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Sample records for experimental muscle pain

  1. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  2. Interaction between histamine-induced itch and experimental muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Wasner, G; Schwarz, K; Schattschneider, J; Binder, A; Jensen, T S; Baron, R

    2004-06-01

    Itch sensation can be inhibited by simultaneously applied cutaneous pain at the same skin site via a central mechanism. Deep muscle pain is often associated with sensory changes in the corresponding dermatome. We investigated whether experimentally induced muscle pain has any influence on histamine-induced itch and vice versa in a double blind placebo-controlled study. Experiments were performed in 18 healthy subjects. In nine individuals control iontophoresis of histamine into the forearm produced a distinct itch sensation. Another nine individuals participated in an additional experiment in which histamine and saline were iontophoresed on the forearm in a randomized double-blinded two-way crossover design after intramuscular injection of capsaicin into the ipsilateral brachioradial muscle. Capsaicin-induced muscle pain reduced itch sensation significantly. In contrast, capsaicin-induced muscle pain increased significantly after cutaneous histamine application compared to muscle pain after iontophoresis of saline (placebo). These novel data indicate that muscle pain inhibits itch and histamine increases muscle pain. A bi-directional interaction between cutaneous histamine-sensitive afferents and nociceptive muscle afferents via central mechanisms is suggested.

  3. Experimental neck muscle pain impairs standing balance in humans.

    PubMed

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    Impaired postural control has been reported in patients with chronic neck pain of both traumatic and non-traumatic etiologies, but whether painful stimulation of neck muscle per se can affect balance control during quiet standing in humans remains unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was thus to investigate the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on standing balance in young healthy adults. To achieve this goal, 16 male university students were asked to stand upright as still as possible on a force platform with their eyes closed in two conditions of No pain and Pain of the neck muscles elicited by experimental painful electrical stimulation. Postural control and postural performance were assessed by the displacements of the center of foot pressure (CoP) and of the center of mass (CoM), respectively. The results showed increased CoP and CoM displacements variance, range, mean velocity, and mean and median frequencies in the Pain relative to the No pain condition. The present findings emphasize the destabilizing effect of experimental neck muscle pain per se, and more largely stress the importance of intact neck neuromuscular function on standing balance.

  4. Hypoalgesic effect of caffeine in experimental ischemic muscle contraction pain.

    PubMed

    Myers, D E; Shaikh, Z; Zullo, T G

    1997-01-01

    It has been theorized that adenosine is a leading candidate for the metabolite responsible for ischemic muscle pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, caffeine, on ischemic skeletal muscle contraction pain. Seven healthy adult volunteers with no history of pain disorders, systemic disease, or habitual caffeine use, were chosen for the two-session, cross-over, double-blind study. Every subject received either 200 mg of caffeine (NoDoz, Bristol-Myers) or identical placebo 1 hour before each of the two trials. Ischemia of the forearm was achieved by inflation of a blood pressure cuff to 250 mm Hg. Forearm muscle activity was generated by performance of wrist curis using a 5-gram bar at a rate of 40 cycles per minute. Pain was rated at 15-second intervals for 1 minute using a visual analog scale (0 to 10) with verbal descriptors. Significance was determined by univariate and multivariate analyses of variance and covariance including repeated measures. Pain ratings at 15 seconds in the caffeine trial were significantly lower (P < 0.02) than those in the placebo trial. This effect continued at 30 seconds (P < 0.05). However, by 45 seconds, pain in the caffeine trial was not significantly lower (P = 0.4) than that in the placebo trial. These results show that high-dose caffeine exhibits considerable analgesic efficacy in experimental muscle pain, adding support for a role of adenosine in producing ischemic muscle contraction pain.

  5. Effect of experimental chewing on masticatory muscle pain onset

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; SILVA, Rafael dos Santos; de ARAUJO, Carlos dos Reis Pereira; ROSSETI, Leylha Maria N.; YASSUDA, Shigueharu; da SILVA, Renato Oliveira Ferreira; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of a chewing exercise on pain intensity and pressurepain threshold in patients with myofascial pain. Methods Twenty-nine consecutive women diagnosed with myofascial pain (MFP) according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria comprised the experimental group and 15 healthy age-matched female were used as controls. Subjects were asked to chew a gum stick for 9 min and to stay at rest for another 9 min afterwards. Pain intensity was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS) every 3 min. At 0, 9 and 18 min, the pressure-pain threshold (PPT) was measured bilaterally on the masseter and the anterior, medium, and posterior temporalis muscles. Results Patients with myofascial pain reported increase (76%) and no change (24%) on the pain intensity measured with the VAS. A reduction of the PPT at all muscular sites after the exercise and a non-significant recovery after rest were also observed. Conclusion The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. there are at least two subtypes of patients with myofascial pain that respond differently to experimental chewing; 2. the chewing protocol had an adequate discriminative ability in distinguishing patients with myofascial pain from healthy controls. PMID:21437467

  6. A method for studying jaw muscle activity during standardized jaw movements under experimental jaw muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lee, Daraporn; Wanigaratne, Kamal; Whittle, Terry; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M

    2006-10-30

    This paper describes a method for studying superficial and deep jaw muscle activity during standardized jaw movements under experimental jaw muscle pain. In 22 healthy adults, pain was elicited in the right masseter muscle via tonic infusion of 4.5% hypertonic saline and which resulted in scores of 30-60 mm on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Subjects performed tasks in five sessions in a repeated measures design, i.e., control 1, test 1 (during hypertonic or isotonic saline infusion), control 2 (without infusion), test 2 (during isotonic or hypertonic saline infusion), control 3 (without infusion). During each session, subjects performed maximal clenching and standardized jaw tasks, i.e., protrusion, lateral excursion, open/close, chewing. Mandibular movement was recorded with a 6-degree-of-freedom tracking system simultaneously with electromyographic (EMG) activity from the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle with fine-wire electrodes (verified by computer tomography), and from posterior temporalis, the submandibular muscle group and bilateral masseter muscles with surface electrodes. EMG root mean square values were calculated at each 0.5 mm increment of mandibular incisor movement for all tasks under each experimental session. This establishes an experimental model for testing the effects of pain on jaw muscle activity where the jaw motor system is required to perform goal-directed tasks, and therefore should extend our understanding of the effects of pain on the jaw motor system.

  7. Experimental muscle pain changes the spatial distribution of upper trapezius muscle activity during sustained contraction.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, Pascal; Leclerc, Fredéric; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Ravier, Philippe; Farina, Dario

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the effect of local excitation of nociceptive muscle afferents on the spatial distribution of muscle activity. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the upper trapezius muscle of 10 healthy volunteers with a 5 x 13 electrode grid during 90-s isometric contractions before, during, 15 and 30 min after intramuscular injection of hypertonic (painful) or isotonic (non-painful) saline. From the multi-channel EMG recordings, two-dimensional maps of root mean square and mean power frequency were obtained. The centre of gravity of the root mean square map was used to quantify global changes in the spatial distribution of muscle activity. During sustained contractions, average root mean square increased, average mean frequency decreased and the centre of gravity moved cranially. During experimental muscle pain, compared to before injection, the average root mean square decreased and there was a caudal shift of the centre of gravity. Fifteen minutes after the painful injection the centre of gravity returned to its original position. Short-term dynamic reorganization of the spatial distribution of muscle activity occurred in response to nociceptive afferent input. The study furnishes an extension of the pain adaptation model indicating heterogeneous inhibition of muscle activity.

  8. Bilateral experimental muscle pain changes electromyographic activity of human jaw-closing muscles during mastication.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Houe, L; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1997-08-01

    The effects of bilateral experimental muscle pain on human masticatory patterns were studied. Jaw movements and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the jaw-closing muscles were divided into multiple single masticatory cycles and analyzed on a cycle-by-cycle basis. In ten men simultaneous bilateral injections of hypertonic saline (5%) into the masseter muscles caused strong pain (mean+/-SE: 7.5+/-0.4 on a 0-10 scale), significantly reduced EMG activity of jaw-closing muscles in the agonist phase, and significantly increased EMG activity in the antagonist phase. Nine of the subjects reported a sensation of less intense mastication during pain. Injections of isotonic saline (0.9%) did not cause pain or significant changes in masticatory patterns. The influence of higher brain centers on conscious human mastication can not be discarded but the observed phase-dependent modulation could be controlled by local neural circuits and/or a central pattern generator in the brain stem which are capable of integrating bilateral nociceptive afferent activity.

  9. Experimental muscle pain produces central modulation of proprioceptive signals arising from jaw muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Capra, N F; Ro, J Y

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline, a well-established experimental model for muscle pain, on central processing of proprioceptive input from jaw muscle spindle afferents. Fifty-seven cells were recorded from the medial edge of the subnucleus interpolaris (Vi) and the adjacent parvicellular reticular formation from 11 adult cats. These cells were characterized as central units receiving jaw muscle spindle input based on their responses to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, muscle palpation and jaw stretch. Forty-five cells, which were successfully tested with 5% hypertonic saline, were categorized as either dynamic-static (DS) (n=25) or static (S) (n=20) neurons based on their responses to different speeds and amplitudes of jaw movement. Seventy-six percent of the cells tested with an ipsilateral injection of hypertonic saline showed a significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during opening and/or holding phases. The most remarkable saline-induced change was a significant reduction of MFR during the hold phase in S units (100%, 18/18 modulated). Sixty-nine percent of the DS units (11/16 modulated) also showed significant changes in MFRs limited to the hold phase. However, in the DS neurons, the MFRs increased in seven units and decreased in four units. Finally, five DS neurons showed significant changes of MFRs during both opening and holding phases. Injections of isotonic saline into the ipsilateral masseter muscle had little effect, but hypertonic saline injections made into the contralateral masseter muscle produced similar results to ipsilateral injections with hypertonic saline. These results unequivocally demonstrate that intramuscular injection with an algesic substance, sufficient to produce muscle pain, produces significant changes in the proprioceptive properties of the jaw movement-related neurons. Potential mechanisms involved in saline-induced changes in the

  10. Women with dysmenorrhea are hypersensitive to experimental deep muscle pain across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Iacovides, Stella; Baker, Fiona C; Avidon, Ingrid; Bentley, Alison

    2013-10-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is a common painful condition in women that recurs every month across the reproductive years. The recurrent nociceptive input into the central nervous system that occurs during menstruation each month in women with dysmenorrhea is hypothesized to lead to increased sensitivity to painful stimuli. We investigated whether women with primary dysmenorrhea are hyperalgesic to deep muscle pain induced by a cleanly nociceptive method of hypertonic saline injection. Pain stimulation was applied both within an area of referred menstrual pain (lower back) and at a remote site outside of referred menstrual pain (forearm) in 12 healthy women with severe dysmenorrhea and 9 healthy women without dysmenorrhea, at 3 phases of the menstrual cycle: menstruation and follicular and luteal phases. Women rated their pain severity on a 100-mm visual analog scale every 30 seconds after injection until the pain subsided. In both groups of women, menstrual cycle phase had no effect on the reported intensity and duration of muscle pain. However, women with dysmenorrhea had increased sensitivity to experimental muscle pain both at the site of referred pain and at a remote nonpainful site, as assessed by peak pain severity visual analog scale rating, area under the visual analog scale curve, and pain duration, compared to women without dysmenorrhea. These data show that women with severe primary dysmenorrhea, who experience monthly menstrual pain, are hyperalgesic to deep muscle pain compared to women without dysmenorrhea. Our findings that dysmenorrheic women are hyperalgesic to a clinically relevant, deep muscle pain in areas within and outside of referred menstrual pain indicates lasting changes in pain sensitivity outside of the painful period during menstruation. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental muscle pain decreases the frequency threshold of electrically elicited muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Mariano; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Ge, Hong-You; Pierelli, Francesco; Sandrini, Giorgio; Farina, Dario

    2007-09-01

    This study in humans tested the hypothesis that nociceptive muscle afferent input facilitates the occurrence of muscle cramps. In 13 healthy adults, muscle cramps were experimentally induced in the foot by stimulating the tibialis posterior nerve at the ankle with 2-s bursts of stimuli separated by 30 s, with stimulation frequency increasing by 2-Hz increments from 10 Hz until the cramp appeared. The minimum stimulation frequency that induced the cramp was defined "cramp frequency threshold". In 2 days, elicitation of the cramp was performed in the two-feet with and without (baseline condition) injection of hypertonic (painful condition) or isotonic (control condition) saline into the deep midportion of the flexor hallucis brevis muscle, from where surface EMG signals were recorded. The cramp frequency threshold was lower for the painful condition with respect to its baseline (mean +/- SE, hypertonic saline: 25.7 +/- 2.1 Hz, corresponding baseline: 31.2 +/- 2.8 Hz; P < 0.01) while there was no difference between the threshold with isotonic injection with respect to baseline. EMG average rectified value and power spectral frequency were higher during the cramp than immediately before the stimulation that elicited the cramp (pre-cramp: 13.9 +/- 1.6 muV and 75.4 +/- 3.8 Hz, respectively; post-cramp: 19.9 +/- 3.2 muV and 101.6 +/- 6.0 Hz; P < 0.05). The results suggest that nociceptive muscle afferent activity induced by injection of hypertonic saline facilitates the generation of electrically elicited muscle cramps.

  12. Experimental knee pain impairs submaximal force steadiness in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle actions.

    PubMed

    Rice, David A; McNair, Peter J; Lewis, Gwyn N; Mannion, Jamie

    2015-09-12

    Populations with knee joint damage, including arthritis, have noted impairments in the regulation of submaximal muscle force. It is difficult to determine the exact cause of such impairments given the joint pathology and associated neuromuscular adaptations. Experimental pain models that have been used to isolate the effects of pain on muscle force regulation have shown impaired force steadiness during acute pain. However, few studies have examined force regulation during dynamic contractions, and these findings have been inconsistent. The goal of the current study was to examine the effect of experimental knee joint pain on submaximal quadriceps force regulation during isometric and dynamic contractions. The study involved fifteen healthy participants. Participants were seated in an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee extensor force matching tasks were completed in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle contraction conditions. The target force was set to 10 % of maximum for each contraction type. Hypertonic saline was then injected into the infrapatella fat pad to generate acute joint pain. The force matching tasks were repeated during pain and once more 5 min after pain had subsided. Hypertonic saline resulted in knee pain with an average peak pain rating of 5.5 ± 2.1 (0-10 scale) that lasted for 18 ± 4 mins. Force steadiness significantly reduced during pain across all three muscle contraction conditions. There was a trend to increased force matching error during pain but this was not significant. Experimental knee pain leads to impaired quadriceps force steadiness during isometric, eccentric, and concentric contractions, providing further evidence that joint pain directly affects motor performance. Given the established relationship between submaximal muscle force steadiness and function, such an effect may be detrimental to the performance of tasks in daily life. In order to restore motor performance in people with painful arthritic conditions of the

  13. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    PubMed

    Gizzi, Leonardo; Muceli, Silvia; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies). In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side) in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain) and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14); the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain). Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus) influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  14. Experimental muscle pain increases variability of neural drive to muscle and decreases motor unit coherence in tremor frequency band

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Utku Ş.; Negro, Francesco; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed that muscle pain influences force variability and low-frequency (<3 Hz) oscillations in the neural drive to muscle. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of experimental muscle pain on the neural control of muscle force at higher frequency bands, associated with afferent feedback (alpha band, 5–13 Hz) and with descending cortical input (beta band, 15–30 Hz). Single-motor unit activity was recorded, in two separate experimental sessions, from the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles with intramuscular wire electrodes, during isometric abductions of the fifth finger at 10% of maximal force [maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)] and ankle dorsiflexions at 25% MVC. The contractions were repeated under three conditions: no pain (baseline) and after intramuscular injection of isotonic (0.9%, control) and hypertonic (5.8%, painful) saline. The results showed an increase of the relative power of both the force signal and the neural drive at the tremor frequency band (alpha, 5–13 Hz) between the baseline and hypertonic (painful) conditions for both muscles (P < 0.05) but no effect on the beta band. Additionally, the strength of motor unit coherence was lower (P < 0.05) in the hypertonic condition in the alpha band for both muscles and in the beta band for the ADM. These results indicate that experimental muscle pain increases the amplitude of the tremor oscillations because of an increased variability of the neural control (common synaptic input) in the tremor band. Moreover, the concomitant decrease in coherence suggests an increase in independent input in the tremor band due to pain. PMID:26019314

  15. Comparison of location, depth, quality, and intensity of experimentally induced pain in 6 low back muscles.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Kylie J; Fels, Matthew; Walker, Scott R; Hodges, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    The pattern of pain originating from experimentally induced low back pain appears diffuse. This may be because sensory information from low back muscles converges, sensory innervation extends over multiple vertebral levels, or people have difficulty accurately representing the painful location on standardized pain maps. The aim of this study was to provide insight into the perception of pain from noxious stimulation of a range of low back muscles using novel depth and location measures. Hypertonic saline (1 mL, 7% NaCl) was injected into bellies of longissimus (LO), quadratus lumborum (QL), superficial multifidus (SM), and deep multifidus (DM) at the level of the fourth lumbar vertebrae (L4) and in SM and DM at L5 using ultrasound guidance over 6 sessions. Fifteen participants reported depth, location, intensity, size, and descriptive quality of pain throughout the painful period (∼14 min). Pain was reported deeper (P<0.04) for DML4/L5 compared with SML4/L5, LO and QL; more cranial for LO compared with DML4 and QL (P<0.01); more lateral for LO compared with DML4 (P<0.02); and more lateral for QL compared with all other muscles at L4 (P<0.0001). Pain intensity was higher in DML4/L5 than all other muscles (P<0.04) for ∼3 minutes. Descriptive qualities varied slightly between muscles. Depth and lateral position may be the most critical descriptors to determine the source of acute lumbar muscular pain. Overlapping regions of pain may be explained by convergence of receptive fields, innervation of multifidus fascicles at multiple lumbar segments, and convergence of sensory input from different muscles to the same sensory cell bodies as demonstrated in the lumbar spine of animal preparations.

  16. The effects of experimental muscle and skin pain on the static stretch sensitivity of human muscle spindles in relaxed leg muscles

    PubMed Central

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Burton, Alexander R; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that noxious inputs onto γ-motoneurons can cause an increase in the activity of muscle spindles, and it has been proposed that this causes a fusimotor-driven increase in muscle stiffness that is believed to underlie many chronic pain syndromes. To test whether experimental pain also acts on the fusimotor system in humans, unitary recordings were made from 19 spindle afferents (12 Ia, 7 II) located in the ankle and toe extensors or peronei muscles of awake human subjects. Muscle pain was induced by bolus intramuscular injection of 0.5 ml 5% hypertonic saline into tibialis anterior (TA); skin pain was induced by 0.2 ml injection into the overlying skin. Changes in fusimotor drive to the muscle spindles were inferred from changes in the mean discharge frequency and discharge variability of spindle endings in relaxed muscle. During muscle pain no afferents increased their discharge activity: seven afferents (5 Ia, 2 II) showed a decrease and six (4 Ia, 2 II) afferents were not affected. During skin pain of 13 afferents discharge rate increased in one (Ia) and decreased in two (1 Ia, 1 II). On average, the overall discharge rate decreased during muscle pain by 6.1% (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon), but remained essentially the same during skin pain. There was no detectable correlation between subjective pain level and the small change in discharge rate of muscle spindles. Irrespective of the type of pain, discharge variability parameters were not influenced (P > 0.05; Wilcoxon). We conclude that, contrary to the ‘vicious cycle’ hypothesis, acute activation of muscle or skin nociceptors does not cause a reflex increase in fusimotor drive in humans. Rather, our results are more aligned with the pain adaptation model, based on clinical studies predicting pain-induced reductions of agonist muscle activity. PMID:18403422

  17. The effect of experimental low back pain on lumbar muscle activity in people with a history of clinical low back pain: a muscle functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Danneels, Lieven; Cagnie, Barbara; D'hooge, Roseline; De Deene, Yves; Crombez, Geert; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Parlevliet, Thierry; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    In people with a history of low back pain (LBP), structural and functional alterations have been observed at several peripheral and central levels of the sensorimotor pathway. These existing alterations might interact with the way the sensorimotor system responds to pain. We examined this assumption by evaluating the lumbar motor responses to experimental nociceptive input of 15 participants during remission of unilateral recurrent LBP. Quantitative T2 images (muscle functional MRI) were taken bilaterally of multifidus, erector spinae, and psoas at several segmental levels (L3 upper and L4 upper and lower endplate) and during several conditions: 1) at rest, 2) upon trunk-extension exercise without pain, and 3) upon trunk-extension exercise with experimental induced pain at the clinical pain-side (1.5-ml intramuscular hypertonic saline injections in erector spinae). Following experimental pain induction, muscle activity levels similarly reduced for all three muscles, on both painful and nonpainful sides, and at multiple segmental levels (P = 0.038). Pain intensity and localization from experimental LBP were similar as during recalled clinical LBP episodes. In conclusion, unilateral and unisegmental experimental LBP exerts a generalized and widespread decrease in lumbar muscle activity during remission of recurrent LBP. This muscle response is consistent with previous observed patterns in healthy people subjected to the same experimental pain paradigm. It is striking that similar inhibitory patterns in response to pain could be observed, despite the presence of preexisting alterations in the lumbar musculature during remission of recurrent LBP. These results suggest that motor output can modify along the course of recurrent LBP. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Antero-posterior activity changes in the superficial masseter muscle after exposure to experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Türp, Jens C; Schindler, Hans J; Pritsch, Maria; Rong, Qiguo

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this randomized, controlled, double-blind study was to examine how the activation pattern of the masseter muscle changes during natural function when experimental pain is induced in a discrete anterior area of the muscle. In 20 subjects, three bipolar surface electrodes and three intramuscular fine-wire electrodes (antero-posterior mapping) were simultaneously attached above and in the right masseter muscle to record the electromyographic (EMG) activity during unilateral chewing before and after infusion of a 0.9% isotonic and 5% hypertonic saline bolus in the anterior area of the muscle. The activity of the contralateral masseter muscle was registered by surface electrodes. In addition, the development of pain intensity was quantitatively measured with a numerical rating scale (NRS). While both saline concentrations caused pain, the hypertonic solution evoked stronger pain. The experiments also provided evidence of a significant although differential activity reduction of the ipsilateral masseter muscle in the antero-posterior direction. The activity reduction decreased with increasing distance from the location of the infusion. The results support the idea that the strategy of differential activation protects the injured muscle while simultaneously maintaining optimal function.

  19. Placebo effect of an inert gel on experimentally induced leg muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Hopker, James G; Foad, Abigail J; Beedie, Christopher J; Coleman, Damian A; Leach, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the therapeutic effects of an inert placebo gel on experimentally induced muscle pain in a sports therapy setting. It aimed to investigate the degree to which conditioned analgesia, coupled with an expectation of intervention, was a factor in subsequent analgesia. Methods Participants were sixteen male and eight female sports therapy students at a UK University. With institutional ethics board approval and following informed consent procedures, each was exposed to pain stimulus in the lower leg in five conditions, ie, conditioning, prebaseline, experimental (two placebo gel applications), and postbaseline. In conditioning trials, participants identified a level of pain stimulus equivalent to a perceived pain rating of 6/10. An inert placebo gel was then applied to the site with the explicit instruction that it was an analgesic. Participants were re-exposed to the pain stimulus, the level of which, without their knowledge, had been decreased, creating the impression of an analgesic effect resulting from the gel. In experimental conditions, the placebo gel was applied and the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 recorded. Results Following application of the placebo gel, the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 increased by 8.2%. Application of the placebo gel significantly decreased participant’s perceptions of muscle pain (P = 0.001). Conclusion Subjects’ experience and expectation of pain reduction may be major factors in the therapeutic process. These factors should be considered in the sports therapeutic environment. PMID:24198560

  20. TENS attenuates repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain following experimentally induced muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Mankovsky-Arnold, Tsipora; Wideman, Timothy H; Larivière, Christian; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2013-11-01

    This study sought to determine whether repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain (RISP) could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain. This study also assessed the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on RISP. The relation between the index of RISP and psychological factors such as catastrophizing and fear of pain was also explored. The sample consisted of 56 healthy (35 women, 21 men) participants who underwent 2 testing sessions, separated by 24 hours. In the first session, musculoskeletal pain was induced with a delayed-onset muscle soreness protocol. During the second session, participants were randomly assigned to the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or placebo condition and were asked to rate their pain as they lifted a series of 18 weighted canisters. An index of RISP was derived as the change in pain ratings across repeated lifts. Approximately 25% of participants showed evidence of RISP. Results also revealed that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuated the RISP effect. Psychological measures (fear of pain, catastrophizing) were not significantly correlated with the index of RISP, but the index of RISP was significantly correlated with a measure of physical tolerance. Discussion addresses the clinical implications of the findings as well as the potential mechanisms underlying RISP. This study showed that RISP could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain with delayed-onset muscle soreness. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation led to a significant reduction in RISP. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimentally induced masseter-pain changes masseter but not sternocleidomastoid muscle-related activity during mastication.

    PubMed

    Pasinato, Fernanda; Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C; Zeredo, Jorge Luis Lopes; Macedo, Sergio Bruzadelli; Corrêa, Eliane C R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of induced masseter-muscle pain on the amplitude of muscle activation, symmetry and coactivation of jaw- and neck-muscles during mastication. Twenty-eight male volunteers, mean age±SD 20.6±2.0years, participated in this study. Surface electromyography of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles was performed bilaterally during mastication of a gummy candy before and after injections of monosodium glutamate solution and isotonic saline solution. As a result, we observed a decrease in the amplitude of activation of the masseter muscle on the working side (p=0.009; d=0.34) and a reduction in the asymmetry between the working and the balancing side during mastication (p=0.007; d=0.38). No changes were observed either on the craniocervical electromyographic variables. In conclusion, experimentally induced pain reduced the masseter muscle activation on the working side, thereby reducing the physiological masseters' recruitment asymmetry between the two sides during mastication. No effects on SCM activity were detected. These results may partly explain the initial maladaptative changes underlying TMD conditions.

  2. The impact of neurodynamic testing on the perception of experimentally induced muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Coppieters, Michel W; Kurz, Kimberly; Mortensen, Thor Einar; Richards, Nicola L; Skaret, Ingrid A; McLaughlin, Laurie M; Hodges, Paul W

    2005-02-01

    Neurodynamic tests such as the straight leg raising (SLR) and slump test are frequently used for assessment of mechanosensitivity of neural tissues. However, there is ongoing debate in the literature regarding the contributions of neural and non-neural tissues to the elicited symptoms because many structures are affected by these tests. Sensitizing manoeuvres are limb or spinal movements added to neurodynamic tests, which aim to identify the origin of the symptoms by preferentially loading or unloading neural structures. A prerequisite for the use of sensitizing manoeuvres to identify neural involvement is that the addition of sensitizing manoeuvres has no impact on pain perception when the origin of the pain is non-neural. In this study, experimental muscle pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline in tibialis anterior or soleus in 25 asymptomatic, naive volunteers. A first experiment investigated the impact of hip adduction, abduction, medial and lateral rotation in the SLR position. In a second experiment, the different stages of the slump test were examined. The intensity and area of experimentally induced muscle pain did not increase when sensitizing manoeuvres were added to the SLR or throughout the successive stages of the slump test. The findings of this study lend support to the validity of the use of sensitizing manoeuvres during neurodynamic testing.

  3. The effect of spinal manipulation on deep experimental muscle pain in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Søren; Ødegaard-Olsen, Øystein; Søvde, Beate

    2015-01-01

    High-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation is commonly used in the treatment of spinal pain syndromes. The mechanisms by which HVLA-manipulation might reduce spinal pain are not well understood, but often assumed to relate to the reduction of biomechanical dysfunction. It is also possible however, that HVLA-manipulation involves a segmental or generalized inhibitory effect on nociception, irrespective of biomechanical function. In the current study it was investigated whether a local analgesic effect of HVLA-manipulation on deep muscle pain could be detected, in healthy individuals. Local, para-spinal muscle pain was induced by injection of 0.5 ml sterile, hyper-tonic saline on two separate occasions 1 week apart. Immediately following the injection, treatment was administered as either a) HVLA-manipulation or b) placebo treatment, in a randomized cross-over design. Both interventions were conducted by an experienced chiropractor with minimum 6 years of clinical experience. Participants and the researcher collecting data were blinded to the treatment allocation. Pain scores following saline injection were measured by computerized visual analogue pain scale (VAS) (0-100 VAS, 1 Hz) and summarized as a) Pain duration, b) Maximum VAS, c) Time to maximum VAS and d) Summarized VAS (area under the curve). Data analysis was performed as two-way analysis of variance with treatment allocation and session number as explanatory variables. Twenty-nine healthy adults (mean age 24.5 years) participated, 13 women and 16 men. Complete data was available for 28 participants. Analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant difference between active and placebo manipulation on any of the four pain measures. The current findings do not support the theory that HVLA-manipulation has a non-specific, reflex-mediated local or generalized analgesic effect on experimentally induced deep muscle pain. This in turn suggests, that any clinical analgesic effect of HVLA

  4. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    ) participated in two sessions at a minimum interval of 1 wk. Microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to measure masseter muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any time point were observed between groups. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity. Qu-ATEBS, the 7-item evidence-based quality assessment tool, is reliable, exhibits face-validity, and has excellent discriminative validity. Tooth clenching was associated with pain, fatigue, and short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, but not with proprioceptive allodynia. It seems that tooth clenching is not directly related to delayed onset muscle soreness. In healthy subjects and in patients with M-TMD, levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate were unaltered after tooth clenching. But 5-HT levels were significantly higher and blood flows significantly lower in M-TMD patients than in healthy controls at all time points. These two factors may facilitate the release, and enhance the effects, of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  5. Does experimental low back pain change posteroanterior lumbar spinal stiffness and trunk muscle activity? A randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Prasad, Narasimha; Huang, Christopher; Chan, K Ming; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2016-05-01

    While some patients with low back pain demonstrate increased spinal stiffness that decreases as pain subsides, this observation is inconsistent. Currently, the relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of experimental low back pain on temporal changes in posteroanterior spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle activity. In separate sessions five days apart, nine asymptomatic participants received equal volume injections of hypertonic or isotonic saline in random order into the L3-L5 interspinous ligaments. Pain intensity, spinal stiffness (global and terminal stiffness) at the L3 level, and the surface electromyographic activity of six trunk muscles were measured before, immediately after, and 25-minute after injections. These outcome measures under different saline conditions were compared by generalized estimating equations. Compared to isotonic saline injections, hypertonic saline injections evoked significantly higher pain intensity (mean difference: 5.7/10), higher global (mean difference: 0.73N/mm) and terminal stiffness (mean difference: 0.58N/mm), and increased activity of four trunk muscles during indentation (P<0.05). Both spinal stiffness and trunk muscle activity returned to baseline levels as pain subsided. While previous clinical research reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between spinal stiffness and low back pain, our study revealed that experimental pain caused temporary increases in spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle co-contraction during indentation, which helps explain the temporal relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain observed in some clinical studies. Our results substantiate the role of spinal stiffness assessments in monitoring back pain progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of experimental muscle pain on the amplitude and velocity sensitivity of jaw closing muscle spindle afferents.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Capra, Norman

    2005-07-19

    The effect of experimental muscle pain on the amplitude and velocity sensitivity of muscle spindle primary afferent neurons in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) was examined. Extracellular recordings were made from 45 neurons designated as spindle primary- or secondary-like on the basis of their response to ramp-and-hold jaw movements. Velocity sensitivity was assessed in spindle primary-like afferents by calculating the mean dynamic index of each unit in response to three different velocities of jaw opening before and after intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline (HS, 5%, 100 microl). The amplitude sensitivity of all jaw muscle spindle afferents was assessed by calculating the mean firing rate of each unit in response to three different amplitudes of jaw openings during both the open and hold phases of the movement and with best-fit lines obtained, using linear regression analysis, before and after HS injection. The variance of the two regression lines obtained for each unit before and after the injection was compared using the coincidence test, and changes in intercept and slope were determined. Seventy-five percent of the primary-like units and 80% of the secondary-like units presented with changes in static behavior after HS injection. Thirty-six percent of the primary-like units showed changes in dynamic behavior. Injection of isotonic saline (control) did not alter the responses of the spindle afferent to jaw opening. Thus, our results demonstrate that the predominant effect of noxious stimulation was a shift in the amplitude sensitivity of both spindle primary-like and secondary-like afferents and, to a lesser extent, the velocity sensitivity of the spindle primary-like unit. In accordance with earlier studies in the cat hindlimb and neck muscles, these results suggest that the activation of masseter muscle nociceptor alters spindle afferent responses to stretch acting primarily through static gamma motor neurons.

  7. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Methods Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Results Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05). Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05). Conclusions The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered. PMID:26680777

  8. Effect of muscle relaxants on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes: a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way cross-over study was performed to investigate the effect of two muscle relaxants (tolperisone hydrochloride and pridinol mesilate) on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes. Fifteen healthy men participated in three randomised sessions separated by at least 1 week. In each session 300 mg tolperisone, 8 mg pridinol mesilate or placebo was administered orally as a single dose. One hour after drug administration 0.3 ml hypertonic saline (5.8%) was injected into the right masseter to produce muscle pain. Subjects continuously rated their perceived pain intensity on an electronic 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured and short-latency reflex responses were evoked in the pre-contracted (15% maximal voluntary contraction) masseter and temporalis muscles by a standardised stretch device (1 mm displacement, 10 ms ramp time) before (baseline), 1 h after medication (post-drug), during ongoing experimental muscle pain (pain-post-drug), and 15 min after pain had vanished (post-pain). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower VAS peak pain scores (5.9 +/- 0.4 cm) after administration of tolperisone hydrochloride compared with pridinol mesilate (6.8 +/- 0.4 cm) and placebo (6.6 +/- 0.4 cm) (P=0.020). Administration of pridinol mesilate was associated with a significant decrease in PPTs compared with tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo (P=0.002) after medication, but not after experimental jaw-muscle pain. The normalised peak-to-peak amplitude of the stretch reflexes were not significantly influenced by the test medication (P=0.762), but were in all sessions significantly facilitated during ongoing experimental jaw-muscle pain (P=0.034). In conclusion, tolperisone hydrochloride provides a small, albeit significant reduction in the perceived intensity of experimental jaw-muscle pain whereas the present dose had no effect on the short-latency jaw

  9. Effect of experimental stress in 2 different pain conditions affecting the facial muscles.

    PubMed

    Woda, Alain; L'heveder, Gildas; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Bodéré, Céline

    2013-05-01

    Chronic facial muscle pain is a common feature in both fibromyalgia (FM) and myofascial (MF) pain conditions. In this controlled study, a possible difference in the mode of deregulation of the physiological response to a stressing stimulus was explored by applying an acute mental stress to FM and MF patients and to controls. The effects of the stress test were observed on pain, sympathetic variables, and both tonic and reflex electromyographic activities of masseteric and temporal muscles. The statistical analyses were performed through a generalized linear model including mixed effects. Painful reaction to the stressor was stronger (P < .001) and longer (P = .011) in FM than in MF independently of a higher pain level at baseline. The stress-induced autonomic changes only seen in FM patients did not reach significance. The electromyographic responses to the stress test were strongest for controls and weakest for FM. The stress test had no effect on reflex activity (area under the curve [AUC]) or latency, although AUC was high in FM and latencies were low in both pain groups. It is suggested that FM is characterized by a lower ability to adapt to acute stress than MF. This study showed that an acute psychosocial stress triggered several changes in 2 pain conditions including an increase in pain of larger amplitude in FM than in MF pain. Similar stress-induced changes should be explored as possible mechanisms for differentiation between dysfunctional pain conditions. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The association between dry needling-induced twitch response and change in pain and muscle function in patients with low back pain: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Walker, Michael J; Rettig, Charles; Davis, Joel; Nelson, Chenae; Su, Jonathan; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Hebert, Jeffrey J

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between dry needling-induced twitch response and change in pain, disability, nociceptive sensitivity, and lumbar multifidus muscle function, in patients with low back pain (LBP). Quasi-experimental study. Department of Defense Academic Institution. Sixty-six patients with mechanical LBP (38 men, 28 women, age: 41.3 [9.2] years). Dry needling treatment to the lumbar multifidus muscles between L3 and L5 bilaterally. Examination procedures included numeric pain rating, the Modified Oswestry Disability Index, pressure algometry, and real-time ultrasound imaging assessment of lumbar multifidus muscle function before and after dry needling treatment. Pain pressure threshold (PPT) was used to measure nocioceptive sensitivity. The percent change in muscle thickness from rest to contraction was calculated to represent muscle function. Participants were dichotomized and compared based on whether or not they experienced at least one twitch response on the most painful side and spinal level during dry needling. Participants experiencing local twitch response during dry needling exhibited greater immediate improvement in lumbar multifidus muscle function than participants who did not experience a twitch (thickness change with twitch: 12.4 [6]%, thickness change without twitch: 5.7 [11]%, mean difference adjusted for baseline value, 95%CI: 4.4 [1 to 8]%). However, this difference was not present after 1-week, and there were no between-groups differences in disability, pain intensity, or nociceptive sensitivity. The twitch response during dry needling might be clinically relevant, but should not be considered necessary for successful treatment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Pain and intramuscular release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle after experimental tooth-clenching exercises in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas; Ghafouri, Bijar; Gerdle, Björn; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Ernberg, Malin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether experimental tooth clenching leads to a release of algesic substances in the masseter muscle. Thirty healthy subjects (16 females, 14 males) participated. During two sessions, separated by at least 1 week, intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect masseter muscle 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and glutamate as well as the metabolic markers pyruvate and lactate. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth-clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction) or a control session (no clenching). Pain and fatigue were measured throughout. The Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analyses. No alterations were observed in the concentrations of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate over time in the clenching or control session, or between sessions at various time points. Pain (P < .01) and fatigue (P < .01) increased significantly over time in the clenching session and were significantly higher after clenching than in the control session (P < .01). Low levels of pain and fatigue developed with this experimental tooth-clenching model, but they were not associated with an altered release of 5-HT, glutamate, lactate, or pyruvate. More research is required to elucidate the peripheral release of algesic substances in response to tooth clenching.

  12. Vitamin D Status Is Not Associated with Outcomes of Experimentally-Induced Muscle Weakness and Pain in Young, Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Susan M.; Dannecker, Erin A.; Peterson, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D receptors have been identified in skeletal muscle; and symptoms of vitamin D deficiency include muscle weakness and pain. Moreover, increased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations have been associated with improved muscle function. To further clarify the importance of vitamin D to muscle, we examined the association between vitamin D status and exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness in healthy people. Muscle damage to the elbow flexors was induced with eccentric exercise (EE) in 48 individuals (22.5 ± 3.2 yrs). Muscle pain ratings following unloaded movement and peak isometric force (IF) were collected before EE and for 4 days post-EE. Linear regression was used to determine if serum 25(OH)D was a predictor of any outcome. In males, R2-values from 0.48 to 1.00. R2 for IF ranged from 0 to 0.02 and P-values from 0.48 to 1.00. In females, R2 for pain ratings ranged from 0.01 to 0.11 and P-values from 0.14 to 0.59. R2 for IF ranged from 0 to 0.04 and P-values from 0.41 to 0.90. In conclusion, vitamin D status did not predict muscle pain or strength after EE-induced muscle damage in young healthy men and women. PMID:21209718

  13. Jaw-motor effects of experimental jaw-muscle pain and stress in patients with deep bite and matched control subjects.

    PubMed

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Svensson, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The effect of experimental jaw-muscle pain and stress on masticatory muscle activity in TMD-patients has been discussed. Furthermore, associations between TMD and deep bite patients have been studied. Accordingly in the present study, comparison of EMG responses at rest, maximal clenching, during evoked pain and stress between deep bite patients and controls was investigated. In 30 deep bite patients and in 30 sex-/age-matched controls with neutral occlusion EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from masseter and anterior temporalis muscles before and during evoked pain and before and during a stress task. Evoked pain was induced by injections of glutamate into the masseter (local pain) and brachioradialis (remote pain) muscles and resting EMG activity was recorded before and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10min. A precision task was used to simulate a stressful condition and EMG activity was recorded twice during the task. Maximal EMG activity was recorded during maximal clenching. Resting and maximal EMG activity were significantly different between groups and age with no gender differences. EMG activity during local pain and during the precision task were significantly different between groups, gender, age and time, whereas no time effect was found for the EMG activity during remote pain. Patients with deep bite have significantly different jaw motor responses to painful stimulation of the trigeminal region and manual precision tasks suggesting a differential integration of both somatosensory and behavioural stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of experimental jaw-muscle pain on the spatial distribution of surface EMG activity of the human masseter muscle during tooth clenching.

    PubMed

    Castroflorio, T; Falla, D; Wang, K; Svensson, P; Farina, D

    2012-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that painful injections of glutamate into the human masseter muscle differentially affect the distribution of the electromyographic (EMG) activity in the masseter muscle at rest and during tooth clenching. Surface EMG signals were recorded bilaterally from the superficial masseter of nine healthy men with a grid of 32 electrodes, before and after intramuscular injection of glutamate or isotonic saline, during rest and isometric contractions at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of the maximal voluntary bite force. Intramuscular injection of glutamate evoked moderate pain (0-10 visual analogue scale: 6·4 ± 1·4), with sensory-discriminative characteristics of the perceived pain, evaluated with the use of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), similar to those previously reported for patients with temporomandibular disorders. There was no effect of the glutamate injection on EMG amplitude during rest, whereas during tooth clenching, the spatial distribution of the masseter EMG activity on both sides was more uniform in the painful condition compared to the control condition. Moreover, the overall EMG amplitude decreased on both sides during the more forceful tooth clenching following glutamate injection. In conclusion, a unilateral painful stimulation was associated with a bilateral inhibition of the masseter muscles during tooth clenching which resulted in a more uniform distribution of EMG activity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Craniofacial muscle pain: review of mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Svensson, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic surveys of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have demonstrated that a considerable proportion of the population--up to 5% or 6%--will experience persistent pain severe enough to seek treatment. Unfortunately, the current diagnostic classification of craniofacial muscle pain is based on descriptions of signs and symptoms rather than on knowledge of pain mechanisms. Furthermore, the pathophysiology and etiology of craniofacial muscle pain are not known in sufficient detail to allow causal treatment. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain cause-effect relationships; however, it is still uncertain what may be the cause of muscle pain and what is the effect of muscle pain. This article reviews the literature in which craniofacial muscle pain has been induced by experimental techniques in animals and human volunteers and in which the effects on somatosensory and motor function have been assessed under standardized conditions. This information is compared to the clinical correlates, which can be derived from the numerous cross-sectional studies in patients with craniofacial muscle pain. The experimental literature clearly indicates that muscle pain has significant effects on both somatosensory and craniofacial motor function. Typical somatosensory manifestations of experimental muscle pain are referred pain and increased sensitivity of homotopic areas. The craniofacial motor function is inhibited mainly during experimental muscle pain, but phase-dependent excitation is also found during mastication to reduce the amplitude and velocity of jaw movements. The underlying neurobiologic mechanisms probably involve varying combinations of sensitization of peripheral afferents, hyperexcitability of central neurons, and imbalance in descending pain modulatory systems. Reflex circuits in the brain stem seem important for the adjustment of sensorimotor function in the presence of craniofacial pain. Changes in somatosensory and motor function may therefore be

  16. Muscle pain inhibits cutaneous touch perception.

    PubMed

    Stohler, C S; Kowalski, C J; Lund, J P

    2001-06-01

    The processing of noxious and non-noxious sensations differs between chronic pain syndromes, and we believe that studies of sensory processing in the presence of pain will help to clarify the aetiology of the conditions. Here we measured in humans the threshold-level mechanosensitivity in tonic experimental muscle pain. We found (1) that muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline reduced cutaneous threshold-level mechanosensitivity at the site of pain and at the mirror site in the contralateral face, (2) that this effect outlasted the sensation of pain, (3) that it was more pronounced when the painful area was reported to be large, and (4) that the loss of mechanosensitivity was greater in males than females. Comparing our findings to results obtained with other pain models, all classes of nociceptors do not seem to have the same effect on cutaneous mechanosensitivity. The observed threshold-level hypoesthesia is consistent with the hypothesis that the increased mechanical thresholds found in clinic cases of temporomandibular disorders and cervicobrachialgia are a direct result of the activation of muscle nociceptors.

  17. Medicines to Treat Muscle Spasms and Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines to Treat Muscle Spasms and Pain Do you have a lot of muscle pain? Are your muscles extremely stiff and tense? If the answer is ... factsheet to learn about two conditions that cause muscle pain and stiffness, and the medicines used to ...

  18. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects.

  19. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazunori; Minakawa, Yoichi; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2011-06-22

    While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle), muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle). Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain.

  20. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle), muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle). Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain. PMID:21696603

  1. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  2. Muscle Cramp - A Common Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal to the touch or may even show visible signs of twitching,” Dr. Quist says. The intensity ... in the blood, such as sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium and phosphate, can also lead to muscle cramps,” ...

  3. The influence of induced shoulder muscle pain on rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscle activity during elevation of the arm.

    PubMed

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Parlevliet, Thierry; Cagnie, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Altered recruitment of rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles has been identified in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. To date, however, the cause-consequence relationship between pain and altered muscle recruitment has not been fully unraveled. The effect of experimental shoulder pain induced by injection of hypertonic saline in the supraspinatus on the activity of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, trapezius, and serratus anterior activity was investigated during the performance of an elevation task by use of muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging in 25 healthy individuals. Measurements were taken at 4 levels (C6-C7, T2-T3, T3-T4, and T6-T7) at rest and after the elevation task performed without and with experimental shoulder pain. During arm elevation, experimentally induced pain caused a significant activity reduction, expressed as reduction in T2 shift of the IS (P = .029). No significant changes in T2 shift values were found for the other rotator cuff muscles or the scapulothoracic muscles. This study demonstrates that acute experimental shoulder pain has an inhibitory effect on the activity of the IS during arm elevation. Acute experimental shoulder pain did not seem to influence the scapulothoracic muscle activity significantly. The findings suggest that rotator cuff muscle function (infraspinatus) should be a consideration in the early management of patients with shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Past Pain Experience and Experimentally induced Pain Perception.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Aude; Plansont, Brigitte; Labrunie, Anaïs; Malauzat, Dominique; Girard, Murielle

    2017-08-02

    Many intercurrent factors may be involved in the modulation of the pain message and its expression, such as the previous experience of pain built along the life. In this study, we aimed to determine whether susceptibility to experimentally induced pain is differentially influenced by the individual previous painful experience in subjects with schizophrenia (SC) major depression (MD), and controls (C). The SC (30), MD (32) and C (30) groups participated in experimental pain tests (application of pressure and induction of ischemia) after a semi-structured interview to make an inventory of the previous painful experiences, and the evaluation of anxiety either with autonomic (heart rate, blood pressure) or psychological (Hospital Anxiety Depression scale HAD) measures, and catastrophism. The reported pain intensities, severities, duration, of the previous pain events, and the number of previous painful events were equivalent in the three groups, except for the number of painful events experimented before the last six months which was lower in the MD group. Experimental pain sensitivity was influenced by the diagnosis, the HAD scores or the number and intensities of previous lived painful events. The lack of a past experience of pain was comparable for the different groups, suggesting that psychiatric disorders do not affect the experience of pain associated with daily life or past events. For each subject, the reported previous experience of pain influences the present feeling of pain.

  5. Muscle inflammation induces a protein kinase Cepsilon-dependent chronic-latent muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dina, Olayinka A; Levine, Jon D; Green, Paul G

    2008-05-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries can induce chronic pain, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. One possible cause has been suggested to be an increased sensitivity to inflammatory mediators. We demonstrate that self-limited inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by intramuscular carrageenan (lasting approximately 5 days) results in a state of chronic-latent hyperalgesia, revealed by injection of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) 10 days after carrageenan at the same site. In carrageenan-pretreated muscle, PGE(2) produced hyperalgesia that was unattenuated even 14 days after injection, markedly longer than the 4-hour hyperalgesia induced by PGE(2) in naive rats. This chronic-latent hyperalgesia was reversed as well as prevented by spinal intrathecal injection of oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to protein kinase Cepsilon, a second messenger implicated in long-lasting plasticity in cutaneous nociceptors. We describe a novel experimental model for chronic muscle pain, produced by mild acute muscle inflammation, that has clinical significance since it has the potential to reveal cellular processes by which acute inflammation or muscle trauma underlies chronic muscle pain.

  6. Muscle inflammation induces a protein kinase C ε–dependent chronic-latent muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Olayinka A.; Levine, Jon D.; Green, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    While skeletal muscle injuries can induce chronic pain, the underlying mechanism is unknown. One possible cause has been suggested to be an increased sensitivity to inflammatory mediators. We demonstrate that self-limited inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by intramuscular carrageenan (lasting ~5 days) results in a state of chronic-latent hyperalgesia, revealed by injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) 10 days after carrageenan at the same site. In carrageenan-pretreated muscle, PGE2 produced hyperalgesia that was unattenuated even 14 days after injection, markedly longer than the 4-h hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 in naïve rats. This chronic-latent hyperalgesia was reversed as well as prevented by spinal intrathecal injection of oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to protein kinase Cε, a second messenger implicated in long-lasting plasticity in cutaneous nociceptors. Perspective We describe a novel experimental model for chronic muscle pain, produced by mild acute muscle inflammation, that has clinical significance since it has the potential to reveal cellular processes by which acute inflammation or muscle trauma underlies chronic muscle pain. PMID:18342576

  7. Site-specific muscle hyper-reactivity in musicians with occupational upper limb pain.

    PubMed

    Moulton, B; Spence, S H

    1992-07-01

    Fourteen musicians who reported a history of pain in the upper limb associated with the playing of their instruments were compared with a sample of pain-free musicians, matched for age, sex and musical instrument. Four tasks were presented in random order and included neutral, general stressor, personal stressor and pain stressor tasks. Ratings of stressfulness and recordings of skin conductance level confirmed the effectiveness of the experimental manipulations for both subject groups. No differences were found between groups or tasks for frontalis surface electromyograph (EMG) activity. Evidence was found, however, of EMG elevation in flexor and trapezius muscles on the pain side for the pain subjects, in response to the task involving recall of a pain experience. This elevation was not found for the pain-free controls or for other stressor tasks, although some elevation in response to the pain stressor task was found for pain subjects in the trapezius muscles of the non-pain side. The duration of return to baseline of EMG following the pain stressor task was found to be extended in pain subjects for the trapezius, but not for the flexor muscles of the pain side. The findings suggest that site-specific muscle hyper-reactivity may play a role in the development and maintenance of occupational upper limb pain in musicians.

  8. Neuropathic Pain-like Alterations in Muscle Nociceptor Function Associated with Vibration-induced Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaojie; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    We recently developed a rodent model of the painful muscle disorders induced by occupational exposure to vibration. In the present study we used this model to evaluate the function of sensory neurons innervating the vibration-exposed gastrocnemius muscle. Activity of 74 vibration-exposed and 40 control nociceptors, with mechanical receptive fields in the gastrocnemius muscle, were recorded. In vibration-exposed rats ~15% of nociceptors demonstrated an intense and long-lasting barrage of action potentials in response to sustained suprathreshold mechanical stimulation (average of 2635 action potentials with frequency of ~44 Hz during a 1 minute suprathreshold stimulus) much greater than has been reported to be produced even by potent inflammatory mediators. While these high-firing nociceptors had lower mechanical thresholds than the remaining nociceptors, exposure to vibration had no effect on conduction velocity and did not induce spontaneous activity. Hyperactivity was not observed in any of 19 neurons from vibration exposed rats pretreated with intrathecal antisense for the IL-6 receptor subunit gp130. Since vibration can injure peripheral nerves, and IL-6 has been implicated in painful peripheral neuropathies, we suggest that the dramatic change in sensory neuron function and development of muscles pain, induced by exposure to vibration, reflects a neuropathic muscle pain syndrome. PMID:20800357

  9. Effects of muscle pain induced by glutamate injections during sustained clenching on the contraction pattern of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Ambrosina; Cioffi, Iacopo; Rongo, Roberto; Borrelli, Roberta; Chiodini, Paolo; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the contraction pattern of masticatory muscles during sustained clenching tasks with or without experimental pain induced by glutamate injection into the masseter muscle. It was hypothesized that acute muscle pain could induce compensatory changes in the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masticatory muscles. Fifteen volunteers (seven males, mean age ± SD = 29.7 ± 1.1 years; eight females, mean age ± SD = 23.5 ± 1.2 years) were recruited in a crossover experimental study. All subjects participated in two randomized 20-minute experimental sessions. Each subject was asked to clench at 25% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). After 10 minutes, isotonic saline or glutamate was injected in random order into the right masseter. EMG activity (root mean square [RMS] and mean power frequency [MPF]) was assessed in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles on both sides. Pain and fatigue were assessed by 0-10 numeric rating scales (NRS) every minute. Differences between conditions (isotonic saline vs glutamate) for all the outcome parameters were analyzed by using a mixed effect model. The EMG activity of the masticatory muscles and pain and fatigue scores were not dependent on isotonic saline/glutamate injection (all P > .05). The RMS in the temporalis and masseter muscles increased with time (right masseter P = 0.001, left masseter P = .004, right temporalis P = .22, left temporalis P = .006), whereas the MPF decreased (right masseter P = .0001, left masseter P < .0001, right temporalis P = .51, left temporalis P = .0005). Scores for fatigue and pain increased during the experimental sessions (all P < .05). Intramuscular injection of glutamate caused more pain than isotonic saline but did not affect the contraction pattern of the masticatory muscles during a sustained clenching task. This finding strongly suggests the adaptive capacity of the stomatognathic system in the presence of acute nociceptive inputs.

