Science.gov

Sample records for experimental wind turbine

  1. An experimental investigation on wind turbine aeromechanics and wake interferences among multiple wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ahmet

    A comprehensive experimental study was conducted to investigate wind turbine aeromechanics and wake interferences among multiple wind turbines sited in onshore and offshore wind farms. The experiments were carried out in a large-scale Aerodynamic/Atmospheric Boundary Layer (AABL) Wind Tunnel available at Iowa State University. An array of scaled three-blade Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine (HAWT) models were placed in atmospheric boundary layer winds with different mean and turbulence characteristics to simulate the situations in onshore and offshore wind farms. The effects of the important design parameters for wind farm layout optimization, which include the mean and turbulence characteristics of the oncoming surface winds, the yaw angles of the turbines with respect to the oncoming surface winds, the array spacing and layout pattern, and the terrain topology of wind farms on the turbine performances (i.e., both power output and dynamic wind loadings) and the wake interferences among multiple wind turbines, were assessed in detail. The aeromechanic performance and near wake characteristics of a novel dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) design with co-rotating or counter-rotating configuration were also investigated, in comparison to a conventional single rotor wind turbine (SRWT). During the experiments, in addition to measuring dynamic wind loads (both forces and moments) and the power outputs of the scaled turbine models, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocity (PIV) system was used to conduct detailed flow field measurements (i.e., both free-run and phase-locked flow fields measurements) to reveal the transient behavior of the unsteady wake vortices and turbulent flow structures behind wind turbines and to quantify the characteristics of the wake interferences among the wind turbines sited in non-homogenous surface winds. A miniature cobra anemometer was also used to provide high-temporal-resolution data at points of interest to supplement the full field PIV

  2. Large experimental wind turbines: Where we are now

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Several large wind turbine projects have been initiated by NASA-Lewis as part of the ERDA wind energy program. The projects consist of progressively large wind turbine ranging from 100 kW with a rotor diameter of 125 feet to 1500 kW with rotor diameters of 200 to 300 feet. Also included is supporting research and technology for large wind turbines and for lowering the costs and increasing the reliability of the major wind turbine components. The results and status of the above projects are briefly discussed in this report. In addition, a brief summary and status of the plans for selecting the utility sites for the experimental wind turbines is also discussed.

  3. Experimental study on durability of small wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Daorina; Shang, Wei; Wang, Huan

    2017-06-01

    Through the basic theory of durability test technology for small and medium sized wind power generation units, and the durability of 3KW wind turbine, this paper analyzed the test method of time available rate of unit and studied the power generation capability of the wind turbine. No power attenuation trend has been found, and a lot of experimental data and rich experience in engineering practice has been obtained with the success of experiments.

  4. Experimental investigation on the wake interference among wind turbines sited in atmospheric boundary layer winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Ozbay, A.; Wang, X. D.; Hu, H.

    2017-08-01

    We examined experimentally the effects of incoming surface wind on the turbine wake and the wake interference among upstream and downstream wind turbines sited in atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) winds. The experiment was conducted in a large-scale ABL wind tunnel with scaled wind turbine models mounted in different incoming surface winds simulating the ABL winds over typical offshore/onshore wind farms. Power outputs and dynamic loadings acting on the turbine models and the wake flow characteristics behind the turbine models were quantified. The results revealed that the incoming surface winds significantly affect the turbine wake characteristics and wake interference between the upstream and downstream turbines. The velocity deficits in the turbine wakes recover faster in the incoming surface winds with relatively high turbulence levels. Variations of the power outputs and dynamic wind loadings acting on the downstream turbines sited in the wakes of upstream turbines are correlated well with the turbine wakes characteristics. At the same downstream locations, the downstream turbines have higher power outputs and experience greater static and fatigue loadings in the inflow with relatively high turbulence level, suggesting a smaller effect of wake interference for the turbines sited in onshore wind farms.

  5. Experimental investigation on the wake interference among wind turbines sited in atmospheric boundary layer winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Ozbay, A.; Wang, X. D.; Hu, H.

    2017-06-01

    We examined experimentally the effects of incoming surface wind on the turbine wake and the wake interference among upstream and downstream wind turbines sited in atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) winds. The experiment was conducted in a large-scale ABL wind tunnel with scaled wind turbine models mounted in different incoming surface winds simulating the ABL winds over typical offshore/onshore wind farms. Power outputs and dynamic loadings acting on the turbine models and the wake flow characteristics behind the turbine models were quantified. The results revealed that the incoming surface winds significantly affect the turbine wake characteristics and wake interference between the upstream and downstream turbines. The velocity deficits in the turbine wakes recover faster in the incoming surface winds with relatively high turbulence levels. Variations of the power outputs and dynamic wind loadings acting on the downstream turbines sited in the wakes of upstream turbines are correlated well with the turbine wakes characteristics. At the same downstream locations, the downstream turbines have higher power outputs and experience greater static and fatigue loadings in the inflow with relatively high turbulence level, suggesting a smaller effect of wake interference for the turbines sited in onshore wind farms.

  6. Experimental Study of Fully Developed Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner v, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Results from an experimental study of an array of up to 100 model wind turbines with 0.25 m diameter, conducted in the turbulent boundary layer of the 6.0 m wide × 2.7 m tall × 72.0 m long test section of the UNH Flow Physics Facility, are reported. The study aims to address two questions. First, for a given configuration (turbine spacing, initial conditions, etc.), when will the model wind farm reach a ``fully developed'' condition, in which turbulence statistics remain the same from one row to the next within and above the wind turbine array. Second, how is kinetic energy transported in the wind turbine array boundary layer (WTABL). Measurements in the fully developed WTABL can provide valuable insight to the optimization of wind farm energy production. Previous experimental studies with smaller model wind farms were unable to reach the fully developed condition. Due to the size of the UNH facility and the current model array, the fully developed WTABL condition can be achieved. The wind turbine array was simulated by a combination of drag-matched porous disks, used in the upstream part of the array, and by a smaller array of realistic, scaled 3-bladed wind turbines immediately upstream of the measurement location.

  7. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, T.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary results of two projects in the development phase of reliable wind turbines designed to supply cost-competitive electrical energy were discussed. An experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are first reviewed. The results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs are also discussed. These studies predict wind energy costs of 1.5 to 7 cents per kW-h for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 per year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  8. Turbulence Impact on Wind Turbines: Experimental Investigations on a Wind Turbine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abadi, A.; Kim, Y. J.; Ertunç, Ö.; Delgado, A.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental investigations have been conducted by exposing an efficient wind turbine model to different turbulence levels in a wind tunnel. Nearly isotropic turbulence is generated by using two static squared grids: fine and coarse one. In addition, the distance between the wind-turbine and the grid is adjusted. Hence, as the turbulence decays in the flow direction, the wind-turbine is exposed to turbulence with various energy and length scale content. The developments of turbulence scales in the flow direction at various Reynolds numbers and the grid mesh size are measured. