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Sample records for experimental thyroid disfunctions

  1. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R. H.

    1898-01-01

    From the results of the various experiments already detailed I feel justified in drawing the following conclusions: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  2. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, R H

    1898-03-01

    FROM THE RESULTS OF THE VARIOUS EXPERIMENTS ALREADY DETAILED I FEEL JUSTIFIED IN DRAWING THE FOLLOWING CONCLUSIONS: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  3. [Characteristics of the thyroid system in adolescents with the autonomic and vascular disfunction of the hypotensive type].

    PubMed

    Buriak, V N

    2000-09-01

    As many as 185 juveniles presenting with hypotensive type vegetative-and-vascular dysfunction (VVD), their age ranging between 11 to 14 years, were studied for functional activity of their thyroid system. The control group comprised 69 healthy children at the same age. The study made showed the VVD adolescents' hypophyseal-and-thyroid system to be compromised. High thyroid activity in the above patients was found to be the case in the presence of normal values for the thyrotropic function of the pituitary body. The revealed specificities were more manifest in VVD boys and suggest to us a compensatory reaction of the thyroid system in response to the development of circulatory hypoxia secondary to disturbances in the vegetative control of the cardiovascular system activity.

  4. [Thyroid C cells are decreased in experimental CDH].

    PubMed

    Martínez, L; De Ceano-Vivas, M; González-Reyes, S; Fernández-Dumont, V; Calonge, W M; Ruiz, E; Rodríguez, J I; Tovar, J A

    2006-04-01

    Experimental CDH is often associated with malformations of neural crest origin. Several of these features are present in human CDH and therefore likely similar pathogenic mechanisms should be explored. The aim of the present study is to examine whether thyroid C-cells, another neural crest derivative, are abnormal in this rat model. Pregnant rats were exposed either to 100 mg of 2-4-dichlorophenyl-p-nitrophenyl ether (nitrofén) or vehicle (controls) on 9.5 day of gestation. Fetuses were recovered on day 21st and the thyroids of those with CDH (68%) were immuno-histochemically stained with anti-calcitonin antibody. The number of positively stained cells per high power field were counted using a computer-assisted image analysis method in at least 5 sections per thyroid. The distribution of the cells within the gland was assessed as well. Comparisons between CDH and control rats were made by non-parametric tests with a significance threshold of p<0.05. The number of c-cells was dramatically reduced in CDH animals in comparison with controls (101.2 +/- 61.3 vs 23.1 +/- 37, p<0.0001). Histology of the thyroid was similar in both groups, but the distribution of positive C-cells within the gland followed an abnormal pattern in CDH rats with the cells tending to be located at the periphery rather than at the core of the lobes. Nitrofén induces a severe decrease in thyroid C cells accompanied by abnormal distribution patterns. These results add further evidence of the involvement of a neural crest dysregulation as a component of the pathogenesis of experimental CDH. Whether there is or not a clinical counterpart to these findings is still unknown, but the nature of the cardiovascular and craneo-facial malformations in some babies with CDH strongly support further research in this field.

  5. TRAIL and DR5 promote thyroid follicular cell apoptosis in iodine excess-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiujie; Li, Lanying; Li, Qingxin; Zang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Zebing

    2011-11-01

    Death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been implicated in target organ destruction in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Several apoptosis signaling pathways, such as Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), have been shown to be active in thyroid cells and may be involved in destructive thyroiditis. Thyroid toxicity of iodide excess has been demonstrated in animals fed with an iodide-rich diet, but its pathogenic role remains unclear. The effects of excessive iodine on TRAIL and its death receptor expression in thyroid were investigated. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was induced by excessive iodine and thyroglobulin (Tg) in non-obese diabetic mice. The expression of TRAIL and its death receptor DR5 was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Following administration of excessive iodine alone, Tg, and excessive iodine combined with Tg, TRAIL-positive cells appear not only in follicular cells but also in lymphocytes infiltrated in the thyroid, whereas DR5-positive cells appear only in follicular cells. Large numbers of CD3-positive cells and a few CD22-positive cells were detected in thyroid. A great amount of follicular cells were labeled specifically by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxynucleotide triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. Taken together, our results suggest that excessive iodine could induce TRAIL and DR5 abnormal expression in thyroid. TRAIL band with DR5 to promote follicular cells apoptosis thus mediate thyroid destruction in EAT.

  6. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  7. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  8. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  9. Transfer of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis by serum from thyroidectomized donors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R M; Weigle, W O

    1969-08-01

    When rabbits were injected with 10.0 mg rabbit thyroglobulin in complete Freund's adjuvant, the earliest thyroid lesions were seen on day 5 and uniformly severe thyroid lesions were seen by day 14; these observations were not significantly different from the thyroid lesions observed at 1 and 2 months post-immunization. Pooled sera were obtained from immunized, thyroidectomized, and nonthyroidectomized donors on various days and transferred to normal recipient rabbits in different experiments. Successful transfer of thyroid lesions was seen when serum containing early antithyroglobulin antibody obtained from thyroidectomized donor animals at various times after immunization was injected into normal recipients in a sequential manner. Immunofluorescent studies of recipient thyroid glands showed focal fixation of rabbit gamma-globulin and beta(1C) complement in thyroid follicles. When purified antibody to rabbit thyroglobulin obtained from thyroidectomized donor sera was transferred sequentially as above, significant thyroid lesions were seen in recipient rabbits. In contrast, no thyroid lesions were seen in recipient animals injected with rabbit sera containing late antithyroglobulin antibody from thyroidectomized donors or hyperimmune sera from guinea pigs. No thyroid lesions were seen in recipient animals injected either with sera from donors given complete adjuvant without thyroglobulin or with globulin fraction of pooled sera containing early antithyroglobulin antibody obtained on various days from nonthyroidectomized donors. Similarly, rabbits rendered unresponsive to guinea pig gammaG-globulin and periodically injected with guinea pig anti-rabbit thyroglobulin showed no thyroid lesions.

  10. Functional capacity of the thyroid autograft: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Papaziogas, B; Antoniadis, A; Lazaridis, Ch; Makris, J; Kotakidou, R; Paraskevas, G; Papaziogas, T

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional capacity of thyroid autografts after total thyroidectomy in a rabbit model. Thirty-eight rabbits underwent total thyroidetomy. One of the two thyroid lobes was cut into 1-mm pieces and was introduced intramuscularly into the right quadriceps muscle (group A, n = 10), the right rectus abdominalis muscle (group B, n = 10), and the right sacrodorsalis muscle (group C, n = 10). Another group of 8 rabbits underwent total thyroidectomy without autologous implantation and served as the control group (group D). The animals were observed for 8 weeks with weekly measurements of thyroid hormones. At the end of the 8th week, a scintigram was performed. The autografts were removed 2 days later. The thyroid hormone levels showed a gradual decrease until the 2nd-5th week after implantation, followed by a gradual increase and establishment of euthyroid levels between the 5th and 8th weeks. Respectively, an increase of thyreotropin hormone was noted with maximal values in the 4th week, followed by a gradual decrease until the end of the 8th week. The scintigram at the end of the 8th week revealed the presence of functional thyroid tissue in all cases. Functional thyroid follicles were found in all animals who survived. In 35.7% of the autografts, we noted the development of fibrous tissue and gigantocytic granulomas in the periphery, which could be interpretated as a "foreign body" reaction. Thyroid autografts can completely substitute thyroid function after total thyroidectomy.

  11. Local thyroid renin-angiotensin system in experimental breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carrera-González, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; Mayas, M D; García, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2013-12-18

    An association between breast cancer and thyroid dysfunction exists although the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Numerous studies have characterized the role of thyroid hormones in controlling the synthesis and secretion of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, but little information is available on the putative role of the local RAS on thyroid function. Here we analyze several soluble and membrane-bound RAS-regulating aminopeptidase activities in thyroid gland from rats with mammary tumors and the relationship with the circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxin (fT4). We analyze soluble and membrane-bound RAS-regulating aminopeptidase activities fluorometrically using their corresponding aminoacyl-β-naphthylamide as the substrate. We have found in rats with mammary tumors a concomitant change of thyroid RAS-regulating enzymes and thyroid hormone production. We suggest that existence of alterations in the regulatory mechanisms mediated by the angiotensins of the local tissue RAS as a consequence of the carcinogenic process which could act alone or in combination with alterations at a higher level of regulation such as the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. © 2013.

  12. Experimental autotransplantation and cryopreservation of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Yüce, İmdat; Okuducu, Hacı; Çağlı, Sedat; Vural, Alperen; Gündoğdu, Ramazan; Abdülrezzak, Ümmühan; Arlı, Turan; Aydın, Mesut; Güney, Ercihan

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the functionality of autotransplanted thyroid tissues immediately or after cryopreservation in rabbits. The study was completed with 12 rabbits randomized in 2 groups. Preoperative scintigraphies were performed for all subjects. The rabbits underwent total thyroidectomy. The first group underwent immediate thyroid autotransplantation. Thyroid tissues of the second group were cryopreserved and autoimplanted at the eighth postoperative week. The free triiodothyronine (fT3) and thyroxine (fT4) levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Postoperative scintigraphies were performed at the eigth week after autoimplantation. The subjects in the first group reached euthyroid levels at the eighth week while none of the second group reached that level, but all showed continuous increase. Although implanted thyroid tissues of 5 of the 6 rabbits in the first group were demonstrated during the first scintigraphy, the number was only 1 in the second group. Thyroid autografts were found to be functional and thought to have a potential preventing postoperative hypothyroidism. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [C-cells of the thyroid gland in experimental osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Titova, M A; Saleeva, G T; Valeeva, I Kh; Orlov, S B; Kiiasov, A P

    2003-01-01

    The population of thyroid C-cells of female rabbits with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis was studied using immunohistochemical method with antibodies against calcitonin (CT) and morphometrically. The development of osteoporosis was confirmed using radiology and densitometry. 8 weeks after the operation, after the detection of hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, some of the animals were given a correcting treatment with calcium-containing drug and vitamin D3 or with a combination of calcium drug with hormonal estrogen-containing drug. 4 weeks after the treatment was started, thyroid C-cells in animals that received the drugs, were significantly larger than in the cells of control and ovariectomized rabbits that received no treatment. Following 12 and 22 weeks, in the animals treated with hormonal drug, both calcium concentrations in blood and urine and C-cell dimensions were normalized. Large C-cells with an intensive reaction to CT were observed at weeks 12 and 22 (weeks 20 and 30 after the operation) in the thyroid gland of the animals that received no treatment and of the animals that received calcium with food. In the last case, the morphological changes of C-cells were more pronounced, despite the insignificant differences in blood calcium concentrations in both groups. These results permit to suggest that the intensity of CT synthesis by C-cells may be influenced by calcium concentrations not only in the blood, but also in the intestinal lumen.

  14. Pituitary-thyroid axis in short- and long-term experimental diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Saba, C C; Breitenbach, M M; Rosenthal, D

    1997-02-01

    Short-term experimental diabetes mellitus (DM) produces a significant decrease in serum thyroid hormones, a decreased or normal serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and a reduction in hepatic and renal T4-5'-deiodination. However, little is known about the effects of chronic diabetes mellitus on the pituitary-thyroid axis function. We evaluated the changes induced by very short-term (6 days), short-term (15 days) and chronic (6 months) streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus in 3-month old female Dutch-Miranda rat serum T4, serum TSH and T4-5'-deiodinase activity in the thyroid and pituitary glands. Serum hormones were determined by specific radioimmunoassays. Iodothyronine-5'-deiodinase activities were assayed in the thyroid and pituitary microsomal fractions using 2 microM T4 as substrate. Mean serum T4 was significantly decreased from 3.3 to 2.0 micrograms/dl 6 days after diabetes mellitus induction, and from 2.2 to 1.5 micrograms/dl after 15 days of DM, with no significant changes in serum TSH, indicating a decreased pituitary TSH responsiveness to the diminished suppression by T4, even though pituitary T4-5'-deiodinase activity was unchanged. Thyroid T4-5'-deiodinase was unchanged after 6 days of diabetes mellitus, but was significantly increased from 20.6 to 37.0 pmol T3/mg protein after 15 days. Six months after diabetes mellitus induction, both serum T4 and thyroid T4-5'-deiodinase returned to normal ranges and serum TSH was unchanged, although pituitary T4-5'-deiodinase was now significantly decreased from 2.7 to 1.7 pmol T3/mg protein. These findings indicate that some kind of adaptation to chronic insulinopenia may occur at the thyroid level, but this does not seem to be true for the pituitary.

  15. The effect of soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) and human thyroid antibodies on the course of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in rats.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, R A; McIntosh, R S; Morgan, B P; Levin, J L; Weetman, A P

    1996-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), induced by immunisation of rats with thyroid extract and complete Freund's adjuvant, has been used as a model to study the effects of complement inhibition mediated by soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) administration during the initial phase of the disease. There was no effect of sCR1 on the severity of thyroiditis at day 28 after immunisation or on the levels of thyroid antibodies, whether sCR1 was given during the first or second week after immunisation. Human IgG containing high levels of thyroid peroxidase antibodies given to rats at the time of immunisation caused significant worsening of thyroiditis severity (P < 0.01 compared to animals receiving normal IgG) but sCR1 again had no effect in this variant of the EAT model. The results indicate that complement does not play a major role in the initial phase of tissue injury in EAT and complement inhibition does not impair the generation of an autoimmune response against the thyroid, although it remains possible that complement activation is important during the chronic phase of disease maintenance in human autoimmune thyroid disease.

  16. Insulin Plant (Costus pictus) Extract Restores Thyroid Hormone Levels in Experimental Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ashwini, S.; Bobby, Zachariah; Sridhar, M. G.; Cleetus, C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the preventive effect of Costus pictus leaf extract in experimental hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups with ten rats in each group: Control (C), hypothyroid (H), control+extract (C+E), and hypothyroid+extract (H+E). Rats in C group did not receive any intervention throughout the experimental period. The rats in the C+E and H+E groups received pretreatment with C. pictus leaf extract for 4 weeks. Subsequently, for the next 6 weeks, rats in the H group received 0.05% propylthiouracil in drinking water while C+E group received C. pictus leaf extract and H+E group received propyl thiouracil and C. pictus leaf extract. Results: Hypothyroid group rats exhibited dramatic increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels with concomitant depletion in the levels of thyroid hormones. Treatment with the extract resulted in remarkable improvement in thyroid profile. Extract produced 10.59-fold increase in plasma free T3, 8.65-fold increase in free T4, and 3.59-fold decrease in TSH levels in H+E group in comparison with H group. Treatment with the extract ameliorated hypercholesterolemia, decreased levels of plasma C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor alpha, suppressed tissue oxidative stress and prevented hepatic and renal damage caused due to thyroid hormone depletion in the H+E group. Pentacyclic triterpenes alpha and beta amyrins were identified and quantified in the extract. Conclusions: This is the first study to reveal that C. pictus extract has therapeutic potential to restore thyroid hormone levels and prevent the biochemical complications due to thyroid hormone insufficiency in the animal model of experimental hypothyroidism. SUMMARY The preventive effect of Costus pictus leaf extract in experimental hypothyroidism was evaluated in the present study.Hypothyroidism was induced in the experimental animals by giving 0

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of luteolin on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Nan; Chen, Gang; Liu, Min; Ye, Xiaozhen; Pan, Yahui; Ge, Jiuyu; Mao, Yanting; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jian; Xie, Sijing

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disease and is believed to be a predominately T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 is a crucial transcription factor of T cell-mediated immunity, with key roles in the proliferation and migration of T helper (Th) cells, differentiation of Th cells into Th17 cells, and the balance between Treg cells and Th17 cells. Flavonoid luteolin has been shown to markedly inhibit Tyr705 activation/phosphorylation of STAT3 and exert anti-inflammatory effects in multiple sclerosis. In the present study, the effect of luteolin on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was analyzed in C57BL/6 mice. Hematoxylin and eosin examination showed that luteolin attenuated lymphocytic infiltration and follicle destruction in thyroid glands. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that luteolin significantly reduced the phosphorylation of STAT3 within the thyroid. An in vitro study was carried out in a RAW264.7 macrophage cell line. Western blot findings demonstrated that luteolin significantly inhibited interferon-γ-induced increases in cyclooxygenase 2, phosphorylated STAT1 and phosphorylated STAT3 expression levels and the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in supernatants. The present findings indicated that luteolin may exert potent anti-inflammatory effects on murine EAT, which may provide a novel therapeutic medication strategy for the early intervention of HT. PMID:28101184

  18. Effect of experimental zinc deficiency on thyroid gland in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R P; Verma, P C; Garg, S L

    1997-01-01

    Zinc deficiency was produced experimentally in guinea-pigs fed on a diet containing 1.03 mg Zn/kg over a period of 45 days. Clinical signs exhibited in Zn-deficient (ZnD) animals were depression with abnormal posture, scaly skin lesions on various parts of the body, oedematous swelling on hind limbs and marked alopecia. There was no effect on food intake. Serum studies in ZnD group revealed significant decreases in the concentrations of Zn from 20 days onwards, and tri-iodo-thyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) from 30 days onwards. Thyroid glands of ZnD animals were smaller in size and pale or whitish pale in colour. Histopathologically, these glands showed changes of atrophy and degeneration in the follicles. It could be concluded that the depletion in serum T3 and T4 due to Zn deficiency was related to thyroid lesions.

  19. The influence of cyclosporin A on experimental autoimmune thyroid disease in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, A.M.; Rennie, D.P.; Weetman, A.P.; Hassman, R.A.; Foord, S.M.; Dieguez, C.; Hall, R.

    1983-01-01

    Female PVG/c rats, thymectomised on weaning and given 4 courses of whole body irradiation to a total dose of 1000 rads, developed experimental autoimmune thyroid disease (EAITD) as assessed by histological evidence of thyroiditis and circulating levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies. Hypothyroidism resulted. Induction of the disease was associated with a highly significant fall in T lymphocyte numbers. Eight weeks after their last dose of irradiation the animals commenced treatment with cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg rat/day, intragastrically) and were treated for varying time intervals thereafter. The reversal of the T lymphocyte helper: suppressor ratio on cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a significant improvement in the disease process. The alterations in the T cell subsets and in the disease lasted only as long as the drug was administered and thereafter reverted towards that seen in the control groups of animals receiving no treatment.

  20. An Experimental Comparison of Two Different Technetium Source Activities Which Can Imitate Thyroid Scintigraphy in Case of Thyroid Toxic Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Miftari, Ramë; Fejza, Ferki; Bicaj, Xhavit; Nura, Adem; Topciu, Valdete; Bajrami, Ismet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In cases of thyroid toxic autonomous nodule, anterior projection of Tc-99m pertechnetate image shows a hot nodule that occupies most, or the entire thyroid lobe with near-total or total suppression of the contra lateral lobe. In this case is very difficult to distinguish toxic nodule from lobe agenesis. Our interest was to estimate and determinate the rate of radioactivity when the source with high activity can make total suppression of the second source with low activity in same conditions with thyroid scintigraphy procedures. Material and methodology: Thyroid scintigraphy was performed with Technetium 99 meta stable pertechnetate. A parallel high resolution low energy collimator was used as an energy setting of 140 KeV photo peak for T-99m. Images are acquired at 200 Kilo Counts in the anterior projection with the collimator positioned as close as the patient’s extended neck (approximately in distance of 18 cm). The scintigraphy of thyroid gland was performed 15 minutes after intravenous administration of 1.5 mCi Tc-99m pertechnetate. Technetium 99 meta stable radioactive sources with different activity were used for two scintigraphies studies, performed in same thyroid scintigraphy acquisition procedures. In the first study, were compared the standard source with high activity A=11.2 mCi with sources with variable activities B=1.33 mCi; 1.03 mCi; 0.7 mCi; 0.36 mCi; and 0.16mCi) in distance of 1.5cm from each other sources, which is approximately same with distance between two thyroid lobes. In the second study were compared the sources with low activity in proportion 70:1(source A = 1.5 mCi and source B=0.021mCi). As clinical studies we preferred two different patents with different thyroid disorders. There were one patient with thyroid toxic nodule in the right lobe, therefore the second patient was with left thyroid nodule agenesis. Results: During our examination, we accurately determined that two radioactive sources in proportion 70:1 will be

  1. Interleukin-10 influences susceptibility to experimental autoimmune thyroiditis independently of the H-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenqian; Liu, Tong; Liu, Shanshan; Zou, Hongjin; Sun, Xuren; Shi, Xiaoguang; Li, Yushu; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2015-02-01

    Both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are relatively resistant to experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) due to their histocompatibility (H-2) genetic background; however, susceptibility to EAT is also influenced by other genetic factors. Given the curative effect of interleukin-10 (IL-10) on thyroiditis, in the present study, we investigated whether IL-10 functions as a non-H-2 genetic factor that influences the development of EAT in mice with an EAT-resistant genetic background. In this study, we observed that the development of EAT could be induced in both C57BL/6 IL-10‑deficient (IL-10-/-) and BALB/c IL-10-/- female mice following immunization with mTg, which indicated that IL-10 may be a non-H-2 factor that affects susceptibility to EAT. However, the role of the H-2 factor remained dominant, as the incidence of EAT was low and its severity was mild. We further investigated the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of EAT in IL-10-/- female mice. We found that Th1 cells, Th17 cells, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, and their associated cytokines were all involved in the development of EAT. The absence of IL-10 promoted the polarization of pathogenic cells and the production of associated cytokines, and suppressed the proliferation of protective T cell clones. Together, these factors may contribute to the development of EAT in IL-10-/- mice. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that IL-10 plays a critical role in the susceptibility to EAT, and a better understanding of the role of IL-10 in autoimmune thyroiditis may facilitate the development of novel strategies for the treatment of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  2. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary-thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-02

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies.

  3. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary–thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:26787873

  4. Coumestrol inhibits autoantibody production through modulating Th1 response in experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuemin; Jin, Qian; Fan, Chenling; Li, Jing; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Coumestrol is a common phytoestrogen found in plants and Chinese medicinal herbs. Its influences on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) were investigated in this study. Female adult CBA/J mice were fed with drinking water containing 1% Tween80 only (Control group), 0.8 mg/l (L group) and 8 mg/l coumestrol (H group) from 6 to 15 weeks of age, respectively. Their serum coumestrol concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography, which were undetectable, 43.70 ± 21.74 ng/ml and 135.07 ± 70.40 ng/ml, respectively. In addition, the mice (n = 14–16/group) were immunized twice with thyroglobulin (Tg) and Freund's adjuvant to induce EAT during the meantime. Although no overt changes in the extent of intrathyroidal mononuclear cell infiltration were shown in the two coumestrol-treated groups as compared with the controls, serum anti-Tg IgG2a, IgG3 and IgG1 titers, ratio of IgG2a to IgG1 and the percentage of T helper (Th)1 cells in the splenocytes were significantly reduced in the L group. Another consistent change was the significantly decreased expression of splenic IFN-γ mRNA after low dose of coumestrol exposure. Uterine weight was also markedly reduced in the mice of L group. These findings suggest that coumestrol treatment may have some beneficial actions against thyroid-specific autoantibody production in the development of autoimmune thyroiditis through suppression of Th1 response due to its anti-estrogenic activity. PMID:27384679

  5. Effect of transgenic overexpression of FLIP on lymphocytes on development and resolution of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yujiang; Sharp, Gordon C; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2011-09-01

    In our previous studies, resolution of granulomatous experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (G-EAT) was promoted when thyroid epithelial cells were protected from Fas-mediated apoptosis due to transgenic overexpression of FLIP. We hypothesized that if FLIP were overexpressed on lymphocytes, CD4(+) effector cells would be protected from Fas-mediated apoptosis, and resolution would be delayed. To test this hypothesis, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing FLIP under the CD2 promoter. Transgenic FLIP was expressed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and B cells. Transgenic overexpression of FLIP protected cultured splenocytes from Fas-mediated, but not irradiation-induced, apoptosis in vitro. Unexpectedly, Tg(+) donor cells transferred minimal G-EAT, which was partially overcome by depleting donor CD8(+) T cells. When Tg(+) and Tg(-) donors transferred equivalent disease, G-EAT resolution was delayed in FLIP transgenic mice. However, CD2-FLIP Tg(+) donors often transferred less severe G-EAT, even after depletion of CD8(+) T cells. This influenced the rate of G-EAT resolution, resulting in little difference in G-EAT resolution between groups. Tg(+) mice always had reduced anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses, compared with Tg(-) littermates, presumably because of FLIP overexpression on B cells. These results suggest that effects of transgenic FLIP on a particular autoimmune disease vary, depending on what cells express the transgene and whether those cells are effector cells or if they function to modulate disease.

  6. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increases in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. For example, after 3 months of exposure to deionized water or water containing 15 ppm monochloramine, plasma cholesterol was 1266 +/- 172 and 2049 +/- 212 mg/dl, respectively, a difference of 783 mg/dl. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. We suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3456597

  7. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Bull, R.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increase in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. The authors suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Experimental thyroiditis in the rhesus monkey. I. Cytotoxic, mixed-agglutinating and complement-fixing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kite, J. H.; Argue, Helen; Rose, N. R.

    1966-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys inoculated repeatedly with a crude extract of pooled rhesus thyroids plus complete Freund adjuvant produced autoantibodies cytotoxic for monkey and human thyroid cells in vitro. No cytotoxicity was observed with normal rhesus kidney or adrenal cells taken as controls from the same animals. The specific cytotoxic reaction was absorbed by thyroid microsomes, but not by other tissue fractions. Monkey (as well as human) thyroiditis sera failed to fix complement with thyroglobulin although both fixed complement with crude thyroid suspensions. The cytotoxic antibody was heat stable (56°C for 30 min) and required complement for damage to tissue cells. Fractionation by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation demonstrated that the cytotoxic antibody had a sedimentation rate of about 7S and was stable to sulphydryl agents, whereas the complement-fixing antibody sedimented more rapidly and was largely inactivated by mercaptoethanol treatment. Thus in this case, cytotoxic antibody is not identical with the over-all complement-fixing activity of an antiserum. The presence of organ specific antigen on the surface of cultured rhesus thyroid cells was detected by the mixed agglutination antiglobulin reaction using monkey antisera. The curves of antibody production detected by mixed agglutination and cytotoxicity tend to correspond although the former test was 10–100 times more sensitive. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4958216

  9. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  10. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (Hifu) Treatment For Thyroid Nodules: Experimental And First Clinical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esnault, Olivier; Franc, Brigitte; Leenhardt, Laurence; Rouxel, Agnès; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Lacoste, François

    2007-05-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thyroid nodules are common and can only be removed by surgery. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) could be a possible minimally invasive alternative treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using HIFU to precisely ablate thyroid nodules without affecting neighbouring structures. METHODS: HIFU was generated by a 3-MHz spherical piezocomposite transducer moved across the target in a stepwise fashion. In a first clinical study 25 patients had their nodules treated with HIFU 2 weeks prior to planned thyroidectomy, using increasing energy. The last patients received a local anesthesia. The lesions were assessed by the pathologist. RESULTS: The histological lesions were clearly visible in most of the fully treated patients, particularly those who received higher energy. Superficial and reversible skin blisters were observed in 7 patients. The design of the treatment head was subsequently modified to eliminate such risk. CONCLUSION: The patient trials confirmed the precision of the targeting and set the energy levels for safe thyroid nodule ablation with HIFU. Further study is needed to assess nodule's changes at longer follow-up.

  11. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high thyroid hormone levels in the blood) and hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels in the blood). In postpartum thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis occurs first followed by hypothyroidism. What causes postpartum thyroiditis? The exact cause is ...

  12. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high thyroid hormone levels in the blood) and hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels in the blood). In postpartum thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis occurs first followed by hypothyroidism. What causes postpartum thyroiditis? The exact cause is ...

  13. Relationship of dietary iodide and drinking water disinfectants to thyroid function in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The importance of dietary iodide on the reported hypothyroid effect of drinking water disinfectants on thyroid function was investigated. Previous studies have also showed differences in the relative sensitivity of pigeons and rabbits to chlorinated water. Pigeons and rabbits were exposed for 3 months to diets containing high (950 ppb) or low (300 ppb) levels of iodide and to drinking water containing two levels of chlorine. Results showed that the high-iodide diet prevented the hypothyroid effect observed in pigeons given the low-iodide diet and chlorinated drinking water. Similar trends were observed in rabbits exposed to the same treatment; however, significant hypothyroid effects were not observed in this animal model. The factor associated with the observed effect of dietary iodide on the chlorine-induced change in thyroid function is unknown, as is the relative sensitivity of rabbits and pigeons to the effect of chlorine. Several factors may explain the importance of dietary iodide and the relative sensitivity of these species. For example, the iodine formed by the known reaction of chlorine with iodide could result in a decrease in the plasma level of iodide because of the relative absorption rates of iodide and iodine in the intestinal tract, and the various types and concentrations of chloroorganics (metabolites) formed in the diet following the exposure of various dietary constituents to chlorine could affect the thyroid function. The former factor was investigated in the present studies. Results do not confirm a consistent, significant reduction in the plasma level of iodide in rabbits and pigeons exposed to chlorinated water and the low-iodide diet. The latter factor is being investigated. PMID:3816728

  14. Relationship of dietary iodide and drinking water disinfectants to thyroid function in experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-11-01

    The importance of dietary iodide on the reported hypothyroid effect of drinking water disinfectants on thyroid function was investigated. Previous studies have also showed differences in the relative sensitivity of pigeons and rabbits to chlorinated water. Pigeons and rabbits were exposed for 3 months to diets containing high (950 ppb) or low (300 ppb) levels of iodide and to drinking water containing two levels of chlorine. Results showed that the high-iodide diet prevented the hypothyroid effect observed in pigeons given the low-iodide diet and chlorinated drinking water. Similar trends were observed in rabbits exposed to the same treatment; however, significant hypothyroid effects were not observed in this animal model. The factor associated with the observed effect of dietary iodide on the chlorine-induced change in thyroid function is unknown, as is the relative sensitivity of rabbits and pigeons to the effect of chlorine. Several factors may explain the importance of dietary iodide and the relative sensitivity of these species. For example, the iodine formed by the known reaction of chlorine with iodide could result in a decrease in the plasma level of iodide because of the relative absorption rates of iodide and iodine in the intestinal tract, and the various types and concentrations of chloroorganics (metabolites) formed in the diet following the exposure of various dietary constituents to chlorine could affect the thyroid function. The former factor was investigated in the present studies. Results do not confirm a consistent, significant reduction in the plasma level of iodide in rabbits and pigeons exposed to chlorinated water and the low-iodide diet. The latter factor is being investigated.

  15. [Inflammation markers and endothelial disfunction in children with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Velarde, María S; Del R Carrizo, Teresita; Prado, María M; Díaz, Elba I; Fonio, María C; Bazán, María C; Abregu, Adela V

    2010-01-01

    A subclinical inflammation state was detected in the early step of diabetes, which increases the serum levels of cytokines that induce acute-phase protein synthesis as C-reactive protein (PCR) and fibrinogen (Fg), stimulating the endothelial disfunction of adhesion molecules. Thirty patients (15 boys, 15 girls) with type 1 diabetes (DT1), without vascular complications, were studied. Their mean age and duration of diabetes were 11.8 +/- 2.1 and 3.9 +/- 3.2 years, respectively. The laboratory parameters evaluated were: blood leukocytes count, globular sedimentation velocity, fasting glycemia, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), high sensitivity PCR (uPCR), plasma soluble E-selectin (sE-S), sVCAM-1 and microalbuminuria. Increased levels of uPCR, sE-S and VCAM-1 were found, compared with the control group control [0.60 (0.30-1.25) vs. 0.20 (0.20-0.65) mg/l, p = 0.013], [108 (60-150) vs. 68 (56-82) ng/ml, p = 0.0031] y [750 (708-826) vs. 721 (674-751) ng/ml, p = 0.039] respectively. When diabetic patients were grouped according to duration of disease (3 and > de 3 years), uPCR values were higher in the second group. uPCR levels were better correlated with sE-S (r = 0.44, p = 0.03) and VCAM-1 (r = 0.49, p = 0.02). These results suggest the presence of pro-inflammatory and endothelial activation states, which are strongly associated with DT1.

  16. Herbal medicine Gamgungtang down-regulates autoimmunity through induction of TH2 cytokine production by lymphocytes in experimental thyroiditis model.

    PubMed

    Sa, Eun-Ho; Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kang, Bong-Seok; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, June-Ki; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2007-02-12

    The crude herbal formulation, Gamgungtang (GGT), has been shown to protect animals against a wide range of spontaneously developing or induced autoimmune diseases. We have previously reported that GGT shows marked down-regulation of several experimental autoimmune diseases. Although very effective at preventing thyroid infiltrates in mice immunized with mouse deglycosylated thyroglobulin and complete Freund's adjuvant and in spontaneous models of thyroiditis, it completely failed to modify experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) induced in mice immunized with mouse thyroglobulin and lipopolysaccharide. In this study, in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms by which GGT suppresses EAT, and autoimmunity in general, we investigated the in vivo effects of this drug on the Th1/Th2 lymphocyte balance, which is important for the induction or inhibition of autoreactivity. Naive SJL/J mice were treated orally for 5 days with GGT (80 mg/(kg day)). Spleen cells were obtained at various time points during the treatment period and were stimulated in vitro with concanavalin A. Interleukins IL-4, IL-10 and IL-12, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine production was evaluated at the protein levels of the cytokines in the medium and mRNA expressions. A significant upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta was observed following treatment with GGT, which peaked at day 5 (IL-10) or day 10 (IL-4). On the other hand, IL-12 and IFN-gamma production were either unchanged or decreased. It seems therefore that GGT induces in vivo a shift towards Th2 lymphocytes which may be one of the mechanisms of down-regulation of the autoimmune reactivity in EAT. Our observations indicate that down-regulation of TH1 cytokines (especially IL-12) and enhancement of Th2 cytokine production may play an important role in the control of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. These data may contribute to the design of new immunomodulating treatments for a group of

  17. Correlated Expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in Thyroid Tumors, Uterine Leiomyomas and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Klemke, Markus; Müller, Marietta Henrike; Wosniok, Werner; Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Nimzyk, Rolf; Helmke, Burkhard Maria; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    In pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands (PASG) recurrent chromosomal rearrangements affecting either 8q12 or 12q14∼15 lead to an overexpression of the genes of the genuine transcription factor PLAG1 or the architectural transcription factor HMGA2, respectively. Both genes are also affected by recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in benign adipocytic tumors as e. g. lipomas and lipoblastomas. Herein, we observed a strong correlation between the expression of HMGA2 and PLAG1 in 14 benign and 23 malignant thyroid tumors. To address the question if PLAG1 can be activated by HMGA2, the expression of both genes was quantified in 32 uterine leiomyomas 17 of which exhibited an overexpression of HMGA2. All leiomyomas with HMGA2 overexpression also revealed an activation of PLAG1 in the absence of detectable chromosome 8 abnormalities affecting the PLAG1 locus. To further investigate if the overexpression of PLAG1 is inducible by HMGA2 alone, HMGA2 was transiently overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. An increased PLAG1 expression was observed 24 and 48 h after transfection. Likewise, stimulation of HMGA2 by FGF1 in adipose tissue-derived stem cells led to a simultaneous increase of PLAG1 mRNA. Altogether, these data suggest that HMGA2 is an upstream activator of PLAG1. Accordingly, this may explain the formation of tumors as similar as lipomas and lipoblastomas resulting from an activation of either of both genes by chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:24516594

  18. Silent thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland. The disorder can cause hyperthyroidism, followed by hypothyroidism. The thyroid gland is located in the neck, ... Later symptoms may be of an underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ), including fatigue and cold intolerance, until the thyroid ...

  19. Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... your menstrual period. Your thyroid helps control your menstrual cycle. Too much or too little thyroid hormone can ... Problems getting pregnant. When thyroid disease affects the menstrual cycle, it also affects ovulation. This can make it ...

  20. Protection of the infant thyroid from radioactive contamination by the administration of stable iodide. An experimental evaluation in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Noteboom, J L; Hummel, W A; Broerse, J J; de Vijlder, J J; Vulsma, T; van Bekkum, D W

    1997-06-01

    Protection of the thyroid from radioactive contamination by the administration of stable iodide was investigated in chimpanzees aged 2 to 98 weeks. The uptake of iodide in the thyroid was measured with 123I-. The animals were subjected to a control measurement first, and subsequently the thyroid uptake of 123I- was determined twice; once at the start and once at the end of 11 days of ingestion of 0.5, 1.5 or 5.0 mg of stable iodide per kg body weight per day. The three doses of iodide reduced the control thyroid iodide uptake of 10 to 30% to lower than 1% when ingested 1 h before exposure to the tracer and to 2-4% when ingested 20 h before exposure. In the latter experiments 0.5 mg iodide/kg was less effective than doses of 1.5 mg/kg or higher. The physiological state of the thyroid of control infant chimpanzees does not differ from that of human infants. Incidentally, an increased level of TSH was found during the ingestion of iodide, but with unaltered thyroxine levels. Therefore, it is concluded that a daily dose of 1.5 mg stable iodide/kg body weight and higher offers optimal protection of the thyroid against exposure to radioactive iodine in infants and that, when used during 10 days, it leaves the thyroid unaffected.

  1. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  2. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  3. Cytokines and thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Ajjan, R A; Watson, P F; Weetman, A P

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines play a crucial role in autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) through various mechanisms. They are produced in the thyroid by intrathyroidal inflammatory cells, in particular lymphocytes, as well as by the thyroid follicular cells (TFC) themselves and may thus act in a cascade to enhance the autoimmune process (Fig. 1). Cytokines upregulate the inflammatory reaction through stimulation of both T and B cells, resulting in antibody production and tissue injury. In addition, intrathyroidal cytokines induce immunological changes in TFC including enhancement of both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecule expression, and upregulation of adhesion and complement regulatory molecule expression. Cytokines can also modulate both growth and function of TFC and have a role in extrathyroidal complications of ATD, most importantly thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), where they induce fibroblast proliferation and enhance the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), resulting in proptosis and the other clinical features of the disease. In addition to these effects, exogenous administration of cytokines has been associated with impairment of thyroid function ranging from the appearance of autoantibodies alone to the development of frank thyroid dysfunction. Cytokines have also been implicated in subacute thyroiditis (SAT) and amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction, as well as in thyroid function abnormalities occurring in patients with non-thyroidal illnesses (NTI). Genetic variations in cytokine genes represent potential risk factors for ATD, and disease associations have been described for polymorphisms in IL-1ra and TNF beta genes. Recent experimental evidence suggests the possibility of novel cytokine-based therapeutic approaches for ATD and its complications, in particular TAO.

  4. Comparison of three methods of calculation, experimental and monte carlo simulation in investigation of organ doses (thyroid, sternum, cervical vertebra) in radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Ayat, Saba

    2012-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy is an effective method for treating thyroid cancer carcinoma, but it has some affects on normal tissues, hence dosimetry of vital organs is important to weigh the risks and benefits of this method. The aim of this study is to measure the absorbed doses of important organs by Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) simulation and comparing the results of different methods of dosimetry by performing a t-paired test. To calculate the absorbed dose of thyroid, sternum, and cervical vertebra using the MCNP code, *F8 tally was used. Organs were simulated by using a neck phantom and Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) method. Finally, the results of MCNP, MIRD, and Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements were compared by SPSS software. The absorbed dose obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for 100, 150, and 175 mCi administered (131)I was found to be 388.0, 427.9, and 444.8 cGy for thyroid, 208.7, 230.1, and 239.3 cGy for sternum and 272.1, 299.9, and 312.1 cGy for cervical vertebra. The results of paired t-test were 0.24 for comparing TLD dosimetry and MIRD calculation, 0.80 for MCNP simulation and MIRD, and 0.19 for TLD and MCNP. The results showed no significant differences among three methods of Monte Carlo simulations, MIRD calculation and direct experimental dosimetry using TLD.

  5. Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Avais; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pearce, Simon H S; Zaman, Azfar; Iervasi, Giorgio; Razvi, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial and vascular endothelial tissues have receptors for thyroid hormones and are sensitive to changes in the concentrations of circulating thyroid hormones. The importance of thyroid hormones in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis can be deduced from clinical and experimental data showing that even subtle changes in thyroid hormone concentrations - such as those observed in subclinical hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, and low triiodothyronine syndrome - adversely influence the cardiovascular system. Some potential mechanisms linking the two conditions are dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction, blood pressure changes, and direct effects of thyroid hormones on the myocardium. Several interventional trials showed that treatment of subclinical thyroid diseases improves cardiovascular risk factors, which implies potential benefits for reducing cardiovascular events. Over the past 2 decades, accumulating evidence supports the association between abnormal thyroid function at the time of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that thyroid hormones can have an important therapeutic role in reducing infarct size and improving myocardial function after acute MI. In this Review, we summarize the literature on thyroid function in cardiovascular diseases, both as a risk factor as well as in the setting of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure or acute MI, and outline the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... D, Davies TF, Schlumberger MJ, Hay ID, Larsen PR. Thyroid physiology and diagnostic evaluation of patients with thyroid disorders. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ...

  7. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocking production of thyroid hormones and resulting in hypothyroidism . TBII is not routinely tested, but TSI is ... autoimmune disease . A low level of thyroid hormones ( hypothyroidism ) can cause symptoms, such as: Weight gain Fatigue ...

  8. Thyroid Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated differently. Common thyroid disorders and problems include: Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism is a disorder in which your thyroid doesn’ ... normal after you get better. If you have hypothyroidism, however, the levels of T4 in your blood ...

  9. Thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  10. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the thyroid, a computerized tomography (CT) scan, or nuclear medicine tests, to diagnose and find the cause ... is having the scan for other health problems. Nuclear medicine tests. Nuclear medicine tests of the thyroid ...

  11. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... panel of genetic mutations linked to follicular or papillary thyroid cancer… Read More June 10, 2012 6 Cirugia De ... 2011 0 Gene Mutation Increases Risk of Recurrent Papillary Thyroid Cancer in Some Patients By admin | 2011 News Releases , ...

  12. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  13. Thyroid hemiagenesis.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R; Gujarati, R

    1997-06-01

    Thyroid hemiagenesis is a rare embryological condition, predominantly in females (3:1) with a left lobe being absent. The associated diseases in the remaining thyroid lobe include benign adenoma, multinodular goiter, hyperthyroidism, chronic thyroiditis, and rarely carcinoma. The most common pathology involved in thyroid hemiagenesis is hyperthyroidism. Presence of carcinoma in a patient with hemiagenesis is quite rare and very few cases are reported in the world literature. We report a 30-year-old female who presented with left thyroid mass gradually increasing in size over a period of 3 months. The patient's pre-operative workup included a thyroid scan, which revealed a cold nodule in the left lobe with absent right lobe. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy was suspicious for papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient underwent thyroid exploration and left thyroid lobectomy. The operative findings confirmed hemiagenesis of the right lobe and papillary carcinoma in the left lobe. All four parathyroids were in normal position. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss and review the literature on thyroid hemiagenesis and present a rare case of absent right thyroid lobe with carcinoma in the remaining left thyroid lobe.

  14. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research.

  15. [Risk factors and pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Paknys, Gintaras; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on Hashimoto's thyroiditis and its pathogenesis and to introduce the readers to the basic concept of autoimmune thyroid disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease are different expressions of a basically similar autoimmune process, and the clinical appearance reflects the spectrum of the immune response in a particular patient. During this response, cytotoxic autoantibodies, stimulatory autoantibodies, blocking autoantibodies, or cell-mediated autoimmunity may be observed. Persons with classic Hashimoto's thyroiditis have serum antibodies reacting with thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. These antibodies (particularly antibodies against thyroid peroxidase) are complement-fixing immunoglobulins and may be cytotoxic. In addition, many patients have cell-mediated immunity directed against thyroid antigens. Cell mediated-immunity is also a feature of experimental thyroiditis induced in animals by injection of thyroid antigen with adjuvants. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is predominantly the clinical expression of cell-mediated immunity leading to destruction of thyroid cells, which in its severest form causes thyroid failure. The significance of genetic component and nongenetic risk factors (pregnancy, drugs, age, sex, infection, and irradiation) in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is also reviewed. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that the genetic component is important in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, although the pattern of inheritance is non-Mendelian and is likely to be influenced by subtle variations in the functions of multiple genes. Nongenetic risk factors (environmental factors) are also etiologically important, because the concordance rate in monozygotic twins is below 1.

  16. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  17. Thyroid hormones in the skeletogenesis and accessory sources of endogenous hormones in Xenopus laevis (Amphibia; Anura) ontogeny: Experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, S V; Vassilieva, A B

    2014-03-01

    Skeletal development was studied in normal and goitrogen-treated Xenopus laevis tadpoles reared under thyroid hormone (TH) deficiency. Early stages of skeletal development proceed similarly in both groups. Later stages are retarded or completely arrested in goitrogen-treated tadpoles. After goitrogen-treated tadpoles were transferred into pure water or into a medium containing both goitrogen and exogenous TH, tadpoles resumed development. Consequently, late stages of skeletogenesis are TH-dependent and TH-induced. Athyroid X. laevis "giant tadpoles" described in literature differ from goitrogen-arrested tadpoles in that they have features which require TH to appear. The appearance of TH-depended features in giant tadpoles indicates the occurrence of the additional sources of TH other than thyroid gland.

  18. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  19. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Thyroid Disorders KidsHealth > For Kids > Thyroid Disorders A A ... the world is a thyroid? What Is the Thyroid? The thyroid (say: THYE-royd) is a gland, ...

  20. Immunostimulatory probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 do not induce pathological inflammation in mouse model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Gill, H S

    2005-08-15

    The possibility that intestinal microflora contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has raised issues regarding the safety of probiotic organisms, especially those with immunostimulating properties, in individuals with such immune dysfunctions. In this study, the effect of consumption of probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001(HN001) and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (HN019) on the induction and progression of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was investigated in CBA/CaH (H-2k) mice. HN001 or HN019 in skim milk were fed to mice daily (1-1.5 x 10(8) cfu/mouse/day) for 5 to 9 weeks. A mild form of EAT was induced by subcutaneous injection of mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) with either Freund's adjuvant (complete and incomplete, CFA and IFA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The proliferative responses of spleen lymphocyte to MTg stimulation in vitro and the presence (and degree) of mononuclear cell infiltration in thyroid gland tissues were examined to assess the development and severity of EAT. The levels of serum anti-MTg antibodies (IgG1 and IgG2a) and spleen weight index were determined to detect the presence of autoimmune responses of mice receiving MTg. Results showed that 8 weeks after immunization, 16.67-50% of the mice developed mild EAT with lymphocyte infiltration in the thyroid glands. Probiotic feeding did not induce full-blown EAT. There were no differences in spleen weight index or the proliferative spleenocytes in response to PMA between mice that received MTg alone and mice that received MTg and probiotic LAB strains.