  10. Gum chewing and jaw muscle fatigue and pains.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T; Mohamed, S E

    1996-06-01

    To study possible associations between gum chewing and fatigue and pains in the jaw muscles, eight healthy adults performed prolonged idling, prolonged unilateral chewing of gum, and brief vigorous clenching of the teeth (MVC). Through surface electromyography (EMG), the authors monitored the cumulative (microV.s) as well as the average rates (microV.s-1) of contractile activities in the right and left masseter muscles. During 10 min of idling there was an absence of muscle fatigue and muscle pains when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 2% and 3%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric muscle pains through MVC. During 10 min of right-sided gum chewing at a rate of 1.2 Hz, the majority of subjects (75%) experienced weak jaw muscle fatigue-not jaw muscle pains-when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 38% and 19%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric pains through MVC. In comparison with 10 min of idling, the weak muscle fatigue of 10 min of unilateral gum chewing appeared when the total contractile activities of the right and left masseter muscles were increased by 1664% and 519%, respectively. It seemed as if prolonged unilateral gum chewing and previous pain-releasing MVC caused some sensitization of muscle nociceptors which, in turn, aggravated subsequent isometric jaw muscle pains elicited through MVC. Even though the right masseter muscle was the most frequent site of clinical fatigue and pains, the authors found no evidence supporting the theoretical foundation of the myofascial pain/dysfunction syndrome.

  11. Muscle activity pattern dependent pain development and alleviation.

    PubMed

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Muscle activity is for decades considered to provide health benefits irrespectively of the muscle activity pattern performed and whether it is during e.g. sports, transportation, or occupational work tasks. Accordingly, the international recommendations for public health-promoting physical activity do not distinguish between occupational and leisure time physical activity. However, in this body of literature, attention has not been paid to the extensive documentation on occupational physical activity imposing a risk of impairment of health - in particular musculoskeletal health in terms of muscle pain. Focusing on muscle activity patterns and musculoskeletal health it is pertinent to elucidate the more specific aspects regarding exposure profiles and body regional pain. Static sustained muscle contraction for prolonged periods often occurs in the neck/shoulder area during occupational tasks and may underlie muscle pain development in spite of rather low relative muscle load. Causal mechanisms include a stereotype recruitment of low threshold motor units (activating type 1 muscle fibers) characterized by a lack of temporal as well as spatial variation in recruitment. In contrast during physical activities at leisure and sport the motor recruitment patterns are more dynamic including regularly relatively high muscle forces - also activating type 2 muscles fibers - as well as periods of full relaxation even of the type 1 muscle fibers. Such activity is unrelated to muscle pain development if adequate recovery is granted. However, delayed muscle soreness may develop following intensive eccentric muscle activity (e.g. down-hill skiing) with peak pain levels in thigh muscles 1-2 days after the exercise bout and a total recovery within 1 week. This acute pain profile is in contrast to the chronic muscle pain profile related to repetitive monotonous work tasks. The painful muscles show adverse functional, morphological, hormonal, as well as metabolic characteristics. Of

  12. Vicarious pain while observing another in pain: an experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, S.; Crombez, G.; Van Ryckeghem, D. M. L.; Brass, M.; Van Damme, S.; Goubert, L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at developing an experimental paradigm to assess vicarious pain experiences. We further explored the putative moderating role of observer's characteristics such as hypervigilance for pain and dispositional empathy. Methods: Two experiments are reported using a similar procedure. Undergraduate students were selected based upon whether they reported vicarious pain in daily life, and categorized into a pain responder group or a comparison group. Participants were presented a series of videos showing hands being pricked whilst receiving occasionally pricking (electrocutaneous) stimuli themselves. In congruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were applied to the same spatial location. In incongruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were in the opposite spatial location. Participants were required to report on which location they felt a pricking sensation. Of primary interest was the effect of viewing another in pain upon vicarious pain errors, i.e., the number of trials in which an illusionary sensation was reported. Furthermore, we explored the effect of individual differences in hypervigilance to pain, dispositional empathy and the rubber hand illusion (RHI) upon vicarious pain errors. Results: Results of both experiments indicated that the number of vicarious pain errors was overall low. In line with expectations, the number of vicarious pain errors was higher in the pain responder group than in the comparison group. Self-reported hypervigilance for pain lowered the probability of reporting vicarious pain errors in the pain responder group, but dispositional empathy and the RHI did not. Conclusion: Our paradigm allows measuring vicarious pain experiences in students. However, the prevalence of vicarious experiences of pain is low, and only a small percentage of participants display the phenomenon. It remains however unknown which variables affect its occurrence. PMID:23781187

  13. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.

  14. Muscle pain in athletes with locomotor disability.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Marco; Castellano, Vincenzo; Ferrara, Michael S; Sbriccoli, Paola; Sera, Francesco; Marchetti, Marco

    2003-02-01

    Athletes with locomotor disabilities (LDA) participate in many competitive sport activities, yet little is known about sport-related muscle pain (SRMP). This study assessed the prevalence, determinants, and main characteristics of SRMP in LDA. A cross-disability epidemiological survey was used to investigate the occurrence of SRMP during the previous year by using a questionnaire administrated by medical doctors. SRMP was defined as any muscle pain experienced during the past 12 months that either occurred during sport activity (training or competition) and/or was reported as a consequence of physical exercise, causing discomfort for at least 1 d and not related to systemic disease. A total of 227 LDA were recruited randomly from the population (567 LDA) who participated in selected National sports events (including swimming, athletics, wheelchair basketball matches, and others) organized by the Italian Federation of Sports for Disabled. Collected data were statistically analyzed with univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to identify possible determinants of SRMP, through the estimate of the prevalence odds ratios. The SRMP period prevalence rate was equal to 50.7% (95% confidence interval (44.0-57.4%)), ranging from 47.0% (swimmers) to 58.8% (basketball athletes). In 71.1% of cases, SRMP lasted less than 1 wk and only 8.7% experienced pain for more than 1 month. SRMP had a higher prevalence in amputees (75.0%) and spinal cord injured LDA (58.1%) than the other groups. There was increased prevalence rate of SRMP with increased training volume. The multivariate logistic regression model showed disorder type, body mass index, and training volume as determinants of SRMP. Prospective studies could be devised to assess the role of anthropometric characteristics and training volume as risk factors of SRMP.

  15. Anxiety measures during induced experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, P; Rood, J P

    1993-01-01

    Results of analgesic studies obtained using experimental pain are often not comparable with those obtained from clinical studies. This may be because anxiety, which plays an important role in the pain experience, may not be evoked by experimentally induced pain. The aim of this study is to measure the level of anxiety induced by the submaximum effort tourniquet technique, which produces pain similar in quality to clinical pain. The mean time that subjects tolerated the pain from the tourniquet was 14.94 minutes. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate increased. Visual analogue scale measures of anxiety showed an overall increase during the experiment but were highly erratic individually. This study suggests that the submaximum effort tourniquet technique is incapable of inducing the same type of anxiety experienced with clinical pain.

  16. Myofascial origins of low back pain. 2. Torso muscles.

    PubMed

    Simons, D G; Travell, J G

    1983-02-01

    Trigger points (TPs) in muscles of the lower torso associated with the spine are an important cause of low back pain. The quadratus lumborum is the muscle most commonly involved, but TPs located there are often overlooked because of inadequate physical examination techniques. TPs in the lower rectus abdominis refer pain horizontally across the low back, and those in the iliopsoas refer pain in a vertical pattern, parallel to the lumbosacral spine. The pain pattern of TPs in the serratus posterior inferior is noted in the region of the muscle itself.

  17. Muscle pain induces task-dependent changes in cervical agonist/antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Falla, D; Farina, D; Dahl, M Kanstrup; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2007-02-01

    This study examined the effect of experimental neck muscle pain on the EMG-force relationship of cervical agonist and antagonist muscles. Surface EMG signals were detected from the sternomastoid, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius muscles bilaterally from 14 healthy subjects during cervical flexion and extension contractions of linearly increasing force from 0 to 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Measurements were performed before and after injection of 0.5 ml hypertonic and isotonic saline into either the sternomastoid or splenius capitis in two experimental sessions. EMG average rectified value (ARV) of the sternomastoid, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius muscles and the muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV) of the sternomastoid muscle were estimated at 5% MVC force increments. During cervical flexion with injection of hypertonic saline in sternomastoid, ARV of sternomastoid was lower on the side of pain in the force range 25-60% MVC (P < 0.05) and was associated with a bilateral reduction of splenius capitis and upper trapezius ARV (P < 0.01). During cervical extension, injection of hypertonic saline in splenius capitis resulted in lower estimates of splenius capitis ARV on the painful side from 45 to 60% MVC (P < 0.05), which was associated with a bilateral increase in upper trapezius ARV estimates from 50 to 60% MVC (P < 0.001). However, no significant change was identified for estimates of sternomastoid ARV. Experimentally induced neck muscle pain resulted in task-dependent changes in cervical agonist/antagonist activity without modifications in muscle fiber CV.

  18. The lumbar multifidus muscle and patterns of pain.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Jon; John Harris, A; Mercer, Susan R

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the patterns of pain induced by injecting hypertonic saline into the lumbar multifidus muscle opposite the L5 spinous process in 15 healthy adult volunteers. All subjects experienced local pain while referred pain was reported by 13 subjects in one of two regions of the thigh; anterior (n=5) or posterior (n=8). These results confirm that the multifidus muscle may be a source of local and referred pain. Comparison of these maps with pain maps following stimulation of the L4 medial dorsal rami and L4-5 interspinous ligaments shows that pain arising from the band of multifidus innervated by the L4 dorsal ramus has a segmental distribution. In addition patterns of pain arising from multifidus clearly overlap those reported for other lumbar structures. These findings highlight the difficulty of using pain distribution to accurately identify specific lumbar structures as the source of pain.

  19. Longitudinal Multilevel Modeling of Facial Pain, Muscle Tension, and Stress.

    PubMed

    Glaros, A G; Marszalek, J M; Williams, K B

    2016-04-01

    The role of masticatory muscle activation on pain in temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJD) is controversial. This single-group, prospective panel study examined the relationships among masticatory muscle tension, emotional distress, and TMJD pain in a sample of 7,023 observations obtained from 171 individuals using longitudinal multilevel modeling. Three main hypotheses were tested. The first posited that emotional distress and muscle tension directly influenced pain (hypothesis 1a: Distress → TMJD Pain; hypothesis 1b: Muscle Tension → TMJD Pain). The second posited that emotional distress directly influenced muscle tension (Distress → Muscle Tension), and the third posited that the effect of emotional distress on pain was mediated by muscle tension (Distress → Muscle Tension → TMJD pain). We also examined the fit of the data to possible alternative models. All the data used in this study were collected via an experience sampling methodology. The fit of the preferred models was better than that of the alternative models, with the preferred models explaining large proportions of the data, especially for level 2 variance (hypothesis 1a = 41% variance; hypothesis 1b = 69% variance; hypothesis 2 = 48% variance). In the mediation model, the addition of muscle tension to the model reduced the impact of emotional distress. The findings support a causal role for masticatory muscle tension in TMJD pain. Clinically, the results suggest that addressing tension and other oral parafunctions in those diagnosed with TMJDs should be an important part of the conservative, noninvasive care of individuals diagnosed with the myofascial pain or arthralgia of TMJD.

  20. Assessment of avoidance behaviors in mouse models of muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Dane; Fuchs, Perry N.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Pain encompasses both a sensory as well as an affective dimension and these are differentially processed in the cortex. Animal models typically use reflexive behaviors to test nociceptive responses; these are thought to reflect the sensory dimension of pain. While several behavioral tests are available for examining the affective dimension of pain it is unclear if these are appropriate in animal models of muscle pain. We therefore tested the utility of existing paradigms as well as new avoidance paradigms in animal models of muscle pain in mice. Specifically we used an escape-avoidance test to noxious mechanical stimuli, a learned avoidance test to noxious mechanical stimuli, and avoidance of physical activity. We used three animal models of muscle pain: carrageenan-induced inflammation, non-inflammatory muscle pain, and exercise-enhanced pain. In the carrageenan model of inflammation mice developed escape-avoidance behaviors to mechanical stimuli, learned avoidance to mechanical stimulation and avoidance of physical activity – these models are associated with unilateral hyperalgesia. When both muscles were inflamed, escape-avoidance behaviors did not develop suggesting equivalent bilateral pain-behaviors cannot be tested with an escape-avoidance test. In the non-inflammatory muscle pain model mice did not show significant changes in escape-avoidance behaviors or learned avoidance, but did avoid physical activity. In the exercise-enhanced pain model, there were no changes in escape avoidance, learned avoidance of noxious or physical activity In conclusion, we developed several testing protocols that assess supraspinal processing of pain-behaviors in models of muscle pain and that are most sensitive in animals with unilateral hyperalgesia. PMID:23747349

  1. Ultrasound guided, painful electrical stimulation of lumbar facet joint structures: an experimental model of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Søren; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Manniche, Claus; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative sensory testing has indicated generalized muscle hyperalgesia in patients with chronic low back pain. The temporal development of such hyperalgesia is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether generalized muscle hyperalgesia can develop within minutes of acute low back pain using a new experimental model of lumbar facet joint pain. Thirteen healthy volunteers were included and baseline pressure pain thresholds were assessed at eight separate sites, outside the area of evoked low back and referred pain. Using ultrasonography, two electrode needles were placed either side of a lumbar facet joint (right L3-4) and used to induce experimental low back pain for 10 min with continuous stimulation. Thresholds, stimulus-response relationships, distribution and quality of the electrically induced pain were recorded. Electrical facet joint stimulation induced low back pain and pain referral into the anterior leg, ipsilaterally, proximal to the knee, similar to what is observed clinically. Pressure pain thresholds did not change significantly before, during and after facet joint stimulation. In conclusion, we describe a novel model of acute experimental low back pain and demonstrate that generalized hyperalgesia did not develop within minutes of acute low back pain.

  2. Effect of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; O'Connor, Patrick J; Dishman, Rod K

    2003-08-01

    This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effect of ingesting a large dose of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate intensity cycling exercise. Low-caffeine-consuming college-aged males (n = 16) ingested either caffeine (10 mg x kg(-1) body weight) or placebo and 1 hour later completed 30 minutes of moderate intensity cycling exercise (60% VO(2peak)). The order of drug administration was counter-balanced. Perceptions of leg muscle pain as well as work rate, heart rate, and oxygen uptake (VO(2)) were recorded during exercise. Leg muscle pain ratings were significantly and moderately reduced after a high dose of caffeine. This observation suggests that prior reports showing caffeine improves endurance exercise performance might be partially explained by caffeine's hypoalgesic properties. It also suggests that moderate intensity cycling exercise has promise as a useful experimental model for the study of naturally occurring muscle pain.

  3. Effect of Deep Cervical Flexor Muscles Training Using Pressure Biofeedback on Pain and Disability of School Teachers with Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Rajan, Reena; Khan, Sohrab Ahmed; Alghadir, Ahmad H.

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The job of secondary school teachers involves a lot of head down posture as frequent reading, assignment correction, computer use and writing on a board put them at risk of developing occupational related neck pain. Available studies of neck pain experienced by teachers are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine whether training of deep cervical flexor muscles with pressure biofeedback has any significant advantage over conventional training for pain and disability experienced by school teachers with neck pain. [Subjects] Thirty teachers aged 25–45 years with neck pain and poor craniocervical flexion test participated in this study. [Methods] A pretest posttest experimental group design was used in which experimental group has received training with pressure biofeedback and conventional exercises while control group received conventional exercises only. Measurements of dependent variables were taken at baseline, and after 2 and 4 weeks of training. Pain intensity was assessed using a numeric pain rating scale and functional disability was assessed using the neck disability index. [Results] The data analysis revealed that there was significant improvement in pain and disability in both the groups and the results were better in the experimental group. [Conclusion] Addition of pressure biofeedback for deep cervical flexor muscles training gave a better result than conventional exercises alone. Feedback helps motor learning which is the set of processes associated with practice or experience leading to permanent changes in ability to respond. PMID:24259822

  4. Effect of deep cervical flexor muscles training using pressure biofeedback on pain and disability of school teachers with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Rajan, Reena; Khan, Sohrab Ahmed; Alghadir, Ahmad H

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] The job of secondary school teachers involves a lot of head down posture as frequent reading, assignment correction, computer use and writing on a board put them at risk of developing occupational related neck pain. Available studies of neck pain experienced by teachers are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine whether training of deep cervical flexor muscles with pressure biofeedback has any significant advantage over conventional training for pain and disability experienced by school teachers with neck pain. [Subjects] Thirty teachers aged 25-45 years with neck pain and poor craniocervical flexion test participated in this study. [Methods] A pretest posttest experimental group design was used in which experimental group has received training with pressure biofeedback and conventional exercises while control group received conventional exercises only. Measurements of dependent variables were taken at baseline, and after 2 and 4 weeks of training. Pain intensity was assessed using a numeric pain rating scale and functional disability was assessed using the neck disability index. [Results] The data analysis revealed that there was significant improvement in pain and disability in both the groups and the results were better in the experimental group. [Conclusion] Addition of pressure biofeedback for deep cervical flexor muscles training gave a better result than conventional exercises alone. Feedback helps motor learning which is the set of processes associated with practice or experience leading to permanent changes in ability to respond.

  5. Dynamic, but not static, pain sensitivity predicts exercise-induced muscle pain: Covariation of temporal sensory summation and pain intensity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D.; George, Steven Z.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-section studies suggest that measures of pain sensitivity, derived from quantitative sensory testing (QST), are elevated in persons with chronic pain conditions. However, little is known about whether development of chronic pain is preceded by elevated pain sensitivity or pain sensitivity increases as a result of prolonged experience of pain. Here we used QST to test static (single suprathreshold stimuli) and dynamic (temporal sensory summation) pain processing of thermal stimuli. Muscle pain was induced using high-intensity exercise (DOMS). Multi-level modeling approaches determined the daily covariation among static and dynamic QST measures and pain intensity. Variation in responses to static pain sensitivity was not associated with pain intensity from DOMS while, in contrast, variation in dynamic pain sensitivity was positively associated with variation in pain intensity from DOMS. This finding supports the use of TSS as a marker of the central pain state and potentially as an appropriate measure for treatment monitoring. PMID:22967843

  6. Predictability of jaw muscle pains from surface electromyograms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T

    1996-04-01

    In seven (88%) of eight healthy subjects, weak to moderate pains were elicited in the masseter muscles through the isometric contractions of maximum voluntary teeth clenching. Integrated surface electromyograms of the right and left masseter muscles were used to quantify the absolute and relative contractile activities of the two muscles. The risk (relative probability) of inducing pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the larger amount of isometric activity was 2.5 times the risk of eliciting pain onset in the single masseter muscle generating the lesser amount of isometric activity. However, as an aid in the diagnosis of pain onset, the method of masseteric surface electromyography had a false diagnostic ratio of 0.67.

  7. The effects of masseter muscle pain on biting performance.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Y Y; Peng, C C; Wen, S C; Lin, L D; Wang, J S; Lou, K L

    2003-10-01

    The present study applied a standardized test food of known hardness to evaluate the biting performance of 20 female patients who had pain mainly in the masseter muscle during palpation. Another 20 women of a similar age group who were pain-free during examination served as controls. Electromyograms (EMG) of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles and the jaw position were recorded and measured when the subjects were biting through two types of test foods with known hardness (hard type, 20 kg hardness and extra-hard type, 60 kg hardness). Pressure-pain-threshold (PPT) values of both the patients and the normal subjects were obtained with an algometer. It was found that the PPT of the patients with pain was significantly lower and that the extra-hard food took more masseter muscle activity and more working side jaw movement in both the pain and the normal groups. During both hard and extra-hard food biting, a significantly longer duration of masseter muscle activity was found in pain patients while the total muscle activity was not significantly stronger. Strong correlation existed between SCM and masseter muscle activity during both hard and extra-hard food biting in the patient group, while such correlation was very weak in the normal group. In conclusion, painful masseter muscles required longer masseter and SCM muscle contraction time for breaking through a hard food of 20 kg and more, and co-activation of SCM and masseter muscles existed and was more evident when the food was harder or the pain was more severe.

  8. The use of electromyography to quantify muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Myslinski, N R; Buxbaum, J D; Parente, F J

    1985-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the feasibility of using electromyography (EMG) to quantify muscle pain in patients suffering from chronic myofacial pain dysfunction (MPD). Ten patients were carefully selected to include those having mild to severe pain, but not any major psychological or other physiological dysfunction. Measurements of perceived pain and EMG frequency and amplitude were recorded before and after standard analgesic therapy. EMG recordings were collected bilaterally from the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles during the resting, swallowing, clenching and chewing modes of activity. Multiple regression (R) analysis indicated that changes in perceived pain are correlated with changes in the EMG and can be determined by using the following formula: delta P = (delta F) (0.405) + C where P = perceived pain level, F = EMG frequency, and C = 1.533. By computing the Phi coefficients, the highest correlation between EMG recordings and subjective pain ratings was demonstrated in the resting mode. In this mode, 64% (multiple R = 0.80) of the variance in perceived pain difference scores from pre- to post-therapy tests could be determined. A significant relationship exists between the change in perceived pain and the EMG (t = 2.525, p less than 0.05), whether pain levels increase or decrease. The implementation of this method to quantify expected changes in pain due to muscle spasm in uncomplicated individuals is discussed.

  9. Jaw muscle pain and its effect on gothic arch tracings.

    PubMed

    Obrez, A; Stohler, C S

    1996-04-01

    Perceived changes in occlusion and decreased range of motion are often expressed by patients with masticatory muscle pain. The adverse loading of craniomandibular tissues that results from an inadequate maxillomandibular relationship in combination with the coexisting dysfunction is widely regarded as the cause of pain. This study was designed to test whether pain can cause significant changes in position of the mandible and therefore form the basis for any perceived changes in the maxillomandibular relationship. A second objective was to determine whether pain can cause changes in the mandibular range of motion. Five subjects who rated pain intensity on a visual analog scale were used in a single-blind, randomized, repeated-measures study design. Tonic muscle pain was induced by infusion of 5% hypertonic saline solution into the central portion of the superficial masseter muscle. Isotonic saline solution was used as a control, with subjects blinded to the type of substance given. The effect of pain on the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing, the direction of the lateral mandibular border movements, and the mandibular range of motion was studied in a horizontal plane with minimal occlusal separation. Pain significantly affected the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing in anterior (F = 11.46, p = 0.03) and transverse (F = 35.0, p = 0.004) directions. Similarly, pain affected the orientation of the mandibular lateral border movements (F = 12.44, p = 0.02) and their magnitude (F = 14.97, p = 0.01). All pain-induced effects proved to be reversible. The observed effect of pain can explain the perceived change of bite that is frequently noted by patients with orofacial pain. This study provided evidence of an alternative causal relationship between pain and changes in occlusal relationship and questions occlusal therapy as treatment, directed toward the elimination of the underlying cause in patients with masticatory muscle pain.

  10. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  11. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    PubMed Central

    Witzeman, Kathryn; Nguyen, Ruby HN; Eanes, Alisa; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 8.3%—16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy. Objective To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD. Design In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity. Methods We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100) was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the highest level of pain. Results The lower vestibule’s mucosa 5.81 (standard deviation =2.83) was significantly more sensitive than the upper vestibule 2.52 (standard deviation =2.6) (P<0.01) on exam. However, mucosal sensitivity was not associated with intercourse pain, while muscle sensitivity was moderately associated with both average and highest intensity of intercourse pain (r=−0.46, P=0.01 and r=−0.42, P=0.02), respectively. Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that mucosal measures alone may not sufficiently capture the spectrum of clinical pain report in women with PVD, which is consistent with the empirical success of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26316805

  12. Referred muscle pain/hyperalgesia and central sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2003-05-01

    Referred muscle pain, resulting from algogenic conditions in viscera or other deep somatic structures (another muscle, a joint), is most often accompanied by secondary hyperalgesia and trophic changes (hypotrophy). Referred pain/ hyperalgesia from viscera is partly due to central sensitisation of viscero-somatic convergent neurons (triggered by the massive afferent visceral barrage) but also probably results from a reflex arc activation (the visceral input triggers reflex muscle contraction in turn responsible for sensitisation of muscle nociceptors). Referred pain/hyperalgesia from deep somatic structures is not explained by the mechanism of central sensitisation of convergent neurons in its original form, since there is little,convergence from deep tissues in the dorsal horn neurons. It has been proposed that these connections, not present from the beginning, are opened by nociceptive input from skeletal muscle, and that referral to myotomes outside the lesion results from the spread of central sensitisation to adjacent spinal segments.

  13. Experimental manipulations of pain catastrophizing influence pain levels in patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Kasch, Helge; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Pain catastrophizing (PC) has been related to pain levels in both patients experiencing acute or chronic pain and in healthy volunteers exposed to experimental pain. Still, it is unclear whether high levels of pain catastrophizing lead to high levels of pain or vice versa. We therefore tested whether levels of pain catastrophizing could be increased and decreased in the same participant through hypnotic suggestions and whether the altered level of situation-specific pain catastrophizing was related to increased and decreased pain levels, respectively. Using the spontaneous pain of 22 patients with chronic tension-type headache and experimentally induced pain in 22 healthy volunteers, participants were tested in 3 randomized sessions where they received 3 types of hypnotic suggestions: Negative (based on the 13 items in the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), Positive (coping-oriented reversion of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and Neutral (neutral sentence) hypnotic suggestions. The hypnotic suggestions significantly increased and decreased situation-specific PC in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Also, the levels of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were significantly altered in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Furthermore, regression analyses showed that changes in pain catastrophizing predicted changes in pain in patients (R = 0.204-0.304; P < 0.045) and in healthy volunteers (R = 0.328-0.252; P < 0.018). This is the first study to successfully manipulate PC in positive and negative directions in both patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers and to show that these manipulations significantly influence pain levels. These findings may have important theoretical and clinical implications.

  14. Sex Differences in Exercise-Induced Muscle Pain and Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Liu, Ying; Rector, R. Scott; Thomas, Tom R.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    There is uncertainty about sex differences in exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage due to several methodological weaknesses in the literature. This investigation tested the hypothesis that higher levels of exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage indicators would be found in women than men when several methodological improvements were executed in the same study. Participants (N = 33; 42% women) with an average age of 23 years (SD = 2.82) consented to participate. After a familiarization session, participants visited the laboratory before and across four days after eccentric exercise was completed to induce arm muscle pain and muscle damage. Our primary outcomes were arm pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds. However, we also measured the following indicators of muscle damage: arm girth; resting elbow extension; isometric elbow flexor strength; myoglobin (Mb); tumor necrosis factor (TNFa); interleukin 1beta (IL1b); and total nitric oxide (NO). Temporary induction of muscle damage was indicated by changes in all outcome measures except TNFa, and IL1b. In contrast to our hypotheses, women reported moderately lower and less frequent muscle pain than men. Also, women’s arm girth and Mb levels increased moderately less than men’s, but the differences were not significant. Few large sex differences were detected. PMID:23182229

  15. The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Shane Q.

    2015-03-01

    Robotic orthoses have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. These orthoses must be characterized by the naturally safe, reliable, and controlled motion of a human therapist's muscles. Such characteristics are only possible in the natural kingdom through the pain sensing realized by the interaction of an intelligent nervous system and muscles' embedded sensing organs. McKibben fluidic muscles or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) are a popular orthosis actuator because of their inherent compliance, high force, and muscle-like load-displacement characteristics. However, the circular cross-section of PMA increases their profile. PMA are also notoriously unreliable and difficult to control, lacking the intelligent pain sensing systems of their biological muscle counterparts. Here the Peano fluidic muscle, a new low profile yet high-force soft actuator is introduced. This muscle is smart, featuring bioinspired embedded pressure and soft capacitive strain sensors. Given this pressure and strain feedback, experimental validation shows that a lumped parameter model based on the muscle geometry and material parameters can be used to predict its force for quasistatic motion with an average error of 10 - 15N. Combining this with a force threshold pain sensing algorithm sets a precedent for flexible orthosis actuation that uses embedded sensors to prevent damage to the actuator and its environment.

  16. Gender, variation in opioid receptor genes and sensitivity to experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain tolerance is subject to considerable inter-individual variation, which may be influenced by a number of genetic and non-genetic factors. The mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors play a role in pain perception and are thought to mediate different pain modalities. The aim of this study was to explore associations between pain thresholds and gender and genetic variants in the three opioid receptor genes (OPRM, OPRD and OPRK). Experimental multi-modal pain data from previously published studies carried out in healthy Caucasian volunteers were used in order to limit the number of confounders to the study outcome. Data on thermal skin pain (n=36), muscle pressure pain (n=31) and mechanical visceral pain (n=50)) tolerance thresholds were included. Results Nineteen genetic polymorphisms were included in linear regression modeling. Males were found to tolerate higher thermal and muscle pressure pain than females (p=0.003 and 0.02). Thirty four percent of variability in thermal skin pain was accounted for by a model consisting of OPRK rs6473799 and gender. This finding was just outside significance when correction for multiple testing was applied. Variability in muscle pressure pain tolerance was associated with OPRK rs7016778 and rs7824175. These SNPs accounted for 43% of variability in muscle pressure pain sensitivity and these findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. No association was found with mechanical visceral pain. Conclusion This is a preliminary and hypothesis generating study due to the relatively small study size. However, significant association between the opioid receptor genes and experimental pain sensitivity supports the influence of genetic variability in pain perception. These findings may be used to generate hypotheses for testing in larger clinical trials of patients with painful conditions. PMID:23570317

  17. Persistent orofacial muscle pain: Its synonymous terminology and presentation.

    PubMed

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Mulder, Maxim J H L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe the presentation of persistent orofacial muscle pain, also commonly referred to as myofascial temporomandibular disorder. In this practice survey, the authors reviewed the demographic and clinical features of 34 patients who were evaluated and diagnosed personally. The majority of the 34 patients were women (82.4%), and their age at consultation averaged 44.6 ± 12.6 (SD) years. The median pain duration was 4.0 years (range: 0.2-34 years). In 97.1% of patients, the pain occurred daily and continuously, and in 51.9% it was unilateral. Chewing or eating made the pain worse in 50% of the patients, and talking in 29.4%. On examination, tightness of the masseter muscle(s) was present in 58.8%, and tenderness in 58.8%. Persistent orofacial muscle pain mostly affects women, generally occurs daily and continuously, and is equally often unilateral and bilateral. Chewing, eating, and talking are the most common aggravating factors, and tightness or tenderness of the masseter muscle(s) is often found on examination.

  18. Craniofacial pain and jaw-muscle activity during sleep.

    PubMed

    Yachida, W; Castrillon, E E; Baad-Hansen, L; Jensen, R; Arima, T; Tomonaga, A; Ohata, N; Svensson, P

    2012-06-01

    This study compared the jaw-muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep in patients with craniofacial pain (n = 63) or no painful conditions (n = 52) and between patients with tension-type headache (TTH: n = 30) and healthy control individuals (n = 30). All participants used a portable single-channel EMG device (Medotech A/S) for four nights. There was no significant difference in EMG activity between craniofacial pain (24.5 ± 17.9 events/hr) and no painful conditions (19.7 ± 14.5), or between TTH (20.8 ± 15.0) and healthy control individuals (15.2 ± 11.6, p >.050). There were positive correlations between EMG activity and number of painful muscles (r = 0.188; p = 0.044), characteristic pain intensity (r = 0.187; p = 0.046), McGill Pain Questionnaire (r = 0.251; p = 0.008), and depression scores (r = 0.291; p = 0.002). Patients with painful conditions had significantly higher night-to-night variability compared with pain-free individuals (p < 0.050). This short-term observational study suggests that there are no major differences between patients with different craniofacial pain conditions and pain-free individuals in terms of jaw-muscle EMG activity recorded with a single-channel EMG device during sleep. However, some associations may exist between the level of EMG activity and various parameters of craniofacial pain. Longitudinal studies are warranted to further explore the relationship between sleep bruxism and craniofacial pain.

  19. Characteristics of Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Infraspinatus Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junbeom; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Chunung; Lee, Sang Chul

    2017-08-01

    To report the characteristics of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle and evaluate the therapeutic effect of trigger-point injections. Medical records of 297 patients (221 women; age, 53.9±11.3 years) with MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle were reviewed retrospectively. Because there were 83 patients with MTrPs in both infraspinatus muscles, the characteristics of total 380 infraspinatus muscles with MTrPs (214 one side, 83 both sides) were investigated. Specific characteristics collected included chief complaint area, referred pain pattern, the number of local twitch responses, and distribution of MTrPs in the muscle. For statistical analysis, the paired t-test was used to compare a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and 2 weeks after the first injection. The most common chief complaint area of MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle was the scapular area. The most common pattern of referred pain was the anterolateral aspect of the arm (above the elbow). Active MTrPs were multiple rather than single in the infraspinatus muscle. MTrPs were frequently in the center of the muscle. Trigger-point injection of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased the pain intensity. Mean VAS score decreased significantly after the first injection compared to the baseline (7.11 vs. 3.74; p<0.001). Characteristics of MTrPs and the therapeutic effects of trigger-point injections of the infraspinatus muscle were assessed. These findings could provide clinicians with useful information in diagnosing and treating myofascial pain syndrome of the infraspinatus muscle.

  20. Modulation of trigeminal laser evoked potentials and laser silent periods by homotopical experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, Antonietta; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cruccu, Giorgio; Svensson, Peter

    2002-07-01

    Cutaneous laser stimulation activates predominantly the A-delta and C mechano-heat nociceptors. Applied to the perioral region, low intensity CO(2)-laser pulses evoke reproducible trigeminal cortical evoked potentials (LEPs). High intensity CO(2)-laser stimuli induce a reflex response in the contracted jaw-closing muscle, the so-called laser silent period (LSP). Both LEPs and LSP provide a useful tool to study the physiology of the trigeminal nociceptive system. In ten healthy subjects we recorded the subjective ratings of the perioral laser stimulation and the trigeminal LEPs and LSP before, during and after homotopic experimental tonic muscle (infusion of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle) and tonic skin pain (topical application of capsaicin to the cheek). LEPs were recorded from the vertex at two stimulus intensities: low (1.1 x pain threshold, PTh) and high (1.5 x PTh). LSP from masseter and temporalis muscles were recorded bilaterally through surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes. CO(2)-laser pulses were applied to the perioral region (V2/V3) on the painful and non-painful side. The amplitude of LEPs increased with higher stimulus intensities (P<0.0001), but were suppressed by 42.3+/-5.3% during experimental muscle pain (P<0.0001) and by 41.6+/-3.2% during skin pain (P<0.0001). No pain-related effects were observed for the N and P latency of the LEPs (P> 0.20). The LSP in the masseter and temporalis muscles had similar onset-latency (80+/-5 ms), offset-latency (111+/-5 ms) and duration (31+/-4 ms). Experimental pain had no effect on the onset- and offset-latency (P>0.05). Experimental pain, whether from muscle or from skin, reduced the degree of suppression (P<0.01) and the area under the EMG curve (P< 0.005) of the LSP. The LSP was still suppressed during the post-pain recordings when the skin pain had disappeared (P<0.05). In all experiments experimental tonic pain decreased the subjective ratings of the perioral laser stimulation (P< 0

  1. Bunion: Strengthening Foot Muscles to Reduce Pain and Improve Mobility.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Foot pain discourages physical activity, and less activity harms overall health. Bunion, extra bone and tissue at the base of the big toe, is a frequent cause of foot pain. More than 64 million Americans have bunions that can lead to painful walking. Bunions affect some 35% of women over the age of 65. Bunions can be removed by surgery, which can reduce pain and improve your ability to walk and exercise, but up to 15% of bunions return. Weak muscles may play a role in bunion-related pain and movement problems. In a review of prior research and commentary on this topic published in the July 2016 issue of JOSPT, the author identifies muscle-strengthening exercises that may help people with bunions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):606. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0504.

  2. IB4(+) nociceptors mediate persistent muscle pain induced by GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Chen, Xiaojie; Bogen, Oliver; Green, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a well-known source of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which can produce mechanical hyperalgesia. Since some neuromuscular diseases are associated with both increased release of GDNF and intense muscle pain, we explored the role of GDNF as an endogenous mediator in muscle pain. Intramuscularly injected GDNF induced a dose-dependent (0.1–10 ng/20 μl) persistent (up to 3 wk) mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat. Once hyperalgesia subsided, injection of prostaglandin E2 at the site induced a prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia (>72 h) compared with naïve rats (<4 h; hyperalgesic priming). Selective neurotoxic destruction of IB4(+) nociceptors attenuated both GDNF hyperalgesia and hyperalgesic priming. Ergonomic muscular injury induced by eccentric exercise or mechanical vibration increased muscle GDNF levels at 24 h, a time point where rats also exhibited marked muscle hyperalgesia. Intrathecal antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to mRNA encoding GFRα1, the canonical binding receptor for GDNF, reversibly inhibited eccentric exercise- and mechanical vibration-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Finally, electrophysiological recordings from nociceptors innervating the gastrocnemius muscle in anesthetized rats, revealed significant increase in response to sustained mechanical stimulation after local GDNF injection. In conclusion, these data indicate that GDNF plays a role as an endogenous mediator in acute and induction of chronic muscle pain, an effect likely to be produced by GDNF action at GFRα1 receptors located in IB4(+) nociceptors. PMID:22914655

  3. Biopsychosocial Influence on Exercise-induced Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness at the Shoulder: Pain Catastrophizing and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Diplotype Predict Pain Ratings

    PubMed Central

    George, Steven Z.; Dover, Geoffrey C.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Sack, Brandon K.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Aydog, Ece; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The experience of pain is believed to be influenced by psychologic and genetic factors. A previous study suggested pain catastrophizing and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype influenced clinical pain ratings for patients seeking operative treatment of shoulder pain. This study investigated whether these same psychologic and genetic factors predicted responses to induced shoulder pain. Methods Participants (n=63) completed self-report questionnaires and had COMT genotype determined before performing a standardized fatigue protocol to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Then, shoulder pain ratings, self-report of upper-extremity disability ratings, and muscle torque production were reassessed 24, 48, and 72 hours later. Results This cohort consisted of 35 women and 28 men, with a mean age of 20.9 years (SD=1.7). The frequency of COMT diplotypes was 42 with “high COMT enzyme activity” (low pain sensitivity group) and 21 with “low COMT enzyme activity” (average pain sensitivity/high pain sensitivity group). A hierarchical regression model indicated that an interaction between pain catastrophizing and COMT diplotype was the strongest unique predictor of 72-hour pain ratings. The same interaction was not predictive of self-report of disability or muscle torque production at 72 hours. The pain catastrophizing × COMT diplotype interaction indicated that participants with high pain catastrophizing and low COMT enzyme activity (average pain sensitivity/high pain sensitivity group) were more likely (relative risk=3.5, P=0.025) to have elevated pain intensity ratings (40/100 or higher). Discussion These findings from an experimental model converge with those from a surgical cohort and provide additional evidence that the presence of elevated pain catastrophizing and COMT diplotype indicative of low COMT enzyme activity have the potential to increase the risk of developing chronic pain syndromes. PMID:18936597

  4. The Effect of 2 Different Exercise Programs on Pain Intensity and Muscle Dimensions in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Narjess; Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad A; Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Rahgozar, Mahdi; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2017-07-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of 2 exercise programs combined with electrotherapy on pain intensity and lumbar stabilizer muscles dimensions in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed with 41 patients with chronic LBP. Participants were randomly allocated into 2 groups: an experimental group (n = 20) received stabilization exercises plus electrotherapy, and a control group (n = 21) received routine exercises plus electrotherapy. Pain intensity, using a visual analog scale, and muscle dimensions of both right and left transverse abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles, using rehabilitative ultrasonography, were assessed before and immediately after 4 weeks of intervention. Significant improvement was identified after interventions on pain intensity and muscle size measurements in both groups (P < .01 in all instances). The only exception was the right-side lumbar multifidus cross-sectional area of the control group, which was not statistically significant (P = .081). No significant differences were found between the 2 exercise groups on pain intensity and muscle dimensions (P > .05 in all instances). The results of this study suggest that a combination of electrotherapy with either routine or stabilization exercise programs may improve pain intensity and muscle dimensions in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Stretch-based relaxation and the reduction of EMG activity among masticatory muscle pain patients.

    PubMed

    Carlson, C R; Okeson, J P; Falace, D A; Nitz, A J; Anderson, D

    1991-01-01

    This study explored the efficacy of stretch-based relaxation procedures for the reduction of muscle activity in the masseter regions of subjects diagnosed with masticatory muscle pain disorders. Thirty-four subjects with elevated masseter activity were assigned randomly to either a postural relaxation/rest experimental group or a stretch-based relaxation experimental group. Following a psychosocial stressor and application of the relaxation procedure, persons in the stretch-based group showed greater reductions in EMG activity than did those in the postural group for the right masseter region (t = 1.94, P less than .04) and the left masseter region (t = 2.07, P less than .03). The results are discussed in terms of the implications of these findings for further research concerning the etiology and treatment of masticatory muscle pain.

  6. Kinesiophobia, Pain, Muscle Functions, and Functional Performances among Older Persons with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aims (1) to determine the association between kinesiophobia and pain, muscle functions, and functional performances and (2) to determine whether kinesiophobia predicts pain, muscle functions, and functional performance among older persons with low back pain (LBP). Methods This is a correlational study, involving 63 institutionalized older persons (age = 70.98 ± 7.90 years) diagnosed with LBP. Anthropometric characteristics (BMI) and functional performances (lower limb function, balance and mobility, and hand grip strength) were measured. Muscle strength (abdominal and back muscle strength) was assessed using the Baseline® Mechanical Push/Pull Dynamometer, while muscle control (transverse abdominus and multifidus) was measured by using the Pressure Biofeedback Unit. The pain intensity and the level of kinesiophobia were measured using Numerical Rating Scale and Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, respectively. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients and multivariate linear regressions. Results No significant correlations were found between kinesiophobia and pain and muscle functions (all p > 0.05). Kinesiophobia was significantly correlated with mobility and balance (p = 0.038, r = 0.263). Regressions analysis showed that kinesiophobia was a significant predictor of mobility and balance (p = 0.038). Conclusion We can conclude that kinesiophobia predicted mobility and balance in older persons with LBP. Kinesiophobia should be continuously assessed in clinical settings to recognize the obstacles that may affect patient's compliance towards a rehabilitation program in older persons with LBP. PMID:28634547

  7. Kinesiophobia, Pain, Muscle Functions, and Functional Performances among Older Persons with Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This study aims (1) to determine the association between kinesiophobia and pain, muscle functions, and functional performances and (2) to determine whether kinesiophobia predicts pain, muscle functions, and functional performance among older persons with low back pain (LBP). This is a correlational study, involving 63 institutionalized older persons (age = 70.98 ± 7.90 years) diagnosed with LBP. Anthropometric characteristics (BMI) and functional performances (lower limb function, balance and mobility, and hand grip strength) were measured. Muscle strength (abdominal and back muscle strength) was assessed using the Baseline® Mechanical Push/Pull Dynamometer, while muscle control (transverse abdominus and multifidus) was measured by using the Pressure Biofeedback Unit. The pain intensity and the level of kinesiophobia were measured using Numerical Rating Scale and Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, respectively. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients and multivariate linear regressions. No significant correlations were found between kinesiophobia and pain and muscle functions (all p > 0.05). Kinesiophobia was significantly correlated with mobility and balance (p = 0.038, r = 0.263). Regressions analysis showed that kinesiophobia was a significant predictor of mobility and balance (p = 0.038). We can conclude that kinesiophobia predicted mobility and balance in older persons with LBP. Kinesiophobia should be continuously assessed in clinical settings to recognize the obstacles that may affect patient's compliance towards a rehabilitation program in older persons with LBP.

  8. Study of experimental pain measures and nociceptive reflex in chronic pain patients and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Boureau, F; Luu, M; Doubrère, J F

    1991-02-01

    This study evaluates (i) the effect of heterotopic chronic pain on various experimental pain measures, (ii) the relationship between experimental pain measures and chronic pain symptomatology assessment, and (iii) the influence of the various pain aetiologies on experimental pain measures. Fifty-three chronic pain patients were compared to 17 pain-free subjects with the following psychophysical and physiological indices: pain threshold (PTh), pain tolerance (PTol), verbal estimation of intensity and unpleasantness (intensity scale, IS; unpleasantness scale, US), threshold for intensity and unpleasantness (ITh and UTh), lower limb RIII nociceptive reflex (RIIITh and RIII frequency of occurrence). Chronic pain syndromes included neuropathic pain (n = 12), iodopathic pain (n = 12), myofascial syndromes (n = 9), headache (n = 9), and miscellaneous pain (n = 11). Chronic pain symptomatology was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS), a French MPQ adaptation (QDSA), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Spielberger State Trait Inventory (STAI) and Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI). No significant difference was observed between chronic pain patients and pain-free control groups and between patient subgroups for PTh, PTol and RIIITh. No significant correlation was found between experimental pain measures and clinical pain, anxiety or depression scores. However, the chronic pain patients had a higher threshold for unpleasantness and judged the suprathreshold stimuli significantly less intense and less unpleasant than the control group. These results are discussed in relation to diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and the adaptation level theory of chronic pain experience.

  9. Heart muscle performance after experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Adesanya, C O; Goldberg, A H; Phear, W P; Thorp, K A; Young, N A; Abelmann, W H

    1976-01-01

    As part of an inquiry into possible antecedents of idiopathic cardiomyopathy, acute experimental coxsackie virus myocarditis was studied for late structural and functional sequelae. Myocarditis was induced in 12- and 22-day-old hamsters by inoculation with coxsackie virus B3. Early viremia occurred, followed by virus replication in heart muscle. Maximum peak developed tension (Tpd) of isometrically contracting isolated heart muscle was depressed 17 and 43% in the animals inoculated at 12 days, and studied 18 and 90 days later, respectively, as compared to their uninoculated controls. In both infected groups, less muscle stretch was required to reach the length at which Tpd was produced. Animals studied 180 days after inoculation did not differ from controls. The muscles from animals inoculated at 22 days of age and studied 18 days later showed a 15% depression of Tpd compared to their controls. Glycerinated muscles from this infected group developed 50% less tension than their controls. The muscles of hamsters inoculated with virus at 22 days and studied 90 and 180 days later showed no change in Tpd. The data suggest that contractility and compliance of heart muscle are decreased 18 days after inoculation, but recover by 90 days if the animals are inoculated at age 22 days. However, if the animals are inoculated at a younger age (12 days), depression of myocardial performance persists for at least an additional 90 days. It is concluded that the inflammatory stage of experimental acute coxsackie virus B3 myocarditis in the Syrian golden hamster may be followed by residual alterations in contractile proteins and myocardial function. PMID:1249200

  10. Role of muscle spindle in weightlessness-induced amyotrophia and muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Ali, Umar; Fan, Xiao-Li; You, Hao-Jun

    2009-10-01

    To date, the medium and long-term space flight is urgent in need and has become a major task of our manned space flight program. There is no doubt that medium and long-term space flight has serious damaging impact upon human physiological systems. For instance, atrophy of the lower limb anti-gravity muscle can be induced during the space flight. Muscle atrophy significantly affects the flight of astronauts in space. Most importantly, it influences the precise manipulation of the astronauts and their response capacity to emergencies on returning to the atmosphere from space. Muscle atrophy caused by weightlessness may also seriously disrupt the normal life and work of the astronauts during the re-adaptation period. Here we summarize the corresponding research concentrating on weightlessness-induced changes of muscular structure and function. By combining research on muscle pain, which is a common clinical pain disease, we further provide a hypothesis concerning a dynamic feedback model of "weightlessness condition right triple arrow muscular atrophy <--> muscle pain". This may be useful to explore the neural mechanisms underlying the occurrence and development of muscular atrophy and muscle pain, through the key study of muscle spindle, and furthermore provide more effective therapy for clinical treatment.

  11. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  12. Myofascial origins of low back pain. 3. Pelvic and lower extremity muscles.

    PubMed

    Simons, D G; Travell, J G

    1983-02-01

    Gluteal, pelvic, and lower extremity muscles are common sites of origin of myofascial low back pain. Trigger points (TPs) in the gluteus maximus and medius muscles refer pain locally to the gluteal and sacral regions, while those in the gluteus minimus are likely to refer pain down the lower extremity as far as the ankle on the same side. TPs in intrapelvic muscles refer pain chiefly to the pelvic region. Besides producing referred myofascial pain, TPs in the piriformis muscle can cause symptoms of entrapment of the peroneal portion or all of the sciatic nerve. TPs in the soleus muscle may refer pain to the sacroiliac joint.

  13. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. Sunil kumar; Naidu, M. U. R.; Rani, P. Usha; Rao, T. Ramesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical) can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding. PMID:23626642

  14. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hufei; Liu, Xinhe; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Zimeng; Zhang, Xu-Yu; Xie, Hong-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT) of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus) and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris). Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P<0.01). Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.382; P<0.001) and the intensity of bilateral shoulder pain (both P<0.01). Preoperative PPT levels of shoulder muscles are closely associated with the severity of shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy. PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, significantly decreased after surgery. Parecoxib improved the decrease of PPT and relieved PLSP.

  15. Muscle injury: review of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Souza, Jaqueline de; Gottfried, Carmem

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the human body. Its main characteristic is the capacity to regenerate after injury independent of the cause of injury through a process called inflammatory response. Mechanical injuries are the most common type of the skeletal muscle injuries and are classified into one of three areas strain, contusion, and laceration. First, this review aims to describe and compare the main experimental methods that replicate the mechanical muscle injuries. There are several ways to replicate each kind of mechanical injury; there are, however, specific characteristics that must be taken into account when choosing the most appropriate model for the experiment. Finally, this review discusses the context of mechanical injury considering types, variability of methods, and the ability to reproduce injury models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Women with dysmenorrhoea are hypersensitive to experimentally induced forearm ischaemia during painful menstruation and during the pain-free follicular phase.

    PubMed

    Iacovides, S; Avidon, I; Baker, F C

    2015-07-01

    Monthly primary dysmenorrhoeic pain is associated with increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, particularly in deep tissue. We investigated whether women with dysmenorrhoea, compared with controls, have increased sensitivity to experimentally induced deep-tissue muscle ischaemia in a body area distant from that of referred menstrual pain. The sub-maximal effort tourniquet test was used to induce forearm ischaemia in 11 women with severe dysmenorrhoea and in nine control women both during menstruation and in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Von Frey hair assessments confirmed the presence of experimental ischaemia. Women rated the intensity of menstrual and ischaemic pain on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Women with dysmenorrhoea [mean (SD): 68 (20) mm] reported significantly greater menstrual pain compared with controls [mean (SD): 2 (6) mm; p = 0.0001] during the menstruation phase. They also rated their forearm ischaemic pain as significantly greater than the controls during the menstruation [dysmenorrhoeics vs. controls mean (SD): 58 (19) mm vs. 31 (21) mm, p < 0.01] and follicular [dysmenorrhoeics vs. controls mean (SD): 60 (18) mm vs. 40 (14) mm, p < 0.01] phases of the menstrual cycle. These data show that compared with controls, women who experience severe recurrent dysmenorrhoea have deep-tissue hyperalgesia to ischaemic pain in muscles outside of the referred area of menstrual pain both during the painful menstruation phase and pain-free follicular phase. These findings suggest the presence of long-lasting changes in muscle pain sensitivity in women with dysmenorrhoea. Our findings that dysmenorrhoeic women are hyperalgesic to a clinically relevant, deep-muscle ischaemic pain in areas outside of referred menstrual pain confirm other studies showing long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity outside of the painful period during menstruation. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  17. Psychological and physiological parameters of masticatory muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Carlson, C R; Reid, K I; Curran, S L; Studts, J; Okeson, J P; Falace, D; Nitz, A; Bertrand, P M

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this research was to identify the psychological and physiological variables that differentiate persons reporting masticatory muscle pain (MMP) from normal controls (NC). This study examined the characteristics of 35 MMP patients in comparison to 35 age-, sex-, and weight-matched NCs. All subjects completed a series of standardized questionnaires prior to undergoing a laboratory evaluation consisting of a psychosocial stressor and pressure pain stimulation at multiple body sites. During the evaluation, subjects' emotional and physiological responses (heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, skin temperature, and muscle activity) were monitored. Results indicated that persons with MMP reported greater fatigue, disturbed sleep, depression, anxiety, menstrual symptoms, and less self-deception (P's < 0.05) than matched controls. At rest, MMPs had lower end tidal carbon dioxide levels (P < 0.04) and lower diastolic blood pressures than the NCs (P < 0.02). During laboratory challenge, both groups responded to the standard stressor with significant physiological activity and emotional responding consistent with an acute stress response (P < 0.01), but there were no differences between the MMPs and NCs. Muscle pain patients reported lower pressure pain thresholds than did NCs at the right/left masseter and right temporalis sites (P's < 0.05); there were no differences in pressure pain thresholds between MMPs and NCs for the left temporalis (P < 0.07) and right/left middle finger sites (P's > 0.93). These results are discussed in terms of the psychological and physiological processes that may account for the development of muscle pain in the masticatory system.

  18. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (P<.01). Experimental low back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (P<.01) although force accuracy and tangential force variability was not affected. Increased variability in the tangential force composition was found during pain compared with the non-painful condition (P<.05). The immediate adaptation to pain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures.

  19. Hypocapnia in patients with chronic neck pain: association with pain, muscle function, and psychologic states.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with chronic neck pain have changes in their transcutaneous partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PtcCO2) and whether other physical and psychologic parameters are associated. In this cross-sectional study, 45 patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain and 45 healthy sex-, age-, height-, and weight-matched controls were voluntarily recruited. The participants' neck muscle strength, endurance of the deep neck flexors, neck range of movement, forward head posture, psychologic states (anxiety, depression, kinesiophobia, and catastrophizing), disability, and pain were assessed. PtcCO2 was assessed using transcutaneous blood gas monitoring. The patients with chronic neck pain presented significantly reduced PtcCO2 (P < 0.01). In the patients, PtcCO2 was significantly correlated with strength of the neck muscles, endurance of the deep neck flexors, kinesiophobia, catastrophizing, and pain intensity (P < 0.05). Pain intensity, endurance of the deep neck flexors, and kinesiophobia remained as significant predictors into the regression model of PtcCO2. Patients with chronic neck pain present with reduced PtcCO2, which can reach the limits of hypocapnia. This disturbance seems to be associated with physical and psychologic manifestations of neck pain. These findings can have a great impact on various clinical aspects, notably, patient assessment, rehabilitation, and drug prescription.

