4) 45-degree row. Right transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrAIO), rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and superficial lumbar multifidus (LMF) activity was recorded with surface EMG and expressed as a percentage of the EMG amplitude recorded during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the respective muscles. Hip abduction in plank increased TrAIO, RA, and LMF EMG amplitude compared with other TRX positions (P < 0.008). Only the hamstring curl was effective in inducing a high EMG amplitude of LMF (P < 0.001). No significant difference in EMG magnitude was found between the taping and no taping conditions overall (P > 0.05). Hip abduction in plank most effectively activated abdominal muscles, whereas the hamstring curl most effectively activated the paraspinal muscles. Applying KT conferred no immediate benefits in improving the core muscle activation during TRX training in adults with chronic LBP. PMID:26185520

  19. Biomechanical effects of sitting with adjustable ischial and lumbar support on occupational low back pain: evaluation of sitting load and back muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Makhsous, Mohsen; Lin, Fang; Bankard, James; Hendrix, Ronald W; Hepler, Matthew; Press, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Background Compared to standing posture, sitting decreases lumbar lordosis, increases low back muscle activity, disc pressure, and pressure on the ischium, which are associated with occupational LBP. A sitting device that reduces spinal load and low back muscle activities may help increase sitting comfort and reduce LBP risk. The objective of this study is to investigate the biomechanical effect of sitting with a reduced ischial support and an enhanced lumbar support (Off-Loading) on load, interface pressure and muscle activities. Methods A laboratory test in low back pain (LBP) and asymptomatic subjects was designed to test the biomechanical effect of using the Off-Loading sitting posture. The load and interface pressure on seat and the backrest, and back muscle activities associated with usual and this Off-Loading posture were recorded and compared between the two postures. Results Compared with Normal (sitting upright with full support of the seat and flat backrest) posture, sitting in Off-Loading posture significantly shifted the center of the force and the peak pressure on the seat anteriorly towards the thighs. It also significantly decreased the contact area on the seat and increased that on the backrest. It decreased the lumbar muscle activities significantly. These effects are similar in individuals with and without LBP. Conclusion Sitting with reduced ischial support and enhanced lumbar support resulted in reduced sitting load on the lumbar spine and reduced the lumbar muscular activity, which may potentially reduce sitting-related LBP. PMID:19193245

  20. The effect of lumbar posture on abdominal muscle thickness during an isometric leg task in people with and without non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rafael Zambelli; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique; Franco, Marcia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Mariana Calais; Ferreira, Manuela Loureiro; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Maher, Christopher

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of lumbar posture on function of transversus abdominis (TrA) and obliquus internus (OI) in people with and without non-specific low back pain (LBP) during a lower limb task. Rehabilitative ultrasound was used to measure thickness change of TrA and OI during a lower limb task that challenged the stability of the spine. Measures were taken in supine in neutral and flexed lumbar postures in 30 patients and 30 healthy subjects. Data were analysed using a two-way (groups, postures) ANOVA. Our results showed that lumbar posture influenced percent thickness change of the TRA muscle but not for OI. An interaction between group and posture was found for TrA thickness change (F(1,56) = 6.818, p = 0.012). For this muscle, only healthy participants showed greater thickness change with neutral posture compared to flexed (mean difference = 6.2%; 95% CI: 3.1-9.3%; p < 0.001). Comparisons between groups for both muscles were not significant. Neutral lumbar posture can facilitate an increase in thickness of the TrA muscle while performing a leg task, however this effect was not observed for this muscle in patients with LBP. No significant difference in TrA and OI thickness change between people with and without non-specific LBP was found.

  1. Multifidus and Paraspinal Muscle Group Cross-Sectional Areas of Patients With Low Back Pain and Control Patients: A Systematic Review With a Focus on Blinding

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Luciana Gazzi

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have investigated differences in paraspinal muscle morphology between patients with low back pain (LBP) and control patients. However, inconsistencies in the results of some of these studies may limit generalizations. Objective The purpose of this study was to systematically review studies evaluating paraspinal muscle morphology in patients with LBP and control patients, with a focus on the effects of blinding. Data Sources An electronic search was performed with the use of relevant databases. Study quality was evaluated by means of the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Study Selection Case-control studies investigating paraspinal muscle size between patients with LBP and control patients who were healthy were included. Studies that compared paraspinal muscle size between symptomatic and asymptomatic sides of patients with unilateral LBP also were included. Data Extraction Studies investigating the same outcome—at the same spinal level and for the same muscle and population—were pooled. Mean differences with 95% confidence interval were calculated for each study. Data Synthesis Eleven studies were included. With 1 exception, all pooled results were significantly different statistically between groups, suggesting that paraspinal muscles are smaller in patients with chronic LBP than in control patients and on the symptomatic side of patients with chronic unilateral LBP. In patients with acute unilateral LBP, there was no significant difference between sides. A qualitative examination demonstrated a trend toward an increased effect size when outcome assessors were unblinded. Limitations Limitations of this review include the small number of studies included and their small sample size. Misclassification of blinding status may have occurred when the study did not report blinding status. Conclusions Evidence suggests that paraspinal muscles are significantly smaller in patients with chronic LBP than in control patients. Although

  2. Chiropractic management of a US Army veteran with low back pain and piriformis syndrome complicated by an anatomical anomaly of the piriformis muscle: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Cynthia; Bakkum, Barclay W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to present the case of a patient with an anatomical anomaly of the piriformis muscle who had a piriformis syndrome and was managed with chiropractic care. Case Report A 32-year-old male patient presented to a chiropractic clinic with a chief complaint of low back pain that radiated into his right buttock, right posterior thigh, and right posterior calf. The complaint began 5 years prior as a result of injuries during Airborne School in the US Army resulting in a 60% disability rating from the Veterans Administration. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mildly decreased intradiscal T2 signal with shallow central subligamentous disk displacement and low-grade facet arthropathy at L5/S1, a hypolordotic lumbar curvature, and accessory superior bundles of the right piriformis muscle without morphologic magnetic resonance imaging evidence of piriformis syndrome. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic treatment included lumbar and sacral spinal manipulation with soft tissue massage to associated musculature and home exercise recommendations. Variations from routine care included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretches, electric muscle stimulation, acupressure point stimulation, Sacro Occipital Technique pelvic blocking, CranioSacral therapy, and an ergonomic evaluation. Conclusion A patient with a piriformis anomaly with symptoms of low back pain and piriformis syndrome responded positively to conservative chiropractic care, although the underlying cause of the piriformis syndrome remained. PMID:22942838

  3. Potential clinical application of masseter and temporal muscle massage treatment using an oral rehabilitation robot in temporomandibular disorder patients with myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Nakayama, Miwa; Nishiyama, Wataru; Ogi, Nobumi; Sakuma, Shigemitsu; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Kurita, Kenichi; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2014-11-11

    Objectives: To investigate the safety, suitable treatment regimen, and efficacy of masseter and temporal muscle massage treatment using an oral rehabilitation robot. Methods: Forty-one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients with myofascial pain (8 men, 33 women, median age: 46 years) were enrolled. The safety, suitable massage regimen, and efficacy of this treatment were investigated. Changes in masseter muscle thickness were evaluated on sonograms. Results: No adverse events occurred with any of the treatment sessions. Suitable massage was at pressure of 10 N for 16 minutes. Five sessions were performed every 2 weeks. Total duration of treatment was 9·5 weeks in median. Massage treatment was effective in 70·3% of patients. Masseter muscle thickness decreased with treatment in the therapy-effective group. Conclusion: This study confirmed the safety of massage treatment, and established a suitable regimen. Massage was effective in 70·3% of patients and appeared to have a potential as one of the effective treatments for myofascial pain.

  4. Non-Drug Pain Relief: Imagery

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. Imagery does not replace pain medicine. It works with your pain medicine to help you have better pain relief. How Imagery Helps Imagery is used to help reduce stress that can cause muscle tension. It can help ...