  1. Hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid activity profiles in experimental azotemia in the rat. Relationship to food intake and thyroid function.

    PubMed Central

    Kinlaw, W B; Schwartz, H L; Mariash, C N; Bingham, C; Carr, F E; Oppenheimer, J H

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the hepatic messenger RNA (mRNA) activity profile in chronically azotemic rats and sought to determine whether the observed changes could be mediated either by reduced food intake or diminished thyroid function at the tissue level. mRNA activity profiles were produced by two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation of radioactively labeled products of an in vitro reticulocyte lysate system which had been programmed by hepatic RNA. Of the approximately 240 translational products identified in this system, seven sequences were consistently altered in azotemia. In pair-fed animals six of these also decreased, but the alterations in three were depressed to a significantly lesser extent in the pair-fed group. Moreover, analysis of covariance suggested that food intake could account for the differences in only one sequence. The possibility that the mRNA activity profile in azotemia could represent the effects of diminished thyroid function was minimized by the finding that the reductions in plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels observed were due largely to reduced plasma protein binding, with maintenance of the mean free T4 and free T3 concentrations within the normal range. The changes in only one mRNA sequence could be related to free T3 levels alone. Our findings, therefore, indicate that although diminished food intake and reduced thyroid function may contribute to some of the observed changes in the mRNA activity profiles, the bulk of alterations in azotemia appear to be mediated by other mechanisms. The striking overlap between the sequences affected by azotemia and pair-feeding raises the speculation that altered gene expression in azotemia may reflect an impaired hepatic response at the pretranslational level to metabolic signals associated with food intake. Images PMID:6511910

  2. Thyroid Nodules

    MedlinePlus

    ... by your thyroid gland. The extra thyroxine can cause symptoms of hyperthyroidism such as: Unexplained weight loss Increased perspiration Tremor ... noncancerous and isn't considered serious unless it causes bothersome symptoms from its size. Some ... Thyroid cyst. Fluid-filled cavities (cysts) in the ...

  3. American Thyroid Association Guide to Investigating Thyroid Hormone Economy and Action in Rodent and Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Grant; Forrest, Douglas; Galton, Valerie Anne; Gereben, Balázs; Kim, Brian W.; Kopp, Peter A.; Liao, Xiao Hui; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Peeters, Robin P.; Refetoff, Samuel; Sharlin, David S.; Simonides, Warner S.; Weiss, Roy E.; Williams, Graham R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An in-depth understanding of the fundamental principles that regulate thyroid hormone homeostasis is critical for the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches for patients with thyroid disease. Summary: Important clinical practices in use today for the treatment of patients with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, or thyroid cancer are the result of laboratory discoveries made by scientists investigating the most basic aspects of thyroid structure and molecular biology. In this document, a panel of experts commissioned by the American Thyroid Association makes a series of recommendations related to the study of thyroid hormone economy and action. These recommendations are intended to promote standardization of study design, which should in turn increase the comparability and reproducibility of experimental findings. Conclusions: It is expected that adherence to these recommendations by investigators in the field will facilitate progress towards a better understanding of the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone dependent processes. PMID:24001133

  4. Thyroid nodules and thyroid autoimmunity in the context of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Antonelli, Alessandro; Vita, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that in most industrialized countries autoimmune disorders, including chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, are increasing. This increase parallels the one regarding differentiated thyroid cancer, the increment of which is mainly due to the papillary histotype. A number of studies have pointed to an association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and differentiated thyroid cancer. The upward trend of these two thyroid diseases is sustained by certain environmental factors, such as polluting substances acting as endocrine disrupting chemicals. Herein we will review the experimental and clinical literature that highlights the effects of environmental and occupational exposure to polluting chemicals in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease or differentiated thyroid cancer. Stakeholders, starting from policymarkers, should become more sensitive to the consequences for the thyroid resulting from exposure to EDC. Indeed, the economic burden resulting from such consequences has not been quantified thus far.

  5. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of thyroiditis and identify autoimmune thyroid conditions Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody—a marker for autoimmune thyroid disease; ... to help detect the presence of excessive calcitonin production, which can occur with C-cell hyperplasia and ...

  6. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  7. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  8. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... in children and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by ...

  9. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... will make your scar show less. Thyroid Hormone Replacement You may need to take thyroid hormone medicine ... natural thyroid hormone. You may not need hormone replacement if only part of your thyroid was removed. ...

  10. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH Pregnancy & Thyroid Disease What is thyroid disease? Thyroid disease ... pituitary responds by decreasing TSH production. How does pregnancy normally affect thyroid function? Two pregnancy-related hormones— ...

  11. [Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Takasu, Nobuyuki

    2006-12-01

    Thyroid hormone has many effects on the heart and vascular system. Many of the clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism are due to the ability of thyroid hormone to alter cardiovascular hemodynamics. The hemodynamic effects of hypothyroidism are opposite to those of hyperthyroidism, although the clinical manifestations are less obvious. This review will integrate what is known about the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart with recent observations from both experimental and clinical studies of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid hormone has both direct and indirect actions on the cardiovascular system. Patients with thyroid disease, especially those with hyperthyroidism, often have symptoms and signs indicating changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics. Indeed, symptoms and signs referable to the cardiovascular system may be the only manifestations of thyroid dysfunction, and thyroid function should therefore be assessed by the measurement of serum thyrotropin concentrations in all patients with cardiovascular disease. Some suggest that the administration of triiodothyronine may benefit some patients with cardiovascular disease.

  12. Thyroid hormone, brain development, and the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Zoeller, Thomas R; Dowling, Amy L S; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Iannacone, Eric A; Gauger, Kelly J; Bansal, Ruby

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for normal brain development. Therefore, it is a genuine concern that thyroid function can be altered by a very large number of chemicals routinely found in the environment and in samples of human and wildlife tissues. These chemicals range from natural to manufactured compounds. They can produce thyroid dysfunction when they are absent from the diet, as in the case of iodine, or when they are present in the diet, as in the case of thionamides. Recent clinical evidence strongly suggests that brain development is much more sensitive to thyroid hormone excess or deficit than previously believed. In addition, recent experimental research provides new insight into the developmental processes affected by thyroid hormone. Based on the authors' research focusing on the ability of polychlorinated biphenyls to alter the expression of thyroid hormone-responsive genes in the developing brain, this review provides background information supporting a new way of approaching risk analysis of thyroid disruptors. PMID:12060829

  13. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  14. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... rays given off by the radioactive material. A computer displays images of the thyroid gland. Other scans ... It is an even gray color on the computer image without darker or lighter areas. What Abnormal ...

  16. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... The coming of age of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation of selected neck nodal metastases in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2011;96:2717. Caprelsa (prescribing information). Wilmington, Del.: ...

  17. Thyroid crises.

    PubMed

    Gavin, L A

    1991-01-01

    In the setting of characteristic features of thyrotoxicosis, the timely diagnosis and aggressive management of thyroid storm should result in a successful outcome. However, severe storm may lead to irreversible cardiovascular collapse, especially in the older patient who may have atypical features of thyrotoxicosis. The fundamental approach is prompt and optimal treatment in the emergency department once the presenting clinical features suggest its presence. Delay in the introduction of therapy while awaiting laboratory confirmation may result in further decompensation and death. The prevention of myxedema coma entails paying special attention to certain high-risk patient groups. These groups include older women with a history of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or previous irradiation or thyroid surgery for hyperthyroidism. Inform such patients of the symptoms and signs of hypothyroidism, and perform annual thyroid function tests, such as a serum TSH, in order to provide early, adequate treatment once the test becomes positive.

  18. Thyroid inferno.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amit; Kaur, Manmeet

    2014-01-01

    The key to uncovering the etiology of hyperthyroidism lies in a careful history and physical examination. Autoimmune markers provide additive information, but should not solely be used to make a diagnosis. Concern has been raised that the overzealous use of thyroid ultrasound, following abnormal thyroid function tests, diverts attention from the workup of the biochemical abnormality to the workup of an incidentally found thyroid nodule. If further imaging is needed, the use ofathyroidscanhas been suggestedbythe Endocrine Society and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. However, in certain scenarios, this may be contraindicated. We present the case of a 28-year-old female with hyperthyroidism, as aplatform to discuss an important clinical sign present on Doppler ultrasound of the thyroid. By recognizing the clinical information gained from a Doppler ultrasound, physicians can avoid additional invasive workup and apply the use of ultrasound where most appropriate.

  19. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, thyroid lymphoma, and metastasis to thyroid.

    PubMed

    Untch, Brian R; Olson, John A

    2006-07-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, thyroid lymphoma, and secondary metastasis to the thyroid gland are uncommon thyroid malignancies. They represent significant challenges for the surgeon owing to difficulties in diagnosis, aggressive biology, and the infrequency of their presentation. An awareness and appreciation of multimodality treatment strategies is essential for their management.

  20. What is the real significance and management of major thyroid disorders in bipolar patients?

    PubMed

    Sierra, Pilar; Cámara, Rosa; Tobella, Helena; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disfunction affects negatively emotional stability and worsens the clinical course of bipolar affective disorder. The main stabilizer used in this illness, lithium carbonate has numerous effects on the physiology of the thyroid, with the most significant being the inhibition of thyroid hormone release that may occur at therapeutic levels. These dysfunctions have also been reported most frequently in bipolar patients not undergoing treatment with lithium, and was not completely explained by the effects of this drug. Apart from the numerous medical complications and mood disturbances, the cognitive or perceptual system may also be affected. In fact, the presence of thyroid disease increases the rates of obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, panic disorder, major depressive disorder, cyclothymia, or bipolar disorder. In severe cases of hypothyroidism, the clinical symptoms and signs can be similar to a melancholic depression or dementia. It is therefore important to know well all these possible complications in daily clinical practice. This review will cover the main thyroid dysfunctions present in bipolar patients, whether ot not produced by treatment with lithium carbonate, and will provide a series of recommendations for clinical management. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells exacerbates sodium iodide-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in human leucocyte antigen DR3 (DRB1*0301) transgenic class II-knock-out non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Flynn, J C; Meroueh, C; Snower, D P; David, C S; Kong, Y M

    2007-03-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to autoimmune disease development. Previously, we evaluated genetic factors in a humanized mouse model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) by immunizing human leucocyte antigen DR3 (HLA-DR3) and HLA-DQ8 transgenic class II-knock-out non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. DR3+ mice were susceptible to experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) induction by both mouse thyroglobulin (mTg) and human (h) Tg, while DQ8+ mice were weakly susceptible only to hTg. As one environmental factor associated with HT and tested in non-transgenic models is increased sodium iodide (NaI) intake, we examined the susceptibility of DR3+ and/or DQ8+ mice to NaI-induced disease. Mice were treated for 8 weeks with NaI in the drinking water. At 0 x 05% NaI, 23% of DR3+, 0% of DQ8+ and 20% of DR3+DQ8+ mice had thyroid destruction. No spleen cell proliferation to mTg was observed. Most mice had undetectable anti-mTg antibodies, but those with low antibody levels usually had thyroiditis. At 0.3% NaI, a higher percentage of DR3+ and DR3+DQ8+ mice developed destructive thyroiditis, but it was not statistically significant. However, when DR3+ mice had been depleted of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells prior to NaI treatment, destructive thyroiditis (68%) and serum anti-mTg antibodies were exacerbated further. The presence of DQ8 molecules does not alter the susceptibility of DR3+DQ8+ mice to NaI-induced thyroiditis, similar to earlier findings with mTg-induced EAT. Susceptibility of DR3+ mice to NaI-induced EAT, in both the presence and absence of regulatory T cells, demonstrates the usefulness of HLA class II transgenic mice in evaluating the roles of environmental factors and immune dysregulation in autoimmune thyroid disease.

  2. Association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Noureldine, Salem I; Tufano, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    The association of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer remains an active focus of research and controversy. Since it was first proposed in 1955, numerous studies have explored the epidemiology and etiology of these concurrent disease processes. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently encountered in thyroid glands resected for a neoplasm. The most frequent association is noted with papillary thyroid cancer. Several recent studies performed on patients undergoing thyroidectomy with coexisting Hashimoto's thyroiditis report an increased prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer, with a favorable disease profile and an improved prognosis, particularly in women. Conversely, some population-based studies using fine-needle aspiration biopsy data report no linkage between serologic Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer, yet they are limited by the lack of definitive pathology. On the other hand, the significantly increased incidence of primary thyroid lymphomas in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis strongly suggests a pathogenetic link between this autoimmune disorder and malignant thyroid lymphoma. The lymphocytic infiltration of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is frequently associated with papillary thyroid cancer and may indeed be a risk factor for developing this type of cancer. Nonetheless, a pathogenesis linking these diseases remains unclear. The relationship between thyroid lymphoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis appears to be well established.

  3. Thyroid emergencies.

    PubMed

    Burger, A G; Philippe, J

    1992-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rapid decompensation of severe hyperthyroidism which can best be described by the three criteria of hyperthermia, tachycardia and altered mental state with severe agitation. There has to be a precipitating factor such as infection, iodine contamination, surgery or even I-131 treatment. Severe hyperthyroidism not fulfilling the criteria of thyroid storm can also be an indication for emergency treatment, particularly in the elderly with heart disease. Suppressed serum TSH and elevated free T4 levels are essential to confirm the diagnosis. When rapidly available, radioiodine uptake of the thyroid can be useful. Therapy aims at rapidly reducing the active circulating hormone pool, hypermetabolic state, tachycardia, and finally hormone synthesis. Thyroid secretion can be blocked by ioipanoic acid or ipodate while hypermetabolic state can be reduced with beta-blockers or calcium channel-blockers. Treatment of hyperthyroidism in patients with iodine contamination is a real therapeutic challenge. Myxoedema coma, a complication of severe hypothyroidism, is defined by hypothermia (rectal temperature less than 36 degrees C), bradycardia, slow mentation, precipitating factor such as infection or drug overdose, and increased serum creatine phosphokinase levels. Diagnosis of severe hypothyroidism should be confirmed by serum measurements of TSH and free T4. Treatment consists of general supporting measures including rewarming, correction of serum electrolyte disturbances, and adequate alimentation. Thyroid hormone treatment should initially be aggressive using either 300-400 micrograms of T4 or 20-40 micrograms of T3 intravenously. Cortisone therapy may be added. Patients should be under close monitoring as arrhythmias and myocardial infarction are frequent complications of myxoedema coma and/or its treatment with thyroid hormones.

  4. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  5. Estrogens and Stem Cells in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zane, Mariangela; Catalano, Veronica; Scavo, Emanuela; Bonanno, Marco; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries highlight the emerging role of estrogens in the initiation and progression of different malignancies through their interaction with stem cell (SC) compartment. Estrogens play a relevant role especially for those tumors bearing a gender disparity in incidence and aggressiveness, as occurs for most thyroid diseases. Although several experimental lines suggest that estrogens promote thyroid cell proliferation and invasion, their precise contribution in SC compartment still remains unclear. This review underlines the interplay between hormones and thyroid function, which could help to complete the puzzle of gender discrepancy in thyroid malignancies. Defining the association between estrogen receptors’ status and signaling pathways by which estrogens exert their effects on thyroid cells is a potential tool that provides important insights in pathogenetic mechanisms of thyroid tumors. PMID:25120531

  6. Thyroid toxicants: assessing reproductive health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Gloria D; Choksi, Neepa Y; Moore, John A; Shelby, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    A thyroid toxicant workshop sponsored by the National Toxicology Program Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction convened on 28-29 April 2003 in Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of this workshop was to examine and discuss chemical-induced thyroid dysfunction in experimental animals and the relevance of reproductive and developmental effects observed for prediction of adverse effects in humans. Presentations highlighted and compared reproductive and developmental effects of thyroid hormones in humans and rodents. Rodent models of thyroid system dysfunction were presented. Animal testing protocols were reviewed, taking into account protocol designs that allow extrapolation to possible human health effects. Potential screening methods to assess toxicant-induced thyroid dysfunction were outlined, and postnatal bioassays of thyroid-related effects were discussed. PMID:14998754

  7. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  8. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies and fine needle biopsy are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may also change the results of the following ...

  9. Thyroid Disorders Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are common. These nodules can be either a growth of thyroid tissue or a fluid-filled cyst, which forms a lump in the thyroid gland. Almost half of the population will have tiny thyroid nodules at some point ...

  10. Evaluation of thyroid incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are an extremely common endocrine disorder with a generally accepted prevalence of around 4% to 7%. Incidental thyroid nodules are typically nonpalpable thyroid nodules found during radiographic evaluation for a non-thyroid-related issue (eg, computed tomographic scan, positron emission tomography scan, carotid duplex). Incidental thyroid nodules are contributing to but are not the sole reason for the rising incidence of thyroid cancer in the Unites States and other developed nations.

  11. Perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid in surgical thyroid specimens of patients with thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Pirali, Barbara; Negri, Sara; Chytiris, Spyridon; Perissi, Andrea; Villani, Laura; La Manna, Luigi; Cottica, Danilo; Ferrari, Massimo; Imbriani, Marcello; Rotondi, Mario; Chiovato, Luca

    2009-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are ubiquitous compounds that may act as endocrine disruptors, neurotoxic agents, and fetal development perturbing substances and may also be carcinogenic, as recently demonstrated in experimental animal models. There is little information on the potential for these compounds to affect the thyroid. Therefore, this study was performed to measure the intrathyroidal levels of PFOA and PFOS in surgical specimens of thyroid glands and to determine if there was a relationship between the concentrations of these substances and the clinical, biochemical, and histologic phenotype of the patients from whom the thyroids were obtained. We also sought to determine if there was a relationship between tissue and serum levels of both PFOA and PFOS. PFOA and PFOS were measured in 28 patients undergoing thyroid surgery for benign (15 multinodular goiters and 7 Graves' disease) and malignant (5 papillary and 1 follicular carcinoma) thyroid disorders. PFOA and PFOS were detectable in all surgical specimens of thyroid tissue. Their median concentrations were 2.0 ng/g (range = 0.4-4.6 ng/g) and 5.3 ng/g (range = 2.1-44.7), respectively. Intrathyroidal concentrations of PFOA and PFOS were similar in the thyroids of patients with thyroid diseases as in thyroid glands obtained at autopsy. There was no relationship between the intrathyroidal concentrations of either PFOA or PFOS and the underlying thyroid disease. A significant correlation between the serum and the tissue levels of PFOS was found in all patients. The serum concentrations of PFOA and PFOS were significantly higher than those in the correspondent surgical specimens. These observations do not support the view that PFOA and PFOS are actively concentrated in the thyroid. PFOA and PFOS, however, are both found in surgical and autopsy thyroid specimens. Therefore, further studies to determine if they have disrupting effects in thyroid cells or tissue, and studies

  12. Thyroid Nodules and Thyroid Cancer: Surgical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Orlo H.

    1980-01-01

    Patients with thyroid nodules must be treated selectively because these nodules develop far more frequently than does thyroid cancer. A thorough clinical history, family history and history of radiation, as well as an accurate physical examination, are very important in determining whether surgical treatment is indicated. Thyroid function tests, a radioactive isotope scan, a thyroid echogram and fine-needle biopsy are also useful. Although there is considerable debate concerning the amount of thyroid tissue that should be removed at operation, the minimal procedure for a “cold,” solid thyroid nodule is a total thyroid lobectomy and isthmectomy. This is the treatment of choice for patients with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma. Partial lobectomy is to be discouraged. Near total or total thyroidectomy should be considered for all other patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Many factors influence the prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer including age, sex, type of thyroid cancer, invasion, symptoms, lymph node metastasis, metastasis to distant sites, extent of the surgical procedure, and use of radioactive iodine and thyroid hormone. With adequate treatment, the prognosis for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is excellent. PMID:7222643

  13. Protection of the maternal and fetal thyroid from radioactive contamination by the administration of stable iodide during pregnancy. An experimental evaluation in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Noteboom, J L; Hummel, W A; Broerse, J J; de Vijlder, J J; Vulsma, T; Jansen, J T; van Bekkum, D W

    1997-06-01

    The safety and efficacy of the administration of stable iodide to protect the fetal thyroid from exposure to radioactive iodide were investigated in chimpanzees in weeks 19 to 21 of pregnancy. The mean 24-h uptake of iodide in the fetal thyroid, determined with 123I-, was 1.8%. Administration of stable potassium iodide (KI), 0.65, 1.95 or 6.5 mg per kg body weight, 1 h before tracer injection reduced the fetal uptake satisfactorily. Only the higher doses were effective after 20 h. Excess iodide may impair a child's thyroid status. However, adverse effects were not found during the 11 days the animals ingested these doses. Tracer concentrations in the amniotic fluid were 30- to 130-fold lower than in the urine. The dose to the fetus from radioactivity in the maternal bladder was estimated by computer simulation. The potential increment of the risk from this dose during the ingestion of stable iodide is smaller than the reduction of risk achieved by inhibiting the uptake of radioactive iodide by the fetal thyroid. The conclusion of the experiments is that stable iodide can be used safely and effectively to protect the fetal thyroid against contamination with radioactive iodine.

  14. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Medullary Carcinoma of Thyroid.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, S; Chakrabarti, S; Mandal, P K; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has been found to be associated with lymphoma, papillary carcinoma and Hürthle cell neoplasms of thyroid. In contrast, there are only a few reports of co-existence of HT with medullary carcinoma of thyroid. An overall prevalence of medullary carcinoma of only 0.35% has been reported in HT patients. Such a rare combination is being presented here. A 33 year old female presented with history of goiter for one year. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the swelling revealed cytological features suggestive of medullary carcinoma of thyroid. Histopathological examination of total thyroidectomy specimen revealed Hashimoto's thyroiditis along with medullary carcinoma of thyroid. Although Hashimoto's thyroiditis can uncommonly co-exist with thyroid neoplasm, its association with medullary carcinoma is extremely rare and hence being presented.

  15. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2016-11-04

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid.

  16. [Thyroid dysfunctions and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology of the thyroid function in normal pregnancy have highlighted the importance of the consequences of abnormal thyroid function on mother and fetal outcomes. Thyroid diseases are common in young women of childbearing age while management of thyroid diseases is relatively straightforward. For each thyroid dysfunction (hypothyroxinemia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis), the issues with the obstetric complications of the mother and the fetus are considered. Indeed, early recognition of thyroid diseases during pregnancy and appropriate management has the potential to improve outcome for the mother and the fetus.

  17. Experimental inoculation of specific pathogen free broiler chickens with a thyroid homogenate, containing chicken astrovirus, which was collected from broiler chickens with runting-stunting syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thyroid glands were collected from field broiler chickens with clinical signs and lesions of Runting-Stunting Syndrome (RSS), submitted for histopathology and processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing using chicken Astrovirus primers. One-day-old White Rock specific pathogen free (SPF) ...

  18. Thyroiditis: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lori B; Stewart, Christopher; Gaitonde, David Y

    2014-09-15

    Thyroiditis is a general term that encompasses several clinical disorders characterized by inflammation of the thyroid gland. The most common is Hashimoto thyroiditis; patients typically present with a nontender goiter, hypothyroidism, and an elevated thyroid peroxidase antibody level. Treatment with levothyroxine ameliorates the hypothyroidism and may reduce goiter size. Postpartum thyroiditis is transient or persistent thyroid dysfunction that occurs within one year of childbirth, miscarriage, or medical abortion. Release of preformed thyroid hormone into the bloodstream may result in hyperthyroidism. This may be followed by transient or permanent hypothyroidism as a result of depletion of thyroid hormone stores and destruction of thyroid hormone-producing cells. Patients should be monitored for changes in thyroid function. Beta blockers can treat symptoms in the initial hyperthyroid phase; in the subsequent hypothyroid phase, levothyroxine should be considered in women with a serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level greater than 10 mIU per L, or in women with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level of 4 to 10 mIU per L who are symptomatic or desire fertility. Subacute thyroiditis is a transient thyrotoxic state characterized by anterior neck pain, suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone, and low radioactive iodine uptake on thyroid scanning. Many cases of subacute thyroiditis follow an upper respiratory viral illness, which is thought to trigger an inflammatory destruction of thyroid follicles. In most cases, the thyroid gland spontaneously resumes normal thyroid hormone production after several months. Treatment with high-dose acetylsalicylic acid or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is directed toward relief of thyroid pain.

  19. [Thyroid emergencies : Thyroid storm and myxedema coma].

    PubMed

    Spitzweg, C; Reincke, M; Gärtner, R

    2017-09-22

    Thyroid emergencies are rare life-threatening endocrine conditions resulting from either decompensated thyrotoxicosis (thyroid storm) or severe thyroid hormone deficiency (myxedema coma). Both conditions develop out of a long-standing undiagnosed or untreated hyper- or hypothyroidism, respectively, precipitated by an acute stress-associated event, such as infection, trauma, or surgery. Cardinal features of thyroid storm are myasthenia, cardiovascular symptoms, in particular tachycardia, as well as hyperthermia and central nervous system dysfunction. The diagnosis is made based on clinical criteria only as thyroid hormone measurements do not differentiate between thyroid storm and uncomplicated hyperthyroidism. In addition to critical care measures therapy focusses on inhibition of thyroid hormone synthesis and secretion (antithyroid drugs, perchlorate, Lugol's solution, cholestyramine, thyroidectomy) as well as inhibition of thyroid hormone effects in the periphery (β-blocker, glucocorticoids).Cardinal symptoms of myxedema coma are hypothermia, decreased mental status, and hypoventilation with risk of pneumonia and hyponatremia. The diagnosis is also purely based on clinical criteria as measurements of thyroid hormone levels do not differ between uncomplicated severe hypothyroidism and myxedema coma. In addition to substitution of thyroid hormones and glucocorticoids, therapy focusses on critical care measures to treat hypoventilation and hypercapnia, correction of hyponatremia and hypothermia.Survival of both thyroid emergencies can only be optimized by early diagnosis based on clinical criteria and prompt initiation of multimodal therapy including supportive measures and treatment of the precipitating event.

  20. Evidence of chemical stimulation of hepatic metabolism by an experimental acetanilide (FOE 5043) indirectly mediating reductions in circulating thyroid hormone levels in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Christenson, W R; Becker, B D; Wahle, B S; Moore, K D; Dass, P D; Lake, S G; Van Goethem, D L; Stuart, B P; Sangha, G K; Thyssen, J H

    1996-02-01

    N-(4-Fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl]oxy]acetamide (FOE 5043) is a new acetanilide-type herbicide undergoing regulatory testing. Previous work in this laboratory suggested that FOE 5043-induced reductions in serum thyroxine (T4) levels were mediated via an extrathyroidal site of action. The possibility that the alterations in circulating T4 levels were due to chemical induction of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism was investigated. Treatment with FOE 5043 at a rate of 1000 ppm as a dietary admixture was found to significantly increase the clearance of [125I]T4 from the serum, suggesting an enhanced excretion of the hormone. In the liver, the activity of hepatic uridine glucuronosyl transferase, a major pathway of thyroid hormone biotransformation in the rat, increased in a statistically significant and dose-dependent manner; conversely, hepatic 5'-monodeiodinase activity trended downward with dose. Bile flow as well as the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of [125I]T4 were increased following exposure to FOE 5043. Thyroidal function, as measured by the discharge of iodide ion in response to perchlorate, and pituitary function, as measured by the capacity of the pituitary to secrete thyrotropin in response to an exogenous challenge by hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone, were both unchanged from the controlled response. These data suggest that the functional status of the thyroid and pituitary glands has not been altered by treatment with FOE 5043 and that reductions in circulating levels of T4 are being mediated indirectly through an increase in the biotransformation and excretion of thyroid hormone in the liver.

  1. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  2. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  3. Thyroid disorders in women.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid disorders include autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer. AITD mainly consist of autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves disease. The common characteristic of thyroid disorders is female preponderance in their prevalence. The female-to-male rate ratio is reported at 4~6:1 for AITD and about 3~4:1 for thyroid nodule. For PTC, it is greatest during reproductive age and drops from five and more in patients aged 20-24, to 3.4 in patients aged 35-44 to one in patients over 80. The effects of female gonadal hormones and X chromosome inactivation on thyroid gland and immune system greatly contribute to the female predilection of AITD. The former mainly include prolactin and estrogen. The direct actions of estrogen on the thyroid tissue contribute to the development of thyroid goiter, nodule and cancer in women.

  4. CHANGES IN TOOTH HARD TISSUE MINERALI-ZATION AND BLOOD RHEOLOGY IN HEALTHY ADOLESCENTS AND THOSE WITH THYROID DYSFUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Beriashvili, S; Nikolaishvili, M; Mantskava, M; Momtsemlidze, N; Franchuk, K

    2016-11-01

    Thyroid dysfunction causes spreading and development of caries in the teeth and changes in periodontal tissues. In addition, it causes changes in peripheral blood flow and mineralization, local transcapillary metabolism causes changes in blood rheology. There are only few works in this direction and, therefore, the purpose of our research was to find out how the mineralization and the rheological properties of blood are changed in lesion of periodontal tissue on a background of thyroid dysfunction. Accordingly, the stomatological study was conducted in 75 adolescents aged 12-18 years by the standard method, recommended by the World Health Organization. According to the study, 45 patients out of them suffered from thyroid dysfunction, in particular from hypothyroidism. The comparator group consisted of 30 children of the same age without endocrine abnormalities. By the gained results it is noted that in spite of different type lesions due to dental caries, the caries incidence and intensiveness is higher in children with hypothyroidism as compared to healthy children. Decrease in saliva excretion rate and increase in oral fluid viscosity was found in children with thyroid and endocrine diseases as compared to healthy children. In children with endocrine disorders concurrent increase in calcium content (1,43±0,08 mmol/l) and decrease in inorganic phosphate concentrations (4,54±0,15 mmol/l) is reliably established. In children with thyroid disfunction and while periodontal tissue pathology, rheological features are disordered more dramatically than in healthy children. Therefore, it can be said that the changes in the adolescents' thyroid function is one of the reasons for formation of periodontal tissue diseases.Therefore, at detecting even the first signs of the periodontal tissue diseases, it is desirable in adolescents to assess the thyroid functional condition, since it will be the precondition for effective treatment and management of dental disease, in

  5. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility.

    PubMed

    Cho, Moon Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women.

  6. Somatostatin receptor expression in thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; England, James A; Rafferty, Amy; Jesudason, Vim; Bedford, Karen; Karsai, Laszlo; Atkin, Stephen L

    2013-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues are commercially available and used for the management of acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumours, but the expression of the receptors as a target in thyroid disease has not been explored. To assess somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor (SSTR1-5) expression in both normal and thyroid disorders, as a potential target for somatostatin analogue therapy, 67 thyroid tissue specimens were reviewed: 12 differentiated thyroid carcinomas, 14 follicular adenomas, 17 multinodular goitres, 14 Graves disease, 10 Hashimotos thyroiditis specimens and five normal thyroids. Tissue was immunostained for SST and SSTR1-5. Positivity and the degree of positivity were recorded by double-blinded observers. Somatostatin receptor expression was highly expressed in normal tissue for SSTR1, 3, 4 and 5 (5 of 5, 4 of 5, 4 of 5 and 5 of 5 respectively) whilst SST and SSTR 2a and b were not expressed at all. The commonest receptor expressed for all pathological subtypes grouped together was SSTR2b (63 specimens). The commonest receptors expressed in differentiated thyroid cancer were SSTR5 (11 of 12 specimens) and SSTR2b (10 of 12 specimens). The commonest receptor expressed in benign disease was SSTR2b (53 of 55 specimens). SSTR5 was significantly under-expressed in Graves disease (P < 0.05). This study illustrates that SSTR 1, 3, 4 and 5 are highly expressed in normal, benign and malignant thyroid tissue. SSTR 2a and 2b appear absent in normal tissue and present in benign and malignant thyroid tissue (P < 0.02). This suggests that focussed SSTR2 treatment may be a potential therapeutic target. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  7. Thyroid Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... made in the pituitary gland located at the base of the brain, called thyroid stimulating hormone (abbreviated ... women who take control birth pills, etc). Another measurement done to assess the thyroid status of patients ...

  8. Thyroid and Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands had high BMRs. Later studies linked these observations with measurements of thyroid hormone levels and showed ... the hyperthyroidism is treated. One consequence of this observation is that the use of thyroid hormone to ...

  9. Thyroid Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem that is directly affecting the thyroid (primary hypothyroidism). The opposite situation, in which the TSH level ... making enough TSH to stimulate the thyroid (secondary hypothyroidism). In most healthy individuals, a normal TSH value ...

  10. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of thyroid disorder or thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism (say: hi-per-THYE-roy-diz-em) happens when the ... Kids with the opposite problem have hypothyroidism (say: hi-po-THYE-roy-diz-em). In this case, ...

  11. Cabozantinib (thyroid cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat a certain type of thyroid cancer that is getting worse and that has spread ... only gives information about cabozantinib capsules (Cometriq) for thyroid cancer. If you are using this medication for advanced ...

  12. American Thyroid Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... 0 87th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association October 18–22, 2017, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada ... the 87th annual meeting of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) is almost upon us! On... Read More ...

  13. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Fazzi, Piera; Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina

    2017-01-01

    Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb)], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S). A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves' disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67) scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid) should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  14. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions A A ... or injury. Signs of inflammation can include redness, heat, pain, or swelling. metabolism: Metabolism refers to the ...

  15. Child thyroid anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and ... a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. Thyroid disorders are more common in older children and ...

  16. Thyroid preparation overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid preparations are medicines used to treat thyroid gland disorders. Overdose occurs when someone takes more than the normal or recommended amount of this medicine. This can be by accident or ...

  17. Mechanism for the anti-thyroid action of minocycline

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, D.R.; Divi, R.L.; Deck, J.; Taurog, A.

    1997-01-01

    Administration of minocycline (MN), a tetracycline antibiotic, produces a black pigment in the thyroids of humans and several species of experimental animals and antithyroid effects in rodents. We have previously shown that these effects appear to be related to interactions of MN with thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the key enzyme in thyroid hormone synthesis. In the present study, the mechanisms for inhibition of TPO-catalyzed iodination and coupling reactions by MN were investigated. 37 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  19. [Thyroid and cardiovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek

    2004-05-01

    In this study three problems concerning interactions between thyroid and cardiovascular system are discussed. Cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, pleural effusion, hyperlipidaemia, arterial hypertension may be consequences of thyroid disorders leading to inappropriate hormone secretion. During such illnesses as heart failure, myocardial infarction and in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery profound changes may occur in thyroid hormone metabolism known as sick euthyroid syndrome. Treatment with amiodarone may lead to changes in thyroid tests results and to development of hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis.

  20. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  1. Thyroid cancer in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlin, J.B.; Sallan, S.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The incidence, clinical presentation, and types of thyroid cancers presenting in childhood are reviewed. The role of antecedent radiation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and genetics of medullary thyroid carcinoma are discussed. Unique aspects of therapy and prognosis for the pediatric patient with thyroid carcinoma are addressed as well as a diagnostic approach to the child who presents with a neck mass.59 references.

  2. Intrinsic Regulation of Thyroid Function by Thyroglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Sellitti, Donald F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The established paradigm for thyroglobulin (Tg) function is that of a high molecular weight precursor of the much smaller thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). However, speculation regarding the cause of the functional and morphologic heterogeneity of the follicles that make up the thyroid gland has given rise to the proposition that Tg is not only a precursor of thyroid hormones, but that it also functions as an important signal molecule in regulating thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Summary: Evidence supporting this alternative paradigm of Tg function, including the up- or downregulation by colloidal Tg of the transcription of Tg, iodide transporters, and enzymes employed in Tg iodination, and also the effects of Tg on the proliferation of thyroid and nonthyroid cells, is examined in the present review. Also discussed in detail are potential mechanisms of Tg signaling in follicular cells. Conclusions: Finally, we propose a mechanism, based on experimental observations of Tg effects on thyroid cell behavior, that could account for the phenomenon of follicular heterogeneity as a highly regulated cycle of increasing and decreasing colloidal Tg concentration that functions to optimize thyroid hormone production through the transcriptional activation or suppression of specific genes. PMID:24251883

  3. Thyroid and menopause.

    PubMed

    del Ghianda, S; Tonacchera, M; Vitti, P

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is common in the general population especially in women. All thyroid diseases are in fact more common in women than in men and may interfere with the reproductive system. Thyroid function and the gonadal axes are related throughout the woman's fertile period. The relationship between the two glands is mutual. In particular, thyroid hormones affect the reproductive function both directly and indirectly through several actions. Studies on the relationship between menopause and thyroid function are few and do not allow to clarify whether menopause has an effect on the thyroid regardless of aging. With aging, the main changes regarding thyroid physiology and function are: a reduction of thyroid iodine uptake, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine synthesis and catabolism of free thyroxine while reverse triiodothyronine increases; the level of thyroid stimulating hormone remains normal with sometimes a tendency to higher limits. These changes are present in both sexes without distinction between males and females. The complexity of the relationships can be summarized in three aspects: thyroid status does not influence significantly the climacteric syndrome; menopause may modify the clinical expression of some thyroid diseases, particularly the autoimmune ones; thyroid function is not directly involved in the pathogenesis of the complications of menopause. However, coronary atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be aggravated in the presence of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. The effects of postmenopausal estrogen replacement on thyroxine requirements in women with hypothyroidism should be considered.

  4. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  5. Thyroid-associated paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Faquin, William; Wei, Nancy; Barbesino, Giuseppe; Stephen, Antonia E

    2011-07-01

    Paragangliomas in the region of the thyroid gland are rare tumors that can present a diagnostic challenge by mimicking follicular and c-cell derived thyroid tumors. Thyroid-associated paragangliomas are likely a subset of laryngeal paragangliomas and, although quite rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a hypervascular thyroid nodule. The preoperative diagnosis of thyroid-associated paragangliomas can be challenging since the cytologic and histologic features overlap with more common primary thyroid neoplasms, in particular medullary carcinoma. Differential expression of a panel of immunohistochemical markers, including neuro-specific enolase, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, keratin, and S100, can be used to distinguish thyroid-associated paragangliomas from primary thyroid tumors. Intraoperatively, thyroid-associated paragangliomas may be associated with significant intraoperative bleeding and are often densely adherent to surrounding tissues, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Interestingly, the aggressive local behavior of these tumors does not correspond to potential for malignancy, as there are no patients with malignant thyroid-associated paragangliomas reported in the medical literature. Therefore, these tumors may be treated with limited resection. Postoperatively, patients with paragangliomas should receive hormonal evaluation for functional disease, imaging evaluation for multicentric and metastatic disease, and genetic counseling. Thyroid-associated paragangliomas are an important part of the differential diagnosis of a hypervascular thyroid nodule, especially in a patient with a fine-needle aspiration biopsy suggestive of medullary thyroid carcinoma, but with unremarkable serum calcitonin levels. Consideration of a thyroid-associated paraganglioma also has important operative and postoperative implications for determining the extent of thyroid resection as well as follow-up testing.

  6. Thyroid-disrupting chemicals: interpreting upstream biomarkers of adverse outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark D; Crofton, Kevin M; Rice, Deborah C; Zoeller, R Thomas

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing evidence in humans and in experimental animals for a relationship between exposure to specific environmental chemicals and perturbations in levels of critically important thyroid hormones (THs). Identification and proper interpretation of these relationships are required for accurate assessment of risk to public health. We review the role of TH in nervous system development and specific outcomes in adults, the impact of xenobiotics on thyroid signaling, the relationship between adverse outcomes of thyroid disruption and upstream causal biomarkers, and the societal implications of perturbations in thyroid signaling by xenobiotic chemicals. We drew on an extensive body of epidemiologic, toxicologic, and mechanistic studies. THs are critical for normal nervous system development, and decreased maternal TH levels are associated with adverse neuropsychological development in children. In adult humans, increased thyroid-stimulating hormone is associated with increased blood pressure and poorer blood lipid profiles, both risk factors for cardiovascular disease and death. These effects of thyroid suppression are observed even within the "normal" range for the population. Environmental chemicals may affect thyroid homeostasis by a number of mechanisms, and multiple chemicals have been identified that interfere with thyroid function by each of the identified mechanisms. Individuals are potentially vulnerable to adverse effects as a consequence of exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. Any degree of thyroid disruption that affects TH levels on a population basis should be considered a biomarker of adverse outcomes, which may have important societal outcomes.

  7. Anemia in thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Hernik, Aleksandra; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-03-28

    Anemia is a frequent, although often underestimated, clinical condition accompanying thyroid diseases. In spite of the fact that anemia and thyroid dysfunction often occur simultaneously, the causative relationship between these two disorders remains ambiguous. Thyroid hormones stimulate erythrocytes precursors proliferation directly, as well as via erythropoietin production enhancement, whereas iron-deficient anemia negatively influences thyroid hormonal status. Thus, different forms of anemia might emerge in the course of thyroid dysfunction. In fact, normocytic anemia is most common, while macrocytic or microcytic anemia occur less frequently. Anemia in hypothyroidism might result from bone marrow depression, decreased erythropoietin production, comorbid diseases, or concomitant iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Altered iron metabolism and oxidative stress may contribute to anemia in hyperthyroidism. The risk of anemia in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may be posed by pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune hemolytic syndrome, or rheumatic disorders. The simultaneous occurrence of anemia and thyroid disease, as well as their close relation, make the diseases an important clinical problem. The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive review summarizing data on the prevalence, potential mechanisms, and therapy of anemia in the course of thyroid diseases from the clinical and pathogenetic perspective. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of treatment-resistant or refractory anemia, as well as in case of increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Of note is that the presence of AITD itself, independently from thyroid hormonal status, might affect hemoglobin level.

  8. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  9. Metformin and thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianghui; Xu, Shuhang; Chen, Guofang; Derwahl, Michael; Liu, Chao

    2017-04-01

    An intriguing area of research in thyroidology is the recently discovered association of insulin resistance with thyroid functional and morphological abnormalities. Individuals with hyperinsulinemia have larger thyroid gland and a higher prevalence of thyroid nodules and cancer. Accordingly, patients treated with metformin have a smaller thyroid volume and a lower risk of incident goiter, thyroid nodule and cancer. Multiple studies in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that metformin can inhibit the growth of thyroid cells and different types of thyroid cancer cells by affecting the insulin/IGF1 and mTOR pathways. Besides, metformin treatment was associated with a decrease in the levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in diabetic patients possibly by enhancing the effects of thyroid hormones in the pituitary and activating the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Based on this evidence, metformin appears to be a promising therapeutic tool in patients with thyroid disease. More clinical studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical significance of metformin for the treatment of thyroid diseases. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Thyroid diseases in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Roland

    2009-12-01

    Thyroid disorders are common in pregnancy and affect maternal and fetal outcome. The reference values for normal thyroid function during first and second trimester had been re-evaluated recently. Hypothyroxinemia affects the neuropsychological development of the child. Maternal thyroid dysfunction or only the presence of thyroid-specific antibodies is associated with increased risk for early abortion, preterm delivery and neonatal morbidity. Pregnant women under levothyroxine treatment are often undertreated or overtreated. Screening for thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women is recommended and cost-effective. Recently, the recommended dose for iodine intake during pregnancy had been increased from 200 to 250 microg/day, because recent studies revealed that even mild-to-moderate iodine intake might affect the neuropsychological development of the child. About 5-18% of all pregnant women exhibit elevated thyroid-specific antibodies, but only 0.3% develop overt hypothyroidism and 0.1-0.4% overt hyperthyroidism. However, those pregnant women with autoimmune thyroiditis and normal thyroid function may have a restricted thyroid reserve, followed by hypothyroxinemia and/or thyroid-stimulating hormone increase during pregnancy. The incidence of miscarriage, preterm delivery and small for date offspring might be increased and probably a delayed neuropsychological development. Routine thyroid function testing at least as early as possible in all pregnant women is emphasized.

  11. Thyroid and parathyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ghervan, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid ultrasound is easy to perform due to the superficial location of the thyroid gland, but appropriate equipment is mandatory with a linear high frequency transducer (7.5 - 12) MHz. Some pathological aspects of the thyroid gland are easily diagnosed by ultrasound, like the enlargement of the thyroid volume (goiter) or the presence of nodules and cysts; while other aspects are more difficult and need more experience (diffuse changes in the structure, echogenicity and vascularization of the parenchyma, differential diagnosis of malignant nodules). Ultrasound has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules; most structural abnormalities of the thyroid need evaluation and monitoring but not intervention. A good knowledge of the normal appearance of the thyroid gland is compulsory for an accurate ultrasound diagnosis.

  12. Thyroid and the heart.

    PubMed

    Grais, Ira Martin; Sowers, James R

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate every component of the cardiovascular system necessary for normal cardiovascular development and function. When cardiovascular disease is present, thyroid function tests are characteristically indicated to determine if overt thyroid disorders or even subclinical dysfunction exists. As hypothyroidism, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease all increase with advancing age, monitoring of thyroid-stimulating hormone, the most sensitive test for hypothyroidism, is important in this expanding segment of our population. A better understanding of the impact of thyroid hormonal status on cardiovascular physiology will enable health care providers to make decisions about thyroid hormone evaluation and therapy in concert with evaluating and treating hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The goal of this review is to access contemporary understanding of the effects of thyroid hormones on normal cardiovascular function and the potential role of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyroid Autoimmunity: Role of Anti-thyroid Antibodies in Thyroid and Extra-Thyroidal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore; Wahl, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a high prevalence in the population, and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is one of the most common representatives. Thyroid autoantibodies are not only frequently detected in patients with AITD but also in subjects without manifest thyroid dysfunction. The high prevalence raises questions regarding a potential role in extra-thyroidal diseases. This review summarizes the etiology and mechanism of AITD and addresses prevalence of antibodies against thyroid peroxidase, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), and anti-thyroglobulin and their action outside the thyroid. The main issues limiting the reliability of the conclusions drawn here include problems with different specificities and sensitivities of the antibody detection assays employed, as well as potential confounding effects of altered thyroid hormone levels, and lack of prospective studies. In addition to the well-known effects of TSHR antibodies on fibroblasts in Graves’ disease (GD), studies speculate on a role of anti-thyroid antibodies in cancer. All antibodies may have a tumor-promoting role in breast cancer carcinogenesis despite anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies having a positive prognostic effect in patients with overt disease. Cross-reactivity with lactoperoxidase leading to induction of chronic inflammation might promote breast cancer, while anti-thyroid antibodies in manifest breast cancer might be an indication for a more active immune system. A better general health condition in older women with anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies might support this hypothesis. The different actions of the anti-thyroid antibodies correspond to differences in cellular location of the antigens, titers of the circulating antibodies, duration of antibody exposure, and immunological mechanisms in GD and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. PMID:28536577

  14. [Riedel thyroiditis: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rongjin; Wang, Junguo

    2014-10-01

    Riedel thyroiditis is a benign disease, which is often self-limited. Examinations, such as CT and histologic diagnosis can distinguish it from malignant neoplasms and hashimoto's thyroiditis. Riedel thyroiditis is an uncommon form of chronic thyroiditis in which the thyroid gland is replaced by fibrous tissue. It can be cured by surgery and medicine.

  15. Oestrogen action on thyroid progenitor cells: relevant for the pathogenesis of thyroid nodules?

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhang; Chen, Guofang; Peng, Wen; Renko, Kostja; Derwahl, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Benign and malignant thyroid nodules are more prevalent in females than in males. Experimental data suggest that the proliferative effect of oestrogen rather than polymorphisms is responsible for this gender difference. This study analysed whether both differentiated thyroid cells and thyroid stem and progenitor cells are targets of oestrogen action. In thyroid stem/progenitor cells derived from nodular goitres, the ability of 17β-oestradiol (E₂) to induce the formation of thyrospheres and the expression of oestrogen receptors (ERs) and the effect of E₂ on the growth and expression of markers of stem cells and thyroid differentiation (TSH receptor, thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin and sodium iodide symporter (NIS)) were analysed. E₂ induced thyrosphere formation, albeit to a lower extent than other growth factors. Thyroid stem and progenitor cells expressed ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2) with eight times higher expression levels of ERα mRNA compared with the differentiated thyrocytes. E₂ was a potent stimulator of the growth of thyroid stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, TSH-induced differentiation of progenitor cells, in particular, the expression of NIS, was significantly inhibited by E₂. In conclusion, oestrogen stimulated the growth and simultaneously inhibited the differentiation of thyroid nodule-derived stem/progenitor cells. From these data and based on the concept of cellular heterogeneity, we hypothesize a supportive role of oestrogen in the propagation of thyroid stem/progenitor cells leading to the selection of a progeny of growth-prone cells with a decreased differentiation. These cells may be the origin of hypofunctioning or non-functioning thyroid nodules in females.

  16. What Does the Thyroid Gland Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... where they do their work. Why are thyroid hormones important? Thyroid hormones help all your organs work ... even babies—can have thyroid problems. Having thyroid hormone levels that are too low (underactive thyroid gland) ...

  17. Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer Thyroid cancer can cause any of the ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. Update on thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S

    2008-05-01

    With over 2 000 articles published on thyroid cancer between January 1, 2006 and September 10, 2007 it is difficult to offer an updated and complete review on this malignancy. Thus, I elected to summarize papers published in 2007 on topics frequently overlooked in other reviews or books, and papers that are likely to be followed by interesting developments. Papers include: 1) the accuracy and currency of websites on thyroid cancer; 2) the detection of the V600E BRAF mutation in very small papillary thyroid cancers that are detected histologically; 3) the relationship between thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis or hepatitis C virus, an association that appears to be nonrandom; 4) the not negligible frequency of coexistence of thyroid cancer with primary hyperparathyroidism; 5) the value of ultrasound elastography of thyroid nodules in distinguishing malignant form benign lesions; 6) the value of percutaneous ethanol injection in the treatment of thyroid or nodal recurrences of thyroid cancer; 7) the relatively benign course of intrathyroid metastases from renal cell carcinoma; 8) the exceedingly rare thyroid paraganglioma, though the rate of reports has increased recently; and 9) the increase in serum calcitonin caused by chronic alcoholism, an increase that cannot be reversed by three weeks of alcohol weaning.

  19. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  20. Submandibular ectopic thyroid with normally located thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Mahmut Sinan; Aytürk, Semra; Güven, Mehmet; Dilek, Fatma Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly of the thyroid gland which is defined as the presence of thyroid tissue at a site other than the pretracheal area. Nearly 1 to 3% of all ectopic thyroids are located in the lateral neck. Simultaneous submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue presenting with a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is extremely rare. In this article, we report a 37-year-old female case admitted to our clinic with a complaint of swollen neck in whom ultrasonography revealed submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue presenting with an orthotopic thyroid gland.

  1. Thyroid Association Ophthalmopathy in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Mor, Sudhir; Aggarwal, Hari Krishan; Chhabra, Pulkit; Jain, Promil

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid associated ophthalmopathy is a constellation of symptoms caused by an autoimmune process involving the orbital tissue. It is common in hyperthyroid patients due to Graves' disease and also reported in euthyroid and hypothyroid Graves' patients with positive thyroid receptor antibodies. But in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, thyroid associated ophthalmopathy is a rarely reported and poorly understood entity. Here we report thyroid associated ophthalmopathy in a patient with hypothyroidism and negative thyroid receptor antibodies who showed heterogeneously hypoechoic thyroid gland on ultrasonography, diffuse lymphocytic infiltrate on fine needle aspiration citology and reduced 99m Tc radioisotope uptake, supporting the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The patient was treated with levothyroxine and artificial tear drops.

  2. Ectopic goitrous submandibular thyroid with goitrous orthotopic thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Avinash Kumar; Mani, Vinayaga; Dixit, Rashmi; Garg, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid is a rare developmental anomaly with lingual thyroid accounting for majority of the cases. The presence of ectopic thyroid tissue lateral to the midline is very rare, and very few cases located in the submandibular region have been reported. The simultaneous finding of submandibular ectopic thyroid tissue and a functional orthotopic thyroid gland is even rarer. In the differential diagnosis of an ectopic submandibular thyroid, it is fundamental to exclude a metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer, even when primary thyroid carcinoma is not demonstrable.

  3. Impact of flavonoids on thyroid function.

    PubMed

    de Souza Dos Santos, Maria Carolina; Gonçalves, Carlos Frederico Lima; Vaisman, Mário; Ferreira, Andrea Claudia Freitas; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2011-10-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds of natural occurrence produced by plants that are largely consumed both for therapeutic purposes and as food. Experimental data have shown that many flavonoids could inhibit thyroperoxidase activity, decreasing thyroid hormones levels thus increasing TSH and causing goiter. In humans, infants fed with soy formula have been shown to develop goiter. However, in post-menopausal women soy intake did not affect thyroid function. In thyroid tumor cell line, flavonoids were shown to inhibit cell growth, but they can also decrease radioiodine uptake, that could reduce the efficacy of radioiodine therapy. Flavonoids could also affect the availability of thyroid hormones to target tissues, by inhibiting deiodinase activity or displacing T4 from transthyretin. Thus, flavonoids have been shown to interfere with many aspects of the thyroid hormones synthesis and availability in in vivo and in vitro models. In the present article, we review and synthesize the literature on the effects of flavonoids on thyroid and discuss the possible relevance of these effects for humans.

  4. Thyroid and the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Grais, Ira Martin; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones modulate every component of the cardiovascular system necessary for normal cardiovascular development and function. When cardiovascular disease is present, thyroid function tests are characteristically indicated to determine if overt thyroid disorders or even subclinical dysfunction exists. As hypothyroidism, hypertension and cardiovascular disease all increase with advancing age monitoring of TSH, the most sensitive test for hypothyroidism, is important in this expanding segment of our population. A better understanding of the impact of thyroid hormonal status on cardiovascular physiology will enable health care providers to make decisions regarding thyroid hormone evaluation and therapy in concert with evaluating and treating hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The goal of this review is to access contemporary understanding of the effects of thyroid hormones on normal cardiovascular function and the potential role of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24662620

  5. [Thyroid involvement of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomohiro; Inui, Naoki; Miyazaki, Hiroo; Matsushima, Sayomi; Kuroishi, Shigeki; Hashimoto, Dai; Naito, Tateaki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Sato, Jun; Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo

    2008-08-01

    A 54-year-old woman was found to have abnormal shadows on her chest radiograph taken on an annual medical examination. The chest radiograph showed multiple nodules in the bilateral middle and lower lung fields accompanied with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy. A computed tomography of the neck and chest revealed nodules in her right middle lobe and bilateral lower lobes with an enlarged thyroid. A metastatic malignant disease involving both thyroid and lungs was suspected, therefore thyroid and lung biopsies were performed. The histological examination of the thyroid and the lung specimens revealed non-caseating epithelioid cell granulomas which were compatible with sarcoidosis. Although the thyroid involvement of sarcoidosis is rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis with patients with thyroid swelling.

  6. [Thyroid malfunction in women].

    PubMed

    Zárate, A; Basurto, L; Hernández, M

    2001-05-01

    The prevalence of thyroid dysfunctions is high in women, this female preponderance has been related with a bigger susceptibility to autoimmune abnormalities. Clinical features of thyroid disease have poor specificity and insidious onset. It is recommended to suspect thyroid pathology in the event of postpartum depression, menstrual abnormalities, amenorrhea, galactorrhea, precocious or delayed sexual development, inexplicable sterility or habitual abortus. The difficult in the clinical diagnosis is compensated by the accessibility and relative easiness of the biological diagnosis by means of the thyroid function tests, mainly the measurements of TSH and FT4 levels; thus, gynecological evaluations should be completed by obtaining thyroid function test. An opportune diagnosis of thyroid illness will solve under the best conditions the gynecological dysfunctions.

  7. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  8. Dual Ectopic Thyroid with Normally Located Thyroid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Choudhury, Bipul; Kaimal Saikia, Uma; Sarma, Dipti; Saikia, Mihir; Dutta Choudhury, Sarojini; Barua, Santanu; Dewri, Swapna

    2011-01-01

    Dual ectopic thyroid is a rare presentation of thyroid ectopia. Only a few cases have been reported in the world literature. Dual ectopic thyroid in the presence of a normally located thyroid is even rarer. We report a case of dual ectopic thyroid in the lingual and submandibular areas in a seventeen-year-old female with hypoplastic thyroid gland in its normal location. The patient presented with a midline swelling at the base of tongue with dysphagia. Thyroid function test revealed primary hypothyroidism. Ultrasonography of the neck showed hypoplastic thyroid in its normal location. A thyroid scan with Technetium-99 m pertechnate showed two intensely hyperfunctioning foci of ectopic thyroid tissue at a higher level in the midline consistent with dual ectopic thyroid, one at the base of tongue and the other in submental region. No uptake was seen in the normal bed. PMID:21765986

  9. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  10. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  11. [Painful lymphocytic subacute thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Cortázar, A; Ruiz de Gordejuela, J; Zabalza, I; Acinas, O; Beitia, J J

    1992-01-25

    Subacute granulomatous thyroiditis (SGT) and subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis (SLT) present a similar evolution during the first year, however, posteriorly, except on rare occasions, SGT maintains normofunction while SLT may present relapse with persistent goiter or permanent hypothyroidism requiring periodic follow up. The presence of spontaneous pain and very elevated VSG have been described accompanying SGT but not SLT histologically proven to be used for differentiating these entities. Two cases with clinical criteria and cytological diagnosis of SLT consulted for spontaneous thyroid pain are presented. VSG greater than 50 mm/1st hour was suggestive of SGT. The importance of cytology for the correct management of subacute thyroiditis is emphasized.

  12. Feline thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Ward, Cynthia R

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid storm is a syndrome described in human medicine to define a multisystemic disorder resulting from organ exposure to excessive levels of thyroid hormone. This form of acute thyrotoxicosis, although uncommon, can be life threatening and is a significant cause of mortality in human emergency rooms. Although thyroid storm is a well-recognized clinical entity in human medicine, it has not been described in veterinary medicine. This article discusses the human syndrome and defines a similar syndrome in hyperthyroid veterinary patients. The clinical signs of and treatment modalities for feline thyroid storm are also presented.

  13. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  14. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  15. The value of thyroid shielding in intraoral radiography

    PubMed Central

    Hazenoot, Bart; Sanderink, Gerard C H; Berkhout, W Erwin R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the utility of the application of a thyroid shield in intraoral radiography when using rectangular collimation. Methods: Experimental data were obtained by measuring the absorbed dose at the position of the thyroid gland in a RANDO® (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) male phantom with a dosemeter. Four protocols were tested: round collimation and rectangular collimation, both with and without thyroid shield. Five exposure positions were deployed: upper incisor (Isup), upper canine (Csup), upper premolar (Psup), upper molar (Msup) and posterior bitewing (BW). Exposures were made with 70 kV and 7 mA and were repeated 10 times. The exposure times were as recommended for the exposure positions for the respective collimator type by the manufacturer for digital imaging. The data were statistically analyzed with a three-way ANOVA test. Significance was set at p < 0.01. Results: The ANOVA test revealed that the differences between mean doses of all protocols and geometries were statistically significant, p < 0.001. For the Isup, thyroid dose levels were comparable with both collimators at a level indicating primary beam exposure. Thyroid shield reduced this dose with circa 75%. For the Csup position, round collimation also revealed primary beam exposure, and thyroid shield yield was 70%. In Csup with rectangular collimation, the thyroid dose was reduced with a factor 4 compared with round collimation and thyroid shield yielded an additional 42% dose reduction. The thyroid dose levels for the Csup, Psup, Msup and BW exposures were lower with rectangular collimation without thyroid shield than with round collimation with thyroid shield. With rectangular collimation, the thyroid shield in Psup, Msup and BW reduced the dose 10% or less, where dose levels were already low, implying no clinical significance. Conclusions: For the exposures in the upper anterior region, thyroid shield results in an important dose reduction for the thyroid. For

  16. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating ... sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ...

  17. [Ultrasound of the thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active versus inactive nodes, and in particular benign versus malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also show promising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  18. [Ultrasound of the Thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active vs. inactive nodes, and in particular benign vs. malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also showpromising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fineneedle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  19. Adipocytokines in Thyroid Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan, Berna İmge; Sahin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Adipocytokines are important mediators of interorgan crosstalk in metabolic regulation. Thyroid diseases have effects on metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of these effects is not clear. Recently, there are several reports suggesting this interrelation between adipocytokines and thyroid dysfunction. In this review, we summarize this relation according to the literature. PMID:24049662

  20. [Thyroid and radiation].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S; Namba, H; Nagataki, S

    1993-11-20

    The topic "Thyroid and Radiation" is both an old and a new area to be solved by human beings. The thyroid is an organ that is usually susceptible to exposure to ionizing radiation, both by virtue of its ability to concentrate radioiodine (internal radiation) and by routine medical examination: Chest X-ray, Dental X-ray, X-irradiation of cervical lymphnodes etc. (external radiation). Iodine-131 is widely used for the therapy of Graves' disease and thyroid cancers, of which the disadvantage is radiation-induced hypothyroidism but not complications of thyroid tumor. The thyroid gland is comparatively radioresistant, however, the data obtained from Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Marshall islands indicates a high incidence of external radiation-induced thyroid tumors as well as hypothyroidism. The different biological effects of internal and external radiation remains to be further clarified. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrate the increased number of thyroid cancer in children around Chernobyl in Belarus. In this review, we would like to introduce the effect of radiation on the thyroid gland at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Furthermore the clinical usefulness of iodine-131, including the safety-control for radiation exposure will be discussed.

  1. Thyroid imaging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.; Chen, J.J.S.

    1987-06-01

    This is the second in a series of Continuing Education articles related to functional/quantitative imaging techniques. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) discuss the clinical applications of thyroid imaging; 2) understand the relationship of related thyroid tests; and 3) recognize the pitfalls and problems associated with this procedure.

  2. Eponym : de Quervain thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Engkakul, Pontipa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2011-04-01

    de Quervain thyroiditis is a self-limited inflammatory disorder of the thyroid gland. It is an uncommon disease in adults and very rare in children. Fritz de Quervain, a Swiss surgeon, who was an authority on thyroid disease, described the unique pathology of this disease. Granulomatous changes with giant cells in thyroid tissue are the pathological findings. Viral infection in genetically predisposed individuals has been proposed as the pathogenesis of the disease. Clinical hallmarks for the diagnosis are painful thyroid enlargement, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein as well as decreased uptake of the thyroid gland on thyroid scintigraphy. In addition, thyrotoxicosis is present in about 50% of cases in early phase of the disease. Serum thyroglobulin level is usually elevated. Only symptomatic treatment with analgesics is usually required for pain relief. Glucocorticoid therapy may be used in severely ill patients. de Quervain thyroiditis is generally completely resolved without complications in 6-12 months. However, permanent hypothyroidism and recurrent disease have been reported in some patients.

  3. Thyroid associated orbitopathy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Gupta, Mani; Mehta, Vinod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) is a self-limiting auto-immune condition usually associated with Grave's disease. It is characterised by ocular pain, eyelid swelling, chemosis, proptosis and keratopathy. As the mechanism for ophthamoplegia and optic neuropathy is the orbital swelling leading to mechanical restriction of ocular muscles and compression of optic nerve, one expects proptosis rather than ptosis in TAO. We describe a case of a young adult woman who presented with acute onset restriction of movement along with partial ptosis and severe diminution of vision in left eye. The MRI of orbit revealed significant swelling of recti along with signal alteration consistent with TAO. The radio-isotope thyroid scan revealed thyroiditis, and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody was significantly high; hence, the diagnosis of Hashimoto thyroiditis was considered. A course of intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral steroid was administered, which produced marked improvement in vision and extraocular movement. PMID:23737589

  4. Cardiovascular effects of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Sangster, Jodi K; Panciera, David L; Abbott, Jonathan A

    2013-07-01

    Thyroid hormones have many effects on cardiovascular function, and deficiency or excess of thyroid hormones can result in cardiac dysfunction. Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are often identified during examination of hyperthyroid and hypothyroid patients. This article addresses the effects of thyroid hormones on the cardiovascular system and the clinical relevance of the cardiovascular response to thyroid dysfunction. In addition, treatment recommendations are presented.

  5. Influence of thyroid in nervous system growth.

    PubMed

    Mussa, G C; Mussa, F; Bretto, R; Zambelli, M C; Silvestro, L

    2001-08-01

    are nervous cell specific, genes coding neurotropins or proteins involved in synaptic excitation. The use of new PMRS and MRI non-invasive techniques has enabled identification of metabolic and biochemical markers for alterations in the encephalon of untreated hypothyroid children. Even an excess of thyroid hormones during early nervous system development can cause permanent effects. Hyperthyroidism in fact initially induces accelerated maturation process including cell migration and differentiation, extension of dendritic processes and synaptogenesis but a later excess of thyroid hormones causes reduction of the total number of dendritic spikes, due to early interruption of neuron proliferation. Experimental studies and clinical research have clarified not only the correlation between nervous system maturation and thyroid function during early development stages and the certain finding from this research is that both excess and deficient thyroid hormones can cause permanent anatomo-functional alterations to the nervous system.

  6. [Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Swirta, Jarosław S; Barczyński, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery is rare, but if it occurs it is a life-threatening condition necessitating emergency surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate prevalence and risk factors of haemorrhage after thyroid surgery. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in a group of 8931 consecutive patients with various thyroid diseases treated in 2004-2013 at our institution. Potential risk factors for postoperative haemorrhage after thyroid surgery were analysed using logistic regression model. Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgery occurred in 40 (0.45%) of 8931 patients. None of the patients died within the perioperative period. Bleeding occurred within first 24 hours following surgery in 38 (95%) patients, and in the remaining 2 (5%) patients in more than 24 hours after initial surgery. The following risk factors for bleeding after thyroid operation were identified: male sex (OR 3.618; 1.762-7.430; p < 0.001), older age > or = 70 years (OR 3.052; 1.275-7.304; p = 0.012), surgery for hyperthyroidism (OR 2.873; 1.511-5.462; p = 0.001), smoking (OR 2.855; 1.502-5.428; p = 0.001), subtotal thyroidectomy in contrast to total thyroidectomy or lobectomy (OR 2.853; 1.356-6.004; p=0.006), and thyroid operation undertaken by resident in training in general surgery (OR 2.596; 1.393-4.837; p = 0.003). Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgical intervention occurs most frequently within first 24 hour following surgery. Hence, for safety reasons a minimum of 24-hour hospital stay is recommended in all patients with risk factors for postoperative bleeding after thyroid operation. Quality monitoring of thyroid surgery should include also risk factors for postoperative bleeding.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature.

  8. [Transoral approach to thyroid gland in the experiment].

    PubMed

    Shulutko, A M; Semikov, V I; Gryaznov, S E; Gorbacheva, A V; Patalova, A R; Mansurova, G T; Boblak, Yu A

    To develop minimally invasive and safe endoscopic access to thyroid gland. Transoral pre-mandibular video-assisted gas-free access to thyroid gland was developed in experimental study that included 19 human cadavers. Stereometric modeling defined the evaluation criteria including the form of basal arch of lower jaw and its height. There was no conflict of instruments in working chamber under platysma. Additional trocar was deployed to resolve the conflict between working parts of instruments during thyroid gland mobilization. The angle of operative action between the instruments is close to 90°. Trocar hole is used for drainage. The access provides good visualization of recurrent laryngeal nerve, upper and lower thyroid arteries and parathyroid gland. It is less traumatic compared with other extra-cervical accesses to thyroid glands.

  9. Role of maternal thyroid hormones in the developing neocortex and during human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Stenzel, Denise; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of thyroid hormones during brain development has been appreciated for many decades. In humans, low levels of circulating maternal thyroid hormones, e.g., caused by maternal hypothyroidism or lack of iodine in diet, results in a wide spectrum of severe neurological defects, including neurological cretinism characterized by profound neurologic impairment and mental retardation, underlining the importance of the maternal thyroid hormone contribution. In fact, iodine intake, which is essential for thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland, has been related to the expansion of the brain, associated with the increased cognitive capacities during human evolution. Because thyroid hormones regulate transcriptional activity of target genes via their nuclear thyroid hormone receptors (THRs), even mild and transient changes in maternal thyroid hormone levels can directly affect and alter the gene expression profile, and thus disturb fetal brain development. Here we summarize how thyroid hormones may have influenced human brain evolution through the adaptation to new habitats, concomitant with changes in diet and, therefore, iodine intake. Further, we review the current picture we gained from experimental studies in rodents on the function of maternal thyroid hormones during developmental neurogenesis. We aim to evaluate the effects of maternal thyroid hormone deficiency as well as lack of THRs and transporters on brain development and function, shedding light on the cellular behavior conducted by thyroid hormones. PMID:23882187

  10. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma

  11. Metastatic phenotype is regulated by estrogen in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Rajoria, Shilpi; Suriano, Robert; Shanmugam, Arulkumaran; Wilson, Yushan Lisa; Schantz, Stimson P; Geliebter, Jan; Tiwari, Raj K

    2010-01-01

    Over 200 million people worldwide are affected by thyroid proliferative diseases, including cancer, adenoma, and goiter, annually. The incidences of thyroid malignancies are three to four times higher in women, suggesting the possible involvement of estrogen. Based on this observed sex bias, we hypothesize that estrogen modulates the growth and metastatic propensity of thyroid cancer cells. In this study, two thyroid cell lines (Nthy-ori 3-1 and BCPAP) were evaluated for the presence of estrogen receptor (ER) by Western blot analysis and estrogen responsiveness by using a cell proliferation assay. In addition, the effect of estradiol (E(2)) on modulation of metastatic phenotype was determined by using in vitro adhesion, migration, and invasion assays. Thyroid cells expressed a functionally active ER-alpha and ER-beta as evidenced by 50-150% enhancement of proliferation in the presence of E(2). E(2) also enhanced adhesion, migration, and invasion of thyroid cells in an in vitro experimental model system that, based on our results, is modulated by beta-catenin. Our data provide evidence that the higher incidence of thyroid cancer in women is potentially attributed to the presence of a functional ER that participates in cellular processes contributing to enhanced mitogenic, migratory, and invasive properties of thyroid cells. These findings will enable and foster the possible development of antiestrogenic therapy targeting invasion and migration, thus affecting metastatic propensity.

  12. Thyroid disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Carney, Leo A; Quinlan, Jeff D; West, Janet M

    2014-02-15

    Thyroid disease is the second most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, and when untreated during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, placental abruption, hypertensive disorders, and growth restriction. Current guidelines recommend targeted screening of women at high risk, including those with a history of thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, or other autoimmune disease; current or past use of thyroid therapy; or a family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. Appropriate management results in improved outcomes, demonstrating the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment. In women with hypothyroidism, levothyroxine is titrated to achieve a goal serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level less than 2.5 mIU per L. The preferred treatment for hyperthyroidism is antithyroid medications, with a goal of maintaining a serum free thyroxine level in the upper one-third of the normal range. Postpartum thyroiditis is the most common form of postpartum thyroid dysfunction and may present as hyper- or hypothyroidism. Symptomatic treatment is recommended for the former; levothyroxine is indicated for the latter in women who are symptomatic, breastfeeding, or who wish to become pregnant.

  13. Occupation and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H; Della Valle, Curt T; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-05-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text 'occupation' 'job' 'employment' or 'work' and 'thyroid cancer'. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarised the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender-stratified results are reported. The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and healthcare occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis.

  14. Thyroid Ultrasound: State of the Art Part 1 - Thyroid Ultrasound reporting and Diffuse Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Manjiri; Barr, Richard; Bojunga, Jörg; Cantisani, Vito; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Cosgrove, David; Cui, Xin Wu; Dong, Yi; Fenner, Franziska; Radzina, Maija; Vinayak, Sudhir; Xu, Jun Mei; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2017-01-31

    Accurate differentiation of focal thyroid nodules (FTL) and thyroid abnormalities is pivotal for proper diagnostic and therapeutic work-up. In these two part articles, the role of ultrasound techniques in the characterization of FTL and evaluation of diffuse thyroid diseases is described to expand on the recently published World Federation in Ultrasound and Medicine (WFUMB) thyroid elastography guidelines and review how this guideline fits into a complete thyroid ultrasound exam.

  15. Sertraline and its iodine product: experimental and theoretical vibrational studies: potential in vitro anti-thyroid activity of sertraline and iodine product toxicity with respect to male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Graciela E; Ferraresi Curotto, Verónica; Laino, Carlos H; Pis Diez, Reinaldo; Williams, Patricia A M; Ferrer, Evelina G

    2013-03-01

    Mayor depression, obsessive-compulsive panic, social anxiety disorders are common diseases that are usually treated with sertraline hydrochloride which is the active ingredient of the well known drugs as Zoloft and Lustral. In this work, we presented a more complete vibrational characterization of the solid phase FT-IR spectra of Sertraline hydrochloride and its sertraline-iodine product in which the conformational space of the molecules was investigated performing molecular dynamic simulations within an NVT ensemble. Geometrical, electronic and vibrational properties were calculated with the density functional theory. Comparison of the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra provides important information about the ability of the computational method to describe the vibrational modes of both molecules. In addition, for the first time we present the evaluation of anti-thyroid activity of sertraline hydrochloride by using the Lang's method. Also, with the aim to evaluate the antidepressant effect of its iodine product we demonstrated for this compound the toxic effect towards the male Wistar rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sertraline and its iodine product: Experimental and theoretical vibrational studies. Potential in vitro anti-thyroid activity of sertraline and iodine product toxicity with respect to male Wistar rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Graciela E.; Ferraresi Curotto, Verónica; Laino, Carlos H.; Pis Diez, Reinaldo; Williams, Patricia A. M.; Ferrer, Evelina G.

    2013-03-01

    Mayor depression, obsessive-compulsive panic, social anxiety disorders are common diseases that are usually treated with sertraline hydrochloride which is the active ingredient of the well known drugs as Zoloft and Lustral. In this work, we presented a more complete vibrational characterization of the solid phase FT-IR spectra of Sertraline hydrochloride and its sertraline-iodine product in which the conformational space of the molecules was investigated performing molecular dynamic simulations within an NVT ensemble. Geometrical, electronic and vibrational properties were calculated with the density functional theory. Comparison of the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra provides important information about the ability of the computational method to describe the vibrational modes of both molecules. In addition, for the first time we present the evaluation of anti-thyroid activity of sertraline hydrochloride by using the Lang's method. Also, with the aim to evaluate the antidepressant effect of its iodine product we demonstrated for this compound the toxic effect towards the male Wistar rats.

  17. Dynamical model for thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokni Lamooki, Gholam Reza; Shirazi, Amir H.; Mani, Ali R.

    2015-05-01

    Thyroid's main chemical reactions are employed to develop a mathematical model. The presented model is based on differential equations where their dynamics reflects many aspects of thyroid's behavior. Our main focus here is the well known, but not well understood, phenomenon so called as Wolff-Chaikoff effect. It is shown that the inhibitory effect of intake iodide on the rate of one single enzyme causes a similar effect as Wolff-Chaikoff. Besides this issue, the presented model is capable of revealing other complex phenomena of thyroid hormones homeostasis.

  18. Transoral robotic thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clark, James H.; Kim, Hoon Yub

    2015-01-01

    There is currently significant demand for minimally invasive thyroid surgery; however the majority of proposed surgical approaches necessitate a compromise between minimal tissue dissection with a visible cervical scar or extensive tissue dissection with a remote, hidden scar. The development of transoral endoscopic thyroid surgery however provides an approach which is truly minimally invasive, as it conceals the incision within the oral cavity without significantly increasing the amount of required dissection. The transoral endoscopic approach however presents multiple technical challenges, which could be overcome with the incorporation of a robotic operating system. This manuscript summarizes the literature on the feasibility and current clinical experience with transoral robotic thyroid surgery. PMID:26425456

  19. TSH (Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of a thyroid disorder , including hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism . TSH is produced by the pituitary gland , a ... thyroid Monitor thyroid replacement therapy in people with hypothyroidism Monitor anti-thyroid treatment in people with hyperthyroidism ...

  20. Check Your Neck for Thyroid Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Awareness Month. "The number of cases of thyroid cancer is rising, and while in most cases the ... the American Thyroid Association. "While in most patients thyroid cancer develops without signs or symptoms, patients who have ...

  1. ΤND: a thyroid nodule detection system for analysis of ultrasound images and videos.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Eystratios G; Maroulis, Dimitris; Iakovidis, Dimitris K

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) system prototype, named TND (Thyroid Nodule Detector), for the detection of nodular tissue in ultrasound (US) thyroid images and videos acquired during thyroid US examinations. The proposed system incorporates an original methodology that involves a novel algorithm for automatic definition of the boundaries of the thyroid gland, and a novel approach for the extraction of noise resilient image features effectively representing the textural and the echogenic properties of the thyroid tissue. Through extensive experimental evaluation on real thyroid US data, its accuracy in thyroid nodule detection has been estimated to exceed 95%. These results attest to the feasibility of the clinical application of TND, for the provision of a second more objective opinion to the radiologists by exploiting image evidences.

  2. Aspergillus thyroiditis in a renal transplant recipient mimicking subacute thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Solak, Y; Atalay, H; Nar, A; Ozbek, O; Turkmen, K; Erekul, S; Turk, S

    2011-04-01

    Fungal pathogens are increasingly encountered after renal transplantation. Aspergillus causes significant morbidity and mortality in transplant patients. Fungal thyroiditis is a rare occurrence owing to unique features of the thyroid gland. Most cases are caused by Aspergillus species and have been described in immunocompromised patients. Presentation may be identical with that of subacute thyroiditis, in which hyperthyroidism features and painful thyroid are the prominent findings. Diagnosis can be ascertained by fine-needle aspiration of thyroid showing branching hyphae of Aspergillus. We describe a renal transplant patient who developed Aspergillus thyroiditis as part of a disseminated infection successfully treated with voriconazole.

  3. Thyroid gland disorder emergencies: thyroid storm and myxedema coma.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid dysfunction will develop in more than 12% of the US population during their lifetimes, true thyroid emergencies are rare. Thyroid storm and myxedema coma are endocrine emergencies resulting from thyroid hormone dysregulation, usually coupled with an acute illness as a precipitant. Careful assessment of risk and rapid action, once danger is identified, are essential for limiting morbidity and mortality related to thyroid storm and myxedema coma. This article reviews which patients are at risk, explains thyroid storm and myxedema coma, and describes pharmacological treatment and supportive cares.

  4. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  5. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 96. Smith PW, Salomone LJ, Hanks JB. Thyroid. In: Townsend ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  6. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  7. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... change over just a few months. previous continue Hypothyroidism A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine — in fact, the condition ... all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses. People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed ...

  8. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... some noncancerous childhood conditions Radiation exposure from nuclear plant disasters Radiation given through a vein (through an IV) during medical tests and treatments does not increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer.

  9. Thyroid hormone deiodination in fish.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Aurea; Valverde-R, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We review the experimental evidence accumulated within the past decade regarding the physiologic, biochemical, and molecular characterization of iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) in piscine species. Agnathans, chondrichthyes, and teleosts express the three isotypes of IDs: ID1, ID2, and ID3, which are responsible for the peripheral fine-tuning of thyroid hormone (TH) bioactivity. At the molecular and operational level, fish IDs share properties with their corresponding vertebrate counterparts. However, fish IDs also exhibit discrete features that seem to be distinctive for piscine species. Indeed, teleostean ID1 is conspicuously resistant to propylthiouracil (PTU) inhibition, and its response to thyroidal status differs from that exhibited by other ID1s. Moreover, both the high level of ID2 activity and its expression in the liver of teleosts are unique among vertebrates. The physiologic role of iodothyronine deiodination in functions regulated by TH in fish is not entirely clear. Nevertheless, current experimental evidence suggests that IDs may coordinate and facilitate, in a tissue-specific fashion, the action of iodothyronines and other hormones involved in such processes.

  10. Clinical and laboratory assessment of thyroid abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.M.

    1985-09-01

    Clinical assessment of the patient with suspected thyroid disease remains an important part of the workup. Available laboratory tests of thyroid function include measurements of serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone, titers of autoantibodies involved with Graves' disease and thyroiditis, and thyroid imaging and uptake techniques. The usefulness and limitations of each of these tests are reviewed.

  11. Thyroid and male reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Shekhar, Skand; Dhole, Bodhana

    2014-01-01

    Male reproduction is governed by the classical hypothalamo-hypophyseal testicular axis: Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and the gonadal steroid, principally, testosterone. Thyroid hormones have been shown to exert a modulatory influence on this axis and consequently the sexual and spermatogenic function of man. This review will examine the modulatory influence of thyroid hormones on male reproduction. PMID:24701426

  12. Thyroid hormone transporter defects.

    PubMed

    Grüters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, active transport of thyroid hormones had been repeatedly demonstrated. The membrane transporters for thyroid hormones which have been identified include the organic anion transporting polypeptide, heterodimeric amino acid transporters and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) which are the focus of this chapter. The gene encoding MCT8 which was identified as a specific thyroid hormone transporter is located on chromosome Xq13.2. The expression pattern of MCT8 indicates that MCT8 plays an important role in the development of the central nervous system by transporting thyroid hormone into neurons as its main target cells. Mutational analysis of the MCT8 gene revealed mutations or deletions in the MCT8 gene in unrelated male patients with severe psychomotor retardation and biochemical findings consistent with thyroid hormone resistance. Indeed, thyroid function tests in patients with MCT8 mutations demonstrated marked elevations of serum T3 (in the thyrotoxic range), a significant decrease in serum T4 or fT4 and normal to elevated TSH levels.

  13. [Abnormality of thyroid function].

    PubMed

    Masamune, Taishi; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    The thyroid hormones are synthesized by iodine. Thyroid dysfunction can develop in patients who have received treatment with iodine-containing contrast media or treatment with amiodarone. Thyrotoxicosis is a symptom due to high levels of thyroid hormone. The entity most threatened is the cardiovascular system. beta-adrenergic receptor blockade can control the heart rate. And a decreasing heart rate may improve heart-pumping function. We should aim to avoid surgery on any patients whose thyroid function is abnormal. The avoidance of a thyroid storm is the goal in managing hyperthyroid patients. Suppression of the sympathetic tone and maintenance of a deep level of surgical anesthesia are prudent. Thyroid storm is rare nowadays but still carries a high mortality. Precipitating factors include infection, surgery, childbirth or trauma, et al. Hypothyroid patients are sensitive to the effects of anesthetic agents and many drugs, including opioids. Mild hypothyroidism may have little perioperative significance. However, overt hypothyroidism can develop in a high percentage of patients with history of subclinical hypothyroidism. An untreated patient with hypothyroidism may present as an emergency with myxedema coma. Myxedema coma is rare but carries a high mortality. Precipitating factors include hypothermia, surgery, trauma, sedative drugs, et al.

  14. The association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Dalal M

    2002-04-01

    An association between lymphocytic thyroiditis and thyroid papillary carcinoma is still controversial. To assess the relationship, a histopathologic analysis of surgically resected thyroid tumors together with the frequency and severity of chronic lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid among patients with follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma was performed. The prevalence of lymphocytic infiltrate, which is indicative of autoimmune thyroiditis, was significantly higher in patients with papillary carcinoma (58%) than in patients with follicular carcinoma (20%) or follicular adenoma (14%). The lymphocytic infiltration within the tumor compared with the severity of thyroiditis in the nontumorous tissue. Therefore, the association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and papillary carcinoma was confirmed. The possibility that an immunologic mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of papillary carcinoma stimulates lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid tissue through an autoimmune mechanism is suggested.

  15. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  16. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  17. Mutagenic activity of acrylamide in the rat thyroid cells under conditions of a subacute experiment.

    PubMed

    Altaeva, A A; Sycheva, L P; Belyaeva, N N

    2011-12-01

    Experimental mutagenic effect of acrylamide on thyroid gland cells was studied by an extended micronucleus test. Acrylamide in doses corresponding to 0.004-0.1 LD(50) increased the incidence of thyroid follicular cells (A-cells) with micronuclei and other karyological parameters in exposed rats after hemithyroidectomy. This cytogenetic effect allows regarding acrylamide as a mutagen for the thyroid gland and as a carcinogen for this organ.

  18. Thyroid cancer: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Cheah, W K

    2007-02-01

    Thyroid cancer is the ninth most common cancer in women in Singapore. Despite an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer in the last few decades, survival has improved due to a combination of early cytological diagnosis, low-morbidity total thyroidectomy, and postoperative radioactive iodine therapy. Thyroid cancer is one of the most curable forms of cancer. This article provides an overview of thyroid cancer and future directions in its diagnosis and treatment.

  19. [Characteristics of postpartum thyroid dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Argatska, A; Nonchev, B; Obretsova, M; Pehlivanov, B

    2015-01-01

    The risk factors and mechanisms for the development of postpartum thyroid dysfunction have been widely discussed. However data on patients suffered spontaneous or induced abortion during early pregnancy are scarce. To reveal the characteristics of thyroid dysfunction in women after an abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy. A total of 28 women (18 euthyroid, 10 with thyroid dysfunction), mean age 30.46 ± 1.01 years following abortion in the first trimester have been included in the study. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodthyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyreoglobulin antibodies (TgAb), thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured and ultrasound assessment of the thyroid was performed 3 and 9 months after the interruption of pregnancy. Hypothyroidism was found in 6 of the women with thyroid dysfunction and thyrotoxicosis--in 4. Clinical features of thyroid dysfunction were observed in 3 patients while in the remaining 7 cases, diagnosis was made on the basis of hormonal levels. Positive titers of thyroid autoantibodies were detected in the majority of the cases with functional disordes. In 6 patients thyroid dysfunction was transient and in 4 hormonal abnormalities persisted on by the 9th month after the abortion. The comparative analysis showed that the volume of the thyroid gland and the degree of hypoehogenicity were significantly higher in patients with thyroid dysfunction compared to euthyroid women. Thyroid dysfunction after abortion in the first trimester is mainly of autoimmune pathogenesis and its characteristics do not differ from those of postpartum thyroiditis. In the majority of patients these disorders are subclinical and may remain unrecognized. A close active follow up of patients at increased risk of functional thyroid disorders after an abortion is required in order to prevent morbidity and identify the cases developing permanent thyroid dysfunction.

  20. Thyroid disease in older people.

    PubMed

    Mitrou, Panayota; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George

    2011-09-01

    Several changes in thyroid hormone secretion, metabolism, and action occur with the increase in age. Aging is often associated with a decrease in serum thyroid stimulating hormone and T3 levels, whereas serum free T4 levels usually remain unchanged. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is higher in the elderly as compared to the younger population. In elderly individuals the non-specific clinical manifestations of thyroid hormone excess or deprivation can cause confusion in the clinical setup; while some of the symptoms of thyroid disease are similar to those in younger patients, it is not uncommon for both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism to be manifested in subtle ways in older patients, often mimicking symptoms of aging or masquerading as diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or nervous system. In addition, diagnosis of thyroid disorders is commonly complicated, due to chronic, non-thyroidal illness or medication therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment of overt thyroid disorders is crucial, since these disorders are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly, usually due to common coexistent diseases such as diminished cardiovascular reserve. Treatment of subclinical thyroid disease should also be considered, based on a combination of age, symptoms and risk factors in the individual patients. In addition, both prevalence and aggressiveness of thyroid cancer increase with age. This review summarizes the changes of thyroid function, as well as the clinical manifestations and treatment of thyroid disorders with advancing age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  2. Thyroid storm induced by strangulation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Jesús I; Petrone, Patrizio; Kuncir, Eric J; Asensio, Juan A

    2004-06-01

    Thyroid storm most often occurs in patients with known thyrotoxicosis. This report discusses a severe case of thyroid storm developing as a direct result of strangulation in a patient without a preexisting history of thyroid disease. Classification and treatment of this entity are discussed.

  3. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  5. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  6. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  7. Carbofuran-induced histophysiological changes in thyroid of the teleost fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R.N.

    1988-10-01

    The long-term toxic effects of continuous exposure for 6 months, from January to June, to a safe dose (4.5 ppm) of a commercial carbamate pesticide, carbofuran, on the histophysiology of thyroid in adult and young (yearling) Channa punctatus, are described in this investigation. In both the experimental groups, thyroid histology exhibited various abnormalities, including hypertrophy, hyperplasia and degeneration of follicular epithelial cells, and reduction in colloid content. Apart from this, in young experimentals, fibrosis of thyroid components, formation of cystic cellular masses, and rupture of blood vessels resulting in hemorrhage can also be seen and suggest direct action of this pesticide on the thyroid. On the other hand, in both treated groups, retardation of thyroid function was also evidenced by significantly reduced thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptake and CR (conversion ratio of PB/sup 131/I in blood serum in relation to total serum /sup 131/I uptake) values. Apparently, these histopathological and physiological changes were markedly pronounced in young experimentals, suggesting greater susceptibility of this group to chronic toxicity of carbofuran than that of adults. Thus, on the basis of these results, it can be inferred that carbofuran pesticide, which is washed into water systems in small quantities, induces adverse histophysiological alterations in thyroid, in an age- and size-dependent manner, possibly by acting directly on thyroid and/or through the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis, in this species.

  8. Genetics of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Medici, Marco; Visser, Theo J; Peeters, Robin P

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies show that subtle variations in thyroid function, including subclinical thyroid dysfunction, and even variation in thyroid function within the normal range, are associated with morbidity and mortality. It is estimated that 40-65% of the inter-individual variation in serum TSH and FT4 levels is determined by genetic factors. To identify these factors, various linkage and candidate gene studies have been performed in the past, which have identified only a few genes. In the last decade, genome-wide association studies identified many new genes, while recent whole-genome sequencing efforts have also been proven to be effective. In the current review, we provide a systematic overview of these studies, including strengths and limitations. We discuss new techniques which will further clarify the genetic basis of thyroid function in the near future, as well as the potential use of these genetic markers in personalizing the management of thyroid disease patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Oncogenesis of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Enas

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid neoplasms encompass a variety of lesions that range from benign adenomas to malignancies. These latter can be well-differentiated, poorly differentiated or undifferentiated (anaplastic) carcinomas. More than 95% of thyroid cancers are derived from thyroid follicular cells, while 2-3% (medullary thyroid cancers, MTC) originate from calcitonin producing C-cells. Over the last decade, investigators have developed a clearer understanding of genetic alterations underlying thyroid carcinogenesis. A number of point mutations and translocations are involved, not only in its tumorigenesis, but also as have potential use as diagnostic and prognostic indicators and therapeutic targets. Many occur in genes for several important signaling pathways, in particular the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Sporadic (isolated) lesions account for 75% of MTC cases, while inherited MTC, often in association with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and 2B syndromes, constitute the remainder. However, non-MEN familial MTC may also occur. Advances in genetic testing have revolutionized the management of MTC, with prospects of genetic screening, testing and early prophylactic thyroidectomy. Ethical concerns of these advances are addressed. PMID:28610401

  11. Obesity and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Marjory Alana; Cunha, Lucas Leite; Batista, Fernando Assis; Ward, Laura Sterian

    2014-10-01

    Many studies have provided observational data on the association of obesity and thyroid cancers, but only few of them propose mechanisms that would permit a better understanding of the causal molecular mechanisms of this association. Considering that there is an increasing incidence of both obesity and thyroid cancers, we need to summarize and link recent studies in order to characterize and understand the contribution of obesity-related factors that might affect thyroid cancer development and progression. Adipose tissue is involved in many vital processes, including insulin sensitivity, angiogenesis, regulation of energy balance, activation of the complement system, and responses such as inflammation. Although these processes have their own molecular pathways, they involve the same molecules through which obesity and adipose tissue might exert their roles in carcinogenesis, not only affecting MAPK and PI3K or even insulin pathways, but also recruiting local inflammatory responses that could result in disease formation and progression. This review describes five important issues that might explain the link between excessive weight and thyroid cancer: thyroid hormones, insulin resistance, adipokines, inflammation, and sexual hormones. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Does normal thyroid gland by ultrasonography match with normal serum thyroid hormones and negative thyroid antibodies?