  20. Effects of Experimental Pain and Lidocaine on Mechanical Somatosensory Profile and Face Perception.

    PubMed

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Castrillon, Eduardo E; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Rodrigues Conti, Paulo César; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effects of experimental muscle pain and topical lidocaine applied to the skin overlying the masseter muscle on the mechanical somatosensory profile and face perception of the masseter muscle in healthy participants. A total of 28 healthy participants received a 45-minute application of a lidocaine or placebo patch to the skin overlying the masseter muscle followed by one injection of 0.2 mL sterile solution of monosodium glutamate. Measurements were taken four times during each session of quantitative sensory testing (QST) (T0 = baseline, T1 = 45 minutes after patch application, T2 = immediately after glutamate injection, and T3 = 25 minutes after the glutamate injection), and the following variables were measured: mechanical detection threshold (MDT), mechanical pain threshold (MPT), pressure pain threshold (PPT), pain report (pain on palpation, pain spreading on palpation, and pain intensity), pain drawing, and perceptual distortion. Multi-way within-subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to the data. The highest MDTs were present at T2 (F = 49.28, P < .001), the lowest PPTs were present at T2 and T3 (F = 21.78, P < .001), and the largest magnitude and area of perceptual distortion were reported at T2 (F > 6.48, P < .001). Short-lasting experimental muscle pain was capable of causing loss of tactile sensitivity as well as perceptual distortion of the face, regardless of preconditioning with a topical lidocaine patch. Short-term application of a lidocaine patch did not significantly affect the mechanical somatosensory profile.

  1. Heritability of pain catastrophizing and associations with experimental pain outcomes: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Trost, Zina; Strachan, Eric; Sullivan, Michael; Vervoort, Tine; Avery, Ally R; Afari, Niloofar

    2015-03-01

    This study used a twin paradigm to examine genetic and environmental contributions to pain catastrophizing and the observed association between pain catastrophizing and cold-pressor task (CPT) outcomes. Male and female monozygotic (n = 206) and dizygotic twins (n = 194) from the University of Washington Twin Registry completed a measure of pain catastrophizing and performed a CPT challenge. As expected, pain catastrophizing emerged as a significant predictor of several CPT outcomes, including cold-pressor Immersion Tolerance, Pain Tolerance, and Delayed Pain Rating. The heritability estimate for pain catastrophizing was found to be 37% with the remaining 63% of variance attributable to unique environmental influence. Additionally, the observed associations between pain catastrophizing and CPT outcomes were not found attributable to shared genetics or environmental exposure, which suggests a direct relationship between catastrophizing and experimental pain outcomes. This study is the first to examine the heritability of pain catastrophizing and potential processes by which pain catastrophizing is related to experimental pain response.

  2. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  3. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness.

  4. Immediate effects of Graston Technique on hamstring muscle extensibility and pain intensity in patients with nonspecific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong Hoon; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Won, Young Sik; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of Graston Technique on hamstring extensibility and pain intensity in patients with nonspecific low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four patients with nonspecific low back pain (27–46 years of age) enrolled in the study. All participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Graston technique group (n=12) and a static stretching group (n=12). The Graston Technique was used on the hamstring muscles of the experimental group, while the static stretching group performed static stretching. Hamstring extensibility was recorded using the sit and reach test, and a visual analog scale was used to measure pain intensity. [Results] Both groups showed a significant improvement after intervention. In comparison to the static stretching group, the Graston technique group had significantly more improvement in hamstring extensibility. [Conclusion] The Graston Technique is a simple and effective intervention in nonspecific low back pain patients to improve hamstring extensibility and lower pain intensity, and it would be beneficial in clinical practice. PMID:28265144

  5. Entropy of Masseter Muscle Pain Sensitivity: A New Technique for Pain Assessment.

    PubMed

    Castrillon, Eduardo E; Exposto, Fernando G; Sato, Hitoshi; Tanosoto, Tomohiro; Arima, Taro; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To test whether manipulation of mechanical pain sensitivity (MPS) of the masseter muscle is reflected in quantitative measures of entropy. In a randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled design, 20 healthy volunteers had glutamate, lidocaine, and isotonic saline injected into the masseter muscle. Self-assessed pain intensity on a numeric rating scale (NRS) was evaluated up to 10 minutes following the injection, and MPS was evaluated after application (at 5 minutes and 30 minutes) of three different forces (0.5 kg, 1 kg, and 2 kg) to 15 different sites of the masseter muscle. Finally, the entropy and center of gravity (COG) of the pain sensitivity scores were calculated. Analysis of variance was used to test differences in means of tested outcomes and Tukey post hoc tests were used to adjust for multiple comparisons. The main findings were: (1) Compared with both lidocaine and isotonic saline, glutamate injections caused an increase in peak, duration, and area under the NRS pain curve (P < .01); (2) A pressure of 2 kg caused the highest NRS pain scores (P < .03) and entropy values (P < .02); (3) Glutamate injections caused increases in entropy values when assessed with 0.5 kg and 1.0 kg but not with 2.0 kg of pressure; and (4) COG coordinates revealed differences between the x coordinates for time (P < .01) and time and force for the y coordinates (P < .01). These results suggest that manipulation of MPS of the masseter muscle with painful glutamate injections can increase the diversity of MPS, which is reflected in entropy measures. Entropy allows quantification of the diversity of MPS, which may be important in clinical assessment of pain states such as myofascial temporomandibular disorders.

  6. Experimental tonic hand pain modulates the corticospinal plasticity induced by a subsequent hand deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Mavromatis, N; Gagné, M; Voisin, J I A V; Reilly, K T; Mercier, C

    2016-08-25

    Sensorimotor reorganization is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of phantom limb pain, but pain itself might modulate sensorimotor plasticity induced by deafferentation. Clinical and basic research support this idea, as pain prior to amputation increases the risk of developing post-amputation pain. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of experimental tonic cutaneous hand pain on the plasticity induced by temporary ischemic hand deafferentation. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (Pain, No Pain) in which transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticospinal excitability in two forearm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis) before (T0, T10, T20, and T40) and after (T60 and T75) inflation of a cuff around the wrist. The cuff was inflated at T45 in both sessions and in the Pain session capsaicin cream was applied on the dorsum of the hand at T5. Corticospinal excitability was significantly greater during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.002) and increased similarly in both muscles (p=0.861). Importantly, the excitability increase in the Post-inflation phase was greater for the Pain than the No-Pain condition (p=0.006). Post-hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between the two conditions during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.030) but no difference during the Pre-inflation phase (p=0.601). In other words, the corticospinal facilitation was greater when pain was present prior to cuff inflation. These results indicate that pain can modulate the plasticity induced by another event, and could partially explain the sensorimotor reorganization often reported in chronic pain populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  8. A comparison of self-hypnosis versus progressive muscle relaxation in patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M; Molton, Ivan R; Raichle, Katherine A; Osborne, Travis L; Engel, Joyce M; Stoelb, Brenda L; Kraft, George H; Patterson, David R

    2009-04-01

    Twenty-two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic pain we recruited into a quasi-experimental trial comparing the effects of self-hypnosis training (HYP) with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) on pain intensity and pain interference; 8 received HYP and the remaining 14 participants were randomly assigned to receive either HYP or PMR. HYP-condition participants reported significantly greater pre- to postsession as well as pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain and pain interference than PMR-condition participants, and gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Most of the participants in both conditions reported that they continued to use the skills they learned in treatment and experienced pain relief when they did so. General hypnotizability was not significantly related to treatment outcome, but treatment-outcome expectancy assessed before and after the first session was. The results support the efficacy of self-hypnosis training for the management of chronic pain in persons with MS.

  9. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain. PMID:26957772

  10. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  11. Characteristics of response to experimental pain in sexually abused women.

    PubMed

    Granot, Michal; Somer, Eli; Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Beny, Ahuva; Sadger, Ronit; Mirkin, Ronit; Moont, Ruth; Yovell, Yoram

    2011-09-01

    Women with a history of sexual abuse (SA) commonly report greater pain symptoms. It is still unclear whether enhanced pain susceptibility is the result of altered pain processing and response. Therefore, this pilot study aimed to explore pain sensitivity to experimentally induced pain and associated psychology in women with a history of severe SA. Twenty-one survivors of severe, long-lasting SA and 21 control women underwent experimentally induced heat pain and completed psychological questionnaires. Pain measures included heat pain thresholds, pain intensity ratings, and pain tolerance in response to contact heat, painful stimulation delivered to the volar forearm. Questionnaires included somatization (Brief Symptom Inventory), personality traits including harm avoidance, novelty seeking, and reward dependence (Cloninger tridimensional personality questionnaire), and levels of dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale). SA women had elevated heat pain thresholds (45.7±2.2°C vs. 43.9±3.1°C; P=0.042) and higher pain intensity ratings (on a 0 to 100 scale: 80.0±26.6 vs. 51.2±27.7; P=0.001). In addition, they had lower tolerability to painful tonic stimulation, greater somatization, and larger harm avoidance scores. Regression analyses showed that higher pain intensity ratings in SA women associated with greater tendency for harm avoidance but not with levels of dissociation. Women with a history of severe SA seem to have a paradoxical pattern of experimental pain response, characterized by both higher pain thresholds and increased pain intensity ratings. This pattern is associated with the personality trait of harm avoidance. Models that might account for these findings are discussed.

  12. Pain-related emotions modulate experimental pain perception and autonomic responses.

    PubMed

    Rainville, Pierre; Bao, Quoc Viet Huynh; Chrétien, Pablo

    2005-12-05

    The effect of emotions on pain perception is generally recognized but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, emotions related to pain were induced in healthy volunteers using hypnosis, during 1-min immersions of the hand in painfully hot water. In Experiment 1, hypnotic suggestions were designed to induce various positive or negative emotions. Compared to a control condition with hypnotic-relaxation, negative emotions produced robust increases in pain. In Experiment 2, induction of pain-related anger and sadness were found to increase pain. Pain increases were associated with increases in self-rated desire for relief and decreases in expectation of relief, and with increases in arousal, negative affective valence and decreases in perceived control. In Experiment 3, hypnotic suggestions specifically designed to increase and decrease the desire for relief produced increases and decreases in pain, respectively. In all three experiments, emotion-induced changes in pain were most consistently found on ratings of pain unpleasantness compared to pain intensity. Changes in pain-evoked cardiac responses (R-R interval decrease), measured in experiments 2 and 3, were consistent with changes in pain unpleasantness. Correlation and multiple regression analyses suggest that negative emotions and desire for relief influence primarily pain affect and that pain-evoked autonomic responses are strongly associated with pain affect. These results confirm the hypothesized influence of the desire for relief on pain perception, and particularly on pain affect, and support the functional relation between pain affect and autonomic nociceptive responses. This study provides further experimental confirmation that pain-related emotions influence pain perception and pain-related physiological responses.

  13. The relationship between selective sleep deprivation, nocturnal jaw-muscle activity and pain in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Arima, T; Svensson, P; Rasmussen, C; Nielsen, K D; Drewes, A M; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2001-02-01

    The relationship between nocturnal jaw-muscle activity and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of selective slow wave sleep (SWS = non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) stage 3 + 4) deprivation on jaw-muscle activity using a new automatic system. Ten healthy men without signs of symptoms of TMD participated. The subjects slept in the laboratory for six continuous nights including one adjustment night, one baseline night, three nights with experimental sleep deprivation and one recovery night. Polysomnographic recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) were obtained for recognition of sleep stages and masseter muscle activity. During the three experimental nights, computer-controlled sound stimulation (60--90 dB(A), 1000 Hz) were given as long as the subjects were in SWS. Maximum voluntary occlusal force (MVOF), pain pressure threshold (PPT) and visual analogue scales (VAS) were used to assess the state of the masseter muscles every morning and evening during the study period. The results showed that the time spent in SWS was significantly decreased during the first sleep deprivation night, but there were no significant effects on nocturnal EMG activity (i.e. the numbers of bruxism episodes per hour of sleep, bruxism bursts per episodes bruxism bursts per hour of sleep), MVOF, VAS or PPT. Furthermore, the automatic system only deprived the SWS in five subjects for the following two nights although the sound stimulation was given at the maximum intensity. These results suggest that deprivation of SWS may not interact immediately with nocturnal jaw-muscle activity and jaw-muscle pain.

  14. Effects of strength and endurance training of superficial and deep neck muscles on muscle activities and pain levels of females with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Borisut, Sudarat; Vongsirinavarat, Mantana; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Sakulsriprasert, Prasert

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] To compare muscle activities and pain levels of females with chronic neck pain receiving different exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred females with chronic neck pain participated in this study. They were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n = 25) on the basis of the exercises performed as follows: strength-endurance exercise, craniocervical flexion exercise, combination of strength-endurance and craniocervical flexion exercise and control groups. Pain, disability levels and changes in the muscle activities of the cervical erector spinae (CE), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), anterior scalenes (AS) and upper trapezius (UT) muscles were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] After 12 weeks of exercise intervention, all three exercise groups showed improvements in pain and disability. The muscle activities during the typing task were significantly different from the control group in all three exercise groups for all muscles except those of the extensor muscles in the craniocervical flexion exercise group. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that exercises for the cervical muscles improve pain and disability. The exercise programs reduced the activities of almost all cervical muscles.

  15. Meta-analysis on brain representation of experimental dental pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-S; Niddam, D M; Hsu, M-L

    2014-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used for investigating the brain representation associated with dental pain evoked by pulpal electrical stimulation. However, because of the heterogeneity of experimental designs and the small sample size of individual studies, the common brain representation regarding dental pain has remained elusive. We used imaging meta-analysis to investigate six dental pain-related fMRI studies (n = 87) and tested 3 hypotheses: (1) Dental pain is associated with the 'core' pain-related network; (2) pain-related brain activation is somatotopically organized in the somatosensory cortex; and (3) dental pain is associated with the cognitive-affective network related to pain. Qualitative and quantitative meta-analyses revealed: (1) common activation of the core pain-related network, including the somatosensory cortex, the insula, and the cingulate cortex; (2) inconsistency in somatotopically organized activation of the primary somatosensory cortex; and (3) common activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, suggesting a role of re-appraisal and coping in the experience of dental pain. In conclusion, fMRI combined with pulpal stimulation can effectively evoke activity in the pain-related network. The dental pain-related brain representation disclosed the mechanisms of how sensory and cognitive-affective factors shape dental pain, which will help in the development of more effective customized methods for central pain control.

  16. Range of Motion as a Predictor of Clinical Shoulder Pain During Recovery From Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A.; Parr, Jeffrey J.; Borsa, Paul A.; George, Steven Z.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Athletic trainers use clinical pain and range of motion (ROM) to gauge recovery after musculoskeletal injury. Limited evidence to date suggests which shoulder ROM measures can predict symptomatic relief and functional recovery after delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Objective: To determine whether shoulder passive internal rotation, passive external rotation, active abduction, and active flexion and evoked pain with abduction are associated with resting pain experienced after exercise-induced DOMS. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Controlled research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 110 healthy, right-hand–dominant participants (44 men: age = 25.39 ± 7.00 years, height = 178.93 ± 7.01 cm, weight = 78.59 ± 14.04 kg; 66 women: age = 22.98 ± 6.11 years, height = 164.64 ± 6.94 cm, weight = 61.86 ± 11.67 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed an exercise-induced DOMS protocol for the external rotators of the dominant shoulder to replicate muscle injury. Main Outcome Measure(s): Current resting pain was assessed daily for 96 hours using the Brief Pain Inventory. We evaluated functional recovery with measures of ROM in abduction, internal rotation, external rotation, and flexion. Evoked pain with active abduction was reported, and the pain rating served as the dependent variable in the regression model. Results: Impairment measures explained resting pain at 48 (R2 = 0.392) and 96 hours (R2 = 0.164). Abduction and internal-rotation ROM and evoked pain with abduction predicted resting pain at 48 hours (P < .001). At 96 hours, evoked pain with abduction of the injured arm (P < .001) was the significant contributor to resting pain. Conclusions: These models suggest that resting pain after experimentally induced DOMS occurs at 48 hours and is associated with specific ranges of motion and evoked pain with abduction. PMID:25658817

  17. Mechanistic experimental pain assessment in computer users with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-You; Vangsgaard, Steffen; Omland, Øyvind; Madeleine, Pascal; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-12-06

    Musculoskeletal pain from the upper extremity and shoulder region is commonly reported by computer users. However, the functional status of central pain mechanisms, i.e., central sensitization and conditioned pain modulation (CPM), has not been investigated in this population. The aim was to evaluate sensitization and CPM in computer users with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) mapping in the neck-shoulder (15 points) and the elbow (12 points) was assessed together with PPT measurement at mid-point in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle among 47 computer users with chronic pain in the upper extremity and/or neck-shoulder pain (pain group) and 17 pain-free computer users (control group). Induced pain intensities and profiles over time were recorded using a 0-10 cm electronic visual analogue scale (VAS) in response to different levels of pressure stimuli on the forearm with a new technique of dynamic pressure algometry. The efficiency of CPM was assessed using cuff-induced pain as conditioning pain stimulus and PPT at TA as test stimulus. The demographics, job seniority and number of working hours/week using a computer were similar between groups. The PPTs measured at all 15 points in the neck-shoulder region were not significantly different between groups. There were no significant differences between groups neither in PPTs nor pain intensity induced by dynamic pressure algometry. No significant difference in PPT was observed in TA between groups. During CPM, a significant increase in PPT at TA was observed in both groups (P < 0.05) without significant differences between groups. For the chronic pain group, higher clinical pain intensity, lower PPT values from the neck-shoulder and higher pain intensity evoked by the roller were all correlated with less efficient descending pain modulation (P < 0.05). This suggests that the excitability of the central pain system is normal in a large group of computer users with low pain intensity

  18. Effect of exhalation exercise on trunk muscle activity and oswestry disability index of patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of exhalation exercises on trunk muscle activity and Oswestry Disability Index by inducing trunk muscle activity through increasing intra-abdominal pressure and activating muscles, contributing to spinal stability. [Subjects and Methods] This intervention program included 20 male patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 10 subjects each were randomly assigned to an exhalation exercise group as the experimental group and a spinal stabilization exercise group as the control group. [Results] There were significant differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles as well as in the Oswestry Disability Index within the experimental group. There were meaningful differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles and in the Oswestry Disability Index within the control group. In addition, there was a meaningful intergroup difference in transverse abdominis muscle activity alone and in the Oswestry Disability Index. [Conclusion] The breathing exercise effectively increased muscle activity by training gross and fine motor muscles in the trunk. Moreover, it was verified as a very important element for strengthening body stability because it both released and prevented low back pain. PMID:27390406

  19. Role of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in facial pain: occlusion, muscle and TMJ pain.

    PubMed

    Rauhala, K; Oikarinen, K S; Raustia, A M

    1999-10-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) which comprise myogenic and arthralgic components have been reported to predispose subjects to headache and facial pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these components in patients with facial pain and to investigate the influence of treatment of TMD on pain of these patients. The subject group consisted of 25 patients suffering from facial pain. The clinical stomatognathic examination was performed before conservative treatment of TMD, and one-two weeks, three months and one year after treatment. The severity of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (AI) and clinical dysfunction (DI) indices of Helkimo. The intensity of pain was evaluated on a numerical rating scale (NRS). According to clinical findings the patients were classified to following diagnostic subgroups: TMD myo (mainly myogenic), TMD arthro (mainly arthrogenous) and TMD comb (both myogenic and arthrogenous components involved). Fifteen patients were classified in the TMD myo group, nine in the TMD comb group and one in the TMD arthro group. The DI index decreased significantly one-two weeks after treatment and remained at this level at three month and one year follow-up examinations. At the first examination the TMD myo group had the highest level of NRS index, which decreased significantly during the time of follow-up, while no significant changes were found in other groups. Bruxism reported by the patient had a positive correlation with the amount of painful muscles on the right side at first examination. The results show that facial pain combined with TMD may be mostly of myogenic origin, and myogenic pain seems to have most favorable response to conservative treatment of TMD.

  20. The effect of nonfunctional tooth contact on sensory and pain perception in patients with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, Ichiro; Oi, Kumiko; De Laat, Antoon

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of nonfunctional tooth contact on sensory threshold (tactile detection threshold: TDT) and pain thresholds (filament-prick pain detection threshold: FPT; pressure pain threshold: PPT) in the orofacial region of patients with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. The study was performed on 36 subjects: 20 normal subjects and 16 patients. Using a stair-case method, TDT and FPT were measured by Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, on the cheek skin (CS) overlying the masseter muscles (MM) and on the skin overlying the palm side of the thenar skin (TS). PPT was measured at the central part of the MM using a pressure algometer. Each parameter was measured before and after keeping light tooth contact for 5 min (session 1) and keeping the jaw relaxed for 5 min (session 2) as a control. There were significant effects of experimental condition (before-after 5 min) on the TDT and FPT at several sites: after 5 min, TDT was higher in all measurement sites except the left CS of the patients in session 2. As for the FPT, the reactions between CS and TS were quite opposite in both sessions: after 5 min, the FPT at the CS decreased and/or remained, but the FPT at the TS increased and/or remained. Significant session effects (session 1-session 2) were only found on the FPT at the CS in patients. Sensitivity to FPT was more susceptible to tooth contact condition, especially in the patients. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Associations between psychological variables and pain in experimental pain models. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M S; Horjales-Araujo, E; Dahl, J B

    2015-10-01

    The association between pain and psychological characteristics has been widely debated. Thus, it remains unclear whether an individual's psychological profile influences a particular pain experience, or if previous pain experience contributes to a certain psychological profile. Translational studies performed in healthy volunteers may provide knowledge concerning psychological factors in healthy individuals as well as basic pain physiology. The aim of this review was to investigate whether psychological vulnerability or specific psychological variables in healthy volunteers are predictive of the level of pain following experimental pain models. A systematic search on the databases, PubMed, Embase, Cochcrane library, and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed during September 2014. All trials investigating the association between psychological variables and experimental pain in healthy volunteers were considered for inclusion. Twenty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 2637 healthy volunteers. The included trials investigated a total of 45 different psychological tests and 27 different types of pain models. The retrieved trials did not present a sufficiently homogenous group to perform meta-analysis. The collected results were diverse. A total of 16 trials suggested that psychological factors may predict the level of pain, seven studies found divergent results, and six studies found no significant association between psychological variables and experimental pain. Psychological factors may have predictive value when investigating experimental pain. However, due to substantial heterogeneity and methodological shortcomings of the published literature, firm conclusions are not possible. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Spontaneous Chronic Pain After Experimental Thoracotomy Revealed by Conditioned Place Preference: Morphine Differentiates Tactile Evoked Pain From Spontaneous Pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-09-01

    Chronic pain after surgery limits social activity, interferes with work, and causes emotional suffering. A major component of such pain is reported as resting or spontaneous pain with no apparent external stimulus. Although experimental animal models can simulate the stimulus-evoked chronic pain that occurs after surgery, there have been no studies of spontaneous chronic pain in such models. Here the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to reveal resting pain after experimental thoracotomy. Male Sprague Dawley rats received a thoracotomy with 1-hour rib retraction, resulting in evoked tactile hypersensitivity, previously shown to last for at least 9 weeks. Intraperitoneal injections of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) or gabapentin (40 mg/kg) gave equivalent 2- to 3-hour-long relief of tactile hypersensitivity when tested 12 to 14 days postoperatively. In separate experiments, single trial CPP was conducted 1 week before thoracotomy and then 12 days (gabapentin) or 14 days (morphine) after surgery, followed the next day by 1 conditioning session with morphine or gabapentin, both versus saline. The gabapentin-conditioned but not the morphine-conditioned rats showed a significant preference for the analgesia-paired chamber, despite the equivalent effect of the 2 agents in relieving tactile allodynia. These results show that experimental thoracotomy in rats causes spontaneous pain and that some analgesics, such as morphine, that reduce evoked pain do not also relieve resting pain, suggesting that pathophysiological mechanisms differ between these 2 aspects of long-term postoperative pain. Perspective: Spontaneous pain, a hallmark of chronic postoperative pain, is demonstrated here in a rat model of experimental postthoracotomy pain, further validating the use of this model for the development of analgesics to treat such symptoms. Although stimulus-evoked pain was sensitive to systemic morphine, spontaneous pain was not, suggesting different mechanistic

  3. Increased levels of intramuscular cytokines in patients with jaw muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Louca Jounger, S; Christidis, N; Svensson, P; List, T; Ernberg, M

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cytokine levels in the masseter muscle, their response to experimental tooth-clenching and their relation to pain, fatigue and psychological distress in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) myalgia. Forty women, 20 with TMD myalgia (Diagnostic Criteria for TMD) and 20 age-matched healthy controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was performed to sample masseter muscle cytokines. After 140 min (baseline), a 20-minute tooth-clenching task was performed (50% of maximal voluntary contraction force). Pain (Numeric rating scale 0-10) and fatigue (Borg's Ratings of Perceived Exertion 6-20) were assessed throughout microdialysis, while pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed before and after microdialysis. Perceived stress (PSS-10) and Trait Anxiety (STAI) were assessed before microdialysis. The levels of IL-6, IL-7, IL-8 and IL-13 were higher in patients than controls (Mann Whitney U-test; P's < 0.05) during the entire microdialysis. IL-6, IL-8 and IL-13 changed during microdialysis in both groups (Friedman; P's < 0.05), while IL-1β, IL-7 and GM-CSF changed only in patients (P's < 0.01). IL-6 and IL-8 increased in response to tooth-clenching in both groups (Wilcoxon test; P's < 0.05), while IL-7, IL-13 and TNF increased only in patients (P's < 0.05). Patients had higher pain and fatigue than controls before and after tooth-clenching (P < 0.001), and lower PPTs before and after microdialysis (P < 0.05). There were no correlations between cytokine levels, pain or fatigue. Also, there were no differences in stress or anxiety levels between groups. In conclusion, the masseter levels of IL-6, IL-7, IL-8 and IL-13 were elevated in patients with TMD myalgia and increased in response to tooth-clenching. Tooth-clenching increased jaw muscle pain and fatigue, but without correlations to cytokine levels. This implies that subclinical muscle inflammation may be involved in TMD myalgia

  4. Amantadine sulfate reduces experimental sensitization and pain in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kleinböhl, Dieter; Görtelmeyer, Roman; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Hölzl, Rupert

    2006-03-01

    We investigated if established psychophysical measures of enhanced experimental sensitization in chronic musculoskeletal pain can be reduced by adjuvant treatment with a N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, amantadine sulfate, and whether a reduction in sensitization might be accompanied by a concurrent improvement in clinical pain. Sensitization was evaluated by an experimental tonic heat model of short-term sensitization with concurrent subjective and behavioral psychophysical scaling. Twenty-six patients with chronic back pain were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and received daily dosages of either placebo or 100 mg of amantadine sulfate during a 1-wk treatment. Participants completed quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds and experimental sensitization before and after treatment and clinical pain ratings before, during, and after treatment. Experimental sensitization and clinical pain were reduced in patients receiving verum. Initially, experimental sensitization was enhanced in patients, with early sensitization at nonpainful intensities of contact heat and enhanced sensitization at painful intensities, as shown previously. After 1 wk of treatment, experimental sensitization was reduced with amantadine sulfate but not with placebo. We conclude that adjuvant chronic pain treatment with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists might be beneficial for chronic pain if enhanced sensitization is involved and that the quantitative sensory test of temporal summation may be used to verify this.

  5. Heritability of Pain Catastrophizing and Associations with Experimental Pain Outcomes: A Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Zina; Strachan, Eric; Sullivan, Michael; Vervoort, Tine; Avery, Ally R.; Afari, Niloofar

    2014-01-01

    The current study employed a twin paradigm to examine the genetic and environmental contributions to pain catastrophizing as well as the observed association between pain catastrophizing and cold pressor task (CPT) outcomes. Male and female monozygotic (n=206) and dizygotic twins (n=194) from the University of Washington Twin Registry completed a measure of pain catastrophizing and performed a CPT challenge. As expected, pain catastrophizing emerged as a significant predictor of several CPT outcomes, including cold pressor immersion tolerance, pain tolerance, and delayed pain rating. The heritability estimate for pain catastrophizing was found to be 37% with the remaining 63% of variance attributable to unique environmental influence. Additionally, the observed associations between pain catastrophizing and CPT outcomes were not found attributable to shared genetics or environmental exposure, suggesting a direct relationship between catastrophizing and experimental pain outcomes. This study is the first to examine the heritability of pain catastrophizing and potential processes by which pain catastrophizing is related to experimental pain response. PMID:25599234

  6. [Analgesic and muscle tonus normalizing effect of flupirtine retard in chronic back pain. Results of a standardized therapeutic evaluation applying objective methods for measuring pain pressure threshold, pain pressure tolerance and muscle tension].

    PubMed

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Uberall, M A

    2008-01-17

    Chronic back pain is mainly caused by painful tension in the back muscles. Thus, analgesics with muscle tone decreasing effects that apparently normalize increased muscle tonus through specific modes of action without disturbing normal muscular movement are an important therapeutic option. Flupirtine retard (Katadolon S long) has provided such an option since 2006. To impartially evaluate the muscle tonus normalizing effects of flupirtine retard by applying specific, objective test methods in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain under routine practice conditions. Prospective standardized evaluation of a treatment with flupirtine retard in 30 patients with continuous chronic, therapy refractory back pain. Measurement of general pain intensity, pain pressure threshold and pain pressure tolerance for trigger-point related pain and muscle tension in the affected back muscles before and during flupirtine retard treatment were performed in a standardized manner. In comparison to the reproducible, constant initial values, the two-week treatment with flupirtine retard led to a significant improvement in all measured muscle-specific indicators: pain pressure threshold (+48%), pain pressure tolerance (+27%) and depth of penetration in the muscle (+18%) (all values p < 0.001). These were also correlated with a clinically observable and statistically significant pain relief from an initial level of 7.0 +/- 1.3 to 3.0 +/- 1.4. Flupirtine retard was shown to be a useful, effective and very tolerable therapeutic option for patients with chronic back pain. The improvement of muscle disturbances which are responsible for the pain in addition to pain relief was shown firstly by objective measure methods.

  7. Study on contraction and relaxation of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles: Comparison with dystrophic muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takamori, M.; Tsujihata, M.; Mori, M.; Hazama, R.; Ide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The contraction-relaxation mechanism of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles of the rabbit is examined. Results are compared with those of human dystrophic muscles, in order to elucidate the role and extent of the neurotrophic factor, and the role played by the intrinsic activity of muscle in connection with pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this disease.

  8. Can Fear, Pain, and Muscle Tension Discriminate Vaginismus from Dyspareunia/Provoked Vestibulodynia? Implications for the New DSM-5 Diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lahaie, Marie-Andrée; Amsel, Rhonda; Khalifé, Samir; Boyer, Stephanie; Faaborg-Andersen, Marie; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2015-08-01

    Fear has been suggested as the crucial diagnostic variable that may distinguish vaginismus from dyspareunia. Unfortunately, this has not been systematically investigated. The primary purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether fear as evaluated by subjective, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures could differentiate women with vaginismus from those with dyspareunia/provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) and controls. A second aim was to re-examine whether genital pain and pelvic floor muscle tension differed between vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD sufferers. Fifty women with vaginismus, 50 women with dyspareunia/PVD, and 43 controls participated in an experimental session comprising a structured interview, pain sensitivity testing, a filmed gynecological examination, and several self-report measures. Results demonstrated that fear and vaginal muscle tension were significantly greater in the vaginismus group as compared to the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Moreover, behavioral measures of fear and vaginal muscle tension were found to discriminate the vaginismus group from the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Genital pain did not differ significantly between the vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD groups; however, genital pain was found to discriminate both clinical groups from controls. Despite significant statistical differences on fear and vaginal muscle tension variables between women suffering from vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD, a large overlap was observed between these conditions. These findings may explain the great difficulty health professionals experience in attempting to reliably differentiate vaginismus from dyspareunia/PVD. The implications of these data for the new DSM-5 diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder are discussed.

  9. Ambulatory electromyogram activity in the upper trapezius region: patients with muscle pain vs. pain-free control subjects.

    PubMed

    Carlson, C R; Wynn, K T; Edwards, J; Okeson, J P; Nitz, A J; Workman, D E; Cassisi, J

    1996-03-01

    This study compared the ambulatory electromyogram activity of persons reporting pain in the shoulder and cervical regions with an equal group of persons not reporting such pain. Ambulatory electromyogram data were obtained over 3-day periods. In addition, all participants completed several standard psychological questionnaires. The results were analyzed with inferential statistics to determine whether subjects reporting significant pain in the shoulder and cervical regions had greater ambulatory electromyogram activity than an equal number of subjects not reporting pain. Considerable controversy exists regarding the role of muscle activity in the etiology and maintenance of muscle pain disorders. Given the availability of ambulatory recording devices that can provide a detailed record of muscle activity over an extended period of time, the present research was conducted to determine whether persons reporting shoulder and cervical pain could be differentiated from a group of normal subjects. All subjects (N = 20) completed a battery of tests with standardized psychometric instruments and then were fitted with ambulatory electromyogram monitors to record electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius region of the dominant side; the time, duration, and amplitude of electromyogram activity greater than 2 microV was recorded. The monitors were worn during normal working hours (mean, 6.2 hours per day) over 3 consecutive days. In addition to wearing the monitors, all subjects completed hourly self-ratings of perceived muscle tension during the recording periods. As expected, subjects with muscle pain reported significantly more pain (mean, 4.9) than did the normal control subjects (mean, 0.9), t(15) = 3.29, P < 0.01. However, patients with muscle pain did not have greater average electromyogram activity (mean, 6.4 microV) over the 3-day period as compared to the normal controls (mean, 7.1 microV), t(18) = -0.25, P < 0.80. Self-monitoring of perceived muscle tension

  10. The role of neuroplasticity in experimental neck pain: a study of potential mechanisms impeding clinical outcomes of training.

    PubMed

    Rittig-Rasmussen, Bjarne; Kasch, Helge; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2014-08-01

    Training is a mainstay in the clinical management of neck pain, yet, effects of various training protocols are only small to moderate and improvements are required. Previous investigations of the nervous system indicate a correlation between neuroplastic adaptation to training and functional recovery. The interaction between neck pain and training thus needs further exploration. This was a randomized experimental study of the effects of experimental neck pain and training on corticomotor excitability. Healthy volunteers were randomized to training and experimental neck pain, training and no pain, and pain and no training. Primary endpoints were corticomotor excitability assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measured as changes in amplitudes and latencies of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), recorded at baseline and after 30 min, 1 h, and 1 week. Additionally, correlations between changes in MEPs and motor learning, effects of pain and concomitant neck training on pain, muscle strength, and fatigue were investigated. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA, paired t tests, Grubbs' outlier test and correlation coefficients. Results indicated that neck pain and training significantly enhanced the inhibition of the amplitudes of the MEPs for 1 week. The results indicate that moderate neck pain and training induce long-lasting inhibition of the corticomotor pathways. This inhibition may limit the outcome of neck training in painful conditions in contrast to pain-free training conditions.

  11. Patients with Concomitant Chronic Neck Pain and Myofascial Pain in Masticatory Muscles Have More Widespread Pain and Distal Hyperalgesia than Patients with Only Chronic Neck Pain.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Daniel; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Beltrán-Alacreu, Héctor; La Touche, Roy; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2017-03-01

    Insufficient evidence exists to compare widespread pain (WP), pain sensibility, and psychological factors that occur in patients presenting with chronic neck pain (CNP) or a combination of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and other complaints. The present study compared the pain sensibility and psychological factors of subjects with CNP with those with TMD + CNP. Cross-sectional study. Local community. A nonprobabilistic convenience sample of 86 persons with CNP or TMD was recruited into three groups: CNP, TMD with myofascial pain in masticatory muscles with cocomitant CNP (TMD + CNP), and asymptomatic control groups consisted of 27, 29, and 30 participants, respectively. Participants underwent a clinical examination to evaluate WP with computerized assessment based on the pain drawing, pressure pain thresholds (PPT), and psychological factors, which were evaluated using the pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI). Statistically significant differences were observed between participants with CNP and TMD + CNP for WP (t = -2.80, P  < 0.01, d = -1.06). Post hoc analyses only revealed significant differences between TMD + CNP participants and asymptomatic controls for PPT at extratrigeminal areas. Pearson correlation analyses showed a moderate positive association between symptomatic groups within the WP and STAI ( P  < 0.05) and a moderate negative association between PCS and PPT ( P  < 0.05) at the right tibialis muscle. TMD + CNP participants had more areas of pain and also showed widespread pain hyperalgesia. Both groups of participants had psychological factors positively associated with STAI and WP; further, PCS and the PPT at the extratrigeminal region were negatively associated with each other in both groups, except for the left tibialis in the TMD + CNP group.

  12. Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Thiago R. T.; Oliveira, Bárbara A.; Ocarino, Juliana M.; Holt, Kenneth G.; Fonseca, Sérgio T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1) to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2) to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength. PMID:26039034

  13. Verbally reinforcing pain reports: an experimental test of the operant model of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jolliffe, Christopher D; Nicholas, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    Effective treatments for chronic pain have been based on the operant model for chronic pain, which holds that pain behaviours can be operantly controlled by various reinforcers. Support for the operant model comes primarily from treatment/outcome studies which report significant reductions in pain behaviours in chronic pain patients, but fail to demonstrate the underlying operant thesis that various reinforcers play a significant role in the establishment and maintenance of pain behaviours. In an experimental test of this hypothesis, the pain reports of forty-six healthy undergraduate students were measured over two sets of fifteen trials, in which the pressure from a blood-pressure cuff applied to their arm either remained stable or decreased over time. Half of the subjects received positive verbal reinforcement from the experimenter after each trial if their report of pain intensity exceeded that of the previous trial. Overall, the mean pain reports of reinforced subjects were significantly greater than those of the non-reinforced subjects both when the intensity of the cuff was stable over trials, and when it decreased, as expected. These results provide support for the operant model of chronic pain. The clinical and theoretical implications of these results for the operant model of chronic pain are discussed, and suggestions for future research are made.

  14. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  15. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27313363

  16. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Criado, Laura; de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-12-01

    Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (p<0,05) in both muscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (p<0,05) in EMG activity in the masseter muscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (p<0,05) in sessions two, three, and four. EMG-biofeedback training produces a decrease in EMG activity in both masseter and temporal muscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle.

  17. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Material and Methods Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. Results A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (p<0,05) in both muscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (p<0,05) in EMG activity in the masseter muscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (p<0,05) in sessions two, three, and four. Conclusions EMG-biofeedback training produces a decrease in EMG activity in both masseter and temporal muscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle

  18. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of experimental tooth clenching on pain and intramuscular release of 5-HT and glutamate in patients with myofascial TMD.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas; Ghafouri, Bijar; Gerdle, Björn; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that tooth clenching may be associated with local metabolic changes, and is a risk factor for myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated the effects of experimental tooth clenching on the levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate, as well as on blood flow and pain intensity, in the masseter muscles of M-TMD patients. Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 pain-free controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to assess blood flow. Two hours after the insertion of a microdialysis catheter, participants performed a 20-minute repetitive tooth clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction). Pain intensity was measured throughout. A significant effect of group (P<0.01), but not of time, was observed on 5-HT levels and blood flow. No significant effects of time or group occurred on glutamate, pyruvate, or lactate levels. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity (P<0.05 and <0.001). No significant correlations were identified between: (1) 5-HT, glutamate, and pain intensity; or between (2) pyruvate, lactate, and blood flow. This experimental tooth clenching model increased jaw muscle pain levels in M-TMD patients and evoked low levels of jaw muscle pain in controls. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT than controls and significantly lower blood flow. These 2 factors may facilitate the release of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  20. Flexible Magnets Are Not Effective in Decreasing Pain Perception and Recovery Time After Muscle Microinjury

    PubMed Central

    Borsa, Paul A.; Liggett, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To assess the therapeutic effects of flexible magnets on pain perception, intramuscular swelling, range of motion, and muscular strength in individuals with a muscle microinjury. Design and Setting: This experiment was a single-blind, placebo study using a repeated-measures design. Subjects performed an intense exercise protocol to induce a muscle microinjury. After pretreatment measurements were recorded, subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental (magnet), placebo (imitation magnet), or control (no magnet) group. Posttreatment measurements were repeated at 24, 48, and 72 hours. Subjects: Forty-five healthy subjects participated in the study. Measurements: Subjects were measured repeatedly for pain perception, upper arm girth, range of motion, and static force production. Four separate univariate analyses of variances were used to reveal statistically significant mean (±SD) differences between variables over time. Interaction effects were analyzed using Scheffe post hoc analysis. Results: Analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant (P > .05) mean differences between conditions for any dependent pretreatment and posttreatment measurements. No significant interaction effects were demonstrated between conditions and times. Conclusions: No significant therapeutic effects on pain control and muscular dysfunction were observed in subjects wearing flexible magnets. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558503

  1. Comparison of Contraction Rates of Abdominal Muscles of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients in Different Postures

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Kang Hoon; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the contraction rates of abdominal muscles in relation to the posture of chronic lumbar pain patients and normal subjects. [Subjects] The subjects were 17 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and 17 normal people between the ages of 20 and 59. [Methods] Experimental postures included a supine position, a sitting position, and a standing position. Measurements were taken at rest and during abdominal contraction. The measurement at rest was taken during expiration with comfortable breathing, and the measurement during contraction was taken at maximum expiration of forced expiration. Muscle contraction rates (on contraction and at relaxation) were calculated. [Results] There were significant differences between CLBP patients and normal subjects in the transversus abdominis (TrA) in the standing position. [Conclusion] Changes in contraction rates of the abdominal muscles of normal subjects and CLBP patients were examined in different postures at maximum expiration. It was found that the contraction rate of TrA in CLBP patients in a standing position, is significantly lower than that of normal subjects. PMID:24259882

  2. The role of paraspinal muscle spindles in lumbosacral position sense in individuals with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Brumagne, S; Cordo, P; Lysens, R; Verschueren, S; Swinnen, S

    2000-04-15

    A two-group experimental design with repeated measures on one factor was used. To investigate the role of paraspinal muscle spindles in lumbosacral position sense in individuals with and without low back pain. Proprioceptive deficits have been identified in patients with low back pain. The underlying mechanisms, however, are not well documented. Lumbosacral position sense was determined before, during, and after lumbar paraspinal muscle vibration in 23 young patients with low back pain and in 21 control subjects. Position sense was estimated by calculating the mean absolute error, constant error, and variable error between six criterion and reproduction sacral tilt angles. Repositioning accuracy was significantly lower in the patient group than in healthy individuals (absolute error difference between groups = 2.7 degrees, P < 0.0001). Multifidus muscle vibration induced a significant muscle-lengthening illusion that resulted in an undershooting of the target position in healthy individuals (constant error = -3.1 degrees, P < 0.0001). Conversely, the position sense scores of the patient group did not display an increase in negative directional error but a significant improvement in position sense during muscle vibration (P < 0.05). No significant differences in absolute error were found between the first and last trial in the healthy individuals (P >/= 0.05) and in the patient group (P > 0.05). Patients with low back pain have a less refined position sense than healthy individuals, possibly because of an altered paraspinal muscle spindle afference and central processing of this sensory input. Furthermore, muscle vibration can be an interesting expedient for improving proprioception and enhancing local muscle control.

  3. Voluntary and reflex control of human back muscles during induced pain

    PubMed Central

    Zedka, Milan; Prochazka, Arthur; Knight, Brian; Gillard, Debby; Gauthier, Michel

    1999-01-01

    Back pain is known to change motor patterns of the trunk. The purpose of this study was to examine the motor output of the erector spinae (ES) muscles during pain in the lumbar region. First, their voluntary activation was assessed during flexion and re-extension of the trunk. Second, effects of cutaneous and muscle pain on the ES stretch reflex were measured, since increased stretch reflex gain has been suggested to underlie increased muscle tone in painful muscles. The trunk movement and electromyographical (EMG) signals from the right and left ES during pain were compared with values before pain. Controlled muscle pain was induced by infusion of 5% saline into the right lumbar ES. Cutaneous pain was elicited by mechanical or electrical stimulation of the dorsal lumbar skin. The stretch reflex was evoked by rapidly indenting the right lumbar ES with a servo-motor prodder. The results from the voluntary task show that muscle pain decreased the modulation depth of ES EMG activity. This pattern was associated with a decreased range and velocity of motion of the painful body segment, which would normally serve to avoid further injury. Interestingly, when subjects overcame this guarding tendency and made exactly the same movements during pain as before pain, the EMG modulation depth was still reduced. The results seem to reconcile the controversy of previous studies, in which both hyper- and hypoactivity of back muscles in pain have been reported. In the tapped muscle, the EMG response consisted of two peaks (latency 19.3 ± 2.1 and 44.6 ± 2.5 ms, respectively) followed by a trough. On the contralateral side the first response was a trough (26.2 ± 3.2 ms) while the second (46.4 ± 4.3 ms) was a peak, similar to the second peak on the tapped side. Cutaneous pain had no effect on the short-latency response but significantly increased the second response on the tapped side. Surprisingly, deep muscle pain had no effect on the stretch reflex. A short-latency reciprocal

  4. Analysis of scapular muscle EMG activity in patients with idiopathic neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Bostyn, Emma; Delemarre, Jolien; Lemahieu, Trees; Cagnie, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    It is proposed that altered scapular muscle function can contribute to abnormal loading of the cervical spine. However, it is not clear if patients with idiopathic neck pain show altered activity of the scapular muscles. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature regarding the differences or similarities in scapular muscle activity, measured by electromyography ( = EMG), between patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain compared to pain-free controls. Case-control (neck pain/healthy) studies investigating scapular muscle EMG activity (amplitude, timing and fatigue parameters) were searched in Pubmed and Web of Science. 25 articles were included in the systematic review. During rest and activities below shoulder height, no clear differences in mean Upper Trapezius ( = UT) EMG activity exist between patients with idiopathic neck pain and a healthy control group. During overhead activities, no conclusion for scapular EMG amplitude can be drawn as a large variation of results were reported. Adaptation strategies during overhead tasks are not the same between studies. Only one study investigated timing of the scapular muscles and found a delayed onset and shorter duration of the SA during elevation in patients with idiopathic neck pain. For scapular muscle fatigue, no definite conclusions can be made as a wide variation and conflicting results are reported. Further high quality EMG research on scapular muscles (broader than the UT) is necessary to understand/draw conclusions on how scapular muscles react in the presence of idiopathic neck pain.

  5. Correlation between the MRI changes in the lumbar multifidus muscles and leg pain.

    PubMed

    Kader, D F; Wardlaw, D; Smith, F W

    2000-02-01

    In the assessment of the lumbar spine by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), changes in the paraspinal muscles are frequently overlooked. In this study, our objective was to investigate the relationships between lumbar multifidus (MF) muscle atrophy and low back pain (LBP), leg pain and intevertebral disc degeneration. A retrospective study of 78 patients (aged 17-72) with LBP presenting with back pain with or without associated leg pain was undertaken. Their MR images were visually analysed for signs of lumbar MF muscle atrophy, disc degeneration and nerve root compression. The clinical history in each case was obtained from their case notes and pain drawing charts. MF muscle atrophy was present in 80% of the patients with LBP. The correlation between MF muscle atrophy and leg pain was found to be significant (P < 0.01). However, the relationships between muscle atrophy and radiculopathy symptoms, nerve root compression, herniated nucleus pulposus and number of degenerated discs were statistically not significant. Examination of the paraspinal muscles looking for atrophy of MF muscle should be considered when assessing MR images of lumbar spine. This may explain the referred leg pain in the absence of other MR abnormalities. Copyright 2000 The Royal College of Radiologists.

  6. Affect balance style, experimental pain sensitivity, and pain-related responses

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, Kimberly T.; Kindler, Lindsay L.; Glover, Toni L.; Staud, Roland; Riley, Joseph L.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Affect is neurobiologically based, influences emotions, contributes to temperamental characteristics, and can be evaluated from both a state and trait perspective. Associations between state-related positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and chronic pain have been investigated. However, little is known about the relationship between trait affect patterns and pain-related experiences. Affect balance style (ABS) provides a framework to assess the combined contribution of trait PA and NA. Psychological factors and experimental pain sensitivity are indicated as predictors of chronic pain onset. The current study investigated the relationship between ABS, pain sensitivity, and pain-related measures in healthy adults. Methods Subjects (n=372) completed quantitative sensory testing, pain-related questionnaires, and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). ABS groups were categorized as Healthy (high PA, low NA), Low (low PA, low NA), Depressive (low PA, high NA), and Reactive (high PA, high NA). Z-scores were computed for three experimental pain measures: ischemic, pressure, and heat. Results ABS groups significantly differed on ischemic pain sensitivity and pain-related measures. Specifically, the Healthy group demonstrated lower ischemic pain sensitivity compared to the Reactive group (p=0.02); the Depressive and Reactive groups endorsed higher somatic symptoms compared to the Healthy group (p<0.02); the Low and Depressive groups reported more physical stimuli sensitivity than the Healthy group (p<0.02); and the Reactive group indicated more passive coping strategies then the Low and Healthy groups (p=0.001). Discussion Findings from the study suggest that among healthy adults, trait affect patterns are associated with ischemic experimental pain sensitivity and other pain-related measures. PMID:22367502

  7. Affect balance style, experimental pain sensitivity, and pain-related responses.

    PubMed

    Sibille, Kimberly T; Kindler, Lindsay L; Glover, Toni L; Staud, Roland; Riley, Joseph L; Fillingim, Roger B

    2012-06-01

    Affect is neurobiologically based, influences emotions, contributes to temperamental characteristics, and can be evaluated from both state and trait perspectives. Associations between state-related positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and chronic pain have been investigated. However, little is known about the relationship between trait affect patterns and pain-related experiences. Affect balance style (ABS) provides a framework to assess the combined contribution of trait PA and NA. Psychological factors and experimental pain sensitivity are indicated as predictors of chronic pain onset. The current study investigated the relationship between ABS, pain sensitivity, and pain-related measures in healthy adults. Participants (n=372) completed quantitative sensory testing, pain-related questionnaires, and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. ABS groups were categorized as Healthy (high PA, low NA), Low (low PA, low NA), Depressive (low PA, high NA), and Reactive (high PA, high NA). Z-scores were computed for 3 experimental pain measures: ischemic, pressure, and heat. ABS groups significantly differed on ischemic pain sensitivity and pain-related measures. Specifically, the Healthy group demonstrated lower ischemic pain sensitivity compared with the Reactive group (P=0.02); the Depressive and Reactive groups endorsed higher somatic symptoms compared with the Healthy group (P<0.02); the Low and Depressive groups reported more physical stimuli sensitivity than the Healthy group (P<0.02); and the Reactive group indicated more passive coping strategies then the Low and Healthy groups (P=0.001). Findings from the study suggest that among healthy adults, trait affect patterns are associated with ischemic experimental pain sensitivity and other pain-related measures.

  8. The effect of combined exercise with slings and a flexi-bar on muscle activity and pain in rotator cuff repair patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Woon; Kim, Yong-Nam; Lee, Dong-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of combined exercise with slings and a Flexi-Bar on muscle activity and pain in rotator cuff repair patients. [Subjects and Methods] This research evaluated 20 rotator cuff repair patients divided randomly into groups of 10 as the control group and the experimental group. The experimental group performed combined exercise with slings and a Flexi-Bar. Both the experimental and control groups were treated with a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator and continuous passive motion. Muscle activity was measured with surface electromyography. Pain was measured with the visual analogue scale. The paired t-test was used to compare groups before and after the experiment. The independent t-test was used to assess the differences in the degree of change between the two groups before and after the experiment. [Results] Subjects of both the experimental group and control group showed significant differences in muscle activity and pain. However, as compared with the control group, there was significant differences in the muscle activity and pain in the experimental group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that combined exercise with slings and a Flexi-Bar is effective in improving muscle activity and decreasing pain in rotator cuff repair patients. PMID:27821956

  9. The effects of isometric exercise types on pain and muscle activity in patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Hyun-Seung; Park, Hun-Kyung; Park, Jung-Sub; Park, Hye-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise types on low back pain (LBP) patients. Isometric exercise types were mat exercise and I-Zer exercise. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: LBP control group, LBP mat exercise group, and LBP I-Zer exercise group in 23–25 aged men. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the degree of pain and the muscle activity in LBP patients. Root mean square (RMS), median frequency (MDF), and mean frequency (MNF) were checked by EMG power spectrum analysis on longissimus thoracic (LT), iliocostalis lumborum (IL), mulitifidus (M), and rectus abdominis (RA). LBP mat exercise program and LBP I-Zer exercise program were conducted 5 sets once time, 3 times per week during 6 weeks. The two-way ANOVA with repeated measure was used to check the pain degree and muscle activity. The present results showed that muscle activity in the LBP I-Zer exercise group was increased compared to the LBP mat exercise group and LBP control group (P<0.05). LBP I-Zer exercise group and LBP mat exercise group showed increased mean frequency in LT, IL, M, and RA muscles than the LBP control group. Therefore, LBP patients performed isometric exercise may have positive effect to reduce pain degree and to increase muscle activity. Especially, LBP I-Zer exercise type showed more effectiveness in reducing pain degree and enhancing muscle activity. PMID:26331136

  10. Topographical mapping and mechanical pain sensitivity of myofascial trigger points in the infraspinatus muscle.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-You; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Madeleine, Pascal; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2008-10-01

    To screen for the presence of latent and active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in patients with unilateral shoulder and arm pain and perform topographical mapping of mechanical pain sensitivity bilaterally in the infraspinatus muscles. Nineteen patients with unilateral musculoskeletal shoulder pain participated in the study. The area overlying the infraspinatus on each side was divided into 10 adjacent sub-areas of 1cm(2), corresponding to the area of a pressure algometer probe. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured in each sub-area bilaterally in the infraspinatus muscles. Following PPT measurement, an acupuncture needle was inserted into each sub-area five times in different directions in order to induce local twitch response and/or referred pain. A significantly lower PPT level in the infraspinatus muscle was detected on the painful side compared with the non-painful side (P=0.001). PPT at midfiber region of the infraspinatus muscles was lower than that at other muscle parts (P<0.05). Multiple, but not single, active MTrPs were found in the infraspinatus muscle on the painful side and there were also multiple latent MTrPs bilaterally in the infraspinatus muscles. PPT at active MTrPs was much lower than the latent MTrPs and again lower than the non-MTrPs. There exists bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia in patients with unilateral shoulder pain. Further, the association of multiple active MTrPs with unilateral shoulder pain and the heterogeneity of mechanical pain sensitivity distribution suggest a crucial role of peripheral sensitization in chronic myofascial pain conditions. Additionally, the locations of MTrPs identified with dry needling correspond well to PPT topographical mapping, suggesting that dry needling and PPT topographical mapping are sensitive techniques in the identification of MTrPs.

  11. Muscle pain induced by static contraction in rats is modulated by peripheral inflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diogo Francisco da Silva Dos; Melo Aquino, Bruna de; Jorge, Carolina Ocanha; Azambuja, Graciana de; Schiavuzzo, Jalile Garcia; Krimon, Suzy; Neves, Juliana Dos Santos; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Oliveira-Fusaro, Maria Claudia Gonçalves

    2017-09-01

    Muscle pain is an important health issue and frequently related to static force exertion. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether peripheral inflammatory mechanisms are involved with static contraction-induced muscle pain in rats. To this end, we developed a model of muscle pain induced by static contraction performed by applying electrical pulses through electrodes inserted into muscle. We also evaluated the involvement of neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. A single session of sustained static contraction of gastrocnemius muscle induced acute mechanical muscle hyperalgesia without affecting locomotor activity and with no evidence of structural damage in muscle tissue. Static contraction increased levels of creatine kinase but not lactate dehydrogenase, and induced neutrophil migration. Dexamethasone (glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory agent), DALBK (bradykinin B1 antagonist), Atenolol (β1 adrenoceptor antagonist), ICI 118,551 (β2 adrenoceptor antagonist), indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), and fucoidan (non-specific selectin inhibitor) all reduced static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia; however, the bradykinin B2 antagonist, bradyzide, did not have an effect on static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Furthermore, an increased hyperalgesic response was observed when the selective bradykinin B1 agonist des-Arg(9)-bradykinin was injected into the previously stimulated muscle. Together, these findings demonstrate that static contraction induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia in gastrocnemius muscle of rats is modulated through peripheral inflammatory mechanisms that are dependent on neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. Considering the clinical relevance of muscle pain, we propose the present model of static contraction-induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia as a useful tool for the study of mechanisms underlying static contraction-induced muscle pain. Copyright © 2017 IBRO

  12. Neuromuscular training and muscle strengthening in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a protocol of randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Lima, Bruna; Reis, Amir Curcio dos; Bley, André Serra; Yi, Liu Chiao; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2014-05-16

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common musculoskeletal condition, particularly among women. Patients with PFPS usually experience weakness in the gluteal muscles, as well as pain and impaired motor control during activities of daily living. Strengthening the hip muscles is an effective way of treating this disorder. Neuromuscular training has also been identified as a therapeutic tool, although the benefits of this intervention in patients with PFPS patients remain inconclusive. This is a protocol of randomized controlled trial with a blind assessor. Thirty-four women with a clinical diagnosis of PFPS participated. These participants were allocated into two groups (experimental and control). The experimental group performed twelve sessions to strengthen the knee extensors, hip abductor and lateral rotator muscles in association with neuromuscular training of the trunk and lower extremities. The control group performed the same number of sessions to strengthen the muscles of the hip and knee. The primary outcome was functional capacity (Anterior Knee Pain Scale - AKPS) at 4 weeks. Pain intensity, muscle strength and kinematic changes were also measured during the step down test after four weeks of intervention. Follow up assessments were conducted after three and six months to assess functional capacity and pain. The effects of the treatment (i.e. between-group differences) were calculated using mixed linear models. The present study was initiated on the 1st of April 2013 and is currently in progress. The results of this study may introduce another effective technique of conservative treatment and could guide physical therapists in the clinical decision-making process for women with PFPS. Current Controlled Trials NCT01804608.

  13. Fatty muscle atrophy: prevalence in the hindfoot muscles on MR images of asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Daniel T; Hodler, Juerg; Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Espinosa, Norman; Zanetti, Marco

    2009-10-01

    To determine prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy in plantar foot muscles in asymptomatic volunteers and in patients with foot pain. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB), abductor hallucis (AH), and quadratus plantae (QP) muscles in 80 asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 48 years; range, 23-84 years) and 80 patients with foot pain (mean age, 48 years; range, 20-86 years). Muscles were characterized as normal (grade 0) or as having mild (grade 1) or substantial (grade 2) fatty atrophy by two readers separately. Results of visual grading for both readers were compared by using the Mann-Whitney test. Associations between age and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were assessed by using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Readers 1 and 2 found substantial fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle in four (5%) and five (6%) volunteers, respectively, and in three (4%) and nine (11%) patients, respectively. One reader diagnosed substantial fatty atrophy of the AH muscle in three (4%) volunteers and of the FDB muscle in two (2%) volunteers. Prevalence for the QP muscle varied between 0% and 1%. An association between age and degree of fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle was found for volunteers by both readers and for patients by reader 1 (P < .01). Prevalence of fatty muscle atrophy of the ADM muscle-classically considered to represent entrapment neuropathy-is between 4% and 11% in both asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain, and it increases with age.

  14. The effect of dry needling on pain, pressure pain threshold and disability in patients with a myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle.

    PubMed

    Ziaeifar, Maryam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Karimi, Noureddin; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-04-01

    Dry needling (DN) has been used recently by physical therapists as a therapy of choice for patients with myofascial trigger points (TrP). The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of DN in the treatment of TrPs in the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. A sample of convenience of 33 patients with TrP in the UT muscle participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard (N = 17) or experimental group (N = 16). The treatment protocol for the standard group consisted of trigger point compression technique (TCT) on MTP, while the patients in the experimental group received DN. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds were assessed for both groups before and after the treatment sessions. In addition, the Disability of Arm, Hand, and Shoulder (DASH) was administered. Statistical analysis (paired t-test) revealed a significant improvement in pain, PPT and DASH scores after treatment in the experimental (DN) and standard (TCT) group compared with before treatment (P < 0.05). The ANCOVA revealed significant differences between the DN and TCT groups on the post-measurement VAS score (P = 0.01). There was, however, no significant difference between the two groups on the post-measurement score of the PPT (P = 0.08) and DASH (P = 0.34). DN produces an improvement in pain intensity, PPT and DASH and may be prescribed for subjects with TrP in UT muscles especially when pain relief is the goal of the treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antihyperalgesic Effect of Tetrodotoxin in Rat Models of Persistent Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Levine, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent muscle pain is a common and disabling symptom for which available treatments have limited efficacy. Since tetrodotoxin (TTX) displays a marked antinociceptive effect in models of persistent cutaneous pain, we tested its local antinociceptive effect in rat models of muscle pain induced by inflammation, ergonomic injury and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While local injection of TTX (0.03-1 μg) into the gastrocnemius muscle did not affect mechanical nociceptive threshold in naïve rats, exposure to the inflammogen carrageenan produced a marked muscle mechanical hyperalgesia, which was dose-dependently inhibited by TTX. This antihyperalgesic effect was still significant at 24 hours. TTX also displayed a robust antinociceptive effect on eccentric exercise-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in the gastrocnemius muscle, a model of ergonomic pain. Finally, TTX produced a small but significant inhibition of neuropathic muscle pain induced by systemic administration of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin. These results indicate that TTX-sensitive sodium currents in nociceptors play a central role in diverse states of skeletal muscle nociceptive sensitization, supporting the suggestion that therapeutic interventions based on TTX may prove useful in the treatment of muscle pain. PMID:26548414

  16. Antihyperalgesic effect of tetrodotoxin in rat models of persistent muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, P; Levine, J D

    2015-12-17

    Persistent muscle pain is a common and disabling symptom for which available treatments have limited efficacy. Since tetrodotoxin (TTX) displays a marked antinociceptive effect in models of persistent cutaneous pain, we tested its local antinociceptive effect in rat models of muscle pain induced by inflammation, ergonomic injury and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While local injection of TTX (0.03-1 μg) into the gastrocnemius muscle did not affect the mechanical nociceptive threshold in naïve rats, exposure to the inflammogen carrageenan produced a marked muscle mechanical hyperalgesia, which was dose-dependently inhibited by TTX. This antihyperalgesic effect was still significant at 24h. TTX also displayed a robust antinociceptive effect on eccentric exercise-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in the gastrocnemius muscle, a model of ergonomic pain. Finally, TTX produced a small but significant inhibition of neuropathic muscle pain induced by systemic administration of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin. These results indicate that TTX-sensitive sodium currents in nociceptors play a central role in diverse states of skeletal muscle nociceptive sensitization, supporting the suggestion that therapeutic interventions based on TTX may prove useful in the treatment of muscle pain. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy. PMID:16718803

  18. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P < 0.05). Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing.

  19. Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorder (TMJMD) - type pain and Co-morbid Pains in a National US Sample

    PubMed Central

    Plesh, O; Adams, SH; Gansky, SA

    2013-01-01

    Aims To compare prevalences of self-reported comorbid headaches, neck, back, and joint pains in respondents with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD)-type pain in the 2000–2005 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and to analyze these self-reported pains by gender and age for Non-Hispanic (NH) Whites (Caucasians), Hispanics and NH Blacks (African Americans). Methods Data from the 2000–2005 NHIS included information on gender, age, race, ethnicity, education, different common types of pain (specifically: TMJMD-type, severe headache/migraine, neck, and low back pains), changes in health status; and health care utilization. Estimates and test statistics (i.e. Pearson correlations, regressions and logistic models) were conducted using SAS survey analysis and SUDAAN software that take into account the complex sample design. Results A total of 189,977 people: 52% female and 48% males; 73% NH Whites, 12% Hispanic, 11% NH Blacks and 4% “Other” were included. A total of 4.6% reported TMJMD-type pain and only 0.77% overall reported it without any comorbid headache/migraine, neck, or low back pains; also 59% of the TMJMD-type pain (N = 8,964) reported ≥two comorbid pain. Females reported more comorbid pain than males (odds ratio (OR) = 1.41, p <0.001), Hispanic and NH Blacks reported more than NH Whites (OR = 1.56, p <0.001; OR = 1.38, p <0.001, respectively). In addition, 53% of those with TMJMD-type pain had severe headache/migraines; 54% had neck pain, 64% low back pain and 62% joint pain. Differences in gender, race by age patterns were detected. For females, headache/migraine pain with TMJMD-type pain peaked around age 40 and decreased thereafter regardless of race/ethnicity. Neck pain continued to increase up to about age 60, with higher prevalence for Hispanic women at younger ages, and more pronounced in males, being the highest in the non-Whites. Low back pain was higher in Black and Hispanic females across the age span and higher

  20. Referred pain from trapezius muscle trigger points shares similar characteristics with chronic tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2007-05-01

    Referred pain and pain characteristics evoked from the upper trapezius muscle was investigated in 20 patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) and 20 age- and gender-matched controls. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks in order to confirm the diagnosis and record the pain history. Both upper trapezius muscles were examined for the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in a blinded fashion. The local and referred pain intensities, referred pain pattern, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were recorded. The results show that referred pain was evoked in 85% and 50% on the dominant and non-dominant sides in CTTH patients, much higher than 55% and 25% in controls (P<0.01). Referred pain spread to the posterior-lateral aspect of the neck ipsi-lateral to the stimulated muscle in both patients and controls, with additional referral to the temple in most patients, but none in controls. Nearly half of the CTTH patients (45%) recognized the referred pain as their usual headache sensation, i.e. active TrPs. CTTH patients with active TrPs in the right upper trapezius muscle showed greater headache intensity and frequency, and longer headache duration than those with latent TrPs. CTTH patients with bilateral TrPs reported significantly decreased PPT than those with unilateral TrP (P<0.01). Our results showed that manual exploration of TrPs in the upper trapezius muscle elicited referred pain patterns in both CTTH patients and healthy subjects. In CTTH patients, the evoked referred pain and its sensory characteristics shared similar patterns as their habitual headache pain, consistent with active TrPs. Our results suggest that spatial summation of perceived pain and mechanical pain sensitivity exists in CTTH patients.

  1. Musculoskeletal Sensitization and Sleep: Chronic Muscle Pain Fragments Sleep of Mice without Altering Its Duration

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Musculoskeletal pain in humans is often associated with poor sleep quality. We used a model in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced by injection of acidified saline into muscle to study the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of mice. Design: A one month pre-clinical study was designed to determine the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of C57BL/6J mice. Methods: We instrumented mice with telemeters to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature. We used an established model of musculoskeletal sensitization in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0). The injections were given into the gastrocnemius muscle and spaced five days apart. EEG and body temperature recordings started prior to injections (baseline) and continued for three weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization was induced by the second injection. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed using von Frey filaments at baseline (before any injections) and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the second injection. Results: Mice injected with acidified saline developed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity at the hind paws as measured by von Frey testing and as compared to control mice and baseline data. Sleep during the light period was fragmented in experimental mice injected with acidified saline, and EEG spectra altered. Musculoskeletal sensitization did not alter the duration of time spent in wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal sensitization in this model results in a distinct sleep phenotype in which sleep is fragmented during the light period, but the overall duration of sleep is not changed. This study suggests the consequences of musculoskeletal pain include sleep disruption, an observation that has been made in the clinical literature but has yet to be studied using preclinical models. Citation: Sutton BC

  2. Regional muscle tension and pain ("fibrositis"). Effect of massage on myoglobin in plasma.

    PubMed

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Christiansen, E; Lund, B; Andersen, R B

    1983-01-01

    In thirteen patients, all women, with regional muscle tension and pain ("fibrositis") plasma myoglobin concentration was measured before and after massage. A significant increase was observed in the plasma myoglobin concentration reaching a maximum three hours after the start of massage treatment (median 133 micrograms/l). A positive correlation was found between the degree of muscle tension and the increase in plasma myoglobin concentration. After repeated massage treatment a gradual decline could be demonstrated in the increase of the plasma myoglobin concentration in coincidence with the efficacy of the treatment. Opposed to this only normal levels of myoglobin were found in plasma when muscles without tenderness and pain were treated with massage. The observed increase of myoglobin in plasma after massage indicates a leak of myoglobin from the muscle fibres, which suggests that regional muscle tension and pain is associated with disorders in the muscle fibres.

  3. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J; Newton, Michael J; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Ten healthy, untrained men (21-39 years). Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P < .05). The PPT was lower in the medial region before exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P < .05). The VAS was correlated with the CR-10 scale (r = 0.91, P < .05) but not with the PPT (r = -0.28, P = .45). The way in which muscles are assessed affects the pain level score. This finding suggests that pain level and pain threshold cannot be used interchangeably and that the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii should be included in DOMS assessment using the VAS, CR-10

  4. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes. PMID:26058036

  5. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-10-01

    A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes.

  6. Effect of transdermal opioids in experimentally induced superficial, deep and hyperalgesic pain.

    PubMed

    Andresen, T; Staahl, C; Oksche, A; Mansikka, H; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Drewes, A M

    2011-10-01

    Chronic pain and hyperalgesia can be difficult to treat with classical opioids acting predominately at the µ-opioid receptor. Buprenorphine and its active metabolite are believed to act through µ-, κ- and δ-receptors and may therefore possess different analgesic and anti-hyperalgesic effects compared with pure µ-receptor agonists, for example, fentanyl. Here, we have compared the analgesic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of buprenorphine and fentanyl. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were randomized to treatment with transdermal buprenorphine (20 µg·h(-1), 144 h), fentanyl (25 µg·h(-1), 72 h) or placebo patches in a double-blind, cross-over experimental pain study. The experimental pain tests (phasic pain, sensitization) involved pressure at the tibial bone, cutaneous electrical and thermal stimulation, intramuscular nerve growth factor, UVB light burn injury model and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia. Pain testing was carried out at baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 144 h after application of the drugs. Compared with placebo, buprenorphine, but not fentanyl, significantly attenuated pressure at the tibial bone as well as pressure pain in the primary hyperalgesic area induced by UVB light The two drugs were equipotent and better than placebo against cutaneous thermal pain stimulation), but failed to show significant analgesic effect to cutaneous electrical stimulation, nerve growth factor-induced muscle soreness and to capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia. Buprenorphine, but not fentanyl, showed analgesic effects against experimentally induced, bone-associated pain and primary hyperalgesia compared with placebo. These tissue- and modality-differentiated properties may reflect the variable effects of opioid drugs observed in individual patients. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Effects of Tai Chi on Pain and Muscle Activity in Young Males with Acute Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, YongHo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the effects of tai chi on low back pain in young males. [Subjects and Methods] Forty males in their 20s with low back pain were randomly assigned to two groups. Tai chi was applied to one group, and stretching was applied to the other group. The subjects conducted exercise for one hour, three times per week for four weeks. They performed warm-up exercises for 10 min at the beginning and end of the sessions and conducted the main exercise for 40 minutes. Wireless surface electromyography (sEMG) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were employed to measure muscle activity and pain, respectively. [Results] There were significant differences between the two groups in pain and muscle activity. The tai chi group’s VAS decreased from 3.1 to 2.1, and its muscle activity decreased from 21.5% maximum voluntary isomeric contraction (MVIC) to 16.4% MVIC. The stretching group’s VAS decreased from 3.4 to 2.8, and its muscle activity decreased from 24.1% MVIC to 22.1% MVIC. [Conclusion] Tai chi is more effective for low back pain in males in their 20s than stretching. Tai chi can be considered an effective method to reduce low back pain in males in their 20s. PMID:24926131

  8. Spontaneous and Bite-Evoked Muscle Pain Are Mediated by a Common Nociceptive Pathway With Differential Contribution by TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Lim, Jongseuk; Joseph, John; Wang, Sen; Wei, Feng; Ro, Jin Y; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2017-06-29

    Spontaneous pain and function-associated pain are prevalent symptoms of multiple acute and chronic muscle pathologies. We established mouse models for evaluating spontaneous pain and bite-evoked pain from masseter muscle, and determined the roles of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) and the contribution of TRPV1- or neurokinin 1 (NK1)-dependent nociceptive pathways. Masseter muscle inflammation increased Mouse Grimace Scale scores and face-wiping behavior, which were attenuated by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of TRPV1. Masseter inflammation led to a significant reduction in bite force. Inhibition of TRPV1 only marginally relieved the inflammation-induced reduction of bite force. These results suggest a differential extent of contribution of TRPV1 to the 2 types of muscle pain. However, chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing nociceptors or chemogenetic silencing of TRPV1-lineage nerve terminals in masseter muscle attenuated inflammation-induced changes in Mouse Grimace Scale scores as well as bite force. Furthermore, ablation of neurons expressing NK1 receptor in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis also prevented both types of muscle pain. Our results suggest that TRPV1 differentially contributes to spontaneous pain and bite-evoked muscle pain, but TRPV1-expressing afferents and NK1-expressing second-order neurons commonly mediate both types of muscle pain. Therefore, manipulation of the nociceptive circuit may provide a novel approach for management of acute or chronic craniofacial muscle pain. We report the profound contribution of TRPV1 to spontaneous muscle pain but not to bite-evoked muscle pain. These 2 types of muscle pain are transmitted through a common nociceptive pathway. These results may help to develop new strategies to manage multiple modes of muscle pain simultaneously by manipulating pain circuits. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pain by Association? Experimental Modulation of Human Pain Thresholds Using Classical Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Madden, Victoria J; Bellan, Valeria; Russek, Leslie N; Camfferman, Danny; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-10-01

    A classical conditioning framework is often used for clinical reasoning about pain that persists after tissue healing. However, experimental studies demonstrating classically conditioned pain in humans are lacking. The current study tested whether non-nociceptive somatosensory stimuli can come to modulate pain thresholds after being paired with painful nociceptive stimuli in healthy humans. We used a differential simultaneous conditioning paradigm in which one nonpainful vibrotactile conditioned stimulus (CS(+)) was simultaneously paired with an unconditioned painful laser stimulus, and another vibrotactile stimulus (CS(-)) was paired with a nonpainful laser stimulus. After acquisition, at-pain-threshold laser stimuli were delivered simultaneously with a CS(+) or CS(-) vibrotactile stimulus. The primary outcome was the percentage of at-threshold laser stimuli that were reported as painful. The results were as expected: after conditioning, at-threshold laser trials paired with the CS(+) were reported as painful more often, as more intense, and as more unpleasant than those paired with the CS(-). This study provides new evidence that pain thresholds can be modulated via classical conditioning, even when the stimulus used to test the threshold cannot be anticipated. As such, it lays a critical foundation for further investigations of classical conditioning as a possible driver of persistent pain. This study provides new evidence that human pain thresholds can be influenced by non-nociceptive somatosensory stimuli, via a classical conditioning effect. As such, it lays a critical foundation for further investigations of classical conditioning as a possible driver of persistent pain. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. SPONTANEOUS CHRONIC PAIN AFTER EXPERIMENTAL THORACTOMY REVEALED BY CONDITIONED PLACE PREFERENCE: morphine differentiates tactile evoked pain from spontaneous pain

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Strichartz, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain following surgery limits social activity, interferes with work and causes emotional suffering. A major component of such pain is is reported as “resting” or spontaneous pain with no apparent external stimulus. Although experimental animal models can simulate the stimulus-evoked chronic pain that occurs after surgery, there have been no studies of spontaneous chronic pain in such models. Here the Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) paradigm was used to reveal resting pain after experimental thoracotomy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a thoracotomy with 1 hour rib retraction, resulting in evoked tactile hypersensitivity, previously shown to last for at least 9 weeks. Intraperitoneal injections of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) or gabapentin (40mg/kg) gave equivalent 2-3h long relief of tactile hypersensitivity, when tested 12-14 days post-operative. In separate experiments, single trial CPP was conducted 1 week before thoracotomy and then 12 days (gabapentin) or 14 days (morphine) after surgery, followed the next day by one conditioning sesssion with morphine or gabapentin, both vs saline. The gabapentin-conditioned, but not the morphine-conditioned rats showed a significant preference for the analgesia-paired chamber, despite the two agents’ equivalent effect in relieving tactile allodynia. These results show that experimental thoracotomy in rats causes spontaneous pain, and that some analgesics, such as morphine, that reduce evoked pain do not also relieve resting pain, suggesting that pathophysiological mechanisms differ between these two aspects of long-term post-operative pain. PMID:26116369

  11. Effects of caffeinated chewing gum on muscle pain during submaximal isometric exercise in individuals with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Kempka, Laura; Weatherby, Amy; Greenlee, Brennan; Mansion, Kimberly

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity is important to manage symptom of fibromyalgia (FM); however, individuals with FM typically experience augmented muscle pain during exercise. This study examined the effects of caffeinated chewing gum on exercise-induced muscle pain in individuals with FM. This study was conducted with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Twenty-three patients with FM completed a caffeine condition where they consumed a caffeinated chewing gum that contains 100mg of caffeine, and a placebo condition where they consumed a non-caffeinated chewing gum. They completed isometric handgrip exercise at 25% of their maximal strength for 3 min, and muscle pain rating (MPR) was recorded every 30s during exercise. Clinical pain severity was assessed in each condition using a pain questionnaire. The order of the two conditions was randomly determined. MPR increased during exercise, but caffeinated chewing gum did not attenuate the increase in MPR compared to placebo gum. Clinical pain severity was generally associated with the average MPR and the caffeine effects on MPR, calculated as difference in the average MPR between the two conditions. The results suggest that more symptomatic individuals with FM may experience greater exercise-induced muscle pain, but benefit more from caffeinated chewing gum to reduce exercise-induced muscle pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Peripheral opioid analgesia in experimental human pain models.

    PubMed

    Tegeder, Irmgard; Meier, Silke; Burian, Maria; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lötsch, Jörn

    2003-05-01

    This placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study assessed whether exclusive activation of peripheral opioid receptors results in significant pain reduction. To achieve opioid activity restricted to the periphery, we used a short-term (2 h) low dose infusion of morphine-6-beta-glucuronide (M6G) because M6G does not pass the blood-brain barrier during this time in amounts sufficient to induce CNS effects. The lack of central opioid effects of M6G was confirmed by a lack of change of the pupil size and absence of other opioid-related CNS effects. As a positive control, morphine was infused at a dosage that definitely produced CNS effects. This was evident by a rapid decrease of the pupil size and by other typical opioid-related side effects including nausea, vomiting, itchiness, hiccup and sedation. Three different pain models were employed to evaluate the analgesic effects: (i) cutaneous inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by briefly freezing a small skin area to -30 degrees C ('freeze lesion'); (ii) muscle hyperalgesia induced by a series of concentric and eccentric muscle contractions (DOMS model; delayed onset of muscle soreness); and (iii) pain induced by electrical current (5 Hz sinus stimuli of 0-10 mA). M6G significantly reduced cutaneous hyperalgesia in the 'freeze lesion' model as assessed with von Frey hairs. It also reduced muscle hyperalgesia in the DOMS model. Electrical pain, however, was not affected by M6G. Morphine was significantly more active in the 'freeze lesion' and DOMS model, and also significantly increased the electrical pain threshold and tolerance. Subcutaneous tissue concentrations of M6G and morphine as assessed with microdialysis were about half those of the respective plasma concentrations. The results of the study indicate that M6G has antihyperalgesic effects in inflammatory pain through activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Since this occurs at concentrations that do not cause central opioid effects, M6G might be useful as a

  13. Changes in Transversus Abdominis Muscle Thickness after Lumbo-Pelvic Core Stabilization Training among Chronic Low Back Pain Individuals.

    PubMed

    Leonard, J H; Paungmali, A; Sitilertpisan, P; Pirunsan, U; Uthaikhup, S

    2015-01-01

    Lumbo-pelvic core stabilization training (LPST) is one of the therapeutic exercises common in practice for rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. This study was carried out to examine the therapeutic effects of LPST on the muscle thickness of transversus abdominis (TrA) at rest and during contraction among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. A total of 25 participants (7 males and 18 females) with chronic non-specific low back pain participated in a within-subject, repeated measures, double-blinded, placebo-controlled comparisons trial. The participants received three different types of experimental therapeutic training conditions which includes the lumbo-pelvic core stabilization training (LPST), the placebo treatment with passive cycling (PC) and a controlled intervention with rest (CI). The interventions were carried out by randomization with 48 hours between the sessions. The effectiveness of interventions was studied by measuring the changes in muscle thickness of TrA at rest and during contraction using a real time ultrasonography. Repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated that the LPST provided significant therapeutic benefits as measured by an increase in the muscle thickness of the TrA at rest (p<0.05) and during contraction (p<0.01). The percentage change of the muscle thickness observed during LPST was significantly higher (p<0.01) when compared to the other two experimental training conditions. The findings indicated that the LPST might provide therapeutic benefits by increasing the muscle thickness and function of TrA. Therefore, it is suggested that LPST technique should be considered as part of management program for treatment of low back pain.

  14. Atrophy of the quadriceps muscle in children with a painful hip.

    PubMed

    Robben, S G; Lequin, M H; Meradji, M; Diepstraten, A F; Hop, W C

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the degree of muscle wasting of various components of the quadriceps muscle in children with a painful hip. Between January 1994 and September 1997, 327 consecutive children with a unilateral painful hip and/or limping were evaluated prospectively with ultrasonography. Quadriceps thickness was measured on both sides. Moreover, muscle thickness was measured in 59 control subjects. The patients were divided into eight groups; transient synovitis (n = 134), Perthes' disease (n = 35), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (n = 5), osteomyelitis (n = 4), aspecific synovitis (n = 5), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 3) and miscellaneous (n = 16). In 125 patients, no sonographic and radiological abnormalities were found and during follow-up the symptoms disappeared ('no pathology' group). Ipsilateral muscle wasting was present in all patient groups, whereas the control subjects showed no significant difference in muscle thickness between legs. The degree of muscle wasting was compared between transient synovitis, the 'no pathology' group, Perthes' disease and control subjects. For both quadriceps and vastus intermedius muscles, there was a significant difference between these groups, except between control subjects and the 'no pathology' group. For the rectus femoris muscle, there was a significant difference between these groups, except between transient synovitis and 'no pathology'. Muscle wasting showed a positive correlation with duration of symptoms and pre-existing muscle mass. In conclusion, different diseases show different degrees of muscle wasting, and there are different patterns of muscle wasting of various components of the quadriceps femoris muscle.

  15. The genetic influences on oxycodone response characteristics in human experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anne E; Sato, Hiroe; Nielsen, Lecia M; Staahl, Camilla; Droney, Joanne; Gretton, Sophy; Branford, Ruth; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Riley, Julia; Ross, Joy

    2015-08-01

    Human experimental pain studies are of value to study basic pain mechanisms under controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variation across selected mu-, kappa- and delta-opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1and OPRD1, respectively) influenced analgesic response to oxycodone in healthy volunteers. Experimental multimodal, multitissue pain data from previously published studies carried out in Caucasian volunteers were used. Data on thermal skin pain tolerance threshold (PTT) (n = 37), muscle pressure PTT (n = 31), mechanical visceral PTT (n = 43) and thermal visceral PTT (n = 41) were included. Genetic associations with pain outcomes were explored. Nineteen opioid receptor genetic polymorphisms were included in this study. Variability in oxycodone response to skin heat was associated with OPRM1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs589046 (P < 0.0001) and rs563649 (P < 0.0001). Variability in oxycodone response to visceral pressure was associated with four OPRM1 SNPs: rs589046 (P = 0.015), rs1799971 (P = 0.045), rs9479757 (P = 0.009) and rs533586 (P = 0.046). OPRM1 SNPs were not associated with oxycodone visceral heat threshold, however, one OPRD1 rs419335 reached significance (P = 0.015). Another OPRD1 SNP rs2234918 (P = 0.041) was associated with muscle pressure. There were no associations with OPRK1 SNPs and oxycodone response for any of the pain modalities. Associations were found between analgesic effects of oxycodone and OPRM1 and OPRD1 SNPs; therefore, variation in opioid receptor genes may partly explain responder characteristics to oxycodone.

  16. The reliability of assessing sternocleidomastoid muscle length and strength in adults with and without mild neck pain.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Michael T; Herren, Jessica; Kilian, Anne; Smith, Steven; Mahmutovic, Fatima; Dolles, Courtney

    2017-04-01

    The sternocleidomastoid (SCM) is an important cervical spine muscle. Weakness of the SCM muscle has been implicated with cervical problems. No studies have examined the reliability of assessing the SCM muscle length or strength. Also no studies exist that have looked to see if imbalances in SCM muscle length or strength exists between the left and right sides in those with and without neck pain. To determine the reliability of assessing the SCM muscle for length and strength and to see if SCM length could predict SCM strength in those with and without neck pain. Cross-sectional study. Fifty-one subjects with and without mild neck pain. Intratester reliability was assessed for SCM muscle length and SCM muscle strength. Differences in SCM length and strength were examined in those with and without neck pain. Intratester reliability was shown to be excellent (ICC (2,2) > 0.90) for the left and right SCM when assessing muscle length and muscle strength for those with and without neck pain. No differences were noted when comparing left to right SCM between those with and without neck pain regarding muscle length or muscle strength. Neither regression models were able to predict SCM muscle strength from SCM muscle length. SCM muscle length and SCM strength can be reliably assessed using a bubble goniometer and HHD. No differences were found when comparing left to right SCM muscle length or strength in those with or without mild neck pain.

  17. Decreased pain sensitivity among people with schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of experimental pain induction studies.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Brendon; Thompson, Trevor; Acaster, Sarah; Vancampfort, Davy; Gaughran, Fiona; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-11-01

    Patients with schizophrenia report reduced pain sensitivity in clinical studies, but experimental studies are required to establish pain sensitivity as a potential endophenotype. We conducted a systematic review of electronic databases from database inception until April 15, 2015, including experimental studies investigating pain among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder vs healthy controls. A random-effect meta-analysis yielding Hedges' g ±95% confidence intervals (CIs) as the effect size (ES) measure was conducted. Primary outcome was a pooled composite of pain threshold and pain tolerance; secondary outcomes included these parameters individually, plus sensory threshold, physiological pain response, and pain intensity or unpleasantness. Across 17 studies, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 387; age, 30.7 ± 6.9 years; females, 31.9%; illness duration, 7.0 ± 5.7 years) were compared with controls (n = 483; age, 29.5 ± 7.4 years; females, 31.0%). Patients had elevated pain threshold/pain tolerance vs controls (ES = 0.583; 95% CI, 0.212-0.954; P = 0.002; studies = 15). Results were similar in antipsychotic-free individuals (ES = 0.599; 95% CI, 0.291-0.907; P < 0.0001; studies = 8), with trend-level significance in antipsychotic-treated individuals (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, -0.007 to 1.125; P = 0.047; studies = 9). Likewise, patients with schizophrenia had increased pain tolerance (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, 0.235-0.897; P = 0.0001; studies = 6), sensory threshold (ES = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.505-1.727; P < 0.0001; studies = 5), and pain threshold (ES = 0.696; 95% CI, 0.407-0.986; P < 0.001; studies = 9), as well as reduced physiological response to noxious stimuli (ES = 0.456; 95% CI, 0.131-0.783; P = 0.006) and pain intensity/unpleasantness ratings (ES = 0.547; 95% CI, 0.146-0.949; P = 0.008). Findings were similarly significant in antipsychotic-free patients with schizophrenia (analysable parameters = 4) and antipsychotic-treated individuals (analysable

  18. Specific proteins of the trapezius muscle correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity – an explorative multivariate proteomic study of the trapezius muscle in women with chronic widespread pain

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Patrik; Ghafouri, Bijar; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Gerdle, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) including fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) has a high prevalence and is associated with prominent negative consequences. CWP/FMS exhibits morphological and functional alterations in the central nervous system. The importance of peripheral factors for maintaining the central alterations are under debate. In this study, the proteins from biopsies of the trapezius muscle from 18 female CWP/FMS patients and 19 healthy female controls were analyzed. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the trapezius muscles were registered. Twelve proteins representing five different groups of proteins were important regressors of pain intensity in CWP/FMS (R2=0.99; P<0.001). In the regression of PPT in CWP/FMS, it was found that 16 proteins representing six groups of proteins were significant regressors (R2=0.95, P<0.05). Many of the important proteins were stress and inflammation proteins, enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, and proteins associated with muscle damage, myopathies, and muscle recovery. The altered expression of these proteins may reflect both direct and indirect nociceptive/inflammatory processes as well as secondary changes. The relative importance of the identified proteins and central alterations in CWP need to be investigated in future research. Data from this and the previous study concerning the same cohorts give support to the suggestion that peripheral factors are of importance for maintaining pain aspects in CWP/FMS. PMID:27330327

  19. The role of TRPA1 in muscle pain and mechanical hypersensitivity under inflammatory conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Asgar, J; Zhang, Y; Saloman, J L; Wang, S; Chung, M-K; Ro, J Y

    2015-12-03

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) is expressed in muscle afferents and direct activation of these receptors induces acute mechanical hypersensitivity. However, the functional role of TRPA1 under pathological muscle pain conditions and mechanisms by which TRPA1 mediate muscle pain and hyperalgesia are not clearly understood. Two rodent behavioral models validated to assess craniofacial muscle pain conditions were used to study ATP- and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced acute mechanical hypersensitivity and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced persistent mechanical hypersensitivity. The rat grimace scale (RGS) was utilized to assess inflammation-induced spontaneous muscle pain. Behavioral pharmacology experiments were performed to assess the effects of AP18, a selective TRPA1 antagonist under these conditions. TRPA1 expression levels in trigeminal ganglia (TG) were examined before and after CFA treatment in the rat masseter muscle. Pre-treatment of the muscle with AP18 dose-dependently blocked the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity induced by NMDA and α,β-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβmeATP), a specific agonist for NMDA and P2X3 receptor, respectively. CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and spontaneous muscle pain responses were significantly reversed by post-treatment of the muscle with AP18 when CFA effects were most prominent. CFA-induced myositis was accompanied by significant up-regulation of TRPA1 expression in TG. Our findings showed that TRPA1 in muscle afferents plays an important role in the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity and in the maintenance of persistent muscle pain and hypersensitivity. Our data suggested that TRPA1 may serve as a downstream target of pro-nociceptive ion channels, such as P2X3 and NMDA receptors in masseter afferents, and that increased TRPA1 expression under inflammatory conditions may contribute to the maintenance of persistent muscle pain

  20. Size and symmetry of trunk muscles in ballet dancers with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gildea, Jan E; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    Cross-sectional, observational study. To investigate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of trunk muscles in professional ballet dancers with and without low back pain (LBP). LBP is the most prevalent chronic injury in classical ballet dancers. Research on nondancers has found changes in trunk muscle size and symmetry to be associated with LBP. There are no studies that examine these changes in ballet dancers. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 14 male and 17 female dancers. The CSAs of 4 muscles (multifidus, lumbar erector spinae, psoas, and quadratus lumborum) were measured and compared among 3 groups of dancers: those without LBP or hip pain (n = 8), those with LBP only (n = 13), and those with both hip-region pain and LBP (n = 10). Dancers with no pain had larger multifidus muscles compared to those with LBP at L3-5 (P<.024) and those with both hip-region pain and LBP at L3 and L4 on the right side (P<.027). Multifidus CSA was larger on the left side at L4 and L5 in dancers with hip-region pain and LBP compared to those with LBP only (P<.033). Changes in CSA were not related to the side of pain (all, P>.05). The CSAs of the other muscles did not differ between groups. The psoas (P<.0001) and quadratus lumborum (P<.01) muscles were larger in male dancers compared to female dancers. There was a positive correlation between the size of the psoas muscles and the number of years of professional dancing (P = .03). In classical ballet dancers, LBP and hip-region pain and LBP are associated with a smaller CSA of the multifidus but not the erector spinae, psoas, or quadratus lumborum muscles.

  1. Masticatory muscle pain and progressive mouth opening limitation caused by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pang, Kang Mi; Park, Ji Woon

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a case of masticatory muscle pain and progressive limited mouth opening secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), popularly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The symptoms were first mistaken as those of temporomandibular disorders, before fatty degeneration of all masticatory muscles were discovered on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ALS should be considered in the differential diagnosis process when the patient presents with longstanding progressive mouth opening limitation associated with pain. MRI could facilitate the diagnostic process.

  2. Impact of Pain Reported During Isometric Quadriceps Muscle Strength Testing in People With Knee Pain: Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Stratford, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Muscle force testing is one of the more common categories of diagnostic tests used in clinical practice. Clinicians have little evidence to guide interpretations of muscle force tests when pain is elicited during testing. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the construct validity of isometric quadriceps muscle strength tests by determining whether the relationship between maximal isometric quadriceps muscle strength and functional status was influenced by pain during isometric testing. Design A cross-sectional design was used. Methods Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were used to identify 1,344 people with unilateral knee pain and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale scores of 1 or higher on the involved side. Measurements of maximal isometric quadriceps strength and ratings of pain during isometric testing were collected. Outcome variables were WOMAC physical function subscale, 20-m walk test, 400-m walk test, and a repeated chair stand test. Multiple regression models were used to determine whether pain during testing modified or confounded the relationship between strength and functional status. Results Pearson r correlations among the isometric quadriceps strength measures and the 4 outcome measures ranged from −.36 (95% confidence interval=−.41, −.31) for repeated chair stands to .36 (95% confidence interval=.31, .41) for the 20-m walk test. In the final analyses, neither effect modification nor confounding was found for the repeated chair stand test, the 20-m walk test, the 400-m walk test, or the WOMAC physical function subscale. Moderate or severe pain during testing was weakly associated with reduced strength, but mild pain was not. Limitations The disease spectrum was skewed toward mild or moderate symptoms, and the pain measurement scale used during muscle force testing was not ideal. Conclusions Given that the spectrum of the sample was skewed toward mild or moderate

  3. MRI assessment of paraspinal muscles in patients with acute and chronic unilateral low back pain.

    PubMed

    Wan, Q; Lin, C; Li, X; Zeng, W; Ma, C

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the changes in paraspinal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and composition, using the digital data from lumbar spine MRIs of patients with acute and chronic low back pain (LBP). In total, 178 patients with unilateral LBP who had lumbar MRI examination were recruited. The data were obtained by a retrospective documentation audit. The CSAs and mean signal intensities of the bilateral paraspinal muscles [psoas major (PM), quadratus lumborum, multifidus (MF) and erector spinae (ES)] were measured, and the percentage of fat infiltration was calculated. The data between the painful side and non-painful side were compared, and between-group comparisons were tested. 42 patients with chronic unilateral LBP could indicate the problem level, and the CSA and mean signal intensity of the MF muscle were analysed at the problem level, and one vertebral above and one vertebral level below the problem level. The CSAs of the PM and ES muscles were significantly decreased in the acute LBP group, while in the chronic LBP group, significant reduction in CSA was found in the MF and ES muscles on the painful side compared with the non-painful side. The mean signal intensity and fat content of the ES muscle on the painful side in the chronic LBP group was significantly higher than that on the painful side in the acute LBP group. The significant decrease of CSA in the MF muscle was found at multiple levels on the painful side. The present findings show that there is selective ipsilateral atrophy of paraspinal muscles, specific to the symptomatic side, in patients with acute and chronic LBP. The reduction of the muscle CSA and increased fatty infiltration occurred synchronously, and the extent of change is significantly greater in chronic LBP in the ES muscle. Atrophy of the MF muscle appears to be at multiple levels but side specific in relation to symptoms in patients with chronic LBP, and the decreased muscle CSA may occur prior to fatty infiltration. There are specific

  4. Experimental comparisons between McKibben type artificial muscles and straight fibers type artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Taro

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes experimental comparison between a conventional McKibben type artificial muscle and a straight fibers type artificial muscle developed by the authors. A wearable device and a rehabilitation robot which assists a human muscle should have characteristics similar to those of human muscle. In addition, because the wearable device and the rehabilitation robot should be light, an actuator with a high power/weight ratio is needed. At present, the McKibben type is widely used as an artificial muscle, but in fact its physical model is highly nonlinear. Further, the heat and mechanical loss of this actuator are large because of the friction caused by the expansion and contraction of the sleeve. Therefore, the authors have developed an artificial muscle tube in which high strength glass fibers have been built into the tube made from natural latex rubber. As results, experimental results demonstrated that the developed artificial muscle is more effective regarding its fundamental characteristics than that of the McKibben type; the straight fibers types of artificial muscle have more contraction ratio and power, longer lifetime than the McKibben types. And it has almost same characteristics of human muscle for isotonic and isometric that evaluate it dynamically.

  5. Effect of Experimental Cutaneous Hand Pain on Corticospinal Excitability and Short Afferent Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Catherine; Gagné, Martin; Reilly, Karen T.; Bouyer, Laurent J.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration is altered in people with chronic pain. While there is substantial evidence that pain interferes with neural activity in primary sensory and motor cortices, much less is known about its impact on integrative sensorimotor processes. Here, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) paradigm was used to assess sensorimotor integration in the presence and absence of experimental cutaneous heat pain applied to the hand. Ulnar nerve stimulation was combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation to condition motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Four interstimulus intervals (ISI) were tested, based on the latency of the N20 component of the afferent sensory volley (N20−5 ms, N20+2 ms, N20+4 ms, N20+10 ms). In the PAIN condition, MEPs were smaller compared to the NEUTRAL condition (p = 0.005), and were modulated as a function of the ISI (p = 0.012). Post-hoc planned comparisons revealed that MEPs at N20+2 and N20+4 were inhibited compared to unconditioned MEPs. However, the level of inhibition (SAI) was similar in the PAIN and NEUTRAL conditions. This suggests that the interplay between pain and sensorimotor integration is not mediated through direct and rapid pathways as assessed by SAI, but rather might involve higher-order integrative areas. PMID:27690117

  6. Effect of Experimental Cutaneous Hand Pain on Corticospinal Excitability and Short Afferent Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Catherine; Gagné, Martin; Reilly, Karen T; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2016-09-29

    Sensorimotor integration is altered in people with chronic pain. While there is substantial evidence that pain interferes with neural activity in primary sensory and motor cortices, much less is known about its impact on integrative sensorimotor processes. Here, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) paradigm was used to assess sensorimotor integration in the presence and absence of experimental cutaneous heat pain applied to the hand. Ulnar nerve stimulation was combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation to condition motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Four interstimulus intervals (ISI) were tested, based on the latency of the N20 component of the afferent sensory volley (N20-5 ms, N20+2 ms, N20+4 ms, N20+10 ms). In the PAIN condition, MEPs were smaller compared to the NEUTRAL condition (p = 0.005), and were modulated as a function of the ISI (p = 0.012). Post-hoc planned comparisons revealed that MEPs at N20+2 and N20+4 were inhibited compared to unconditioned MEPs. However, the level of inhibition (SAI) was similar in the PAIN and NEUTRAL conditions. This suggests that the interplay between pain and sensorimotor integration is not mediated through direct and rapid pathways as assessed by SAI, but rather might involve higher-order integrative areas.

  7. Muscle Power Is an Independent Determinant of Pain and Quality of Life in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Baseline data on 190 subjects with knee OA (mean ± SD age 60.2 ± 10.4 years, body mass index 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m(2) ) were obtained from a randomized controlled trial. Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press, and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P < 0.02) and also significantly and positively associated with SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) scores (r = 0.16, P < 0.05). After adjustment for multiple covariates, muscle power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS scores (P ≤ 0.04). However, muscle strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Effects of hypnotic analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    DeBenedittis, G; Panerai, A A; Villamira, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia are still poorly understood and conflicting data are reported regarding the underlying neurochemical correlates. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hypnotically induced analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain, taking into account pain and distress tolerance as well as the neurochemical correlates. 11 high hypnotizable Ss and 10 low hypnotizable Ss, as determined by scores on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1962), were administered an ischemic pain test in both waking and hypnotic conditions. The following variables were measured: (a) pain and distress tolerance, (b) anxiety levels, and (c) plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Results confirmed significant increases of pain and distress tolerance during hypnosis as compared to the waking state, with positive correlations between pain and distress relief and hypnotizability. Moreover, a hypnotically induced dissociation between the sensory-discriminative and the affective-motivational dimensions of pain experience was found, but only in high hypnotizable Ss. Hypnotic analgesia was unrelated to anxiety reduction and was not mediated either by endorphins or by ACTH.

  9. Experimental and modelling evidence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kenneth; Han, June-Chiew; Crampin, Edmund John; Taberner, Andrew James; Loiselle, Denis Scott

    2017-10-01

    Heat associated with muscle shortening has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle, but its existence in cardiac muscle remains contentious after five decades of study. By iterating between experiments and computational modelling, we show compelling evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle and reveal, mechanistically, the source of this excess heat. Our results clarify a long-standing uncertainty in the field of cardiac muscle energetics. We provide a revised partitioning of cardiac muscle energy expenditure to include this newly revealed thermal component. When a muscle shortens against an afterload, the heat that it liberates is greater than that produced by the same muscle contracting isometrically at the same level of force. This excess heat is defined as 'shortening heat', and has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle but not in cardiac muscle. Given the micro-structural similarities between these two muscle types, and since we imagine that shortening heat is the thermal accompaniment of cross-bridge cycling, we have re-examined this issue. Using our flow-through microcalorimeter, we measured force and heat generated by isolated rat trabeculae undergoing isometric contractions at different muscle lengths and work-loop (shortening) contractions at different afterloads. We simulated these experimental protocols using a thermodynamically constrained model of cross-bridge cycling and probed the mechanisms underpinning shortening heat. Predictions generated by the model were subsequently validated by a further set of experiments. Both our experimental and modelling results show convincing evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle. Its magnitude is inversely related to the afterload or, equivalently, directly related to the extent of shortening. Computational simulations reveal that the heat of shortening arises from the cycling of cross-bridges, and that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is more sensitive to

  10. Trunk muscle activation in low-back pain patients, an analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Dieën, Jaap H; Selen, Luc P J; Cholewicki, Jacek

    2003-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the literature on trunk muscle recruitment in low-back pain patients. Two models proposed in the literature, the pain-spasm-pain model and the pain adaptation model, yield conflicting predictions on how low- back pain would affect trunk muscle recruitment in various activities. The two models are outlined and evidence for the two from neurophsysiological studies is reviewed. Subsequently, specific predictions with respect to changes in activation of the lumbar extensor musculature are derived from both models. These predictions are compared to the results from 30 clinical studies and three induced pain studies retrieved in a comprehensive literature search. Neither of the two models is unequivocally supported by the literature. These data and further data on timing of muscle activity and load sharing between muscles suggest an alternative model to explain the alterations of trunk muscle recruitment due to low-back pain. It is proposed that motor control changes in patients are functional in that they enhance spinal stability.

  11. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  12. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone. PMID:25729190

  13. Muscle Pain as a Regulator of Cycling Intensity: Effect of Caffeine Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Gonglach, Alexander R; Ade, Carl J; Bemben, Michael G; Larson, Rebecca D; Black, Christopher D

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine ingestion improves endurance time trial performance. However, the ergogenic mechanism of action remains unresolved. One potential explanation for caffeine's performance-enhancing effect is an improvement in work for a given amount of muscle pain. To test this hypothesis, participants performed two studies in which they regulated exercise intensity based on feelings of muscle pain. Thirteen young men were asked to regulate exercise intensity based on feelings of "moderate" muscle pain (a "3" on a 0-10 pain scale). After three familiarization trials, either caffeine (∼ 5 mg · kg(-1) body weight) or placebo were administered before a moderate pain trial. Nine caffeine "responders" were retested and ask to regulate their exercise intensity at a "strong" pain level (a "5" on a 0-10 pain scale). A caffeine (∼ 5 mg · kg(-1) body weight) or placebo was again ingested before exercise. Participants performed more work (P = 0.008) and covered more distance (P = 0.008) at a higher average power output (P = 0.009) and VO2 (P = 0.019), for an identical amount of "moderate" muscle pain in the caffeine condition. When exercising at a rating of a "5," caffeine did not increase total work, distance covered, or VO2 for an identical amount of "strong" pain in the nine caffeine "responders." Our findings indicate caffeine increases work performed during exercise, eliciting a moderate amount of a pain. However, a threshold level of muscle pain may exist above which antagonism of adenosine receptors alone does not induce a hypoalgesic effect.

  14. Motor adaptations to local muscle pain during a bilateral cyclic task.

    PubMed

    Brøchner Nielsen, Niels-Peter; Tucker, Kylie; Dorel, Sylvain; Guével, Arnaud; Hug, François

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how unilateral pain, induced in two knee extensor muscles, affects muscle coordination during a bilateral pedaling task. Fifteen participants performed a 4-min pedaling task at 130 W in two conditions (Baseline and Pain). Pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of one leg. Force applied throughout the pedaling cycle was measured using an instrumented pedal and used to calculate pedal power. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from eight muscles to assess changes in muscle activation strategies. Compared to Baseline, during the Pain condition, EMG amplitude of muscles of the painful leg (VL and VM-the painful muscles, and RF-another quadriceps muscle with no pain) was lower during the extension phase [(mean ± SD): VL: -22.5 ± 18.9%; P < 0.001; VM: -28.8 ± 19.9%; P < 0.001, RF: -20.2 ± 13.9%; P < 0.001]. Consistent with this, pedal power applied by the painful leg was also lower during the extension phase (-16.8 ± 14.2 W, P = 0.001) during Pain compared to Baseline. This decrease was compensated for by an 11.3 ± 8.1 W increase in pedal power applied by the non-painful leg during its extension phase (P = 0.04). These results support pain adaptation theories, which suggest that when there is a clear opportunity to compensate, motor adaptations to pain occur to decrease load within the painful tissue. Although the pedaling task offered numerous possibilities for compensation, only between-leg compensations were systematically observed. This finding is discussed in relation to the mechanical and neural constraints of the pedaling task.

  15. Back Pain and Endurance Training of Back Muscles: Justification for Further Study in Helicopter Pilots.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    FR, Bendix T, Skov P, Jensen CV, Kristensen JH, Krohn L, Schoeler H. Intensive, dynamic back-muscle exercises, conventional physiotherapy , or...quantitative measurement of abdominal and back muscle strength. Spine 1980;5:143-148. 31. Hayne CR. Ergonomics and back pain. Physiotherapy 1984 Jan;70

  16. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  17. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM. PMID:27152691

  18. Nonpainful wide-area compression inhibits experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Honigman, Liat; Bar-Bachar, Ofrit; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Granovsky, Yelena

    2016-09-01

    Compression therapy, a well-recognized treatment for lymphoedema and venous disorders, pressurizes limbs and generates massive non-noxious afferent sensory barrages. The aim of this study was to study whether such afferent activity has an analgesic effect when applied on the lower limbs, hypothesizing that larger compression areas will induce stronger analgesic effects, and whether this effect correlates with conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Thirty young healthy subjects received painful heat and pressure stimuli (47°C for 30 seconds, forearm; 300 kPa for 15 seconds, wrist) before and during 3 compression protocols of either SMALL (up to ankles), MEDIUM (up to knees), or LARGE (up to hips) compression areas. Conditioned pain modulation (heat pain conditioned by noxious cold water) was tested before and after each compression protocol. The LARGE protocol induced more analgesia for heat than the SMALL protocol (P < 0.001). The analgesic effect interacted with gender (P = 0.015). The LARGE protocol was more efficient for females, whereas the MEDIUM protocol was more efficient for males. Pressure pain was reduced by all protocols (P < 0.001) with no differences between protocols and no gender effect. Conditioned pain modulation was more efficient than the compression-induced analgesia. For the LARGE protocol, precompression CPM efficiency positively correlated with compression-induced analgesia. Large body area compression exerts an area-dependent analgesic effect on experimental pain stimuli. The observed correlation with pain inhibition in response to robust non-noxious sensory stimulation may suggest that compression therapy shares similar mechanisms with inhibitory pain modulation assessed through CPM.