  5. Experimental evidence and mathematical modeling of thermal effects on human colonic smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Altomare, A; Gizzi, A; Guarino, M P L; Loppini, A; Cocca, S; Dipaola, M; Alloni, R; Cicala, M; Filippi, S

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown, in animal models, that gastrointestinal tract (GIT) motility is influenced by temperature; nevertheless, the basic mechanism governing thermal GIT smooth muscle responses has not been fully investigated. Studies based on physiologically tuned mathematical models have predicted that thermal inhomogeneity may induce an electrochemical destabilization of peristaltic activity. In the present study, the effect of thermal cooling on human colonic muscle strip (HCMS) contractility was studied. HCMSs were obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer. After removal of the mucosa and serosa layers, strips were mounted in separate chambers. After 30 min, spontaneous contractions developed, which were measured using force displacement transducers. Temperature was changed every hour (37, 34, and 31°C). The effect of cooling was analyzed on mean contractile activity, oscillation amplitude, frequency, and contraction to ACh (10(-5) M). At 37°C, HCMSs developed a stable phasic contraction (~0.02 Hz) with a significant ACh-elicited mean contractile response (31% and 22% compared with baseline in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively). At a lower bath temperature, higher mean contractile amplitude was observed, and it increased in the presence of ACh (78% and 43% higher than the basal tone in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively, at 31°C). A simplified thermochemomechanical model was tuned on experimental data characterizing the stress state coupling the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration to tissue temperature. In conclusion, acute thermal cooling affects colonic muscular function. Further studies are needed to establish the exact mechanisms involved to better understand clinical consequences of hypothermia on intestinal contractile activity.

  6. Experimentally Reduced Hip-Abductor Muscle Strength and Frontal-Plane Biomechanics During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Michael B.; Kendall, Karen D.; Patel, Chirag; Wiley, J. Preston; Emery, Carolyn; Ferber, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Context: Researchers have postulated that reduced hip-abductor muscle strength may have a role in the progression of knee osteoarthritis by increasing the external knee-adduction moment. However, the relationship between hip-abductor strength and frontal-plane biomechanics remains unclear. Objective: To experimentally reduce hip-abduction strength and observe the subsequent changes in frontal-plane biomechanics. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight healthy, recreationally active men (age = 27 ± 6 years, height = 1.75 ± 0.11 m, mass = 76.1 ± 10.0 kg). Intervention(s): All participants underwent a superior gluteal nerve block injection to reduce the force output of the hip-abductor muscle group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximal isometric hip-abduction strength and gait biomechanical data were collected before and after the injections. Gait biomechanical variables collected during walking consisted of knee- and hip-adduction moments and impulses and the peak angles of contralateral pelvic drop, hip adduction, and ipsilateral trunk lean. Results: Hip-abduction strength was reduced after the injection (P = .001) and remained lower than baseline values at the completion of the postinjection gait data collection (P = .02). No alterations in hip- or knee-adduction moments (hip: P = .11; knee: P = .52) or impulses (hip: P = .16; knee: P = .41) were found after the nerve block. Similarly, no changes in angular kinematics were observed for contralateral pelvic drop (P = .53), ipsilateral trunk lean (P = .78), or hip adduction (P = .48). Conclusions A short-term reduction in hip-abductor strength was not associated with alterations in the frontal-plane gait biomechanics of young, healthy men. Further research is needed to determine whether a similar relationship is true in older adults with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25875071

  7. Muscle fibre size and type distribution in thoracic and lumbar regions of erector spinae in healthy subjects without low back pain: normal values and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    MANNION, A. F.; DUMAS, G. A.; COOPER, R. G.; ESPINOSA, F. J.; FARIS, M. W.; STEVENSON, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the normal muscle fibre size and type distribution of the human erector spinae, both in thoracic and lumbar regions, in a group of 31 young healthy male (n=17) and female (n=14) volunteers. Two percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were obtained under local anaesthesia, from the belly of the left erector spinae, at the levels of the 10th thoracic and 3rd lumbar vertebrae. Samples were prepared for routine histochemistry for the identification of fibre types. Fibre size (cross-sectional area (CSA) and narrow diameter (ND)) was quantified using computerised image analysis. The mean CSA/ND for each fibre type was greater in the thoracic than the lumbar region, but there was no difference between the 2 regions either for percentage type I (i.e. percentage distribution by number), percentage type I area (i.e. relative area of the muscle occupied by type I fibres) or the ratio describing the size of the type I fibre relative to that of the type II. Men had larger fibres than women, for each fibre type and at both sampling sites. In the men, each fibre type was of a similar mean size, whereas in the women the type I fibres were considerably larger than both the type II A and type II B fibres, with no difference between the latter two. In both regions of the erector spinae there was no difference between men and women for the proportion (%) of a given fibre type, but the percentage type I fibre area was significantly higher in the women. The erector spinae display muscle fibre characteristics which are clearly very different from those of other skeletal muscles, and which, with their predominance of relatively large type I (slow twitch) fibres, befit their function as postural muscles. Differences between thoracic and lumbar fascicles of the muscle, and between the muscles of men and women, may reflect adaptive responses to differences in function. In assessing the degree of any pathological change in the muscle of patients with low back pain

  8. Acute effect of Aloe vera gel extract on experimental models of pain.

    PubMed

    Rathor, Naveen; Mehta, Ashish K; Sharma, Amit K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2012-12-01

    The present study was performed to explore the effect of aqueous extract of Aloe vera on behavioural parameters of pain. Pain assessment was performed by the tail-flick and formalin tests. A. vera (100 mg/kg, per oral (p.o.)) produced an insignificant decrease in the pain response in the tail-flick and formalin tests. Moreover, A. vera (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) did not have significant effect on the tail-flick test. However, A. vera (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly decreased the second phase of the formalin-induced pain. Thus, these findings suggest that A. vera exerts its effect by a peripheral mechanism of action rather than central.

  9. Neuromuscular adaptations predict functional disability independently of clinical pain and psychological factors in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Abboud, Jacques; St-Pierre, Charles; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain exhibit characteristics such as clinical pain, psychological symptoms and neuromuscular adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the independent contribution of clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations to disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Clinical pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, anxiety, neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain were assessed in 52 patients with chronic low back pain. Lumbar muscle electromyographic activity was assessed during a flexion-extension task (flexion relaxation phenomenon) to assess both chronic neuromuscular adaptations and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain during the task. Multiple regressions showed that independent predictors of disability included neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain (β=0.25, p=0.006, sr(2)=0.06), neuromuscular responses to experimental pain (β=-0.24, p=0.011, sr(2)=0.05), clinical pain intensity (β=0.28, p=0.002, sr(2)=0.08) and psychological factors (β=0.58, p<0.001, sr(2)=0.32). Together, these predictors accounted for 65% of variance in disability (R(2)=0.65 p<0.001). The current investigation revealed that neuromuscular adaptations are independent from clinical pain intensity and psychological factors, and contribute to inter-individual differences in patients' disability. This suggests that disability, in chronic low back pain patients, is determined by a combination of factors, including clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations.

  10. Hypnosis and Local Anesthesia for Dental Pain Relief-Alternative or Adjunct Therapy?-A Randomized, Clinical-Experimental Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Thomas Gerhard; Wolf, Dominik; Callaway, Angelika; Below, Dagna; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Willershausen, Brita; Daubländer, Monika

    2016-01-01

    This prospective randomized clinical crossover trial was designed to compare hypnosis and local anesthesia for experimental dental pain relief. Pain thresholds of the dental pulp were determined. A targeted standardized pain stimulus was applied and rated on the Visual Analogue Scale (0-10). The pain threshold was lower under hypnosis (58.3 ± 17.3, p < .001), maximal (80.0) under local anesthesia. The pain stimulus was scored higher under hypnosis (3.9 ± 3.8) than with local anesthesia (0.0, p < .001). Local anesthesia was superior to hypnosis and is a safe and effective method for pain relief in dentistry. Hypnosis seems to produce similar effects observed under sedation. It can be used in addition to local anesthesia and in individual cases as an alternative for pain control in dentistry.