    PubMed

    Trimboli, P; Rossi, F; Condorelli, E; Laurenti, O; Ventura, C; Nigri, G; Romanelli, F; Guarino, M; Valabrega, S

    2010-10-01

    Few papers have shown that a hypoechoic appearance of the thyroid gland at ultrasonography (US) is related to a hypofunction and serum positivity of thyroid antibodies (T-Ab). However, it is not ascertained if normal thyroid appearance at US correspond to normal thyroid laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to assess the value of normal thyroid at US in predicting normal thyroid hormones and negative T-Ab in a cohort of 48 adult patients. All patients (37 females and 11 males) were referred to our hospital to undergo their first thyroid US examination, followed by a thyroid function evaluation. All subjects had normal thyroid gland at US. As a control group 65 patients with hypoechoic and inhomogeneous thyroid gland were enrolled. All 48 patients had normal free-T (3) and free-T (4) levels. While 41 patients (85.4%) showed normal TSH, in 7 subjects (14.6%) TSH was elevated and a significant (p < 0.001) difference was recorded between the two groups in mean TSH value. Positive T-Ab value was found in 5 patients (10.4%) and the remaining 43 patients (89.6%) had negative T-Ab. TSH was not significantly correlated with age, thyroid volume or BMI. The multivariate model showed that only BMI was significantly correlated to thyroid volume (p < 0.01, r(2)=0.31). These results showed that normal thyroid recorded by US matches with normal thyroid laboratory assessment to a large degree. These preliminary data need to be confirmed in a prospective study and in a larger series and should suggest the evaluation of thyrotropin and thyroid antibodies in subjects with normal thyroid gland as assessed by US.

  13. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  14. Molecular mimicry and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2016-06-15

    Hypothesized 40 years ago, molecular mimicry has been thereafter demonstrated as an extremely common mechanism by which microbes elude immune response and modulate biosynthetic/metabolic pathways of the host. In genetically predisposed persons and under particular conditions, molecular mimicry between microbial and human antigens can turn a defensive immune response into autoimmunity. Such triggering role and its pathogenetic importance have been investigated and demonstrated for many autoimmune diseases. However, this is not the case for autoimmune thyroid disease, which appears relatively neglected by this field of research. Here we review the available literature on the possible role of molecular mimicry as a trigger of autoimmune thyroid disease. Additionally, we present the results of in silico search for amino acid sequence homologies between some microbial proteins and thyroid autoantigens, and the potential pathogenetic relevance of such homologies. Relevance stems from the overlap with known autoepitopes and the occurrence of specific HLA-DR binding motifs. Bioinformatics data published by our group support and explain the triggering role of Borrelia, Yersinia, Clostridium botulinum, Rickettsia prowazekii and Helicobacter pylori. Our new data suggest the potential pathogenic importance of Toxoplasma gondii, some Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, Candida albicans, Treponema pallidum and hepatitis C virus in autoimmune thyroid disease, indicating specific molecular targets for future research. Additionally, the consistency between in silico prediction of cross-reactivity and experimental results shows the reliability and usefulness of bioinformatics tools to precisely identify candidate molecules for in vitro and/or in vivo experiments, or at least narrow down their number.

  15. Postpartum thyroid dysfunction in women with autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Argatska, Antoaneta; Nonchev, Boyan; Orbetzova, Maria; Pehlivanov, Blagovest

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) is a predisposing factor for developing postpartum thyroid dysfunction (PPTD). To study the characteristics of PPTD in women with AIT. Thirty-eight women with pre-existing AIT were included in the study. Thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodthyronine, free thyroxine, thyroid peroxidase antibodies, thyroglobulin antibodies were measured and ultrasound evaluation of the thyroid gland was performed in the first trimester of pregnancy and during the first year following delivery. Thyroid dysfunction was recognized in 68.4% of the patients - 28.9% presented with hypothyroidism and 39.5 % with thyrotoxicosis. The immunological and morphological parameters did not differ between euthyroid women and those with thyroid dysfunction. At the end of the postpartum period restoration of euthyroid state (being on the treatment before pregnancy) was observed in 15.4% of patients with PPTD, while 84.6% required increase of the levothyroxine dose. The analysis found a significantly lower volume of the thyroid gland, shorter duration of the disease, a lower dose of levothyroxine before and during gestation in patients with impaired thyroid function at the end of the postpartum period. The risk of PPTD in women with AIT predating pregnancy is higher among women with preserved thyroid functional capacity motivating a thorough assessment of thyroid hormone levels and close follow-up of those women during the postpartum period.

  16. Thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Tam, Abbas Ali; Kaya, Cafer; Kılıç, Fevzi Balkan Mehmet; Ersoy, Reyhan; Çakır, Bekir

    2014-12-01

    The frequency of thyroid nodules accompanying Graves' disease and the risk of thyroid cancer in presence of accompanying nodules are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of thyroid nodules and the risk of thyroid cancer in patients operated because of graves' disease. Five hundred and twenty-six patients in whom thyroidectomy was performed because of Graves' disease between 2006 and 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients who had received radioactive iodine treatment and external irradiation treatment in the neck region and who had had thyroid surgery previously were not included in the study. While accompanying thyroid nodule was present in 177 (33.6%) of 526 Graves' patients, thyroid nodule was absent in 349 (66.4%) patients. Forty-two (8%) patients had thyroid cancer. The rate of thyroid cancer was 5.4% (n = 19) in the Graves' patients who had no nodule, whereas it was 13% (n = 23) in the patients who had nodule. The risk of thyroid cancer increased significantly in presence of nodule (p = 0.003). Three patients had recurrence. No patient had distant metastasis. No patient died during the follow-up period. Especially Graves' patients who have been decided to be followed up should be evaluated carefully during the follow-up in terms of thyroid cancer which may accompany.

  17. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most common form of endocrine cancer and that thyroid hormone is needed for the growth and metabolism of each cell in the body, understanding the molecular and the cellular aspects of thyroid stem cell biology will ultimately provide insights into mechanisms underlying human disease. PMID:18310275

  18. Thyroid Langerhans cell histiocytosis and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Mohammed; Alhakami, Hadi; AlSubayea, Haia; Alfattani, Naif; Guler, Mohammet; Satti, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 27-year-old female, married with two children, presented to our clinic with a 1-year history of thyroid swelling and pressure symptoms on lying backward and bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. The patient was a known case of panhypopituitarism for 5 years. Comprehensive patient evaluation including FNAC with papillary thyroid cancer result then she underwent total thyroidectomy and bilateral neck dissection and final histologic examination confirmed papillary thyroid carcinoma in the background of lymphocytic thyroiditis, associated with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). The draining cervical lymph nodes were also involved by LCH and metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. Although the association of LCH with papillary thyroid carcinoma in the thyroid has been reported, their co-existence with LCH in the draining lymph nodes is very uncommon. PMID:27867869

  19. Immunohistochemical study of oestrogen receptors in 351 human thyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, S M; Monajemzadeh, M; Larijani, B; Haghpanah, V

    2007-08-01

    It is well recognised that the pathogenesis of thyroid diseases is complex and different factors such as genetic factors, iodine deficiency, sex, age, radiation therapy in childhood, growth stimulating antibodies, and other epithelial growth factors can influence them. Epidemiological features of thyroid tumours and experimental evidence suggest that female sex hormones may exert effects on the thyroid gland and its neoplasms. This possibility was addressed by investigating the expression of oestrogen receptor protein in 351 thyroid lesions. The tissues from 351 human thyroid glands comprising 130 nodular goitres and 221 neoplastic lesions were used for the present immunohistochemical assessment of oestrogen receptor expression. Incidence of oestrogen receptor positive cases were 24 percent (31/130) for nodular goitres, 22 percent (8/37) for follicular adenomas, 11 percent (2/18) for follicular carcinomas, 31 percent (37/119) for papillary carcinomas, zero percent (0/35) for medullary carcinomas and zero percent (0/12) for undifferentiated carcinomas. The incidence of oestrogen receptor positivity, which is compatible with other studies, is higher in well-differentiated thyroid lesions. The incidence of oestrogen receptor reactivity does not significantly differ between females and males of different age groups and it does not correlate with lymph node status, and vascular and capsular invasions. The relatively high proportion of oestrogen receptor positivity in goitres, follicular adenomas and papillary carcinomas, compared with its reactivity in other thyroid neoplasms, and contrasted against normal thyroid tissue, suggests that the incidence of oestrogen receptor reactivity tends to increase with better differentiation of thyroid lesions. This finding may have clinical relevance.

  20. [Thyroid gland and fertility].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, P

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that the thyroid hormones are associated with a number of aspects of the human reproduction. Both states, hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, have significant effect on the estrogen and androgen metabolism, the menstrual function and on fertility. The role of thyroid hormones (TH) during infertility has been little exploited. Interesting facts are that TH deficiency is more common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and in certain cases with unexplained infertility. There are very few studies on the effect and paracrine regulation of TH and its receptors in the female reproductive tract. This report provides an overview of the most common thyroid disorders and their impact on ovarian function and reproductive performance in women as well as in cases with infertility and the implementation of assisted reproductive technologies (ART).

  1. Automatic investigation of the thyroid nodules from US images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibicu, Dorin; Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the current study is to develop a standalone Computer Aided Diagnosis (CADi) application in order to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of the thyroid nodules in ultrasound images. The automatic investigation process is based on a new algorithm that allows the digital ultrasound images processing by filtering, binarization and segmentation techniques. The presence of thyroid nodules in processed images is automatically highlighted. The software application allows the possibility to perform geometric measurements on the investigated images. The processed images, the automatic diagnostic and the geometric measurements can be saved in a database attached to the application. In our experimental analysis 90 US images were used: 45 images of healthy thyroid and 45 that present thyroid nodules. The CADi application has a good accuracy of 87.77%.

  2. Sepsis leads to thyroid impairment and dysfunction in rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xingsheng; Shi, Songjing; Shi, Songchang

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis was a systemic response to a local infection. Apoptosis was observed in the experimental sepsis. In this study, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established in rats. We found that sepsis decreased thyroid hormone levels, including triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), free T3 (fT3), and free T4 (fT4). Besides, we detected the increasing expression level of Caspase-3 and increasing ratio of TUNEL positive cells in the thyroid after sepsis. Furthermore, a series of pathological ultrastructural changes were observed in thyroid follicular epithelial cells by CLP-induced sepsis. This study established a sepsis animal model and provided the cellular and molecular basis for decoding the pathological mechanism in thyroid with the occurrence of sepsis.

  3. Biochemical testing of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G; Hay, I D

    1997-12-01

    Various published guidelines recommending serum thyrotropin (TSH)-first thyroid testing are outlined. The entities called "subclinical hypothyroidism" and "subclinical hyperthyroidism" are defined on the basis of abnormal TSH concentrations and normal values of other biochemical thyroid tests. The controversies about follow-up and treatment of these disorders are discussed. The laboratory experience of Mayo Clinic Rochester in using TSH-first thyroid testing and the subsequent implementation of a thyroid test ordering cascade are presented. Finally, recommendations are given for further optimizing laboratory testing for thyroid disorders.

  4. [Non thyroidal illnesses (NTIS)].

    PubMed

    Luca, F; Goichot, B; Brue, T

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities in the circulating levels of thyroid hormones, without evidence of coexisting thyroid or pituitary gland disease can be observed in all general diseases. These nonthyroidal illnesses (NTIS) are the result of complex mechanisms that combine the effect of some drugs, cytokines, nutritional and endocrine factors at all levels of the thyrotropic axis, from the hypothalamus to the cellular transporters and nuclear receptors of thyroid hormones. The patterns of NTIS depend on the underlying disease and its severity. Thirtyfive years after the initial description, the pathophysiological significance of these anomalies remains controversial. One of the dilemma of NTIS is whether the hormone responses represent an adaptive and normal, physiologic response to conserve energy and protect against hypercatabolism in case of aggression, or whether it is a maladaptive response contributing to a worsening of the disease. This debate is not just a theoretical question, because in the first case the process must be respected, in the other case a vigorous treatment to restore circulating thyroid hormone levels is justified. There have been very few clinical studies designed to address whether the substitution with thyroid hormone is advantageous, and there is at current time no permissive evidence for the use of thyroid hormone replacement in patients with NTIS. But the clinical context, the choice of the molecule or of the dose and the way of administration were not necessarily the most relevant. Theoretically, stimulation of thyreotrope axis used a continuous infusion of TRH seems to provide clinical benefit. With the expectation that randomized clinical trials will provide demonstration of NTIS treatment efficiency, the question might remain unanswered for several more years. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Post-partum thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Neves, Celestino; Alves, Marta; Delgado, Luís; Medina, J Luís

    2009-01-01

    In the post-partum period the immune alterations are associated with the multiple autoimmune diseases relapse. After birth, immune-tolerance variation slowly disappear, and is observed a return to a normal state - after an exacerbation period - of autoimmune reactivity, during which a great increase in T cells and autoantibodies is observed. In this period - 3 to 9 months after birth - the thyroid autoimmune disease relapses or reappears. The reactivation of the immune system in the post-partum period unchains an acute phase of celular destruction which characterizes the post-partum thyroiditis.

  6. Robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alabbas, Haytham; Bu Ali, Daniah

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the gold standard treatment for patients with thyroid cancer or nodules suspicious for cancer. Open conventional approach is the standard surgical approach. However, a visible neck incision could be a concern for most young female patients, especially for patients with a history of healing with keloid or hypertrophic scars. Robotic remote access approaches have evolved into a safe and feasible approach in selected patients, providing a hidden scar with good patient satisfaction. This review will focus on the performance and safety of robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery. PMID:28149806

  7. Robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Alabbas, Haytham; Bu Ali, Daniah; Kandil, Emad

    2016-12-01

    Surgery is the gold standard treatment for patients with thyroid cancer or nodules suspicious for cancer. Open conventional approach is the standard surgical approach. However, a visible neck incision could be a concern for most young female patients, especially for patients with a history of healing with keloid or hypertrophic scars. Robotic remote access approaches have evolved into a safe and feasible approach in selected patients, providing a hidden scar with good patient satisfaction. This review will focus on the performance and safety of robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery.

  8. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:28373861

  9. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction.

  10. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition.

  11. Lingual thyroid: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Quarracino, María; Aguas, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Lingual thyroid is an abnormal formation appearing as the result of a deficient descent during embryological development of the thyroid gland through the thyroglossal duct to its normal pretracheal location. The lesion consists of a tumor mass of thyroid tissue located at the base of the tongue, in the region of the foramen caecum linguae. The size can vary from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. More than 400 cases of lingual thyroid have been documented in the literature to date. Lingual thyroid has been identified in 10% of the tongues examined in some autopsy series. Its identification is of great significance, since it may constitute the only functional thyroid tissue in the body, and may inadvertently be destroyed as a result of histological biopsy procedures. The present study presents a clinical case of lingual thyroid in a 17-year-old female.

  12. Painless thyroiditis complicated by acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Tajima, Naoko

    2010-01-01

    The serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level is decreased in acromegalic patients. Although this phenomenon is thought to be caused by the enhanced secretion of somatostatin which suppresses TSH production, it has not yet been proven. We describe a 60-year-old woman with acromegaly who showed a low concentration of TSH. We diagnosed her as painless thyroiditis based on an increased level of thyroglobulin, depressed radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), normal vascularity and mild swelling of the thyroid, and normal T3, T4, free T3 and free T4 levels. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of acromegaly complicated by painless thyroiditis. The differential diagnosis between central hypothyroidism and painless thyroiditis is so important. Since it is difficult to diagnose precisely based on only the data of a low level of TSH and normal levels of thyroid hormones, we consider that measurement of thyroglobulin and RAIU is necessary when the complication of painless thyroiditis is suspected.

  13. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes.

  14. Methodology of the thyroid gland disease decision-making using profiling in steroid hormone pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sun; Yoon, Chang No

    2007-02-19

    To find out the genetic factors of outbreak of thyroid gland disease, we developed the thyroid gland decision-making system, which processes the metabolic profile in steroid hormone map using a statistical method. Metabolic profile is a measured data of lots of mixed materials that includes not only known metabolites, but also unknown ones, which is estimated to have an influence on the thyroid gland disease. Therefore, to develop thyroid gland disease decision-making system, analyzing metabolic profile containing multi-materials would be useful for diagnosing thyroid gland disease. Because experimental values used for system construction are area values for the retention time, the observations are preprocessed through variable transition and t-test to use the area values concurrently and the highly correlated materials are estimated by principal component analysis. The thyroid gland decision-making system developed through the logistic regression is an excellent system demonstrating 98.7% accuracy in the classification table.

  15. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (DE-71)Interferes with Thyroid Hormone Action Independent Of Effects On Circulating Levels of Thyroid Hormone in Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are routinely found in human tissues including cord blood and breast milk. PBDEs may interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) during development, which could produce neurobehavioral deficits. An assumption in experimental and epidemiological stud...

  16. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (DE-71)Interferes with Thyroid Hormone Action Independent Of Effects On Circulating Levels of Thyroid Hormone in Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are routinely found in human tissues including cord blood and breast milk. PBDEs may interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) during development, which could produce neurobehavioral deficits. An assumption in experimental and epidemiological stud...

  17. Thyroid-associated Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Şahlı, Esra; Gündüz, Kaan

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy is the most frequent extrathyroidal involvement of Graves’ disease but it sometimes occurs in euthyroid or hypothyroid patients. Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy is an autoimmune disorder, but its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Autoimmunity against putative antigens shared by the thyroid and the orbit plays a role in the pathogenesis of disease. There is an increased volume of extraocular muscles, orbital connective and adipose tissues. Clinical findings of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy are soft tissue involvement, eyelid retraction, proptosis, compressive optic neuropathy, and restrictive myopathy. To assess the activity of the ophthalmopathy and response to treatment, clinical activity score, which includes manifestations reflecting inflammatory changes, can be used. Supportive approaches can control symptoms and signs in mild cases. In severe active disease, systemic steroid and/or orbital radiotherapy are the main treatments. In inactive disease with proptosis, orbital decompression can be preferred. Miscellaneous treatments such as immunosuppressive drugs, somatostatin analogs, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulins and anticytokine therapies have been used in patients who are resistant to conventional treatments. Rehabilitative surgeries are often needed after treatment. PMID:28405484

  18. Remote access thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  19. [Postpartum thyroiditis. A review].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Hernández, Z; Segura-Domínguez, A

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a transient thyroid dysfunction of autoimmune origin that can occur in the first year postpartum in women who have not been previously diagnosed with thyroid disease. It may start with clinical thyrotoxicosis followed by hypothyroidism and the subsequent recovery of thyroid function, or may just appear as isolated thyrotoxicosis or hypothyroidism. PPT recurs in high percentage of patients after subsequent pregnancies. Many women develop permanent hypothyroidism sometime during the 3 to 10 year period after an episode of PPT. It is important for family physicians to be familiar with this disease, due to its high prevalence in order to make a correct diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Family doctors also play a crucial role in the monitoring of these patients, given the negative implications of established hypothyroidism on reproduction in the female population during their reproductive years. This article reviews the principle characteristics of PPT along with its diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunogenetics of Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2005-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is an organ-specific T-cell mediated disease. It is a complex disease, with a strong genetic component. To date, significant progress has been made towards the identification and functional characterization of HT susceptibility genes. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the genetic input to the pathogenesis of HT. PMID:15762980

  1. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  2. The thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Hellman, D E

    1980-01-01

    Disorders of the thyroid gland are frequently unrecognized and untreated by the attending physician and present the anesthesiologist with a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Very large goiters distort and compress the larynx and require an experienced anesthesiologist for safe intubation. If surgery is elective and can be postponed in patients suspected of being hypo- or hyperthyroid, there is sufficient time to permit the anesthesiologist and the attending physician to obtain appropriate tests of thyroid function and institute appropriate therapeutic measures to restore the metabolic rate to normal. When there is insufficient time to confirm a clinical diagnosis of thyroid disease, the anesthesiologist is faced with important therapeutic decisions. It is the author's opinion that therapeutic intervention is, in most instances, preferable to therapeutic nihilism. In the case of a patient suspected of hypothyroidism, it is usually safe to administer a physiologic replacement dose of thyroxine to support the patient intraoperatively or postoperatively. If hypothyroidism is associated with cardiovascular disease, other debilitating illness, or advanced age, thyroxine must be given with extreme caution in order to avoid dangerous tachyarrhythmias or too rapid acceleration of the metabolic rate. The hyperthyroid patient facing nonelective surgery represents a very serious challenge to the anesthesiologist, since marked accentuation of clinical hyperthyroidism (thyroid storm) is a major risk of such surgery. In such a situation, intravenous propranolol and intravenous iodine are the optimal drugs for a safe and uncomplicated clinical course during and following surgery. In both instances, the anesthesiologist must use skillful clinical judgment in making the appropriate diagnosis and selecting appropriate therapy. Careful and continuous supervision of the patient is necessary during and following surgery and appropriate treatment and support of the patient should be

  3. Sex steroids and the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Tahboub, Rundsarah; Arafah, Baha M

    2009-12-01

    Thyroid function is modulated by genetic and environmental causes as well as other illnesses and medications such as gonadal or sex steroids. The latter class of drugs (sex steroids) modulates thyroid function. Gonadal steroids exert their influence on thyroid function primarily by altering the clearance of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG). While oestrogen administration causes an increase in serum TBG concentration, androgen therapy results in a decrease in this binding protein. These effects of gonadal steroids on TBG clearance and concentration are modulated by the chemical structure of the steroid being used, its dose and the route of administration. Despite the gonadal steroids-induced changes in serum TBG concentrations, subjects with normal thyroid glands maintain clinical and biochemical euthyroidism without changes in their serum free thyroxine (T4) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. In contrast, the administration of gonadal steroids to patients with thyroid diseases causes significant biochemical and clinical alterations requiring changes in the doses of thyroid medications. Similarly, gonadal steroid therapy might unmask thyroid illness in previously undiagnosed subjects. It would be prudent to assess thyroid function in subjects with thyroid disease 6-8 weeks after gonadal steroid administration or withdrawal.

  4. Thyroid hormone and the heart.

    PubMed

    Moolman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone has important cardiovascular effects, and abnormalities of its production cause cardiovascular morbidity. The role of both excessive and insufficient thyroid hormone production in the pathogenesis of clinical cardiac diseases can be deduced from thyroid hormone-induced molecular changes. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of myocardial genes regulating the handling of calcium, which affects both systolic and diastolic myocardial function. Thyroid hormone also has indirect and direct effects on peripheral vascular smooth muscle tone, and alters the coupling of the left ventricle and arterial system. Excessive production of thyroid hormone results in an increased cardiac output as well as increased cardiac work efficiency, but reduced cardiac reserve. Amiodarone therapy for cardiac rhythm can cause both hyper- and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) can be due to either excessive thyroid hormone production (type I AIT) or thyroid hormone release due to an inflammatory condition (type II AIT). Classification of AIT is helpful in guiding therapy. Amiodarone causes changes in the thyroid function tests of euthyroid patients on therapy--it inhibits the conversion of T(4) and T(3), which results in decreased T(3) and slightly increased T(4) serum levels in euthyroid patients. Baseline thyroid functions should therefore be determined before starting amiodarone therapy, and at 6-monthly intervals thereafter.

  5. Iodine deficiency and thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-04-01

    Iodine deficiency early in life impairs cognition and growth, but iodine status is also a key determinant of thyroid disorders in adults. Severe iodine deficiency causes goitre and hypothyroidism because, despite an increase in thyroid activity to maximise iodine uptake and recycling in this setting, iodine concentrations are still too low to enable production of thyroid hormone. In mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency, increased thyroid activity can compensate for low iodine intake and maintain euthyroidism in most individuals, but at a price: chronic thyroid stimulation results in an increase in the prevalence of toxic nodular goitre and hyperthyroidism in populations. This high prevalence of nodular autonomy usually results in a further increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism if iodine intake is subsequently increased by salt iodisation. However, this increase is transient because iodine sufficiency normalises thyroid activity which, in the long term, reduces nodular autonomy. Increased iodine intake in an iodine-deficient population is associated with a small increase in the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity; whether these increases are also transient is unclear. Variations in population iodine intake do not affect risk for Graves' disease or thyroid cancer, but correction of iodine deficiency might shift thyroid cancer subtypes toward less malignant forms. Thus, optimisation of population iodine intake is an important component of preventive health care to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Etiopathogenesis of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Makazlieva, Tanja; Vaskova, Olivija; Majstorov, Venjamin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thyroid malignomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm consisting of most frequent differentiated encountered carcinomas, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma, then medullary thyroid carcinoma originating from neuroendocrine calcitonin-producing C-cells and rare forms of thyroid lymphomas arising from intrathyroidal lymphatic tissue, thyroid sarcomas and poorly differentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. There are increasing numbers of epidemiological studies and publications that have suggested increased incidence rate of thyroid carcinomas. We have read, analysed and compare available reviews and original articles investigating different etiological factors in the development of thyroid carcinomas through Google Scholar and PubMed Database. DISCUSSION: Aetiology involved in the development of thyroid carcinomas is multifactorial and includes external influences, as well as constitutional predispositions and genetic etiological factors. The actual effect of environmental and constitutional factors is on promoting genetic and epigenetic alterations which result in cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Until now are identified numerous genetic alterations, assumed to have an important role in oncogenesis, with MAPK and PI3K-AKT as crucial signalling networks regulating growth, proliferation, differentiation and cell survival/apoptosis. CONCLUSION: This new molecular insight could have a crucial impact on diagnosis and also on improving and selecting an appropriate treatment to the patients with thyroid malignancies. PMID:27703585

  7. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical neck dissection for benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Most of the current literature consists of case series of robotic thyroidectomies. Recent retrospective and prospective analyses have evaluated the safety and oncologic efficacy of robotic surgery for thyroid cancer. Although robotic thyroid surgery is often associated with longer operation times than conventional open surgery, robotic techniques have shown similar or superior levels of surgical completeness and safety compared with conventional open or endoscopic surgery. Compared to open thyroidectomy, robotic thyroidectomy has been associated with several quality-of-life benefits, including excellent cosmetic results, reduced neck pain and sensory changes, and decreased voice and swallowing discomfort after surgery. For surgeons, robotic surgery has improved ergonomics and has a shorter learning curve than open or endoscopic surgery. The advantages of robotic thyroid surgery over conventional surgery suggest that robotic thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection may become the preferred surgical option for thyroid diseases. Robotic thyroid surgery will likely continue to develop as more endocrine and head-and-neck surgeons are trained and more patients seek this newly developed surgical option. PMID:24783046

  8. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  9. Thyroid diseases and female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mintziori, G; Anagnostis, P; Toulis, K A; Goulis, D G

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid diseases are very common in women of reproductive age. The aim of this study was to review the current evidence on physiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of women with thyroid disorders that are currently seeking fertility, undergoing assisted reproduction technologies (ART) or being pregnant. Normal thyroid function is essential for normal function of the gonadal axis, thus important in maintaining normal reproductive capacity. On the contrary, any type of thyroid dysfunction may reduce the likelihood of pregnancy; the latter can be restored to normal after appropriate treatment. Over eight million children have been born as a result of assisted reproduction techniques (ART) since 1978. As these procedures are becoming more common in clinical practice, the exact impact of thyroid status on reproductive outcomes as well as that of drugs used in ART on thyroid function has to be fully elucidated. Maternal thyroid function is crucial, especially during the first weeks of gestation, for offspring's wellness and brain development. On the other hand, normal physiological mechanisms during gestation can have a major impact on maternal thyroid function. As human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-like effect, high hCG concentrations are associated with thyroid stimulation, both functionally (lower serum TSH concentrations) and anatomically (increased thyroid volume). Although the association between maternal hypothyroidism and increased perinatal morbidity has been described for over a century, more recently, even the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as recurrent abortions and placental abruption. This is of major clinical significance, as anti-thyroid antibodies are surprisingly prevalent in pregnancy, especially during the first two trimesters.

  10. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  11. What Does the Thyroid Gland Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... where it helps other cells do their job. hypothyroidism (hi-poh-THY-royd-izm): when your thyroid ... t make enough thyroid hormone, which is called hypothyroidism. When you don’t have enough thyroid hormone, ...

  12. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  13. 2009 American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Perros, P

    2010-08-01

    The American Thyroid Association guidelines on thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer, published in 2009, provide valuable recommendations based on current evidence. Inevitably, controversies and uncertainties will continue to challenge clinicians and patients. On topics where evidence is not clear-cut, judgement may be coloured by pre-existing practises and the structure of the health service in each country, so one has to be aware of the pitfalls of transferring recommendations to one's own practise.

  14. Interlinking of hypoxia and estrogen in thyroid cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rajoria, S; Hanly, E; Nicolini, A; George, A L; Geliebter, J; Shin, E J; Suriano, R; Carpi, A; Tiwari, R K

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen aids in neo-vascularization of various tumors during hypoxic conditions, however the role of estrogen within the hypoxic environment of thyroid cancer is not known. In a series of experimentations, using human thyroid cancer cells, we observed that estrogen and hypoxia modulate the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling which is abrogated by the anti-estrogen fulvestrant and the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 (3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole). Furthermore, we found that the conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells lead to enhanced migration and tubulogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) which is abrogated by HIF-1 inhibitor. These findings, in addition to our previous and other scientific literature data, lead us to conclude that estrogen and hypoxia are interlinked in thyroid cancer and can equally modulate epithelial-endothelial cell interactions by mediating key cellular, metabolic and molecular processes of thyroid cancer progression. We believe that the hormonal component and cellular adaptation to oxygen tension of cancer cells are functionally equivalent with a cellular transition that can be exploited clinically for a combinational approach for thyroid cancer treatment involving antiestrogens as well as anti-hypoxic agents.

  15. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  16. [Medullary thyroid carcinoma and other rare types of thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Obara, Takao

    2007-11-01

    Among 4 major traditional groups of thyroid carcinoma, papillary and follicular carcinomas are most common, and other forms, anaplastic and medullary carcinomas, are relatively rare. The 2003 WHO histological classification of thyroid tumor separated 7 other malignant thyroid tumors into distinct pathological entities, such as poorly differentiated, squamous cell, mucinous carcinomas, carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE), etc. Although they are also extremely rare, recognition of their clinicopathologic features are very important. In this review, not only diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for the rare forms of thyroid carcinomas, specifically focussed on medullary carcinoma and CASTLE, but also their histogenetic abnormalities were discussed.

  17. Thyroid hormone antibodies and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in mongrel dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Rajatanavin, R.; Fang, S.L.; Pino, S.; Laurberg, P.; Braverman, L.E.; Smith, M.; Bullock, L.P.

    1989-05-01

    Abnormally elevated serum T3 concentrations measured by RIA were observed in 19 clinically euthyroid or hypothyroid mongrel dogs. The serum T4 concentrations in these sera were low, normal, or high. Measurement of the intensity of thyroid hormone binding to serum proteins was determined by equilibrium dialysis. A marked decrease in the percent free T3 was observed in these abnormal sera. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, pH 7.4, of normal dog serum enriched with tracer /sup 125/I-labeled thyroid hormones demonstrated binding of (/sup 125/I)T4 to transthyretin, thyroid hormone-binding globulin, and albumin and of (/sup 125/I)T3 primarily to thyroid hormone-binding globulin. In all abnormal sera, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated strikingly higher binding of T3 to immunoglobulin (Ig). Eleven of 16 abnormal sera had minimal to moderate binding of T4 to Ig. The percent free T4 was lower only in dogs whose sera demonstrated markedly increased binding of T4 to Ig. All abnormal sera tested had positive antithyroglobulin antibodies, consistent with the diagnosis of autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis. As in humans, antibodies to thyroid hormones in dogs are more common in the presence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and should be considered when elevated serum thyroid hormone concentrations are observed in the absence of clinical thyrotoxicosis. When an antibody to only one thyroid hormone is present, a marked discrepancy in the serum concentrations of T3 and T4 will be observed.

  18. Thyroid storm induced by blunt thyroid gland trauma.

    PubMed

    Delikoukos, Stylianos; Mantzos, Fotios

    2007-12-01

    Isolated thyroid gland injury due to blunt neck trauma is uncommon and rarely complicated by thyroid storm in patients without known hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to report our experience on blunt thyroid gland injury followed by massive gland hemorrhage, acute airway obstruction, and symptoms of thyroid storm. Among 231 patients with neck trauma, four patients appeared with isolated thyroid gland injury. In two of them, the diagnosis of simultaneous thyrotoxic crisis was made on the basis of clinical findings and confirmed on emergency laboratory tests. The diagnosis of thyroid gland injury was supposed by the history and physical examination and established after neck exploration. Therapy was directed at stabilizing the patients by correcting the hyperthyroid state, followed by operative treatment. Left lobectomy and total thyroidectomy were performed and, along with postoperative medical measures, led to uneventful recovery. This study demonstrates that thyroid gland injury due to blunt neck trauma, although uncommon, may result in potentially life-threatening thyroid storm due to rupture of acini and liberation of thyroid hormones into the bloodstream. This may occur in patients without known hyperthyroidism.

  19. Changes in plasma catecholamines levels as preclinical biomarkers in experimental models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, A R; Ugryumov, M V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the changes in the concentrations of blood plasma catecholamines as possible biomarkers of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the mouse experimental model of PD induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). A significant decrease was detected in the levels of dopamine and L-DOPA in the PD preclinical stage model as a result of the catecholamines systemic metabolism disfunction. In the PD early clinical stage models, the level of L-DOPA and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid decreased, which is consistent with the results of blood tests in untreated patients.

  20. [Diagnostic imaging of thyroid tumor].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Megumi

    2012-11-01

    Recently, thyroid nodules are found frequently when other imaging test was performed, and selection of diagnostic methods and its handling have become a problem clinically. Although it is possible to differentiate the malignant tumor from benign one using B-mode ultrasound, it can be obtained more detailed information in combination of other modalities such as color Doppler and tissue elasticity imaging (elastography). The malignant B-mode findings are irregular shape, indistinct border, hypoechoic and inhomogeneous internal echo, and fine calcification. CT/MRI is useful to evaluate the extention of thyroid cancer to adjacent organs beyond the thyroid capsule. It is also useful to evaluate distant metastases to lung or brain of thyroid cancer. In nuclear medicine, 125I scintigraphy is used to measure thyroid uptake rate, 131I scintigraphy is used to investigate the distant metastasis of thyroid cancer. It is necessary to be careful that some false-positive cases exist in 18FDG-PET.

  1. Perioperative Management of Thyroid Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Palace, Marcia Rashelle

    2017-01-01

    Due to the manifold effects of thyroid hormone across virtually all organ systems, the complications associated with thyroid dysfunction are numerous and diverse. The stresses encountered during the perioperative period may exacerbate underlying thyroid disorders, potentially precipitating decompensation and even death. Thus, it is of the utmost importance for the clinician to comprehend the mechanisms by which thyroid disease may complicate surgery and postoperative recovery and to be cognizant of the most effective means of optimizing the status of thyrotoxic and hypothyroid patients perioperatively. This article describes the adverse effects of thyroid dysfunction as they relate to the patient undergoing both thyroid and nonthyroid surgery and recommends treatment approaches aimed at decreasing perioperative risk. PMID:28469454

  2. Thyroid Tests: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free T4 (Thyroxine) Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) T3 (Triiodothyronine) Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Thyroid Antibodies (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Thyroid ...

  3. Thyroid Hormones and Methylmercury Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    O’Mara, Daniel M.; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for cellular metabolism, growth, and development. In particular, an adequate supply of thyroid hormones is critical for fetal neurodevelopment. Thyroid hormone tissue activation and inactivation in brain, liver, and other tissues is controlled by the deiodinases through the removal of iodine atoms. Selenium, an essential element critical for deiodinase activity, is sensitive to mercury and, therefore, when its availability is reduced, brain development might be altered. This review addresses the possibility that high exposures to the organometal, methylmercury (MeHg), may perturb neurodevelopmental processes by selectively affecting thyroid hormone homeostasis and function. PMID:18716716

  4. Female infertility and the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Kris; Velkeniers, Brigitte

    2004-06-01

    Difficulty to conceive or subfertility constitutes a major psychological burden. Assisted reproductive technology changed significantly the outcome of couples faced with subfertility. These techniques consequently increased tremendously our understanding of the mechanisms underlying reproductive failure and opened new perspectives for future interventions, not only to increase cumulative conception rates after ART, but also spontaneous pregnancy rates. Thyroid dysfunction adversely affects fertility. Many studies imply a role for immunology, including thyroid autoimmunity in conception failure. In this review we attempt to update the available information on the adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction and/or thyroid autoimmunity on subfertility and we propose a rationale for testing and potential treatment options.

  5. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  6. Incidental thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer: considerations before determining management.

    PubMed

    Tufano, Ralph P; Noureldine, Salem I; Angelos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The worldwide incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing substantially, almost exclusively attributable to small papillary thyroid cancers. Increased use of diagnostic imaging is considered the most likely explanation for this reported rise, but other factors may also be contributing. The increase in health care expenditures related to managing these presumably low-risk cancers, without a clear patient benefit, has resulted in a backlash against the early detection of thyroid cancer. Currently, there is no way to confidently predict which incidentally detected thyroid nodule may be the precursor to a more aggressive process. Predictions such as these would require more accurate characterization of the biology of individual thyroid cancers than is currently possible. With time, we might prove our ability to confidently differentiate low-risk from high-risk thyroid cancers, but until that happens, routine screening for thyroid cancer by imaging billed as a "health checkup" should not be performed. However, incidentally detected thyroid nodules should be reported, and a clear medical team management plan should be developed. Our ethical responsibility is to provide patients with objective, evidence-based information about their disease status, not to assume that we know what is best for them by selectively withholding information. In addition, providing patients with psychosocial assistance will help them process the information necessary to make informed decisions that will provide them with the most value when a small thyroid nodule or cancer is incidentally identified. Herein, we summarize the epidemiological data for disease incidence, discuss some controversies in disease management, and outline the key elements and ethical considerations of informed decision making as they apply to managing incidentally detected thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation for postsurgical thyroid removal of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Lipin; Long, Bin; Ye, Xuemei; Ge, Minghua; Wang, Kejing; Guo, Liang; Li, Linfa

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. Surgical removal with radioactive iodine therapy is recommended for recurrent thyroid carcinoma, and the postsurgical thyroid removal is critical. This study evaluated the clinical values of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the postsurgical thyroid removal for DTC. 35 DTC patients who had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy received RFA for postsurgical thyroid removal. Before and two weeks after RFA, the thyroid was examined by ultrasonography and (99m)TcO4 (-) thyroid imaging, and the serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxin (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroglobulin (Tg) were detected. The efficacy and complications of RFA were evaluated. Results showed that, the postsurgical thyroid removal by RFA was successfully performed in 35 patients, with no significant complication. After RFA, the average largest diameter and volume were significantly decreased in 35 patients (P > 0.05), and no obvious contrast media was observed in ablation area in the majority of patients. After RFA, the serum FT3, FT4 and Tg levels were markedly decreased (P < 0.05), and TSH level was significantly increased (P < 0.05). After RFA, radioiodine concentration in the ablation area was significantly reduced in the majority of patients. The reduction rate of thyroid update was 0.69±0.20%. DTC staging and interval between surgery and RFA had negative correlation (Pearson coefficient = -0.543; P = 0.001), with no obvious correlation among others influential factors. RFA is an effective and safe method for postsurgical thyroid removal of DTC.

  8. Sonographic appearance of thyroid cancer in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Sara M; Benson, Carol B; Arthaud, Dylan M; Alexander, Erik K; Frates, Mary C

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether the sonographic appearance of thyroid cancer differs in patients with and without Hashimoto thyroiditis. Patients with histologically proven thyroid cancer who had thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies measured and sonography performed preoperatively were included. We evaluated each nodule for size, echogenicity, composition, margins, halo, and vascularity and evaluated the background heterogeneity of the gland. There were 162 thyroid cancers in 145 patients. Forty-two patients (29.0%) had Hashimoto thyroiditis with positive TPO antibodies, and 103 patients (71.0%) had negative TPO antibodies. The background echogenicity was more often heterogeneous in TPO antibody-positive patients compared to those who had negative TPO antibodies (57.1% versus 26.2%; P= .0005). Comparing cancers in TPO antibody-positive to TPO antibody-negative patients, there was no significant difference in the size, echogenicity, composition, margins, halo presence, calcification presence and type, or vascularity of the cancerous nodule (P > .05). Among TPO antibody-positive patients, comparing thyroid cancerous nodules in patients with heterogeneous glands to those with homogeneous glands, there was no significant difference in any sonographic characteristic except the margin of the nodule, which was more often irregular or poorly defined in heterogeneous glands and more often smooth in homogeneous glands (P< .05). Sonographic features of thyroid cancer are similar in patients with and without Hashimoto thyroiditis. Among patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and thyroid cancer, the sonographic appearance of the cancerous nodule is similar, except that cancerous nodule margins are more likely to be irregular or poorly defined when the gland is heterogeneous. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Radiofrequency ablation for postsurgical thyroid removal of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Lipin; Long, Bin; Ye, Xuemei; Ge, Minghua; Wang, Kejing; Guo, Liang; Li, Linfa

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. Surgical removal with radioactive iodine therapy is recommended for recurrent thyroid carcinoma, and the postsurgical thyroid removal is critical. This study evaluated the clinical values of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the postsurgical thyroid removal for DTC. 35 DTC patients who had been treated by subtotal thyroidectomy received RFA for postsurgical thyroid removal. Before and two weeks after RFA, the thyroid was examined by ultrasonography and 99mTcO4 - thyroid imaging, and the serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxin (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroglobulin (Tg) were detected. The efficacy and complications of RFA were evaluated. Results showed that, the postsurgical thyroid removal by RFA was successfully performed in 35 patients, with no significant complication. After RFA, the average largest diameter and volume were significantly decreased in 35 patients (P > 0.05), and no obvious contrast media was observed in ablation area in the majority of patients. After RFA, the serum FT3, FT4 and Tg levels were markedly decreased (P < 0.05), and TSH level was significantly increased (P < 0.05). After RFA, radioiodine concentration in the ablation area was significantly reduced in the majority of patients. The reduction rate of thyroid update was 0.69±0.20%. DTC staging and interval between surgery and RFA had negative correlation (Pearson coefficient = -0.543; P = 0.001), with no obvious correlation among others influential factors. RFA is an effective and safe method for postsurgical thyroid removal of DTC. PMID:27186311

  10. Robotic facelift thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bomeli, Steven R.; Duke, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for thyroid surgery have advanced dramatically over the past two decades, driven by a better understanding of thyroid physiology, anatomy, and perioperative management strategies. Improvements in surgical technology have permitted surgeons to perform minimally invasive surgery associated with less dissection, decreased pain, smaller anterior cervical incisions, and most importantly a faster recovery. The advent of robotic surgical technology has allowed the development of remote access thyroidectomy for select patients who wish to avoid a visible cervical incision completely. The robotic facelift thyroidectomy (RFT) approach also offers the advantage of outpatient surgery without the need for postoperative drainage. A growing body of evidence supports the safety and efficacy of the approach, and as a result the technique is now being performed at several centers around the world. PMID:26425453

  11. Medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leboulleux, Sophie; Baudin, Eric; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Schlumberger, Martin

    2004-09-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) arises from parafollicular or C cells that produce calcitonin (CT), and accounts for 5-10% of all thyroid cancers. MTC is hereditary in about 25% of cases. The discovery of a MTC in a patient has several implications: disease extent should be evaluated, phaeochromocytoma and hyperparathyroidism should be screened for and whether the MTC is sporadic or hereditary should be determined by a direct analysis of the RET proto-oncogene. In this review, pathological characteristics, tumour markers and genetic abnormalities in MTC are discussed. The diagnostic and therapeutic modalities applied to patients with clinical MTC and those identified with preclinical disease through familial screening are also described. Progresses concerning genetics, initial treatment, follow-up, screening and treatment of pheochromocytoma have permitted an improvement in the long-term outcome. However, there is no effective treatment for distant metastases, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed.

  12. [Thyroid gland and sleep].

    PubMed

    Steiger, A

    1999-01-01

    A set of data suggests that the thyroid gland plays a role in the bi-directional interaction between the electrophysiological and the endocrine components of sleep, e.g. the nonREM-REM-cycle and the patterns of nocturnal hormone secretion, respectively. In detail thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxin (T4) show circadian rhythms. A specific relationship was observed between TSH and REM sleep. Blunted TSH levels were found in healthy elderly subjects and, probably due to overactivity of corticotropin-releasing hormone in patients with depression in comparison to young normal controls. Pulsatile administration of thyrotropin-releasing hormone induced a decrease of sleep efficiency and an earlier occurrence of the cortisol rise in normal controls. Slow wave sleep was reduced in patients with hypothyroidism in comparison to normal controls. The sleep EEG normalised after therapy.

  13. Anticonvulsants and thyroid function.

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, P P; Bates, D; Howe, J G; Ratcliffe, W A; Schardt, C W; Heath, A; Evered, D C

    1978-01-01

    Serum total and free thyroid hormone concentrations were estimated in 42 patients with epilepsy taking anticonvulsants (phenytoin, phenobarbitone, and carbamazepine either singly or in combination). There was a significant reduction in total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) in the treated group compared with controls. Free hormone concentrations were lower than total hormone concentrations, suggesting that increased clearance of thyroid hormones occurs in patients receiving anticonvulsants. Detailed analysis indicated that phenytoin had a significant depressant effect on TT4, FT4, FT3, and reverse T3 (rT3). Phenobarbitone and carbamazepine had no significant main effects, but there were significant interactions between phenytoin and carbamazepine for TT4 and FT4. phenobarbitone and carbamazepine for FT3, and phenytoin and phenobarbitone for rT3. PMID:656820

  14. Thyroid dysfunction and choleduocholithiasis.

    PubMed

    Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Khansari, Mohammad Reza; Sohrabi, Masoud Reza; Hemasi, Gholam Reza; Shamspour, Najmeh; Abdolahi, Nafiseh; Zamani, Farhad

    2013-07-01

    Disturbances in lipid metabolism which occur during hypothyroidism leadto the formation of gallstones. This study aims to evaluate the thyroid functionpattern in patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones. This case-control study recruited 151 patients with preliminary diagnosesof CBD stone who underwent ERCP (cases). The control group comprisedhealthy people who met the study criteria in the same hospital. The controlgroup underwent ultrasonography to exclude any asymptomatic bile duct lithiasis.A questionnaire that included demographic and anthropometrics datawere completed by an assigned physician. Morning blood samples that followed12 hours of fasting were taken from all participants for measurements ofserum total thyroxin (T4), serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), fastingblood sugar (FBS), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein(LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). The mean TSH in patients (2.59 ± 4.86mg/dl) was higher than the controlgroup (2.53± 4.13 9mg/dl). In subclinical hypothyroidism, serum TSH levelshigher than 5 MU/L were found in 30.6% of cases compared with 22.5% ofcontrols [OR: 1.53; 95 % confidence interval (95% CI): 0.968-2.438). Hypothyroidismwas detected in 10.8% of the control group and in 11.3% of cases(OR: 1.87; 95% CI: 0.578-2.043). The mean total cholesterol levels in caseswas higher than the control group (p=0.61).The levels of TG (p=0.05), HDL(73.35 vs. 46.41; p<0.01) and LDL (64.81.88 vs. 111.04; p<0.01) was statisticallysignificant between both groups. There is an association between thyroid disorders and the presence of bileduct stones. Thyroid testing in patients with gallstone and bile duct stones isrecommended because hypothyroidism may be a predisposing factor for stonepassage from the gallbladder.

  15. Thyroid associated orbitopathy

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Rajat; Weis, Ezekiel

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid associated orbitopathy, also known as Graves’ orbitopathy, is typically a self-limiting autoimmune process associated with dysthyroid states. The clinical presentation may vary from very mild disease to severe irreversible sight-threatening complications. Despite ongoing basic science and clinical research, the pathogenesis and highly effective therapeutic strategies remain elusive. The present article reviews the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of this common, yet poorly understood disease, which remains a challenge to the ophthalmologist. PMID:22446901

  16. Thyroid disorders in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasad, Menaka; Bhattacharyya, Shaila Shamanur; Bhattacharyya, Arpandev

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid disorders are common in pregnancy and the most common disorder is subclinical hypothyroidism. Due to the complex hormonal changes during pregnancy, it is important to remember that thyroxine requirements are higher in pregnancy. According to recent American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines, the recommended reference ranges for TSH are 0.1 to 2.5 mIU/L in the first trimester, 0.2 to 3.0 mIU/L in the second trimester, and 0.3 to 3.0 mIU/L in the third trimester. Maternal hypothyroidism is an easily treatable condition that has been associated with increased risk of low birth weight, fetal distress, and impaired neuropsychological development. Hyperthyroidism in pregnancy is less common as conception is a problem. Majority of them are due to Graves’ disease, though gestational hyperthyroidism is to be excluded. Preferred drug is propylthiouracil (PTU) with the target to maintain free T4 in upper normal range. Doses can be reduced in third trimester due to the immune-suppressant effects of pregnancy. Early and effective treatment of thyroid disorder ensures a safe pregnancy with minimal maternal and neonatal complications. PMID:23565370

  17. The aging thyroid.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, Vafa; Surks, Martin I

    2013-10-01

    As life expectancy increases and population age advances, diagnosis and treatment of diseases common in the geriatric population assume an increasingly important role in modern medicine. In the last few years, the emergence of age-specific reference ranges for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) has added to the complexity of diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction in this age group, especially in the 'subclinical' category. The recent studies confirm an increase in population TSH distribution with age, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. Conclusive evidence about adverse cardiovascular, metabolic, and cognitive consequences of subclinical hypothyroidism in the elderly remains elusive. The transient nature of subtle degrees of thyroid dysfunction in a significant proportion of elderly patients has also been reproduced in the recent publications. A growing body of literature in the last few years, reviewed here, highlights the importance of employing additional caution before assigning diagnoses of hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism to elderly patients and initiation of treatment modalities that can have long-lasting effects.

  18. Pediatric Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), which originates from thyroid parafollicular C cells, accounts for 3 to 5% of thyroid malignancies. MTC occurs either sporadically or in an inherited autosomal dominant manner. Hereditary MTC occurs as a familial MTC or as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and B syndromes. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed between hereditary MTC and germ-line "gain of function" mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Most cases of pediatric MTC are hereditary whereas sporadic MTC is rare in children and is usually diagnosed in adults. Therefore, MTC in children is most often diagnosed in the course of a familial genetic investigation. The standard treatment of MTC mainly requires surgery involving total thyroidectomy and central neck node dissection before extrathyroidal extension occurs. To prevent MTC development in hereditary syndromes, prophylactic thyroidectomy is performed in presymptomatic patients. An appropriate age at which the surgery should take place is determined based upon the data from genotyping, serum calcitonin measurements, and ultrasonography. For the treatment of advanced MTC cases, the broad spectrum receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors vandetanib and cabozantinib, which also inhibit RET, are used although they are not always effective.

  19. Thyroid Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Dadu, Ramona; Hu, Mimi I; Lu, Charles; Gunn, Gary Brandon; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Lai, Stephen Y; Williams, Michelle D

    2015-12-01

    Surgery remains the most important effective treatment for differentiated (DTC) and medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Radioactive iodine (RAI) is another important treatment but is reserved only for DTC whose disease captures RAI. Once patients fail primary therapy, observation is often recommended, as most DTC and MTC patients will have indolent disease. However, in a fraction of patients, systemic therapy must be considered. In recent decades 4 systemic therapies have been approved by the United States FDA for DTC and MTC. Sorafenib and lenvatinib are approved for DTC and vandetanib and cabozantinib for MTC. Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare and rapidly progressive form of thyroid cancer with a very high mortality rate. Treatment of ATC remains a challenge. Most patients are not surgical candidates at diagnosis due to advanced disease. External beam radiation and radiosensitizing radiation are the mainstay of therapy at this time. However, exciting new drugs and approaches to therapy are on the horizon but it will take a concerted, worldwide effort to complete clinical trials in order to find effective therapies that will improve the overall survival for this devastating disease.

  20. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  1. [Hashimoto's thyroiditis(chronic thyroiditis), IgG4-related thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Mitsuyasu

    2012-11-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis emerges in patients who have genetic preponderance such as SNPs of CTLA-4 and risk factors such as excess intake of iodine, pregnancy or postpartum period, and smoking. Such risk factors also affect the entire clinical course. One of the major outcomes in Hashimoto's thyroiditis appears to be increased in cardio-vascular risks through subclinical hypothyroidism and concomitant metabolic syndrome, but in most cases, treatment with L-T4 has little effects on cardio-vascular benefit or quality of life. The pregnant women also have risks for obstetric complications and postpartum thyroid dysfunction. The women who have anti-TPO antibodies, type 1 diabetes, or previous history of post-partum thyroid dysfunction are recommended to be measured their TSH. It is noteworthy that Hashimoto's thyroiditis is sometimes complicated with encephalopathy, papillary carcinoma, or IgG4-related thyroiditis. IgG4-related thyroiditis is partly similar but partly discerned from a variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The pathogenetic roles of this variant on autoimmune-based thyroiditis remain unclear.

  2. The thyroid-brain interaction in thyroid disorders and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Goetz, T; Glenn, T; Whybrow, P C

    2008-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the metabolic activity of the adult brain, and neuropsychiatric manifestations of thyroid disease have long been recognised. However, it is only recently that methodology such as functional neuroimaging has been available to facilitate investigation of thyroid hormone metabolism. Although the role of thyroid hormones in the adult brain is not yet specified, it is clear that without optimal thyroid function, mood disturbance, cognitive impairment and other psychiatric symptoms can emerge. Additionally, laboratory measurements of peripheral thyroid function may not adequately characterise central thyroid metabolism. Here, we review the relationship between thyroid hormone and neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with primary thyroid disease and primary mood disorders.

  3. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen

  4. Find an Endocrinology - Thyroid Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... ATA Mission, Vision, Goals Work of the ATA Governance & Leadership Staff Contact the ATA ATA Headquarters 6066 Leesburg Pike Suite 550 Falls Church, VA 22041 thyroid@thyroid.org Contact Form Legal Privacy Terms of Use Is registered in the U.S. Patent ...

  5. Perchlorate, iodine and the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    In pharmacologic doses, perchlorate inhibits thyroidal iodine uptake and subsequently decreases thyroid hormone production. Although pharmacologic doses may be used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism, recent literature has focussed on the detection of low levels of perchlorate in the environment, groundwater and foodstuffs and their potential adverse effects on human thyroid function. This is of particular concern to the developing foetus and infant, whose normal neurodevelopment depends on adequate iodine intake for the production of thyroid hormones. Further research is needed to clarify the potential health effects of low-level chronic environmental perchlorate exposure. The health impact of environmental perchlorate may be dependent upon adequate iodine intake and should be interpreted in combination with other environmental exposures that are also potential thyroidal endocrine disruptors. PMID:20172477

  6. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  7. HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS AND VESTIBULAR DYSFUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, Giuseppe; Russo, Diego; Monzani, Fabio; Petrolo, Claudio; Fattori, Bruno; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Cassandro, Ettore; Costante, Giuseppe

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review was to analyze the existing literature concerning the relationship between Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and vestibular dysfunction. We used electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library) to search and collect all published articles about the association between HT and vestibular disorders. Several observational and retrospective studies have postulated a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and vestibular disorders. In most cases, an appropriate control group was lacking, and the impact of thyroid functional status could not precisely be established. In recent years, two well-designed prospective studies have provided convincing evidence that the association is not random. One article reported that patients with Ménière disease (MD) had a significantly higher prevalence of positive anti-thyroid autoantibody as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, more than half of MD patients had either positive anti-thyroid or non-organ-specific autoantibody titers, compared to less than 30% of both patients with unilateral vestibular paresis without cochlear involvement and healthy controls. Another study found that patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) had significantly higher serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and antithyroid autoantibody levels than healthy controls. Additionally, almost one-fifth of euthyroid patients with HT had signs of BPPV. The published results indicate that patients with MD or BPPV are potential candidates to also develop HT. Thus, in HT patients, the presence of even slight symptoms or signs potentially related to vestibular lesions should be carefully investigated. AITD = autoimmune thyroid disease; BPPV = benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; EH = endolymphatic hydrops; HT = Hashimoto thyroiditis; L-T4 = L-thyroxine; MD = Ménière disease; PS = Pendred syndrome; Tg = thyroglobulin; TPO = thyroid peroxidase; TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  8. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.

  9. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guihua; Zou, Dazhong; Cai, Haiyun; Liu, Yajun

    2016-06-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a type of autoimmune thyroid disease with an increasing prevalence in past decades. Its diagnosisis mostly based on ultrasonography. Ultrasonography is a useful and essential tool to make this diagnosis based on the characteristics of the disease. In the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy is an effective method to distinguish Hashimoto's thyroiditis from other thyroid disorders. One exciting and recent advance is that non-invasive ultrasound-based methods have supplemented fine-needle aspiration to diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis under more complex conditions. In this review, we discuss the recent advantages of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  10. Sonographic Elastography of the Thyroid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Duymus, Mahmut; Avcu, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Thyroid gland disorders include benign and malignant thyroid nodules and diffuse thyroid disorders. The incidence of malignant thyroid nodules is low and the prognosis is good. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer and diffuse parenchymal disorders is generally based on clinical manifestations and histopathological evaluation. Ultrasonography has its place in the diagnostics and follow-up of thyroid disorders. Ultrasonographic elastography is a new, developing method that shows increase in clinical practice. In this study, we aimed to review the data on thyroid ultrasound elastography. PMID:27103947

  11. Oxidative Stress and Immune System in Vitiligo and Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Roberta; Dragoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired dermatological disease frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Several theories have been proposed so far to unravel the complex vitiligo pathogenesis. Currently, the autocytotoxic and the autoimmune theories are the most accredited hypothesis, since they are sustained by several important clinical and experimental evidences. A growing body of evidences shows that autoimmunity and oxidative stress strictly interact to finally determine melanocyte loss. In this scenario, associated thyroid autoimmunity might play an active and important role in triggering and maintaining the depigmentation process of vitiligo. PMID:25838868

  12. Thyroid crisis in the maxillofacial trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Robert J; Lewis, Tashorn; Miller, Jared; Clarkson, Earl I

    2014-11-01

    Thyroid crisis, also known as thyroid storm, is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis that results in a hypermetabolic and hyperadrenergic state. This condition requires prompt recognition and treatment because the mortality from thyroid crisis approaches 30%. Thyrotoxicosis alone will usually not progress to thyroid crisis. Thyroid crisis will typically be precipitated by some concomitant event such as infection, iodine-containing contrast agents, medications such as amiodarone, pregnancy, or surgery. Trauma is a rare precipitator of thyroid crisis. Several published studies have reported thyroid crisis resulting from blunt or penetrating neck trauma. Significant systemic trauma, such as motor vehicle accidents, has also been reported to precipitate thyroid crisis. It is very unusual for minor trauma to precipitate thyroid crisis. In the present study, we report the case of a patient who had incurred relatively minor maxillofacial trauma and developed thyroid crisis 2 weeks after the initial trauma.

  13. Etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in melasma patients

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Nimet; Kılıç, Arzu; Koparal, Suha; Artüz, Ferda; Çakmak, Atıl; Köse, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melasma is a common chronic, acquired pigmentation disorder with a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Aim To investigate the etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with melasma. Material and methods Forty-five women with melasma and 45 age-matched healthy women were included in the study group. A detailed history was taken from the patients including triggering factors of melasma. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin (AbTG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (Ab-TPO) were measured and thyroid ultrasonography was performed for each subject. Results In 26.7% of patients, pregnancy, in 17.8%, oral contraceptive use and in 13.3%, intense sunlight exposure were the triggering factors. 17.8% of patients had a family history of melasma. FT4, TSH and AbTG levels were significantly higher in the patient group. Conclusions The results suggest that a combination of factors including pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, sunlight and genetic factors often trigger melasma. Thyroid hormones and thyroid autoimmunity may also play a role in the pathogenesis which needs to be proven by further studies. PMID:26759539

  14. [Thyroid hormone treatment].

    PubMed

    Gärtner, R

    2013-07-01

    The autoimmune thyroiditis with overt or subclinical primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis of hypothyroidism is not difficult, the question when a replacement therapy in subclinical hypothyroidism should be initiated is still under discussion. In patients with overt hypothyroidism defined as low FT4 and elevated TSH or TSH > 10 mU/L a replacement with levothyroxine is clearly indicated. In patients with subclinical hypothyroidism defined as a TSH between 4 and 10 mU/L and normal FT4, the treatment with Levothyroxine depends on the underlying disease and symptoms. Levothyroxine is a prohormone with is activated by deiodination in the organs to triiodothyronine. Therefore, levothyroxine for replacement therapy is mainly used. Some patients, however, do not feel well with this treatment and therefore studies with a combination therapy of levothyroxine and triiodothyronine had been performed and it could be shown that this might be related to a polymorphism in type 2 deiodinase in some patients, with the consequence of lower intracellular triodothyronine formation. In women on levothyroxine replacement therapy getting pregnant, the demand of levothyroxine increases up to 25-50 µg, especially in the early weeks of pregnancy. It also has to be considered that the resorption of levothyroxine depends on normal stomach acid and therefore patients on acid blockers or atrophic gastritis require higher dosages of levothyroxine. Only patients after thyroidectomy because of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with higher grad of malignancy need a TSH suppressive therapy, those with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma the TSH should be within the low normal range. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Risk assessment of thyroid follicular cell tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R N; Crisp, T M; Hurley, P M; Rosenthal, S L; Singh, D V

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid follicular cell tumors arise in rodents from mutations, perturbations of thyroid and pituitary hormone status with increased stimulation of thyroid cell growth by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), or a combination of the two. The only known human thyroid carcinogen is ionizing radiation. It is not known for certain whether chemicals that affect thyroid cell growth lead to human thyroid cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency applies the following science policy positions: 1) chemically induced rodent thyroid tumors are presumed to be relevant to humans; 2) when interspecies information is lacking, the default is to assume comparable carcinogenic sensitivity in rodents and humans; 3) adverse rodent noncancer thyroid effects due to chemically induced thyroid-pituitary disruption are presumed to be relevant to humans; 4) linear dose-response considerations are applied to thyroid cancer induced by chemical substances that either do not disrupt thyroid functioning or lack mode of action information; 5) nonlinear thyroid cancer dose-response considerations are applied to chemicals that reduce thyroid hormone levels, increase TSH and thyroid cell division, and are judged to lack mutagenic activity; and 6) nonlinear considerations may be applied in thyroid cancer dose-response assessments on a case-by-case basis for chemicals that disrupt thyroid-pituitary functioning and demonstrate some mutagenic activity. Required data for risk assessment purposes is mode of action information on mutagenicity, increases in follicular cell growth (cell size and number) and thyroid gland weight, thyroid-pituitary hormones, site of action, correlations between doses producing thyroid effects and cancer, and reversibility of effects when dosing ceases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681971

  16. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  17. Painful thyroid nodule, a misleading presentation of subacute thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Corinne; Bertrand, Claude; Michel, Luc; Donckier, Julian E

    2016-10-01

    Typical presentation of subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is an anterior neck pain radiating up to the jaw and ear, often associated with asthenia and fever. Biology shows hyperthyroidism and inflammation. The thyroid uptake is low at scintigraphy. However, the clinical presentation of SAT may be misleading. We report two cases of SAT whose initial manifestation was a painful thyroid nodule suspected of malignancy. In both cases, ultrasound feature was a heterogeneous, hypoechoic, ill-defined area with a low vascularization on colour Doppler. These areas were interpreted by radiologist as nodules. Surgery was then considered. Such a presentation should be known by clinicians to prevent unnecessary surgery.

  18. Modified Miccoli's thyroid surgery for thyroid diseases

    PubMed Central

    YU, HUI; GE, XIN; PAN, WEIKANG; WANG, HUAIJIE; HUANG, QIANG; DONG, YU; GAO, YA; YU, JIANJUN

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT), originally described by Miccoli, is considered to be the most widely practiced and easily reproducible procedure for selected patients with benign and/or malignant thyroid nodules. Modified techniques based on MIVAT, namely modified Miccoli's thyroid surgery (MMTS), were developed based on MIVAT. This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary results of MMTS compared with those of MIVAT. The enrolling criteria included a benign nodule <3.5 cm in diameter, a malignant tumor <2 cm, no previous neck surgery and no evidence of any suspected lymph node metastasis or local invasion. Unilateral lobectomy was considered for benign lesions and the additional dissection of central compartment (level VI) lymph nodes was applied for malignant disease. The modified techniques included carefully selecting the operative incision, expanding the operative space, embedding a drainage tube in situ and delicately suturing every layer inwards and crosswise, as well as measuring cervical motion. In addition to the comparison of surgical outcomes between MMTS and MIVAT, other surgical parameters, including operative time, blood loss, postoperative drainage, cosmetic satisfaction, peak angle of cervical rotation, length of hospitalization and complications, were retrospectively analyzed. A consecutive series of 70 patients, including 54 cases of benign and 16 cases of malignant disease, initially underwent MIVAT between April, 2008 and May, 2012, while 127 patients, including 98 benign and 29 malignant cases, subsequently underwent MMTS between September, 2011 and October, 2014. Patients who received MMTS exhibited significantly less blood loss (20.3±11.3 vs. 32.3±12.6 ml, P<0.01), lower volume of postoperative drainage (42.77±15.2 vs. 50.48±23.2 ml, P<0.01) and higher cosmetic satisfaction (94.6±3.5 vs. 88.9±2.7%, P<0.01), but a longer operative time (102±36 vs. 50.48±23.2 min, P<0.01) when compared with MIVAT. In addition, a

  19. Identifying a Small Molecule Blocking Antigen Presentation in Autoimmune Thyroiditis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Menconi, Francesca; Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Jacobson, Eric M.; Concepcion, Erlinda; David, Chella S.; Kastrinsky, David B.; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that an HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain (DRβ1-Arg74) is the specific HLA class II variant conferring risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). We also identified 5 thyroglobulin (Tg) peptides that bound to DRβ1-Arg74. We hypothesized that blocking the binding of these peptides to DRβ1-Arg74 could block the continuous T-cell activation in thyroiditis needed to maintain the autoimmune response to the thyroid. The aim of the current study was to identify small molecules that can block T-cell activation by Tg peptides presented within DRβ1-Arg74 pockets. We screened a large and diverse library of compounds and identified one compound, cepharanthine that was able to block peptide binding to DRβ1-Arg74. We then showed that Tg.2098 is the dominant peptide when inducing experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in NOD mice expressing human DRβ1-Arg74. Furthermore, cepharanthine blocked T-cell activation by thyroglobulin peptides, in particular Tg.2098 in mice that were induced with EAT. For the first time we identified a small molecule that can block Tg peptide binding and presentation to T-cells in autoimmune thyroiditis. If confirmed cepharanthine could potentially have a role in treating human AITD. PMID:26703475

  20. Identifying a Small Molecule Blocking Antigen Presentation in Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Menconi, Francesca; Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; David, Chella S; Kastrinsky, David B; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-02-19

    We previously showed that an HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain (DRβ1-Arg74) is the specific HLA class II variant conferring risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). We also identified 5 thyroglobulin (Tg) peptides that bound to DRβ1-Arg74. We hypothesized that blocking the binding of these peptides to DRβ1-Arg74 could block the continuous T-cell activation in thyroiditis needed to maintain the autoimmune response to the thyroid. The aim of the current study was to identify small molecules that can block T-cell activation by Tg peptides presented within DRβ1-Arg74 pockets. We screened a large and diverse library of compounds and identified one compound, cepharanthine that was able to block peptide binding to DRβ1-Arg74. We then showed that Tg.2098 is the dominant peptide when inducing experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in NOD mice expressing human DRβ1-Arg74. Furthermore, cepharanthine blocked T-cell activation by thyroglobulin peptides, in particular Tg.2098 in mice that were induced with EAT. For the first time we identified a small molecule that can block Tg peptide binding and presentation to T-cells in autoimmune thyroiditis. If confirmed cepharanthine could potentially have a role in treating human AITD.

  1. Thyroid and Aging or the Aging Thyroid? An Evidence-Based Analysis of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone production, metabolism, and action change with aging. The reference ranges for serum thyrotropin and thyroid hormones are derived mainly from younger populations. Thus, the prevalence of subclinical thyroid dysfunction is increased greatly in the elderly. However, it is unclear whether mild thyroid dysfunction in the elderly is associated with adverse outcomes. In this review, we discuss current evidence-based literature on thyroid function in the elderly and whether subclinical thyroid dysfunction in the elderly should be treated. PMID:24106641

  2. New model systems to illuminate thyroid organogenesis. Part I: an update on the zebrafish toolbox.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Robert; Antonica, Francesco; Costagliola, Sabine

    2013-12-01

    Thyroid dysgenesis (TD) resulting from defects during embryonic thyroid development represents a major cause of congenital hypothyroidism. The pathogenetic mechanisms of TD in human newborns, however, are still poorly understood and disease-causing genetic variants have been identified in only a small percentage of TD cases. This limited understanding of the pathogenesis of TD is partly due to a lack of knowledge on how intrinsic factors and extrinsic signalling cues orchestrate the differentiation of thyroid follicular cells and the morphogenesis of thyroid tissue. Recently, embryonic stem cells and zebrafish embryos emerged as novel model systems that allow for innovative experimental approaches in order to decipher cellular and molecular mechanisms of thyroid development and to unravel pathogenic mechanisms of TD. Zebrafish embryos offer several salient properties for studies on thyroid organogenesis including rapid and external development, optical transparency, ease of breeding, relative short generation time and amenability for genome editing. In this review, we will highlight recent advances in the zebrafish toolkit to visualize cellular dynamics of organ development and discuss specific prospects of the zebrafish model for studies on vertebrate thyroid development and human congenital thyroid diseases.

  3. Lingual thyroid: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Bassem; Monib, Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lingual thyroid (LT) gland is a rare clinical entity which was found to occur due to the failure of the thyroid gland to descend to its normal cervical location during embryogenesis. The presence of an ectopic thyroid gland located at the base of the tongue may present with symptoms like dysphagia, dysphonia, upper airway obstruction or even hemorrhage at any time from infancy through adulthood. Presentation of case We are presenting a case of 5-year-old girl who presented with lingual thyroid, treated with Suppression treatment followed by elective surgical resection. Discussion Incidence of ectopic lingual thyroid gland is reported as 1:100,000. It is more common in females. Most of presentations due to oropharyngeal obstruction, including dysphagia, dyspnea and dysphonia. Investigations include thyroid function tests, neck US, Technetium scanning and C.T. Conclusion Lingual thyroid is a rare anomaly. Dysphagia and dysphonia are common presenting symptoms. Pathogenesis of this ectopic is unknown. Different types of surgical approaches have been described in the management. PMID:22096763

  4. Hashimoto thyroiditis: a century later.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rania; Al-Shaikh, Safa; Akhtar, Mohammed

    2012-05-01

    More than a century has passed since the first description of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) as a clinicopathologic entity. HT is an autoimmune disease in which a breakdown of immune tolerance is caused by interplay of a variety of immunologic, genetic, and environmental factors. Thyrocyte injury resulting from environmental factors results in expression of new or hidden epitopes that leads to proliferation of autoreactive T and B cells. Infiltration of thyroid by these cells results in HT. In addition to the usual type of HT, several variants such as the fibrous type and Riedal thyroiditis are also recognized. The most recently recognized variant is immunoglobulin G4(+) HT, which may occur as isolated thyroid limited disease or as part of a generalized Ig4-related sclerosing disease. The relationship between HT and Riedel thyroiditis remains unclear; however, recent evidence seems to suggest that it may also be part of the spectrum of Ig4-related sclerosing disease. HT is frequently associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma and may indeed be a risk factor for developing this type of cancer. The relationship between thyroid lymphoma and HT on the other hand appears well established.

  5. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  6. Thyroid diseases and bone health.

    PubMed

    Williams, G R; Bassett, J H D

    2017-08-29

    Thyroid hormones are essential for skeletal development and are important regulators of bone maintenance in adults. Childhood hypothyroidism causes delayed skeletal development, retarded linear growth and impaired bone mineral accrual. Epiphyseal dysgenesis is evidenced by classic features of stippled epiphyses on X-ray. In severe cases, post-natal growth arrest results in a complex skeletal dysplasia. Thyroid hormone replacement stimulates catch-up growth and bone maturation, but recovery may be incomplete dependent on the duration and severity of hypothyroidism prior to treatment. A severe phenotype characteristic of hypothyroidism occurs in children with resistance to thyroid hormone due to mutations affecting THRA encoding thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα). Discovery of this rare condition recapitulated animal studies demonstrating that TRα mediates thyroid hormone action in the skeleton. In adults, thyrotoxicosis is well known to cause severe osteoporosis and fracture, but cases are rare because of prompt diagnosis and treatment. Recent data, however, indicate that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fracture. Population studies have also shown that variation in thyroid status within the reference range in post-menopausal women is associated with altered BMD and fracture risk. Thus, thyroid status at the upper end of the euthyroid reference range is associated with low BMD and increased risk of osteoporotic fragility fracture. Overall, extensive data demonstrate that euthyroid status is required for normal post-natal growth and bone mineral accrual, and is fundamental for maintenance of adult bone structure and strength.

  7. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casula, Sabina; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2012-01-01

    Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin fold-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4) to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i) they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii) could play a role in modulating cell proliferation – in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)-13 cells is threefold to fourfold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a fivefold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma, and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches. PMID:22675319

  8. Coexistence of papillary thyroid cancer and Hashimoto thyroiditis in children: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Koibuchi, Harumi; Omoto, Kiyoka; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Toyotsuji, Tomonori; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Kawano, Mikihiko

    2014-07-01

    This report documents 3 pediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma cases with associated Hashimoto thyroiditis. In all 3 cases, hypoechoic nodules accompanied by multiple echogenic spots were noted on sonography of the thyroid. Hashimoto thyroiditis was suspected on the basis of positive thyroid autoantibody test results and pathologic examinations of thyroidectomy specimens, which revealed chronic thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration as the background of papillary thyroid carcinoma development. The potential for papillary carcinoma development warrants close follow-up, and meticulous sonographic examinations must be performed in children with Hashimoto thyroiditis. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. [Drainage in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Ardito, G; Revelli, L; Guidi, M L; Murazio, M; Lucci, C; Modugno, P; Di Giovanni, V

    1999-01-01

    Bleeding represents a rare complication of thyroid surgery but when it occurs it may be life-threatening. To prevent this complication drainage is widely used. However no study has demonstrated the drains' value and recent reports have questioned its benefits. Therefore we have analyzed our experience of a 10 year-period in which 1.217 thyroidectomies were performed by the same surgical team and prophylactic routine drainage was always adopted. In 13 patients (1.06%) a benign hematoma occurred with spontaneous remission. In 6 patients the bleeding was severe and compressive hematoma occurred; it required surgical re-exploration. Such a complication is unusual in the neck surgery (0.49% in the authors' series) performed by experienced surgeons and when life-threatening hematomas do occur they depend on various uncontrolled factors and drainage is often not helpful. Otherwise a meticulous haemostatic technique is necessary and patients should be observed very closely during the few first hours following surgery on the thyroid gland. Therefore on the basis of the analysis of their series, although it is not always possible to prove the benefit of the drainage, the authors suggest its indication in the neck surgery, as in other fields with dead space, to remove blood and secretions reducing postoperative complications. They have never observed wound infections and patients were discharged within 72 hours.

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  11. What's New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What’s New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... RAI) therapy. Doctors and researchers are looking for new ways to treat thyroid cancer that are more ...

  12. Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Patients Following Thyroidectomy for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Weiss, Roy E.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients following thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer, although a potentially straightforward clinical problem, can present the clinician and patient with a variety of challenges. Most often the problems are related to the dose and preparation of thyroid hormone (TH) to use. Some patients feel less well following thyroidectomy and/or radioiodine ablation than they did before their diagnosis. We present evidence that levothyroxine (L-T4) is the preparation of choice, and keeping the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) between detectable and 0.1 mU/L should be the standard of care in most cases. In unusual circumstances, when the patient remains clinically hypothyroid despite a suppressed TSH, we acknowledge there may be as yet unidentified factors influencing the body’s response to TH, and individualized therapy may be necessary in such patients. PMID:26886951

  13. Mitochondrial disfunction as a cause of ALS.

    PubMed

    Pizzuti, Antonio; Petrucci, Simona

    2011-03-01

    Recent studies on patient with sporadic ALS and on in vitro and in vivo models of mendelian diseases have been addressed toward the unravelling of the mitochondrial behaviour in ALS, whether as a primarily pathogenic factor, or as a fundamental contributor to the cell death. Morphological evidence suggests mitochondria pathology in ALS and many physiological mechanisms involving these organelles appear deranged in ALS, such as energy production, apoptotic triggering, calcium homeostasis and axonal transport of mitochondria. The article briefly addresses recent advances on this field.

  14. Medullary thyroid carcinoma: The third most common thyroid cancer reviewed

    PubMed Central

    STAMATAKOS, MICHAEL; PARASKEVA, PANORAIA; STEFANAKI, CHARIKLEIA; KATSARONIS, PARASKEVAS; LAZARIS, ANDREAS; SAFIOLEAS, KONSTANTINOS; KONTZOGLOU, KONSTANTINOS

    2011-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer is a type of thyroid cancer of neuroendocrine origin. It occurs in hereditary and sporadic forms, and its aggressive behavior is associated with the clinical presentation and type of RET mutation. Total thyroidectomy remains the ideal choice of treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment are the fundamental for a 100% cure rate. In this study, we present our experience of 3 cases, along with a complete review of the literature derived from a Pubmed Database search. PMID:22870127

  15. Hashimoto thyroiditis, anti-thyroid antibodies and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Posselt, Rayana T; Coelho, Vinícius N; Skare, Thelma L

    2017-05-25

    To study the prevalence of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), anti-thyroid autoantibodies (anti-thyroglobulin or TgAb and thyroperoxidase or TPOAb) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. To analyze if associated HT, TgAb and/or TPOAb influence clinical or serological profiles, disease activity and/or its cumulative damage. Three hundred and one SLE patients and 141 controls were studied for thyroid stimulating hormone, thyroxin, TgAb and TPOAb by chemiluminescence and immunometric assays. Patients' charts were reviewed for serological and clinical profiles. Activity was measured by SLE Disease Activity Index and cumulative damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for SLE. SLE patients were divided into: (i) with HT; (ii) with anti-thyroid antibodies but without HT; and (iii) without HT and without anti-thyroid antibodies, and were then compared. Furthermore, SLE patients were compared according to the number of positive anti-thyroid antibodies. Hashimoto thyroiditis prevalence in SLE was 12.6% and 5.6% in controls (P = 0.02; odds ratio = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.09-5.2). Lupus patients with HT had less malar rash (P = 0.02) and more anti-Sm (P = 0.04). Anti-Sm was more common in those with two anti-thyroid antibodies than in those with one or negative. The presence of HT or the number of positive autoantibodies did not associate either with disease activity (P = 0.95) or with cumulative damage (P = 0.98). There is a two-fold increased risk of HT in SLE patients. Anti-Sm antibodies favor this association and also double antibody positivity. Disease activity and cumulative damage are not related to HT or with autoantibodies. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. [Thyroid involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L V; Herlin, T

    1995-07-24

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare disease in childhood, and is characterized by widespread inflammation of blood vessels and connective tissue. Although the disease affects a number of different organs, thyroid involvement is not included in the classification criteria set of SLE. We describe two cases of irls with SLE who developed thyroiditis with goitre, thyroid autoantibodies, elevated serum TSH and decreased thyroid function tests. One patient had thyroiditis eighteen months before SLE was diagnosed and the other developed thyroiditis six months after the onset of SLE. Recent prospective studies have shown that thyroid involvement in SLE presenting either as hyper- or hypothyroidism is more common among children than adults. We therefore recommend that thyroid function tests should regularly be performed in juvenile SLE patients and, conversely, that child patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis should be examined for symptoms and serology of SLE.

  17. IL-1β a potential factor for discriminating between thyroid carcinoma and atrophic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kammoun-Krichen, Maha; Bougacha-Elleuch, Noura; Mnif, Mouna; Bougacha, Fadia; Charffedine, Ilhem; Rebuffat, Sandra; Rebai, Ahmed; Glasson, Emilie; Abid, Mohamed; Ayadi, Fatma; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between cytokines and others soluble factors (hormones, antibodies...) can play an important role in the development of thyroid pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to examine the possible correlation between serum cytokine concentrations, thyroid hormones (FT4 and TSH) and auto-antibodies (Tg and TPO), and their usefulness in discriminating between different thyroid conditions. In this study, we investigated serum from 115 patients affected with a variety of thyroid conditions (44 Graves' disease, 17 Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 11 atrophic thyroiditis, 28 thyroid nodular goitre and 15 papillary thyroid cancer), and 30 controls. Levels of 17 cytokines in serum samples were measured simultaneously using a multiplexed human cytokine assay. Thyroid hormones and auto-antibodies were measured using ELISA. Our study showed that IL-1β serum concentrations allow the discrimination between atrophic thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer groups (p = 0.027).

  18. Painless thyroiditis associated to thyroid carcinoma: role of initial ultrasonography evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Raisa Bressan; Macedo, Bruno Mussoi de; Izquierdo, Rogério Friedrich; Meyer, Erika Laurini Souza

    2016-04-01

    Even though it is a rare event, most associations of thyroid carcinoma with subacute thyroiditis described in the literature are related to its granulomatous form (Quervain's thyroiditis). We present a patient with subacute lymphocytic thyroiditis (painless thyroiditis) and papillary thyroid cancer that was first suspected in an initial ultrasound evaluation. A 30-year old female patient who was referred to the emergency room due to hyperthyroidism symptoms was diagnosed with painless thyroiditis established by physical examination and laboratory findings. With the presence of a palpable painless thyroid nodule an ultrasound was prescribed and the images revealed a suspicious thyroid nodule, microcalcification focus in the heterogeneous thyroid parenquima and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was taken from this nodule; cytology was assessed for compatibility with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Postsurgical pathology evaluation showed a multicentric papillary carcinoma and lymphocytic infiltration. Subacute thyroiditis, regardless of type, may produce transitory ultrasound changes that obscure the coexistence of papillary carcinoma. Due to this, initial thyroid ultrasound evaluation should be delayed until clinical recovery. We recommended a thyroid ultrasound exam for initial evaluation of painless thyroiditis, particularly in patients with palpable thyroid nodule. Further cytological examination is recommended in cases presenting with suspect thyroid nodule and/or non-nodular hypoechoic (> 1 cm) or heterogeneous areas with microcalcification focus.

  19. Urticarial vasculitis reveals unsuspected thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Olga; Mota, Alberto; Baudrier, Teresa; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with erythematous, violaceous plaques with a serpiginous and unusual appearance located on the left shoulder, left thigh, and right buttock, evolving for 5 days, which eventually became generalized. A skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis and a diagnosis of urticarial vasculitis was made. The complete blood count, biochemistry, complement levels, and other immunological test results were unremarkable. However, antithyroid antibody titers were increased. Despite having normal thyroid function tests and an absence of specific symptoms, the patient underwent a thyroid ultrasound, which revealed features of thyroiditis, and was subsequently referred to an endocrinologist. Several diseases can be associated with urticarial vasculitis, namely infections and autoimmune connective-tissue disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome. Thyroiditis is an uncommon association.

  20. Foetal and neonatal thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Radetti, G; Zavallone, A; Gentili, L; Beck-Peccoz, P; Bona, G

    2002-10-01

    Thyroid hormones have been shown to be absolutely necessary for early brain development. During pregnancy, both maternal and foetal thyroid hormones contribute to foetal brain development and maternal supply explains why most of the athyreotic newborns usually do not show any signs of hypothyroidism at birth. Foetal and/or neonatal hypothyroidism is a rare disorder. Its incidence, as indicated by neonatal screening, is about 1:4000. Abnormal thyroid development (i.e. agenesia, ectopic gland, hypoplasia) or inborn errors in thyroid hormone biosynthesis are the most common causes of permanent congenital hypothyroidism. Recent studies reported that mutations involving Thyroid Transcriptor Factors (TTF) such as TTF-1, TTF-2, PAX-8 play an important role in altered foetal thyroid development. Deficiency of transcriptor factor (Pit-1, Prop-1, LHX-3) both in mother and in the foetus represents another rare cause of foetal hypothyroidism. At birth clinical picture may be not always so obvious and typical signs appear only after several weeks but a delayed diagnosis could have severe consequences consisting of delayed physical and mental development. Even if substitutive therapy is promptly started some learning difficulties might still arise suggesting that intrauterine adequate levels of thyroid hormones are absolutely necessary for a normal neurological development. Placental transfer of maternal antithyroid antibodies inhibiting fetal thyroid function can cause transient hypothyroidism at birth. If the mother with thyroid autoimmune disease is also hypothyroid during pregnancy and she doesn't receive substitutive therapy, a worse neurological outcome may be expected for her foetus. Foetal and/or neonatal hyperthyroidism is a rare condition and its incidence has been estimated around 1:4000-40000, according to various authors. The most common causes are maternal thyroid autoimmune disorders, such as Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Rarer non autoimmune causes

  1. Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... whole body to slow down. This is called hypothyroidism. If your thyroid begins to over-produce hormones ... and Grave’s Disease are two common causes of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism (respectively). Both are autoimmune diseases: autoimmune ...

  2. Proteome analysis in thyroid pathology.

    PubMed

    Pagni, Fabio; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Bono, Francesca; Garancini, Mattia; Roversi, Gaia; De Sio, Gabriele; Galli, Manuel; Smith, Andrew James; Chinello, Clizia; Magni, Fulvio

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has continuously increased due to its detection in the preclinical stage. Clinical research in thyroid pathology is focusing on the development of new diagnostic tools to improve the stratification of nodules that have biological, practical and economic consequences on the management of patients. Several clinical questions related to thyroid carcinoma remain open and the use of proteomic research in the hunt for new targets with potential diagnostic applications has an important role in the solutions. Many different proteomic approaches are used to investigate thyroid lesions, including mass spectrometry profiling and imaging technologies. These approaches have been applied to different human tissues (cytological specimens, frozen sections, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue or Tissue Micro Arrays). Moreover, other specimens are used for biomarker discovery, such as cell lines and the secretome. Alternative approaches, such as metabolomics and lipidomics, are also used and integrated within proteomics.

  3. Thyroid hormones and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Felipe

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem and its relationship to thyroid dysfunction has been increasingly investigated in recent years. Since it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormones (TH) and mainly T3 have cardioprotective effects, it is easy to understand that in the scenario of thyroid disorder, cardiac function may be damaged, and inversely in cardiac dysfunction thyroid dysregulation may be seen. The increase in plasma TH produces a clear neurohormonal activation which impacts negatively on cardiac function. In hypothyroidism, and in addition to extracardiac dysfunction, myocardial and vascular remodelling is altered and they contribute to cardiac failure. Abnormal low plasma TSH has also been shown to be a risk factor for developing HF in several recent studies, and they suggest that TSH is an independent predictor of clinical outcome including death and cardiac hospitalizations. Therefore, physicians should consider all these concepts when managing a patient with heart failure, not only for a clear diagnosis, but also for better and accurate treatment.

  4. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. This leads to low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism) and causes the pituitary gland to release more ... is that it can cause the symptoms of hypothyroidism, including tiredness, depression, weight gain, sleepiness, constipation, muscle ...

  5. Thyroid hemangiomas diagnosed on sonography.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hee; Kim, Soo Jin; Jung, Hyun Kyung

    2014-04-01

    Primary thyroid hemangiomas are extremely rare, and only a few cases have been previously reported. Primary hemangiomas are developmental anomalies resulting from the inability of the angioblastic mesenchyme to form canals. Thyroid hemangiomas are generally considered difficult to diagnose preoperatively because of their low incidence and nonspecific imaging findings. Here we report 2 cases of thyroid hemangiomas that were diagnosed correctly on preoperative sonography. Our cases showed similar sonographic findings, such as well-circumscribed hypoechoic lesions with internal channel-like linear lines, and bloody content was aspirated during fine-needle aspirations. Our report shows that thyroid hemangiomas can be diagnosed correctly by sonography with or without confirmation of bloody content in the lesions by fine-needle aspiration.

  6. Imaging the thyroid in children.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Jérôme

    2014-03-01

    Color Doppler Ultrasounds (CDU) and Thyroid Scanning (TS) have much improved in recent years and offer a likely diagnosis of the disorder and its main subtypes. This especially applies when diagnosing permanent or transient causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH), where dual imaging has proven to be more informative than single scanning. Though both isotopes have acceptable performances, the use of (123)I appears more advisable, since it more accurately identifies the various aetiologies of CH and probably has better dosimetric characteristics than (99m)Tc. Detailed dual imaging patterns are presented in connection with most of the underlying mechanisms explaining CH, thyroid dysgenesis (75%) and dyshormonogenesis (20%). Imaging of thyroid autoimmunity, of immunogenic thyrotoxicosis and of thyroid autonomy, is helped by CDU but most often requires a quantified (123)I-TS (molecular imaging). We finally show the interest of CDU to sort suspicious nodule and present the new TIRADS scoring system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thyroid storm with multiorgan failure.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hui Wen; See, Kay Choong; Phua, Jason

    2010-03-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially fatal condition. Various unusual presentations in patients with thyroid storm have been described but multiorgan dysfunction is uncommonly seen. We describe a 35-year-old patient with a history of Graves' disease who was diagnosed with thyroid storm at 2 weeks postpartum. This was complicated by acute liver failure, acute kidney injury, severe lactic acidosis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and heart failure with acute pulmonary edema. The multiorgan dysfunction was reversed by prompt institution of antithyroid drugs and supportive management in the intensive care unit. Thyroid storm is a medical emergency. One of the challenges lies in recognizing its varied presentations. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is important to prevent the catastrophic outcomes associated with this condition.

  8. Rational therapy for thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Carter, J N; Eastman, C J; Kilham, H A; Lazarus, L

    1975-10-01

    An approach to the management of patients with thyroid storm is described. The treatment regimen, which is directed against the abnormalities as they are presently understood, incorporates: (a) Propranolol to inhibit the catecholamine-mediated peripheral effects of the circulating thyronines; (b) Propylthiouracil to inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis and to inhibit peripheral conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine (T3), the predominant source of T3 production; (c) Iodine to block the glandular release of thyroid hormones; (d) Dexamethasone along with general supportive therapy. The regimen has been used for a 13 year old schoolgirl with thyroid storm, and the induced rapid fall in serum T3 levels is illustrated. It has also been used in patients with florid thyrotoxicosis undergoing emergency surgery and has resulted in marked clinical improvement associated with rapid decreases in serum T3 levels. It is a simple and efficient regimen, rendering cumbersome forms of therapy such as plasmapheresis and peritoneal dialysis unnecessary.

  9. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  10. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  11. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  12. BRAF in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanzilotta, Salvatore Giovanni; Grammatica, Luciano; Paradiso, Angelo; Simone, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    Novel genetic findings about papillary thyroid carcinoma identify BRAF gene as a subject of great interest. Involvement of BRAF gene in pathogenesis of PTC, diagnostic value and the putative prognostic significance of its T1799A mutation are summarized in this article. Furthermore, a particular attention is focused to the role of pre-operative detection of BRAF mutation in the FNAB specimens of thyroid nodules and to the use of this gene as target for an effective cancer therapy. PMID:17641411

  13. Clinical Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Staunton, M. D.; Greening, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    In a survey of 293 patients with carcinoma of the thyroid, a goitre or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck were the commonest symptoms and a mass confined to one lobe the commonest sign. Hardness of the mass was an important diagnostic feature, and at least two-thirds of the tumour could be recognized before operation. It is suggested that the preoperative evaluation of thyroid swellings should be classified as benign, cancer suspected, and cancer probable. PMID:4800743

  14. Coexistence of resistance to thyroid hormone and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Igata, Motoyuki; Tsuruzoe, Kaku; Kawashima, Junji; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kondo, Tatsuya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Seiya; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Miyamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a syndrome of reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones. RTH is majorly caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. Here, we report a rare case of RTH with a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to a thyroid tumor and hormonal abnormality. She had elevated serum thyroid hormones and non-suppressed TSH levels. Genetic analysis of THRB identified a missense mutation, P452L, leading to a diagnosis of RTH. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor and lymph nodes enabled the cytological diagnosis of PTC with lymph node metastases. Total thyroidectomy and neck lymph nodes dissection were performed. Following surgery, thyroxine replacement (≥500 μg) was necessary to avoid the symptoms of hypothyroidism and to maintain her TSH levels within the same range as before the operation. During the follow-up, basal thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were around 6 ng/ml and TSH-stimulated Tg levels were between 12 and 20 ng/ml. Up to present, the patient has had no recurrence of PTC. This indicates that these Tg values are consistent with a biochemical incomplete response or an indeterminate response. There is no consensus regarding the management of thyroid carcinoma in patients with RTH, but aggressive treatments such as total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine (RAI) and TSH suppression therapy are recommended. Learning points There are only a few cases reporting the coexistence of RTH and thyroid carcinoma. Moreover, our case would be the first case presenting one with lymph node metastases. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. When total thyroidectomy is performed in

  15. Thyroid hormone biosynthesis and release.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Denise P; Dupuy, Corinne

    2017-01-31

    Thyroid hormones (TH) 3,5,3',5'- tetraiodothyronine or thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'- triiodothyronine (T3) contain iodine atoms as part of their structure, and their synthesis occur in the unique structures called thyroid follicles. Iodide reaches thyroid cells through the bloodstream that supplies the basolateral plasma membrane of thyrocytes, where it is avidly taken up through the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS). Thyrocytes are also specialized in the secretion of the high molecular weight protein thyroglobulin (TG) in the follicular lumen. The iodination of the tyrosyl residues of TG preceeds TH biosynthesis, which depends on the interaction of iodide, TG, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) at the apical plasma membrane of thyrocytes. Thyroid hormone biosynthesis is under the tonic control of thyrotropin (TSH), while the iodide recycling ability is very important for normal thyroid function. We discuss herein the biochemical aspects of TH biosynthesis and release, highlighting the novel molecules involved in the process.