  19. IL17 Mediates Pelvic Pain in Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen F.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Done, Joseph; Wong, Larry; Bell-Cohn, Ashlee; Roman, Kenny; Cashy, John; Ohlhausen, Michelle; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is the most common form of prostatitis, accounting for 90–95% of all diagnoses. It is a complex multi-symptom syndrome with unknown etiology and limited effective treatments. Previous investigations highlight roles for inflammatory mediators in disease progression by correlating levels of cytokines and chemokines with patient reported symptom scores. It is hypothesized that alteration of adaptive immune mechanisms results in autoimmunity and subsequent development of pain. Mouse models of CPPS have been developed to delineate these immune mechanisms driving pain in humans. Using the experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) in C57BL/6 mice model of CPPS we examined the role of CD4+T-cell subsets in the development and maintenance of prostate pain, by tactile allodynia behavioral testing and flow cytometry. In tandem with increased CD4+IL17A+ T-cells upon EAP induction, prophylactic treatment with an anti-IL17 antibody one-day prior to EAP induction prevented the onset of pelvic pain. Therapeutic blockade of IL17 did not reverse pain symptoms indicating that IL17 is essential for development but not maintenance of chronic pain in EAP. Furthermore we identified a cytokine, IL7, to be associated with increased symptom severity in CPPS patients and is increased in patient prostatic secretions and the prostates of EAP mice. IL7 is fundamental to development of IL17 producing cells and plays a role in maturation of auto-reactive T-cells, it is also associated with autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes. More recently a growing body of research has pointed to IL17’s role in development of neuropathic and chronic pain. This report presents novel data on the role of CD4+IL17+ T-cells in development and maintenance of pain in EAP and CPPS. PMID:25933188

  20. The initial effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold of healthy adults: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Ji, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on delayed onset muscle soreness. [Subjects] Forty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: a nerve mobilization group (experimental) and a control group. [Methods] The subjects of the experimental group were administered a median nerve mobilization technique and ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. The subjects in the control group were only administered ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue and the pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in all variables, compared to pre-intervention. Furthermore, the control group showed significant improvements in the pressure pain threshold, compared to pre-intervention. Significant differences in the post-intervention gains in muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold were found between the experimental group and the control group. [Conclusion] Application of the upper extremity neural mobilization technique is considered to have a positive effect on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:27134351

  1. A Patient Developed Painful Muscle Cramps due to Overeating Mangos

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman had a habit to eat a mango every night before sleep and experienced muscle cramps during sleep. Her muscle cramps may be resulted from potassium overload due to overeating mangos. PMID:23091750

  2. Dry needling of the trapezius muscle in office workers with neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Lacomba, María Torres; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Mayoral Del Moral, Orlando; Rodrigo-Medina, Beatriz; Gutiérrez Ortega, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Neck pain is a frequent complaint in office workers. This pain can be caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the trapezius muscle. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of active MTrPs in the trapezius muscle. A randomized, single blinded clinical trial was carried out at the Physical Therapy Department at Physiotherapy in Women's Health Research Group at Physical Therapy Department of University of Alcalá, in Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. Forty-four office workers with neck pain and active MTrPs in the trapezius muscle were randomly allocated to either the DDN or the control group (CG). The participants in the DDN group were treated with DDN of all MTrPs found in the trapezius muscle. They also received passive stretch of the trapezius muscle. The CG received the same passive stretch of the trapezius muscle only. The primary outcome measure was subjective pain intensity, measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were pressure pain threshold (PPT), cervical range of motion (CROM) and muscle strength. Data were collected at baseline, after interventions and 15 days after the last treatment. Differences were found between the DDN group and the CG for the VAS (P < 0.001), PPT (P < 0.001), range of motion (AROM) (P < 0.05) and strength (P < 0.05) after intervention and at the 15-day follow-up. Deep dry needling and passive stretch seems to be more effective than passive stretch only. The effects are maintained in the short term. The results support the use of DDN in the management of trapezius muscle myofascial pain syndrome in neck pain.

  3. Dry needling of the trapezius muscle in office workers with neck pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Lacomba, María Torres; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Mayoral del Moral, Orlando; Rodrigo-Medina, Beatriz; Gutiérrez Ortega, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a frequent complaint in office workers. This pain can be caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the trapezius muscle. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of active MTrPs in the trapezius muscle. Methods A randomized, single blinded clinical trial was carried out at the Physical Therapy Department at Physiotherapy in Women's Health Research Group at Physical Therapy Department of University of Alcalá, in Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. Forty-four office workers with neck pain and active MTrPs in the trapezius muscle were randomly allocated to either the DDN or the control group (CG). The participants in the DDN group were treated with DDN of all MTrPs found in the trapezius muscle. They also received passive stretch of the trapezius muscle. The CG received the same passive stretch of the trapezius muscle only. The primary outcome measure was subjective pain intensity, measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were pressure pain threshold (PPT), cervical range of motion (CROM) and muscle strength. Data were collected at baseline, after interventions and 15 days after the last treatment. Results Differences were found between the DDN group and the CG for the VAS (P < 0.001), PPT (P < 0.001), range of motion (AROM) (P < 0.05) and strength (P < 0.05) after intervention and at the 15-day follow-up. Discussion Deep dry needling and passive stretch seems to be more effective than passive stretch only. The effects are maintained in the short term. The results support the use of DDN in the management of trapezius muscle myofascial pain syndrome in neck pain. PMID:27582622

  4. Involvement of nitric oxide system in experimental muscle crush injury.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, I; Abassi, Z; Coleman, R; Milman, F; Winaver, J; Better, O S

    1998-01-01

    Muscle crush injury is often complicated by hemodynamic shock, electrolyte disorders, and myoglobinuric renal failure. In this study, we examined the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) system in the development of muscle damage in an experimental model of crush injury induced by exertion of standardized mechanical pressure on tibialis muscle of rat. The intact limb served as a control. Four days after injury, the crushed muscle was characterized by extreme capillary vasodilatation as demonstrated by histological morphometric analysis. These changes were accompanied by muscle hyperperfusion as evaluated by measurements of femoral blood flow (ultrasonic flowmetry) and capillary blood flow (laser-doppler flowmetry). Treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, largely decreased the hyperperfusion. Furthermore, the expression of the different NOS isoforms, assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and immunoreactive levels, determined by Western blot, revealed a remarkable induction of the inducible NOS in the crushed limb. Similarly, endothelial NOS mRNA increased gradually after the induction of muscle damage. In contrast, the major muscular NOS, i.e., neuronal isoform remained unchanged. In line with the alterations in the mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed parallel changes in the immunoreactive levels of the various NOS. These findings indicate that muscle crush is associated with activation of the NO system mainly due to enhancement of iNOS. This may contribute to NO-dependent extreme vasodilatation in the injured muscle and aggravate the hypovolemic shock after crush injury. PMID:9502774

  5. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F.; Driban, Jeffrey B.; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A.; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined the relationships between lower extremity muscle strength, power and perceived disease severity in participants with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Methods We used baseline data from a randomized controlled trial in 190 participants with knee OA (age: 60.2 ± 10.4 yrs; BMI: 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m2). Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index and health-related quality of life using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. Results In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P < 0.02). It was also significantly and positively associated with SF-36 physical component scores (PCS) (r = 0.16, P < 0.05). After adjusting for multiple covariates, muscle power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS (P ≤ 0.04). However, strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Conclusions Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. PMID:26315282

  6. A Comparison of Self-Hypnosis Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Pain1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M.; Molton, Ivan R.; Raichle, Katherine A.; Osborne, Travis L.; Engel, Joyce M.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Kraft, George H.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic pain we recruited into a quasi-experimental trial comparing the effects of self-hypnosis training (HYP) with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) on pain intensity and pain interference; 8 received HYP and the remaining 14 participants were randomly assigned to receive either HYP or PMR. HYP-condition participants reported significantly greater pre- to postsession as well as pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain and pain interference than PMR-condition participants, and gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Most of the participants in both conditions reported that they continued to use the skills they learned in treatment and experienced pain relief when they did so. General hypnotizability was not significantly related to treatment outcome, but treatment-outcome expectancy assessed before and after the first session was. The results support the efficacy of self-hypnosis training for the management of chronic pain in persons with MS. PMID:19234967

  7. Structural Changes of Lumbar Muscles in Non-specific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Goubert, Dorien; Oosterwijck, Jessica Van; Meeus, Mira; Danneels, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar muscle dysfunction due to pain might be related to altered lumbar muscle structure. Macroscopically, muscle degeneration in low back pain (LBP) is characterized by a decrease in cross-sectional area and an increase in fat infiltration in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. In addition microscopic changes, such as changes in fiber distribution, might occur. Inconsistencies in results from different studies make it difficult to draw firm conclusions on which structural changes are present in the different types of non-specific LBP. Insights regarding structural muscle alterations in LBP are, however, important for prevention and treatment of non-specific LBP. The goal of this article is to review which macro- and/or microscopic structural alterations of the lumbar muscles occur in case of non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP), recurrent low back pain (RLBP), and acute low back pain (ALBP). Systematic review. All selected studies were case-control studies. A systematic literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and Web of Science. Only full texts of original studies regarding structural alterations (atrophy, fat infiltration, and fiber type distribution) in lumbar muscles of patients with non-specific LBP compared to healthy controls were included. All included articles were scored on methodological quality. Fifteen studies were found eligible after screening title, abstract, and full text for inclusion and exclusion criteria. In CLBP, moderate evidence of atrophy was found in the multifidus; whereas, results in the paraspinal and the erector spinae muscle remain inconclusive. Also moderate evidence occurred in RLBP and ALBP, where no atrophy was shown in any lumbar muscle. Conflicting results were seen in undefined LBP groups. Results concerning fat infiltration were inconsistent in CLBP. On the other hand, there is moderate evidence in RLBP that fat infiltration does not occur, although a larger muscle fat index was found in the erector spinae

  8. Differences in psychosocial functioning and sleep quality between idiopathic continuous orofacial neuropathic pain patients and chronic masticatory muscle pain patients.

    PubMed

    Porto, Felipe; de Leeuw, Reny; Evans, Daniel R; Carlson, Charles R; Yepes, Juan F; Branscum, Adam; Okeson, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    To examine differences between idiopathic continuous orofacial neuropathic pain (ICONP) patients and chronic masticatory muscle pain (MMP) patients for psychosocial functioning and sleep quality. Archival data were used to compare 81 ICONP patients to 81 age- and sex-matched chronic MMP patients on pain severity, life interference, life control, and affective distress measures from the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI), a global severity index of psychological symptoms from the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C), and overall sleep quality from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). MANOVA, MANCOVA, and chi-square analysis were used to investigate differences between the two groups in the psychosocial and sleep variables. The ICONP group reported greater pain severity (P = .013) and more life interference (P = .032) than the MMP group, while the MMP group reported higher levels of global psychological symptoms (P = .005) than the ICONP group. After controlling for pain severity, however, the MMP group demonstrated greater affective distress (P = .014) than the ICONP group, and life interference was no longer significantly different between the groups. ICONP patients were more likely to report a traumatic life event (P = .007). Although ICONP patients are likely to present more intense pain and report that their pain causes more interference in their lives, MMP patients are more likely to present with higher levels of overall psychological symptoms. The greater levels of pain severity reported by ICONP patients appear to be partially responsible for their higher levels of reported life interference.

  9. Experimental orofacial pain and sensory deprivation lead to perceptual distortion of the face in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dagsdóttir, Lilja Kristín; Skyt, Ina; Vase, Lene; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Patients suffering from persistent orofacial pain may sporadically report that the painful area feels "swollen" or "differently," a phenomenon that may be conceptualized as a perceptual distortion because there are no clinical signs of swelling present. Our aim was to investigate whether standardized experimental pain and sensory deprivation of specific orofacial test sites would lead to changes in the size perception of these face areas. Twenty-four healthy participants received either 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (HS) or local anesthetics (LA) into six regions (buccal, mental, lingual, masseter muscle, infraorbital and auriculotemporal nerve regions). Participants estimated the perceived size changes in percentage (0 % = no change, -100 % = half the size or +100 % = double the size), and somatosensory function was checked with tactile stimuli. The pain intensity was rated on a 0-10 Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS), and sets of psychological questionnaires were completed. HS and LA were associated with significant self-reported perceptual distortions as indicated by consistent increases in perceived size of the adjacent face areas (P ≤ 0.050). Perceptual distortion was most pronounced in the buccal region, and the smallest increase was observed in the auriculotemporal region. HS was associated with moderate levels of pain VNRS = 7.3 ± 0.6. Weak correlations were found between HS-evoked perceptual distortion and level of dissociation in two regions (P < 0.050). Experimental pain and transient sensory deprivation evoked perceptual distortions in all face regions and overall demonstrated the importance of afferent inputs for the perception of the face. We propose that perceptual distortion may be an important phenomenon to consider in persistent orofacial pain conditions.

  10. Association of low back pain with muscle stiffness and muscle mass of the lumbar back muscles, and sagittal spinal alignment in young and middle-aged medical workers.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Aoyama, Tomoki; Murakami, Takashi; Yanase, Ko; Ji, Xiang; Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-09-14

    Muscle stiffness of the lumbar back muscles in low back pain (LBP) patients has not been clearly elucidated because quantitative assessment of the stiffness of individual muscles was conventionally difficult. This study aimed to examine the association of LBP with muscle stiffness assessed using ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE) and muscle mass of the lumbar back muscle, and spinal alignment in young and middle-aged medical workers. The study comprised 23 asymptomatic medical workers [control (CTR) group] and 9 medical workers with LBP (LBP group). Muscle stiffness and mass of the lumbar back muscles (lumbar erector spinae, multifidus, and quadratus lumborum) in the prone position were measured using ultrasonic SWE. Sagittal spinal alignment in the standing and prone positions was measured using a Spinal Mouse. The association with LBP was investigated by multiple logistic regression analysis with a forward selection method. The analysis was conducted using the shear elastic modulus and muscle thickness of the lumbar back muscles, and spinal alignment, age, body height, body weight, and sex as independent variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle and body height were significant and independent determinants of LBP, but that muscle mass and spinal alignment were not. Muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle in the LBP group was significantly higher than that in the CTR group. The results of this study suggest that LBP is associated with muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle in young and middle-aged medical workers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Function and structure of the deep cervical extensor muscles in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Schomacher, Jochen; Falla, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    The deep cervical extensors are anatomically able to control segmental movements of the cervical spine in concert with the deep cervical flexors. Several investigations have confirmed changes in cervical flexor muscle control in patients with neck pain and as a result, effective evidence-based therapeutic exercises have been developed to address such dysfunctions. However, knowledge on how the deep extensor muscles behave in patients with neck pain disorders is scare. Structural changes such as higher concentration of fat within the muscle, variable cross-sectional area and higher proportions of type II fibres have been observed in the deep cervical extensors of patients with neck pain compared to healthy controls. These findings suggest that the behaviour of the deep extensors may be altered in patients with neck pain. Consistent with this hypothesis, a recent series of studies confirm that patients display reduced activation of the deep cervical extensors as well as less defined activation patterns. This article provides an overview of the various different structural and functional changes in the deep neck extensor muscles documented in patients with neck pain. Relevant recommendations for the management of muscle dysfunction in patients with neck pain are presented.

  12. Role for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the induction of chronic muscle pain in the rat.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Pedro; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2014-06-01

    While raised levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) have been observed in patients with chronic muscle pain, direct evidence for its role as an algogen in skeletal muscle is still lacking. In the rat, MCP-1 induces a dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia lasting for up to 6weeks. Following recovery, rats exhibited a markedly prolonged hyperalgesia to an intramuscular injection of prostaglandin E2, hyperalgesic priming. Intrathecal pretreatment with isolectin B4 (IB4)-saporin, which selectively destroys IB4-positive (IB4+) nociceptors, markedly decreased MCP-1-induced hyperalgesia and prevented the subsequent development of priming. To evaluate the involvement of MCP-1 in stress-induced chronic pain we administered, intrathecally, antisense (AS) or mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides directed against CCR2 (the canonical receptor for MCP-1) mRNA, during the exposure to water-avoidance stress, a model of stress-induced persistent muscle pain. The AS treatment attenuated this hyperalgesia, whereas IB4-saporin abolished water-avoidance stress-induced muscle hyperalgesia and prevented stress-induced hyperalgesic priming. These results indicate that MCP-1 induces persistent muscle hyperalgesia and a state of latent chronic sensitization to other algogens, by action on its cognate receptor on IB4+ nociceptors. Because MCP-1 also contributes to stress-induced widespread chronic muscle pain, it should be considered as a player in chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

  13. IB4-Saporin Attenuates Acute and Eliminates Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Gear, Robert W.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    The function of populations of nociceptors in muscle pain syndromes remain poorly understood. We compared the contribution of two major classes, isolectin B4-positive (IB4(+)) and IB4-negative (IB4(−)) nociceptors, in acute and chronic inflammatory and ergonomic muscle pain. Baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold was assessed in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats treated with IB4-saporin, which selectively destroys IB4(+) nociceptors. Rats were then submitted to models of acute inflammatory (intramuscular carrageenan)- or ergonomic intervention (eccentric exercise or vibration)-induced muscle pain, and each of the three models also evaluated for the transition from acute to chronic pain, manifest as prolongation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced hyperalgesia, after recovery from the hyperalgesia induced by acute inflammation or ergonomic interventions. IB4-saporin treatment did not affect baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold. However, compared to controls, IB4-saporin treated rats exhibited shorter duration mechanical hyperalgesia in all three models and attenuated peak hyperalgesia in the ergonomic pain models. And, IB4-saporin treatment completely prevented prolongation of PGE2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, IB4(+) and IB4(−) neurons contribute to acute muscle hyperalgesia induced by diverse insults. However, only IB4+ nociceptors participate in the long term consequence of acute hyperalgesia. Finally, using retrograde labelling we found that approximately 70% of sensory neurons innervating the gastrocnemius muscle are IB4(+). PMID:22206923

  14. Randomized Clinical Trial of Acupuncture for Myofascial Pain of the Jaw Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yoshi F.; Younger, Jarred; Goddard, Greg; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating symptoms associated with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. Methods Twenty-eight subjects over the age of 18 and diagnosed with chronic myofascial pain of the jaw muscles were randomized to receive real (n = 16) or sham (n = 12) acupuncture. Prior to treatment, each subject clenched his or her teeth for 2 minutes. Acupuncture or sham acupuncture was then administered at the Hegu large intestine 4 (LI4) acupoint for 15 minutes. Real acupuncture was given by penetrating the needle through a sticky foam pad at the acupoint. Sham acupuncture was conducted by pricking the skin, without penetration, with a shortened, blunted acupuncture needle through a foam pad placed away from the acupoint. General head and neck pain ratings were obtained before and after treatment on a numerical rating scale. A mechanical pain stimulus on the masseter muscle was given before and after treatment and rated on a visual analog scale to measure pain tolerance level. Paired t tests were performed to detect significant changes in pain levels. Results Subjects receiving real acupuncture experienced a significant reduction in jaw pain (P = .04), jaw/face tightness (P = .04), and neck pain (P = .04), and a significant increase in pain tolerance of the masseter muscle (P = .001). Subjects were not able to determine whether they received real or sham acupuncture (P = .69). No significant pain reductions were observed in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion A single acupuncture session using one acupoint at Hegu large intestine 4 significantly reduced most myofascial pain endpoints when compared to sham acupuncture. PMID:19888488

  15. Botulinum Toxin A Injection into the Subscapularis Muscle to Treat Intractable Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injection into the subscapularis muscle on intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. Methods Six stroke patients with intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain were included. Botulinum toxin A was injected into the subscapularis muscle. Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale. Pain-free range of motion was assessed for shoulder abduction and external rotation. The spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator was measured using the modified Ashworth scale. Assessments were carried out at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, and, if possible, 8 weeks. Results Intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain was improved (p=0.004) after botulinum toxin injection into the subscapularis muscle. Restricted shoulder abduction (p=0.003), external rotation (p=0.005), and spasticity of the shoulder internal rotator (p=0.005) were also improved. Improved hemiplegic shoulder pain was correlated with improved shoulder abduction (r=–1.0, p<0.001), external rotation (r=–1.0, p<0.001), and spasticity of the internal rotator (r=1.0, p<0.001). Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injection into the subscapularis muscle appears to be valuable in the management of intractable hemiplegic shoulder pain. PMID:27606265

  16. Involvement of central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors on antinociceptive effect of tetrahydrocannabinol in muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Bagüés, Ana; Martín, M Isabel; Sánchez-Robles, Eva M

    2014-12-15

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors have emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for pain management in recent years and the interest in the use of cannabinoids is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where conventional treatments fail. Muscle pain is a major clinical problem and new pharmacological approaches are being studied. Recently, we have demonstrated that cannabinoid synthetic agonists are useful to reduce muscular pain in two animal models, where the local administration is effective. Now, we want to know if tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid natural derivative with therapeutic use in humans, is also effective in reducing acute muscle pain. The antinociceptive effect of THC by systemic (i.p.) and local (i.m.) administration was tested in two animal models of acute muscle pain, rat masseter and gastrocnemius, induced by hypertonic saline (HS) injection. The drugs used were the non-selective agonist THC and two selective cannabinoid antagonists, AM251 (CB1) and AM630 (CB2). THC, i.p. and i.m. administered, reduced the nociceptive behaviours induced by HS in both muscular pain models. The antinociceptive effect induced by the systemic administration of THC was mediated by CB1 receptors in the masseter muscle whereas in gastrocnemius both CB1 and CB2 receptors participated. When THC was administered locally, only CB2 receptors were involved in the antinociceptive effect in both muscles. This study suggests that THC could be a future pharmacological option in the treatment of muscle pain. The local administration of THC could be an interesting option to treat this type of pain avoiding the central adverse effects.

  17. Comparison of psychologic and physiologic functioning between patients with masticatory muscle pain and matched controls.

    PubMed

    Carlson, C R; Okeson, J P; Falace, D A; Nitz, A J; Curran, S L; Anderson, D

    1993-01-01

    This study explored the physiologic and psychologic distinctions between masticatory muscle pain patients and age and sex-matched normal controls. Subjects completed several standardized psychologic tests. They then underwent a laboratory stress profile evaluation to obtain physiologic measures (EMG, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) under conditions of rest, mental stress, and relaxation. The pain patients reported greater anxiety, especially cognitive symptoms, and feelings of muscle tension than did the controls. Under stress, pain patients had higher heart rates and systolic blood pressure than the controls. Electromyogram activity in the masseter regions was not significantly different between the pain and control group. The results are discussed in terms of the likely mechanisms that might account for the observed differences between masticatory pain patients and normal subjects.

  18. Effects of experimental craniofacial pain on fine jaw motor control: a placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Trulsson, Mats; Svensson, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the experiment was to test the hypothesis that experimental pain in the masseter muscle or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) would perturb the oral fine motor control, reflected in bigger variability of bite force values and jaw muscle activity, during repeated splitting of food morsels. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in four sessions. An intervention was made by injection of either 0.2 ml of monosodium glutamate/isotonic saline (MSG/IS) (randomized) in either the masseter or TMJ (randomized). The participants were asked to hold and split a flat-faced placebo tablet with their anterior teeth, thirty times each at baseline, during intervention and post-intervention. Pain was measured using a 0-10 visual analog scale. The force applied by the teeth to "hold" and "split" the tablet along with the corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity of the jaw muscles and subject-based reports on perception of pain was recorded. The data analysis included a three-way analysis of variance model. The peak pain intensity was significantly higher during the painful MSG injections in the TMJ (6.1 ± 0.4) than the injections in masseter muscle (5.5 ± 0.5) (P = 0.037). Variability of hold force was significantly smaller during the MSG injection than IS injection in the masseter (P = 0.024). However, there was no significant effect of intervention on the variability of split force during the masseter injections (P = 0.769) and variability of hold and split force during the TMJ injections (P = 0.481, P = 0.545). The variability of the EMG activity of the jaw muscles did not show significant effects of intervention. Subject-based reports revealed that pain did not interfere in the ability to hold the tablet in 57.9 and 78.9 %, and the ability to split the tablet in 78.9 and 68.4 %, of the participants, respectively, during painful masseter and TMJ injections. Hence, experimental pain in the masseter muscle or TMJ did not have any robust effect in terms of bigger

  19. Acute caffeine ingestion enhances strength performance and reduces perceived exertion and muscle pain perception during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Parkhouse, Natalie; Cook, Kathryn; Smith, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of caffeine ingestion in enhancing aerobic performance is well established. However, despite suggestions that caffeine may enhance resistance exercise performance, research is equivocal on the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on resistance exercise performance. It has also been suggested that dampened perception of perceived exertion and pain perception might be an explanation for any possible enhancement of resistance exercise performance due to caffeine ingestion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of caffeine ingestion on repetitions to failure, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and muscle pain perception during resistance exercise to failure. Eleven resistance trained individuals (9 males, 2 females, mean age±SD=26.4±6.4 years), took part in this double-blind, randomised cross-over experimental study whereby they ingested a caffeinated (5 mg kg(-1)) or placebo solution 60 minutes before completing a bout of resistance exercise. Experimental conditions were separated by at least 48 hours. Resistance exercise sessions consisted of bench press, deadlift, prone row and back squat exercise to failure at an intensity of 60% 1 repetition maximum. Results indicated that participants completed significantly greater repetitions to failure, irrespective of exercise, in the presence of caffeine (p=0.0001). Mean±S.D of repetitions to failure was 19.6±3.7 and 18.5±4.1 in caffeine and placebo conditions, respectively. There were no differences in peak heart rate or peak blood lactate values across conditions (both p >0.05). RPE was significantly lower in the caffeine compared to the placebo condition (p=0.03) and was significantly higher during lower body exercises compared to upper body exercises irrespective of substance ingested (p=0.0001). For muscle pain perception, a significant condition by exercise interaction (p=0.027) revealed that muscle pain perception was lower in the caffeine condition, irrespective of exercise

  20. Influence of delayed muscle reflexes on spinal stability: model-based predictions allow alternative interpretations of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Anne; Puta, Christian; Anders, Christoph; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Wagner, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    Model-based calculations indicate that reflex delay and reflex gain are both important for spinal stability. Experimental results demonstrate that chronic low back pain is associated with delayed muscle reflex responses of trunk muscles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of such time-delayed reflexes on the stability using a simple biomechanical model. Additionally, we compared the model-based predictions with experimental data from chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls using surface-electromyography. Linear stability methods were applied to the musculoskeletal model, which was extended with a time-delayed reflex model. Lateral external perturbations were simulated around equilibrium to investigate the effects of reflex delay and gain on the stability of the human lumbar spine. The model simulations predicted that increased reflex delays require a reduction of the reflex gain to avoid spinal instability. The experimental data support this dependence for the investigated abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects. Reflex time-delay and gain dependence showed that a delayed reflex latency could have relevant influence on spinal stability, if subjects do not adapt their reflex amplitudes. Based on the model and the experimental results, the relationship between muscle reflex response latency and the maximum of the reflex amplitude should be considered for evaluation of (patho) physiological data. We recommend that training procedures should focus on speeding up the delayed reflex response as well as on increasing the amplitude of these reflexes.

  1. Efficacy of core muscle strengthening exercise in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Kumar, Suraj; Nezamuddin, Md; Sharma, V P

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a common health problem in human being and about 5 to 15% will develop chronic low back pain (CLBP). The clinical findings of CLBP suggest that lumbar mobility is decreased and recruitment order of core muscles is altered. In literature, there is no data about the effect of core muscles strengthening in the chronicity (short duration, long duration) of CLBP. This study evaluated the effect of core muscle strengthening intervention on chronicity of chronic low back pain. Thirty patients were recruited from the outpatient department of the National Institute for the Orthopaedically Handicapped. These 30 patients divided into two groups: A and B on the basis of duration of low back pain. Group-A patients complain about pain duration for more than twelve months and Group B complains about pain duration from three to twelve months. Both the groups were received same intervention for six weeks. Assessment was done pre intervention and post intervention after six weeks for both the groups. %For both the groups the assessment was done after six weeks for pre and post intervention. The result described both the groups showed improvement in all the outcome measures including pain as well as in function using Numerical pain rating scale, Oswestry Disability Index, Sorensen test, Gluteus Maximus Strength, Activation of transversus abdominis and Modified-Modified Schober's Test. The improvement was statistically non-significant with inter groups and significant within group. This study concludes that core muscle strengthening exercise along with lumbar flexibility and gluteus maximus strengthening is an effective rehabilitation technique for all chronic low back pain patients irrespective of duration (less than one year and more than one year) of their pain.

  2. Concentration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the pelvic floor muscles: an experimental comparative rat model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chin-Jung

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle.

  3. Concentration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Pelvic Floor Muscles: An Experimental Comparative Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. Materials and Methods We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Results Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Conclusion Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle. PMID:24954342

  4. The psoas muscle as cause of low back pain in infantile cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Camoriano, R.; Valle, M.; Boero, S.

    2008-01-01

    Psoas muscle spasticity is hypothesised as a rare cause of low back pain in patients with infantile cerebral palsy. The authors describe a new manoeuvre for the study of psoas tenderness and ultrasound (US)-guided transabdominal botulinum toxin injection technique. A possible causal relationship between psoas tension and low back pain was found incidentally in two examined cases. In subsequent patients, botulinum toxin was injected and, in cases of disappearance of symptoms, the psoas tendon was sectioned at the pelvic brim with definitive disappearance of pain. The relationship between psoas tension and low back pain in patients with infantile cerebral palsy seems likely, given the result in the four patients. PMID:19384481

  5. Effects of intrathecal ketorolac on human experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    Eisenach, James C.; Curry, Regina; Tong, Chuanyao; Houle, Timothy T.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, the most commonly used analgesics, reduce pain by inhibiting cyclooxygenase at peripheral sites of inflammation, but potentially also by inhibiting cyclooxygenase in the central nervous system, especially the spinal cord. Animal studies suggest that products of cyclooxygenase in the spinal cord do not alter pain responses to acute noxious stimuli, but reduce pain and sensitization following peripheral inflammation. We used spinal injection of small doses of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, ketorolac, to survey the role of spinal cyclooxygenase in human experimental pain and hypersensitivity states. Methods Following regulatory agency approval and informed consent, we examined the effect of 2.0 mg intrathecal ketorolac in 41 healthy volunteers to acute noxious thermal stimuli in normal skin and to mechanical stimuli in skin sensitized by topical capsaicin or ultraviolet burn. We also examined the effect of intravenous ketorolac, Results Intrathecal ketorolac reduced hypersensitivity when it was induced by a combination of ultraviolet burn plus intermittent heat and, according to one of two analytical strategies, when it was induced by ultraviolet burn alone. Conclusions These data suggest a more limited role for spinal cord cyclooxygenase in human pain states than predicted by studies in animals. PMID:20395821

  6. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J.; Newton, Michael J.; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Context: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. Objective: To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy, untrained men (21–39 years). Intervention(s): Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Main Outcome Measure(s): Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Results: Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P < .05). The PPT was lower in the medial region before exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P < .05). The VAS was correlated with the CR-10 scale (r = 0.91, P < .05) but not with the PPT (r = −0.28, P = .45). Conclusions: The way in which muscles are assessed affects the pain level score. This finding suggests that pain level and pain threshold cannot be used

  7. Acute caffeine ingestion enhances performance and dampens muscle pain following resistance exercise to failure.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Oxford, S W

    2012-06-01

    This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effects of acute caffeine ingestion on perceptions of muscle pain following a bout of high-intensity, upper-body resistance exercise to failure. Moderately trained males (N.=18) ingested a dose of caffeine (5 mg · kg-1) or placebo in a randomised and counterbalanced order and 1 hour later completed bench press exercise to failure at an intensity of 60% 1 repetition maximum. Repetitions completed was taken as a measure of performance, peak heart rate was determined via heart rate telemetry during the exercise bout, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and upper body muscle pain was recorded immediately upon failure of the exercise task and peak blood lactate concentration was determined post-exercise. Caffeine resulted in improved repetitions to failure (t [17]=3.119, P=0.006), greater peak blood lactate (t [17] =5.080, P=0.0001) and lower RPE (t 17=-3.431, P=0.003) compared to placebo. Muscle pain perception was also significantly lower in the caffeine condition compared to placebo (t [17]=-2.567, P=0.04). These results support prior studies using aerobic based exercise modes in suggesting that caffeine ingestion can dampen exercise-induced muscle pain. Specifically, caffeine ingestion enhances muscular strength performance and reduces upper body muscle pain perception immediately following a bout of high-intensity resistance exercise to failure.

  8. The muscle twitch in myofascial pain relief: effects of acupuncture and other needling methods.

    PubMed

    Chu, J; Schwartz, I

    2002-01-01

    Proposed is that needling methods such as acupuncture, primarily effect pain relief in myofascial pain through a local mechanism, elicitation of muscle twitches. Occasionally, diagnostic needling procedures such as electromyography (EMG) can relieve such pain through insertional intramuscular movements of the needle electrode. This results in stimulation of the motor end-plate zones (MEPZs), eliciting muscle twitches. As needle elicitation of muscle twitches is a common diagnostic technique to identify myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), muscle twitches elicited at such points may be therapeutic, not just diagnostic. Occasionally evoked small local muscle twitches are observed in pain relieving methods using needle penetration or manipulation, such as classical or electrical acupuncture and intramuscular stimulation (IMS). Twitch elicitation has been observed to be essential to obtain myofascial pain relief associated with the needling methods of automated and electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ATOIMS and ETOIMS). These two methods facilitate the elicitation of larger force twitches by mechanical or electrical stimulation respectively at motor end-plate zones.

  9. Muscle relaxation for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment: possible effects regarding anxiety and pain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Faye; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Chen, Ching; Hsieh, Yu-Lian; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Hung, Chi-Fa; Lin, Shu-Ching; Tsai, Hsiu-Huang; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Effectively managing pain is vital for the well-being and satisfaction of patients undergoing dermatologic treatments involving lasers. This study investigates the potential outcome of using muscle relaxation techniques to reduce pain among people having their tattoos removed with laser treatment. This study consists of 56 participants (mean age 18.1 ± 2.1 years) that had tattoos removed using the principle of selective photothermolysis. These participants underwent muscle relaxation before receiving the laser treatment. Their peripheral skin temperatures (PST) were measured both at the beginning and the end of the muscle relaxation period. Then, the Beck Anxiety Inventory was applied to evaluate anxiety levels. Once the laser treatment was completed, pain levels were measured using a visual analogue scale. A total of 125 person-sessions of laser treatment and psychometric assessments were performed in this study. The muscle relaxation method significantly increased the PST of the participants while reducing the levels of anxiety and pain throughout the course of the laser treatment procedure. The PST, anxiety scores, and pain scores all showed significant correlations with one another. According to the results obtained, this study proposes that muscle relaxation techniques be considered possibly auxiliary treatment options for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment. Additional studies with a comparison group and a larger sample size are required in the future to confirm the effectiveness of such intervention.

  10. Ultrasonic Tissue Characterization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle in Patients with Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P.; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in skeletal muscle that produce symptomatic referred pain when palpated. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Objective characterization and quantitative measurement of the properties of MTrPs can improve their localization and diagnosis, as well as lead to clinical outcome measures. MTrPs associated with soft tissue neck pain are often found in the upper trapezius muscle. We have previously demonstrated that MTrPs can be visualized using ultrasound imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether texture-based image analysis can differentiate structural heterogeneity of symptomatic MTrPs and normal muscle. Patients with chronic (>3 months) neck pain with spontaneously painful, palpable MTrPs (active MTrPs) and healthy volunteers without spontaneous pain (normal) were recruited for this study. Entropy filtering was performed on B-mode images of the upper trapezius and mean entropy values of symptomatic muscles were compared with healthy ones. Entropy analysis was also used to evaluate the size of regions with low entropy. We found that sites with active MTrPs have significantly lower entropy (p<0.05), i.e. they have more homogenous texture, than asymptomatic ones. PMID:23366899

  11. The effects of topical Arnica on performance, pain and muscle damage after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Pumpa, Kate L; Fallon, Kieran E; Bensoussan, Alan; Papalia, Shona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if topical Arnica is effective in reducing pain, indicators of inflammation and muscle damage, and in turn improve performance in well-trained males experiencing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty well-trained males matched by maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 Max) completed a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Topical Arnica was applied to the skin superficial to the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles immediately after a downhill running protocol designed to induce DOMS. Topical Arnica was reapplied every 4 waking hours for the duration of the study. Performance measures (peak torque, countermovement and squat jump), pain assessments (visual analogue scale (VAS) and muscle tenderness) and blood analysis (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, myoglobin and creatine kinase) were assessed at seven time points over five days (pre-, post-, 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the downhill run). Participants in the topical Arnica group reported less pain as assessed through muscle tenderness and VAS 72 hours post-exercise. The application of topical Arnica did not affect any performance assessments or markers of muscle damage or inflammation. Topical Arnica used immediately after intense eccentric exercise and for the following 96 hours did not have an effect on performance or blood markers. It did however demonstrate the possibility of providing pain relief three days post-eccentric exercise.

  12. Trunk muscle reflexes are elicited by small continuous perturbations in healthy subjects and patients with low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Ludvig, Daniel; Larivière, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) has been recognized as the leading cause of disability worldwide. Lumbar instability has been considered as an important mechanism of LBP and one potential contributor to lumbar stability is trunk muscle reflex activity. However, due to the differences in experimental paradigms used to quantify trunk mechanics and trunk reflexes it remains unclear as to what extent the reflex pathway contributes to overall lumbar stability. The goal of this work was to determine to what extent reflexes of various trunk muscles were elicited by the small continuous perturbations normally used to quantify trunk mechanics. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured bilaterally from 3 trunk extensor muscles and 3 trunk flexor muscles at four epochs: 25-50ms, 50-75ms, 75-100ms and 100-125ms following each perturbation. Reflex activity was seen in all muscles as 34 of the 48 muscle-epoch combinations showed a significant reflex response to either perturbations in the forward or backward direction. However, the reflex EMG activity did not correlate with mechanical estimates of the reflex response. Thus, even though reflexes are indeed elicited by the small perturbations used to quantify trunk mechanics, their exact contribution to overall lumbar stability remains unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimentally induced pain perception is acutely reduced by aerobic exercise in people with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Shepanski, Melissa A; Mackenzie, Sean P; Clifford, Philip S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether subjects with chronic low back pain demonstrate exercise-induced analgesia to experimentally induced pressure pain. We employed a repeated measures design to study eight subjects with chronic low back pain (mean +/- standard deviation age = 40 +/- 10, duration of pain = 7 +/- 4 years). Pain ratings were measured immediately before and 2 minutes and 32 minutes after 25 minutes of cycle ergometry (5 minutes at 50% peak oxygen uptake, then 20 minutes at 70% peak oxygen uptake). We based the pain ratings on subject input on a visual analog scale at 10-second intervals during the 2-minute pressure pain stimulus to the nondominant index finger. Compared with preexercise values, pain ratings were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after exercise at both 2 and 32 minutes postexercise. We conclude that pressure pain perception can be reduced for more than 30 minutes following aerobic exercise from leg cycling among people with chronic low back pain.

  14. Inflammatory muscle pain is dependent on the activation of kinin B1 and B2 receptors and intracellular kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Meotti, FC; Campos, R; da Silva, KABS; Paszcuk, AF; Costa, R; Calixto, JB

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE B1 and B2 kinin receptors are involved in pain transmission but they may have different roles in the muscle pain induced by intense exercise or inflammation. We investigated the contribution of each of these receptors, and the intracellular pathways involved, in the initial development and maintenance of the muscle pain associated with inflammation-induced tissue damage. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured using the Randall–Selitto apparatus after injecting 5% formalin solution into the gastrocnemius muscle in mice treated with selective antagonists for B1 or B2 receptors. The expression of kinin receptors and cytokines and the activation of intracellular kinases were monitored by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. KEY RESULTS The i.m. injection of formalin induced an overexpression of B1 and B2 receptors. This overexpression was associated with the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by formalin because treatment with B1 receptor antagonists (des-Arg9[Leu8]-BK, DALBK, and SSR240612) or B2 receptor antagonists (HOE 140 and FR173657) prevented the hyperalgesia. Formalin increased myeloperoxidase activity, and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in gastrocnemius. Myeloperoxidase activity and TNF-α mRNA expression were inhibited by either DALBK or HOE 140, whereas IL-6 was inhibited only by HOE 140. The hyperalgesia induced by i.m. formalin was dependent on the activation of intracellular MAPKs p38, JNK and PKC. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Inflammatory muscle pain involves a cascade of events that is dependent on the activation of PKC, p38 and JNK, and the synthesis of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 associated with the up-regulation of both B1 and B2 kinin receptors. PMID:22220695

  15. Effects of William training on lumbosacral muscles function, lumbar curve and pain.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Rouholah; Javid, Marziyeh; Najafabadi, Ebrahim Moslehi

    2015-01-01

    There are many types of treatments and recommendations for restoring back deformities depending on doctors' knowledge and opinions. The purpose of the exercises is to reduce pain and to ensure stability of the lower trunk by toning the abdominal muscles, buttocks and hamstrings. Given the duration of flares and relapses rate, it is important to apply an efficient and lasting treatment. To evaluate the effects of 8 weeks of William's training on flexibility of lumbosacral muscles and lumbar angle in females with Hyperlordosis. Forty female students with lumbar lordosis more than normal degrees (Hyperlordotic) that were randomly divided into exercise and control groups were selected as the study sample. The lumbar lordosis was measured using a flexible ruler, flexibility of hamstring muscles was measured with the active knee extension test, the hip flexor muscles strength was measured using Thomas test, the lumbar muscles flexibility measures by Schober test, abdominal muscles strength measured by Sit-Up test and back pain was measured using McGill's Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) questionnaire. Data were compared before and post-test using independent and paired t-testes. Results showed that 8 weeks of William's exercise led to significant decreases in lumbar angle and back pain, increases in flexibility of hamstring muscles, hip flexor muscles flexibility, lumbar extensor muscles flexibility and abdominal muscles strength. The findings show that William's corrective training can be considered as a useful and valid method for restoring and refining back deformities like as accentuated back-arc and became wreaked muscles' performance in lumbar areas.

  16. Musculoskeletal sensitization and sleep: chronic muscle pain fragments sleep of mice without altering its duration.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Blair C; Opp, Mark R

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in humans is often associated with poor sleep quality. We used a model in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced by injection of acidified saline into muscle to study the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of mice. A one month pre-clinical study was designed to determine the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of C57BL/6J mice. We instrumented mice with telemeters to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature. We used an established model of musculoskeletal sensitization in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0). The injections were given into the gastrocnemius muscle and spaced five days apart. EEG and body temperature recordings started prior to injections (baseline) and continued for three weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization was induced by the second injection. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed using von Frey filaments at baseline (before any injections) and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the second injection. Mice injected with acidified saline developed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity at the hind paws as measured by von Frey testing and as compared to control mice and baseline data. Sleep during the light period was fragmented in experimental mice injected with acidified saline, and EEG spectra altered. Musculoskeletal sensitization did not alter the duration of time spent in wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. Musculoskeletal sensitization in this model results in a distinct sleep phenotype in which sleep is fragmented during the light period, but the overall duration of sleep is not changed. This study suggests the consequences of musculoskeletal pain include sleep disruption, an observation that has been made in the clinical literature but has yet to be studied using preclinical models.

  17. Muscle activation timing and balance response in chronic lower back pain patients with associated radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Frost, Lydia R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain and associated radiculopathy present with neuromuscular symptoms both in their lower back and down their leg; however, investigations of muscle activation have so far been isolated to the lower back. During balance perturbations, it is necessary that lower limb muscles activate with proper timing and sequencing along with the lower back musculature to efficiently regain balance control. Patients with chronic low back pain and radiculopathy and matched controls completed a series of balance perturbations (rapid bilateral arm raise, unanticipated and anticipated sudden loading, and rapid rise to toe). Muscle activation timing and sequencing as well as kinetic response to the perturbations were analyzed. Patients had significantly delayed lower limb muscle activation in rapid arm raise trials as compared to controls. In sudden loading trials, muscle activation timing was not delayed in patients; however, some differences in posterior chain muscle activation sequencing were present. Patients demonstrated less anterior-posterior movement in unanticipated sudden loading trials, and greater medial-lateral movement in rise to toe trials. Patients with low back pain and radiculopathy demonstrated some significant differences from control participants in terms of muscle activation timing, sequencing, and overall balance control. The presence of differences between patients and controls, specifically in the lower limb, indicates that radiculopathy may play a role in altering balance control in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasonic characterization of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Zaazhoa, Maryam; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-04-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in taut bands of skeletal muscle that are painful on compression. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Localization, diagnosis, and clinical outcome measures of painful MTrPs can be improved by objectively characterizing and quantitatively measuring their properties. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound imaging and elastography can differentiate symptomatic (active) MTrPs from normal muscle. Patients with chronic (>3 months) neck pain with spontaneously painful, palpable (i.e., active) MTrPs and healthy volunteers without spontaneous pain (having palpably normal muscle tissue) were recruited for this study. The upper trapezius muscles in all subjects were imaged, and the echotexture was analyzed using entropy filtering of B-mode images. Vibration elastography was performed by vibrating the muscle externally at 100 Hz. Color Doppler variance imaging was used to quantify the regions of color deficit exhibiting low vibration amplitude. The imaging measures were compared against the clinical findings of a standardized physical exam. We found that sites with active MTrPs (n = 14) have significantly lower entropy (p < 0.05) and significantly larger nonvibrating regions (p < 0.05) during vibration elastography compared with normal, uninvolved muscle (n = 15). A combination of both entropy analysis and vibration elastography yielded 69% sensitivity and 81% specificity in discriminating active MTrPs from normal muscle. These results suggest that active MTrPs have more homogeneous texture and heterogeneous stiffness when compared with normal, unaffected muscle. Our methods enabled us to improve the imaging contrast between suspected MTrPs and surrounding muscle. Our results indicate that in subjects with chronic neck pain and active MTrPs, the abnormalities are not confined to discrete isolated nodules

  19. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P.; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Zaazhoa, Maryam; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in taut bands of skeletal muscle that are painful on compression. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Localization, diagnosis, and clinical outcome measures of painful MTrPs can be improved by objectively characterizing and quantitatively measuring their properties. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound imaging and elastography can differentiate symptomatic (active) MTrPs from normal muscle. Patients with chronic (>3 months) neck pain with spontaneously painful, palpable (i.e., active) MTrPs and healthy volunteers without spontaneous pain (having palpably normal muscle tissue) were recruited for this study. The upper trapezius muscles in all subjects were imaged, and the echotexture was analyzed using entropy filtering of B-mode images. Vibration elastography was performed by vibrating the muscle externally at 100 Hz. Color Doppler variance imaging was used to quantify the regions of color deficit exhibiting low vibration amplitude. The imaging measures were compared against the clinical findings of a standardized physical exam. We found that sites with active MTrPs (n = 14) have significantly lower entropy (p < 0.05) and significantly larger nonvibrating regions (p < 0.05) during vibration elastography compared with normal, uninvolved muscle (n = 15). A combination of both entropy analysis and vibration elastography yielded 69% sensitivity and 81% specificity in discriminating active MTrPs from normal muscle. These results suggest that active MTrPs have more homogeneous texture and heterogeneous stiffness when compared with normal, unaffected muscle. Our methods enabled us to improve the imaging contrast between suspected MTrPs and surrounding muscle. Our results indicate that in subjects with chronic neck pain and active MTrPs, the abnormalities are not confined to discrete isolated nodules

  20. Pain differs from non-painful attention-demanding or stressful tasks in its effect on postural control patterns of trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Nicholas, M K; Hodges, Paul W

    2004-05-01

    Pain changes postural activation of the trunk muscles. The cause of these changes is not known but one possibility relates to the information processing requirements and the stressful nature of pain. This study investigated this possibility by evaluating electromyographic activity (EMG) of the deep and superficial trunk muscles associated with voluntary rapid arm movement. Data were collected from control trials, trials during low back pain (LBP) elicited by injection of hypertonic saline into the back muscles, trials during a non-painful attention-demanding task, and during the same task that was also stressful. Pain did not change the reaction time (RT) of the movement, had variable effects on RT of the superficial trunk muscles, but consistently increased RT of the deepest abdominal muscle. The effect of the attention-demanding task was opposite: increased RT of the movement and the superficial trunk muscles but no effect on RT of the deep trunk muscles. Thus, activation of the deep trunk muscles occurred earlier relative to the movement. When the attention-demanding task was made stressful, the RT of the movement and superficial trunk muscles was unchanged but the RT of the deep trunk muscles was increased. Thus, the temporal relationship between deep trunk muscle activation and arm movement was restored. This means that although postural activation of the deep trunk muscles is not affected when central nervous system resources are limited, it is delayed when the individual is also under stress. However, a non-painful attention-demanding task does not replicate the effect of pain on postural control of the trunk muscles even when the task is stressful.

  1. EVALUATION OF MICROCURRENT ELECTRICAL NERVE STIMULATION (MENS) EFFECTIVENESS ON MUSCLE PAIN IN TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Garcia, Alicio Rosalino; Turcio, Karina Helga Leal; Hamata, Marcelo Matida

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Microcurrent Electrical Nerve Stimulation (MENS) was evaluated and compared with occlusal splint therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients with muscle pain. Twenty TMD patients were divided into four groups. One received occlusal splint therapy and MENS (I); other received splints and placebo MENS (II); the third, only MENS (III) and the last group, placebo MENS (IV). Sensitivity derived from muscle palpation was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Results were submitted to analysis of variance (p<0.05). There was reduction of pain level in all groups: group I (occlusal splint and MENS) had a 47.7% reduction rate; group II (occlusal splint and placebo MENS), 66.7%; group III (MENS), 49.7% and group IV (placebo MENS), 16.5%. In spite of that, there was no statistical difference (analysis of variance / p<0.05) between MENS and occlusal splint therapy regarding muscle pain reduction in TMD patients after four weeks. PMID:19089032

  2. Evaluation of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation (MENS) effectiveness on muscle pain in temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Garcia, Alicio Rosalino; Turcio, Karina Helga Leal; Hamata, Marcelo Matida

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Microcurrent Electrical Nerve Stimulation (MENS) was evaluated and compared with occlusal splint therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients with muscle pain. Twenty TMD patients were divided into four groups. One received occlusal splint therapy and MENS (I); other received splints and placebo MENS (II); the third, only MENS (III) and the last group, placebo MENS (IV). Sensitivity derived from muscle palpation was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Results were submitted to analysis of variance (p<0.05). There was reduction of pain level in all groups: group I (occlusal splint and MENS) had a 47.7% reduction rate; group II (occlusal splint and placebo MENS), 66.7%; group III (MENS), 49.7% and group IV (placebo MENS), 16.5%. In spite of that, there was no statistical difference (analysis of variance / p<0.05) between MENS and occlusal splint therapy regarding muscle pain reduction in TMD patients after four weeks.

  3. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P; Heimur, Juliana; Gebreab, Tadesse; Armstrong, Katherine; Gerber, Lynn H; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are palpable, tender nodules in skeletal muscle that produce symptomatic referred pain when palpated. MTrPs are characteristic findings in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). The role of MTrPs in the pathophysiology of MPS is unknown. Objective characterization and quantitative measurement of the properties of MTrPs can improve their localization and diagnosis, as well as lead to clinical outcome measures. MTrPs associated with soft tissue neck pain are often found in the upper trapezius muscle. We have previously demonstrated that MTrPs can be visualized using ultrasound imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether texture-based image analysis can differentiate structural heterogeneity of symptomatic MTrPs and normal muscle.