  11. A Phosphorylatable Sphingosine Analog Induces Airway Smooth Muscle Cytostasis and Reverses Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Experimental Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, David R.; Lecours, Pascale B.; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Beaulieu, Marie-Josée; Huppé, Carole-Ann; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Flamand, Nicolas; Don, Anthony S.; Bissonnette, Élyse; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laplante, Mathieu; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.; Bossé, Ynuk; Marsolais, David

    2017-01-01

    In asthma, excessive bronchial narrowing associated with thickening of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) causes respiratory distress. Numerous pharmacological agents prevent experimental airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) when delivered prophylactically. However, most fail to resolve this feature after disease is instated. Although sphingosine analogs are primarily perceived as immune modulators with the ability to prevent experimental asthma, they also influence processes associated with tissue atrophy, supporting the hypothesis that they could interfere with mechanisms sustaining pre-established AHR. We thus assessed the ability of a sphingosine analog (AAL-R) to reverse AHR in a chronic model of asthma. We dissected the pharmacological mechanism of this class of agents using the non-phosphorylatable chiral isomer AAL-S and the pre-phosphorylated form of AAL-R (AFD-R) in vivo and in human ASM cells. We found that a therapeutic course of AAL-R reversed experimental AHR in the methacholine challenge test, which was not replicated by dexamethasone or the non-phosphorylatable isomer AAL-S. AAL-R efficiently interfered with ASM cell proliferation in vitro, supporting the concept that immunomodulation is not necessary to interfere with cellular mechanisms sustaining AHR. Moreover, the sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase inhibitor SM4 and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor antagonist VPC23019 failed to inhibit proliferation, indicating that intracellular accumulation of sphingosine-1-phosphate or interference with cell surface S1P1/S1P3 activation, are not sufficient to induce cytostasis. Potent AAL-R-induced cytostasis specifically related to its ability to induce intracellular AFD-R accumulation. Thus, a sphingosine analog that possesses the ability to be phosphorylated in situ interferes with cellular mechanisms that beget AHR. PMID:28270767

  12. Influence of topical capsaicin on facial sensitivity in response to experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-S; Kho, H-S; Kim, Y-K; Chung, S-C

    2007-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent component of the red pepper, has been used as an analgesic in a variety of pain conditions, but sensory impairment after long-term treatment has been concerned. This study investigated the influence of topical capsaicin on various types of sensations including pain in the facial areas innervated by the mental nerve, and also evaluated whether the measurement of cutaneous current perception threshold (CPT) is reliable for the quantification of sensory change following capsaicin application. Twenty healthy subjects were given topical capsaicin cream (0.075%), which was applied to the mental area unilaterally, four times daily for 2 weeks. Burning sensation after capsaicin application gradually decreased with repeated applications. Repeated topical capsaicin resulted in reduced sensation to mechanical, heat and cold pain without changing non-painful tactile sensation. It also resulted in increased CPTs at 5 Hz and 250 Hz stimuli but no change in the CPTs at 2000 Hz from the first evaluation after capsaicin treatment and throughout the treatment period. This study demonstrated that topical capsaicin treatment for the management of chronic localized pain can be safely applied to the face without affecting non-painful normal sensations, and that CPT testing is a clinically useful tool for the quantification of sensory changes following capsaicin application.

  13. Pressure pain thresholds assessed over temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy individuals, patients with tension-type headache, and those with migraine--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sanne; Petersen, Marie Weinreich; Svendsen, Anette Sand; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and summarize the available scientific literature addressing pressure pain threshold (PPT) values over the temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy humans, patients with tension-type headache (TTH), and those with migraine both in males and females. Six relevant medical databases for the literature search were included: PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, BioMed Central, and Embase. The search strategy was performed applying 15 keywords (eg, pressure pain threshold, temporalis muscle, tension type headache, pressure algometer) and their combinations. A total of 156 articles were identified, and 40 relevant articles were included. The main outcomes of the systematic review were extracted, and it was demonstrated that the PPT values in general were lower in patients compared with healthy subjects, and this was especially noted for temporalis in both females (migraine: 231.2 ± 38.3 kPa < TTH: 248.4 ± 39.3 kPa < healthy: 282.1 ± 70.8 kPa) and males (migraine: 225.5 ± 61.2 kPa < TTH: 264.2 ± 32.5 kPa < healthy: 314.8 ± 63.3 kPa). The masseter muscle seemed to be more sensitive than the other 2 muscles, in both females (healthy: masseter 194.1 ± 62.7 kPa < frontalis 277.5 ± 51.1 kPa < temporalis 282.1 ± 70.8 kPa) and males (healthy: masseter 248.2 ± 48.4 kPa < temporalis 314.8 ± 63.3 < frontalis 388 kPa). Females had lower PPT values than those of males in temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles. This work is the first to systematically review the scientific literature addressing PPT values over craniofacial muscles of healthy subjects, patients with TTH, and those with migraine to provide the PPT value ranges. Based on these findings, a set of guidelines was established to assist future studies including PPT assessments over craniofacial muscles.

  14. [The results of the multicenter pharmaco-epidemiological observational project on the use of mydocalm in the treatment of pain syndromes with the muscle spasm].

    PubMed

    Skoromets, A A; Gekht, A B; Galanov, D V; Danilenko, O A; Barantsevich, E R; Lebedeva, A V; Belova, A N; Shprakh, V V; Bogdanov, E I; Prokopenko, S V; Khabirov, F A; Spirin, N N; Baliazin, V A; Miakotnykh, V S; Volkova, L I; Gafurov, B G; Mishchenko, T S; Toktomushev, Ch T; Shyralieva, R K; Musaev, S K; Guseinov, S G

    2015-01-01

    The prospective multicenter open noncomparative pharmaco-epidemiological observational project on the use of mydocalm in real clinical practice has been completed in 2013. The project has been performed in 2090 clinical/rehabilitation settings in 284 cities of 13 countries using the results of 35,383 patients. The project aimed to assess the safety of treatment (percentage of patients with adverse-effects) and pain relieving efficacy as well as patient's satisfaction with the treatment. In total, 6603 (19%) adverse-effects were recorded. Their severity was evaluated as mild in 84,48%, no serious adverse-effects were noted. The high efficacy of mydocalm in the treatment of pain syndromes with the muscle spasm has been demonstrated. The high level of tolerability and absence of the clinically significant increase of adverse effects in the combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been confirmed.

  15. Acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN) in a 15-year-old boy presenting with severe pain and distal muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Rostásy, K M; Huppke, P; Beckers, B; Brockmann, K; Degenhardt, V; Wesche, B; König, F; Gärtner, J

    2005-08-01

    Acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN) is a recently described subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome characterized by acute onset of distal weakness, loss of deep tendon reflexes and sensory symptoms. Electrophysiological studies show mildly reduced nerve conduction velocities combined with a marked reduction of muscle action and sensory nerve action potentials. Here, we report a 15-year-old boy who suffered from severe burning and knife-like pain that increased over a period of three months and resulted in a disrupted sleep pattern and suicidal intentions as well as marked loss of weight. In addition, he developed muscle weakness in his hands and feet. Neurophysiological and histopathological studies revealed AMSAN. Marked improvement of his condition was achieved by treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, high-dose methylprednisolone, and a combination of gabapentin, antidepressants, and an oral morphine.

  16. Mechanisms underlying the sparing of masticatory versus limb muscle function in an experimental critical illness model.

    PubMed

    Aare, Sudhakar; Ochala, Julien; Norman, Holly S; Radell, Peter; Eriksson, Lars I; Göransson, Hanna; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hoffman, Eric P; Larsson, Lars

    2011-12-16

    Acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM) is a common debilitating acquired disorder in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients that is characterized by tetraplegia/generalized weakness of limb and trunk muscles. Masticatory muscles, on the other hand, are typically spared or less affected, yet the mechanisms underlying this striking muscle-specific difference remain unknown. This study aims to evaluate physiological parameters and the gene expression profiles of masticatory and limb muscles exposed to factors suggested to trigger AQM, such as mechanical ventilation, immobilization, neuromuscular blocking agents, corticosteroids (CS), and sepsis for 5 days by using a unique porcine model mimicking the ICU conditions. Single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and force-generating capacity, i.e., maximum force normalized to fiber cross-sectional area (specific force), revealed maintained masseter single muscle fiber cross-sectional area and specific-force after 5 days' exposure to all triggering factors. This is in sharp contrast to observations in limb and trunk muscles, showing a dramatic decline in specific force in response to 5 days' exposure to the triggering factors. Significant differences in gene expression were observed between craniofacial and limb muscles, indicating a highly complex and muscle-specific response involving transcription and growth factors, heat shock proteins, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, oxidative stress responsive elements, and sarcomeric proteins underlying the relative sparing of cranial vs. spinal nerve innervated muscles during exposure to the ICU intervention.

  17. Comparison of Lateral Abdominal Muscle Thickness and Cross Sectional Area of Multifidus in Adolescent Soccer Players with and without Low Back Pain: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Noormohammadpour, Pardis; Hosseini Khezri, Alireza; Linek, Paweł; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Hassannejad, Alireza; Younesian, Ali; Farahbakhsh, Farzin; Kordi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint amongst adolescent athletes. While different studies have shown association between LBP and trunk muscle thickness in the general population, few articles have studied it in adolescent athletes. Objectives The aim of this study is to compare lateral abdominal muscle thickness and function, and cross sectional area (CSA) of lumbar multifidus (LM) in adolescent soccer players with and without LBP. Methods In total, 28 adolescent soccer players with and without LBP, from the premier league participated in this study. The thickness of external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis and the CSA of the LM muscles at L4 level on both sides were measured at rest and contraction via ultrasound imaging (USI). In addition, leg length discrepancy, hamstring flexibility, active lumbar forward flexion, and isometric muscle endurance of trunk extensors were measured in both groups. (study design/setting: case control study). Results The mean (SD) age in LBP group and non-LBP group were 14.0 (1.1) and 14.1 (0.9) years, respectively. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics of participants between groups. Findings showed no significant difference between LBP and non-LBP groups comparing all measured variables. Conclusions The data obtained support that there is not a correlation between abdominal muscle thickness and CSA of the lumbar multifidi and LBP in adolescent soccer players. These findings suggest that other factors rather than the thickness of deep trunk muscles may play a more significant role in the etiology of LBP in adolescent soccer players. PMID:28144414

  18. The lidocaine metabolite N-ethylglycine has antinociceptive effects in experimental inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Werdehausen, Robert; Mittnacht, Sebastian; Bee, Lucy A.; Minett, Michael S.; Armbruster, Anja; Bauer, Inge; Wood, John N.; Hermanns, Henning; Eulenburg, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) plays a crucial role in regulating extracellular glycine concentrations and might thereby constitute a new drug target for the modulation of glycinergic inhibition in pain signaling. Consistent with this view, inhibition of GlyT1 has been found to induce antinociceptive effects in various animal pain models. We have shown previously that the lidocaine metabolite N-ethylglycine (EG) reduces GlyT1-dependent glycine uptake by functioning as an artificial substrate for this transporter. Here, we show that EG is specific for GlyT1 and that in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, systemic treatment with EG results in an efficient amelioration of hyperalgesia and allodynia without affecting acute pain. There was no effect on motor coordination or the development of inflammatory edema. No adverse neurological effects were observed after repeated high-dose application of EG. EG concentrations both in blood and spinal fluid correlated with an increase of glycine concentration in spinal fluid. The time courses of the EG and glycine concentrations corresponded well with the antinociceptive effect. Additionally, we found that EG reduced the increase in neuronal firing of wide-dynamic-range neurons caused by inflammatory pain induction. These findings suggest that systemically applied lidocaine exerts antihyperalgesic effects through its metabolite EG in vivo, by enhancing spinal inhibition of pain processing through GlyT1 modulation and subsequent increase of glycine concentrations at glycinergic inhibitory synapses. EG and other substrates of GlyT1, therefore, may be a useful therapeutic agent in chronic pain states involving spinal disinhibition. PMID:25932687

  19. Association between history and physical examination factors and change in lumbar multifidus muscle thickness after spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Fritz, Julie M; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Kawchuk, Greg N; Parent, Eric C; Gill, Norman W; Childs, John D; Teyhen, Deydre S

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the clinical characteristics of patients with low back pain (LBP) who display improved lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle function after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) may provide insight into a potentially synergistic interaction between SMT and exercise. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the baseline historical and physical examination factors associated with increased contracted LM muscle thickness one week after SMT. Eighty-one participants with LBP underwent a baseline physical examination and ultrasound imaging assessment of the LM muscle during submaximal contraction before and one week after SMT. The relationship between baseline examination variables and 1-week change in contracted LM thickness was assessed using correlation analysis and hierarchical multiple linear regression. Four variables best predicted the magnitude of increases in contracted LM muscle thickness after SMT. When combined, these variables suggest that patients with LBP, (1) that are fairly acute, (2) have at least a moderately good prognosis without focal and irritable symptoms, and (3) exhibit signs of spinal instability, may be the best candidates for a combined SMT and lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE) treatment approach.

  20. Vibration-induced muscle injury. An experimental model and preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Necking, L E; Dahlin, L B; Fridén, J; Lundborg, G; Lundström, R; Thornell, L E

    1992-06-01

    The hind paws of rats were subjected to vibration at a frequency of 80 Hz., an acceleration of 32 m./s.2 rms (i.e. ah.w approximately 6.3 m./s.2 rms) for five hours daily during five consecutive days. Morphological, histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of the soleus, extensor digitorum longus and the plantar muscles in the vibrated limb and the contralateral control limb were performed. No changes were seen in the soleus or extensor digitorum longus muscles but different degrees of degeneration of the muscle fibres were seen in the plantar muscle sections as well as signs of regeneration. No changes were observed in the contralateral unexposed limb. It is concluded that it is not only nervous tissue but also muscle tissue that can be affected by vibration. The changes seem to be confined to muscles close to the vibration exciter.

  1. [Morphohistochemical study of skeletal muscles in rats after experimental flight on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Il'ina-Kakueva, E I

    1990-01-01

    Morphometric and histochemical methods were used to examine the soleus, gastrocnemius (medial portion), quadriceps femoris (central portion) and biceps brachii muscles of Wistar SPF rats two days after the 13-day flight on Cosmos-1887. It was found that significant atrophy developed only in the soleus muscle. The space flight did not change the percentage content of slow (type I) and fast (type II) fibers in fast twitch muscles. During two days at 1 g the slow soleus muscle developed substantial circulation disorders, which led to interstitial edema and necrotic changes. The gastrocnemius muscle showed small foci containing necrotic myofibers. Two days after recovery no glycogen aggregates were seen in myofibers, which were previously observed in other rats examined 4--8 hours after flight. An initial stage of muscle readaptation to 1 g occurred, when NAD.H2-dehydrogenase activity was decreased.

  2. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M. Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  3. Effects of the Workplace Health Promotion Activities Soccer and Zumba on Muscle Pain, Work Ability and Perceived Physical Exertion among Female Hospital Employees

    PubMed Central

    Barene, Svein; Krustrup, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This 40-week workplace physical training RCT investigated the effect of soccer and Zumba, respectively, on muscle pain intensity and duration, work ability, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during work among female hospital employees. Methods 107 hospital employees were cluster-randomized into two training groups, and a control group. The training was conducted outside working hours as two-three 1-h sessions per week for the first 12 weeks, and continued as one-two 1-h sessions per week for the last 28 weeks. Muscle pain intensity and duration, work ability, and RPE during work were measured at baseline and after 12 and 40 weeks. Results After 12 weeks, both the soccer (−1.9, 95% CI, −3.0, −0.8, P = 0.001) and the Zumba group (−1.3, 95% CI, −2.3, −0.3, P = 0.01) reduced the pain intensity (on a scale from 0 to 10) in the neck-shoulder region (eta squared = 0.109), whereas only the soccer group (−1.9, 95% CI, −3.2, −0.7, P = 0.002, eta squared = 0.092) showed a reduction after 40 weeks referencing the control group. After 40 weeks, both the soccer (-16.4 days, 95% CI, −29.6, −3.2, P<0.02) and the Zumba group (-16.6 days, 95% CI, −28.9, −4.2, P<0.01) reduced the pain duration during the past 3 months in the neck-shoulder region (eta squared = 0.077). No significant effects on intensity or duration of pain in the lower back, RPE during work or work ability were found. Conclusions The present study indicates that workplace initiated soccer and Zumba training improve neck-shoulder pain intensity as well as duration among female hospital employees. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN 61986892. PMID:25494175

  4. Efficacy and safety of PPC-5650 on experimental rectal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Simrén, Magnus; Törnblom, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2015-02-01

    PPC-5650 is a new pharmacological agent that can modulate acid-sensing ion channel activity, leading to a reduction in the pain signal under up-regulated conditions. The non-clinical programme for PPC-5650 supported a role for this novel agent in the treatment of pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In patients with IBS, the aims of the study were: (1) to assess the efficacy of a single bolus of PPC-5650 locally applied in the rectum using multi-modal stimulations of the recto sigmoid and (2) to assess the safety profile of PPC-5650. The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial in patients with IBS, excluding females of child-bearing potential. The study consisted of a training visit, study visit 1 and 2 and a follow-up visit. Rectosigmoid electrical, thermal and mechanical stimulations were performed, pain perception was rated on a pain intensity scale and referred pain areas were assessed. All adverse events were registered. Twenty-five patients with IBS were enrolled and completed the study (9 women and 16 men; mean age 50.4 ± 12.7 years). No effects of the study drug were found on any of the rectal stimulations or for referred pain areas (all p > 0.05). No significant or clinically relevant treatment-related differences were seen for the laboratory safety variables or any other reported adverse event. In conclusion, in patients with IBS on rectal sensitivity to multi-modal stimulations, PPC-5650 did not produce efficacy relative to placebo. The overall safety and tolerability of PPC-5650 was acceptable.

  5. Effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and low back pain in dysmenorrheic young adult women: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huei-Mein; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chiu, Min-Huei; Hu, Hsou-Mei

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and low back pain (LBP) in dysmenorrheic young adult women. In all, 129 female students, who had been experiencing dysmenorrhea with LBP during menstruation and who scored more than 4 points on the visual analog scale for pain, were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (n = 65) received acupressure massage three times a week for 30 minutes on the sanyinjiao (SP6), ciliao (BL32), and taichong (Liver 3) acupoints. The control group (n = 64) received only a manual of menstrual health education without acupressure intervention. Data were collected at five time points: at baseline, 30 minutes, and 4, 8, and 12 months after the intervention. During the 12-month follow-up, the experimental group had significantly lower menstrual distress and LBP scores than the control group. Among 65 participants in the experimental group, 53 (82%) reported a moderate to high levels of menstrual distress, 51 (78%) reported moderate to high levels of LBP relief, and 49 (75%) reported moderate to high levels of satisfaction with acupressure. Our findings may serve as a reference for health care professionals and young women to improve self-care during menstruation and help further understand the therapeutic effects of acupressure on menstrual distress and LBP.

  6. Lung injury-dependent oxidative status and chymotrypsin-like activity of skeletal muscles in hamsters with experimental emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral skeletal muscle is altered in patients suffering from emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative stress have been demonstrated to participate on skeletal muscle loss of several states, including disuse atrophy, mechanical ventilation, and chronic diseases. No evidences have demonstrated the occurance in a severity manner. Methods We evaluated body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress, and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity in the gastrocnemius muscle of emphysemic hamsters. The experimental animals had 2 different severities of lung damage from experimental emphysema induced by 20 mg/mL (E20) and 40 mg/mL (E40) papain. Results The severity of emphysema increased significantly in E20 (60.52 ± 2.8, p < 0.05) and E40 (52.27 ± 4.7; crossed the alveolar intercepts) groups. As compared to the control group, there was a reduction on body (171.6 ± 15.9 g) and muscle weight (251.87 ± 24.87 mg) in the E20 group (157.5 ± 10.3 mg and 230.12 ± 23.52 mg, for body and muscle weight, respectively), which was accentuated in the E40 group (137.4 ± 7.2 g and 197.87 ± 10.49 mg, for body and muscle weight, respectively). Additionally, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence (CL), carbonylated proteins, and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were elevated in the E40 group as compared to the E20 group (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). The severity of emphysema significantly correlated with the progressive increase in CL (r = −0.95), TBARS (r = −0.98), carbonyl proteins (r = −0.99), and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity (r = −0.90). Furthermore, augmentation of proteolytic activity correlated significantly with CL (r = 0.97), TBARS (r = 0.96), and carbonyl proteins (r = 0.91). Conclusions Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that muscle atrophy observed in this model of emphysema is mediated by increased muscle chymotrypsin

  7. The effect of patellar taping on EMG activity of vasti muscles during squatting in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mostamand, Javid; Bader, Dan L; Hudson, Zöe

    2011-01-01

    Although patellar taping has been shown to reduce pain in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, the mechanisms of pain reduction have not completely been established following its application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate EMG activity of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis following the application of patellar taping during a functional single leg squat. Both vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset and vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis amplitude of 18 participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 18 healthy participants as controls were measured using an EMG unit. This procedure was performed on the affected knee of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome, before, during, and after patellar taping during unilateral squatting. The same procedure was also performed on the unaffected knees of both groups. The mean values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset prior to taping (2.54 ms, s = 4.35) were decreased significantly following an immediate application of tape (-3.22 ms, s = 3.45) and after a prolonged period of taping (-6.00 ms, s = 3.40 s) (P < 0.05). There was also a significant difference between the mean values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset among controls (-2.03 ms, s = 6.04) and participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome prior to taping (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant difference between the ranked values of vastus medialis obliquus/vastus lateralis amplitude of the affected and unaffected knees of participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls during different conditions of taping (P > 0.05). Decreased values of vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis onset may contribute to patellar realignment and explain the mechanism of pain reduction following patellar taping in participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  8. Experimental Evaluation of Stable Isotope Fractionation in Fish Muscle and Otoliths

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated an unresolved question in the use of stable isotopes to determine diet and trophic position of fish using both muscle and otoliths. We determined: i) the degree of fractionation of δ13C and δ15N between diet and muscle, and assessed if fractionation was consistent...

  9. Changes in masticatory muscle activity according to food size in experimental human mastication.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, S; Ohkochi, N; Kawakami, T; Sugimura, M

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in masticatory muscle activity according to food size in human mastication. Sixteen subjects performed deliberate unilateral chewing of similarly cone shaped hard gummy jellies weighing 5 and 10 g. The masseter and anterior temporal muscle activity on both sides was recorded for the first 10 strokes. The normalized muscle activity during the chewing of the 10 g jelly was significantly higher than that of the 5-g jelly, and there was a considerably high significant correlationship between the muscle activity during the chewing of the 10- and 5-g jellies in each muscle on each side. The 10 g/5 g jelly ratio for the masseter muscle activity on the non-chewing side almost coincided with the theoretical energy ratio required to shear, although that of the chewing side was lower than the ratio. The 10 g/5 g jelly ratio for the temporal muscle activity on both sides almost coincided with the food height ratio. The results suggest that anterior temporal and masseter muscle activity changes according to the rate of change in the height of hard coherent food bolus and food resistance required to shear, respectively, during mastication.

  10. Changes in direction-specific activity of psoas major and quadratus lumborum in people with recurring back pain differ between muscle regions and patient groups.

    PubMed

    Park, Rachel J; Tsao, Henry; Cresswell, Andrew G; Hodges, Paul W

    2013-06-01

    Psoas major (PM) and quadratus lumborum (QL) muscles have anatomically discrete regions. Redistribution of activity between these regions has been observed in people with low back pain (LBP). We hypothesised that the bias of activity of specific regions of PM and QL towards trunk extension may change depending on whether LBP individuals have more or less erector spinae (ES) activity in an extended/upright lumbar posture. Ten volunteers with recurring episodes of LBP and nine pain-free controls performed isometric trunk efforts in upright sitting. LBP individuals were subgrouped into those with high and low ES electromyographic activity (EMG) when sitting with a lumbar lordosis. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into fascicles of PM arising from the transverse process (PM-t) and vertebral body (PM-v) and anterior (QL-a) and posterior layers (QL-p) of QL. The LBP group with low ES EMG had greater bias of PM-t, PM-v and QL-p towards trunk extension. The LBP group with high ES activity showed less PM activity towards extension. These findings suggest redistribution of activity within and/or between these muscles with extensor moments. This is likely to be important to consider for effective clinical interventions for individuals with LBP.

  11. Do patients with chronic pain show autonomic arousal when confronted with feared movements? An experimental investigation of the fear-avoidance model.

    PubMed

    Glombiewski, Julia Anna; Riecke, Jenny; Holzapfel, Sebastian; Rief, Winfried; König, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald; Seifart, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    The relevance of a phobia-based conceptualization of fear for individuals with chronic pain has been much debated in the literature. This study investigated whether patients with highly fearful chronic low back pain show distinct physiological reaction patterns compared with less fearful patients when anticipating aversive back pain-related movements. We used an idiosyncratic fear induction paradigm and collected 2 different measures of autonomic nervous system activation and muscle tension in the lower back. We identified 2 distinct psychophysiological response patterns. One pattern was characterized by a moderate increase in skin conductance, interbeat interval (IBI) increase, and muscle tension increase in the lower back. This response was interpreted as an attention reaction to a moderately stressful event. The other pattern, found in 58% of the participants, was characterized by a higher skin conductance response, IBI decrease, and muscle tension increase in the lower back. According to Bradley and Lang defense cascade model, this response is typical of a fear reaction. Participants showing the psychophysiological pattern typical of fear also had elevated scores on some self-report measures of components of the fear-avoidance model, relative to participants showing the reaction pattern characteristic of attention. This study is the first to provide psychophysiological evidence for the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain.

  12. Combined neuromodulatory interventions in acute experimental pain: assessment of melatonin and non-invasive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Nádia Regina Jardim; Laste, Gabriela; Deitos, Alícia; Stefani, Luciana Cadore; Cambraia-Canto, Gustavo; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Brunoni, Andre R.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and melatonin can effectively treat pain. Given their potentially complementary mechanisms of action, their combination could have a synergistic effect. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that compared to the control condition and melatonin alone, tDCS combined with melatonin would have a greater effect on pain modulatory effect, as assessed by quantitative sensory testing (QST) and by the pain level during the Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM)-task. Furthermore, the combined treatment would have a greater cortical excitability effect as indicated by the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and on the serum BDNF level. Healthy males (n = 20), (aged 18–40 years), in a blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover, clinical trial, were randomized into three groups: sublingual melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + a-tDCS, melatonin (0.25 mg/kg) + sham-(s)-tDCS, or sublingual placebo+sham-(s)-tDCS. Anodal stimulation (2 mA, 20 min) was applied over the primary motor cortex. There was a significant difference in the heat pain threshold (°C) for melatonin+a-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean difference: 4.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 8.63) and melatonin+s-tDCS vs. placebo+s-tDCS (mean: 5.16, 95% CI: 0.84 to 8.36). There was no difference between melatonin+s-tDCS and melatonin+a-tDCS (mean difference: 0.29, 95% CI: −3.72 to 4.23). The mean change from the baseline on amplitude of motor evocate potential (MEP) was significantly higher in the melatonin+a-tDCS (−19.96% ± 5.2) compared with melatonin+s-tDCS group (−1.36% ± 5.35) and with placebo+s-tDCS group (3.61% ± 10.48), respectively (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). While melatonin alone or combined with a-tDCS did not significantly affect CPM task result, and serum BDNF level. The melatonin effectively reduced pain; however, its association with a-tDCS did not present an additional modulatory effect on acute induced pain. PMID:25873871

  13. Origin and development of muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Holobar, Aleš; Botter, Alberto; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Cramps are sudden, involuntary, painful muscle contractions. Their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. One hypothesis is that cramps result from changes in motor neuron excitability (central origin). Another hypothesis is that they result from spontaneous discharges of the motor nerves (peripheral origin). The central origin hypothesis has been supported by recent experimental findings, whose implications for understanding cramp contractions are discussed.

  14. Autism and motor acts: experimental analysison mylohyoid muscle emg recordingsduring grasping-to-eat action - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Paolo B; Ragogna, Paolo; Cremaschi, Silvana; Mondani, Massimo; Carniel, Roberto; Corubolo, Mario; Budai, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Most neuroscience studies do not pay enough attention to bio-mechanical related problems, such as the kinematic aspects of movements, that pose important boundary conditions, but are in general not sufficiently taken into consideration. In this work, using an experimental protocol based on measurements of mylohyoid (MH) muscle activity during grasping-to-eat actions, we debate the existence of impairments of action chains in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We re-examine the results of an electromyographic (EMG) experiment on MH muscle presented in a previous study; and we compare them to the results of a new, similar experiment in order to study the electromyographic activity of MH in typically developing (TD) children and in children with ASD executing grasping-to-eat actions. Our results are remarkably different from the original work and seem to indicate that there is no clear experimental evidence of different action organization in children with ASD.

  15. Reliability of ultrasound in combination with surface electromyogram for evaluating the activity of abdominal muscles in individuals with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung-Hye; Park, Du-Jin

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the reliability of ultrasound in combination with surface electromyogram (EMG) for evaluating the activity of the abdominal muscles in individuals with and without low back pain during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM). The study recruited ten individuals with or without low back pain, respectively. While the participants were performing the ADIM, the activities of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and the internal oblique (IO) were measured using ultra-sound, while the activities of the external oblique (EO) and the rectus abdominis (RA) were measured using surface EMG. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to verify the inter-rater reliability of ultrasound in combination with surface EMG at rest and during the ADIM, and Bland-Altman plots were used to verify intra-rater reliability. The inter-rater reliability for the two groups at rest and during the ADIM was excellent (ICC2,1 = 0.77-0.95). In the Bland-Altman plots, the mean differences and 95% limits of agreement in the abdominal muscles of the two groups at rest were -0.03∼0.03 mm (-0.66 to 0.60 mm) and -0.12∼ -0.05 (-0.58 to 0.48% MVIC), respectively. The mean differences and 95% limits of agreement in the abdominal muscles of the two groups during the ADIM were -0.04∼0.02 mm (-0.73 to 0.65 mm) and -0.19∼0.05% MVIC (-1.24 to 1.34% MVIC), respectively. The ultrasound in combination with surface EMG showed excellent inter-rater and intra-rater reliability at rest and during the ADIM.

  16. The neural mobilization technique modulates the expression of endogenous opioids in the periaqueductal gray and improves muscle strength and mobility in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The neural mobilization (NM) technique is a noninvasive method that has been proven to be clinically effective in reducing pain; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze whether NM alters the expression of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR), the delta-opioid receptor (DOR) and the Kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and improves locomotion and muscle force after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Methods The CCI was imposed on adult male rats followed by 10 sessions of NM every other day, starting 14 days after the CCI injury. At the end of the sessions, the PAG was analyzed using Western blot assays for opioid receptors. Locomotion was analyzed by the Sciatic functional index (SFI), and muscle force was analyzed by the BIOPAC system. Results An improvement in locomotion was observed in animals treated with NM compared with injured animals. Animals treated with NM showed an increase in maximal tetanic force of the tibialis anterior muscle of 172% (p < 0.001) compared with the CCI group. We also observed a decrease of 53% (p < 0.001) and 23% (p < 0.05) in DOR and KOR levels, respectively, after CCI injury compared to those from naive animals and an increase of 17% (p < 0.05) in KOR expression only after NM treatment compared to naive animals. There were no significant changes in MOR expression in the PAG. Conclusion These data provide evidence that a non-pharmacological NM technique facilitates pain relief by endogenous analgesic modulation. PMID:24884961

  17. The effects of Botulinum Toxin type A on capsaicin-evoked pain, flare, and secondary hyperalgesia in an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjøn M; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2006-06-01

    The trigeminovascular system is involved in migraine. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin type A (BoNT-A) in migraine has been investigated in clinical studies but the mechanism of action remains unexplored. It is hypothesized that BoNT-A inhibits peripheral sensitization of nociceptive fibers and indirectly reduces central sensitization. We examined the effect of intramuscular injection of BoNT-A on an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization induced by intradermal capsaicin injection to the forehead. BoNT-A (BOTOX) or saline was injected intramuscularly in precranial, neck and shoulder muscles to 32 healthy male volunteers in a double blind-randomized manner. Intradermally capsaicin-induced pain, flare and secondary hyperalgesia were obtained before and 1, 4 and 8 weeks after the above treatments. A significant suppressive effect of BoNT-A on pain, flare and hyperalgesia area was observed. The pain intensity area was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (9.16+/-0.83 cm x s) compared to saline group (15.41+/-0.83cm x s) (P=0.011). The flare area was also reduced significantly in BoNT-A group (29.81+/-0.69 cm2) compared to saline group (39.71+/-0.69 cm2) (P<0.001). Similarly, the mean area of secondary hyperalgesia was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (4.25+/-0.91 cm2) compared to saline group (7.03+/-0.91 cm2) (P=0.040). Post hoc analysis showed significant differences across the trials with a remarkable suppression effect of BoNT-A on capsaicin-induced sensory and vasomotor reactions as early as week1 (P<0.001). BoNT-A presented suppressive effects on the trigeminal/cervical nociceptive system activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to the forehead. The effects are suggested to be caused by a local peripheral effect of BoNT-A on cutaneous nociceptors.

  18. The enigmatic subcostal muscle: Anatomical study with application to spine and chest pain syndromes and avoidance of confusion on imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Ho; Won, Hyung-Sun; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, In-Beom

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to revisit the morphological characteristics of the subcostal muscle and to obtain its morphometric data. One hundred and two sides of the thorax from 51 adult cadavers were used. The total number of subcostal muscles in the 102 specimens was 559. The subcostal muscle commonly comprised an aponeurosis at its superior and inferior attachments. This muscle had a thin band-like shape in 64.2% cases, while in the other 35.8% either its superior or inferior attachment was wider. It was classified into the following four types on the basis of its inferior attachment: in Types I and II it extended to two (79.3%) and three (12.0%) lower ribs, respectively; in Type III it joined adjacent muscles such as the psoas major (2.2%) or quadratus lumborum (0.7%); and in Type IV it was attached to the transverse process (0.4%) or body (3.9%) of the 12th thoracic vertebra and the body of the 1st lumbar vertebra (1.4%). The subcostal muscle was found at the deepest layer of the intercostal space, and mainly presented in the upper and lower parts of the thorax. Its width and height were 18.2 ± 10.9 mm (mean ± SD) and 56.0 ± 13.3 mm, respectively. The distances from the midsagittal line to the superior and inferior attachments of the subcostal muscle were 77.1 ± 13.0 mm and 48.9 ± 13.5 mm, respectively. The results of this study will help to advance current understanding of the subcostal muscle.

  19. Experimental evaluation of the effects of pravastatin on electrophysiological parameters of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pierno, S; De Luca, A; Tricarico, D; Ferrannini, E; Conte, T; D'Alò, G; Camerino, D C

    1992-11-01

    The effects of daily chronic treatment for 6 months with pravastatin was evaluated on the performance of the skeletal muscle system of different rat groups. At all doses (0.1 mg/kg-20 mg/kg) the righting reflex and the electromyographic signals observed in vivo did not show any abnormality. At the end of the treatment the Extensor digitorum longus muscles were dissected from treated and control rats and their passive and active electrical parameters were analyzed in vitro by standard microelectrodes technique. Pravastatin did not modify the chloride conductance nor the excitability characteristics of the fibers. Chronic treatment with pravastatin does not produce any alteration of skeletal muscle function.

  20. Effect of Catechol-O-methyltransferase-gene (COMT) Variants on Experimental and Acute Postoperative Pain in 1,000 Women undergoing Surgery for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kambur, Oleg; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Leal, Suzanne M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Kalso, Eija A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamines in different tissues. Polymorphisms in COMT gene can attenuate COMT activity and increase sensitivity to pain. Human studies exploring the effect of COMT polymorphisms on pain sensitivity have mostly included small, heterogeneous samples and have ignored several important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study examines the effect of COMT polymorphisms on experimental and postoperative pain phenotypes in a large ethnically homogeneous female patient cohort. Methods Intensity of cold (+2–4°C) and heat (+48°C) pain and tolerance to cold pain were assessed in 1,000 patients scheduled for breast cancer surgery. Acute postoperative pain and oxycodone requirements were recorded. Twenty-two COMT SNPs were genotyped and their association with six pain phenotypes analyzed with linear regression. Results There was no association between any of the tested pain phenotypes and SNP rs4680. The strongest association signals were seen between rs165774 and heat pain intensity as well as rs887200 and cold pain intensity. In both cases, minor allele carriers reported less pain. Neither of these results remained significant after strict multiple testing corrections. When analyzed further, the effect of rs887200 was, however, shown to be significant and consistent throughout the cold pressure test. No evidence of association between the SNPs and postoperative oxycodone consumption was found. Conclusions SNPs rs887200 and rs165774 located in the untranslated regions of the gene had the strongest effects on pain sensitivity. Their effect on pain is described here for the first time. These results should be confirmed in further studies and the potential functional mechanisms of the variants studied. PMID:24343288

  1. Ultrasound measurement of deep abdominal muscle activity in sitting positions with different stability levels in subjects with and without chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Omid; Arab, Amir Massoud; Amiri, Mohsen; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in three sitting postures with different levels of stability. The technique of ultrasound imaging was used for individuals with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). A sample of 40 people participated in this study. Subjects were categorised into two groups: with LBP (N = 20) and without LBP (N = 20). Changes in the thickness of tested muscles were normalized under three different sitting postures to actual muscle thickness at rest in the supine lying position and were expressed as a percentage of thickness change. The percentage of thickness change in TrA and IO increased as the stability of the sitting position decreased in both groups. However, the percentages of thickness change in all positions were less in subjects with LBP. There was a significant difference in thickness change in TrA when sitting on a gym ball between subjects with and without LBP but no difference was found when sitting on a chair. There was no significant difference in thickness change in IO in all positions between the two groups. Our findings indicate that difference in the percentage of thickness change in TrA between subjects with and without LBP increases as the stability of sitting position decreases.

  2. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  3. Possible Local Stem Cells Activation by Microcurrent Application in Experimentally Injured Soleus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zickri, Maha Baligh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe injuries in skeletal muscle result in muscle weakness that delays recovery and contribute to progressive decline in muscle function. Microcurrent therapy (MCT) is a novel treatment method used in soft tissue injury and tissue regeneration therapy. The regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle tissue resides in satellite cells, the quiescent adult stem cells. Aim: The present work aimed at investigating the relation between microcurrent therapy and local stem cells in regeneration of induced skeletal muscle injury in albino rat. Materials and methods: Twenty six adult male albino rats were divided into Sham group, Injury group (I): subjected to soleus muscle injury and subdivided into subgroups I1 & I2 sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after injury respectively. Microcurrent group (M): subjected to muscle injury and micro-current was applied. The animals were subdivided into subgroups M1 and M2 sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after injury. Histological, immunohistochemical and morphometric studies were performed. Results: Atypical fibers widely separated by infiltrating cells and strong acidophilic sarcoplasm with focal vacuolations were found in injury group. In M1 subgroup few atypical fibers were found. In M2 subgroup multiple typical fibers were detected. A significant decrease in the mean area of atypical fibers, a significant increase in the mean area% of alpha SMA+ve cells and that of CD34+ve cells were found in microcurrent group compared to injury group. Conclusion: A definite therapeutic effect of the microcurrent was found on induced skeletal muscle injury. This effect was proved to be related to satellite cell activation. PMID:25473445

  4. EMG analysis of trapezius and masticatory muscles: experimental protocol and data reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Sforza, C; Rosati, R; De Menezes, M; Musto, F; Toma, M