  16. Thromboembolic complications of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Min, T; Benjamin, S; Cozma, L

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. Early recognition and prompt treatment are essential. Atrial fibrillation can occur in up to 40% of patients with thyroid storm. Studies have shown that hyperthyroidism increases the risk of thromboembolic events. There is no consensus with regard to the initiation of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in severe thyrotoxicosis. Anticoagulation is not routinely initiated if the risk is low on a CHADS2 score; however, this should be considered in patients with thyroid storm or severe thyrotoxicosis with impending storm irrespective of the CHADS2 risk, as it appears to increase the risk of thromboembolic episodes. Herein, we describe a case of thyroid storm complicated by massive pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical findings. Early recognition and prompt treatment could lead to a favourable outcome.Hypercoagulable state is a recognised complication of thyrotoxicosis.Atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm.Anticoagulation should be considered for patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation irrespective of the CHADS2 score.Patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and clinical evidence of thrombosis should be immediately anticoagulated until hyperthyroidism is under control.

  17. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  18. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-21

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  19. Thyroid lymphoma on a background of Hashimoto's thyroiditis: PET/CT appearances.

    PubMed

    Mane, Mayuresh; O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shi, Min; Shinagare, Atul B; Fisher, David C

    2014-01-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma is a rare thyroid tumor accounting for only 5% of all thyroid malignancies. It is more common in patients with a background history of chronic thyroiditis. PET/CT is helpful in the initial staging and for follow up to assess treatment response.

  20. Thyroid cancer in black thyroid glands: the effect of age and race.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yasin; Crawford, Byron E; Murci, Mohammad; Masoodi, Hammad; Khan, Amna N; Hu, Tian; Kandil, Emad; Friedlander, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Black thyroid pigmentation is a rare entity. The risk of malignancy is higher in black thyroid compared to non-black thyroid glands. We aimed to examine the effect of age and race on the risk of malignancy in black thyroid glands. We identified a series of consecutive patients who underwent thyroidectomy at an academic institution between January 1998 and May 2013. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and histopathology data were reviewed. Among 925 patients who underwent thyroidectomy, 112 (12.1%) patients with black thyroid glands were identified. The incidence of thyroid cancer was 55.4% in black thyroid glands compared to 32.8% in non-black thyroid glands (p < 0.0001). The incidence of papillary thyroid cancer among the black and non-black thyroid glands was 34.8 and 20%, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean age (± SD) for patients with black thyroid glands and those with non-black thyroid was 54.3 ± 12.8 and 51.2 ± 15.7 years, respectively (p = 0.05). Black thyroid glands were also associated with a higher incidence of microcarcinomas (76 vs. 59%, p = 0.02). Among patients with black thyroid glands, Caucasians had a higher malignancy rate (63.4%) than African-Americans (37%; p = 0.03). The incidence of malignancy is higher in black thyroid compared to non-black thyroid glands, specifically in Caucasians. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Thyroid Cancer Statistics | Did You Know?

    Cancer.gov

    Thyroid cancer represents the 8th most common cancer in the United States. Did you know that this cancer, located at the base of the throat in the thyroid gland, is highly treatable and usually curable?

  2. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  3. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  4. Riedel's thyroiditis associated with hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Marín, F.; Araujo, R.; Páramo, C.; Lucas, T.; Salto, L.

    1989-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism secondary to Riedel's thyroiditis is rare, only 2 previous cases having been reported. We present the case of a 36 year old woman with Riedel's thyroiditis which developed into hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism. Images Figure 1 PMID:2608578

  5. Thyroid storm following suicide attempt by hanging

    PubMed Central

    Shrum, J M; Byers, B; Parhar, K

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 19-year-old woman with asphyxiation complicated by cardiac arrest, following an unsuccessful suicide attempt by hanging, developed an uncommon complication of trauma-induced thyroid storm. She was initially admitted to the intensive care unit intubated and mechanically ventilated for postcardiac arrest management. Investigation of thyroid storm was pursued after the patient was noted to be persistently hypertensive, tachycardic and agitated despite high levels of sedation. Thyroid function tests confirmed the clinical suspicion of progressive thyrotoxicosis, with associated imaging consistent with thyroid inflammation secondary to band-like traumatic pressure to the lower half of the thyroid gland. Treatment with β-blockers and a thionamide resulted in the eventual resolution of her thyroid storm state and normalisation of her thyroid function. We conclude that traumatically induced thyroid storm should be considered in all hypermetabolic patients following blunt neck injuries including hanging, and that traditional treatment of hyperthyroidism can be successfully applied. PMID:25008337

  6. Thyroid storm following suicide attempt by hanging.

    PubMed

    Shrum, J M; Byers, B; Parhar, K

    2014-07-09

    Summary A 19-year-old woman with asphyxiation complicated by cardiac arrest, following an unsuccessful suicide attempt by hanging, developed an uncommon complication of trauma-induced thyroid storm. She was initially admitted to the intensive care unit intubated and mechanically ventilated for postcardiac arrest management. Investigation of thyroid storm was pursued after the patient was noted to be persistently hypertensive, tachycardic and agitated despite high levels of sedation. Thyroid function tests confirmed the clinical suspicion of progressive thyrotoxicosis, with associated imaging consistent with thyroid inflammation secondary to band-like traumatic pressure to the lower half of the thyroid gland. Treatment with β-blockers and a thionamide resulted in the eventual resolution of her thyroid storm state and normalisation of her thyroid function. We conclude that traumatically induced thyroid storm should be considered in all hypermetabolic patients following blunt neck injuries including hanging, and that traditional treatment of hyperthyroidism can be successfully applied. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Triple ectopic thyroid: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Nilegaonkar, Sujit; Naik, Chetna; Sonar, Sameer; Hirawe, Deepti

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid tissue is an uncommon congenital aberration. It is extremely rare to have three ectopic foci at three different sites. The thyroid scan has been used successfully to diagnose ectopic thyroid tissue. We report a case of ectopic thyroid tissue at base of tongue, another at the level of hyoid and third one as aberrant tissue at suprahyoid location in a 16 year old female who presented with swelling in front of neck. This patient was clinically diagnosed as thyroglossal cyst and was being planned for surgery. Preoperative thyroid scan helped in establishing diagnosis of ectopic thyroid which was the only functioning thyroid tissue. Thus, it prevented unnecessary surgery. Therefore it is suggested that thyroid scan and USG/CT scan must be done as routine work up in neck swellings pre operatively to avoid unnecessary surgeries. PMID:23559716

  8. Lenvatinib approved for certain thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    The FDA approved lenvatinib to treat progressive, differentiated thyroid cancer, potentially offering the most effective treatment to date for a subset of thyroid cancer patients who do not respond to standard therapy.

  9. Thyroid nodules and cancers in children.

    PubMed

    Josefson, Jami; Zimmerman, Donald

    2008-09-01

    The incidence of thyroid nodules in children is estimated to be 1 to 1.5% based on clinical examination. Children with thyroid nodules, compared to adults with thyroid nodules, have a fourfold greater risk of developing malignant thyroid disease. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common pediatric endocrine tumor, constituting 0.5-3% of all childhood malignancies. The thyroid is one of the most frequent sites of secondary neoplasm in children who receive radiation therapy for other malignancies. Thyroid carcinoma has been studied extensively in adults. However, the pediatric literature on this subject is much less complete, owing to the rarity of its diagnosis. This article reviews the predisposing factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis , clinical presentation, detailed treatment and follow-up management of children with thyroid carcinoma. Additionally, a discussion regarding the controversial aspects of radioiodine therapy in children is included.

  10. Sarcoma of the thyroid region mimicking Riedel's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Montaner, A; Beltran, M; d Romero; Oliva, H

    2001-01-01

    Because sarcomas of the anterior lower neck region occur so infrequently, they are not usually considered in the differential diagnosis of Riedel's thyroiditis. Riedel's thyroiditis itself may be confused on clinical grounds alone with malignant neoplasms because of its invasive features. Sarcomatoid carcinoma is the main entity to be discarded in this regard. This is accomplished through histological examination by the finding of carcinomatous areas and/or reactivity with epithelial markers. These features also set apart sarcomatoid carcinoma from true sarcomas. This report concerns a patient with a sarcoma of the anterior lower neck region which was initially suspected to be Riedel's thyroiditis or sarcomatoid carcinoma on clinical and radiological grounds. A peroperative biopsy was interpreted by two independent pathologists as consistent with Riedel's thyroiditis. The subsequent clinical course and postmortem examination demonstrated a high grade sarcoma with metastasis to both lungs and the pleura, and invasion of adjacent neck structures. Nevertheless, some areas of the postmortem material showed a microscopic pattern similar to mediastinal fibrosis, raising the possibility of the malignant transformation of a fibrosclerotic lesion. Key Words: Riedel's thyroiditis • sarcomatoid carcinoma • fibrous histiocytoma • differential diagnosis PMID:11429435

  11. Flavonoids, Thyroid Iodide Uptake and Thyroid Cancer—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Carlos F. L.; de Freitas, Mariana L.; Ferreira, Andrea C. F.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant tumor of the endocrine system and the incidence has been increasing in recent years. In a great part of the differentiated carcinomas, thyrocytes are capable of uptaking iodide. In these cases, the main therapeutic approach includes thyroidectomy followed by ablative therapy with radioiodine. However, in part of the patients, the capacity to concentrate iodide is lost due to down-regulation of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), the protein responsible for transporting iodide into the thyrocytes. Thus, therapy with radioiodide becomes ineffective, limiting therapeutic options and reducing the life expectancy of the patient. Excessive ingestion of some flavonoids has been associated with thyroid dysfunction and goiter. Nevertheless, studies have shown that some flavonoids can be beneficial for thyroid cancer, by reducing cell proliferation and increasing cell death, besides increasing NIS mRNA levels and iodide uptake. Recent data show that the flavonoids apingenin and rutin are capable of increasing NIS function and expression in vivo. Herein we review literature data regarding the effect of flavonoids on thyroid cancer, besides the effect of these compounds on the expression and function of the sodium-iodide symporter. We will also discuss the possibility of using flavonoids as adjuvants for therapy of thyroid cancer. PMID:28604619

  12. Clinical concepts on thyroid emergencies.

    PubMed

    Papi, Giampaolo; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Pontecorvi, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid-related emergencies are caused by overt dysfunction of the gland which are so severe that require admission to intensive care units (ICU) frequently. Nonetheless, in the ICU setting, it is crucial to differentiate patients with non-thyroidal illness and alterations in thyroid function tests from those with intrinsic thyroid disease. This review presents and discusses the main etiopathogenetical and clinical aspects of hypothyroid coma (HC) and thyrotoxic storm (TS), including therapeutic strategy flow-charts. Furthermore, a special chapter is dedicated to the approach to massive goiter, which represents a surgical thyroid emergency. We searched the electronic MEDLINE database on September 2013. Data Selection and Data Extraction: Reviews, original articles, and case reports on "myxedematous coma," "HC," "thyroid storm," "TS," "massive goiter," "huge goiter," "prevalence," "etiology," "diagnosis," "therapy," and "prognosis" were selected. Severe excess or defect of thyroid hormone is rare conditions, which jeopardize the life of patients in most cases. Both HC and TS are triggered by precipitating factors, which occur in patients with severe hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis, respectively. The pillars of HC therapy are high-dose l-thyroxine and/or tri-iodothyroinine; i.v. glucocorticoids; treatment of hydro-electrolyte imbalance (mainly, hyponatraemia); treatment of hypothermia; often, endotracheal intubation and assisted mechanic ventilation are needed. Therapy of TS is based on beta-blockers, thyrostatics, and i.v. glucocorticoids; eventually, high-dose of iodide compounds or lithium carbonate may be of benefit. Surgery represents the gold standard treatment in patients with euthyroid massive nodular goiter, although new techniques - e.g., percutaneous laser ablation - are helpful in subjects at high surgical risk or refusing operation.

  13. Clinical Concepts on Thyroid Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Giampaolo; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Pontecorvi, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Thyroid-related emergencies are caused by overt dysfunction of the gland which are so severe that require admission to intensive care units (ICU) frequently. Nonetheless, in the ICU setting, it is crucial to differentiate patients with non-thyroidal illness and alterations in thyroid function tests from those with intrinsic thyroid disease. This review presents and discusses the main etiopathogenetical and clinical aspects of hypothyroid coma (HC) and thyrotoxic storm (TS), including therapeutic strategy flow-charts. Furthermore, a special chapter is dedicated to the approach to massive goiter, which represents a surgical thyroid emergency. Data Source: We searched the electronic MEDLINE database on September 2013. Data Selection and Data Extraction: Reviews, original articles, and case reports on “myxedematous coma,” “HC,” “thyroid storm,” “TS,” “massive goiter,” “huge goiter,” “prevalence,” “etiology,” “diagnosis,” “therapy,” and “prognosis” were selected. Data Synthesis and Conclusion: Severe excess or defect of thyroid hormone is rare conditions, which jeopardize the life of patients in most cases. Both HC and TS are triggered by precipitating factors, which occur in patients with severe hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis, respectively. The pillars of HC therapy are high-dose l-thyroxine and/or tri-iodothyroinine; i.v. glucocorticoids; treatment of hydro-electrolyte imbalance (mainly, hyponatraemia); treatment of hypothermia; often, endotracheal intubation and assisted mechanic ventilation are needed. Therapy of TS is based on beta-blockers, thyrostatics, and i.v. glucocorticoids; eventually, high-dose of iodide compounds or lithium carbonate may be of benefit. Surgery represents the gold standard treatment in patients with euthyroid massive nodular goiter, although new techniques – e.g., percutaneous laser ablation – are helpful in subjects at high surgical risk or refusing operation. PMID:25071718

  14. The thyroid and metabolism: the action continues.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, Anthony N; Forrest, Douglas

    2008-07-01

    On March 27, 2008, the American Thyroid Association sponsored a research summit on the Thyroid and Metabolism. The goals of the summit were to explore emerging new concepts and potential therapies arising from recent insights into the action of thyroid hormone signaling. New advances have identified functions previously thought to be distinct from thyroid hormone signaling pathways and suggest new avenues of therapy for metabolic disease.

  15. Parasitic thyroid nodules: cancer or not?

    PubMed

    Baker, Lauren J; Gill, Anthony J; Chan, Charles; Lin, Betty P C; Crawford, Bronwyn A

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, a 58-year-old woman presented with thyrotoxicosis. She had undergone left hemithyroidectomy 14 years before for a benign follicular adenoma. Ultrasound imaging demonstrated bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy with enhanced tracer uptake in the left lateral neck on a Technetium-99m uptake scan. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of a left lateral neck node was insufficient for a cytological diagnosis; however, thyroglobulin (Tg) washings were strongly positive. The clinical suspicion was of functionally active metastatic thyroid cancer in cervical lymph nodes. A completion thyroidectomy and bilateral cervical lymph node dissection were performed. Histology demonstrated benign multinodularity in the right hemithyroid, with bilateral reactive lymphadenopathy and 24 benign hyperplastic thyroid nodules in the left lateral neck that were classified as parasitic thyroid nodules. As there had been a clinical suspicion of thyroid cancer, and the hyperplastic/parasitic thyroid tissue in the neck was extensive, the patient was given ablative radioactive iodine (3.7 GBq). After 2 years, a diagnostic radioactive iodine scan was clear and the serum Tg was undetectable. The patient has now been followed for 7 years with no evidence of recurrence. Archived tissue from a left lateral neck thyroid nodule has recently been analysed for BRAF V600E mutation, which was negative. Thyrotoxicosis due to functional thyroid tissue in the lateral neck is very rare and may be due to metastatic thyroid cancer or benign parasitic thyroid tissue.Parasitic thyroid nodules should be considered as a differential diagnosis of lateral neck thyroid deposits, particularly where there is a history of prior thyroid surgery.Parasitic thyroid nodules may occur as a result of traumatic rupture or implantation from a follicular adenoma at the time of surgery.The use of ablative radioactive iodine may be appropriate, as resection of all parasitic thyroid tissue can prove difficult.BRAF mutational analysis

  16. Concurrent medullary and papillary carcinoma of thyroid.

    PubMed

    Ateşpare, Altay; Çalış, Aslı Batur; Çelik, Öner; Yener, Neşe; Vural, Çetin

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in the same thyroid gland is a rare condition. These tumors derive from different cells; PTC originates from follicular cells whereas MTC originates from parafollicular cells. Because of this, the treatment of these tumors also differs. This article describes two rare cases of the simultaneous occurrence of MTC and PTC in the thyroid gland.

  17. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27034829

  18. Dual ectopic thyroid gland: sonography and scintigraphy of lingual and sublingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Marković, Vinko; Glavina, Gordana; Eterović, Davor; Punda, Ante; Brdar, Dubravka

    2014-06-01

    Dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid gland is an extraordinarily rare condition. We present 1 patient with subclinical hypothyroidism. The clinical examination revealed that the thyroid gland was not palpable in its usual cervical location, whereas ultrasonography confirmed an empty thyroid bed without any ectopic thyroid tissue in the rest of the neck. The final diagnosis of dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid was established by ultrasound examination through the mouth floor and confirmed by scintigraphy and CT thereafter.

  19. MRI-based three-dimensional thermal physiological characterization of thyroid gland of human body.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; He, Zhi Zhu; Yang, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    This article is dedicated to present a MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) based three-dimensional finite element modeling on the thermal manifestations relating to the pathophysiology of thyroid gland. An efficient approach for identifying the metabolic dysfunctions of thyroid has also been demonstrated through tracking the localized non-uniform thermal distribution or enhanced dynamic imaging. The temperature features over the skin surface and thyroid domain have been characterized using the numerical simulation and experimental measurement which will help better interpret the thermal physiological mechanisms of the thyroid under steady-state or water-cooling condition. Further, parametric simulations on the hypermetabolism symptoms of hyperthyroidism and thermal effects within thyroid domain caused by varying breathing airflow in the trachea and blood-flow in artery and vein were performed. It was disclosed that among all the parameters, the airflow volume has the largest effect on the total heat flux of thyroid surface. However, thermal contributions caused by varying the breathing frequency and blood-flow velocity are negligibly small. The present study suggests a generalized way for simulating the close to reality physiological behavior or process of human thyroid, which is of significance for disease diagnosis and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of HMGI-C protein synthesis suppresses retrovirally induced neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Manfioletti, G; Santoro, M; Bandiera, A; Visconti, R; Giancotti, V; Fusco, A

    1995-01-01

    Elevated expression of the three high-mobility group I (HMGI) proteins (HMGI, HMGY, and HMGI-C) has previously been correlated with the presence of a highly malignant phenotype in epithelial and fibroblastic rat thyroid cells and in experimental thyroid, lung, mammary, and skin carcinomas. Northern (RNA) blot and run-on analyses demonstrated that the induction of HMGI genes in transformed thyroid cells occurs at the transcriptional level. An antisense methodology to block HMGI-C protein synthesis was then used to analyze the role of this protein in the process of thyroid cell transformation. Transfection of an antisense construct for the HMGI-C cDNA into normal thyroid cells, followed by infection with transforming myeloproliferative sarcoma virus or Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, generated cell lines that expressed significant levels of the retroviral transforming oncogenes v-mos or v-ras-Ki and removed the dependency on thyroid-stimulating hormones. However, in contrast with untransfected cells or cells transfected with the sense construct, those containing the antisense construct did not demonstrate the appearance of any malignant phenotypic markers (growth in soft agar and tumorigenicity in athymic mice). A great reduction of the HMGI-C protein levels and the absence of the HMGI(Y) proteins was observed in the HMGI-C antisense-transfected, virally infected cells. Therefore, the HMGI-C protein seems to play a key role in the transformation of these thyroid cells. PMID:7862147

  1. The effects of taking chronic nitrate by drinking water on thyroid functions and morphology.

    PubMed

    Eskiocak, S; Dundar, C; Basoglu, T; Altaner, S

    2005-07-01

    Nitrate incorporation in humans takes place via drinking water and food. The water used for drinking and cooking in the goitrous areas is high in nitrate content. The aim of the present study was to evaluate both chronic effects and the dose-response relationship of nitrate on thyroid functions. A total of rats were divided into 5 work groups and sodium nitrate was added to their drinking water in different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 250 and 500 mg/l) over a 30-week period. The radioiodine uptake of thyroid was decreased in the 50 mg/l nitrate group, whereas it was increased in the 250 and 500 mg/l nitrate groups as compared to control. All hormones of thyroid gland except total thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone were decreased in the 50, 250 and 500 mg/l nitrate groups. However, the level of total thyroxin was increased in the 100 mg/l nitrate group. Thyroid gland weights were increased in all experimental groups. Histomorphological changes were observed in the 250 and 500 mg/l nitrate groups. These findings suggest that nitrate impairs thyroid function involving the hypothalamo-hypophysio-thyroid axis. This observation could contribute to the current discussion about the acceptable daily intake of nitrate, as well as drinking water nitrate standard safety margins.

  2. Application of Absorbable Hemostatic Materials Observed in Thyroid Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Ming; Liang, Zhen-Zhen; Song, Yan

    2016-05-01

    To observe the application effects of the absorbable hemostatic materials in thyroid operation. Methods: From May 2014 to January 2015, 100 patients with thyroid surgery in our university affiliated hospital were selected as the research object. Randomly divided into experimental group and control group, 50 cases in each group. Application of absorbable hemostatic hemostatic materials in the experimental group during the operation, the control group using the traditional mechanical methods of hemostasis hemostasis to observe the operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative drainage volume, complications and hospital stay of the two groups. Results: The operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative drainage and hospital stay in the experimental group were significantly lower in the study group than in the control group, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P< 0.05); The satisfaction of patients in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group, the difference was statistically significant in the two groups (P < 0.05); There was no significant difference in the incidence of wound bleeding complications between the study group and the control group (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Absorbable hemostatic materials can effectively shorten the operation time, reduce intraoperative blood loss and postoperative drainage, reduce the length of hospital stay and improve the success rate of surgery and patient satisfaction, which is worthy to be popularized in clinical thyroid surgery.

  3. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  4. Thyroid hormone dysfunction during pregnancy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Aynadis; Terefe, Betelihem; Abebe, Molla; Biadgo, Belete

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunctions such as hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules may develop during pregnancy leading to abortion, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Epidemiological data have shown the significant role of maternal thyroid hormone in fetal neurologic development and maternal health. It has been suggested that the deleterious effects of thyroid dysfunction can also extend beyond pregnancy and delivery to affect neuro-intellectual development in the early life of the child. Pregnancy poses an important challenge to the maternal thyroid gland as hormone requirements are increased during gestation as a result of an increase in thyroid- binding globulin, the stimulatory effect of HCG on TSH receptors, and increased peripheral thyroid hormone requirements. Maternal thyroid dysfunction is associated with increased risk for early abortion, preterm delivery, neonatal morbidity and other obstetrical complications. Early diagnosis for thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women and treatment of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is important and cost effective to avoid both fetal and maternal complications secondary to thyroid dysfunction. Therefore the aim of this review was to assess the thyroid function changes occurring during pregnancy, the different disorders with their maternal and fetal implications, the laboratory diagnosis and the best ways of management of these conditions. PMID:27981252

  5. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer and the age of the patient: Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients younger than 45 years Stage I: ... the body, such as the lungs or bones. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer in patients 45 years and older Stage I: ...

  7. Thyroid disorders during pregnancy and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2015-07-01

    An awareness of the gestational changes to thyroid physiology and the impact of uncontrolled thyroid disease on pregnancy and infant outcome is essential for the successful management of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. This review summarizes strategies for the management of thyroid disease in pregnancy and post partum, and it highlights areas where there is still a lack of consensus.

  8. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer: are they immunologically linked?

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Margret; Schott, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most common autoimmune disease in humans frequently leading to hypothyroidism. HT is characterized by a cellular immune response with lymphatic infiltration of the thyroid gland by T and B cells, as well as by a humoral immune response leading to specific antibody production. The synchronous appearance of HT and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) indicates an immunological link between the two entities. Three different pathomechanisms may be postulated, including preexisting autoimmunity leading to malignancy due to inflammation, immunity towards preexisiting tumor cells leading to specific autoimmunity, and immune tolerance leading to malignancy despite (auto)immunity. In this article we review data describing these potential mechanisms that might lead to the synchronous appearance of HT and PTC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Intraoperative neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Motos-Micó, José Jacob; Felices-Montes, Manuel; Abad-Aguilar, Teresa

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery facilitates the identification of anatomical structures in cervical endocrine surgery reducing the frequency of vocal cord paralysis. To study the normal electrophysiological values of the vague and recurrent laryngeal nerves before and after thyroid surgery. To compare rates of injury of recurrent nerve before and after the introduction of the intraoperative neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery. An observational, descriptive and prospective study in which a total of 490 patients were included. Between 2003-2010, surgery was performed on 411 patients (703 nerves at risk) with systematic identification of recurrent laryngeal nerves. Between 2010-2011 neuromonitorization was also systematically performed on 79 patients. Before the introduction of intraoperative neuromonitoring of 704 nerves at risk, there were 14 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries. Since 2010, after the introduction of the intraoperative neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery, there has been no nerve injury in 135 nerves at risk. We consider the systematic identification of the recurrent laryngeal nerve is the 'gold standard' in thyroid surgery and the intraoperative neuromonitoring of nerves can never replace surgery but can complement it. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Thyroid Ultrasonography in Differentiation between Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Pishdad, P; Pishdad, G R; Tavanaa, S; Pishdad, R; Jalli, R

    2017-03-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common causes of hyper and hypothyroidism, respectively. Differentiation of these 2 diseases, if the patient is euthyroid, may sometimes be extremely difficult on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of gray scale sonography in differentiation of Graves' disease from Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study included 149 patients divided into three groups, patients with Graves' disease (34 patients, mean age = 36.8 ± 10.17 years), Patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (62 patients, mean age = 33.4 ± 12.16 years) and control group (53 healthy people, mean age = 34.74 ± 16.87 years). Members of all groups were referred to a single radiologist for thyroid sonography for evaluation of thyroid echogenicity pattern. A total of 117 women and 32 men were examined by sonography. The most common sonographic pattern in Hashimoto and Graves' was homogenous hypo-echogenicity which was observed in 45.2% and 47.1% of cases, respectively. Peripheral hypo-echogenicity pattern was seen in 40.3% of Hashimoto's group with 100% specificity and 40.3% sensitivity. Central-hypoechogenic pattern was observed in 17.6% of Graves' group with 100% and 17.6% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Our findings indicate that sonography has high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It is therefore not possible to differentiate between these two diseases using sonography alone. Confirmation by laboratory data is also needed.

  11. [Thyroid and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Gallowitsch, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-10-01

    The cardiocirculatory changes in hyperthyroidism seem to be an accommodation to the increased metabolic demands and lead to an increased perfusion of the peripheral tissues. Due to the influence of elevated thyroid hormone levels, contractility, stroke volume, resting heart rate, and contraction and relaxation velocity of the left ventricle increase. Caused by direct effect on the smooth vascular muscle, systemic vascular resistance is decreased with the consequence of a diminished afterload and an increased cardiac efficiency. The activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system and the increased production of erythropoietin additionally lead to an increased blood volume, which increases cardiac preload together with the increased venous backflow. Manifest hypothyroidism is characterized by bradycardia and diastolic dysfunction in rest and systolic dysfunction at stress. Despite a slight increase of diastolic blood pressure due to an increased systemic vascular resistance, blood pressure remains nearly stable because of diminished cardiac output. Hypercholesterinaemia and diastolic hypertension in hypothyroid patients can lead to the development of arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Also subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significantly higher risk for arteriosclerosis and CHD, whereas subclinical hyperthyroidism seems to be associated with an increased mortality for all reasons, especially for cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Cediranib Maleate With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-09

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  13. Thyroid profiles in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone and episodes of thyrotoxicosis, including repeated painless thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Matsuo; Otsuka, Fumiko; Tozaki, Teruaki; Ban, Yoshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Thyrotoxic disease can be difficult to recognize in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) because the clinical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis cannot be observed, and thyrotropin (TSH) may not be suppressed because of hormone resistance. Painless thyroiditis is a relatively common cause of thyrotoxicosis, but its occurrence in RTH has not been reported. We assessed the thyroid profile in a patient with RTH and episodes of thyrotoxicosis who experienced repeated painless thyroiditis. A 44-year-old Japanese woman with RTH, which was confirmed by the presence of a P453A mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) gene, showed a slight elevation of the basal levels of thyroid hormones, which indicated that her pituitary RTH was mild. She experienced a slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia concomitant with TSH suppression. A diagnosis of painless thyroiditis was made because of the absence of TSH receptor antibodies, low Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake by the thyroid gland, and transient suppression followed by a slight elevation of TSH following the elevation of thyroid hormones. The patient's complaints of general malaise and occasional palpitations did not change throughout the course of painless thyroiditis. Three years later, painless thyroiditis occurred again without any deterioration of the clinical manifestations. Mild pituitary RTH can be overcome by slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia during mild thyrotoxicosis. When pituitary resistance is severe and TSH is not suppressed, thyrotoxicosis may be overlooked.

  14. Lingual thyroid. Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kansal, P.; Sakati, N.; Rifai, A.; Woodhouse, N.

    1987-11-01

    We describe four patients who presented with a lingual thyroid condition (three females and one male, aged between 7 and 22 years). Only the male patient was symptomatic with mild dysphagia and hemoptysis. The diagnosis was suspected in three patients, and was confirmed by iodine 123 or 131 scanning in all patients and by a computed tomographic scan in the one patient studied. The patient with dysphagia received a 10-mCl therapeutic dose of iodine 131 before thyroxine replacement was started. The diagnosis and management of lingual thyroid is discussed. All patients need lifelong thyroxine suppression. Unenhanced computed tomographic scans have a diagnostic appearance due to the iodine content of the ectopic thyroid tissue.

  15. Thyroid hormone disorders and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Yu, Zhui; Li, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality, which results from severe infection and can lead to secondary organ dysfunction. It is one of the most common cause of death in intensive care unit. Clinical reports have shown that sepsis was often accompanied by thyroid dysfunction, which is called "low triiodothyronine (T3)" syndrome and characterized by decreased blood total T3 and free T3, and by normal or decreased thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This syndrome may greatly affect the prognosis of patients with sepsis. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the role of thyroid hormone disorder in the development and prognosis of sepsis.

  16. Expression of thyroid-specific transcription factors in thyroid carcinoma, contralateral thyroid lobe and healthy thyroid gland in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pessina, P; Castillo, V; Araújo, M; Carriquiry, M; Meikle, A

    2012-08-01

    Thyrotropin receptor (TSH-R), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroperoxidase (TPO), thyroid specific transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), paired box 8 transcription factor (PAX-8), insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) transcripts were determined by real-time PCR in follicular carcinoma and contralateral (CL) lobes, and healthy thyroid canine glands. Concentrations of TSH-R, PAX-8, and ERα mRNA were not different among groups; the carcinoma group had lower Tg and TPO mRNA than healthy and CL groups, while no differences were found between the two latter groups, suggesting that the carcinoma tissue presents an altered capacity to synthesize thyroid hormones. The transcription factor that promotes thyrocytes proliferation, TTF-1 as well as IGF-1, presented a greater mRNA expression in the CL group, suggesting that the CL lobe may function in a compensatory state. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  17. Intravascular lymphoma and thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Katalinić, Darko; Valković, Toni; Lucin, Ksenija; Rudez, Josip

    2006-03-01

    Intravascular lymphoma (IVL) is a rare disease characterized by the proliferation of neoplastic cells in the small blood vessels that frequently goes undiagnosed until the time of autopsy. The neoplastic cells are usually of B-cell origin. The clinical course was examined to determine factors that would facilitate antemortem diagnosis. IVL is observed with clinical, histopathological and immunohystochemical methods. This is a unique case because the thyroid gland is a rare place for IVL. Accent is given on immunohystochemical methods and tissue biopsy in the differential diagnosis of IVL when nervous system and thyroid gland dysfunction occur This report indicates that micro-ecosystem of multinodular goitrous might influence the expression of chemokines and/or adhesion moleculs on endothelial and lymphoma cells, leading to heavy infiltration of thyroid gland. Concurrently, that may guide the physician to tissue biopsy facilitating antemortem diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy.

  18. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  19. Systemic Sarcoidosis with Thyroid Involvement.

    PubMed

    Okuma, Hideyuki; Hashimoto, Koshi; Wang, Xin; Ohkiba, Noriaki; Murooka, Nozomi; Akizuki, Norikazu; Inazawa, Takeshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-08-15

    A 66-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with iritis, visited our hospital due to general malaise. A blood analysis revealed hypercalcemia. Computed tomography revealed mediastinal and hilar lymph node hyperplasia. Moreover, (67)Gallium scintigraphy demonstrated strong accumulation in the lesions, suggesting sarcoidosis. A core needle biopsy (CNB) of the hypoechoic areas of the thyroid was performed because the patient refused to undergo a bronchoscopic examination. The scattering of slightly acidophilic epithelioid cell granulomas was observed in the pathological examination of the biopsy specimen. Based on this finding, the patient was diagnosed with sarcoidosis. Although sarcoidosis rarely involves the thyroid gland, in the present case, thyroid CNB was an alternative diagnostic method that allowed a pathological diagnosis to be obtained.

  20. The effect of thymic inoculation to induce tolerance of allogeneic thyroid grafts in the outbred rabbit.

    PubMed

    Torchia, M G; Aitken, R M; Thliveris, A

    1998-10-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that allograft tolerance can be achieved in inbred rats and mice following intrathymic injection of donor cells or antigen and treatment with antilymphocyte serum (ALS). In outbred dogs, xenografts, and inbred rat strains with major MHC antigen difference, tolerance has not similarly been induced. The focus of this study was to determine whether allogeneic thyroid graft tolerance could be achieved in outbred rabbits. In the experimental group (n = 5), recipients received an intrathymic injection of donor lymphocytes and a single treatment of ALS. Controls (n = 5) received intrathymic cell culture medium and ALS treatment. Donor-recipient allogenicity was monitored with mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) over 18 weeks. Donor thyroid tissue was placed into recipient gluteal muscle fibres one week following the last MLC measurement. A third group of rabbits (n = 4) received thyroid autografts without any other treatment. There were no differences in MLC stimulation indices (SI) between the control and experimental group nor did MLC (SI) change within groups. All thyroid autografts survived the two week monitoring period and demonstrated normal appearing thyroid follicles on histologic examination. All thyroid allografts showed severe acute rejection reactions on biopsy within one week. Further studies using outbred animals to examine the role of thymic inoculation are required to determine whether similar techniques might be successful in the human.

  1. [Thyroid nodules: clinical management and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Giovanella, L

    2009-01-21

    Thyroid nodules are common and are frequently benign. The prevalence of thyroid nodules ranges from 3-7% (palpation) to 50% (ultrasonography). Thyroid cancer occurs in 5-10% of nodules. Thyroid ultrasonography (US) is not a screening test but all patients with palpable thyroid nodule should undergo US examination. US-guided fine-needle aspiration citology (FNC) is recommendend for nodules with suspicious features at US examination or when clinical risk factors occur. A radioisotope scan is useful if the TSH is low or suppressed to detect (benign) functioning nodules.

  2. Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone has profound effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. This article describes the cellular mechanisms by which thyroid hormone acts at the level of the cardiac myocyte and the vascular smooth muscle cell to alter phenotype and physiology. Because it is well established that thyroid hormone, specifically T(3), acts on almost every cell and organ in the body, studies on the regulation of thyroid hormone transport into cardiac and vascular tissue have added clinical significance. The characteristic changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics and metabolism that accompany thyroid disease states can then be best understood at the cellular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology of thyroid diseases in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ogbera, Anthonia Okeoghene; Kuku, Sonny Folunrusho

    2011-01-01

    Background: Thyroid disorders are common endocrine disorders encountered in the African continent. Environmental and nutritional factors are often implicated in the occurrence of some thyroid disorders that occur in this part of the world. This is a narrative review that seeks to document the pattern, prevalence, and management of thyroid disorders in the continent. Materials and Methods: The search engine used for this review were PubMed and Google scholar. All available articles on thyroid disorders from the sub-African continent, published until May 2011, were included. Results: Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) which top the list of thyroid disorders and remain the commonest cause of thyroid disorders in the continent is often affected not only by the iodine status in the region but sometimes also by selenium deficiency and thiocyanate toxicity. The reported prevalence rates of endemic goiter range from 1% to 90% depending on the area of study with myxedematous cretinism still a prominent feature of IDD in only a few regions of the continent. The extent of autoimmune thyroid disorders remains unknown because of underdiagnosis and underreporting but the few available studies note a prevalence rate of 1.2% to 9.9% of which Graves diseases is the commonest of these groups of disorders. Rarer causes of thyroid dysfunction such as thyroid tuberculosis and amiodarone related causes are also documented in this review. The onset of new thyroid diseases following amiodarone usage was documented in 27.6% of persons treated for arrhythmia. Reports on thyroid malignancies (CA) in Africa abound and differentiated thyroid malignancies are noted to occur more commonly than the other forms of thyroid CA. The documented prevalence rates of thyroid CA in the African continent are as follows (papillary: 6.7–72.1%, follicular: 4.9–68%, anaplastic: 5–21.4%, and medullary: 2.6%–13.8%). For the differentiated thyroid CA, there is a changing trend toward the more frequent

  4. Thyroid consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Pacini, F; Vorontsova, T; Molinaro, E; Shavrova, E; Agate, L; Kuchinskaya, E; Elisei, R; Demidchik, E P; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    It is well recognized that the use of external irradiation of the head and neck to treat patients with various non-thyroid disorders increases their risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma years after radiation exposure. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has also been reported in survivors of the atomic bombs in Japan, as well as in Marshall Island residents exposed to radiation during the testing of hydrogen bombs. More recently, exposure to radioactive fallout as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident has clearly caused an enormous increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid carcinoma in Belarus, Ukraine, and, to a lesser extent, in the Russian Federation, starting in 1990. When clinical and epidemiological features of thyroid carcinomas diagnosed in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident are compared with those of naturally occurring thyroid carcinomas in patients of the same age group in Italy and France, it becomes apparent that the post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinomas were much less influenced by gender, virtually always papillary (solid and follicular variants), more aggressive at presentation and more frequently associated with thyroid autoimmunity. Gene mutations involving the RET proto-oncogene, and less frequently TRK, have been shown to be causative events specific for papillary cancer. RET activation was found in nearly 70% of the patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinomas following the Chernobyl accident. In addition to thyroid cancer, radiation-induced thyroid diseases include benign thyroid nodules, hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis, with or without thyroid insufficiency, as observed in populations after environmental exposure to radioisotopes of iodine and in the survivors of atomic bomb explosions. On this basis, the authors evaluated thyroid autoimmune phenomena in normal children exposed to radiation after the Chernobyl accident. The results demonstrated an increased prevalence of circulating thyroid

  5. Mixed cryoglobulinemia and thyroid autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, P; Ferrari, S M; Giuggioli, D; Corrado, A; Fabiani, S; Marchi, S; Ferri, C; Antonelli, A

    2013-01-01

    In patients with hepatitis C virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC+HCV) the following thyroid disorders are significantly more frequent than in HCV not infected controls: 1) high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase autoantibody (AbTPO), 2) high levels of serum AbTPO and/or anti-thyroglobulin (AbTg) autoantibody; 3) humoral and ultrasonographical signs of thyroid autoimmunity (35%); 4) prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (11%). Also, the prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer has been found higher in MC+HCV patients than in controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. These results suggest a careful monitoring of thyroid function in these patients.

  6. [Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Límanová, Zdeňka; Jiskra, Jan

    Cardiovascular system is essentially affected by thyroid hormones by way of their genomic and non-genomic effects. Untreated overt thyroid dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Although it has been studied more than 3 decades, in subclinical thyroid dysfunction the negative effect on cardiovascular system is much more controversial. Large meta-analyses within last 10 years have shown that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with higher cardiovascular risk than subclinical hypothyroidism. Conversely, in patients of age > 85 years subclinical hypothyroidism was linked with lower mortality. Therefore, subclinical hyperthyroidism should be rather treated in the elderly while subclinical hypothyroidism in the younger patients and the older may be just followed. An important problem on the border of endocrinology and cardiology is amiodarone thyroid dysfunction. Effective and safe treatment is preconditioned by distinguishing of type 1 and type 2 amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism. The type 1 should be treated with methimazol, therapeutic response is prolonged, according to recent knowledge immediate discontinuation of amiodarone is not routinely recommended and patient should be usually prepared to total thyroidectomy, or rather rarely 131I radioiodine ablation may be used if there is appropriate accumulation. In the type 2 there is a promt therapeutic response on glucocorticoids (within 1-2 weeks) with permanent remission or development of hypothyroidism. If it is not used for life-threatening arrhytmias, amiodarone may be discontinuated earlier (after several weeks). Amiodarone induced hypothyroidism is treated with levothyroxine without amiodarone interruption.Key words: amiodarone induced thyroid dysfunction - atrial fibrillation - cardiovascular risk - heart failure - hyperthyroidism - hypothyroidism - thyroid stimulating hormone.

  7. [The implementation of computer model in research of dynamics of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle].

    PubMed

    Abduvaliev, A A; Gil'dieva, M S; Khidirov, B N; Saĭdalieva, M; Khasanov, A A; Musaeva, Sh N; Saatov, T S

    2012-04-01

    The article deals with the results of computational experiments in research of dynamics of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle in normal condition and in the case of malignant neoplasm. The model studies demonstrated that the chronic increase of parameter of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle results in abnormal behavior of numbers of cell cenosis of thyroid gland follicle. The stationary state interrupts, the auto-oscillations occur with transition to irregular oscillations with unpredictable cell proliferation and further to the "black hole" effect. It is demonstrated that the present medical biologic experimental data and theory propositions concerning the structural functional organization of thyroid gland on cell level permit to develop mathematical models for quantitative analysis of numbers of cell cenosis of thyroid gland follicle in normal conditions. The technique of modeling of regulative mechanisms of living systems and equations of cell cenosis regulations was used

  8. Case of concurrent Riedel's thyroiditis, acute suppurative thyroiditis, and micropapillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Taek; Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, So Hun; Hong, Seong Bin; Nam, Moonsuk; Kim, Yong Seong; Chu, Young Chae

    2013-03-01

    Riedel's thyroiditis (RT) is a rare chronic inflammatory disease of the thyroid gland. It is characterized by a fibroinflammatory process that partially destroys the gland and extends into adjacent neck structures. Its clinical manifestation can mask an accompanying thyroid neoplasm and can mimic invasive thyroid carcinoma. Therefore, diagnosis can be difficult prior to surgical removal of the thyroid, and histopathologic examination of the thyroid is necessary for a definite diagnosis. The concurrent presence of RT and other thyroid diseases has been reported. However, to our knowledge, the association of RT with acute suppurative thyroiditis and micropapillary carcinoma has not been reported. We report a rare case of concurrent RT, acute suppurative thyroiditis, and micropapillary carcinoma in a 48-year-old patient.

  9. Transient diffuse low thyroid echogenicity in painless postpartum thyroiditis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Fierro-Renoy, J F

    1999-11-01

    We report two cases of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, one patient with recurrent painless thyroiditis and another with recurrent postpartum thyroiditis. In these two patients, the episode of subacute thyroiditis seemed to be immune mediated. Thyroid ultrasonography showed a diffuse, markedly hypoechogenic gland, coinciding with each of the episodes of transient thyroid dysfunction that reverted to a normal echographic appearance with recovery of normal thyroid function. These two cases show that a diffuse low echogenicity of the thyroid, frequently seen in autoimmune thyroid disorders, can be a reversible event and suggest that the transient nature of certain forms of hypothyroidism may be predicted by a follow-up echographic examination. Further studies with a larger number of patients are required to confirm this observation.

  10. Diagnostic Dilemma in Discordant Thyroid Function Tests Due to Thyroid Hormone Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Srichomkwun, Panudda; Scherberg, Neal H.; Jakšić, Jasminka; Refetoff, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assay interference could be the cause of abnormal thyroid function tests. Early recognition prevents inappropriate patient management. The objective of this report is to present a case with discordant thyroid function tests in different thyroid assay platforms due to thyroid autoantibodies. Methods We present a case her family, laboratory data and methods that investigate immunoassay interference. Results A 21-year-old woman with autoimmune thyroid disease was treated for hypothyroidism with levothyroxine and noted to have elevated total and free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine but normal thyroid-stimulating hormone. Repeat thyroid function tests using different platforms revealed discrepant results. Further investigation showed that the patient had positive thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAAbs). Conclusion We demonstrates abnormal thyroid function tests caused by THAAbs. The latter were the cause of interference with assays resulting in discrepant test results inconsistent with the clinical presentation. Early recognition would prevent inappropriate patient management. PMID:28078322

  11. Occult multifocal papillary thyroid microcarcinoma presenting as a supraclavicular mass containing anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deutschmann, Michael; Khalil, Moosa; Bhayana, Shelly; Chandarana, Shamir

    2013-04-01

    There are reports in the literature of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in cervical lymph nodes with evidence of only papillary carcinoma in the thyroid gland. There have been no cases of this clinical scenario with only papillary microcarcinoma in the thyroid gland. We describe the case of a 60-year-old man who initially presented with an enlarged right, level 5, supraclavicular lymph node. Initial fine-needle aspiration demonstrated evidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The final pathologic finding in the thyroid gland showed only multiple foci of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. The index neck mass showed evidence of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. This is the first instance in the literature in which anaplastic thyroid carcinoma has appeared in metastatic cervical lymph nodes with only a focus of papillary microcarcinoma in the thyroid gland. With this case, we hope to build awareness of this rare finding.

  12. New developments in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Robert I

    2013-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is common but rarely deadly. Unfortunately, when the disease becomes refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI), few effective treatment options remain. This situation is changing, however, with the availability of multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cabozantanib and vandetanib, both recently FDA-approved for advanced or metastatic disease, have more than doubled progression-free survival in medullary thyroid cancer. New agents in the pipeline may yield even better outcomes, as discussed by Dr. Robert I. Haddad at the NCCN 18th Annual Conference.

  13. Update of Thyroid Developmental Genes.

    PubMed

    Stoupa, Athanasia; Kariyawasam, Dulanjalee; Carré, Aurore; Polak, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid dysgenesis (TD) is the most common cause of congenital hypothyroidism in iodine-sufficient regions and includes a spectrum of developmental anomalies. The genetic components of TD are complex. Although a sporadic disease, advances in developmental biology have revealed monogenetic forms of TD. Inheritance is not based on a simple Mendelian pattern and additional genetic elements might contribute to the phenotypic spectrum. This article summarizes the key steps of normal thyroid development and provides an update on responsible genes and underlying mechanisms of TD. Up-to-date technologies in genetics and biology will allow us to advance in our knowledge of TD.

  14. Rheumatic symptoms in autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) is generally regarded as a classic example of single organ autoimmunity with a high association with endocrine thyroid disorders. However, it is closely associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatologic syndromes and has long been known to have several rheumatic manifestations particularly in association with hypothyroidism. More recently, it has also been implicated in rheumatologic syndromes in the absence of hypothyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism. There is also an emerging body of evidence that ATD is highly linked to chronic generalized pain syndromes including fibromyalgia. This review examines the rheumatic symptoms of ATD described in the current literature and discusses the clinical relevance of ATD in general rheumatology.

  15. [Endotracheal dystopia of thyroid tissue].

    PubMed

    Otte, T; Kleinsasser, O

    1984-05-01

    Endotracheal ectopic thyroid tissue is rare. It can cause gradual obstruction of the tracheal lumen culminating in sudden dyspnoea. The diagnosis is relatively easy to make with the aid of a laryngeal mirror, by endoscopy, or by x-rays. However, it is most important to take the clinical picture into consideration. It is thought that the ectopic tissue arises from splitting of the thyroid gland during the descent in the embryonal stage. Treatment consists of removal via a tracheofissure. The tracheal mucous membrane must be treated with special care to prevent cicatricial stenosis of the trachea.

  16. Epigenetic modulators of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodero, Sandra; Delgado-Álvarez, Elías; Díaz-Naya, Lucía; Martín Nieto, Alicia; Menéndez Torre, Edelmiro

    2017-01-01

    There are some well known factors involved in the etiology of thyroid cancer, including iodine deficiency, radiation exposure at early ages, or some genetic changes. However, epigenetic modulators that may contribute to development of these tumors and be helpful to for both their diagnosis and treatment have recently been discovered. The currently known changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNAs in each type of thyroid carcinoma are reviewed here. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Papillary thyroid carcinoma: does the association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis affect the clinicopathological characteristics of the disease?

    PubMed

    Girardi, Fábio Muradás; Barra, Marinez Bizarro; Zettler, Cláudio Galleano

    2015-01-01

    Papillary carcinoma is the most common malignant thyroid neoplasm. The effect of the concurrent presence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary thyroid carcinoma remains controversial. To evaluate the association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and clinicopathological parameters in thyroid papillary carcinoma cases, based on an historical institutional cohort analysis. Cross-sectional study obtained from a historical cohort, including all cases submitted to thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma in a single institution during an 11-year period study. A total of 417 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma were enrolled; 148 (35.4%) also had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A female predominance among cases associated to Hashimoto's thyroiditis was observed. The thyroid tumor, in cases associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, had a smaller mean diameter, lower frequency of extra-thyroid extension, and earlier clinicopathological staging. A high proportion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases are associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. There are associations among these cases with several histopathological factors already recognized for their prognostic value, which by themselves could impact outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep deprivation alters thyroid hormone economy in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Nayana Coutinho; da Cruz, Natália Santos; de Paula Nascimento, Cristine; da Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues; da Silva, Alba Cenélia Matos; Olivares, Emerson Lopes; Marassi, Michelle Porto

    2015-02-01

    sleep-deprived and sleep-restricted rats; rebound restored this parameter in only the PSD24R group. The serum TSH and T4 concentrations decreased, whereas T3 increased in both the PSD24 and PSD96 groups compared with control animals (P < 0.05). Only PSD24R and PSD96R normalized T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations, respectively, independently of the higher circulating T3 concentrations (∼20-30%) noted in all groups compared with control animals (P < 0.05). Brown adipose tissue D2 activity increased in the PSD 24 and 96 h groups (∼10 times), and PSD24R was more effective than PSD96R at restoring basal brown adipose tissue D2 activity. Our data suggest that thyroid hormone metabolism adapts to sleep deprivation-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid alterations and increases T4 to T3 activation peripherally, thereby increasing circulating T3 in rats. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  19. Thyroid abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, S.L.; McDougall, I.R.; Constine, L.S.

    1995-03-30

    The thyroid gland is the largest pure endocrine gland in the body and one of the organs most likely to produce clinically significant abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation. Radiation doses to the thyroid that exceed approximately 26 Gy frequently produce hypothyroidism, which may be clinically overt or subclinical, as manifested by increased serum thyrotropin and normal serum-free thyroxine concentrations. Pituitary or hypothalamic hypothyroidism may arise when the pituitary region receives doses exceeding 50 Gy with conventional, 1.8-2 Gy fractionation. Direct irradiation of the thyroid may increase the risk of Graves` disease or euthyroid Graves` ophthalmopathy. Silent thyroiditis, cystic degeneration, benign adenoma, and thyroid cancer have been observed after therapeutically relevant doses of external radiation. Direct or incidental thyroid irradiation increases the risk for well-differentiated, papillary, and follicular thyroid cancer from 15- to 53-fold. Thyroid cancer risk is highest following radiation at a young age, decreases with increasing age at treatment, and increases with follow-up duration. The potentially prolonged latent period between radiation exposure and the development of thyroid dysfunction, thyroid nodularity, and thyroid cancer means that individuals who have received neck or pituitary irradiation require careful, periodic clinical and laboratory evaluation to avoid excess morbidity. 39 refs.

  20. Environmental Exposures and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures, ranging from perchlorate in rocket fuel to polychlorinated biphenols, have been shown to influence thyroid function. Although most of these agents are associated with reduced thyroid hormone levels or impaired thyroid hormone action, a number of environmental exposures confer an increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Summary Factors that increase autoimmune thyroid disease risk include radiation exposure, both from nuclear fallout and medical radiation, increased iodine intake, as well as several contaminants in the environment that influence the thyroid. Although ∼70% of the risk for developing autoimmune thyroid disease is attributable to genetic background, environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in susceptible individuals. Conclusions Understanding the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction can be utilized to reduce the risk to populations. Knowledge of the specific factors that trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and their mode of action, however, may also inform risk reduction in the individual patient. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease based on family history. PMID:20578899

  1. Environmental exposures and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Brent, Gregory A

    2010-07-01

    Environmental exposures, ranging from perchlorate in rocket fuel to polychlorinated biphenols, have been shown to influence thyroid function. Although most of these agents are associated with reduced thyroid hormone levels or impaired thyroid hormone action, a number of environmental exposures confer an increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Factors that increase autoimmune thyroid disease risk include radiation exposure, both from nuclear fallout and medical radiation, increased iodine intake, as well as several contaminants in the environment that influence the thyroid. Although approximately 70% of the risk for developing autoimmune thyroid disease is attributable to genetic background, environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in susceptible individuals. Understanding the association of environmental agents with thyroid dysfunction can be utilized to reduce the risk to populations. Knowledge of the specific factors that trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and their mode of action, however, may also inform risk reduction in the individual patient. These factors are especially relevant for those at increased risk of autoimmune thyroid disease based on family history.

  2. Thyroid development in zebrafish lacking Taz.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Andrea; Porreca, Immacolata; Caputi, Luigi; De Felice, Elena; Schulte-Merker, Stephan; Zannini, Mariastella; Sordino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Taz is a signal-responsive transcriptional coregulator implicated in several biological functions, from chondrogenesis to regulation of organ size. Less well studied, however, is its role in thyroid formation. Here, we explored the in vivo effects on thyroid development of morpholino (MO)-mediated knockdown of wwtr1, the gene encoding zebrafish Taz. The wwtr1 gene is expressed in the thyroid primordium and pharyngeal tissue of developing zebrafish. Compared to mammalian cells, in which Taz promotes expression of thyroid transcription factors and thyroid differentiation genes, wwtr1 MO injection in zebrafish had little or no effect on the expression of thyroid transcription factors, and differentially altered the expression of thyroid differentiation genes. Analysis of wwtr1 morphants at later stages of development revealed that the number and the lumen of thyroid follicles, and the number of thyroid follicle cells, were significantly smaller. In addition, Taz-depleted larvae displayed patterning defects in ventral cranial vessels that correlate with lateral displacement of thyroid follicles. These findings indicate that the zebrafish Taz protein is needed for the normal differentiation of the thyroid and are the first to suggest that Taz confers growth advantage to the endocrine gland.

  3. Initial surgical management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Witt, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    The rapid increase in the rate of papillary thyroid cancer is likely caused by improved surveillance. A significant trend toward total thyroidectomy for low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer is present in the United States after a paradigm shift from treatment of macroscopic disease to the treatment of macroscopic and microscopic disease by increasingly sensitive tests. Compelling arguments for thyroid lobectomy and total thyroidectomy for low-risk thyroid cancer remain. The relatively small number of deaths from thyroid cancer, the small number of clinical thyroid cancers, and the huge number of incidental thyroid cancers are indicative of how little we understand the biology of this disease. Clinical medicine awaits biologic markers to refine treatment recommendations.

  4. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  5. A rare case of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Brock; Dhillon, Manvinder Shelley; Yong-Yow, Sabrina

    2016-04-18

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening state of thyroid hormone excess. Rapid recognition of thyroid storm is key to decreasing the morbidity and mortality of this condition. Clinical manifestations of thyroid storm include unexplained weight loss, hyperactivity and irritability. The most common causes of thyrotoxicosis are Graves' disease, toxic multinodular goitre and toxic adenoma. We present a rare case of thyroid storm induced by dual nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy in a patient receiving treatment for advanced melanoma. In this case, our patient was admitted for thyroid storm 1 month after initiating treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy. The patient was treated with β-blockers, antithyroid medications and systemic steroids resulting in an improvement in thyroid function testing and symptoms. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Computed tomography in the evaluation of thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Newman, G.E.; Korobkin, M.; Workman, J.B.; Moore, A.V.; Coleman, R.E.

    1984-05-01

    Traditionally, thyroid imaging has been performed primarily using radionuclide scanning. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) was performed in 18 patients to evaluate the CT appearance of various thyroid abnormalities including diffuse toxic goiter, multinodular goiter, Hashimoto thyroiditis, thyroid adenoma, and malignant thyroid tumors. CT images of the thyroid were correlated with radionuclide scanning, surgical findings, and clinical and laboratory results. CT provided a complementary method for evaluation of the thyroid by defining the morphology of the thyroid gland and more precisely defining the anatomic extent of thyroid abnormalities in relation to the normal structures of the neck and mediastinum.

  7. Thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Syrigos, K N; Konstantoulakis, M M; Constantoulakis, M; Marafelia, P; Koutras, D; Golematis, B C

    1994-01-01

    Antibodies against thyroid antigens are commonly found in patients with chronic gastritis type B (20-30%) and pernicious anaemia (50%), two disorders that predispose to gastric cancer. In addition, thyroid disease in increased incidence has been reported in breast and in colon cancer. In order to determine a) the incidence of antithyroid antibodies (ATA) in gastric cancer, b) the thyroid function in patients with ATA and c) the correlation between ATA and the presence of chronic gastritis, we examined the sera of 32 patients with gastric cancer (GC) for the presence of antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies. T3, T4 and TSH values were also measured. The sera of 36 patients with malignant tumours of the GI tract other than stomach (OMT) and of 40 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Three of the 32 GC patients had antithyroglobulin antibodies, 4 had antimicrosomal and one had both types. Of the eight patients with ATA (25%) only two had hypothyroidism and another two histologically diagnosed chronic gastritis. Three sera of the healthy controls and one of the OMT had also antithyroid antibodies. To conclude, a significant number of patients with GC had ATA as compared to controls (p < 0.01) but the presence of ATA did not necessarily indicate an abnormality of thyroid function. The presence of antibodies did not correlate with chronic gastritis type B.

  8. Rare Undifferentiated Tumour of Thyroid: Primary Thyroid Fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Girgin, Sadullah; Göya, Cemil; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin; Urakçi, Zuhat

    2016-01-01

    Primary thyroid fibrosarcoma cases are very rare. Although it is a known fact that soft tissue sarcomas show slow growth, there have been some cases in literature similar to our case in which there was a fast-growing tumour tissue causing breathing and swallowing difficulties due to painless pressure. For diagnosis, there is no specific clinical or radiological finding. We report a 67-year-old male with a mobile fast-growing mass covering almost all over the neck that appeared 2 months prior to the admission. Laboratory findings showed that the patient was euthyroid. Fine needle aspiration biopsy results are consistent with suspicion of a mesenchymal, histiocytic, epithelial or lymphoid tissue origined malignancy. Patient was taken into surgical operation. The thyroid tissue invaded the main vascular structure, trachea and esophagus. Due to this situation R1 resection was applied. Immunohistopathological examination showed a conventional type of fibrosarcoma. After the surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had been planned and applied. Patients died before the radiotherapy sessions ended. It should be kept in mind that a rapid growth in thyroid tissue can be thyroid fibrosarcoma, there could be a rapid clinical course and poor prognosis after operation. PMID:27504356

  9. Rare Undifferentiated Tumour of Thyroid: Primary Thyroid Fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Bahadir, Mehmet Veysi; Girgin, Sadullah; Göya, Cemil; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin; Urakçi, Zuhat

    2016-06-01

    Primary thyroid fibrosarcoma cases are very rare. Although it is a known fact that soft tissue sarcomas show slow growth, there have been some cases in literature similar to our case in which there was a fast-growing tumour tissue causing breathing and swallowing difficulties due to painless pressure. For diagnosis, there is no specific clinical or radiological finding. We report a 67-year-old male with a mobile fast-growing mass covering almost all over the neck that appeared 2 months prior to the admission. Laboratory findings showed that the patient was euthyroid. Fine needle aspiration biopsy results are consistent with suspicion of a mesenchymal, histiocytic, epithelial or lymphoid tissue origined malignancy. Patient was taken into surgical operation. The thyroid tissue invaded the main vascular structure, trachea and esophagus. Due to this situation R1 resection was applied. Immunohistopathological examination showed a conventional type of fibrosarcoma. After the surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had been planned and applied. Patients died before the radiotherapy sessions ended. It should be kept in mind that a rapid growth in thyroid tissue can be thyroid fibrosarcoma, there could be a rapid clinical course and poor prognosis after operation.

  10. Thyroid function during the spontaneous course of subacute thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, V.L.; Romaldini, J.H.; Rodrigues, H.F.; Tanaka, L.M.; Farah, C.S.

    1985-05-01

    A study of changes in serum T/sub 4/, T/sub 3/, and Tg as well as of serum TSH response to TRH was done in ten patients with subacute thyroiditis, from the acute phase up to 56 mo. All patients had symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. The mean serum T/sub 4/, T/sub 3/, and Tg concentration were significantly higher than in normal subjects. The basal TSH concentrations failed to increase in response to TRH. Mean serum T/sub 3/ and serum Tg levels remained higher than in normal subjects until 4 to 5 mo after the acute phase. Thyroid autoantibodies were absent during the whole period of study. An exaggerated response of TSH to TRH in six out of seven patients was observed from a 2 to 3 mo period until the end of follow-up. All patients with T/sub 3/ to T/sub 4/ ratio above the normal range (7-24 ng/..mu..g) showed also an exaggerated response of TSH to TRH. These data suggest that the spontaneous course of subacute thyroiditis may lead to a low thyroid reserve detectable even 5 yr following the acute phase of the disease.

  11. TERT Promoter Mutations in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 discovery of TERT promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for ETS transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0%, 11.3%, 17.1%, 43.2%, and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence, and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g., RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms, and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer. PMID:26733501

  12. TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 discovery of Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for E-twenty-six transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0, 11.3, 17.1, 43.2 and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g. RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Evidence that MHC I-E dampens thyroid autoantibodies and prevents spreading to a second thyroid autoantigen in I-A(k) NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, A-N; Aliesky, H A; Banuelos, B; Chabot-Roy, G; Rapoport, B; Lesage, S; McLachlan, S M

    2015-06-01

    NOD.H2(k) and NOD.H2(h4) mice carry the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule I-A(k) associated with susceptibility to experimentally induced thyroiditis. Dietary iodine-enhanced spontaneous thyroid autoimmunity, well known in NOD.H2(h4) mice, has not been investigated in NOD.H2(k) mice. We compared NOD.H2(h4) and NOD.H2(k) strains for thyroiditis and autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (TgAb) and thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) without or with dietary sodium iodide (NaI) for up to 32 weeks. TgAb levels were significantly higher in NOD.H2(h4) compared with NOD.H2(k) mice on NaI, and TPOAb developed in NOD.H2(h4) mice but not in NOD.H2(k) mice. DNA exome analysis revealed, in addition to the differences in the chromosome (Chr) 17 MHC regions, that NOD.H2(k) mice, and particularly NOD.H2(h4) mice, have substantial non-MHC parental DNA. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis highlighted thyroid autoimmunity and immune-response genes on Chr 17 but not on Chr 7, and 15 parental B10.A4R DNA. Studies of parental strains provided no evidence for non-MHC gene contributions. The exon 10 Tg haplotype, associated with experimentally induced thyroiditis, is absent in NOD.H2(h4) and NOD.H2(k) mice and is not a marker for spontaneous murine thyroid autoimmunity. In conclusion, the absence of I-E is a likely explanation for the difference between NOD.H2(h4) and NOD.H2(k) mice in TgAb levels and, as in humans, autoantibody spreading to TPO.

  14. Growth and development in a child with resistance to thyroid hormone and ectopic thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Heather, Natasha; Hall, Kate; Neas, Katherine; Potter, Howard; Wiltshire, Esko

    2012-03-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone is an uncommon problem, which has rarely been associated with thyroid dysgenesis. We report a case with both thyroid gland ectopy and resistance to thyroid hormone and, thus, a reduced capacity to produce and respond to thyroid hormone. The patient presented at 2 years of age with developmental delay, dysmorphic features, and elevation in both thyroxine and thyrotropin. We document her response to therapy with thyroxine, with particular regard to her growth and development. Persistent elevation of thyrotropin is commonly recognized during treatment of congenital hypothyroidism. Resistance to thyroid hormone may be an important additional diagnosis to consider in cases where thyrotropin remains persistently elevated.

  15. Recent developments in the investigation of thyroid regulation and thyroid carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hard, G C

    1998-01-01

    This review covers new mechanistic information spanning the past 10 years relevant to normal and abnormal thyroid growth and function that may assist in the risk assessment of chemicals inducing thyroid follicular cell neoplasia. Recent studies have shown that thyroid regulation occurs via a complex interactive network mediated through several different messenger systems. Increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels activate the signal transduction pathways to stimulate growth and differentiation of the follicular cell. The important role of TSH in growth as well as in function helps to explain how disruptions in the thyroid-pituitary axis may influence thyroid neoplasia in rodents. New investigations that couple mechanistic studies with information from animal cancer bioassays (e. g., sulfamethazine studies) confirm the linkage between prolonged disruption of the thyroid-pituitary axis and thyroid neoplasia. New initiation/promotion studies in rodents also support the concept that chronic stimulation of the thyroid induced by goitrogens can result in thyroid tumors. Some of these studies confirm previous suggestions regarding the importance of chemically induced thyroid peroxidase inhibition and the inhibition of 3,3',5, 5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4, thyroxine) deiodinases on disruption of the thyroid-pituitary axis leading to thyroid neoplasia. Some comparative physiologic and mechanistic data highlight certain differences between rodents and humans that could be expected to confer an increased vulnerability of rodents to chronic hypersecretion of TSH. New data from epidemiologic and molecular genetic studies in humans contribute further to an understanding of thyroid neoplasia. Acute exposure to ionizing radiation, especially in childhood, remains the only verified cause of thyroid carcinogenesis in humans. Iodine deficiency studies as a whole remain inconclusive, even though several new studies in humans examine the role of dietary iodine deficiency in

  16. SKI-606, a Src inhibitor, reduces tumor growth, invasion, and distant metastasis in a mouse model of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Gu; Guigon, Celine J; Fozzatti, Laura; Park, Jeong Won; Lu, Changxue; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Src is over-expressed or hyper-activated in a variety of human cancers including thyroid carcinoma. Src is a central mediator in multiple signaling pathways that are important in oncogenesis and cancer progression. In this study, we evaluated the effects of a Src inhibitor, SKI-606 (bosutinib), in a spontaneous metastatic thyroid cancer model with constitutively activated Src (ThrbPV/PVPten+/− mice). Experimental Design ThrbPV/PVPten+/− mice were treated with SKI-606 or vehicle controls, beginning at 6 weeks of age until the mice succumbed to thyroid cancer. We assessed the effects of SKI-606 on thyroid cancer progression and analyzed the impact of SKI-606 on aberrant Src-mediated signaling. Results SKI-606 effectively inhibited aberrant activation of Src and its downstream targets to markedly inhibit the growth of thyroid tumor, thereby prolonging the survival of treated mice. While Src inhibition did not induce cell apoptosis, it decreased cell proliferation by affecting the expression of key regulators of cell cycle progression. Importantly, SKI-606 dramatically prevented de-differentiation, vascular invasion, and lung metastasis of thyroid cancer cells. These responses were meditated by down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and inhibition of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Src is critical in the progression of thyroid cancer, making oral SKI-606 a promising treatment strategy for refractory thyroid cancer. PMID:22271876

  17. Segmentation of ultrasound images of thyroid nodule for assisting fine needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Li; Tian, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid nodule is very high and generally increases with the age. Thyroid nodule may presage the emergence of thyroid cancer. Most thyroid nodules are asymptomatic which makes thyroid cancer different from other cancers. The thyroid nodule can be completely cured if detected early. Therefore, it is necessary to correctly classify the thyroid nodule to be benign or malignant. Fine needle aspiration cytology is a recognized early diagnosis method of thyroid nodule. There are still some limitations in the fine needle aspiration cytology, such as the difficulty in location and the insufficient cytology specimen. The accuracy of ultrasound diagnosis of thyroid nodule improves constantly, and it has become the first choice for auxiliary examination of thyroid nodular disease. If we could combine medical imaging technology and fine needle aspiration cytology, the diagnostic rate of thyroid nodule would be improved significantly. The properties of ultrasound, such as echo, shadow, and reflection, will degrade the image quality, which makes it difficult to recognize the edges for physicians. Image segmentation technique based on graph theory has become a research hotspot at present. Normalized cut (Ncut) is a representative one, whose biggest advantage is not prone to small region segmentation but suitable for segmentation of feature parts of medical image. However, how to solve the normalized cut has become a problem, which needs large memory capacity and heavy calculation of weight matrix. It always generates over segmentation or less segmentation which leads to inaccurate in the segmentation. The speckle noise produced in the formation process of B ultrasound image of thyroid tumor makes the quality of the image deteriorate. In the light of this characteristic, we combine the anisotropic diffusion model with the normalized cut in this paper. After the enhancement of anisotropic diffusion model, it removes the noise in the B ultrasound image while

  18. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  19. Painless giant cell thyroiditis diagnosed by fine needle aspiration and associated with intense thyroidal uptake of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, L.R.; Moreno, A.J.; Pittman, D.L.; Jones, J.D.; Spicer, M.J.; Tracy, K.P.

    1986-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with fever, goiter, and no evidence of pain or tenderness in the thyroid. A diagnosis of silent thyroiditis was made after obtaining evidence of biochemical thyrotoxicosis, intense gallium-67 citrate thyroidal localization, and cytologic thyroiditis. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid revealed numerous giant cells in all areas of the thyroid, typical of subacute thyroiditis. This is believed to be the first time painless thyroiditis is reported with the classic cytologic feature of painful subacute thyroiditis.

  20. Effects of TCDD on thyroid hormone homeostasis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kohn, M C

    2000-02-01

    A physiological dosimetric model was constructed to describe the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on circulating thyroid hormones in the rat and to test the hypothesis that these hormonal changes cause chronically elevated serum thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone, TSH), which mediates growth promotion and may lead to thyroid tumors in TCDD-treated rats. The model included diffusion restricted distribution of TCDD among compartments for liver, kidney, white fat, slowly and rapidly perfused tissues, and the thyroxine-sensitive tissues brown fat, pituitary, and thyroid. Blood was distributed among major vessels and the capillary beds of the tissues. Metabolism of TCDD was limited to the liver. Secretion of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine, T4) from the thyroid was modeled as stimulated by circulating TSH, whose release from the pituitary was regulated by the hypothalamic peptides thyrotropin releasing hormone (activating) and somatostatin (inhibiting). Release of these peptides was represented as inhibited and activated, respectively, by circulating T4. Binding proteins for T3 and T4 and metabolism of the hormones by deiodination were included in thyroxine-sensitive tissues. Induction of hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-1*6 (UGT), the enzyme which glucuronidates T4, was modeled as induced by the complex formed between TCDD and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. The computed extent of deiodination, primacy of the thyroid in generating T3 from T4, dependence of liver and kidney on locally produced T3, and export of T3 formed in the pituitary agreed with experimental observations. The model reproduced the observed decrease in circulating T4 and elevated serum TSH following chronic administration of TCDD. The altered levels were attributed to the increased clearance of T4 by the induced UGT and the consequent modification of feedback control of hormone releases. These results are consistent with the

  1. Effects of Vitamin D treatment on thyroid autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Simsek, Yasin; Cakır, Ilkay; Yetmis, Mikail; Dizdar, Oguzhan Sitki; Baspinar, Osman; Gokay, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D was shown to be related to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) in the previous studies. We aimed to investigate the relationship between Vitamin D and thyroid autoimmunity. Materials and Methods: Eighty-two patients, diagnosed with AITD by the endocrinology outpatient clinic, were included in this prospective study. All of the patients had both AITD and Vitamin D deficiency, defined as serum values <20 ng/mL. They were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group included 46 patients and the second one included 36 patients. The first group was treated with Vitamin D for 1 month at 1000 IU/day. The second group served as the control group and was not treated with Vitamin D replacement. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, free T4 (fT4), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), and Vitamin D levels were measured at the initiation of the study and again at 1 month in all patients. Results: Two groups were similar with regard to age, sex, and type of thyroid disease. Whereas TPO-Ab (before; 278.3 ± 218.4 IU/ml and after; 267.9 ± 200.7 IU/ml) and TgAb (before; 331.9 ± 268.1 IU/ml and after; 275.4 ± 187.3 IU/ml) levels were significantly decreased by the Vitamin D replacement therapy in group 1 (P = 0.02, P = 0.03, respectively), the evaluated parameters in the control group did not significantly change (P = 0.869, P = 0.530, respectively). In addition, thyroid function tests did not significantly change with Vitamin D replacement in two groups. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the pathogenesis of AITDs. Since supplementation of the Vitamin D decreased thyroid antibody titers in this study in Vitamin D deficient subjects, in the future Vitamin D may become a part of AITDs' treatment, especially in those with Vitamin D insufficiency. Further clinical and experimental studies are required to understand the effect of Vitamin D on AITD. PMID:28163731

  2. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  3. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  4. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Leventoğlu, Sezai

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old male with primary leiomyosarcoma of the thyroid is presented. The paucity of diagnostic maneuvers, including tumor markers, fine needle aspiration, and frozen section biopsy, are stressed, in addition to the fulminate course of the disease. PMID:23833760

  5. Intracardiac ectopic thyroid (struma cordis).

    PubMed

    Besik, Josef; Szarszoi, Ondrej; Bartonova, Anastazie; Netuka, Ivan; Maly, Jiri; Urban, Marian; Jakabcin, Jozef; Pirk, Jan

    2014-03-01

    A 67-year-old male with a history of gastrointestinal malignancy was found to have a tumor in the right ventricular outflow tract. The tumor was surgically removed, and the histological diagnosis was thyroid struma. We review the literature on this rare cardiac tumor. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bromine and thyroid hormone activity.

    PubMed Central

    Allain, P; Berre, S; Krari, N; Laine, P; Barbot, N; Rohmer, V; Bigorgne, J C

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possible consequences of high plasma concentrations of bromine on thyroid hormone. METHODS--Bromine was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the plasma of 799 patients consulting for thyroid disorders. Because the mean (SD) bromine concentration in the plasma of healthy subjects is 4 (1) mg/l, concentrations above 6 mg/l were regarded as outside the normal range. Bromine, free thyroxine (FT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) values were compared. RESULTS--The percentage of patients with normal, low, and high FT4 and TSH plasma activities, measured separately, did not differ between patients with low and high bromine concentrations. The percentage of patients with high TSH but normal FT4 values was significantly higher in the group with bromine values of more than 6 mg/l than in the group with bromine concentrations below this (p < 0.02). CONCLUSION--An increase in plasma bromine could potentiate an increase in plasma TSH concentration, probably as a consequence of a minor inhibitory effect on thyroid activity. PMID:8320326

  7. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  8. Canadian survey of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W. John; McKinney, Steven E.

    1985-01-01

    We report the results of a multicentre retrospective chart review of 2214 patients with thyroid cancer registered at 13 radiotherapy centres between 1958 and 1978. The data analysed included sex, age at the time of diagnosis, pathological diagnosis, extent of disease before treatment, types of treatment and their complications, and the rates of recurrence and survival up to 24 years after diagnosis. Although papillary cancers were most common, anaplastic and miscellaneous tumours were more frequent than expected, which reflects the type of patients referred by endocrinologists and surgeons to radiotherapy centres. There were marked differences in patterns of referral to the centres. Some patients with papillary and follicular thyroid cancers died of these cancers up to 20 years after diagnosis. The clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome of the rarer types of thyroid malignant tumours were of particular interest. The influence of age at the time of diagnosis on survival rates for patients with papillary or follicular thyroid cancer was highly significant, indicating much more aggressive behaviour of these cancers in older patients, particularly those beyond the age of 60 years. A more detailed analysis of tumour subtypes should provide new information on their natural history and lead to better management. PMID:3978516

  9. Is Hashimoto's thyroiditis a risk factor for medullary thyroid carcinoma? Our experience and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Ayman A; Ali, Moaath K Mustafa; Jaber, Omar I; Suleiman, Moh'd J; Ashhab, Ashraf A; Al Shweiat, Wajdi Mohammed; Momani, Munther Suliaman; Shomaf, Maha; AbuRuz, Salah Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    The etiology of medullary thyroid carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a significant association between medullary thyroid carcinoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the histopathologic material of thyroidectomized patients. Retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study, we reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for different thyroid-related complaints between January 2000 and January 2012 at Jordan University Hospital-Amman, Jordan. To highlight relevant previously published studies addressing this topic, a literature search was conducted for English language studies reporting "medullary thyroid carcinoma" or "C-cell hyperplasia" in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Of the 863 patients with a mean age of 47.2 ± 12.3 years who underwent total thyroidectomy during the study period, 78 (9.04 %) were diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 15 (1.74 %) had medullary thyroid carcinoma, 3 (20 %) of whom had coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A total of 683 (79.1 %) patients had benign thyroid disease, 67 (9.8 %) of whom had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The difference between these rates was not statistically significant (p = 0.19). When examined by gender, 9 females had medullary thyroid carcinoma, 3 (33.3 %) of whom had coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis; by contrast, of 560 females with benign thyroid disease, 62 (11.1 %) had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (p = 0.04). Although this study population represents a small and single-institution experience, our results suggest that there might be an association between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and medullary thyroid carcinoma only in female patients who undergo total thyroidectomy.

  10. Thyroid hormone transporters in the brain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takehiro; Abe, Takaaki

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in proper mammalian development of the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Lack of sufficient thyroid hormone results in abnormal development of virtually all organ systems, a syndrome termed cretinism. In particular, hypothyroidism in the neonatal period causes serious damage to neural cells and leads to mental retardation. Although thyroxine is the major product secreted by the thyroid follicular cells, the action of thyroid hormone is mediated mainly through the deiodination of T(4) to the biologically active form 3,3', 5-triiodo-L-thyronine, followed by the binding of T(3) to a specific nuclear receptor. Before reaching the intracellular targets, thyroid hormone must cross the plasma membrane. Because of the lipophilic nature of thyroid hormone, it was thought that they traversed the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. However, in the past decade, a membrane transport system for thyroid hormone has been postulated to exist in various tissues. Several classes of transporters, organic anion transporter polypeptide (oatp) family, Na(+)/Taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (ntcp) and amino acid transporters have been reported to transport thyroid hormones. Monocarboxylate transporter8 (MCT8) has recently been identified as an active and specific thyroid hormone transporter. Mutations in MCT8 are associated with severe X-linked psycomotor retardation and strongly elevated serum T3 levels in young male patients. Several other molecules should be contributed to exert the role of thyroid hormone in the central nervous system.

  11. Surgical Treatment of Hashimoto's with Thyroid Microcarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tao, Liu; Xi-Lin, H; Xiang-Dong, M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the surgical strategies for treating Hashimoto's disease complicated with thyroid microcarcinoma. We analyzed the clinical data of 25 patients with Hashimoto's disease with thyroid microcarcinoma who were treated in our hospital from January 1995 to September 2011. The incidence of Hashimoto's disease with thyroid microcarcinoma was 9.8 % (25/256) in our hospital. Amongst them, 19 patients had papillary thyroid carcinoma and six had follicular thyroid carcinoma. There were 24 cases (96 %) confirmed by the frozen section examination and one (4 %) after surgery. One patient did not undergo remedial surgery. The surgical approaches were determined based on preoperative examinations and intraoperative frozen pathology, including thyroid lobe and isthmus resection with contralateral lobe subtotal resection in 19 cases, and bilateral subtotal thyroid lobectomy in one case. Central lymph node dissection was conducted for all patients except one who was not diagnosed until after the surgery. No recurrence occurred during the follow-up (range: 6 months to 17 years) and all patients have survived to date. The preoperative diagnosis rate of Hashimoto's disease with thyroid cancer (in particular thyroid microcarcinomas) is low. Preoperative palpation, color Doppler ultrasound, fine needle aspiration, and the frozen section examination are helpful to improve the diagnosis rate of Hashimoto's disease with thyroid microcarcinoma. Surgery procedure is the most effective approach.

  12. Sudden unexpected death associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Vibeke; Drostrup, Dorthe Høj; Thomsen, Jørgen L

    2007-04-01

    A forensic autopsy study comprising 125 cases was carried out retrospectively in order to evaluate pathological changes in the thyroid gland in different groups of death. The five groups selected consecutively were: (i) opiate addicts who died from an overdose, (ii) alcoholics who died as a result of their alcohol abuse, (iii) cases of fatal poisoning other than opiate addicts, (iv) unknown cause of death and (v) controls without prior disease. Tissue samples from the thyroid gland were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson. Histology examinations were subsequently performed blind with semiquantitative assessment of the following six parameters: (a) height of the follicular epithelium, (b) the amount of lymphocytes, (c) the presence of plasma cells, (d) hyperplastic follicular changes, (e) oxyphilic changes, and (f) fibrosis. The most striking result was the finding of extensive lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid parenchyma in five of the 124 cases, of which four belonged in the group of 'unknown cause of death'. This discovery leads to reflections regarding lymphocytic thyroiditis as a cause of death, either by itself or in combination with other disorders. Silent (painless) thyroiditis, especially, is easily overlooked at autopsy as there are no macroscopic changes and often no prior symptoms or history of thyroid disease pointing towards this condition. Analyses of thyroid hormones are unreliable in predicting endocrine status in life. Routine microscopy of the thyroid gland is therefore advocated in cases of sudden unexpected death in order to diagnose thyroid disease, in particular silent (painless) thyroiditis.

  13. Sonographic features of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian-shui; Li, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Jin-rui

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic values of gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (FHT). The gray-scale and colour Doppler ultrasound data of 120 patients with histopathologically confirmed FHT were retrospectively studied. The background of thyroid parenchyma was subjectively evaluated as absence or presence of diffuse Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The vascular types of thyroid nodules were determined as follows: hypovascularity, marked internal flow, marked peripheral flow, and focal thyroid inferno. Among all 120 nodules, 71 (59.2%) were located in normal thyroid parenchyma, 49 (40.8%) in the background of diffuse Hashimoto's thyroiditis. In the normal thyroid background, hypoechoic nodules accounted for 85.9% (61/71), and only 14.1% (10/71)nodules were isoechoic or hyperechoic. However, in the background of diffuse Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 40.8% were hypoechoic and 59.2% were isoechoic or hyperechoic. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). In terms of the vascular types, the hypovascularity, marked internal flow, marked peripheral flow, and focal thyroid inferno accounted for 45 %, 25.9%, 20.8%, and 8.3%, respectively. The "focal inferno" is a relative specific color Doppler feature of FHT.

  14. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis Pathology and Risk for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paparodis, Rodis; Imam, Shahnawaz; Todorova-Koteva, Kristina; Staii, Anca

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) has been found to coexist with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in surgical specimens, but an association between the two conditions has been discounted by the medical literature. Therefore, we performed this study to determine any potential relationship between HT and the risk of developing DTC. Methods: We collected data for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T4), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) titers, surgical pathology, and weight-based levothyroxine (LT4) replacement dose for patients who were referred for thyroid surgery. Patients with HT at final pathology were studied further. To estimate thyroid function, patients with preoperative hypothyroid HT (Hypo-HT) were divided into three equal groups based on their LT4 replacement: LT4-Low (<0.90 μg/kg), LT4-Mid (0.90–1.43 μg/kg), and LT4-High (>1.43 μg/kg). A group of preoperatively euthyroid (Euth-HT) patients but with HT by pathology was also studied. All subjects were also grouped based on their TPO-Ab titer in TPO-high (titer >1:1000) or TPO-low/negative (titer <1:1000 or undetectable) groups. The relationship of HT and DTC was studied extensively. Results: Of 2811 subjects, 582 had HT on surgical pathology, 365 of whom were Euth-HT preoperatively. DTC was present in 47.9% of the Euth-HT, in 59.7% of LT4-Low, 29.8% of LT4-Mid, and 27.9% of LT4-High groups. The relative risk (RR) for DTC was significantly elevated for the Euth-HT and LT4-Low groups (p<0.001), but not for the LT4-Mid or LT4-High replacement dose groups. TPO-low/negative status conferred an increased RR in the Euth-HT and LT4-Low replacement dose groups (p<0.001 both), while TPO-high status decreased it in Euth-HT group (p<0.05) and made it nonsignificant in the LT4-Low group. Conclusions: HT pathology increases the risk for DTC only in euthyroid subjects and those with partially functional thyroid glands (LT4-Low) but not in fully hypothyroid HT (LT4-Mid and LT4-High). High TPO-Ab titers

  15. Genetics Home Reference: brain-lung-thyroid syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals have reduced thyroid function from birth ( congenital hypothyroidism ), resulting in lower-than-normal levels of thyroid ... have a milder condition called compensated or subclinical hypothyroidism, in which thyroid hormone levels are within the ...

  16. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria for distinguishing hyperplastic thyroid lesions from thyroid neoplasia in bony fishes have long been debated by scientists. Confusion exists because the thyroid tissue in most teleosts is unencapsulated, is occasionally found in ectopic sites, and is frequently predispos...

  17. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria for distinguishing hyperplastic thyroid lesions from thyroid neoplasia in bony fishes have long been debated by scientists. Confusion exists because the thyroid tissue in most teleosts is unencapsulated, is occasionally found in ectopic sites, and is frequently predispos...

  18. Impaired Hair Growth and Wound Healing in Mice Lacking Thyroid Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesus M.; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies. PMID:25254665

  19. Directed differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into thyroid follicular cells.

    PubMed

    Arufe, Maria C; Lu, Min; Kubo, Atsushi; Keller, Gordon; Davies, Terry F; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2006-06-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms leading to the induction and specification of thyroid follicular cells is important for our understanding of thyroid development. To characterize the key events in this process, we previously established an experimental embryonic stem (ES) cell model system, which shows that wild-type mouse CCE ES cells can give rise to thyrocyte-like cells in vitro. We extend our analysis in this report by using a genetically manipulated ES cell line in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNA is targeted to the TSH receptor (TSHR) gene, linking GFP expression to the transcription of the endogenous TSHR gene. The appearance of GFP-positive cells was dependent on the formation of embryoid bodies from undifferentiated ES cells and was greatly enhanced by TSH treatment during the first 2-4 d of differentiation. With the support of Matrigel, highly enriched ES cell-derived GFP-positive cells formed thyroid follicle-like clusters in a serum-free medium supplemented with TSH. Importantly, these clusters display the characteristics of thyroid follicular cells. Immunofluorescent studies confirmed the colocalization of TSHR with the Na+/I- symporter in the clusters and indicated that Na+/I- symporter was expressed exclusively in the plasma membrane. In addition, I- uptake activity was observed in these cells. Our results indicate that ES cells can be induced to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells, providing a powerful tool to study embryonic thyroid development and function.

  20. Directed Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells into Thyroid Follicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arufe, Maria C.; Lu, Min; Kubo, Atsushi; Keller, Gordon; Davies, Terry F.; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2006-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms leading to the induction and specification of thyroid follicular cells is important for our understanding of thyroid development. To characterize the key events in this process, we previously established an experimental embryonic stem (ES) cell model system, which shows that wild-type mouse CCE ES cells can give rise to thyrocyte-like cells in vitro. We extend our analysis in this report by using a genetically manipulated ES cell line in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNA is targeted to the TSH receptor (TSHR) gene, linking GFP expression to the transcription of the endogenous TSHR gene. The appearance of GFP-positive cells was dependent on the formation of embryoid bodies from undifferentiated ES cells and was greatly enhanced by TSH treatment during the first 2–4 d of differentiation. With the support of Matrigel, highly enriched ES cell-derived GFP-positive cells formed thyroid follicle-like clusters in a serum-free medium supplemented with TSH. Importantly, these clusters display the characteristics of thyroid follicular cells. Immunofluorescent studies confirmed the colocalization of TSHR with the Na+/I− symporter in the clusters and indicated that Na+/I− symporter was expressed exclusively in the plasma membrane. In addition, I− uptake activity was observed in these cells. Our results indicate that ES cells can be induced to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells, providing a powerful tool to study embryonic thyroid development and function. PMID:16497809

  1. Impaired hair growth and wound healing in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Jurado, Constanza; García-Serrano, Laura; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Paramio, Jesus M; Aranda, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental observations show that the skin is affected by the thyroidal status. In hypothyroid patients the epidermis is thin and alopecia is common, indicating that thyroidal status might influence not only skin proliferation but also hair growth. We demonstrate here that the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) mediate these effects of the thyroid hormones on the skin. Mice lacking TRα1 and TRβ (the main thyroid hormone binding isoforms) display impaired hair cycling associated to a decrease in follicular hair cell proliferation. This was also observed in hypothyroid mice, indicating the important role of the hormone-bound receptors in hair growth. In contrast, the individual deletion of either TRα1 or TRβ did not impair hair cycling, revealing an overlapping or compensatory role of the receptors in follicular cell proliferation. In support of the role of the receptors in hair growth, TRα1/TRβ-deficient mice developed alopecia after serial depilation. These mice also presented a wound-healing defect, with retarded re-epithelialization and wound gaping, associated to impaired keratinocyte proliferation. These results reinforce the idea that the thyroid hormone nuclear receptors play an important role on skin homeostasis and suggest that they could be targets for the treatment of cutaneous pathologies.

  2. Parathyroid scans and thyroid uptake of thallium 201 of subjects in chronic hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maayan, M.L.; Rubin, J.E.; Berlyne, G.; Volpert, E.M.; Sellitto, R.; Schor, S.; Braunstein, D.; Johnson, R.; Wallace, E.Z.; Bitton, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Patients in chronic hemodialysis were injected i.v. 1mCi each Thallium Chloride 201 (TlCl) and Technetium 99m pertechnetate (Tc99m) and imagings of the thyroid and parathyroid glands were taken after 30, 60 and 90'. Parathyroid scans were obtained by computerized subtraction of the Tc99m from the TlCl image. The percentage uptake of TlCl and Tc99m was measured at 1 and 3 hrs in normal, hemodialyzed and thyroxine treated subjects as well as in untreated and thyroxine treated mice. Thyroid tests and serum electrolytes were routinely determined. Enlarged parathyroid glands were visualized in 5 out of 6 patients on hemodialysis. TlCl uptake was greatly decreased and thyroid imagings poor in patients in renal failure. This was parallel in all cases with a high serum K/sup +/. Tc99m uptake and scans were unaffected by renal status. Administration of L-thyroxine greatly reduced the thyroidal uptake and accompanying scans after both Tc99m and TlCl in human subjects as well as in experimental animals. The authors conclude the following: a) TlCl - Tc99m subtraction scans enabled visualization of hyperplastic parathyroid glands in patients in chronic hemodialysis; b) Thyroid uptake of TlCl was inversely related to the serum K/sup +/ level; and c) Both Tc99m and TlCl thyroidal uptake were inhibited by administration of L-thyroxine, hence TSH dependent.

  3. In vitro assessment of thyroidal and estrogenic activities in poultry and broiler manure.

    PubMed

    Valdehita, A; Quesada-García, A; Delgado, M M; Martín, J V; García-González, M C; Fernández-Cruz, M L; Navas, J M

    2014-02-15

    Among the many chemicals found in avian manure, endocrine disruptors (EDs), of natural or anthropogenic origin, are of special environmental concern. Nowadays, an increasing amount of estrogens is being released into the environment via the use of manure to fertilize agricultural land. While most research in this field has focused on estrogenic phenomena, little is known about alterations related to other endocrine systems, such as the thyroidal one. Here we simultaneously assessed the potential estrogenic and thyroidal activity of poultry and broiler litter manure using in vitro approaches based on estrogen receptor (Er) and thyroid receptor (Tr) transactivation assays. In addition, leaching experiments were performed to assess whether the EDs present in the manure pass through a soil column and potentially reach the groundwater. Manure from four broiler and four poultry farms was collected in two sampling campaigns carried out in two seasons (fall and spring). Extracts from broiler and poultry manure exhibited strong thyroidal activity. Only poultry manure showed estrogenic activity, which is consistent with the low levels of estrogens expected in hatchlings. Leakage experiments were performed in columns with two kinds of arable soils: sandy and loamy. No estrogenicity or thyroidal activity was detectable in soils treated with the manure or in the corresponding leachates. These results indicate that substances with estrogenic or thyroidal activity were degraded in the soil under our experimental conditions. However, the long-term effects associated with the constant and intensive application of manure to agricultural land in some regions require further research.