  4. Efficacy of thiocolchicoside in Indian patients suffering from low back pain associated with muscle spasm.

    PubMed

    Soonawalla, Darius F; Joshi, Niteen

    2008-05-01

    Low back pain (LBP), a high prevalent condition among middle aged population, is usually associated with 'muscle spasm' that is responsible for giving rise to pain as well as its persistence. Muscle spasm is an involuntary, painful contraction of muscles that interferes with the function and cause of muscular disorder. Therefore centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxants, also called lissive drugs, are commonly used for its treatment. Sometimes these are combined with NSAIDs. The use of centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxants, though efficacious, is associated with frequent development of dose-related adverse drug reactions like sedation, impairment of voluntary motor functions and ataxia. So there is an urgent need for newer better drugs for treatment of conditions associated with muscle spasm. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of oral thiocolchicoside (TC), a natural glycoside as compared to an adrenergic alpha 2 agonist tizanidine (TZ) in the Indian patients with LBP accompanied by muscle spasm. In this randomised, non-cross over clinical study, 60 adult Indians aged between 18 and 65 years with clinical diagnosis of muscle spasm associated with low back pain were enrolled. Patients satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were either treated with TC and TZ for one week duration. Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain at rest and VAS for tiredness, drowsiness, dizziness and alertness was used as the self-rated primary efficacy and safety variable. Pain was also assessed by mobility assessment; muscle spasm assessment and analgesic consumption. Data obtained from 58 patients (those who completed the study) indicated that in this one week study both TC and TZ provided sustained symptoms relief compared with the baseline. There was statistically significant reduction in severity of symptoms from day 0 to day 7 in both the groups. Patients were followed up on 3rd and 7th day and severity score of various parameters was

  5. Sleep Fragmentation Hypersensitizes Healthy Young Women to Deep and Superficial Experimental Pain.

    PubMed

    Iacovides, Stella; George, Kezia; Kamerman, Peter; Baker, Fiona C

    2017-07-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation on pain sensitivity has typically been studied using total and partial sleep deprivation protocols. These protocols do not mimic the fragmented pattern of sleep disruption usually observed in individuals with clinical pain conditions. Therefore, we conducted a controlled experiment to investigate the effect of sleep fragmentation on pain perception (deep pain: forearm muscle ischemia, and superficial pain: graded pin pricks applied to the skin) in 11 healthy young women after 2 consecutive nights of sleep fragmentation, compared with a normal night of sleep. Compared with normal sleep, sleep fragmentation resulted in significantly poorer sleep quality, morning vigilance, and global mood. Pin prick threshold decreased significantly (increased sensitivity), as did habituation to ischemic muscle pain (increased sensitivity), over the course of the 2 nights of sleep fragmentation compared with the night of normal sleep. Sleep fragmentation did not increase the maximum pain intensity reported during muscle ischemia (no increase in gain), and nor did it increase the number of spontaneous pains reported by participants. Our data show that sleep fragmentation in healthy, young, pain-free women increases pain sensitivity in superficial and deep tissues, indicating a role for sleep disruption, through sleep fragmentation, in modulating pain perception. Our findings that pain-free, young women develop hyperalgesia to superficial and deep muscle pain after short-term sleep disruption highlight the need for effective sleep management strategies in patients with pain. Findings also suggest the possibility that short-term sleep disruption associated with recurrent acute pain could contribute to increased risk for future chronic pain conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequential MR imaging of denervated muscle: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bendszus, Martin; Koltzenburg, Martin; Wessig, Carsten; Solymosi, Laszlo

    2002-09-01

    MR changes in denervated muscles have been reported to occur within days up to several weeks after peripheral nerve damage. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the longitudinal changes in denervated muscles by using MR imaging. In 12 Lewis rats, the left sciatic nerve was transected at the level of the proximal thigh. MR imaging of both legs was performed before and 1 hour, 24 hours, 48 hours, 7 days, 14 days, 28 days, and 2 months after the procedure. The MR protocol included T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted double turbo spin-echo, and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) sequences obtained in the axial plane. Signal intensities (T2-weighted double turbo spin-echo and TIRM sequences) and the T2 TR (T2-weighted double turbo spin-echo sequence) were recorded for the soleus, peroneal, and gracilis muscles of both sides. Moreover, the circumferences of both lower legs were determined on the basis of T1-weighted images. Twenty-four hours after denervation, a signal intensity increase in the denervated peroneal and soleus muscles was present on TIRM images. On T2-weighted images, only the peroneal muscle exhibited slightly increased signal intensities and T2 TR. Forty-eight hours after nerve transection, the denervated soleus and peroneal muscles revealed prolonged T2 TR and marked increased signal intensities on T2-weighted and TIRM images when compared with the contralateral side, which further increased at or less than 2 months after denervation. Muscle atrophy of the denervated muscles was present as early as 7 days after denervation and was also increased at follow-up examinations. The TIRM sequence is more sensitive than is T2-weighted imaging in the detection of signal intensity changes in denervated muscle. These changes occur as early as 24 (TIRM sequence) and 48 (T2-weighted sequence) hours, respectively, after complete transection of the sciatic nerve in rats and precede muscle atrophy. The sensitivity to early signal intensity

  7. Caffeine lowers muscle pain during exercise in hot but not cool environments.

    PubMed

    Ganio, Matthew S; Johnson, Evan C; Lopez, Rebecca M; Stearns, Rebecca L; Emmanuel, Holly; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Casa, Douglas J; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S; Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2011-03-01

    Caffeine (CAF) ingestion may enhance endurance exercise by lowering perceived exertion (RPE) and muscle pain. However, exercise in the heat may be detrimental to performance by increasing RPE and pain. The purpose of this study was to examine if caffeine affects pain and related perceptual responses differently in cool and hot ambient conditions. Eleven male cyclists (mean ± SD; age, 25 ± 6 years; mass, 72.6 ± 8.1 kg; VO(2max), 58.7 ± 2.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed four trials in a randomized, double blind design. While remaining euhydrated, subjects cycled for 90 min at 65 ± 7% VO(2max) followed by a 15-min performance trial. Subjects ingested 3 mg kg(-1) of encapsulated caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA) 60 min before and 45 after beginning exercise in 12°C and 33°C (i.e., 12-CAF, 33-CAF, 12-PLA, and 33-PLA trials). Central, local, and overall perceived exertion (C-, L-, and O-RPE) and pain were measured throughout exercise. Throughout submaximal exercise C-, L-, and O-RPE were significantly greater in 33°C (P<0.05) but were not affected by CAF (P>0.05). Using area-under-the-curve analysis, pain in 33-PLA was increased by 74% vs 12-PLA (P<0.05). CAF did not reduce pain in 12°C (P=0.542), but in 33°C, CAF reduced pain by 27% (P=0.032). Despite this apparent advantage, CAF improved performance independent of ambient temperature (i.e., non-significant interaction; P=0.662). This study found that, although caffeine improves exercise capacity, its effect on leg muscle pain is dependent on ambient temperature. Although exercise in the heat increases muscle pain compared to a cooler environment, caffeine reduces this pain. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In-field masticatory muscle activity in subjects with pain-related TMD diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, S.N.; McCall, W.; Dunford, R.; Nickel, J.C.; Iwasaki, L.R.; Crow, H.C.; Gonzalez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pain-related Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent conditions among TMDs. There is contrasting evidence available for association of pain-related TMD and masticatory muscle activity (MMA). The present investigation assesses the associations between MMA levels of masseter and temporalis muscles during awake and sleep among pain-related TMD diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population The department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo. Twenty females and 6 males participated in this study. Material & Methods Using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC-TMD), participants were diagnostically categorized. Subjects used a custom monitoring system, which recorded in–field muscle activities. A factorial model tested for association between independent variable (muscle, time period, MMA level, diagnostic group) effects and the logarithm of MMA. Greenhouse–Geisser test was used to determine any statistically significant associations (p ≤ 0.003). Results No statistically significant association was found among four-way, three-way, and two-way analyses. However, among the main effects, range of magnitudes was the only variable to be statistically significant. Although the data suggest a trend of increased masseter MMA in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group both during awake and sleep time periods, such observation is not maintained for the temporalis muscle. In addition, temporalis MMA was found to be higher in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group only at extreme activity levels (<25% and ≥80% ranges). Conclusion This data support the association between masticatory muscle hyperactivity and painful-TMD conditions. PMID:25865542

  9. Caffeine attenuates delayed-onset muscle pain and force loss following eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Maridakis, Victor; O'Connor, Patrick J; Dudley, Gary A; McCully, Kevin K

    2007-03-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures experiment examined the effects of a 5 mg . kg(-1) body weight dose of caffeine on delayed-onset muscle pain intensity and force loss in response to 64 eccentric actions of the dominant quadriceps induced by electrical stimulation. Low caffeine-consuming college-aged females (n = 9) ingested caffeine or placebo 24 and 48 hours following electrically stimulated eccentric exercise of the quadriceps. One hour after ingestion, maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and submaximal voluntary eccentric actions were used to determine force loss during activation of damaged quadriceps and whether caffeine attenuates muscle pain intensity. Pain intensity was measured using a 0 to 100 visual analog scale. Caffeine produced a large (12.7 raw visual analog scale [VAS] units; -48%; Cohen's d effect size = -0.88), statistically significant hypoalgesia during the MVIC (t = -2.52; df = 8; P = .036). The reduction in pain scores during submaximal voluntary eccentric movements was smaller (7.8 raw VAS units; -26%, d = -0.34), as was the increase in MVIC force (4.4%; d = 0.13). Eccentric exercise occurs when skeletal muscles produce force while being lengthened. For example, the biceps brachii muscles act eccentrically when a cup of coffee is lowered from the mouth to a tabletop. This experiment found that caffeine (equal to approximately 2 cups of brewed coffee) could produce a large reduction in pain resulting from eccentric exercise-induced, delayed-onset muscle injury. This finding may improve the quality of life of individuals who experience skeletal muscle pain after engaging in unaccustomed, eccentrically biased exercise.

  10. Muscle Trigger Points and Pressure Pain Sensitivity Maps of the Feet in Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tornero-Caballero, Maria C; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Cigarán-Méndez, Margarita; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Madeleine, Pascal; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in feet musculature and topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the feet as well as the relationship between TrPs, pressure pain maps, and clinical variables in women with fibromyalgia (FMS). METHODS : Fifty-one FMS women and 24 comparable healthy women participated. TrPs within the flexor hallucis brevis, adductor hallucis, dorsal interossei, extensor digitorum brevis, and quadratus plantae, as well as external and internal gastrocnemius, were explored. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed in a blind manner over seven locations on each foot. Topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the plantar region were generated using the averaged PPT of each location. RESULTS : The prevalence rate of foot pain was 63% (n = 32). The number of active TrPs for each FMS woman with foot pain was 5 ± 1.5 without any latent TrPs. Women with FMS without foot pain and healthy controls had only latent TrPs (2.2 ± 0.8 and 1.5 ± 1.3, respectively). Active TrPs in the flexor hallucis brevis and adductor hallucis muscles were the most prevalent. Topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps revealed that FMS women with foot pain had lower PPT than FMS women without pain and healthy controls, and higher PPT on the calcaneus bone (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS : The presence of foot pain in women with FMS is high. The referred pain elicited by active TrPs in the foot muscles reproduced the symptoms in these patients. FMS women suffering foot pain showed higher pressure hypersensitivity in the plantar region than those FMS women without pain.

  11. Pain and soreness associated with a percutaneous electrical stimulation muscle cramping protocol.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin C; Knight, Kenneth L

    2007-11-01

    Muscle cramps are difficult to study scientifically because of their spontaneity and unpredictability. Various laboratory techniques to induce muscle cramps have been explored but the best technique for inducing cramps is unclear. Electrical stimulation appears to be the most reliable, but there is a perception that it is extremely painful. Data to support this perception are lacking. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation is a tolerable method of inducing cramps with few side effects. We measured cramp frequency (HZ), pain during electrical stimulation, and soreness before, at 5 s, and 30, 60, and 90 min after cramp induction using a 100-mm visual analog scale. Group 1 received tibial nerve stimulation on 5 consecutive days; Group 2 received it on alternate days for five total treatments. Pain and soreness were mild. The highest ratings occurred on Day 1 and decreased thereafter. Intersession reliability was high. Our study showed that electrical stimulation causes little pain or soreness and is a reliable method for inducing cramps.

  12. [Bioelectric activity of paravertebral muscles in experimental scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, G I; Popov, S V

    1976-12-01

    The paper is concerned with a study of the bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles in 2 groups of rabbits with differently expressed degrees of experimental scoliosis and in a control group of intact animals. The results demonstrated an asymmetry in the tonic bioelectric activity in the paravertebral muscles in scoliosis, unlike the reactions of the control group of animals. The character of asymmetry depends upon the degree of deformation: in cases of moderately expressed scoliosis there is a prevalence of the tonic bioelectric activity on the level of the basic arc of distortion on the side of the concavity; in severely expressed scoliosis the tonic bioelectrical activity of the paravertebral muscles on the concave side appears to be less than on the convex side. An asymmetry of the tonic activity takes place on the level of compensatory arcs as well. The authors come to the conclusion on the pathogenetical role of the muscular dysbalance in the genesis of scoliotic deformation.

  13. Neck muscle endurance and head posture: A comparison between adolescents with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Silva, Anabela G

    2016-04-01

    The main aims of this study were to compare the neck flexor and extensor endurance and forward head posture between adolescents with and without neck pain. The secondary aims were to explore potential associations between muscles endurance, head posture and neck pain characteristics and to assess intra-rater reliability of the measurements used. Adolescents with neck pain (n = 35) and age-matched asymptomatic adolescents (n = 35) had their forward head posture, neck flexor endurance and neck extensor endurance measured using clinical tests. Intra-rater reliability was also assessed. Forward head posture and neck flexor and extensor endurance tests showed moderate to almost perfect intra-rater reliability (ICC between 0.58 and 0.88). Adolescents with neck pain showed significantly less forward head posture (neck pain = 46.62 ± 4.92; asymptomatic = 44.18°± 3.64°, p > 0.05) and less neck flexor (neck pain = 24.50 ± 23.03s; asymptomatic = 35.89 ± 21.53s, p > 0.05) and extensor endurance (neck pain = 12.6.64 ± 77.94s; asymptomatic = 168.66 ± 74.77s, p > 0.05) than asymptomatic adolescents. Results suggest that changes in posture and neck muscle endurance are a feature of adolescents with neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of caffeine on leg muscle pain during cycling exercise among females.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; O'connor, Patrick J; Tubandt, Leslie; Puetz, Tim; Ely, Matthew R

    2006-03-01

    This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effects of ingesting two doses of caffeine on perceptions of leg muscle pain during moderate-intensity cycling exercise among females. Low-caffeine-consuming college-aged females (N = 11) ingested one of two doses of caffeine (5 or 10 mg x kg(-1) body weight) or a placebo and 1 h later completed 30 min of cycling on an ergometer at approximately 60% VO2peak. The conditions were completed in a counterbalanced order. Perceptions of leg muscle pain as well as power output, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and oxygen consumption (VO2) were recorded during exercise. Caffeine had a significant effect on leg muscle pain ratings [F (2,20) = 10.63, P = 0.001, n2 = 0.52]. The mean pain intensity scores during exercise after ingesting 10 mg x kg(-1) body weight caffeine, 5 mg x kg(-1) body weight caffeine, and placebo were 1.6 +/- 1.1, 1.3 +/- 0.7, and 2.4 +/- 1.1, respectively. The results support that caffeine ingestion has a large effect on reducing leg muscle pain during exercise among females, but this effect does not appear to be dose-dependent between 5 and 10 mg.kg body weight caffeine.

  15. Changes in jaw muscle EMG activity and pain after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Ernberg, M; Schopka, J H; Fougeront, N; Svensson, P

    2007-01-01

    Limited jaw-opening capacity is frequently encountered following third molar surgery and may impair function. The aim of this study was to investigate the electromyographic (EMG) activity in jaw muscles after third molar surgery to obtain more insight into the mechanisms of restrictions in jaw opening. Twenty subjects were examined before, 24 h and 1 week after surgery. Ten healthy controls were subjected to the same examination at two different occasions for intersession variability. The EMG activity of the masseter and anterior digastricus muscles was recorded at different jaw positions and during maximum voluntary clenching. Pain intensity was assessed at rest and during movements. The EMG activity in the jaw muscles increased with opening level (P < 0.01), but did not change after surgery. In contrast, the EMG activity during clenching was decreased in all muscles after surgery (P < 0.05). The pain intensity after surgery increased with jaw opening level (P < 0.001), but was in general not correlated to EMG level. Pain intensity during clenching was increased after surgery (P < 0.001), but not correlated to EMG level. The EMG activity did not change between visits in the control group. In conclusion, the results indicate that third molar surgery does not influence the EMG activity in the masseter and anterior digastricus muscles during various levels of static jaw opening, but decreases the EMG activity during clenching. However, these changes are not influenced by pain intensity. The results have implications for the understanding of the phenomenon of trismus.

  16. Effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain and fatigue in human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Martina, R

    2001-04-01

    Gum chewing has been accepted as an adjunct to oral hygiene, as salivary stimulant and vehicle for various agents, as well as for jaw muscle training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain, fatigue and pressure tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Fifteen women without temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were requested to perform one of the following chewing tasks in three separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and empty-chewing with no bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 40 min at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, perceived muscle pain and masticatory fatigue were rated on visual analog scales (VAS) before, throughout, and after the chewing task. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were assessed before and immediately after the chewing tasks, and again after 24 h. The VAS scores for pain and fatigue significantly increased only during the hard gum chewing, and after 10 min of recovery VAS scores had decreased again, almost to their baseline values. No significant changes were found for PPTs either after hard or soft gum chewing. The findings indicate that the jaw muscles recover quickly from prolonged chewing activity in subjects without TMD.

  17. Calcific tendonitis of the longus colli muscle: a cause of atraumatic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Widlus, D M

    1985-10-01

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis is a not-infrequent cause of atraumatic neck pain. Two patients presented with neck pain and stiffness, one with associated dysphagia. Cervical spine radiographs showed calcification anterior to the dens, establishing the diagnosis of calcific tendonitis of the longus colli muscle. Treatment with analgesics and antiinflammatory agents brought relief of symptoms within one week. A review of the literature shows that these patients had courses similar to those in previously reported cases.

  18. Does pain in the masseter and anterior temporal muscles influence maximal bite force?

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Moreno, Amália; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; de Caxias, Fernanda Pereira; Turcio, Karina Helga Leal

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in pain and muscle force, and the relationship between them, in patients with muscle pain and bruxism, prior to and after treatment. Thirty women with bruxism and myofascial pain (Ia) were included in this study. Sleep bruxism diagnosis was made based on clinical diagnostic criteria, and awake bruxism diagnosis was made by patient questionnaires and the presence of tooth wear. The diagnosis of myofascial pain was established according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC-TMD). Dentulous or partially edentulous patients (rehabilitated with conventional fixed prostheses) were included in the study according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pain treatment protocol included occlusal splints, patient education, and physiotherapy for 30days. Bite force was measured using a dynamometer at the central incisor and the first molar regions on both sides. The exams were performed at baseline, after 7days, and 30days after treatment. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare patient pain level response among the periods analyzed in the study. Bite force data were submitted to two-way repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Tukey HSD test (p<0.05). A simple regression analysis was performed to verify the relation between pain level and bite force. Results revealed that there was a statistical difference in pain level over time for both muscles and sides (p<0.01). In the molar region, the bite force exhibited significantly higher values after 30days of treatment, when compared with the baseline (p<0.001). There was a correlation between pain level and bite force only for the temporal muscle in all periods analyzed (p<0.05). There was no strong correlation in the response level points to support the association of pain and bite force. Pain level decreased and bite force increased in the molar region after treatment. No strong correlation or dispersion in the relationship between pain levels

  19. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  20. Muscle injections with lidocaine improve resting fatigue and pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Staud, Roland; Kizer, Taylor; Robinson, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) complain of long-lasting fatigue and pain which are not relieved by rest and worsened by physical exertion. Previous research has implicated metaboreceptors of muscles to play an important role for chronic fatigue and pain. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking impulse input from deep tissues with intramuscular lidocaine injections would improve not only the pain but also fatigue of CFS patients. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 58 CFS patients received 20 mL of 1% lidocaine (200 mg) or normal saline once into both trapezius and gluteal muscles. Study outcomes included clinical fatigue and pain, depression, and anxiety. In addition, mechanical and heat hyperalgesia were assessed and serum levels of lidocaine were obtained after the injections. Results Fatigue ratings of CFS patients decreased significantly more after lidocaine compared to saline injections (p = 0.03). In contrast, muscle injections reduced pain, depression, and anxiety (p < 0.001), but these changes were not statistically different between lidocaine and saline (p > 0.05). Lidocaine injections increased mechanical pain thresholds of CFS patients (p = 0.04) but did not affect their heat hyperalgesia. Importantly, mood changes or lidocaine serum levels did not significantly predict fatigue reductions. Conclusion These results demonstrate that lidocaine injections reduce clinical fatigue of CFS patients significantly more than placebo, suggesting an important role of peripheral tissues for chronic fatigue. Future investigations will be necessary to evaluate the clinical benefits of such interventions. PMID:28721090

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Serratus Anterior Muscle Pain Syndrome: Description of Technique and Case Series.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell; Nowakowsky, Michal; Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Cogan, Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    Chronic chest pain is a challenge, and serratus anterior muscle pain syndrome (SAMPS) is often overlooked. We have developed an ultrasound-guided technique for infiltrating local anesthetics and steroids in patients with SAMPS. In 8 patients, the duration of chronic pain was approximately 19 months. Three months after treatment, all patients had experienced a significant reduction in pain. Infiltration for SAMPS confirms the diagnosis and provides adequate pain relief.

  2. Muscle Functions and Functional Performance among Older Persons with and without Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare muscle functions and functional performances between older persons with and without low back pain (LBP) and to determine the association between muscle functions and functional performances. This is a cross-sectional study, involving 95 older persons (age = 70.27 ± 7.26 years). Anthropometric characteristics, muscle functions, and functional performances were measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and multiple linear regression. The functional performances showed no significant differences (females LBP versus non-LBP, males LBP versus non-LBP) (p < 0.05). For muscle functions, significant differences were found (females LBP versus non-LBP) for abdominal muscle strength (p = 0.006) and back muscle strength (p = 0.07). In the LBP group, significant correlations were found between back and abdominal muscle strength and hand grip strength (r = 0.377 and r = 0.396, resp.), multifidus control and lower limb function (r = 0.363) in females, and back muscle strength and lower limb function (r = 0.393) in males (all p < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that abdominal and back muscle strengths were significant predictors of hand grip strength (p = 0.041 and p = 0.049, resp.), and multifidus control was a significant predictor of lower limb function in females (p = 0.047). This study demonstrates that older women with LBP exhibit poorer muscle functions compared to older women without LBP.

  3. Muscle Functions and Functional Performance among Older Persons with and without Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare muscle functions and functional performances between older persons with and without low back pain (LBP) and to determine the association between muscle functions and functional performances. This is a cross-sectional study, involving 95 older persons (age = 70.27 ± 7.26 years). Anthropometric characteristics, muscle functions, and functional performances were measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and multiple linear regression. The functional performances showed no significant differences (females LBP versus non-LBP, males LBP versus non-LBP) (p < 0.05). For muscle functions, significant differences were found (females LBP versus non-LBP) for abdominal muscle strength (p = 0.006) and back muscle strength (p = 0.07). In the LBP group, significant correlations were found between back and abdominal muscle strength and hand grip strength (r = 0.377 and r = 0.396, resp.), multifidus control and lower limb function (r = 0.363) in females, and back muscle strength and lower limb function (r = 0.393) in males (all p < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that abdominal and back muscle strengths were significant predictors of hand grip strength (p = 0.041 and p = 0.049, resp.), and multifidus control was a significant predictor of lower limb function in females (p = 0.047). This study demonstrates that older women with LBP exhibit poorer muscle functions compared to older women without LBP. PMID:27872641

  4. Examination of contraction-induced muscle pain as a behavioral correlate of physical activity in women with and without fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Corbin, Lisa W; Maluf, Katrina S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare muscle pain intensity during a sustained isometric contraction in women with and without fibromyalgia (FM), and examine the association between muscle pain and self-reported levels of physical activity. Fourteen women with FM and 14 healthy women completed the study, where muscle pain ratings (MPRs) were obtained every 30 s during a 3 min isometric handgrip task at 25% maximal strength, and self-reported physical activity was quantified using the Baecke Physical Activity Questionnaire. Women with FM were less physically active than healthy controls. During the isometric contraction, MPR progressively increased in both groups at a comparable rate, but women with FM generally reported a greater intensity of muscle pain than healthy controls. Among all women, average MPR scores were inversely associated with self-reported physical activity levels. Women with FM exhibit augmented muscle pain during isometric contractions and reduced physical activity than healthy controls. Furthermore, contraction-induced muscle pain is inversely associated with physical activity levels. These observations suggest that augmented muscle pain may serve as a behavioral correlate of reduced physical activity in women with FM. Implications for Rehabilitation Women with fibromyalgia experience a greater intensity of localized muscle pain in a contracting muscle compared to healthy women. The intensity of pain during muscle contraction is inversely associated with the amount of physical activity in women with and without fibromyalgia. Future studies should determine whether exercise adherence can be improved by considering the relationship between contraction-induced muscle pain and participation in routine physical activity.

  5. The effect of progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions of middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, I Hsien; Chang, Kwang H; Liou, Tsan H; Tsou, Chih M; Huang, Yi C

    2017-07-17

    BACKGROUNDː Although neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, there is no consensus on suitable exercise methods for middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Therefore, this study investigated the effectiveness of a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise intervention program on cervical muscle function improvement in ≥45-year old patients with chronic neck pain. To evaluated the effects of progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions of middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. A randomized controlled Single-blind trial. Rehabilitation department of a hospital. POPULATIONː A total of 72 subjects aged ≥45 years with chronic neck pain were randomly allocated to either a experimental group (n = 36; age 57.3±8.74 years) or a control group (n = 36; age 58.15±8.17 years). The control group received only traditional physiotherapy, whereas the experimental group participated in a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise program consisting of cranio-cervical flexion and progressive resistance exercises in addition to receiving traditional physiotherapy. The muscle functions of subjects in both groups were tested before the experiment and also after the intervention program. The pretest and posttest measured the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT) and the superficial cervical muscle strength. RESULTSː After the intervention, the experimental group had a 56.48point improvement in the performance index of the CCFT (P<0.001), a 1.71-kg improvement in superficial neck flexor strength (P<0.001), and a 2.52-kg improvement in superficial neck extensor strength (P<0.001), indicating that in 6-week intervention significantly influenced the improvement of cervical muscle functions. CONCLUSIONSː This study confirmed that the 6-week progressive shoulder-neck exercise program can effectively improve cervical muscle function in middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Progressive shoulder-neck exercise might provide positive

  6. Muscle Tissue Saturation Compared With Muscle Tissue Perfusion During Low Blood Flows: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Sisse Anette; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Olsen Alstrup, Aage Kristian; Munk, Ole Lajord; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Larsson, Anders; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2017-03-22

    To investigate whether changes in muscle tissue perfusion measured with positron emission tomography would be reflected by parallel changes in muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) measured using near-infrared spectroscopy during high and low blood flow levels achieved using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in an animal model. A prospective, randomized study. Research laboratory, single institution. Eight pigs (69-71 kg). In anesthetized pigs, normothermic CPB was established with a blood flow of 60 mL/kg/min for 1 hour. Thereafter, a low blood flow of either 47.5 or 35 mL/kg/min was applied for 1 hour followed by a blood flow of 60 mL/kg/min for an additional hour. Regional StO2 was measured continuously by placing a near-infrared spectroscopy electrode on the skin above the gracilis muscle of the noncannulated back leg. Muscle tissue perfusion was measured using positron emission tomography with (15)O-labeled water during spontaneous circulation and the different CPB blood flows. Systemic oxygen consumption was estimated by measurement of venous saturation and lactate levels. The results showed profound systemic ischemia during low CPB blood flow. StO2 remained high until muscle tissue perfusion decreased to about 50%, after which StO2 paralleled the linear decrease in muscle tissue perfusion. In an experimental CPB animal model, StO2 was stable until muscle tissue perfusion was reduced by about 50%, and at lower blood flow levels, there was almost a linear relationship between StO2 and muscle tissue perfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dysfunction of endogenous pain inhibition during exercise with painful muscles in patients with shoulder myalgia and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Lannersten, Lisa; Kosek, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise influenced endogenous pain modulation in healthy controls, shoulder myalgia patients and fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Twenty-one healthy subjects, 20 shoulder myalgia patients and 20 FM patients, all females, participated. They performed standardized static contractions, that is, outward shoulder rotation (m. infraspinatus) and knee extension (m. quadriceps). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were determined bilaterally at m. infraspinatus and m. quadriceps. During contractions PPTs were assessed at the contracting muscle, the resting homologous contralateral muscle and contralaterally at a distant site (m. infraspinatus during contraction of m. quadriceps and vice versa). Myalgia patients had lower PPTs compared to healthy controls at m. infraspinatus bilaterally (p<0.01), but not at m. quadriceps. FM patients had lower PPTs at all sites compared to healthy controls (p<0.001) and myalgia patients (p<0.001). During contraction of m. infraspinatus PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.003), but not in myalgia or FM patients. During contraction of m. quadriceps PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.001) and myalgia patients (all sites: p<0.02), but not in FM patients. In conclusion, we found a normal activation of endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms in myalgia patients during contraction of the non-afflicted m. quadriceps, but a lack of pain inhibition during contraction of the painful m. infraspinatus. FM patients failed to activate their pain inhibitory mechanisms during all contractions.

  8. The local and referred pain from myofascial trigger points in the temporalis muscle contributes to pain profile in chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2007-01-01

    To assess the local and referred pain areas and pain characteristics evoked from temporalis muscle trigger points (TrPs) in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). Thirty CTTH patients and 30 age and sex-matched controls were studied. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks to substantiate the diagnosis and record the pain history. Both temporalis muscles were examined for the presence of myofascial TrPs in a blinded fashion. The local and referred pain intensities, referred pain pattern, and pressure pain threshold were recorded. Referred pain was evoked in 87% and 54% on the dominant and nondominant sides in CTTH patients, which was significantly higher (P<0.001) than in controls (10% vs. 17%, respectively). Referred pain spread to the temple ipsilateral to the stimulated muscle in both patients and controls, with additional referral behind the eyes in most patients, but none in controls. CTTH patients reported a higher local [visual analog scale (VAS): 5.6+/-1.2 right side, 5.3+/-1.4 left side] and referred pain (VAS: 4.7+/-2 right side, 3.5+/-2.8 left side) intensity than healthy controls (VAS: 0.8+/-0.7 right side, 0.7+/-0.7 left side for local pain; and 0.3+/-0.2 right side, 0.4+/-0.3 left side for referred pain) in both temporalis muscles (both, P<0.001). The local and referred pain areas were larger in patients than in controls (P<0.001). Twenty-three out of 30 CTTH patients (77%) had active TrPs in the temporalis muscle leading to their usual headache (17 patients on the right side; 12 on the left side, whereas 6 with bilateral active TrPs). CTTH patients with active TrPs in either right or left temporalis muscle showed longer headache duration than those with latent TrPs (P=0.004). CTTH patients showed significantly (P<0.001) lower pressure pain threshold (1.1+/-0.2 right side, 1.2+/-0.3 left side) as compared with controls (2.5+/-0.5 right side, 2.6+/-0.4 left side). In CTTH patients, the evoked local and referred pain from active TrPs in the temporalis

  9. Entropy measures of back muscles EMG for subjects with and without pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurcher, Ulrich; Kaufman, Miron; Vyhnalek, Bryan; Sung, Paul

    2007-10-01

    We have previously reported that the time-dependent entropy S(t) calculated from electromyography time series of low back muscles exhibit plateau-like behavior for intermediate times [50 ,ms < t < 0.5 ,s]. We proposed that the plateau value can be used to characterize the sEMG signal of subjects with low back pain [J. Rehab. Res. Dev. 44, 599 (2007)]. We report results of a larger study, and compare the entropies for the left -and right thoracic and left- and right lumbar muscles. We also compare entropies from muscles before and after physical therapy intervention.

  10. Why do you smile at me while I'm in pain? --Pain selectively modulates voluntary facial muscle responses to happy faces.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Antje B M; Wieser, Matthias J; Alpers, Georg W; Strack, Fritz; Pauli, Paul

    2012-08-01

    It has been well documented that emotional stimuli modulate pain perception, but little is known about the reverse influence pain may have on emotion processing. According to the motivational priming theory, pain should facilitate the processing of unpleasant and hamper the processing of pleasant affective stimuli. To this end, we investigated the influence of tonic pain on the processing of happy and angry faces in 30 healthy participants. As a measure of affect processing, the interference of picture content on participants' voluntary reactions to the pictures either with a compatible or an incompatible facial muscle (M. zygomaticus major ["smile"] or M. corrugator supercilii ["frown"]) was recorded by electromyogram (EMG). Additionally, participants rated valence and arousal of each picture. During both tasks, the participants received either painful or non-painful pressure stimulation. Pain stimulation was generally associated with slower compatible and incompatible muscle responses (M. zygomaticus and M. corrugator) and fewer erroneous incompatible (M. corrugator) responses to happy faces. However, pain did not affect muscle responses to angry faces and explicit valence and arousal ratings. Thus, pain seems to selectively influence the responses to happy faces, which may result from a slowed processing of incongruent information (happy/pain). That happy faces are processed differently during pain may bear important implications for social interactions during acute and possibly even chronic pain states. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. High prevalence of shoulder girdle muscles with myofascial trigger points in patients with shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is reported to be highly prevalent and tends to be recurrent or persistent despite medical treatment. The pathophysiological mechanisms of shoulder pain are poorly understood. Furthermore, there is little evidence supporting the effectiveness of current treatment protocols. Although myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are rarely mentioned in relation to shoulder pain, they may present an alternative underlying mechanism, which would provide new treatment targets through MTrP inactivation. While previous research has demonstrated that trained physiotherapists can reliably identify MTrPs in patients with shoulder pain, the percentage of patients who actually have MTrPs remains unclear. The aim of this observational study was to assess the prevalence of muscles with MTrPs and the association between MTrPs and the severity of pain and functioning in patients with chronic non-traumatic unilateral shoulder pain. Methods An observational study was conducted. Subjects were recruited from patients participating in a controlled trial studying the effectiveness of physical therapy on patients with unilateral non-traumatic shoulder pain. Sociodemographic and patient-reported symptom scores, including the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire, and Visual Analogue Scales for Pain were compared with other studies. To test for differences in age, gender distribution, and education level between the current study population and the populations from Dutch shoulder studies, the one sample T-test was used. One observer examined all subjects (n = 72) for the presence of MTrPs. Frequency distributions, means, medians, standard deviations, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for descriptive purposes. The Spearman's rank-order correlation (ρ) was used to test for association between variables. Results MTrPs were identified in all subjects. The median number of muscles with MTrPs per subject was 6 (active MTrPs) and 4 (latent MTr

  12. Immediate Effect of Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation on Pain and Muscle Activation in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Glaviano, Neal R.; Saliba, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  For individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP), altered muscle activity and pain are common during functional tasks. Clinicians often seek interventions to improve muscle activity and reduce impairments. One intervention that has not been examined in great detail is electrical stimulation. Objective:  To determine whether a single patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation (PENS) treatment would alter muscle activity and pain in individuals with PFP during 2 functional tasks, a single-legged squat and a lateral step down. Design:  Cohort study. Setting:  Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients of Other Participants:  A total of 22 individuals with PFP (15 women, 7 men; age = 26.0 ± 7.9 years, height = 173.8 ± 8.1 cm, mass = 75.1 ± 17.9 kg). Intervention(s):  Participants were randomized into 2 intervention groups: a 15-minute PENS treatment that produced a strong motor response or a 15-minute 1-mA subsensory (sham) treatment. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Before and immediately after the intervention, we assessed normalized electromyography amplitude, percentage of activation time across functional tasks, and onset of activation for the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, adductor longus, biceps femoris, and medial gastrocnemius muscles during a single-legged squat and a lateral step down. Scores on the visual analog scale for pain were recorded before and after the intervention. Results:  After a single treatment of PENS, the percentage of gluteus medius activation increased (0.024) during the lateral step down. Visual analog scores decreased during both the single-legged squat (PENS: preintervention = 2.7 ± 1.9, postintervention = 0.9 ± 0.7; sham: preintervention = 3.2 ± 1.6, postintervention = 2.8 ± 1.9; group × time interaction: P = .041) and lateral step down (PENS: preintervention = 3.4 ± 2.4, postintervention = 1.1 ± 0.8; sham: preintervention = 3.9 ± 1.7, postintervention = 3.3 ± 2.0; group

  13. The normal and the painful shoulders during the breaststroke. Electromyographic and cinematographic analysis of twelve muscles.

    PubMed

    Ruwe, P A; Pink, M; Jobe, F W; Perry, J; Scovazzo, M L

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and compare electrical activity patterns in 12 shoulder muscles during the breaststroke in 25 competitive swimmers who had normal shoulders and in 14 who had painful shoulders while they performed this stroke in a pool. The electromyographic analysis was synchronized with high-speed cinematography to discern phases of the breaststroke. Means, standard deviations, and t-tests were done for each phase. The differences in muscle activity between the two groups of swimmers demonstrated an increase in the internal rotators in the group with painful shoulders. They also demonstrated a decrease in the teres minor, supraspinatus, and the upper trapezius muscles. These factors increase the risk of impingement. Both the serratus anterior and teres minor muscles in the swimmers with normal shoulders consistently fired at or above 15% manual muscle test throughout the breaststroke cycle and were thus subject to fatigue. Based on these results, exercises for the breaststroke swimmer should be directed toward endurance training of the serratus anterior and teres minor muscles while balancing the internal and external rotators of the shoulder as well as the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles.

  14. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles. PMID:27738508

  15. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles.

  16. Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Muscles Located at the Site of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ato Ampomah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the location of the MTSS pain (posteromedial border of tibia) and the muscles that originate from that site. Method. The study was conducted in the Department of Anatomy of the School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, and involved the use of 22 cadaveric legs (9 paired and 4 unpaired) from 11 males and 2 females. Findings. The structures that were thus observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia were the soleus, the flexor digitorum longus, and the deep crural fascia. The soleus and flexor digitorum longus muscles were observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia. The tibialis posterior muscle had no attachment to this site. Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that if traction is the cause of MTSS then soleus and the flexor digitorum muscles and not the tibialis posterior muscle are the likely cause of MTSS. PMID:27066291

  17. Effects of mindfulness and distraction on pain depend upon individual differences in pain catastrophizing: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Prins, B; Decuypere, A; Van Damme, S

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the perception of experimental pain was different during a mindfulness manipulation than during a distraction manipulation. Furthermore, it was examined if effects were moderated by dispositional pain catastrophizing. Undergraduate students (n = 51) completed self-report measures of pain catastrophizing and mindfulness. Subsequently, they were administered a series of mildly painful heat stimuli, which they had to rate. During pain induction, participants listened to either a pre-recorded mindfulness instruction (mindfulness group) or a pre-recorded story (distraction group). After controlling for baseline experimental pain ratings, we found no overall group effect, indicating that there was no difference in experienced pain between the mindfulness group and the distraction group. However, a significant moderation effect was found. When dispositional pain catastrophizing was high, pain was less pronounced in the mindfulness group than in the distraction group, whereas the opposite effect was found when the level of pain catastrophizing was low. The findings suggest that in persons with a high level of catastrophic thinking about pain, mindfulness-based coping may be a better approach than distraction. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  18. Changes in recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with low back pain: ultrasound measurement of muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L; Hodges, Paul W

    2004-11-15

    Ultrasound and electromyographic (EMG) measures of trunk muscle activity were compared between low back pain (LBP) and control subjects in a cross-sectional study. To compare the recruitment of the abdominal muscles (measured as a change in thickness with ultrasound imaging) between people with and without low back pain and to compare these measurements with EMG recordings made with intramuscular electrodes. Although ultrasonography has been advocated as a noninvasive measure of abdominal muscle activity, it is not known whether it can provide a valid measure of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in LBP. Ten subjects with recurrent LBP and 10 matched controls were tested during isometric low load tasks with their limbs suspended. Changes in thickness from resting baseline values were obtained for transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI), and obliquus externus (OE) using ultrasonography. Fine wire EMG was measured concurrently. Study participants with LBP had a significantly smaller increase in TrA thickness with isometric leg tasks compared with controls. No difference was found between groups for OI or OE. Similar results were found for EMG. People with LBP had less TrA EMG activity with leg tasks, and there was no difference between groups for EMG activity for OI or OE. This study reinforces evidence for changes in automatic control of TrA in people with LBP. Furthermore, the data establish a new test of recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with LBP. This test presents a feasible noninvasive test of automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles.

  19. Self-reported muscle pain in adolescents with migraine and tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Blaschek, Astrid; Milde-Busch, Astrid; Straube, Andreas; Schankin, Christoph; Langhagen, Thyra; Jahn, Klaus; Schröder, Sebastian Andreas; Reiter, Karl; von Kries, Rüdiger; Heinen, Florian

    2012-02-01

    To identify possible associations between muscular pain and headache in adolescents in a large population-based sample. Grammar school students were invited to fill in a questionnaire on headache and associated lifestyle factors. Headache was classified according to the German version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (2nd edition). Muscular pain was assessed via denoting affected areas in schematic drawings of a body and via provoked muscular pain on controlled movements of head, neck and shoulder regions. Prevalence of any headache within the previous 6 months exceeded 80%. In all subjects muscular pain or pain on movement was most prominent in the neck and shoulder region, ranging from 9% to 27% in the non-headache population to up to 63% for individuals with migraine or mixed migraine and tension-type headache (TTH). Frequency of muscular pain increased significantly with growing chronicity of TTH. A strong association between muscle pain in the neck/shoulder region and headache was observed, pointing to the importance of muscular pain for headache in adolescents. Also, in this age group muscular pain appears to be of particular importance in chronic TTH and - unexpectedly - in migraine, which is the most important new finding in our study.

  20. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  1. Palmitoylethanolamide and stearoylethanolamide levels in the interstitium of the trapezius muscle of women with chronic widespread pain and chronic neck-shoulder pain correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, Nazdar; Ghafouri, Bijar; Larsson, Britt; Stensson, Niclas; Fowler, Christopher J; Gerdle, Björn

    2013-09-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is a complex condition characterized by central hyperexcitability and altered descending control of nociception. However, nociceptive input from deep tissues is suggested to be an important drive. N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in regulation of inflammation and pain. Previously we have reported elevated levels of the 2 NAEs, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-α ligand N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA) in chronic neck/shoulder pain (CNSP). In the present study, the levels of PEA and SEA in women with CWP (n=18), CNSP (n=34) and healthy controls (CON, n=24) were investigated. All subjects went through clinical examination, pressure pain threshold measurements and induction of experimental pain in the tibialis anterior muscle. Microdialysis dialysate of the trapezius was collected before and after subjects performed a repetitive low-force exercise and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP were significantly higher post exercise compared with CWP, and both pre and post exercise compared with CON. Levels of both NAEs decreased significantly pre to post exercise in CWP. Intercorrelations existed between aspects of pain intensity and sensitivity and the level of the 2 NAEs in CWP and CNSP. This is the first study demonstrating that CNSP and CWP differ in levels of NAEs in response to a low-force exercise which induces pain. Increases in pain intensity as a consequence of low-force exercise were associated with low levels of PEA and SEA in CNSP and CWP. These results indicate that PEA and SEA have antinociceptive roles in humans.

  2. Brief relaxation training is not sufficient to alter tolerance to experimental pain in novices

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Greg J.

    2017-01-01

    Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing and muscle relaxation, are aspects common to most forms of mindfulness training. There is now an abundance of research demonstrating that mindfulness training has beneficial effects across a wide range of clinical conditions, making it an important tool for clinical intervention. One area of extensive research is on the beneficial effects of mindfulness on experiences of pain. However, the mechanisms of these effects are still not well understood. One hypothesis is that the relaxation components of mindfulness training, through alterations in breathing and muscle tension, leads to changes in parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system functioning which influences pain circuits. The current study seeks to examine how two of the relaxation subcomponents of mindfulness training, deep breathing and muscle relaxation, influence experiences of pain in healthy individuals. Participants were randomized to either a 10 minute deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or control condition after which they were exposed to a cold pain task. Throughout the experiment, measures of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system activity were collected to assess how deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation alter physiological responses, and if these changes moderate any effects of these interventions on responses to pain. There were no differences in participants’ pain tolerances or self-reported pain ratings during the cold pain task or in participants’ physiological responses to the task. Additionally, individual differences in physiological functioning were not related to differences in pain tolerance or pain ratings. Overall this study suggests that the mechanisms through which mindfulness exerts its effects on pain are more complex than merely through physiological changes brought about by altering breathing or muscle tension. This indicates a need for more research examining the specific subcomponents of

  3. Neck muscle vibration can improve sensorimotor function in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Beinert, Konstantin; Keller, Martin; Taube, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    People with neck pain display a diminished joint position sense and disturbed postural control, which is thought to be a result of impaired somatosensory afferent activity and/or integration. Afferent processing can be artificially manipulated by vibration and was shown to reduce motor performance in healthy subjects. However, the effect of vibration on sensorimotor function in neck pain patients is scarcely investigated. To assess the effect of neck muscle vibration on joint position sense and postural control in neck pain subjects and healthy controls. Case control study. Thirteen neck pain patients and 10 healthy controls participated in the present study. Cervical joint position sense and dynamic and static postural stability. Short-term, targeted neck muscle vibration with 100 Hz was applied after baseline measurement. Vibration had opposite effects in patients and healthy subjects. Patients showed improved joint position sense (p<.01) and reduced dynamic postural sway (p<.05) after vibration, whereas vibration resulted in reduced joint position sense acuity (p<.05) and a nonsignificant increase in postural sway in healthy controls. This is the first study showing an improved motor performance after neck muscle vibration in patients with neck pain. Thus, vibration may be used to counteract sensorimotor impairment of the cervical spine. Potential underlying mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Central Projection of Pain Arising from Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Leidl, Caroline; Kaschka, Miriam; Carr, Richard W.; Terekhin, Pavel; Handwerker, Hermann O.; Forster, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a subacute pain state arising 24–48 hours after a bout of unaccustomed eccentric muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the patterns of cortical activation arising during DOMS-related pain in the quadriceps muscle of healthy volunteers evoked by either voluntary contraction or physical stimulation. The painful movement or physical stimulation of the DOMS-affected thigh disclosed widespread activation in the primary somatosensory and motor (S1, M1) cortices, stretching far beyond the corresponding areas somatotopically related to contraction or physical stimulation of the thigh; activation also included a large area within the cingulate cortex encompassing posteroanterior regions and the cingulate motor area. Pain-related activations were also found in premotor (M2) areas, bilateral in the insular cortex and the thalamic nuclei. In contrast, movement of a DOMS-affected limb led also to activation in the ipsilateral anterior cerebellum, while DOMS-related pain evoked by physical stimulation devoid of limb movement did not. PMID:23056613

  5. Pain complaint and muscle soreness associated with high-voltage electrical stimulation: effect of ramp time.

    PubMed

    Balogun, J A

    1986-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ramp time on subjects' perception of discomfort/pain and muscle soreness associated with high-voltage electrical stimulation. 31 female students were randomly assigned to three treatment groups, each of which was assigned a different ramp time (1.0, 3.5, and 5.0 sec.). The subjects' wrist and finger flexors were stimulated with ElectroStim 180-2 unit using the bipolar electrode arrangement. During the stimulation, the subjects rated their experience of discomfort/pain at the threshold of sensory stimulation, the threshold of motor stimulation, and maximum tolerance of painful stimulation. The session was terminated after 10 tetanic isometric contractions. The subjects were instructed to rate their soreness, 24- and 36-hr. poststimulation using a 10-point ratio scale. A significant F ratio was noted for discomfort/pain perceptual levels but not for ramp time. Scheffé's post hoc analysis showed that the discomfort increased as the current intensity was increased. The F ratio for ramp time and time frame (24- and 36-hr. poststimulation) was not statistically significant for the ratings of muscle soreness. The findings suggest that the patients's complaint of pain and muscle soreness associated with high-voltage electrical stimulation is not affected by the rate of rise of current.

  6. Association of strength, muscle balance, and atrophy with pain and function in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Nava-Bringas, Tania Inés; Ramírez-Mora, Isabel; Coronado-Zarco, Roberto; Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Cruz-Medina, Eva; Arellano-Hernández, Aurelia; Hern Ndez-López, Mario; León-Hernández, S R

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the relationship of strength, muscular balance, and atrophy with pain and function in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Transversal, descriptive, and observational. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this study. Twenty six patients ages 50 years and older, with degenerative spondylolisthesis at L4-L5. Measurements included Pain Visual Analogue Scale scores (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index scores (ODI), and isokinetic trunk testing; assessment of multifidus atrophy and spinal stenosis was performed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 17.0 software for Windows. Pearson's correlation was used to ascertain the correlation between variables. ANOVA with analysis of covariance was used to determine the correlation between the remainder variables. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Of the 26 patients studied, with an average age of 60.23 ± 7.6 years, 20 had grade I spondylolisthesis and 6 were grade II. Correlation between the ODI scores and spondylolisthesis grading was significant (r=0.576, p=0.005); correlation between agonist/antagonist ratio in the isokinetic test (predominant extensor muscles over flexors) with the ODI scores was also significant (r=0.446, p=0.02), regardless of spinal stenosis. No correlation was found between functionality and pain with strength or multifidus atrophy. Muscle trunk imbalance with predominance of extensor over flexor muscles is associated with functional disability. Rehabilitation programs should be designed to improve muscle balance rather than muscle strength alone.

  7. Trunk muscles strength and endurance in chronic low back pain patients with and without clinical instability.

    PubMed

    Davarian, Sanaz; Maroufi, Nader; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil; Farahmand, Farzam; Parnianpour, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown inconsistent findings regarding muscle endurance in chronic low back pain (CLBP). Questions also remain about muscle endurance in patients with clinical instability. The aim of this study was to investigate trunk muscles strength and endurance in CLBP patients with and without clinical instability. 32 CLBP patients (15 with and 17 without clinical instability) and 39 matched healthy subjects participated in this study. The standing extension test was performed to assess the strength and endurance of the lumbar extensors while recording their electromyographic activity. The patients' disability was evaluated using the Oswestry and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaires. Patients with clinical instability showed lower maximal voluntary exertion (MVE) and higher time to fatigue (TTF) compared to healthy subjects (P=0.000 and P=0.008, respectively) and patients without instability (P=0.002 and P=0.02, respectively). There was no difference in these variables between patients without instability and healthy controls. A negative relationship between MVE and TTF and a positive correlation between disability and pain intensity were seen. Strength training of trunk extensor muscles can be considered as part of the treatment protocol for CLBP patients with clinical instability. Although patients without instability suffered from pain or disability, they showed more similarity to healthy subjects in terms of trunk muscles strength and endurance.

  8. Human masticatory muscle activity and jaw position under experimental stress.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C-M; Chou, S-L; Gale, E N; McCall, W D

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether stress induced a consistent pattern of increased electromyographic (EMG) activity in different masticatory muscles, and whether stress produced changes in jaw position. Thirty-five dental students at Taipei Medical College volunteered for this study. Mental arithmetic was used to create a stress condition and relaxation instruction was used to help relax the subjects. Subjects were asked to evaluate the stress they felt under each experimental condition with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Surface electrodes were used to monitor the EMG activities of the right masseter, right posterior temporalis and suprahyoid muscles. A kinesiograph was used to observe the jaw position. Data collected before mental arithmetic or relaxation monitored the baseline level. The VAS means were significantly increased during the stress condition and significantly decreased following relaxation, compared with the baseline. There was also a significant increase in EMG activity of all three muscles during mental arithmetic compared with baseline; different patterns of increased EMG activity were noticed in the three muscles under a continuous stress condition. Under stress, the incidence of tooth contact at intercuspal position was also increased.

  9. Assessing analgesic actions of opioids by experimental pain models in healthy volunteers – an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Staahl, Camilla; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    AIM Experimental pain models may help to evaluate the mechanisms of action of analgesics and target the clinical indications for their use. This review addresses how the efficacy of opioids can be assessed in human volunteers using experimental pain models. The drawback with the different study designs is also discussed. METHOD A literature search was completed for randomized controlled studies which included human experimental pain models, healthy volunteers and opioids. RESULTS Opioids with a strong affinity for the µ-opioid receptor decreased the sensation in a variety of experimental pain modalities, but strong tonic pain was attenuated more than short lasting pain and non-painful sensations. The effects of opioids with weaker affinity for the µ-opioid receptor were detected by a more narrow range of pain models, and the assessment methods needed to be more sensitive. CONCLUSION The way the pain is induced, assessed and summarized is very important for the sensitivity of the pain models. This review gives an overview of how different opioids perform in experimental pain models. Generally experimental pain models need to be designed with careful consideration of pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. This knowledge can aid the decisions needed to be taken when designing experimental pain studies for compounds entering phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:19694733

  10. Pain-Related Brain Activity Evoked by Active and Dynamic Arm Movement: Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness as a Promising Model for Studying Movement-Related Pain in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Kan, Shigeyuki; Uematsu, Hironobu; Shibata, Masahiko; Fujino, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a suitable model for the study of movement-evoked pain, we attempted to identify brain regions specifically involved in pain evoked by active and dynamic movement under DOMS condition. Subject Twelve healthy volunteers Methods DOMS was induced in the left upper-arm flexor muscles by an eccentric elbow contraction exercise. Movement-evoked pain in the affected muscles was evaluated just before (day 0) and after (days 1–7 and 30) the exercise using a visual analog scale. Subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans while performing repeated elbow flexion on day 2 (DOMS condition) and day 30 (painless condition). We compared brain activity between the DOMS and painless conditions. Results Movement-evoked pain reached peak intensity on day 2 and disappeared by day 30 in all subjects. No subject felt pain at rest on either of these days. Contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), parietal operculum and bilateral presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) showed greater activity during active and dynamic arm movement with DOMS than during the same movement without pain. There was no difference in activation of brain regions known collectively as the “pain matrix,” except for the parietal operculum, between the two conditions. Conclusion Active and dynamic movement with pain selectively evoked activation of M1, pre-SMA, and parietal operculum, as assessed using DOMS. Our results demonstrate that DOMS is a promising experimental model for the study of movement-evoked pain in humans. PMID:25929675

  11. Role of Kv4.3 in Vibration-Induced Muscle Pain in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Conner, Lindsay B; Alvarez, Pedro; Bogen, Oliver; Levine, Jon D

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that changes in the expression of voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv) 4.3 contribute to the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by vibration injury, in a rodent model for hand-arm vibration syndrome in humans. Here we show that the exposure of the gastrocnemius muscle to vibration injury induces muscle hyperalgesia that is accompanied by a significant downregulation of Kv4.3 in affected sensory nerve fibers in dorsal root ganglia. We additionally show that the intrathecal administration of antisense oligonucleotides for Kv4.3 messenger RNA itself induces muscle hyperalgesia in the rat. Our results suggest that attenuation in the expression of Kv4.3 may contribute to neuropathic pain in people affected by hand-arm vibration syndrome. Our findings establish Kv4.3 as a potential molecular target for the treatment of hand-arm vibration syndrome. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    PubMed Central

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; p<0.0001/p=0.015). Conclusions These results suggest that strength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  13. Muscle trigger points and pressure pain hyperalgesia in the shoulder muscles in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement: a blinded, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Lozano, Amparo; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    Our aim was to describe the differences in the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in the shoulder muscles and to investigate the presence of mechanical hypersensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement and healthy controls. Twelve patients with strictly unilateral shoulder impingement and 10 matched controls were recruited. TrPs in the levator scapula, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, pectoralis major, and biceps brachii muscles were explored. TrPs were considered active if the local and referred pain reproduced the pain symptoms and the patient recognized the pain as a familiar pain. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the levator scapulae, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis major, biceps brachii, and tibialis anterior muscles. Both explorations were randomly done by an assessor blinded to the subjects' condition. Patients with shoulder impingement have a greater number of active (mean +/- SD: 2.5 +/- 1; P < 0.001) and latent (mean +/- SD: 2 +/- 1; P = 0.003) TrPs when compared to controls (only latent TrPs, mean +/- SD: 1 +/- 1). Active TrPs in the supraspinatus (67%), infraspinatus (42%), and subscapularis (42%) muscles were the most prevalent in the patient group. Patients showed a significant lower PPT in all muscles when compared to controls (P < 0.001). Within the patient group a significant positive correlation between the number of TrPs and pain intensity (r (s) = 0.578; P = 0.045) was found. Active TrPs in some muscles were associated to greater pain intensity and lower PPTs when compared to those with latent TrPs in the same muscles (P < 0.05). Significant negative correlations between pain intensity and PPT levels were found. Patients with shoulder impingement showed widespread pressure hypersensitivity and active TrPs in the shoulder muscles, which reproduce their clinical pain symptoms. Our results suggest both peripheral and central sensitisation mechanisms in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

  14. Development of a behavioral assessment of craniofacial muscle pain in lightly anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ro, Jin Y; Capra, Norman; Masri, Radi

    2003-07-01

    In this study, a new behavioral assessment of craniofacial muscle pain in the lightly anesthetized rat is described. Intramuscular injections with algesic agents in lightly anesthetized rats evoked a characteristic ipsilateral hindpaw shaking behavior for several minutes similar to previously described orofacial pain-induced grooming behavior in awake rats (Neurosci Lett 103 (1989) 349, Pain 62 (1995) 295). Eighty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in a series of experiments to study whether this behavior could serve as a valid measure of craniofacial muscle pain. First, we demonstrated that different algesic chemicals, mustard oil (20%), formalin (3%) or hypertonic saline (5%) injected in the mid-region of the masseter muscle effectively elicited the hindpaw shaking behavior. The behavior was only minimally evoked with vehicle injection. Repeated administrations of hypertonic saline, a short duration non-sensitizing algogen, demonstrated reproducibility of the assay. Second, we showed that the peak and overall magnitude of the shaking behavior evoked by injections with different concentrations of mustard oil (1 and 5%) changed in a concentration dependent manner. Finally, we showed that systemic administration of morphine sulfate (3 and 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) dose dependently attenuated mustard oil induced hindpaw-shaking behavior. Lidocaine injected locally 5 min prior to mustard oil injection also significantly decreased the hindpaw shaking behavior. Based on these results we concluded that ipsilateral hindpaw shaking in lightly anesthetized rats is a stereotypical behavior evoked by noxious muscle stimulation and can be used as a reliable behavioral measure to assess craniofacial muscle pain.