    2011-09-01

    We aimed to define a standardised protocol for the electromyographic evaluation of trapezius muscle in dentistry and to assess its within- and between-session repeatability. Surface electromyography of trapezius, masseter and temporal muscles was performed in 40 healthy subjects aged 20-35 years during shoulder elevation, and maximum teeth clenching with and without cotton rolls. Two repetitions were made both within (same electrodes) and between sessions (different electrodes). Maximum voluntary clench on cotton rolls was used to standardise the potentials of the six analysed muscles with tooth contact; shoulder elevation was used to standardise the upper trapezius potentials. From the standardised electromyographic potentials, several indices (muscle symmetry; masticatory muscle torque and relative activity; total masticatory muscle activity; trapezius cervical load, percentage co-contraction of trapezius during teeth clenching) were computed; random (technical error of measurement) and systematic (Student's t-test, Analysis of Variance) errors were assessed. For all indices, no systematic errors were found between the two separate data collection sessions. Within session, limited (lower than 8%) technical errors of measurement were found for temporalis and masseter symmetry, torque and activity indices, and the trapezius cervical load. Larger random errors were obtained for trapezius symmetry and total masticatory muscle activity (up to 20%). Between sessions, no significant differences were found for trapezius co-contraction. In conclusion, a protocol for the standardisation of trapezius muscle that may be used within dental clinical applications was defined, and the repeatability of masseter, temporalis and trapezius electromyographic recordings for serial assessments was assessed in healthy subjects.

  5. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator of 5000 Hz frequency provides better analgesia than that of 100 Hz frequency in mice muscle pain model.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Tsung; Chien, Hsiao-Jung; Lin, Ya-Chi; Liu, Yen-Chin

    2017-04-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENSs) have been proved to be effective in muscle pain management for several decades. However, there is no consensus for the optimal TENS program. Previous research demonstrated that a 100 Hz TENS (L-TENS) provided better analgesia than a conventional TENS (< 5 Hz). However, no research compared a higher-frequency (> 100 Hz) TENS with a 100 Hz TENS. We used a 5000 Hz (5 kHz) frequency TENS (M-TENS) and an L-TENS to compare analgesic effect on a mice skin/muscle incision retraction model. Three groups of mice were used (sham, L-TENS, and M-TENS) and applied with different TENS programs on Day 4 after the mice skin/muscle incision retraction model; TENS therapy was continued as 20 min/d for 3 days. Mice analgesic effects were measured via Von Frey microfilaments with the up-down method. After therapy, mice spinal cord dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were harvested for cytokine evaluation (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) with the Western blotting method. Our data demonstrated that the M-TENS produced better analgesia than the L-TENS. Cytokine in the spinal cord or DRG all expressed lower than that of the sham group. However, there is no difference in both cytokine levels between TENSs of different frequencies in the spinal cord and DRG. We concluded that the M-TENS produced faster and better mechanical analgesia than the L-TENS in the mice skin/muscle incision retraction model. Those behavior differences were not in accordance with cytokine changes in the spinal cord or DRG.

  6. Partitioning of Organic Ions to Muscle Protein: Experimental Data, Modeling, and Implications for in Vivo Distribution of Organic Ions.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Luise; Goss, Kai-Uwe; Endo, Satoshi

    2016-07-05

    The in vivo partitioning behavior of ionogenic organic chemicals (IOCs) is of paramount importance for their toxicokinetics and bioaccumulation. Among other proteins, structural proteins including muscle proteins could be an important sorption phase for IOCs, because of their high quantity in the human and other animals' body and their polar nature. Binding data for IOCs to structural proteins are, however, severely limited. Therefore, in this study muscle protein-water partition coefficients (KMP/w) of 51 systematically selected organic anions and cations were determined experimentally. A comparison of the measured KMP/w with bovine serum albumin (BSA)-water partition coefficients showed that anionic chemicals sorb more strongly to BSA than to muscle protein (by up to 3.5 orders of magnitude), while cations sorb similarly to both proteins. Sorption isotherms of selected IOCs to muscle protein are linear (i.e., KMP/w is concentration independent), and KMP/w is only marginally influenced by pH value and salt concentration. Using the obtained data set of KMP/w a polyparameter linear free energy relationship (PP-LFER) model was established. The derived equation fits the data well (R(2) = 0.89, RMSE = 0.29). Finally, it was demonstrated that the in vitro measured KMP/w values of this study have the potential to be used to evaluate tissue-plasma partitioning of IOCs in vivo.

  7. Muscle-fiber transdifferentiation in an experimental model of respiratory chain myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Skeletal muscle fiber composition and muscle energetics are not static and change in muscle disease. This study was performed to determine whether a mitochondrial myopathy is associated with adjustments in skeletal muscle fiber-type composition. Methods Ten rats were treated with zidovudine, an antiretroviral nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that induces a myopathy by interfering with mitochondrial functions. Soleus muscles were examined after 21 weeks of treatment. Ten untreated rats served as controls. Results Zidovudine induced a myopathy with mitochondrial DNA depletion, abnormalities in mitochondrial ultrastructure, and reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity. Mitochondrial DNA was disproportionally more diminished in type I compared with type II fibers, whereas atrophy predominated in type II fibers. Compared with those of controls, zidovudine-exposed soleus muscles contained an increased proportion (256%) of type II fibers, whereas neonatal myosin heavy chains remained repressed, indicating fiber-type transformation in the absence of regeneration. Microarray gene-expression analysis confirmed enhanced fast-fiber isoforms, repressed slow-fiber transcripts, and reduced neonatal fiber transcripts in the mitochondrial myopathy. Respiratory chain transcripts were diminished, whereas the enzymes of glycolysis and glycogenolysis were enhanced, indicating a metabolic adjustment from oxidative to glycolytic capacities. A coordinated regulation was found of transcription factors known to orchestrate type II fiber formation (upregulation of MyoD, Six1, Six2, Eya1, and Sox6, and downregulation of myogenin and ERRγ). Conclusions The type I to type II fiber transformation in mitochondrial myopathy implicates mitochondrial function as a new regulator of skeletal muscle fiber type. PMID:23107834

  8. Association between sensitisation and pain-related behaviours in an experimental canine model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rialland, Pascale; Otis, Colombe; Moreau, Maxim; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Beaudry, Francis; Del Castillo, Jerome R E; Bertaim, Thierry; Gauvin, Dominique; Troncy, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Evaluation of nociceptive sensitisation in canine osteoarthritis studies has been poorly reported, or even related to other clinical symptoms. In 16 dogs, peak vertical force (PVF), subjective pain assessment using 3 scales, sympathetic stress response with electrodermal activity (EDA) measurement, and behavioural changes with video analysis and telemetered motor activity were quantified at baseline (D-7), and 28 and 56 days post transection of the cranial cruciate ligament. As markers of central sensitisation, selected spinal cord biomarkers (substance P and transthyretin) were quantified at D56. Electrical withdrawal thresholds on the stifle and the tail were measured as indicative of peripheral and central quantitative sensory testing (QST) sensitisation, respectively. The effects of vehicle administration (n=8) were compared with tiludronate (2mg/kg subcutaneously, q2 week, starting at D0) administration. Generalized estimated equations tested the association between the behavioural and physiological methods and QST sensitisation, and therefore the sensitivity of the methods for detecting treatment efficacy. Compared to tiludronate, at D56, vehicle-treated dogs had increased spinal substance P (P=0.01), concomitant decreased transthyretin (P=0.02), and (compared to baseline) demonstrated peripheral and central QST sensitisation, which was not present for tiludronate. Only PVF, the spontaneous behaviour "walking with full weight-bearing," and EDA were associated with occurrence of QST sensitisation and indicated significant tiludronate analgesic efficacy after inclusion of central QST sensitisation as a predictor variable in the statistical model. This study establishes the strong interest to implement QST as a predictor of canine osteoarthritis pain symptoms explained by pain sensitisation.

  9. Antihyperalgesic Effect of Hesperidin Improves with Diosmin in Experimental Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Villalobos, Azucena I; González-Trujano, María-Eva; Pellicer, Francisco; López-Muñoz, Francisco J

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a primary lesion,