  4. Transgenic expression of TGF-beta on thyrocytes inhibits development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis and increases regulatory T cells in thyroids of NOD.H-2h4 mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiguang; Fang, Yujiang; Sharp, Gordon C; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic NOD.H-2h4 mice expressing TGF-beta under control of the thyroglobulin promoter were generated to assess the role of TGF-beta in the development of thyrocyte hyperplasia. In contrast to nontransgenic littermates, which develop lymphocytic spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (L-SAT), all TGF-beta transgenic (Tg) mice given NaI water for 2-7 mo developed thyroid lesions characterized by severe thyroid epithelial cell hyperplasia and proliferation, with fibrosis and less lymphocyte infiltration than in nontransgenic mice. Most Tg mice produced less anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody than did wild type (WT) mice. T cells from Tg and WT mice were equivalent in their ability to induce L-SAT after transfer to SCID or TCRalpha(-/-) mice. WT lymphocytes could transfer experimental autoimmune thyroiditis or L-SAT to Tg mice, indicating that the transgenic environment did not prevent migration of lymphocytes to the thyroid. Thyroids of Tg mice had higher frequencies of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) compared with nontransgenic WT mice. Transient depletion of Tregs by anti-CD25 resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into thyroids of transgenic mice. Treg depletion also resulted in increased anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses and increased expression of IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma-inducible chemokines in thyroids of Tg mice. The results suggest that spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis is inhibited in mice expressing transgenic TGF-beta on thyrocytes, at least in part, because there is an increased frequency of Tregs in their thyroids.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of Benign Thyroid Nodules and Recurrent Thyroid Cancers: Consensus Statement and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Na, Dong Gyu; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyung; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Jeong Seon; Kim, Kyu Sun; Baek, Seon Mi; Lee, Younghen; Chong, Semin; Sim, Jung Suk; Huh, Jung Yin; Bae, Jae-Ik; Kim, Kyung Tae; Han, Song Yee; Bae, Min Young; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-01-01

    Thermal ablation using radiofrequency is a new, minimally invasive modality employed as an alternative to surgery in patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the optimal use of radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, the results of multicenter studies, and expert consensus. PMID:22438678

  6. Sonographic features of medullary thyroid carcinomas according to tumor size: comparison with papillary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liguang; Chen, Bo; Zhao, Miaoqing; Zhang, Huawei; Liang, Bo

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in sonographic features of medullary thyroid carcinomas according to nodule size and compared with findings for papillary thyroid carcinomas. This study included 38 medullary thyroid carcinoma nodules and 91 papillary thyroid carcinoma nodules, which were confirmed by pathologic examination between May 2008 and September 2013. Nodules were divided into those that were greater than 10 mm (large nodules) and 10 mm or less (small nodules). The differences in sonographic features (composition, echogenicity, margin, calcifications, and shape) between groups were analyzed with a χ(2) test. Large medullary thyroid carcinomas more frequently showed an ovoid-to-round shape and a smooth margin; small medullary thyroid carcinomas more frequently showed a taller-than-wide shape and a spiculated margin; the differences were statistically significant between the groups (P < .05). Compared with papillary thyroid carcinomas, large medullary thyroid carcinomas tended to have an ovoid-to-round shape, a smooth margin, and macrocalcifications and were more frequently diagnosed as indeterminate nodules (P < .05); however, there were no significant differences in the internal composition, calcifications, echogenicity, margin, and shape between small medullary thyroid carcinomas and small papillary thyroid carcinomas (P > .05). Our data indicate that the sonographic features of medullary thyroid carcinomas are associated with tumor size; furthermore, the sonographic features of medullary thyroid carcinomas are similar to those of small papillary thyroid carcinomas but greatly different from those of large papillary thyroid carcinomas. Large medullary thyroid carcinomas are more commonly diagnosed as indeterminate nodules by sonography than large papillary thyroid carcinomas, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy or serum calcitonin measurement may be helpful. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  7. Effects of fission neutrons on human thyroid tissues maintained in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shigeki; Ryo, Haruko; Hongyo, Tadashi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Tsuboi-Kikuya, Rie; Tokita, Yoriko; Matsuzuka, Fumio; Hiramatsu, Keizo; Fujikawa, Kazuo; Itoh, Tetsuo; Nomura, Taisei

    2010-02-01

    Morphology and function (secretion of thyroid hormone) of human thyroid tissues from Graves' disease patients are well maintained in C57BL/6J-scid mice. Serum level of thyroid hormone was reduced by fission neutrons from the nuclear reactor UTR-KINKI, and changes in thyroid hormone by fission neutrons were bigger than those by low LET radiations, X-rays and (137)Cs gamma-rays, suggesting high relative biological effectiveness (RBE; 6.5) of fission neutrons. Microarray analyses revealed that about 3% of genes showed more than 4-fold change in gene expression in the unexposed thyroid tissues against surgically resected thyroid tissues from the same patient, probably due to the difficult oxygen and nutrient supply shortly after transplantation. Dose-dependent changes in gene expression against unexposed concurrent controls were observed with increasing doses of fission neutrons (0.2-0.6Gy) and (137)Cs gamma-rays (1.0-3.0Gy) and showed high RBE (4.2). Furthermore, there were some specific genes which showed more than 4-fold change in gene expression in all the thyroid tissues exposed to higher doses of radiation, especially neutrons (0.4 and 0.6Gy), but none at lower doses (0.2Gy of neutrons and 1.0 and 2.0Gy of gamma-rays). These genes related to degeneration, regeneration, apoptosis, and transcription, respond specifically and very sensitively to neutron injury in human thyroid tissues. This is the first experimental report that fission neutrons can induce some morphological and functional disorders in human tissues, showing high RBE against gamma-ray exposure. These results are useful to evaluate the risks of fission neutrons and cosmic rays to humans.

  8. Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad; Goldner, Whitney; Beseler, Cheryl L; Rogan, Eleanor G; Cavalieri, Ercole L

    2013-12-01

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer most frequently occurs in premenopausal women. Greater exposure to estrogens may be a risk factor for thyroid cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in thyroid cancer, a spot urine sample was obtained from 40 women with thyroid cancer and 40 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates significantly differed between cases and controls (p < 0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in thyroid cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts might play a role in the initiation of thyroid cancer. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  9. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Goldner, Whitney; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.; Cavalieri, Ercole L.

    2013-01-01

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer most frequently occurs in premenopausal women. Greater exposure to estrogens may be a risk factor for thyroid cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in thyroid cancer, a spot urine sample was obtained from 40 women with thyroid cancer and 40 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates significantly differed between cases and controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in thyroid cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts might play a role in the initiation of thyroid cancer. PMID:23686454

  10. The incidence and prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Donald S A; Cooper, David S

    2012-10-01

    The thyroid gland is the most common organ affected by autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases, most notably type 1 diabetes mellitus, are increasing in incidence. It is unknown whether autoimmune thyroid diseases are following the same pattern. This review summarizes studies of autoimmune thyroid disease incidence and prevalence since 1950, not only for these measures of occurrences, but also for commenting on identified risk factors for thyroid autoimmunity. We find that incidence of autoimmune thyroid disease is currently higher than in historic series although the studies are so variable in design, patient population, disease definition, and laboratory methods that it is impossible to tell whether this difference is real. Further research is required to assess the possibility of changing disease patterns of autoimmune thyroid disease as opposed to simple changes in diagnostic thresholds.

  11. Does microbiota composition affect thyroid homeostasis?

    PubMed

    Virili, Camilla; Centanni, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for the host to ensure digestive and immunologic homeostasis. When microbiota homeostasis is impaired and dysbiosis occurs, the malfunction of epithelial barrier leads to intestinal and systemic disorders, chiefly immunologic and metabolic. The role of the intestinal tract is crucial in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, and hormones, including exogenous and endogenous iodothyronines as well as micronutrients involved in thyroid homeostasis. However, the link between thyroid homeostasis and microbiota composition is not yet completely ascertained. A pathogenetic link with dysbiosis has been described in different autoimmune disorders but not yet fully elucidated in autoimmune thyroid disease which represents the most frequent of them. Anyway, it has been suggested that intestinal dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune thyroiditis. Furthermore, hypo- and hyper-thyroidism, often of autoimmune origin, were respectively associated to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and to changes in microbiota composition. Whether some steps of this thyroid network may be affected by intestinal microbiota composition is briefly discussed below.

  12. Identifying reference chemicals for thyroid bioactivity screening.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Susanna; Browne, Patience; Dix, David

    2016-10-01

    Reference chemicals were selected based on thyroid bioactivity in 'Tier 1' screening assays used by the U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Active reference chemicals had significant effects on thyroid-responsive endpoints in the amphibian metamorphosis assay, and the male and female pubertal rat assays. In the absence of thyroid weight or histopathological effects, additional published studies providing mechanistic data on thyroid activity were required for active chemicals. Inactive reference chemicals had no significant effects on thyroid-responsive endpoints in Tier 1 assays, or in amphibian or rodent studies from several online databases. The 34 reference chemicals (29 active and five inactive) will be useful for performance-based validation of alternative, high throughput screening assays for thyroid bioactivity.

  13. New Treatment in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Dario; Prestifilippo, Angela; Scarfia, Alessia; Martino, Daniela; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor. Thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, and TSH suppression represent the standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. In this paper, we reviewed the recent literature reports (pubmed, medline, EMBASE database, and abstracts published in meeting proceedings) on new treatments in advanced nonmedullary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Studies of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as antiangiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. We summarized both the results obtained and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Reported data in this paper are encouraging, but further trials are necessary to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:23133451

  14. New Insights into Thyroid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells exhibit an extraordinary ability for self-renewal. They also give rise to many specialized cells. The potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and drug discovery has been well documented. Although advances in stem cell science have raised broad ethical concerns, it is clear that stem cell technology has revolutionized our thinking in modern biology and medicine and provided the basis for understanding many of the mechanisms controlling basic biological processes and disease mechanisms. This review details the nascent field of thyroid stem cell research, exploring the current status of thyroid stem cell differentiation from the perspectives of both developmental biology and cell replacement therapy. It highlights successes to date in the generation of thyroid follicular cells from embryonic stem cells in the laboratory and the identification and characterization of adult stem cells from human thyroid glands and thyroid cancers. Finally, it outlines future challenges with a focus on potential stem cell therapy for thyroid patients. PMID:17727339

  15. Medullary carcinoma in a lingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Yaday, S; Singh, I; Singh, J; Aggarwal, N

    2008-03-01

    Total ectopia of thyroid is a rare phenomenon and malignant change in an ectopic thyroid is even rarer. We report a case of medullary carcinoma in a total ectopic lingual thyroid occurring in a 45-year-old woman who presented with dysphagia, plummy voice and a round sessile mass at the base of the tongue. The mass was extirpated using Trotter's midline approach. Upon examination, it was found to be medullary carcinoma in an ectopic thyroid. Permanent substitution therapy with thyroxine secured the euthyroid status of the patient. The embrylogical basis and a review of literature regarding carcinomatous change in an ectopic thyroid are also discussed. There is a need to investigate for an ectopic thyroid, or even total ectopia, in the case of any smooth mass found at the base of the tongue.

  16. Targeting the TSH receptor in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher W; Paul, Jonathan; Gedye, Craig; Tolosa, Jorge; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun; Smith, Roger

    2017-03-28

    Recent advances in the arena of theranostics have necessitated a re-examining of previously established fields. The existing paradigm of therapeutic thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) targeting in the post-surgical management of differentiated thyroid cancer using levothyroxine and recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is well understood. However, in an era of personalized medicine, and with an increasing awareness of the risk profile of longstanding pharmacological hyperthyroidism, it is imperative clinicians understand the molecular basis and magnitude of benefit for individual patients. Furthermore, TSHR has been recently re-conceived as a selective target for residual metastatic thyroid cancer, with pilot data demonstrating effective targeting of nanoparticles to thyroid cancers using this receptor as a target. This review examines the evidence for TSHR signaling as an oncogenic pathway, and assesses the evidence for ongoing TSHR expression in thyroid cancer metastases. Priorities for further research are highlighted.

  17. Treatment modalities of thyroid related orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eric S; Subramanian, Prem S

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to highlight recent advances in the treatment of thyroid eye disease. Review article. Existing literature and the authors' experience was reviewed. Thyroid ophthalmopathy is a disfiguring and vision-threatening complication of autoimmune thyroid disease that may develop or persist even in the setting of well-controlled systemic thyroid status. Treatment response can be difficult to predict, and optimized algorithms for disease management do not exist. Thyroid ophthalmopathy should be graded for both severity and disease activity before choosing a treatment modality for each patient. The severity of the disease may not correlate directly with the activity; medical treatment is most effective in active disease, and surgery is usually reserved for quiescent disease with persistent proptosis and/or eyelid changes. Intravenous pulsed corticosteroids, orbital radiotherapy, and orbital surgical techniques form the mainstay of current management of thyroid ophthalmopathy. Immunosuppressive and biologic agents may have a role in treating active disease although additional safety and efficacy studies are needed.

  18. Thyroid hormone resistance and its management

    PubMed Central

    Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of impaired sensitivity to thyroid hormone, also known as syndrome of thyroid hormone resistance, is an inherited condition that occurs in 1 of 40,000 live births characterized by a reduced responsiveness of target tissues to thyroid hormone due to mutations on the thyroid hormone receptor. Patients can present with symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. They usually have elevated thyroid hormones and a normal or elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. Due to their nonspecific symptomatic presentation, these patients can be misdiagnosed if the primary care physician is not familiar with the condition. This can result in frustration for the patient and sometimes unnecessary invasive treatment such as radioactive iodine ablation, as in the case presented herein. PMID:27034574

  19. Foetal programming by maternal thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Olsen, Jørn; Laurberg, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Foetal programming is an emerging concept that links a wide range of exposures during foetal life to later development of disease. Thyroid disorders are common in women of reproductive age, and careful management of pregnant women suffering from thyroid disease is important considering the crucial role of thyroid hormones during early brain development. It is possible that maternal thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy may lead to structural and/or functional changes during foetal brain development. Such an effect could later predispose the offspring to an increased risk of neurologic or psychiatric disease. We recently observed that children born to mothers with thyroid dysfunction had an increased risk of developing seizure disorders, autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders and psychiatric disease in adolescence and young adulthood. In the review, we discuss the concept of potential foetal programming by maternal thyroid disease.

  20. Endocrine disruptors and thyroid hormone physiology.

    PubMed

    Jugan, Mary-Line; Levi, Yves; Blondeau, Jean-Paul

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine disruptors are man-made chemicals that can disrupt the synthesis, circulating levels, and peripheral action of hormones. The disruption of sex hormones was subject of intensive research, but thyroid hormone synthesis and signaling are now also recognized as important targets of endocrine disruptors. The neurological development of mammals is largely dependent on normal thyroid hormone homeostasis, and it is likely to be particularly sensitive to disruption of the thyroid axis. Here, we survey the main thyroid-disrupting chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, perchlorates, and brominated flame-retardants, that are characteristic disruptors of thyroid hormone homeostasis, and look at their suspected relationships to impaired development of the human central nervous system. The review then focuses on disrupting mechanisms known to be directly or indirectly related to the transcriptional activity of the thyroid hormone receptors.

  1. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  2. Tissue-specific thyroid hormone regulation of gene transcripts encoding iodothyronine deiodinases and thyroid hormone receptors in striped parrotfish (Scarus iseri).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kaitlin M; Lema, Sean C

    2011-07-01

    In fish as in other vertebrates, the diverse functions of thyroid hormones are mediated at the peripheral tissue level through iodothyronine deiodinase (dio) enzymes and thyroid hormone receptor (tr) proteins. In this study, we examined thyroid hormone regulation of mRNAs encoding the three deiodinases dio1, dio2 and dio3 - as well as three thyroid hormone receptors trαA, trαB and trβ - in initial phase striped parrotfish (Scarus iseri). Parrotfish were treated with dissolved phase T(3) (20 nM) or methimazole (3 mM) for 3 days. Treatment with exogenous T(3) elevated circulating T(3), while the methimazole treatment depressed plasma T(4). Experimentally-induced hyperthyroidism increased the relative abundance of transcripts encoding trαA and trβ in the liver and brain, but did not affect trαB mRNA levels in either tissue. In both sexes, methimazole-treated fish exhibited elevated dio2 transcripts in the liver and brain, suggesting enhanced outer-ring deiodination activity in these tissues. Accordingly, systemic hyperthyroidism elevated relative dio3 transcript levels in these same tissues. In the gonad, however, patterns of transcript regulation were distinctly different with elevated T(3) increasing mRNAs encoding dio2 in testicular and ovarian tissues and dio3, trαA and trαB in the testes only. Thyroid hormone status did not affect dio1 transcript abundance in the liver, brain or gonads. Taken as a whole, these results demonstrate that thyroidal status influences relative transcript abundance for dio2 and dio3 in the liver, provide new evidence for similar patterns of dio2 and dio3 mRNA regulation in the brain, and make evident that fish exhibit tr subtype-specific transcript abundance changes to altered thyroid status.

  3. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  4. Thyroid Radiofrequency Ablation: Updates on Innovative Devices and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Sun; Park, Auh Whan; Chung, Sae Rom; Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-known, effective, and safe method for treating benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. Thyroid-dedicated devices and basic techniques for thyroid RFA were introduced by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology (KSThR) in 2012. Thyroid RFA has now been adopted worldwide, with subsequent advances in devices and techniques. To optimize the treatment efficacy and patient safety, understanding the basic and advanced RFA techniques and selecting the optimal treatment strategy are critical. The goal of this review is to therefore provide updates and analysis of current devices and advanced techniques for RFA treatment of benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. PMID:28670156

  5. Acute suppurative thyroiditis caused by Eikenella corrodens.

    PubMed

    Queen, J S; Clegg, H W; Council, J C; Morton, D

    1988-04-01

    Eikenella corrodens is a slow-growing facultative anaerobe present in the normal oral flora. Two children have been described with acute suppurative thyroiditis with E corrodens as the major pathogen. Staphylococci are the most frequently identified pathogens in acute suppurative thyroiditis. Penicillin or ampicillin are the drugs of choice for infections caused by E corrodens. Anatomic defects should be searched for in children with acute suppurative thyroiditis.

  6. Thyroid Gland Hematoma After Blunt Neck Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Saylam, Baris; Çomçali, Bülent; Ozer, Mehmet Vasfi; Coskun, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Hemorrhage of a previously normal thyroid gland as a result of blunt trauma is a very rare condition. We report a case of blunt trauma that caused acute hemorrhage into the thyroid gland and presented with hoarseness. The diagnosis of thyroid gland hematoma was made with a combination of fiberoptic laryngoscopy, cervical computed tomography, and carotid angiography. The patient was treated conservatively, had a favorable course without further complications, and was discharged four days after admission. PMID:20046242

  7. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  8. Resistance to thyroid hormone due to defective thyroid receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Carla; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones act via nuclear receptors (TRα1, TRβ1, TRβ2) with differing tissue distribution; the role of α2 protein, derived from the same gene locus as TRα1, is unclear. Resistance to thyroid hormone alpha (RTHα) is characterised by tissue-specific hypothyroidism associated with near-normal thyroid function tests. Clinical features include dysmorphic facies, skeletal dysplasia (macrocephaly, epiphyseal dysgenesis), growth retardation, constipation, dyspraxia and intellectual deficit. Biochemical abnormalities include low/low-normal T4 and high/high-normal T3 concentrations, a subnormal T4/T3 ratio, variably reduced reverse T3, raised muscle creatine kinase and mild anaemia. The disorder is mediated by heterozygous, loss-of-function, mutations involving either TRα1 alone or both TRα1 and α2, with no discernible phenotype attributable to defective α2. Whole exome sequencing and diagnostic biomarkers may enable greater ascertainment of RTHα, which is important as thyroxine therapy reverses some metabolic abnormalities and improves growth, constipation, dyspraxia and wellbeing. The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of RTHα and its optimal management remain to be elucidated. PMID:26303090

  9. Presence of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy in Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Emrah; Kan, Elif Kilic; Ecemis, Gülcin; Colak, Ramis

    2014-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of ophthalmopathy in Hashimoto's patients and to make a comparison in subgroups of patients METHODS The study involved 110 Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients and 50 control subjects attending to the endocrinology department of the hospital. Subgroup classification of patients was made as euthyroid, subclinic and clinic in Hashimato's thyroiditis. All patients were evaluated by a single experienced ophthalmologist for the prevalence and characteristics of eye signs. RESULTS The overall prevalences of eye changes were 22.7% (25 patients) in patients and 4% (2 persons) in control subjects respectively (P=0.002). In patients the most common symptom was retrobulbar eye pain with or without any eye movement. Thirteen patients had significant upper eyelid retraction (11.8%). Six patients had eye muscle dysfunction as reduced eye movements in up gaze. In control patients one person had proptosis and another had lid retraction. The clinical activity score and classification of the ophthalmopathy did not show any significant differences among subgroups. CONCLUSION The eye signs were mostly mild (22.7%) and the most common eye sign was the presence of upper eyelid retraction (11.8%). Additionally six patients had eye muscle dysfunction as reduced eye movements in up gaze. Therefore we recommend to make a routine ophthalmic examination in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients in order not to omit the associated ophthalmopathy. PMID:25161935

  10. Studies on thyroid cell surface antigens using cultured human thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fenzi, G F; Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Marcocci, C; Rotella, C M; Zonefrati, R; Toccafondi, R; Pinchera, A

    1982-01-01

    Human thyroid cells in primary culture were used for studies of thyroid cell surface antibodies in patients with thyroid autoimmune disorders. Radioiodinated IgG preparations containing thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb), thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and/or thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) were tested for binding to thyroid cells. Binding was observed with radioiodinated IgG from patients with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and idiopathic myxoedema containing TMAb, irrespective of the presence of TSAb and TgAb, while negative results were obtained with normal IgG. A dose-dependent inhibition of binding to thyroid cells was produced by the addition of the corresponding unlabelled IgG preparations. Evidence for tissue specificity was provided by the absence of binding to human skin fibroblasts used as controls. Preabsorption with human thyroid microsomes completely abolished the binding to thyroid cells of a radioiodinated TMAb positive IgG preparation, while only incomplete removal of the reactivity to thyroid microsomes was produced by preabsorption with thyroid cells. These data suggest that some but not all microsomal antigenic determinants are expressed on the thyroid cell surface. Binding to thyroid cells was also observed with purified TgAb, indicating that thyroglobulin antigenic determinants are present on the surface of thyroid cells. No evidence of binding was obtained with a TSAb positive Graves' IgG preparation with undetectable TMAb and TgAb. Unlabelled IgG preparations containing TMAb from patients with either Hashimoto's thyroiditis or idiopathic myxoedema were shown to inhibit the binding to thyroid cells of radioiodinated TMAb positive Graves' IgG and vice versa. These data indicate that antibodies present in these thyroid autoimmune disorders share common thyroid cell surface antigens. However, the binding of radioiodinated IgG from a patient with idiopathic myxoedema was only partially inhibited by Graves' or Hashimoto's Ig

  11. The Diffuse Sclerosing Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer Presenting as Innumerable Diffuse Microcalcifications in Underlying Adolescent Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Kwak, Jeong Ja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common diffuse thyroid disease and is characterized by diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. However, the ultrasonographic findings of papillary thyroid carcinomas that arise from Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the pediatric and adolescent population are not well known. We report a rare ultrasonographic finding in a 22-year-old woman diagnosed with the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma that arose from underlying Hashimoto's thyroiditis: innumerable diffuse microcalcifications instead of a typical malignant-appearing nodule. PMID:27015194

  12. Pathology of thyroid in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lanjewar, Dhaneshwar Namdeorao; Ramraje, Sushma Nagsen; Lanjewar, Sonali Dhaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    The course of human immunodeficiency virus infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be complicated by a variety of endocrine abnormalities, including abnormalities of thyroid gland. This study was designed to understand the spectrum of pathology of thyroid in Indian patients with AIDS. The present study describes the findings of retrospective autopsy findings of 158 patients with AIDS which revealed infectious diseases from a time period before the use of highly active antiretroviral regimen. A wide range of bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were observed. Tuberculosis was recorded in 14 (09%) patients, Cryptococcus neoformans in 11 (7%) patients and cytomegalovirus in 3 (2%) patients. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and lymphocytic thyroiditis were seen in 02 (01%) patients each. One patient had dual infection comprising of tuberculosis and cytomegalovirus infection. The other microscopic findings observed were goiter (2 patients), interstitial fibrosis in thyroid (7 patients), and calcification in thyroid (8 patients). Abnormalities of thyroid are uncommon findings in patients with HIV infection however several case reports of thyroid involvement by infectious agents and neoplasm are described in these patients; hence patients with HIV infection should be closely followed up for development of goiter or abnormalities of thyroid functions.

  13. Thyroid Autoimmunity in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Borowiec, Ada; Kucharska, Anna; Chacewicz, Karolina; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-04-30

    Turner syndrome is associated with increased incidence of autoimmune diseases, especially those of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity among pediatric patients with Turner syndrome. The study was retrospective and included 41 girls with Turner syndrome aged 6-18 years. Free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, and karyotype were investigated. The correlation between karyotype and incidence of thyroid autoimmunity was also examined. Eleven patients (26.8%) were positive for TPO-Ab and/or TG-Ab. Three girls from that subgroup were euthyroid, 5 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 3 were diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism. Out of these 11 patients affected by thyroid autoimmunity, 6 girls had mosaic karyotype with X-isochromosome (n = 4) or with deletions (n = 2), and 5 had the 45,X karyotype. The study findings confirmed a high incidence of thyroid autoimmunity in girls with Turner syndrome, but we failed to observe an association between the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity and karyotype. We conclude that it is important to monitor thyroid function in patients with Turner syndrome because they are prone to develop hypothyroidism.

  14. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coexistence of papillary carcinoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Matesa-Anić, Dubravka; Matesa, Neven; Dabelić, Nina; Kusić, Zvonko

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of coexistence of papillary carcinoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in cytologic material. Cytologic findings were collected from 10508 patients that underwent ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was found in 2156 (20.5%) and papillary carcinoma in 269 (2.6%) of 10508 patients with FNAC, whereas both Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary carcinoma were present in 42 (0.4%) patients. Among patients with FNAC diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the prevalence of papillary carcinoma was 1.9%. Among patients with FNAC diagnosis of papillary carcinoma, the prevalence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis was 15.6%. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of papillary carcinoma and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in patients undergoing FNAC (p=0.0522). In conclusion, in a large series of patients, the incidence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary carcinoma coexistence in cytologic material was 0.4%. There was no statistically significant relationship between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and papillary carcinoma in cytologic material.

  16. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tracy S; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; Oxley, Keri; Sosa, Julie Ann

    2008-04-01

    Primary leiomyosarcomas of the thyroid gland are rare. We present the case of a 65-year-old woman with a rapidly enlarging neck mass for 2 months. The preoperative differential diagnosis included medullary thyroid cancer, anaplastic thyroid cancer, and primary versus metastatic sarcoma. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy, bilateral central neck dissections, and cervical thymectomy; she is currently being treated with ifosfamide and adriamycin. We review the literature on leiomyosarcoma of the thyroid, including the differential diagnoses, pathology, and alternative treatment strategies, including surgery and adjuvant therapy.

  17. Concurrence of Grave's disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Takata, I; Taketani, T; Saida, K; Nakajima, H

    1977-01-01

    Early histological changes in the thyroid gland were examined in 30 patients with juvenile thyrotoxicosis, by means of needle biopsy. Based on the degree of lymphocytic infiltration and degenerative changes in follicular epithelium, results were classified into four groups. A: hyperplastic changes without cellular infiltration (6 patients, 20%); B: hyperplastic changes with areas of focal thyroiditis less than 30% of specimen (10 patients, 33%); C: those with 30 to 60% areas ot thyroiditis (10 patients, 33%); D: almost diffuse thyroiditis (4 patients, 13%). Moderate to severe lymphocytic thyroiditis was frequently present in the early stage of hyperplastic thyroid glands. The clinical significance of the 4 histological groups was evaluated. Neither clinical signs nor routine laboratory tests could differentiate these groups except group D, in which thyrotoxic signs were mild and transient. However, serum antithyroid antibodies tended to increase in accordance with severity of thyroiditis. The rate of remission was high in groups C and D, whereas relapse was frequent in group A. These results suggest that Grave's disease and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis are closely related in the early stage of thyrotoxicosis in children, and that the clinical course may be considerably altered by the degree of associated thyroiditis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 3 PMID:580172

  18. Thyroid dysfunction in obese and overweight children.

    PubMed

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Kucharska, Anna; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and thyroid function are closely related. Thyroid hormones are involved in the regulation of metabolism, thermogenesis, food intake, and fat oxidation. In obese children the most frequent hormonal abnormalities are slight hyperthyrotropinaemia and moderate increases in total T3 and/or fT3 concentrations. Those abnormalities are usually considered a cause of obesity, but according to recent studies, they should actually be considered an adaptation process aimed at increasing resting energy expenditure and total energy expenditure. Those abnormalities do not require any treatment and normalise after substantial weight loss. The mechanisms of those changes are dependent on leptin, thyroid hormone resistance, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The present paper describes the abovementioned mechanisms based on the latest research. We also present a review of some recent original studies evaluating thyroid function in overweight and obese children, including thyroid ultrasound. A thyroid ultrasound scan in obese children frequently shows increased thyroid volume, which correlates with moderately increased TSH levels and a hypoechoic pattern typical of autoimmune thyroiditis, but without antithyroid autoantibodies. Alterations of thyroid function in overweight and obese patients cause an increase in energy expenditure, which facilitates weight loss and prevents further weight gain. Therefore, normalisation of TSH and fT3 after weight loss could explain difficulties in maintaining reduced weight. (Endokrynol Pol 2017; 68 (1): 54-60).

  19. Management of well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Selena; Shindo, Maisie

    2012-10-01

    This review provides an overview of current guideline recommendations for the clinical evaluation and surgical management of well-differentiated thyroid cancer, and further examines the evidence for controversial topics such as the minimum degree of primary resection, the role of elective central neck dissection, and the extent of lateral neck dissection. Well-differentiated thyroid cancer comprises the majority of thyroid cancers, about 90%, and includes both papillary and follicular carcinomas. Despite convergence of the medical community in establishing treatment guidelines under the American Thyroid Association, there still remain many areas of disagreement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-09-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary.

  1. Biomarkers for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Kruttibas; Sarkar, Siddik; Das, Subhasis; Mohanty, Biswanarayan; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid tumor contributes 1% of the total tumor but 90% of the endocrine related tumors. Majority of the thyroid cancers are being diagnosed by Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and histology. Although histology is considered as gold standard, it has some limitations, like variants of papillary and follicular cancer creates confusion among pathologists, where the morphological features are indistinguishable. Conventional histology and FNAC fails to provide any prognostic and therapeutic information. To address this problem, several immunohistochemical markers are proposed and their efficiency in thyroid cancer diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are being evaluated. Among the discussed immunohistochemical markers, few have potential in accurate diagnosis and prognosis of thyroid carcinoma. Hector battifora mesothelial antigen-1 (HBME-1) and Galectin-3 (GAL-3) shows highest specificity and sensitivity in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer respectively. Overexpression of EGFR in thyroid cancer is in proportionate with the severity of the advanced thyroid carcinoma, which required further evaluation and validation. Surgery and radio-iodine therapy is the main treatment modality, however; combined targeted therapeutic approach against different thyroid cancer receptor and biomarkers can reduce the side effect, and improve therapeutic efficiency. This review is oriented towards the finding of the potent thyroid cancer receptor having enhanced sensitivity and specificity, with diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic efficiency.

  2. Is dietary nitrate/nitrite exposure a risk factor for development of thyroid abnormality? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Zahra; Mirmiran, Parvin; Ghasemi, Asghar; Kabir, Ali; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2015-05-01

    The potential effects of inorganic nitrate/nitrite on global health are a much debated issue. In addition to possible methemoglobinemia and carcinogenic properties, anti-thyroid effects of nitrate/nitrite have been suggested. Considering the growing significance of nitrate/nitrite and since there is no comprehensive review in data available, clarifying the effect of nitrate/nitrite on thyroid disorder outcomes is essential. Therefore, we conducted this systematic review of experimental and clinical studies, and a meta-analysis of relevant cohort and cross-sectional studies investigating the association of nitrate/nitrite exposure and thyroid function. Most animal studies show that high exposure (~10-600 times of acceptable daily intake) to nitrate/nitrite induces anti-thyroid effects, including decreased serum level of thyroid hormones and histomorphological changes in thyroid gland; however no similar observations have been documented in humans. Based on our meta-analysis, no significant association was observed between nitrate exposure and the risk of thyroid cancer, hyper- and hypothyroidism; findings from three cohort studies however showed a significant association between higher exposure to nitrite and the risk of thyroid cancer (risk = 1.48, 95% confidence interval = 1.09-2.02, P = 0.012). Additional research is needed to clarify the association between nitrate/nitrite exposures and both thyroid function and cancer.

  3. Development and test of sets of 3D printed age-specific thyroid phantoms for 131I measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Tiffany; Caldeira Ideias, Pedro; Rimlinger, Maeva; Broggio, David; Franck, Didier

    2017-06-01

    In the case of a nuclear reactor accident the release contains a high proportion of iodine-131 that can be inhaled or ingested by members of the public. Iodine-131 is naturally retained in the thyroid and increases the thyroid cancer risk. Since the radiation induced thyroid cancer risk is greater for children than for adults, the thyroid dose to children should be assessed as accurately as possible. For that purpose direct measurements should be carried out with age-specific calibration factors but, currently, there is no age-specific thyroid phantoms allowing a robust measurement protocol. A set of age-specific thyroid phantoms for 5, 10, 15 year old children and for the adult has been designed and 3D printed. A realistic thyroid shape has been selected and material properties taken into account to simulate the attenuation of biological tissues. The thyroid volumes follow ICRP recommendations and the phantoms also include the trachea and a spine model. Several versions, with or without spine, with our without trachea, with or without age-specific neck have been manufactured, in order to study the influence of these elements on calibration factors. The calibration factor obtained with the adult phantom and a reference phantom are in reasonable agreement. In vivo calibration experiments with germanium detectors have shown that the difference in counting efficiency, the inverse of the calibration factor, between the 5 year and adult phantoms is 25% for measurement at contact. It is also experimentally evidenced that the inverse of the calibration factor varies linearly with the thyroid volume. The influence of scattering elements like the neck or spine is not evidenced by experimental measurements.

  4. "Focal thyroid inferno" on color Doppler ultrasonography: a specific feature of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xianshui; Guo, Limei; Zhang, Huabin; Ran, Weiqiang; Fu, Peng; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Wen; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jinrui; Jia, Jianwen

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate color-Doppler features predictive of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A total of 521 patients with 561 thyroid nodules that underwent surgeries or gun biopsies were included in this study. These nodules were divided into three groups: focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (104 nodules in 101 patients), benignity other than focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (73 nodules in 70 patients), and malignancy (358 nodules in 350 patients). On color Doppler sonography, four vascularity types were determined as: hypovascularity, marked internal flow, marked peripheral flow and focal thyroid inferno. The χ2 test was performed to seek the potential vascularity type with the predictive ability of certain thyroid pathology. Furthermore, the gray-scale features of each nodule were also studied. The vascularity type I (hypovascularity) was more often seen in focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis than other benignity and malignancy (46% vs. 20.5% and 19%). While the type II (marked internal flow) showed the opposite tendency (26.9% [focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis] vs. 45.2% [other benignity] and 52.8% [malignancy]). However, type III (marked peripheral flow) was unable to predict any thyroid pathology. Importantly, type IV (focal thyroid inferno) was exclusive to focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. All 8 type IV nodules appeared to be solid, hypoechoic, and well-defined. Using "focal thyroid inferno" as an indicator of FHT, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 7.7% and 100% respectively. The vascularity type of "focal thyroid inferno" is specific for focal Hashimoto thyroiditis. Recognition of this particular feature may avoid unnecessary interventional procedures for some solid hypoechoic thyroid nodules suspicious of malignancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thyroglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2015-04-15

    Identification of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is becoming increasingly common. Patients usually have an excellent prognosis. Most undergo total thyroidectomy, radioiodine ablation and treatment with suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Patients require long term follow-up which includes measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg). Interpretation of serum Tg requires knowledge of the concurrent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration, as secretion is TSH dependant, and an awareness of the limitations of the methods used to measure it. These limitations include the heterogeneity of Tg in serum, the ability of assays to recognise forms of Tg secreted by a tumour, assay biases and not least the potential for interference in immunoassays for Tg from endogenous thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) in patient serum. This review considers what the clinician wants to know and how Tg results can be interpreted in light of an awareness of assay limitations.

  6. Contemporary management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, D Russell; Chin, Edward; Terris, David J

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a relatively common and frequently curable malignant neoplasm, accounting for nearly 2% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The diagnostic and management options have evolved considerably in the past decade, and a current understanding of these trends in the standard of care have assumed an important consideration in the practices of head and neck surgeons and endocrinologists alike. We sought to review the epidemiology and pathology of the several types of thyroid cancer and to present our evidence-based management algorithm. Every effort was made to offer alternative treatment strategies and supporting data where available. In addition to reviewing well-established approaches to diagnosis and management, emphasis is placed on newer techniques, including minimally invasive thyroidectomy, molecular detection of disease propensity, and the use of recombinant thyrotropin prior to radioiodine ablation.

  7. Thyroid hormone disrupting potentials of bisphenol A and its analogues - in vitro comparison study employing rat pituitary (GH3) and thyroid follicular (FRTL-5) cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Cheolmin; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Kyungho

    2017-04-01

    As adverse health effects of bisphenol A (BPA) become a growing public health concern, the chemicals substituting BPA have been increasingly used in everyday lives. BPA substitutes have been frequently detected in both environment and biota in increasing levels. However, very limited toxicological information is available for these chemicals. In the present study, thyroid disrupting effects of nine structural analogues of BPA were evaluated along with BPA, using rat pituitary (GH3) and thyroid follicular (FRTL-5) cells. Similar to BPA, its analogues caused significant down-regulation of tshβ, trα, trβ, dio1 or dio2 genes in GH3 cells, and some analogues, such as BPF, BPM or BPZ, showed even greater potency compared to BPA. In FRTL-5 cells, the genes responsible for hormone synthesis, e.g., pax8, nis, tg or tpo genes, exhibited over 1.5-fold up-regulation following exposure to BPA analogues, such as BPS. The effects on gene regulation was different by the cell line. Our results clearly show that the BPA substituting chemicals may influence thyroid hormone homeostasis by affecting thyroid regulation and hormone synthesis, often at lower doses compared to BPA. Thyroid effects of the BPA analogues deserve further investigations in experimental organisms and in human populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  9. Differentiated thyroid tumors: surgical indications.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, R; Monacelli, M; Santoprete, S; Triola, R; Conti, C; Pecoriello, R; Favoriti, P; Di Patrizi, M S; Barillaro, I; Boccolini, A; Avenia, S; D'Ajello, M; Sanguinetti, A; Avenia, N

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid gland tumors represent 1% of malignant tumors. In Italy their incidence is in constant growth. The aggressiveness depends on the histological type. The relative non-aggressive grade of different forms of tumors is the basis for discussing the treatment of choice: total thyroidectomy vs lobectomy with or without lymphadenectomy of the sixth level in the absence of metastasis. Authors report about their experience, and they advocate, given the high percentage of multicentric forms, total thyroidectomy as treatment of choice.

  10. Affective cycling in thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, A.

    1988-05-01

    Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed.

  11. Thyroid Tissue Connected to Normally Located Thyroid Gland: Ectopic or Exophytic?

    PubMed Central

    Keles, Erol; Ozkara, Sule; Karlidag, Turgut; Ozercan, İbrahim Hanifi

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic thyroid tissue is seen rarely. It is often seen in cervical midline, and rarely in other areas such as submandibular area. Diagnosis is made histopathologically by fine needle biopsy after the elimination of malignancy. In the treatment of ectopic thyroid tissue, surgical excision is mostly applied. According to our knowledge, there is no exophytic thyroid tissue reported in the literature. In this paper, a 32-year-old woman who presented with a swelling under the right jaw and found a thyroid tissue attached to the normally located thyroid gland with a fibrous band in the neck was discussed. PMID:23094169

  12. A misdiagnosed Riedel's thyroiditis successfully treated by thyroidectomy and tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Jung; Wu, Ta-Jen; Lee, Chung-Ta; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2012-12-01

    Riedel's thyroiditis, known as invasive fibrous thyroiditis, is a very rare form of chronic thyroiditis. It is hard to make the diagnosis without surgical biopsy. We present a case of Riedel's thyroiditis in a 52-year-old female with past history of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. She suffered from bilateral neck pain, which radiated to both lower jaws. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 125 mm/hour. Subacute thyroiditis superimposed on Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed and treated with steroid. However the response was poor and she had a history of severe peptic ulcer. To avoid inducing the peptic ulcer by steroid, she received bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy. During surgery, the thyroid had severe adhesion to surrounding soft tissue and the pathology showed Riedel's thyroiditis. The neck pain improved after thyroidectomy. Tamoxifen has been given for 8 months and the size of remnant thyroid decreased to 8 mm. We concluded that combined thyroidectomy and tamoxifen successfully cured a patient with Riedel's thyroiditis.

  13. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Autoimmune Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Miriam; Santaguida, Maria Giulia; Virili, Camilla; Capriello, Silvia; Brusca, Nunzia; Gargano, Lucilla; Centanni, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The term "thyrogastric syndrome" defines the association between autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic autoimmune gastritis (CAG), and it was first described in the early 1960s. More recently, this association has been included in polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type IIIb, in which autoimmune thyroiditis represents the pivotal disorder. Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent autoimmune disease, and it has been reported to be associated with gastric disorders in 10-40% of patients while about 40% of patients with autoimmune gastritis also present HT. Some intriguing similarities have been described about the pathogenic mechanism of these two disorders, involving a complex interaction among genetic, embryological, immunologic, and environmental factors. CAG is characterized by a partial or total disappearance of parietal cells implying the impairment of both hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor production. The clinical outcome of this gastric damage is the occurrence of a hypochlorhydric-dependent iron-deficient anemia, followed by pernicious anemia concomitant with the progression to a severe gastric atrophy. Malabsorption of levothyroxine may occur as well. We have briefly summarized in this minireview the most recent achievements on this peculiar association of diseases that, in the last years, have been increasingly diagnosed.

  14. Incidental carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Pezzolla, Angela; Marzaioli, Rinaldo; Lattarulo, Serafina; Docimo, Giovanni; Conzo, Giovanni; Ciampolillo, Anna; Barile, Graziana; Anelli, Ferdinando Massimiliano; Madaro, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of incidental thyroid carcinoma in patients submitted to thyroidectomy for a benign disease is quite frequent. A retrospective analysis was performed on 455 patients submitted to surgical intervention in order to establish the incidence of this kind of carcinoma. Two hundred fifty-six patients (56%) were affected by benign disease (176 multinodular goiter, 12 uninodular goiter, 1 Plummer disease and 67 Basedow disease) and 202 (44%) by carcinoma. In 28 of 256 patients (11%), affected by benign disease, occurred a histological diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma, (10 papillary carcinoma, 1 follicular carcinoma, 29 papillary carcinoma follicular variant). In this study it's considered incidental thyroid carcinoma the one occurred in patients who never underwent Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) and there were no suspicious features in all exams that may suggest the presence of carcinoma. Twenty-three of the 40 incidental carcinoma (57.5%) were microcarcinomas. Ten patients had a sincronous carcinoma. Actually, these patients are still in a follow up program and no recurrency of disease is occasionally observed. This study shows that the only way to put doubts on the real benignity of the disease is the fine needle aspiration; there are no other instruments that could identify the occurrence of the carcinoma. Moreover in the majority of cases the incidental carcinoma is a microcarcinoma, it doesn't reach significant volume, may be not centered by a FNA, but in most cases it's not really biologically aggressive.

  15. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  16. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as "self" are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  17. [Immediate complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Pomata, M; Ragazzo, G; Pisano, G; Farina, G P

    1990-06-01

    The Authors report the results of a series of 502 thyroid operations (bilateral in 322 cases [64%] and unilateral in 180 cases [36%]), with the aim to evaluate the incidence of early complications and to establish when they were more likely to occur. Preoperative diagnosis was based on scintigraphic scan recently combined to ultrasonography with fine needle biopsy. In all patients a pre and postoperative control of vocal cords motility was performed. Intraoperative identification of recurrent laryngeal nerve was the rule. Complications include a single case of mortality due to cerebral haemorrhage, 2 cases of monolateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, 4 cases of transient dysphonia, 8 cases of temporary hypoparathyroidism, 5 cases of postoperative bleeding. In three patients a temporary tracheostomy was needed. Thyrotoxic storm did not occur and wound infections were negligible. The various thyroid diseases and their different biological behavior are responsible of the risk factors, local and general ones, which the surgeon must recognize. Diagnostic accuracy, meticulous surgical technique and the best treatment at the first approach are the main factors to prevent complications in thyroid surgery.

  18. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems.

  19. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems. PMID:27213120

  20. [Immunohistochemical profile of angiogenesis in the thyroid gland in various thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Rurua, N Z; Gogiashvili, L E; Tsagareli, Z G

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study - to determine the feature of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) expression in the thyroid gland (TG) in various thyroid diseases. Material - thyroid tissue (operative material) with histologically confirmed diagnosis: 10 - follicular adenoma, 17 - multinodular goiter, 8 - thyroiditis Hashimoto, 8 - papillary carcinoma, 10 - intact (normal) thyroid samples (forensic autopsy). The immunohistochemical study of the material showed the following results: the increase of the Hürtle cells population 40 % or more indicates a hyperthyroidism tendency despite TSH+ receptor status. Under the thyroid pathology TSH and VEGF expression appears in thyrocytes and also in microvascular endothelial cells. VEGF expression is below the norm in the Hashimoto thyroiditis. VEGF is involved not only in angiogenesis, but in pathophysiological shifts in thyroid tissue. Microvessel density (MVD) and TSH positive receptor status under the thyroid pathology testify the absence of the endothelial cells transformation, however, this index can not serve as a biopothential prognostic marker of thyroid disease.