  15. Muscle pain perception and sympathetic nerve activity to exercise during opioid modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. B.; O'Connor, P. J.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of the endogenous opioid system on forearm muscle pain and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during dynamic fatiguing exercise. Twelve college-age men (24 +/- 4 yr) performed graded (1-min stages; 30 contractions/min) handgrip to fatigue 1 h after the ingestion of either 60 mg codeine, 50 mg naltrexone, or placebo. Pain (0-10 scale) and exertion (0-10 and 6-20 scales) intensities were measured during the last 15 s of each minute of exercise and every 15 s during recovery. MSNA was measured continuously from the peroneal nerve in the left leg. Pain threshold occurred earlier [1.8 +/- 1, 2. 2 +/- 1, 2.2 +/- 1 J: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively] and was associated with a lower rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (2.7 +/- 2, 3.6 +/- 2, 3.8 +/- 2: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively) in the codeine condition compared with either the naltrexone or placebo conditions. There were no main effects (i.e., drugs) or interaction (i.e., drugs x time) for either forearm muscle pain or RPE during exercise [pain: F (2, 22) = 0.69, P = 0.51]. There was no effect of drug on MSNA, heart rate, or blood pressure during baseline, exercise, or recovery. Peak exercise MSNA responses were 21 +/- 1, 21 +/- 2.0, and 21 +/- 2.0 bursts/30 s for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. Peak mean arterial pressure responses were 135 +/- 4, 131 +/- 3, and 132 +/- 4 mmHg for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. It is concluded that neither 60 mg codeine nor 50 mg naltrexone has an effect on forearm muscle pain, exertion, or MSNA during high- intensity handgrip to fatigue.

  16. Muscle pain perception and sympathetic nerve activity to exercise during opioid modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. B.; O'Connor, P. J.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of the endogenous opioid system on forearm muscle pain and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during dynamic fatiguing exercise. Twelve college-age men (24 +/- 4 yr) performed graded (1-min stages; 30 contractions/min) handgrip to fatigue 1 h after the ingestion of either 60 mg codeine, 50 mg naltrexone, or placebo. Pain (0-10 scale) and exertion (0-10 and 6-20 scales) intensities were measured during the last 15 s of each minute of exercise and every 15 s during recovery. MSNA was measured continuously from the peroneal nerve in the left leg. Pain threshold occurred earlier [1.8 +/- 1, 2. 2 +/- 1, 2.2 +/- 1 J: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively] and was associated with a lower rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (2.7 +/- 2, 3.6 +/- 2, 3.8 +/- 2: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively) in the codeine condition compared with either the naltrexone or placebo conditions. There were no main effects (i.e., drugs) or interaction (i.e., drugs x time) for either forearm muscle pain or RPE during exercise [pain: F (2, 22) = 0.69, P = 0.51]. There was no effect of drug on MSNA, heart rate, or blood pressure during baseline, exercise, or recovery. Peak exercise MSNA responses were 21 +/- 1, 21 +/- 2.0, and 21 +/- 2.0 bursts/30 s for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. Peak mean arterial pressure responses were 135 +/- 4, 131 +/- 3, and 132 +/- 4 mmHg for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. It is concluded that neither 60 mg codeine nor 50 mg naltrexone has an effect on forearm muscle pain, exertion, or MSNA during high- intensity handgrip to fatigue.

  17. Experimental Pain Phenotype Profiles in a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Sample of Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Riley, Joseph L.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine patterns of interindividual variability in experimental pain responses emerging from multiple experimental pain measures in a racially/ethnically diverse sample of healthy adults and to examine the association between the derived phenotype profiles with demographic, psychological, and health-related measures. Methods Two hundred and ninety-one participants underwent heat, cold, pressure, and ischemic pain assessments, and completed several psychological and health-related assessments. The experimental pain measures were subjected to a principal component analysis and factor scores were used to compute Pain Sensitivity Index scores. The scores were subsequently submitted to a cluster analysis to identify patterns of pain sensitivity across experimental pain modalities. Results The sample was equally composed of non-Hispanic whites, African Americans, and Hispanic whites. Sensitivity scores were computed for heat pain, pressure pain, cold pain, ischemic pain, and temporal summation of heat pain. Five distinct clusters were characterized by high heat pain sensitivity, low ischemic pain sensitivity, low cold pain sensitivity, low pressure pain sensitivity, and high temporal summation. Cluster membership was significantly different by sex as well as somatic reactivity and catastrophizing, although cluster differences were most pronounced between the heat pain-sensitive individuals vs the cold pain-insensitive individuals. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of phenotyping individuals to account for interindividual differences in pain responses. Our findings also replicate previously reported pain phenotypes, which are not solely related to demographic, psychosocial, or health-related factors in our healthy participants. Future studies designed to elucidate the biological underpinnings of pain sensitivity profiles would be of substantial value. PMID:23889771

  18. Does Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Training Affect Pain Pressure Thresholds of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain? A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Evdokia; Papanikolaou, Dimitra-Tania; Koutsojannis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background. We need to understand more about how DNF performs in different contexts and whether it affects the pain threshold over myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Purpose. The objectives were to investigate the effect of neck muscles training on disability and pain and on pain threshold over MTrPs in people with chronic neck pain. Methods. Patients with chronic neck pain were eligible for participation with a Neck Disability Index (NDI) score of over 5/50 and having at least one MTrP on either levator scapulae, upper trapezoid, or splenius capitis muscle. Patients were randomly assigned into either DNF training, superficial neck muscle exercise, or advice group. Generalized linear model (GLM) was used to detect differences in treatment groups over time. Results. Out of 67 participants, 60 (47 females, mean age: 39.45 ± 12.67) completed the study. Neck disability and neck pain were improved over time between and within groups (p < 0.05). However, no differences were found within and between the therapeutic groups (p < 0.05) in the tested muscles' PPTs and in cervicothoracic angle over a 7-week period. Conclusion. All three groups improved over time. This infers that the pain pathways involved in the neck pain relief are not those involved in pain threshold. PMID:27990302

  19. Suggestions to Reduce Clinical Fibromyalgia Pain and Experimentally Induced Pain Produce Parallel Effects on Perceived Pain but Divergent Functional MRI–Based Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, Stuart W.G.; Whalley, Matthew G.; Seah, Stanley T.H.; Oakley, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Hypnotic suggestion is an empirically validated form of pain control; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Methods Thirteen fibromyalgia patients received suggestions to alter their clinical pain, and 15 healthy controls received suggestions to alter experimental heat pain. Suggestions were delivered before and after hypnotic induction with blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) activity measured concurrently. Results Across groups, suggestion produced substantial changes in pain report (main effect of suggestion, F2, 312 = 585.8; p < .0001), with marginally larger changes after induction (main effect of induction, F1, 312 = 3.6; p = .060). In patients, BOLD response increased with pain report in regions previously associated with pain, including thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex. In controls, BOLD response decreased with pain report. All changes were greater after induction. Region-of-interest analysis revealed largely linear patient responses with increasing pain report. Control responses, however, were higher after suggestion to increase or decrease pain from baseline. Conclusions Based on behavioral report alone, the mechanism of suggestion could be interpreted as largely similar regardless of the induction or type of pain experience. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data, however, demonstrated larger changes in brain activity after induction and a radically different pattern of brain activity for clinical pain compared with experimental pain. These findings imply that induction has an important effect on underlying neural activity mediating the effects of suggestion, and the mechanism of suggestion in patients altering clinical pain differs from that in controls altering experimental pain. Patient responses imply that suggestions altered pain experience via corresponding changes in pain-related brain regions, whereas control responses imply suggestion engaged cognitive control. PMID:27490850

  20. Experimental pain phenotyping in community-dwelling individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Josue S; Riley, Joseph L; Glover, Toni; Sibille, Kimberly T; Bartley, Emily J; Goodin, Burel R; Bulls, Hailey W; Herbert, Matthew; Addison, Adriana S; Staud, Roland; Redden, David T; Bradley, Laurence A; Fillingim, Roger B; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel

    2016-09-01

    Pain among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with significant disability in older adults, and recent evidence demonstrates enhanced experimental pain sensitivity. Although previous research showed considerable heterogeneity in the OA clinical pain presentation, less is known regarding the variability in responses to experimental pain. The present study included individuals with knee OA (n = 292) who participated in the Understanding Pain and Limitations in Osteoarthritic Disease study and completed demographic and psychological questionnaires followed by a multimodal quantitative sensory testing (QST) session. Quantitative sensory testing measures were subjected to variable reduction procedures to derive pain sensitivity index scores, which in turn were entered into a cluster analysis. Five clusters were significantly different across all pain sensitivity index variables (P < 0.001) and were characterized by: (1) low pain sensitivity to pressure pain (N = 39); (2) average pain sensitivity across most modalities (N = 88); (3) high temporal summation of punctate pain (N = 38); (4) high cold pain sensitivity (N = 80); and (5) high sensitivity to heat pain and temporal summation of heat pain (N = 41). Clusters differed significantly by race, gender, somatic reactivity, and catastrophizing (P < 0.05). Our findings support the notion that there are distinct subgroups or phenotypes based on experimental pain sensitivity in community-dwelling older adults with knee OA, expanding previous findings of similar cluster characterizations in healthy adults. Future research is needed to further understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying pain within these subgroups, which may be of added value in tailoring effective treatments for people with OA.

  1. The Effects of Mindful Attention and State Mindfulness on Acute Experimental Pain Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Christine T.; Dick, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Attention-based coping strategies for pain are widely used in pediatric populations. The purpose of this study was to test a novel mindful attention manipulation on adolescent’s experimental pain responses. Furthermore, the relationship between state mindfulness and experimental pain was examined. Methods A total of 198 adolescents were randomly assigned to a mindful attention manipulation or control group prior to an experimental pain task. Participants completed measures of state mindfulness immediately prior to the pain task, and situational catastrophizing and pain intensity following the task. Results Overall the manipulation had no effect on pain. Secondary analysis showed that meditation experience moderated the effect of the manipulation. State mindfulness predicted pain outcomes, with reductions in situational catastrophizing mediating this relationship. Conclusions The mindful attention manipulation was effective among adolescents with a regular meditation practice. State mindfulness was related to ameliorated pain responses, and these effects were mediated by reduced catastrophizing. PMID:24599947

  2. Ultrasonography in Diagnosis of Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Reliability of Novel Ultrasonic Indexes of Upper Trapezius Muscle.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Navid; Okhovatian, Farshad; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Karami, Mehdi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Mohammadi, Hosein Kouhzad

    2016-03-23

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common non-articular musculoskeletal disorder. It is characterized by local and referred pain due to the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). MTrPs most commonly involve the upper trapezius muscle and can be visualized using ultrasound imaging. This study was designed to determine the inter-rater reliability of some new ultrasonographic indices of the upper trapezius muscle and the sensitivity and specificity of 2D ultrasound imaging in the diagnosis of MPS. This semi-experimental study enrolled 15 participants of both genders (mean age: 40.60 ± 5.74 years) with suspected symptoms of MPS. In the first step of the study, the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography for diagnosis of MPS was determined in a double blind manner. In the second step, some ultrasonographic measurements, such as muscle thickness, area of MTrPs in longitudinal view, echogenicity of MTrPs in longitudinal view, echogenicity of muscle with MTrPs in longitudinal and transverse views, and the pennation angle of the upper trapezius muscle were measured twice and their reliability was determined using the value of the mean of the two measurements. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonographic diagnosis were 91% and 75%, respectively. The inter-rater reliability of upper trapezius muscle thickness, pennation angle, area of MTrPs, echogenicity of active MTrPs in longitudinal view, echogenicity of muscle with MTrPs in transverse view and echogenicity of muscle with MTrPs in longitudinal view were 0.91, 0.96, 0.93, 0.83, 0.93, and 0.91, respectively. 1. Our findings indicated that ultrasonography is a useful method for the diagnosis of MPS owing to its high sensitivity. 2. Appropriate reliability of the quantitative ultrasonographic indices of interest, especially the area of MTrPs and their echogenicity, could be useful for long-term monitoring and designing interventional studies for better management of the syndrome.

  3. Referred pain elicited by manual exploration of the lateral rectus muscle in chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Gerwin, Robert D; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the presence of referred pain elicited by manual examination of the lateral rectus muscle in patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). A case-control blinded study. It has been found previously that the manual examination of the superior oblique muscle can elicit referred pain to the head in some patients with migraine or tension-type headache. However, a referred pain from other extraocular muscles has not been investigated. Fifteen patients with CTTH and 15 healthy subjects without headache history were included. A blinded assessor performed a manual examination focused on the search for myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in the right and left lateral rectus muscles. TrP diagnosis was made when there was referred pain evoked by maintained pressure on the lateral corner of the orbit (anatomical projection of the lateral rectus muscle) for 20 seconds, and increased referred pain while the subject maintained a medial gaze on the corresponding side (active stretching of the muscle) for 15 seconds. On each side, a 10-point numerical pain rate scale was used to assess the intensity of referred pain at both stages of the examination. Ten patients with CTTH (66.6%) had referred pain that satisfied TrPs diagnostic criteria, while only one healthy control (0.07%) reported referred pain upon the examination of the lateral rectus muscles (P < 0.001). The elicited referred pain was perceived as a deep ache located at the supraorbital region or the homolateral forehead. Pain was evoked on both sides in all subjects with TrPs, with no difference in pain intensity between the right and the left. The average pain intensity was significantly greater in the patient group (P < 0.001). All CTTH patients with referred pain recognized it as the frontal pain that they usually experienced during their headache attacks, which was consistent with active TrPs. In some patients with CTTH, the manual examination of lateral rectus muscle TrPs elicits a referred pain that

  4. Experimental pain responses in children with chronic pain and in healthy children: How do they differ?

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie CI; Evans, Subhadra; Seidman, Laura C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extant research comparing laboratory pain responses of children with chronic pain with healthy controls is mixed, with some studies indicating lower pain responsivity for controls and others showing no differences. Few studies have included different pain modalities or assessment protocols. OBJECTIVES: To compare pain responses among 26 children (18 girls) with chronic pain and matched controls (mean age 14.8 years), to laboratory tasks involving thermal heat, pressure and cold pain. Responses to cold pain were assessed using two different protocols: an initial trial of unspecified duration and a second trial of specified duration. METHODS: Four trials of pressure pain and of thermal heat pain stimuli, all of unspecified duration, were administered, as well as the two cold pain trials. Heart rate and blood pressure were assessed at baseline and after completion of the pain tasks. RESULTS: Pain tolerance and pain intensity did not differ between children with chronic pain and controls for the unspecified trials. For the specified cold pressor trial, 92% of children with chronic pain completed the entire trial compared with only 61.5% of controls. Children with chronic pain exhibited a trend toward higher baseline and postsession heart rate and reported more anxiety and depression symptoms compared with control children. CONCLUSIONS: Contextual factors related to the fixed trial may have exerted a greater influence on pain tolerance in children with chronic pain relative to controls. Children with chronic pain demonstrated a tendency toward increased arousal in anticipation of and following pain induction compared with controls. PMID:22518373

  5. A practical guide and perspectives on the use of experimental pain modalities with children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Caes, Line; Wilson, Anna C; Williams, Sara E; Chambers, Christine T

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Use of experimental pain is vital for addressing research questions that would otherwise be impossible to examine in the real world. Experimental induction of pain in children is highly scrutinized given the potential for harm and lack of direct benefit to a vulnerable population. However, its use has critically advanced our understanding of the mechanisms, assessment and treatment of pain in both healthy and chronically ill children. This article introduces various experimental pain modalities, including the cold pressor task, the water load symptom provocation test, thermal pain, pressure pain and conditioned pain modulation, and discusses their application for use with children and adolescents. It addresses practical implementation and ethical issues, as well as the advantages and disadvantages offered by each task. The incredible potential for future research is discussed given the array of experimental pain modalities now available to pediatric researchers. PMID:24641434

  6. Nonverbal Communication as a Pain Reliever: The Impact of Physician Supportive Nonverbal Behavior on Experimentally Induced Pain.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Mollie A; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Hall, Judith A

    2017-08-01

    Despite the evidence for the potential of supportive communication to alleviate physical pain, no study to date has assessed the impact of supportive nonverbal behavior on the objective and subjective experience of pain. This analogue study examined the impact of an actor-physician's supportive nonverbal behavior on experimentally induced pain. Participants (N = 205) were randomly assigned to interact with a videotaped physician conveying high or low supportive nonverbal behaviors. Participant pain was assessed with subjective and objective measures. Participants interacting with the high nonverbal support physicians showed increased pain tolerance and a reduction in the amount of pain expressed compared to those interacting with the low nonverbal support physicians. For subjectively rated pain, a gender difference existed such that for men, high physician nonverbal support decreased pain ratings and memory of pain, but for women, high physician nonverbal support increased pain ratings and memory of pain. These results highlight the importance of nonverbal communication in altering pain with broad implications for clinical care.

  7. Ultrasonographic analysis of dorsal neck muscles thickness changes induced by isometric contraction of shoulder muscles: A comparison between patients with chronic neck pain and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Noureddin; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Rahnama, Leila; Noori-Kochi, Farhang; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2016-04-01

    Altered pattern of muscle activity is commonly seen with chronic neck pain (CNP). However, limited investigations have been done on dorsal neck muscles' activity pattern while performing upper limb tasks in patients with CNP. To investigate dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles. Case-control study. This study investigated dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles in 20 healthy participants (mean age 27 ± 4.37) and 17 patients with CNP (mean age 29 ± 5.50). Effects of isometric force of shoulder muscles on dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes were also evaluated. Significant muscle × group interaction was observed for the dorsal neck muscles thickness changes (p = 0.008) indicating different pattern of muscle activity in terms of changes in muscle thickness of two groups. Significant main effects of direction was observed (P = 0.003), with the abduction had the greatest impact on changing the dorsal neck muscles thickness. patients with CNP showed altered pattern of muscle thickness changes in comparison to healthy participants. Isometric abduction of shoulder muscles induced the greatest changes of dorsal neck muscles thickness among other force directions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Tenney, H Rich; Boyle, Kyndall L; Debord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test.

  9. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  10. EXERCISE PREVENTS DEVELOPMENT OF AUTONOMIC DYSREGULATION AND HYPERALGESIA IN A MOUSE MODEL OF CHRONIC MUSCLE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic function. Regular physical activity prevents development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function in sedentary mice with CMP, and if exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. CMP was induced by two intramuscular injections of pH 5 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24h after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia that can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP. PMID:26313406

  11. Effects of experimentally induced low back pain on the sit-to-stand movement and electroencephalographic contingent negative variation

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jesse V.; Yaguchi, Chie; Kaida, Chizuru; Irei, Mariko; Naka, Masami; Henry, Sharon M.; Fujiwara, Katsuo

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that people with chronic, recurrent low back pain (LBP) exhibit changes in cerebrocortical activity that associate with altered postural coordination, suggesting a need for a better understanding of how the experience of LBP alters postural coordination and cerebrocortical activity. To characterize changes in postural coordination and pre-movement cerebrocortical activity related to the experience of acutely induced LBP, 14 healthy participants with no history of LBP performed sit-to-stand movements in 3 sequential conditions: (1) without experimentally induced LBP; NoPain1, (2) with movement-associated LBP induced by electrocutaneous stimulation; Pain, and (3) again without induced LBP; NoPain2. The Pain condition elicited altered muscle activation and redistributed forces under the seat and feet prior to movement, decreased peak vertical force exerted under the feet during weight transfer, longer movement times, as well as decreased and earlier peak hip extension. Stepwise regression models demonstrated that electroencephalographic amplitudes of contingent negative variation during the Pain condition significantly correlated with the participants’ change in sit-to-stand measures between the NoPain1 and Pain conditions, as well as with the subsequent difference in sit-to-stand measures between the NoPain1 and NoPain2 conditions. The results, therefore, identify the contingent negative variation as a correlate for the extent of an individual’s LBP-related movement modifications and to the subsequent change in movement patterns from before to after the experience of acutely induced LBP, thereby providing a direction for future studies aimed to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the development of altered movement patterns with LBP. PMID:21952791

  12. Delayed abdominal muscle onsets and self-report measures of pain and disability in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Paul; Murphy, Bernadette

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was the measure the onset time of the transverse abdominis (TA) muscle during rapid unilateral shoulder movements in individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP), and to evaluate the relationship between latency times and self-report measures of pain and disability. Descriptive cross-sectional study. University laboratory. Eighty individuals with chronic LBP of a non-specific origin (males n=44, females n=36). Responses of the right and left surface TA/internal obliques were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) during rapid unilateral shoulder flexion, abduction, and extension. Pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and disability with the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Seventy-five percent of individuals were identified as lacking feedforward activation. A significant sidexdirection main effect was identified, with the ipsilateral latency more delayed in flexion and abduction (F(2316)=58.2, p<0.001). Individuals without feedforward activation had lower ODI scores (23.2+/-6.9% vs 31.0+/-9.2%, mean difference 7.8%, 95% CI 3.9 to 11.6%, p<0.001). Regression analysis found that 17% of the variance in VAS scores for the entire sample (n=80) were explained by the latency times measured. This relationship was stronger when the sample was separated into individuals who did (n=20), and did not (n=60) have feedforward activation. Deep abdominal muscle onsets during rapid limb movement were significantly associated with self-rated pain scores. Seventy-five percent of individuals with chronic non-specific LBP exhibited delayed activation. No evidence has been provided in this study to support, or refute the use of specific localized deep abdominal contractions for exercise rehabilitation programs. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  14. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  15. Autonomic responses to exercise: cortical and subcortical responses during post-exercise ischaemia and muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-03-01

    Sustained isometric contraction of skeletal muscle causes an increase in blood pressure, due to an increase in cardiac output and an increase in total peripheral resistance-brought about by an increase in sympathetically-mediated vasoconstriction. Both central command and reflex inputs from metaboreceptors in the contracting muscles have been shown to contribute to this sympathetically mediated increase in blood pressure. Occluding the blood supply and trapping the metabolites in the contracted muscle (post-exercise ischaemia) has shown that, while heart rate returns to baseline following exercise, the increase in MSNA and blood pressure persists in the absence of central command-sustained by peripheral inputs. Post-exercise ischaemia activates group III and IV muscle afferents, which are also activated during noxious stimulation. Indeed, post-exercise ischaemia is painful, so what is the role of pain in the increase in blood pressure? Intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline causes a deep dull ache, not unlike that produced by post-exercise ischaemia, and we have shown that this can cause a sustained increase in MSNA and blood pressure. We have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of the brain to identify the cortical and subcortical sites involved in the sensory processing of muscle pain, and in the generation of the autonomic responses to muscle pain, produced either by post-exercise ischaemia or intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline. During static hand-grip exercise there were parallel increases in signal intensity in the contralateral primary motor cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and cerebellar cortex that ceased at the end of the exercise, reflecting the start and end of central command. Progressive increases during the contraction phase occurred in the contralateral insula, as well as the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex, and continued during the period of post-exercise ischaemia. Decreases in signal intensity occurred in the

  16. Experimental reduction of pain catastrophizing modulates pain report but not spinal nociception as verified by mediation analyses.

    PubMed

    Terry, Ellen L; Thompson, Kathryn A; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2015-08-01

    Pain catastrophizing is associated with enhanced pain; however, the mechanisms by which it modulates pain are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that catastrophizing modulates supraspinal processing of pain but does not modulate spinal nociception (as assessed by nociceptive flexion reflex [NFR]). Unfortunately, most NFR studies have been correlational. To address this, this study experimentally reduced catastrophizing to determine whether it modulates spinal nociception (NFR). Healthy pain-free participants (N = 113) were randomly assigned to a brief 30-minute catastrophizing reduction manipulation or a control group that received pain education. Before and after manipulations, 2 types of painful stimuli were delivered to elicit (1) NFR (single trains of stimuli) and (2) temporal summation of NFR (3 stimulations at 2 Hz). After each set of stimuli, participants were asked to report their pain intensity and unpleasantness, as well as their situation-specific catastrophizing. Manipulation checks verified that catastrophizing was effectively reduced. Furthermore, pain intensity and unpleasantness to both stimulation types were reduced by the catastrophizing manipulation, effects that were mediated by catastrophizing. Although NFRs were not affected by the catastrophizing manipulation, temporal summation of NFR was reduced. However, this effect was not mediated by catastrophizing. These results indicate that reductions in catastrophizing lead to reductions in pain perception but do not modulate spinal nociception and provides further evidence that catastrophizing modulates pain at the supraspinal, not the spinal, level.

  17. Contributions of peripheral and central opioid receptors to antinociception in rat muscle pain models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Eva Ma; Bagües, Ana; Martín, Ma Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Administration of hypertonic saline (HS) is an accepted model to study muscular pain. HS-induced nociceptive responses were tested in masseter, already described, and in two new pain models of spinally innervated muscles (gastrocnemius and triceps) developed in rats at our laboratory. HS administration in the masseter induced vigorous hindpaw shaking and in the gastrocnemius or triceps, paw withdrawal or flexing. Participation of the central and peripheral opioid receptors in HS-induced pain is compared in these muscles: masseter, innervated by trigeminal nerve, and gastrocnemius and triceps by spinal nerves. Morphine and loperamide were used to reveal peripheral and central components of opioid analgesia. Both agonists reduced HS-induced nociceptive behaviours in the masseter and were antagonised by the opioid antagonist naloxone and by naloxone methiodide, an opioid receptor antagonist that poorly penetrates the blood-brain barrier. Unexpectedly, in the gastrocnemius and triceps, morphine, but not loperamide, decreased the nociceptive behaviour and this effect was only reversed by naloxone. So, peripheral opioid receptors seem to participate in HS-induced masseter pain, whereas only central opioid receptors reduced the nociception in gastrocnemius and triceps. Our results suggest that the use of peripheral opioids can be more advantageous than central opioids for treatment of orofacial muscular pain.

  18. Lack of both sex differences and influence of resting blood pressure on muscle pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Poudevigne, Melanie S; O'Connor, Patrick J; Pasley, Jeffrey D

    2002-01-01

    To test whether muscle pain intensity caused by different intensities of unaccustomed eccentric exercise was moderately and negatively associated with resting blood pressure, and whether women reported higher pain ratings compared with men in response to such exercise. The repeated measures design involved random assignment of 42 young adults (21 women, 7 per condition) to complete elbow extension exercises with a weight that was 80%, 100%, or 120% of their maximal voluntary concentric strength. Total work was equated by manipulating the number of repetitions performed in the 80% (n = 45), 100% (n = 36), and 120% (n = 30) condition groups. A clinical laboratory in a large university in the southeastern U.S. Pain intensity ratings averaged over 3 days and resting blood pressure measurements averaged over 6 days. For both sexes there was a dose-response relation between the relative intensity of the unaccustomed eccentric exercise and mean pain intensity ratings. Mean pain intensity was not significantly related to systolic or diastolic blood pressure. There was no significant sex difference in pain intensity, although men's ratings, in contrast to expectations, tended to be higher than the women's ratings. The negative findings, contrary to those predicted from previous experiments in which other types of noxious stimuli have been used, suggest that sex and blood pressure associations with pain intensity are stimulus dependent.

  19. Cortical representation of experimental tooth pain in humans.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, H H F; Kemppainen, P; Ringler, R; Handwerker, H O; Forster, C

    2005-12-05

    Cortical processing of electrically induced pain from the tooth pulp was studied in healthy volunteers with fMRI. In a first experiment, cortical representation of tooth pain was compared with that of painful mechanical stimulation to the hand. The contralateral S1 cortex was activated during painful mechanical stimulation of the hand, whereas tooth pain lead to bilateral activation of S1. The S2 and insular region were bilaterally activated by both stimuli. In S2, the center of gravity of the activation during painful mechanical stimulation was more medial/posterior compared to tooth pain. In the insular region, tooth pain induced a stronger activation of the anterior and medial parts. The posterior part of the anterior cingulate gyrus was more strongly activated by painful stimulation of the hand. Differential activations were also found in motor and frontal areas including the orbital frontal cortex where tooth pain lead to greater activations. In a second experiment, we compared the effect of weak with strong tooth pain. A significantly greater activation by more painful tooth stimuli was found in most of those areas in which tooth pain had induced more activation than hand pain. In the medial frontal and right superior frontal gyri, we found an inverse relationship between pain intensity and BOLD contrast. We concluded that tooth pain activates a cortical network which is in several respects different from that activated by painful mechanical stimulation of the hand, not only in the somatotopically organized somatosensory areas but also in parts of the 'medial' pain projection system.

  20. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head, neck, shoulder, and arm muscles reproduces pain symptoms in blue-collar (manual) and white-collar (office) workers.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gröbli, Christian; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fischer, Christine Stebler; Boesch, Daniel; Froidevaux, Philippe; Stocker, Lilian; Weissmann, Richard; González-Iglesias, Javier

    2012-07-01

    To describe the prevalence and referred pain area of trigger points (TrPs) in blue-collar (manual) and white-collar (office) workers, and to analyze if the referred pain pattern elicited from TrPs completely reproduces the overall spontaneous pain pattern. Sixteen (62% women) blue-collar and 19 (75% women) white-collar workers were included in this study. TrPs in the temporalis, masseter, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, oblique capitis inferior, levator scapulae, scalene, pectoralis major, deltoid, infraspinatus, extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus, extensor digitorum communis, and supinator muscles were examined bilaterally (hyper-sensible tender spot within a palpable taut band, local twitch response with snapping palpation, and elicited referred pain pattern with palpation) by experienced assessors blinded to the participants' condition. TrPs were considered active when the local and referred pain reproduced any symptom and the patient recognized the pain as familiar. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomic maps, digitized, and measured. Blue-collar workers had a mean of 6 (SD: 3) active and 10 (SD: 5) latent TrPs, whereas white-collar workers had a mean of 6 (SD: 4) active and 11 (SD: 6) latent TrPs (P>0.548). No significant differences in the distribution of active and latent TrPs in the analyzed muscles between groups were found. Active TrPs in the upper trapezius, infraspinatus, levator scapulae, and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles were the most prevalent in both groups. Significant differences in referred pain areas between muscles (P<0.001) were found; pectoralis major, infraspinatus, upper trapezius, and scalene muscles showed the largest referred pain areas (P<0.01), whereas the temporalis, masseter, and splenius capitis muscles showed the smallest (P<0.05). The combination of the referred pain from TrPs reproduced the overall clinical pain area in all participants. Blue-collar and white-collar workers

  1. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vaegter, Henrik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Pain biomarkers are warranted for individualized pain management. Based on different pain modulatory phenotypes, the objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups within patients with nonmalignant chronic pain and to investigate differences in clinical pain and pain hypersensitivity between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 patients with chronic pain to assess pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance, temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to 10 repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in cuff pressure pain threshold during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection and heat pain thresholds at clinical painful and nonpainful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM, 4 distinct groups were formed: group 1 (n = 85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP; group 2 (n = 148) had impaired CPM and normal TSP; group 3 (n = 45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP; and group 4 (n = 122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions than the other 3 groups (P < 0.001), indicating that impaired CPM and facilitated TSP play an important role in widespread pain. Groups 1 and 2 compared with group 4 had lower heat pain threshold at nonpainful areas and lower cuff pressure pain tolerance (P < 0.02), indicating that CPM plays a role for widespread hyperalgesia. Moreover, group 1 demonstrated higher clinical pain scores than group 4 (P < 0.05). Although not different between subgroups, patients were profiled on demographics, disability, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. Future research should investigate interventions tailored towards these subgroups.

  2. Change the myofascial pain and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint following kinesio taping of latent myofascial trigger points in the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points.

  3. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  4. Correlation between skin surface temperature over masticatory muscles and pain intensity in women with myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a common clinical manifestation in individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The literature report changes in microcirculation in this condition. The aim of the present study was to correlate skin surface temperature at the central point of the masticatory muscles with pain intensity in women with myogenous TMD. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to divide 40 female university students into four groups: control group (n=10), mild pain group (n=10), moderate pain group (n=10) and severe pain group (n=10). Infrared thermography was used to assess the masticatory muscles. No significant correlations were found between pain intensity and skin surface temperature over the left masseter (p=0.368), right masseter (p=0.618), left anterior temporalis (p=0.293) and right anterior temporalis (p=0.922) muscles. No correlations were found between pain intensity and asymmetry of the masseter (p=0.375) and anterior temporalis (p=0.090) muscles. Moreover, no significant difference in skin surface temperature (p> 0.05) was found among the different groups. Pain intensity in women with myogenous TMD was not associated with skin surface temperature at the central point of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles.

  5. Activation of lumbar paraspinal and abdominal muscles during therapeutic exercises in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Arokoski, Jari P; Valta, Taru; Kankaanpää, Markku; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2004-05-01

    To assess the activities of paraspinal and abdominal muscles during therapeutic exercises for the treatment of patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP), and to study the effects of active physical rehabilitation on these activities. A cross-sectional study comparing muscle activities during 18 stabilization exercises, and a prospective follow-up of patients with CLBP during rehabilitation. Rehabilitation clinic in university hospital in Finland. Nine volunteers (5 men, 4 women) aged 27 to 58 years. Three months of active outpatient rehabilitation (4 to 6 times in a rehabilitation clinic, supplemented with self-motivated exercise at home) supervised by a physiotherapist. Surface electromyography was recorded bilaterally from L5 level paraspinal, rectus abdominis, and obliquus externus abdominis muscles. The recorded signal was averaged and normalized to the maximal electromyographic amplitude obtained during the maximal voluntary contraction. The measurements were taken before and after the exercise treatment period. CLBP patients showed variable trunk muscle activity patterns during the different therapeutic exercises, similar to those that we reported earlier in healthy subjects. The maximal trunk isometric extension (pre, 147.3+/-75.9Nm; post, 170.1+/-72.3Nm) and flexion (pre, 72.0+/-37.9Nm; post, 93.5+/-42.5Nm) torques did not show a significant changes during the exercise period. However, trunk rotation-flexion torque (pre, 52.9+/-26.5Nm; post, 82.4+/-65.8Nm) increased significantly (35.8%) after the exercise period (P<.05). The corresponding maximal electromyographic amplitudes of back and abdominal muscles remained unchanged. Disability, as assessed by visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index, did not change. The CLBP patients performed therapeutic exercises with similar abdominal and back extensor muscle activities in the same way as the healthy subjects in our earlier studies. In this study, active physical rehabilitation had no

  6. Trunk strength and lumbar paraspinal muscle activity during isometric exercise in chronic low-back pain patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Cassisi, J E; Robinson, M E; O'Conner, P; MacMillan, M

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe trunk strength and lumbar paraspinal muscle activity across five angles of flexion during isometric exercise and rest in chronic low-back pain patients and control subjects. High muscle tension as measured by surface integrated electromyography is predicted by a muscle spasm model, and low muscle tension is predicted by a muscle deficiency model. Prior lumbar surgery had no affect on peak torque or maximum surface integrated electromyography data. Both groups produced greater torque and less surface integrated electromyography in more flexed positions. Chronic low-back pain patients exhibited lower peak torque and lower maximum surface integrated electromyography bilaterally during isometric extension effort across all angles. A muscle deficiency model of chronic low back pain was supported by these data and a muscle spasm model was not supported. Discriminant analyses indicated that monitoring maximum surface integrated electromyography of lumbar muscles during isometric effort facilitates classification of chronic low-back pain patients. Future directions are discussed in terms of applying psychophysiologic methods to pain rehabilitation.

  7. Elite swimmers with and without unilateral shoulder pain: mechanical hyperalgesia and active/latent muscle trigger points in neck-shoulder muscles.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Lozano, A; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Calderón-Soto, C; Domingo-Camara, A; Madeleine, P; Arroyo-Morales, M

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the presence of mechanical hypersensitivity and active trigger points (TrPs) in the neck-shoulder muscles in elite swimmers with/without unilateral shoulder pain. Seventeen elite swimmers with shoulder pain; 18 swimmers without shoulder pain; and 15 elite athletes matched controls were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the levator scapulae, sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, subscapularis and tibialis anterior muscles. TrPs in the levator scapulae, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, sternocleidomastoid and subscapularis muscles were also explored. Swimmers with shoulder pain showed significant lower PPT in all muscles compared with controls (P<0.01). No differences in PPT were found between swimmers with and without shoulder pain, underlining widespread mechanical hypersensitivity. The mean number of TrPs for elite swimmer with and without shoulder pain was, respectively, 4.7 ± 1 (2.1 ± 1.5 active; 2.6 ± 1.4 latent) and 4.7 ± 1.3 (1.3 ± 1.3 active; 3.4 ± 1.5 latent), whereas healthy athletes only showed latent TrPs (2.4 ± 1.2). Elite swimmers with shoulder pain showed higher number of active TrPs than swimmers without pain, whereas it was the opposite for the number of latent muscle TrP (P<0.05). The reported mechanical hypersensitivity suggests that active TrPs play a role in the development of shoulder pain in elite swimmers.

  8. Experimental pain induces attentional bias that is modified by enhanced motivation: An eye tracking study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z-K; Wang, J-Y; Luo, F

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of prior pain experience and motivation on attentional bias towards pain-related information were investigated within two visual-probe tasks via eye movement behaviours. It is hypothesized that pain experience would induce stronger attentional bias and such bias could be suppressed by the motivation to avoid impeding pain. All participants took part in visual-probe tasks with pictures and words as stimuli that are typically used in studies of attentional bias. They were allocated to three groups: no-pain (NP) group, performing tasks without experiencing pain; pain-experience (PE) group, performing the same tasks following painful stimuli; and pain-experience-with-motivation (PEM) group, undergoing the same procedure as PE group with additional instructions about avoiding impeding pain. Eye movements were recorded during the tasks. The eye movement data showed that: (1) participants in the PE group exhibited stronger attention bias towards painful pictures than those in the NP group; (2) the attentional bias towards painful pictures was significantly reduced in the PEM group as compared to the PE group. By contrast, the verbal task failed to find these effects using sensory pain words as stimuli. This study was the first that revealed the impact of acute experimental pain on attentional bias towards pain-related information in healthy individuals through eye tracking. It may provide a possible solution to reduce hypervigilance towards pain-related information by altering the motivational relevance. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: (1) This study revealed the impact of experimental pain on attentional bias in healthy individuals; (2) This study may provide a possible approach of altering motivational relevance to control the pain-induced attentional bias towards pain-related information. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  9. Magnitude of spinal muscle damage is not statistically associated with exercise-induced low back pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Mark D; Horn, Maggie E; Lott, Donovan J; Arpan, Ishu; George, Steven Z

    2011-12-01

    Findings on imaging of noncontractile anatomic abnormalities and the intensity of low back pain have weak associations because of false-positive rates among asymptomatic individuals. This association might be stronger for contractile tissues. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between location and reports of pain intensity in the low back and exercise-induced muscle damage to the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Nondiagnostic observational study in a laboratory setting. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in the low back of healthy pain-free volunteers. Measures of pain intensity (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]) and location (area on the pain diagram) were taken before and 48 hours after exercise. Muscle damage was quantified using mechanical pain thresholds, motor performance deficits, and transverse relaxation time (T2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Changes pre- to postexercise in signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging within the erector spinae, pain intensity, pain area, mechanical pain threshold, and isometric torque were assessed using paired t tests. Bivariate correlations were conducted to assess associations among muscle damage, pain intensity, and pain drawing area. Twenty participants volunteered (11 women; average age, 22.3 years; average body mass index, 23.5) for study participation. Reports of pain intensity at 48 hours ranged from 0 to 59 mm on the VAS. Muscle damage was confirmed by reductions in mechanical threshold (p=.011) and motor performance (p<.001) and by changes in T2-weighted MRI (p=.007). This study was powered to find an association of at least r=0.5 to be statistically significant. Correlations of continuous variables revealed no significant correlations between pain intensity and measures of muscle damage (ranging between -0.075 and 0.151). There was a significant association between the remaining torque deficit at 48 hours and pain area. The results of this study indicate that there was no

  10. Magnitude of spinal muscle damage is not statistically associated with exercise-induced low back pain intensity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D.; Horn, Maggie E.; Lott, Donovan J.; Arpan, Ishu; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Findings on imaging of noncontractile anatomic abnormalities and the intensity of low back pain have weak associations because of false-positive rates among asymptomatic individuals. This association might be stronger for contractile tissues. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between location and reports of pain intensity in the low back and exercise-induced muscle damage to the lumbar paraspinal muscles. STUDY DESIGN Nondiagnostic observational study in a laboratory setting. METHODS Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in the low back of healthy pain-free volunteers. Measures of pain intensity (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]) and location (area on the pain diagram) were taken before and 48 hours after exercise. Muscle damage was quantified using mechanical pain thresholds, motor performance deficits, and transverse relaxation time (T2)–weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Changes pre- to postexercise in signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging within the erector spinae, pain intensity, pain area, mechanical pain threshold, and isometric torque were assessed using paired t tests. Bivariate correlations were conducted to assess associations among muscle damage, pain intensity, and pain drawing area. RESULTS Twenty participants volunteered (11 women; average age, 22.3 years; average body mass index, 23.5) for study participation. Reports of pain intensity at 48 hours ranged from 0 to 59 mm on the VAS. Muscle damage was confirmed by reductions in mechanical threshold (p=.011) and motor performance (p<.001) and by changes in T2-weighted MRI (p=.007). This study was powered to find an association of at least r=0.5 to be statistically significant. Correlations of continuous variables revealed no significant correlations between pain intensity and measures of muscle damage (ranging between −0.075 and 0.151). There was a significant association between the remaining torque deficit at 48 hours and pain area

  11. Identifying experimental methods to determine the effect of pain on attention: a review of pain, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine studies.

    PubMed

    Moore, David J; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    To review published studies of the effects that pain and common psychopharmacological substances have on the attentional performance of healthy adults. To identify which attentional tasks have the greatest potential to investigate the effect of pain on attention and provide recommendations for future research. A search was conducted for reports of experimental studies of attention in the context of pain. This was supplemented with studies on attention and caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. Studies were included if they used a healthy adult sample, used experimental or quasi-experimental methods, were relevant to the study of attention or interruption of pain and/or examined the acute effects of a substance on attention. Thirty-two papers, with 49 different experimental studies were identified (12 pain, 21 nicotine, 7 caffeine, 9 alcohol). Fourteen different tasks were reviewed across six domains of attention. The most promising measures of attention were the continuous performance task, flanker task, endogenous pre-cuing task, n-back task, inhibition task and dual task. There are reliable tasks that could be used to determine the effects of pain on attention. Future research is required that develops the utility of these tasks to improve our understanding of the effects pain and analgesia have on attentional performance. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  13. Ethnic Identity Predicts Experimental Pain Sensitivity In African Americans and Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Rahim-Williams, F. Bridgett; Riley, Joseph L.; Herrera, Dyanne; Campbell, Claudia; Hastie, Barbara A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine experimental pain sensitivity in three ethnic groups, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and non-Hispanic whites, and to determine whether ethnic identity is differentially associated with pain sensitivity across ethnic groups. Participants included sixty-three African American, sixty-one Hispanic and eighty-two non-Hispanic white participants who were assessed using three experimental pain measures: thermal, cold-pressor and ischemic. Participants’ ethnic identity was assessed using the Multi-group Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM). Ethnic group differences in pain responses were observed, with African American and Hispanic subjects showing lower cold and heat pain tolerances than non-Hispanic whites. In addition, pain range (i.e. tolerance – threshold) was computed for heat, cold and ischemic pain, and the two minority groups again had lower values compared to non-Hispanic whites. Ethnic identity was associated with pain range only for African American and Hispanic groups. Statistically controlling for ethnic identity rendered some of the group differences in pain range non-significant. These findings indicate that ethnic identity is associated with pain sensitivity in ethnic minority groups, and may partially mediate group differences in pain perception. The results of the present investigation provide evidence of ethnic group differences in responses to experimental pain across multiple noxious stimuli, with both minority groups exhibiting greater sensitivity to laboratory evoked pain compared to non-Hispanic whites. PMID:17296267

  14. Sex differences in experimental pain among healthy children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Birnie, Kathryn A; Caes, Line; Schinkel, Meghan; Chambers, Christine T

    2014-05-01

    Sex differences in response to experimental pain are commonly reported in systematic reviews in the adult literature. The objective of the present research was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of sex differences in healthy children's responses to experimental pain (e.g., cold pressor, heat pain, pressure pain) and, where possible, to conduct analyses separately for children and adolescents. A search was conducted of electronic databases for published papers in English of empirical research using experimental pain tasks to examine pain-related outcomes in healthy boys and girls between 0 and 18 years of age. Eighty articles were eligible for inclusion and were coded to extract information relevant to sex differences. The systematic review indicated that, across different experimental pain tasks, the majority of studies reported no significant differences between boys and girls on pain-related outcomes. However, the meta-analysis of available combined data found that girls reported significantly higher cold pressor pain intensity compared to boys in studies where the mean age of participants was greater than 12 years. Additionally, a meta-analysis of heat pain found that boys had significantly higher tolerance than girls overall, and boys had significantly higher heat pain threshold than girls in studies where the mean age of participants was 12 years or younger. These findings suggest that developmental stage may be relevant for understanding sex differences in pain.

  15. Assessment of knee joint pain in experimental rodent models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Piel, Margaret J; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Pain assessment in animal models of osteoarthritis is integral to interpretation of a model's utility in representing the clinical condition, and enabling accurate translational medicine. Here we describe two methods for behavioral pain assessments available for use in animal models of experimental osteoarthritic pain: Von Frey filaments and spontaneous activity monitoring.

  16. Lower Extremity Muscle Activity, Kinematics, and Dynamic Postural Control in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shiho; Aminaka, Naoko; Gribble, Phillip A

    2017-07-17

    Altered lower extremity muscle activity has been suggested to be associated with lower extremity kinematics in individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, few studies examined these relationships and the results are inconsistent. To compare the lower extremity muscle activity, kinematics, pain level, and reach distance during the anterior reach of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) between participants with PFP and healthy individuals (CON). Case-control. Research laboratory. Twenty-eight (PFP=14, CON=14) participants volunteered. Each participant performed three maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) of the gluteus maximus (GMAX), gluteus medius (GMED), adductor longus (AL), and vastus medialis (VM) and five anterior reaches of the SEBT. Three-dimensional joint kinematics of the hip and knee at the time of touch-down of the SEBT and integrated-electromyography (iEMG) of each muscule was recorded during the descent phase of the SEBT. Coactivation ratios between the GMED and AL were calculated (GMED/AL). Pain level was assessed at the baseline and during performance of the SEBT, using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Participants with PFP demonstrated decreased GMED/AL co-activation ratio (p=0.01) and shorter reach distance (p=0.014) during anterior reach of the SEBT compared to the CON group. Participants with PFP demonstrated higher pain levels at baseline (p<0.027) and during test performance (p<0.001) compared to the CON group and increased pain level during the test performance compared to baseline (p<0.001). No other significant differences were observed. There were alterations in muscle activity during SEBT performance, suggesting that over-activity of AL relative to GMED is a unique neural recruitment pattern in those with PFP. However, hip and knee joint kinematics did not seem to contribute to deficits in the anterior reach distance, suggesting a need for continued assessment of these deficiencies.

  17. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  18. Efficacy of Rhus coriaria (sumac) juice in reducing muscle pain during aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, A H; Gabr, S A

    2016-06-01

    The main target of this study was to measure the influence of sumac juice drink on muscle indices and pain during an acute, intense exercise for 30 days. Forty healthy volunteers (15-25 years) were involved in aerobic exercise program for 4 weeks. Participants ingested sumac juice or placebo drink twice daily for 30 days. All participants were subjected for the evaluation of pain and estimation of serum: creatine kinase (CK), lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), troponin I, hydroxyproline (hyp), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and in vitro antioxidant activity of sumac juice using pre-validated visual analog scale, colorimetric and immunoassays. The participants of both groups, placebo and sumac, showed an increment in pain scores both during exercise and post-exercise intervals. However, the sumac juice group showed a significant smaller increase in the pain scores compared to the placebo group. Participants in the sumac juice group were more willing to use the drink in the future. They achieved a higher satisfaction of sumac juice in ameliorating and the reduction of pain. Also, the sumac group showed a significant enhancement in the level of CK, LDH, troponin I, hyp, along with significant increase in serum (TAC) compared to the placebo group. The protective activity of muscle may relate to the antioxidant activity of phenolic component(s) in sumac juice as measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging (87.9%) and β-carotene-linoleic acid (68.7%) assays. These data suggest that oral administration of sumac juice may have a beneficial effect on muscle performance among athletes.

  19. Influence of Polymorphisms in the HTR3A and HTR3B Genes on Experimental Pain and the Effect of the 5-HT3 Antagonist Granisetron

    PubMed Central

    Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Schalling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally if 5-HT3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) contribute to pain perception and efficacy of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron and sex differences. Sixty healthy participants were genotyped regarding HTR3A (rs1062613) and HTR3B (rs1176744). First, pain was induced by bilateral hypertonic saline injections (HS, 5.5%, 0.2 mL) into the masseter muscles. Thirty min later the masseter muscle on one side was pretreated with 0.5 mL granisetron (1 mg/mL) and on the other side with 0.5 mL placebo (isotonic saline) followed by another HS injection (0.2 mL). Pain intensity, pain duration, pain area and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed after each injection. HS evoked moderate pain, with higher intensity in the women (P = 0.023), but had no effect on PPTs. None of the SNPs influenced any pain variable in general, but compared to men, the pain area was larger in women carrying the C/C (HTR3A) (P = 0.015) and pain intensity higher in women with the A/C alleles (HTR3B) (P = 0.019). Pre-treatment with granisetron reduced pain intensity, duration and area to a lesser degree in women (P < 0.05), but the SNPs did not in general influence the efficacy of granisetron. Women carrying the C/T & T/T (HTR3A) genotype had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.041) and area (P = 0.005), and women with the C/C genotype (HTR3B) had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.030), duration (P = 0.030) and area compared to men (P = 0.017). In conclusion, SNPs did not influence experimental muscle pain or the effect of granisetron on pain variables in general, but there were some sex differences in pain variables that seem to be influenced by genotypes. However, due to the small sample size further research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:28002447

  20. Chronic regional muscular pain in women with precise manipulation work. A study of pain characteristics, muscle function, and impact on daily activities.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, K G; Bäckman, E; Henriksson, C; de Laval, J H

    1996-01-01

    Pain characteristics, muscle function and impact on daily activities were studied in 39 women with chronic regional muscular pain (RMP). They were all blue-collar workers in work involving precise manipulations. The main location of the pain was in the neck-shoulder region. Nineteen age-matched women with fibromyalgia (FM) were studied in the same way as the RMP patients. Thirty-seven women with no pain and with the same age and weight as the RMP patients served as reference group with respect to muscle strength and endurance. A follow-up study was done with respect to pain distribution and other pain characteristics 20 months after the initial examination. The findings were of the same nature in the RMP and the FM groups. The intensity of pain, the lowering of pain threshold for pressure, and the degree of sleep disturbance were greater in the FM than in the RMP group. Isometric muscle strength and static muscular endurance were reduced in both FM and RMP compared to reference values. The reduction in strength and endurance was greater in FM than in RMP. Even if the impact on everyday activities were greater in FM than in RMP, the impact was substantial in RMP patients also, for example with regard to work capacity. There were no transitions from RMP to FM during the 20 months to follow-up. Three FM patients, however, did not meet the ACR criteria for FM at follow-up.

  1. The Association between Imaging Parameters of the Paraspinal Muscles, Spinal Degeneration, and Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Carmeli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review investigated imaging parameters of the paraspinal muscles and their association with spinal degenerative features and low back pain (LBP) found in the literature. Three principal signs of muscle degeneration were detected on imaging: decreased muscle size, decreased radiographic density, and increased fat deposits. Men have a higher density of paraspinal muscles than women, younger individuals have a higher density than older ones, and lean individuals have a higher density than those with an increased body mass index. Fatty infiltration appears to be a late stage of muscular degeneration and can be measured noninvasively by an MRI scan. Fatty infiltration in the lumbar multifidus is common in adults and is strongly associated with LBP, especially in women, independent of body composition. Fatty infiltration develops in areas where most degenerative changes are found. MR spectroscopy studies have corroborated that the lumbar multifidus in LBP subjects has a significantly higher fat content than asymptomatic controls. There is a strong need for establishing uniform methods of evaluating normal parameters and degenerative changes of the paraspinal muscles. Additional imaging studies are needed to improve the understanding of the association and causal relationships between LBP, spinal degeneration, and changes in the paraspinal muscles. PMID:28409152

  2. The Association between Imaging Parameters of the Paraspinal Muscles, Spinal Degeneration, and Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid; Carmeli, Eli; Been, Ella

    2017-01-01

    This narrative review investigated imaging parameters of the paraspinal muscles and their association with spinal degenerative features and low back pain (LBP) found in the literature. Three principal signs of muscle degeneration were detected on imaging: decreased muscle size, decreased radiographic density, and increased fat deposits. Men have a higher density of paraspinal muscles than women, younger individuals have a higher density than older ones, and lean individuals have a higher density than those with an increased body mass index. Fatty infiltration appears to be a late stage of muscular degeneration and can be measured noninvasively by an MRI scan. Fatty infiltration in the lumbar multifidus is common in adults and is strongly associated with LBP, especially in women, independent of body composition. Fatty infiltration develops in areas where most degenerative changes are found. MR spectroscopy studies have corroborated that the lumbar multifidus in LBP subjects has a significantly higher fat content than asymptomatic controls. There is a strong need for establishing uniform methods of evaluating normal parameters and degenerative changes of the paraspinal muscles. Additional imaging studies are needed to improve the understanding of the association and causal relationships between LBP, spinal degeneration, and changes in the paraspinal muscles.

  3. Chronic Low Back Pain in Women: Muscle Activation during Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fernanda G; Carmo, Carolina M; Fracini, América C; Pereira, Rita R P; Takara, Kelly S; Tanaka, Clarice

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the activities of the trunk and hip muscles in chronic low back pain (CLBP) women and asymptomatic subjects during the kneeling to half-kneeling task. [Subjects] Twenty-nine CLBP women and thirty asymptomatic subjects (C) participated in this study. [Methods] Electromyography activity (EMG) of the obliquus internus abdominis (OI), the lumbar erector spinae (LES) and the gluteus medius (GM) muscles was recorded bilaterally. The peak amplitude, the time of peak amplitude and the integrated linear envelope EMG for each muscle were obtained. [Results] The C group bilateral OI and GM muscles displayed higher peak amplitudes and earlier times of peak amplitude. They also had higher integrated linear envelope EMG values. The CLBP group bilateral LES muscles had higher peak amplitudes and earlier times of peak amplitude. They also showed an increased integrated linear envelope EMG values. [Conclusion] The CLBP women activate the LES muscles in the kneeling to half-kneeling task, showing different patterns of motor planning activity. PMID:24409022

  4. A clinical surrogate model for proof of efficacy of external phytomedicines for muscle pain. Results of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study in volunteers with muscle pain due to physical training.

    PubMed

    Uehleke, Bernhard; Stange, Rainer

    2009-06-01

    Surrogate models have been postulated for (re-)registration of external remedies for pain, whose active substances are in accordance to monographs. In a new human model, we investigated an ointment consisting of high dosed herbal ingredients. We conducted a clinical study in 32 healthy volunteers. Four muscle regions were treated with the ointments (verum on the one side and placebo on the other) in a randomized and doubleblinded manner immediately after a standardized physical exercise with individual intensity, as well as after 1, 2 and 24 h. Acute muscle pain and muscle tension for each region was documented repeatedly during the following two days by visual analogue scale (VAS). Primary outcome parameter was the difference of pain during the follow up given as area under the curve (AUC) of VAS for corresponding right and left regions, treated with verum or placebo. Also the difference of muscle tension was documented and evaluated in an analogous way. 30 out of 32 included patients finished the study, but developed only moderate muscle pain, with highest pain scores for extension muscles of the arm. There was less pain in the course for the verum in 3 of the 4 regions, the mean difference of individual AUCs was at highest for the extension (triceps) muscles of the arm, but between-group differences failed significance. Feeling of muscle tension was higher than that of pain, with smaller mean AUCs of verum in all 4 regions; the differences were significant in total (p<0.02) and in 2 of 4 single regions. Physical exercise was not intensive enough to exert clear symptoms. Our volunteers with sportive background seem not to show severe symptoms of muscle pain and muscle tension even after an intensive training. Despite low levels of symptoms, verum showed better courses of muscle tension and muscle pain. For future studies it seems better not to use volunteers with sportive background but totally untrained persons in order to achieve pronounced symptoms. The model

  5. Morphology of the abdominal muscles in ballet dancers with and without low back pain: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gildea, Jan E; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the morphology of transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis muscles and the ability to "draw in" the abdominal wall, in professional ballet dancers without low back pain, with low back pain or both hip region and low back pain. Observational study. Magnetic resonance images of 31 dancers were taken at rest and during voluntary abdominal muscle contraction. Measurements included the thickness of transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis muscles, lateral slide of the anterior extent of the transversus abdominis muscles (transversus abdominis slide) and reduction in total cross sectional area of the trunk. The transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis muscles were thicker in male dancers and the right side was thicker than the left in both genders. There was no difference in muscle thickness as a proportion of the total thickness, between dancers with and without pain, although there was a trend for female dancers with low back pain only to have a smaller change in transversus abdominis muscle thickness with contraction than those without pain. Transversus abdominis slide was less in female dancers than in male dancers. When gender was ignored, the extent of transversus abdominis slide was less in dancers with low back pain only. Reduction in trunk cross sectional area with contraction was not different between genders or groups. This study provides evidence that the abdominal muscles (transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis) are asymmetrical in dancers and although the abdominal muscles are not different in structure (resting thickness) in dancers with LBP, there is preliminary evidence for the behavioural change of reduced slide of transversus abdominis during the 'draw in' of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of self-myofascial release on myofascial pain, muscle flexibility, and strength: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid; Ben David, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Numerous techniques have been employed to treat myofascial pain syndrome. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) is a relatively new technique of soft tissue mobilization. The simplicity and portability of the SMFR tools allow it to be easily implemented in any type of fitness or rehabilitation program. It is an active method and can be used by anyone at home or at the workplace. To review the current methods of SMFR, their mechanisms, and efficacy in treating myofascial pain, improving muscle flexibility and strength. PubMed, Google Scholar, and PEDro databases were searched without search limitations from inception until July 2016 for terms relating to SMFR. During the past decade, therapists and fitness professionals have implemented SMFR mainly via foam rolling as a recovery or maintenance tool. Researchers observed a significant increase in the joint range of motion after using the SMFR technique and no decrease in muscle force or changes in performance after treatment with SMFR. SMFR has been widely used by health-care professionals in treating myofascial pain. However, we found no clinical trials which evaluated the influence of SMFR on myofascial pain. There is an acute need for these trials to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of SMFR in the treatment of the myofascial syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Etiological analysis and significance of anterior knee pain induced by gluteal muscles contracture].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Yu-jie; Wang, Jun-liang; Qi, Wei; Qu, Feng; Yuan, Bang-tuo; Wang, Jiang-tao; Shen, Xue-zhen; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Juan-li

    2014-12-01

    To explore causes of gluteal muscle contracture induced anterior knee pain and curative effect of arthroscopic release. From March 2002 to August 2013,36 patients with gluteal muscle contracture induced anterior knee pain were treated, including 15 males, 21 females, aged from 9 to 40 years old with an average (18.7±7.2) years old; the courses of diseases ranged from 4 to 30 years. The clinical manifestations involved limited to symmelia, positive Ober sign, buttocks touch contracture belts, knee and patella slide to lateral when doing squat activities. All patients were performed gluteal muscle contracture release under arthroscopic. Postoperative complications were observed, Kujala scoring before and after operation was used for compare curative effect. All patients were followed up with an average of 29 months. The incision were healed well, and no complications were occurred. Postoperative Kujala score were improved more than preoperative. Gluteal muscle contracture release could alleviate hypertension of lateral patella, and palys an important role in preventing patellofemoral arthritis.

  8. Generalized Pressure Pain Hypersensitivity in the Cervical Muscles in Women with Migraine.

    PubMed

    Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Giantomassi, Maria Carolina Merli; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Gonçalves, Maria Cláudia; Dach, Fabíola; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the differences in pressure sensitivity in the cervical musculature including the upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, levator scapulae, and anterior scalene muscles between women with migraine and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study. Thirty women with migraine and 30 healthy women participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were bilaterally assessed over upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, levator scapulae, and anterior scalene muscles in a blinded design. Mean values of both sides were pooled for statistical analysis. Comparison between groups was performed by unpaired Student t-test and correlation with headache features with Spearman's correlation test. Migraine patients exhibited lower PPT in all muscles compared with controls: upper trapezius (P = 0.046); suboccipital (P < 0.001); sternocleidomastoid (P < 0.001); anterior scalene (P < 0.001), and levator scapulae (P < 0001). No associations were observed between the frequency and the intensity of migraine or years with the disease and PPT. This study showed generalized pressure pain hypersensitivity in the cervical musculature in women with migraine. Our findings provide support for the physical therapy treatment and evaluation of musculoskeletal cervical spine disorders in individuals with migraine and reinforce that all cervical muscles should be evaluated. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Role of Kv 4.3 in vibration-induced muscle pain in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Lindsay; Alvarez, Pedro; Bogen, Oliver; Levine, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that changes in the expression of Kv4.3 contribute to the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by vibration injury, a rodent model for hand-arm vibration syndrome in humans. Here we show that the exposure of the gastrocnemius muscle to vibration injury induces muscle hyperalgesia that is accompanied by a significant down-regulation of Kv4.3 in affected sensory nerve fibers in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We additionally demonstrate that the intrathecal administration of antisense oligonucleotides for Kv4.3 mRNA itself induces muscle hyperalgesia in the rat. Our results suggest that attenuation in the expression of Kv4.3 may contribute to neuropathic pain in people affected by hand-arm vibration syndrome. PMID:26721612

  10. Effect of caffeine on leg-muscle pain during intense cycling exercise: possible role of anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gliottoni, Rachael C; Motl, Robert W

    2008-04-01

    This experiment examined the effect of a moderate dose of caffeine on perceptions of leg-muscle pain during a bout of high-intensity cycling exercise and the role of anxiety sensitivity in the hypoalgesic effect of caffeine on muscle pain during exercise. Sixteen college-age women ingested caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) or a placebo and 1 hr later completed 30 min of cycling on an ergometer at 80% of peak aerobic capacity. The conditions were completed in a counterbalanced order, and perceptions of leg-muscle pain were recorded during the bouts of exercise. Caffeine resulted in a large reduction in leg-muscle pain-intensity ratings compared with placebo (d = -0.95), and the reduction in leg-muscle pain-intensity ratings was larger in those with lower anxiety-sensitivity scores than those with higher anxiety-sensitivity scores (d = -1.28 based on a difference in difference scores). The results support that caffeine ingestion has a large effect on reducing leg-muscle pain during high-intensity exercise, and the effect is moderated by anxiety sensitivity.

  11. Study of the control strategy of the quadriceps muscles in anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Cesarelli, M; Bifulco, P; Bracale, M

    2000-09-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a common pathological condition, particularly among young people and athletes, associated to an abnormal motion of the patella during the bending of the knee and possibly dependent on a muscular or structural imbalance. A lack of synergy in the quadriceps muscles results in a dynamic misalignment of the patella, which in turn produces pain. AKP rehabilitative therapy consists of conservative treatment whose main objective is to strengthen the Vastus Medialis. The aim of this article is to study the quadriceps muscle control strategy in AKP patients during an isokinetic exercise. Analysis of the muscle activation strategy is important for an objective measurement of the knee functionality in that it helps to diagnose and monitor the rehabilitative treatment. Surface electromyography (EMG) from the three superficial muscles of the femoral quadriceps during a concentric isokinetic exercise has been analyzed along with the signals of knee joint position and torque. A group of 12 AKP patients has been compared with a group of 30 normal subjects. Analysis of the grand ensemble average of the EMG linear envelopes in AKP patients reveals significant modifications in Vastus Medialis activity compared to the other quadriceps muscles. In order to study the synergy of the muscles, temporal identifiers have been associated to the EMG linear envelopes. To this end, EMG linear envelope decomposition in Gaussian pulses turned out to be effective and the results highlight an appreciable delay in the activation of the Vastus Medialis in AKP patients. This muscular unbalance can explain the abnormal motion of the patella.

  12. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period. PMID:26834359

  13. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength.

  14. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength. PMID:27190430

  15. Observational learning and pain-related fear: an experimental study with colored cold pressor tasks.

    PubMed

    Helsen, Kim; Goubert, Liesbet; Peters, Madelon L; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2011-12-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to experimentally test whether pain-related fear can be acquired through observational learning, whether extinction occurs after actual exposure to the aversive stimulus, and whether pain-related fear was associated with increased pain ratings. During an observation phase, female volunteers watched a video showing models performing cold pressor tasks (CPT), of which the color served as a conditioned stimulus (CS). In a differential fear conditioning paradigm, each of 2 colors were either paired with models' painful (CS+) or neutral (CS-) facial expressions. Exposure consisted of participants performing CPTs of both colors (10°C). Self-reported fear of pain and expected pain ratings were obtained after the observation period, while actual pain and avoidance measures were obtained during and after exposure. Results show that after observing another person performing the CPT associated with the painful faces, subjects report more fear of pain and expect more intense and unpleasant pain as compared with the CPT associated with the neutral faces. This effect of observational learning on pain-related fear persisted until after exposure. During and after exposure no stimulus-type effect for pain ratings was found. This study provides preliminary evidence for observational learning of pain-related fear in humans. Fear of pain can be more disabling than pain itself, and is a risk factor for chronic pain. Knowledge about the acquisition of pain-related fear may help to develop novel pain management programs. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the effects of observational learning on pain-related fear. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    PubMed

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology.

  17. Sex differences in parent and child pain ratings during an experimental child pain task.

    PubMed

    Moon, E C; Chambers, C T; Larochette, Anne-Claire; Hayton, K; Craig, K D; McGrath, P J

    2008-01-01

    Research in the field of pediatric pain has largely ignored the role of fathers in their children's pain experiences. The first objective of the present study was to examine the effect of the presence of mothers versus fathers on children's subjective ratings, facial expressions and physiological responses to acute pain. The second objective was to examine whether child and parent sex influence parents' proxy ratings of their children's pain. The final objective was to compare levels of agreement between mothers' and fathers' assessments of their children's pain. Participants included 73 children (37 boys, 36 girls), four to 12 years of age, along with 32 fathers and 41 mothers. Children undertook the cold pressor pain task while observed by one of their parents. During the task, the children's heart rates and facial expressions were recorded. Children provided self-reports and parents provided proxy reports of child pain intensity using the seven-point Faces Pain Scale. Neither child nor parent sex had a significant impact on children's subjective reports, facial expressions or heart rates in response to acute pain. Fathers gave their sons higher pain ratings than their daughters, whereas mothers' ratings of their sons' and daughters' pain did not differ. Kappa statistics and t tests revealed that fathers tended to be more accurate judges of their children's pain than mothers. Overall, this research highlights the importance of examining both parent and child sex differences in pediatric pain research.

  18. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head and neck-shoulder muscles reproduces head pain features in children with chronic tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain pattern and areas from trigger points (TrPs) in head, neck, and shoulder muscles in children with chronic tension type headache (CTTH). Fifty children (14 boys, 36 girls, mean age: 8 ± 2) with CTTH and 50 age- and sex- matched children participated. Bilateral temporalis, masseter, superior oblique, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, and levator scapula muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the children's condition. TrPs were identified with palpation and considered active when local and referred pains reproduce headache pain attacks. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and also measured. The total number of TrPs was significantly greater in children with CTTH as compared to healthy children (P < 0.001). Active TrPs were only present in children with CTTH (P < 0.001). Within children with CTTH, a significant positive association between the number of active TrPs and headache duration (r (s) = 0.315; P = 0.026) was observed: the greater the number of active TrPs, the longer the duration of headache attack. Significant differences in referred pain areas between groups (P < 0.001) and muscles (P < 0.001) were found: the referred pain areas were larger in CTTH children (P < 0.001), and the referred pain area elicited by suboccipital TrPs was larger than the referred pain from the remaining TrPs (P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations between some headache clinical parameters and the size of the referred pain area were found. Our results showed that the local and referred pains elicited from active TrPs in head, neck and shoulder shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous CTTH in children, supporting a relevant role of active TrPs in CTTH in children.

  19. The Effect of Fibromyalgia and Widespread Pain on the Clinically Significant Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Pain Disorders - A Prospective 18-Month Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Velly, Ana Miriam; Look, John O.; Schiffman, Eric; Lenton, Patricia A.; Kang, Wenjun; Messner, Ronald P.; Holcroft, Christina A.; Fricton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Although most cases of Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) are mild and self-limiting, about 10% of TMJD patients develop severe disorders associated with chronic pain and disability. It has been suggested that fibromyalgia and widespread pain play a significant role in the Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) chronicity. This paper assessed the effects of fibromyalgia and widespread pain on clinically significant TMJD pain (GCPS II-IV). Four hundred eighty-five participants recruited from the Minneapolis/St. Paul area through media advertisements and local dentists received examinations and completed the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) at baseline and at 18th months. Baseline widespread pain (OR: 2.53, P=0.04) and depression (OR: 5.30, P=0.005) were associated with onset of clinically significant pain (GCPS II-IV) within 18 months after baseline. The risk associated with baseline fibromyalgia was moderate, but not significant (OR: 2.74, P=0.09). Persistence of clinically significant pain was related to fibromyalgia (OR: 2.48, P=0.02) and with depression (OR: 2.48, P=0.02). These results indicate that these centrally generated pain conditions play a role in the onset and persistence of clinically significant TMJD. PMID:20466595

  20. Posterior auricular pain caused by the trigger points in the sternocleidomastoid muscle aggravated by psychological factors -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Min, Sam Hong; Chang, Seong-Ho; Jeon, Se Keun; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Park, Ji-Yong; Shin, Hye Won

    2010-12-01

    Psychological factors play a significant role in the pain mechanism, and psychological approaches may be useful complements to traditional medical and surgical treatments in pain management. The authors report a case of recurrent severe posterior auricular pain caused by trigger points in the right sternocleidomastoid muscle and influenced by stressful psychological situations (e.g., family affairs, job loss) in a 50-year-old man.

  1. Automated discovery of safety and efficacy concerns for joint & muscle pain relief treatments from online reviews.

    PubMed

    Adams, David Z; Gruss, Richard; Abrahams, Alan S

    2017-04-01

    Product issues can cost companies millions in lawsuits and have devastating effects on a firm's sales, image and goodwill, especially in the era of social media. The ability for a system to detect the presence of safety and efficacy (S&E) concerns early on could not only protect consumers from injuries due to safety hazards, but could also mitigate financial damage to the manufacturer. Prior studies in the field of automated defect discovery have found industry-specific techniques appropriate to the automotive, consumer electronics, home appliance, and toy industries, but have not investigated pain relief medicines and medical devices. In this study, we focus specifically on automated discovery of S&E concerns in over-the-counter (OTC) joint and muscle pain relief remedies and devices. We select a dataset of over 32,000 records for three categories of Joint & Muscle Pain Relief treatments from Amazon's online product reviews, and train "smoke word" dictionaries which we use to score holdout reviews, for the presence of safety and efficacy issues. We also score using conventional sentiment analysis techniques. Compared to traditional sentiment analysis techniques, we found that smoke term dictionaries were better suited to detect product concerns from online consumer reviews, and significantly outperformed the sentiment analysis techniques in uncovering both efficacy and safety concerns, across all product subcategories. Our research can be applied to the healthcare and pharmaceutical industry in order to detect safety and efficacy concerns, reducing risks that consumers face using these products. These findings can be highly beneficial to improving quality assurance and management in joint and muscle pain relief. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of muscle and joint pressure-pain thresholds in patients with complex regional pain syndrome and upper limb pain of other origin.

    PubMed

    Mainka, Tina; Bischoff, Florian S; Baron, Ralf; Krumova, Elena K; Nicolas, Volkmar; Pennekamp, Werner; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vollert, Jan; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Pain localized in the deep tissues occurs frequently in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, hyperalgesia to blunt pressure over muscles is common in CRPS, but it often appears in limb pain of other origin as well. Considering that 3-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) reveals periarticular enhanced bone metabolism in CRPS, joint-associated hyperalgesia to blunt pressure might be a more specific finding than hyperalgesia over muscles. In 34 patients with upper limb pain (18 CRPS, 16 non-CRPS; diagnosed in accordance to the Budapest criteria) and in 18 healthy controls, pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the thenar (PPTThenar), the metacarpophalangeal (PPTMCP), and the proximal interphalangeal (PPTPIP) joints using a pressure algometer (Somedic, Sweden). Beforehand, all patients had received TPBS for diagnostic purposes independently of the study. Region-of-interest (ROI) ratios (mineralization phase) for the MCP and PIP, excluding fracture sites, were correlated with the PPT. In CRPS, all ROI ratios were significantly increased and all PPT of the affected hand were decreased compared to non-CRPS (PPTThenar: 243±150kPa vs 358±197kPa, PPTMCP: 80±67kPa vs 159±93kPa, PPTPIP: 80±56kPa vs 184±110kPa; P<.01) and controls (PPTThenar: 478±106kPa, PPTMCP: 254±50kPa, PPTPIP: 275±76kPa; P<.01). A PPTThenar below 293kPa revealed 77% sensitivity but only 63% specificity, whereas a PPTPIP below 102kPa had 82% sensitivity and 94% specificity to identify CRPS. Only in CRPS were PPTMCP and PPTPIP correlated significantly inversely with the ROI ratio (MCP: r=-0.439, PIP: r=-0.447). PPTPIP shows higher specificity for CRPS type I than PPTThenar without loss of sensitivity. Therefore, measurement of joint PPT could be a noninvasive diagnostic tool reflecting increased bone metabolism assessed by TPBS as a sign of bone pathophysiology. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Reduction of cervical and respiratory muscle strength in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability.

    PubMed

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Sollano-Vallez, Ernesto; Del Corral, Tamara

    2017-06-11

    To investigate whether patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability have a greater cervical motor function impairment and respiratory disturbances compared with patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having mild disability and asymptomatic subjects; and the association between these outcomes in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study, 44 patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and 31 healthy subjects participated. The neck disability index was used to divide the patients into 2 groups: 1) mild disability group (scores between 5 and 14 points); and 2) moderate to severe disability group (scores >14 points). Cervical motor function was measured by cervical range of motion, forward head posture, neck flexor, and extensor muscle strength. Respiratory function and maximum respiratory pressures were also measured. Statistically differences were found between the patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having a moderate to severe disability and the asymptomatic subjects for cervical and respiratory muscle strength. Comparisons between chronic nonspecific neck pain and the asymptomatic groups showed differences for all the variables, except for forward head posture. The regression model determined that strength of cervical flexion explained 36.4 and 45.6% of the variance of maximum inspiratory pressures and maximum expiratory pressures, respectively. Only the chronic nonspecific neck pain group with moderate to severe disability showed differences compared with the healthy subjects. Neck muscle strength could be a good predictor of respiratory muscle function. Implications for rehabilitation Neck pain severity could be closely associated with decreased respiratory pressure in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for patients with moderate to severe disability, such as respiratory muscle training. The regression

  4. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482.

  5. In Vivo praying and catastrophizing mediate the race differences in experimental pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Meints, Samantha M; Hirsh, Adam T

    2015-05-01

    Black individuals have a lower tolerance for experimental pain than white individuals. Black and white individuals also differ in their use of pain coping strategies, which may explain the race differences in pain sensitivity. We examined the extent to which situation-specific pain coping mediated black-white differences in pain sensitivity. We hypothesized that 1) black participants would demonstrate lower pain tolerance than white participants, 2) black participants would use different pain coping strategies than white participants, and 3) the differential use of these strategies would mediate the relationship between race and pain tolerance. Healthy college undergraduates (N = 190) participated in a cold pressor task and then completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire-Revised to assess their situation-specific pain coping. Compared with white participants, black participants demonstrated lower pain tolerance, engaged in more situation-specific catastrophizing and praying, and ignored pain less frequently. Catastrophizing and praying were inversely related to pain tolerance and were significant mediators of the relationship between race and pain tolerance. The indirect effect of praying was stronger than that of catastrophizing. Race differences in pain sensitivity may be due, in part, to differences in the use of catastrophizing and praying as coping strategies. These results may help guide treatments addressing maladaptive pain coping. This study suggests that race differences in pain sensitivity may be due, in part, to the differential use of catastrophizing and praying strategies. Psychosocial treatments for pain should encourage patients to take an active role in their pain management. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nurses' response to pain communication from patients: a post-test experimental study.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Laporta, Matthew; Meadows-Oliver, Mikki

    2007-01-01

    Inadequate communication about pain can result in increased pain for patients. The purpose of the current pilot study was to test how nurses respond when patients use their own words, a pain intensity scale, or both to communicate pain. A post-test only experimental design was used with three pain description conditions, personal and numeric; personal only; numeric only. The setting included six hospitals and one school of nursing located in the northeastern United States. PARTICIPANTS included 122 registered medical surgical nurses. Nurses were randomly assigned to condition, and read a vignette about a trauma patient with moderately severe pain. The vignettes were identical except for the patient's pain description and age. The nurses then wrote how they would respond to the patient's pain. Two blind raters content analyzed the responses, giving nurses one point for including each of six a priori criteria derived from the Acute Pain Management Panel [1992. Acute Pain Management: operative or medical procedures and trauma. Clinical practice guideline (AHCPR Publication No. 92-0032)., Rockville, MD, USA] and the American Pain Society [2003. Principles of analgesic use in the treatment of acute pain and cancer pain, Glenville, IL, USA]. Nurses planned similar numbers of pain management strategies across the three conditions, with a mean of 2.1 (SD=1.14) strategies out of the recommended six. Nurses did not respond with more pain management strategies when patients describe pain in their own words, or in their own words and a pain intensity scale. The relatively small number of pain management strategies planned by the nurses suggests that nurses use few strategies to respond to moderately severe pain problems.

  7. Muscle organization in individuals with and without pain and joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J C; Gonzalez, Y M; McCall, W D; Ohrbach, R; Marx, D B; Liu, H; Iwasaki, L R

    2012-06-01

    Central nervous system organization of masticatory muscles determines the magnitude of joint and muscle forces. Validated computer-assisted models of neuromuscular organization during biting were used to determine organization in individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Ninety-one individuals (47 women, 44 men) were assigned to one of four diagnostic groups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of pain (P) and bilateral temporomandibular joint disc displacement (DD). Electromyography and bite-forces were measured during right and left incisor and molar biting. Two three-dimensional models employing neuromuscular objectives of minimization of joint loads (MJL) or muscle effort (MME) simulated biting tasks. Evaluations of diagnostic group and gender effects on choice of best-fit model were by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests, evaluations of right-left symmetry were by Chi-square and Fisher's exact statistics, and evaluations of model accuracy were by within-subject linear regressions. MME was the best-fit during left molar biting in +DD individuals and incisor biting in men (all p < 0.03). Incisor biting symmetry in muscle organization was significantly higher (p < 0.03) in healthy individuals compared with those with TMD. Within-subject regressions showed that best-fit model errors were similar among groups: 8 to 15% (0.68 ≤ R(2) ≤ 0.74). These computer-assisted models predicted muscle organization during static biting in humans with and without TMDs.

  8. Muscle Organization in Individuals with and without Pain and Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J.C.; Gonzalez, Y.M.; McCall, W.D.; Ohrbach, R.; Marx, D.B.; Liu, H.; Iwasaki, L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system organization of masticatory muscles determines the magnitude of joint and muscle forces. Validated computer-assisted models of neuromuscular organization during biting were used to determine organization in individuals with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Ninety-one individuals (47 women, 44 men) were assigned to one of four diagnostic groups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of pain (P) and bilateral temporomandibular joint disc displacement (DD). Electromyography and bite-forces were measured during right and left incisor and molar biting. Two three-dimensional models employing neuromuscular objectives of minimization of joint loads (MJL) or muscle effort (MME) simulated biting tasks. Evaluations of diagnostic group and gender effects on choice of best-fit model were by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests, evaluations of right-left symmetry were by Chi-square and Fisher’s exact statistics, and evaluations of model accuracy were by within-subject linear regressions. MME was the best-fit during left molar biting in +DD individuals and incisor biting in men (all p < 0.03). Incisor biting symmetry in muscle organization was significantly higher (p < 0.03) in healthy individuals compared with those with TMD. Within-subject regressions showed that best-fit model errors were similar among groups: 8 to 15% (0.68 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.74). These computer-assisted models predicted muscle organization during static biting in humans with and without TMDs. PMID:22522774

  9. Investigation of trunk muscle co-contraction and its association with low back pain development during prolonged sitting.

    PubMed

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Nairn, Brian C; Drake, Janessa D M

    2013-08-01

    Previous work has shown muscle activation differences between chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls in sitting postures, and between asymptomatic individuals who do (PDs: pain developers) and do not (NPDs: non-pain developers) develop transient back pain during prolonged standing (as determined using a visual analog scale). The current study aimed to investigate differences in trunk muscle co-contraction between PD and NPD individuals over 2h of prolonged sitting. Ten healthy males sat continuously for 2h while performing tasks that simulated computer-aided-drafting; four were classified as PDs, and six as NPDs. Co-contraction indices were calculated from EMG data collected from eight trunk muscles bilaterally, and compared between pain groups and over time. PDs exhibited higher levels of co-contraction than NPDs. Additionally, co-contraction tended to increase over time, and was significantly correlated to pain development. The relationship between co-contraction and back pain development may actually be circular, in that it is both causal and adaptive: high co-contraction initially predisposes to pain development, following which co-contraction further increases in an attempt to alleviate the pain, and the cycle perpetuates. Further work will be required to elucidate the exact nature of this relationship, and to confirm the generalizability to other populations.

  10. Neck muscle strength and mobility of the cervical spine as predictors of neck pain: a prospective 6-year study.

    PubMed

    Salo, Petri; Ylinen, Jari; Kautiainen, Hannu; Häkkinen, Keijo; Häkkinen, Arja

    2012-05-20

    Follow-up study. To study whether neck muscle strength or cervical spine mobility values could serve as predictors for future neck pain among originally pain-free working-age subjects during a long period. Neck pain has been associated with weaker neck muscle strength and lower cervical spine mobility in several studies. However, causality between physical capacity and neck pain has not been shown. Isometric neck muscle strength and passive range of motion of the cervical spine of 220 healthy female volunteers, aged 20 to 59 years, were measured. A postal survey was conducted 6 years later to determine whether any volunteers had experienced neck pain. The receiver operator characteristics curve was used to study how well the neck strength and mobility values in different movement planes at baseline served as predictors of future neck pain. Of the 192 (87%) responders, 37 (19%) reported neck pain for 7 days during the past year. In predicting neck pain, areas under the receiver operator characteristics curves (95% confidence intervals) in different movement planes were 0.52 to 0.56 (0.41-0.66) for isometric neck strength and 0.54 to 0.56 (0.44-0.76) for passive mobility of the cervical spine. The results suggest that neither isometric neck muscle strength nor passive mobility of cervical spine has predictive value for later occurrences of neck pain in pain-free working-age women. Thus, screening healthy subjects for weaker neck muscle strength or decreased mobility of the cervical spine may not be recommended for preventive purposes.

  11. Neuromuscular electrostimulation techniques: historical aspects and current possibilities in treatment of pain and muscle waisting.

    PubMed

    Heidland, August; Fazeli, Gholamreza; Klassen, André; Sebekova, Katarina; Hennemann, Hans; Bahner, Udo; Di Iorio, Biagio

    2013-01-01

    ), acetylcholine and adenosine). The modern electrotherapy of neuromusculo- skeletal pain is based in particular on the following types: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS or electro-acupuncture) and spinal cord stimulation (SCS). In mild to moderate pain, TENS and PENS are effective methods, whereas SCS is very useful for therapy of refractory neuropathic or ischemic pain. In 2005, high tone external muscle stimulation (HTEMS) was introduced. In diabetic peripheral neuropathy, its analgesic action was more pronounced than TENS application. HTEMS appeared also to have value in the therapy of symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Besides its pain-relieving effect, electrical stimulation is of major importance for prevention or treatment of muscle dysfunction and sarcopenia. In controlled clinical studies electrical myostimulation (EMS) has been shown to be effective against the sarcopenia of patients with chronic congestive heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ESRD.

  12. Effects of coping statements on experimental pain in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Roditi, Daniela; Robinson, Michael E; Litwins, Nola

    2009-08-19

    The present study measured the effects of catastrophizing self-statements and positive coping self-statements on cold pressor-induced pain. Participants were 58 adult chronic pain patients with current facial pain. It was hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to a decrease in pain endurance whereas positive coping would lead to an increase in pain endurance. It was also hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to an increase in peak pain intensity whereas positive coping would lead to a decrease in peak pain intensity. At pretest, participants submerged their nondominant hand in the cold pressor. Pain sensitivity ranges (PSR) were subsequently determined by calculating the difference between tolerance and threshold times. Ratings of peak pain intensity were measured using a pressure sensitive bladder/transducer. Participants underwent random assignment to either a catastrophizing group or a positive coping self-statement group. ANCOVA results revealed that on average, participants employing catastrophizing statements as a coping strategy experienced significantly lower PSR (M = 35.53, SD = 39.71) compared to participants employing positive coping self-statements (M = 73.70, SD = 86.14) when controlling for pretest PSR. Group assignment had no significant influence on peak pain intensity ratings. Thus, our results reveal that manipulation of coping causes changes in pain endurance.

  13. Are flexibility and muscle-strengthening activities associated with a higher risk of developing low back pain?

    PubMed

    Sandler, Robert D; Sui, Xuemei; Church, Timothy S; Fritz, Stacy L; Beattie, Paul F; Blair, Steven N

    2014-07-01

    To examine the association between participation in flexibility or muscle-strengthening activities with the development of low back pain. Observational cohort study. The cohort included 4610 adults, 17% female, between 20 and 81 years of age (mean 46.6, standard deviation 4.96). The cohort was followed for a mean of 4.9 years for self-reported low back pain. All participants reported at baseline whether they performed flexibility or muscle-strengthening activities, including specific sub-types. Neither general performance of flexibility or muscle-strengthening activities were associated with a higher incidence of low back pain compared to those who did not perform these activities. Those who reported stretching, as a specific flexibility activity were at a higher risk of developing low back pain compared with those who performed no flexibility exercises, reported callisthenic flexibility activities, or attended exercise classes. Those who reported using weight training machines, as part of muscle-strengthening activities, had a higher risk of reporting low back pain, compared with those who did not perform muscle-strengthening activities or performed callisthenic or free weight activities. In this sample, stretching or use of weight training machines is associated with increased risk of developing low back pain compared to use of free weights, callisthenics or exercise classes. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The relationship beween posture and back muscle endurance in industrial workers with flexion-related low back pain.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Peter B; Mitchell, Tim; Bulich, Paul; Waller, Rob; Holte, Johan

    2006-11-01

    This preliminary cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine if there were measurable relationships between posture, back muscle endurance and low back pain (LBP) in industrial workers with a reported history of flexion strain injury and flexion pain provocation. Clinical reports state that subjects with flexion pain disorders of the lumbar spine commonly adopt passive flexed postures such as slump sitting and present with associated dysfunction of the spinal postural stabilising musculature. However, to date there is little empirical evidence to support that patients with back pain, posture their spines differently than pain-free subjects. Subjects included 21 healthy industrial workers and 24 industrial workers with flexion-provoked LBP. Lifestyle information, lumbo-pelvic posture in sitting, standing and lifting, and back muscle endurance were measured. LBP subjects had significantly reduced back muscle endurance (P < 0.01). LBP subjects sat with less hip flexion, (P = 0.05), suggesting increased posterior pelvic tilt in sitting. LBP subjects postured their spines significantly closer to their end of range lumbar flexion in 'usual' sitting than the healthy controls (P < 0.05). Correlations between increased time spent sitting, physical inactivity and poorer back muscle endurance were also identified. There were no significant differences found between the groups for the standing and lifting posture measures. These preliminary results support that a relationship may exist between flexed spinal postures, reduced back muscle endurance, physical inactivity and LBP in subjects with a history of flexion injury and pain.

  15. The effect of different exercise programs on cervical flexor muscles dimensions in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Javanshir, Khodabakhsh; Amiri, Mohsen; Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; De las Penas, Cesar Fernandez; Rezasoltani, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different exercise programs on cervical flexor muscles dimensions in patients with chronic neck pain is yet to be demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of two exercise programs; craniocervical flexion (CCF) and cervical flexion (CF), on flexor muscles dimensions in patients with chronic neck pain. Following ethical approval, 60 patients were randomly assigned into either a CCF group or a CF group. Patients in the CCF group were given CCF exercises and those in the CF group received CF exercises. All patients received interventions for a period of ten weeks. Pain intensity and functional disability were assessed using numerical pain rate scale and neck disability index, respectively. Dimensions of longus colli (LC) and sternoclidomastoid (SCM) muscles were measured using ultrasonography (US). All measurements were taken before and after interventions. Following intervention, the CCF group demonstrated a significant increase in LC muscle dimensions including cross sectional area, width and thickness compared with the CF group. A statistically significant increase was found on SCM thickness in the CF group. Following intervention, SCM thickness measurement in the CCF group showed no significant changes. Statistically significant decrease on pain intensity and disability were also found in both groups. Present findings demonstrated that craniocervical flexion program which specifically recruiting deep cervical flexor muscles increased LC muscle dimension significantly and CF program as an endurance training program increased SCM thickness.

  16. Relationships among Eysenck's extraversion, Rorschach's Erlebnistypus, and tolerance of experimental tonic pain (Cold Water Pressor Test).

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, Stefano; De Carolis, Antonella

    2005-02-01

    In a group of 42 healthy volunteers the correlations between the concept of Extraversion-Introversion as defined by Eysenck and Erlebnistypus as defined by Rorschach were analysed to relate these with the tolerance of an experimentally induced tonic pain. We conducted an experimental procedure comprising a test and retest. At test the subjects were administered the Rorschach, the Eysenck Personality Inventory, the Cold Water Pressor Test, a nongraduated Visual Analogue Scale, and the Italian version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. At retest the experimental induction of pain was measured again. At test subjects who scored higher on the EPI Extraversion scale tolerated pain longer and did not modify their performance at retest. Also, the concepts of Extroversion defined by the Rorschach test and by the Extraversion scale of the Eysenck Personality Inventory shared some psychophysiological features of higher tolerance to pain. These personality features did not influence how subjects qualitatively describe the immediate painful experience.

  17. Frequency of daytime tooth clenching episodes in individuals affected by masticatory muscle pain and pain-free controls during standardized ability tasks.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Iacopo; Landino, Donatella; Donnarumma, Valeria; Castroflorio, Tommaso; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambrosina

    2017-05-01

    Tooth clenching has been suggested to be related to temporomandibular pain. However, the electromyographic characteristics of daytime clenching episodes have been minimally investigated. This study aimed to analyze the frequency, amplitude, and duration of daytime clenching episodes in patients with masticatory muscle pain and pain-free individuals. Fifteen women with masticatory muscles myalgia (MP group, mean ± SD age = 26.4 ± 7.6 years) matched for age to 18 pain-free women (CTR group, mean ± SD age = 25.3 ± 2.8 years) were submitted to three different ability tasks (filling out questionnaires for 40 min, reading for 20 min, and playing a videogame for 20 min). The electromyographic activity periods (AP) of the right masseter greater than 10 % (AP10), 20 % (AP20), and 30 % (AP30) of the maximum voluntary contraction were analyzed. The mean frequencies of AP10, AP20, and AP30 were greater in MP than in CTR individuals (all p < 0.05). The mean duration of AP10 was higher in MP group than CTR group only while filling out the questionnaires (p = 0.0033). CTR group had an increased frequency and duration of AP10 while playing the videogame than while reading a magazine. The ability tasks did not affect the muscle activity in the MP group. Individuals with masticatory muscle pain have an increased frequency of both high and low-intense daytime clenching episodes. The type of ability task affects the frequency and the duration of clenching episodes only in pain-free individuals. Clinicians should recognize that the frequency and intensity of daytime clenching are noticeably increased in individuals with masticatory muscle pain in order to better tailor treatment.

  18. An experimental investigation of the effects of preferred and relaxing music listening on pain perception.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Laura A; MacDonald, Raymond A R

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of music listening on perception and tolerance of experimentally induced cold pressor pain. Fifty-four participants (34 females, 20 males) each underwent 3 cold pressor trials while listening to (a) white noise, (b) specially designed relaxation music, and (c) their own chosen music. Tolerance time, pain intensity on visual analog scale, and the pain rating index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and perceived control over the pain were measured in each condition. While listening to their own preferred music, male and female participants tolerated the painful stimulus significantly longer than during both the relaxation music and control conditions. However, only female participants rated the intensity of the pain as significantly lower in the preferred music condition. Both male and female participants reported feeling significantly more control when listening to their preferred music. It is suggested that personal preference is an influential factor when considering the efficacy of music listening for pain relief.

  19. Esophageal mucosal mast cell infiltration and changes in segmental smooth muscle contraction in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Park, S W; Lee, H; Lee, H J; Chung, H; Park, J C; Shin, S K; Lee, S K; Lee, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells release potent mediators that alter enteric nerve and smooth muscle functions and may contribute to the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The goal of this study was to determine if mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with smooth muscle segmental changes in esophageal contraction. All patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) were divided into two groups consisting of patients with non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain (FCP) according to the results of ambulatory 24 hours esophageal pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry. Pressure-volume (PV) was calculated by multiplying the length of the esophageal segment, duration of the contraction, and mean pressure over the entire space-time box (P mean). Quantification of mast cells was performed in five consecutive nonoverlapping immunostained sections. Spearman correlation analysis showed that the distal segment PV correlated with the mast cell count in all of the patients combined and in patients with FCP with correlation coefficients of 0.509 and 0.436, respectively (P = 0.004 and P = 0.042). Similar findings were observed for the segmental ratio of distal to proximal smooth muscle PV in all patients and in patients with FCP (correlation coefficients 0.566; P = 0.001 and correlation coefficients 0.525; P = 0.012, respectively). Mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with distal esophageal contraction as a key pathophysiologic factor of NCCP.

  20. Periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Long, Hu; Liao, Lina; Gao, Meiya; Ma, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2015-08-01

    Calcitonin-related gene peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in orofacial inflammatory pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Closed coil springs were used to deliver forces. Rats were euthanized on 0d, 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 14d following experimental tooth movement. Then, alveolar bones were obtained for immunostaining of periodontal tissues against CGRP. Two hours prior to euthanasia on each day, orofacial pain levels were assessed through rat grimace scale. CGRP and olcegepant (CGRP receptor antagonist) were injected into periodontal tissues to verify the roles of periodontal CGRP in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Periodontal CGRP expression levels and orofacial pain levels were elevated on 1d, 3d, 5d, and 7d following experimental tooth movement. The two indices were significantly correlated with each other and fitted into a dose-response model. Periodontal administration of CGRP could elevate periodontal CGRP expressions and exacerbate orofacial pain. Moreover, olcegepant administration could decrease periodontal CGRP expressions and alleviate orofacial pain. Therefore, periodontal CGRP plays an important role in pain transmission and modulation following experimental tooth movement. We suggest that it may participate in a positive feedback aiming to amplify orofacial pain signals.

  1. Work partitioning of transversally loaded muscle: experimentation and simulation.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Tobias; Till, Olaf; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are surrounded by other muscles, connective tissue and bones, which may transfer transversal forces to the muscle belly. Simple Hill-type muscle models do not consider transversal forces. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine and model the influence of transversal muscle loading on contraction dynamics, e.g. on the rate of force development and on the maximum isometric muscle force (Fim). Isometric experiments with and without transversal muscle loading were conducted on rat muscles. The muscles were loaded (1.3 N cm⁻²) by a custom-made plunger which was able to move in transversal direction. Then the muscle was fully stimulated, the isometric force was measured at the distal tendon and the movement of the plunger was captured with a high-speed camera. The interaction between the muscle and the transversal load was modelled based on energy balance between the (1) work done by the contractile component (CC) and (2) the work done to lift the load, to stretch the series elastic structures and to deform the muscle. Compared with the unloaded contraction, the force rate was reduced by about 25% and Fim was reduced by 5% both in the experiment and in the simulation. The reduction in Fim resulted from using part of the work done by the CC to lift the load and deform the muscle. The response of the muscle to transversal loading opens a window into the interdependence of contractile and deformation work, which can be used to specify and validate 3D muscle models.

  2. Skeletal muscle contractility, self-reported pain and tissue sensitivity in females with neck/shoulder pain and upper Trapezius myofascial trigger points– a randomized intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In relation to Myofascial Triggerpoints (MFTrPs) of the upper Trapezius, this study explored muscle contractility characteristics, the occurrence of post-intervention muscle soreness and the effect of dry needling on muscle contractile characteristics and clinical outcomes. Methods Seventy-seven female office workers (25-46yrs) with and without neck/shoulder pain were observed with respect to self-reported pain (NRS-101), pressure-pain threshold (PPT), maximum voluntary contraction (Fmax) and rate of force development (RFD) at baseline (pre-intervention), immediately post-intervention and 48 hours post-intervention. Symptomatic and asymptomatic participant groups were each randomized into two treatment sub-groups (superficial (SDN) and deep dry needling (DDN)) after baseline testing. At 48 hours post-intervention participants were asked whether delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and/or post-needling soreness had developed. Results Muscle contractile characteristics did not differ between groups at baseline. Forty-six individuals developed muscle soreness (39 from mechanical testing and seven from needling). No inter-group differences were observed post-intervention for Fmax or RFD for the four sub-groups. Over the observation period, symptomatic participants reported less pain from both SDN (p= 0.003) and DDN (p=0.011). However, PPT levels were reduced for all participants (p=0.029). Those reporting DOMS experienced significant decreases in PPT, irrespective of symptom state or intervention (p=0.001). Conclusions In selected female neck/shoulder pain sufferers, maximum voluntary contraction and rapid force generation of the upper Trapezius was not influenced by clinically relevant self-reported pain or the presence of diagnostically relevant MFTrPs. Dry needling, deep or superficial, did not affect measured functional outcomes over the 48-hour observation period. DOMS affected participants uniformly irrespective of pain, MFTrP status or intervention

  3. Sex, Gender, and Pain: A Review of Recent Clinical and Experimental Findings

    PubMed Central

    Fillingim, Roger B.; King, Christopher D.; Ribeiro-Dasilva, Margarete C.; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Riley, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    Sex-related influences on pain and analgesia have become a topic of tremendous scientific and clinical interest, especially in the last 10 to 15 years. Members of our research group published reviews of this literature more than a decade ago, and the intervening time period has witnessed robust growth in research regarding sex, gender, and pain. Therefore, it seems timely to revisit this literature. Abundant evidence from recent epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrates that women are at substantially greater risk for many clinical pain conditions, and there is some suggestion that postoperative and procedural pain may be more severe among women than men. Consistent with our previous reviews, current human findings regarding sex differences in experimental pain indicate greater pain sensitivity among females compared with males for most pain modalities, including more recently implemented clinically relevant pain models such as temporal summation of pain and intramuscular injection of algesic substances. The evidence regarding sex differences in laboratory measures of endogenous pain modulation is mixed, as are findings from studies using functional brain imaging to ascertain sex differences in pain-related cerebral activation. Also inconsistent are findings regarding sex differences in responses to pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic pain treatments. The article concludes with a discussion of potential biopsychosocial mechanisms that may underlie sex differences in pain, and considerations for future research are discussed. Perspective This article reviews the recent literature regarding sex, gender, and pain. The growing body of evidence that has accumulated in the past 10 to 15 years continues to indicate substantial sex differences in clinical and experimental pain responses, and some evidence suggests that pain treatment responses may differ for women versus men. PMID:19411059

  4. [Autologous grafting of extraocular muscles: experimental study in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Meireles-Teixeira, Jorge; Bicas, Harley E A

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of autologous extraocular muscle grafting as a type of muscle expansion surgery. The left superior rectus muscle of twenty-nine rabbits was resected and this fragment was attached to the endpoint of the respective right superior rectus (test group). Thereafter, the superior rectus of the left eye was reattached to the sclera (control group). Both groups were examined during different postoperative periods in order to assess their outcomes. The presence of hyperemia was slightly more frequent in the grafted group. Secretion and muscle atrophy were negligible in both groups. Fibrosis was greater in grafted animals. These muscles were weaker than the control muscles, although the force required to split muscular parts was always greater than the physiological one. This surgical technique was reliable and useful if one intends to achieve muscle expansion without the intrinsic risks of dealing with heterologous/artificial materials.

  5. Referred pain areas of active myofascial trigger points in head, neck, and shoulder muscles, in chronic tension type headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ge, Hong-You; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; González-Iglesias, Javier; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-10-01

    Our aim was to analyze the differences in the referred pain patterns and size of the areas of those myofascial trigger points (TrPs) involved in chronic tension type headache (CTTH) including a number of muscles not investigated in previous studies. Thirteen right handed women with CTTH (mean age: 38 ± 6 years) were included. TrPs were bilaterally searched in upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, masseter, levator scapulae, superior oblique (extra-ocular), and suboccipital muscles. TrPs were considered active when both local and referred pain evoked by manual palpation reproduced total or partial pattern similar to a headache attack. The size of the referred pain area of TrPs of each muscle was calculated. The mean number of active TrPs within each CTTH patient was 7 (95% CI 6.2-8.0). A greater number (T = 2.79; p = 0.016) of active TrPs was found at the right side (4.2 ± 1.5) when compared to the left side (2.9 ± 1.0). TrPs in the suboccipital muscles were most prevalent (n = 12; 92%), followed by the superior oblique muscle (n =11/n = 9 right/left side), the upper trapezius muscle (n = 11/n = 6) and the masseter muscle (n = 9/n=7). The ANOVA showed significant differences in the size of the referred pain area between muscles (F = 4.7, p = 0.001), but not between sides (F = 1.1; p = 0.3): as determined by a Bonferroni post hoc analysis the referred pain area elicited by levator scapulae TrPs was significantly greater than the area from the sternocleidomastoid (p = 0.02), masseter (p = 0.003) and superior oblique (p = 0.001) muscles. Multiple active TrPs exist in head, neck and shoulder muscles in women with CTTH. The referred pain areas of TrPs located in neck muscles were larger than the referred pain areas of head muscles. Spatial summation of nociceptive inputs from multiple active TrPs may contribute to clinical manifestations of CTTH. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline on experimental inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Mariana L; Benevides, Verônica M; Sachs, Daniela; Brito, Gerly A C; da Rocha, Francisco A C; Poole, Stephen; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2004-01-01

    The antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline was investigated in three experimental pain models. Pentoxifylline (0.5–1.6 mg kg−1) given 30 min before the stimulus significantly inhibited the writhing response induced by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of either acetic acid (−90%) or zymosan (−83%), but not that of iloprost, in mice, as well as the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia in the zymosan arthritis in rats (−50%). Pentoxifylline also inhibited the mechanical hypernociception in rats induced by the intraplantar injection of either carrageenin (−81%), bradykinin (−56%) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α; −46%), but not that induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Pentoxifylline did not inhibit the nociceptive response in the hot plate test in mice. Further, the antinociceptive effect of pentoxifylline in the writhing test in mice and the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia were not reversed by the coadministration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Thus, pentoxifylline antinociceptive effect is probably not mediated at a central level. Pentoxifylline significantly reduced TNF-α (−43%) and IL-1β (−42%) concentrations in the joint exudates of rats stimulated by intra-articular injection of zymosan and the production of both cytokines (−66 and −86%, respectively) by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vivo with zymosan as well as the expression of TNF-α at the tissue level in carrageenin-injected rat paws. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of pentoxifylline is associated with the inhibition of the release of both TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:15520047

  7. Antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline on experimental inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Vale, Mariana L; Benevides, Verônica M; Sachs, Daniela; Brito, Gerly A C; da Rocha, Francisco A C; Poole, Stephen; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2004-12-01

    The antihyperalgesic effect of pentoxifylline was investigated in three experimental pain models. Pentoxifylline (0.5-1.6 mg kg(-1)) given 30 min before the stimulus significantly inhibited the writhing response induced by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of either acetic acid (-90%) or zymosan (-83%), but not that of iloprost, in mice, as well as the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia in the zymosan arthritis in rats (-50%). Pentoxifylline also inhibited the mechanical hypernociception in rats induced by the intraplantar injection of either carrageenin (-81%), bradykinin (-56%) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha; -46%), but not that induced by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Pentoxifylline did not inhibit the nociceptive response in the hot plate test in mice. Further, the antinociceptive effect of pentoxifylline in the writhing test in mice and the zymosan-induced articular hyperalgesia were not reversed by the coadministration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Thus, pentoxifylline antinociceptive effect is probably not mediated at a central level. Pentoxifylline significantly reduced TNF-alpha (-43%) and IL-1beta (-42%) concentrations in the joint exudates of rats stimulated by intra-articular injection of zymosan and the production of both cytokines (-66 and -86%, respectively) by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vivo with zymosan as well as the expression of TNF-alpha at the tissue level in carrageenin-injected rat paws. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of pentoxifylline is associated with the inhibition of the release of both TNF-alpha and IL-1beta.

  8. Empathy Predicts an Experimental Pain Reduction During Touch.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Pavel; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G; Yellinek, Shahar; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence for pain-alleviating effects of segmental tactile stimulation, yet the effect of social touch and its underlying mechanism is still unexplored. Considering that the soma affects the way we think, feel, and interact with others, it has been proposed that touch may communicate emotions, including empathy, interacting with the identity of the toucher. Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine the analgesic effects of social touch, and to test the moderating role of the toucher's empathy in analgesia using an ecological paradigm. Tonic heat stimuli were administered to women. Concurrently, their partners either watched or touched their hands, a stranger touched their hands, or no one interacted with them. The results revealed diminished levels of pain during partners' touch compared with all other control conditions. Furthermore, taking into account the dyadic interaction, only during the touch condition we found 1) a significant relationship between the partners' pain ratings, and 2) a significant negative relationship between the male touchers' empathy and the pain experience of their female partners. The findings highlight the powerful analgesic effect of social touch and suggest that empathy between romantic partners may explain the pain-alleviating effects of social touch. Pain research mostly concentrates on different factors around a single pain target, without taking into account various social interactions with the observers. Our findings support the idea that pain perception models should be extended, taking into account some psychological characteristics of observers. Our conclusions are on the basis of advanced statistical methods. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of gender norms and group identification on hypothetical and experimental pain tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pool, Gregory J; Schwegler, Andria F; Theodore, Brian R; Fuchs, Perry N

    2007-05-01

    Previous research indicates that men typically tolerate more pain in experimental settings than women. One likely explanation for these group differences in pain tolerance is conformity to traditional, gender group social norms (i.e., the ideal man is masculine and tolerates more pain; the ideal woman is feminine and tolerates less pain). According to self-categorization theory, norms guide b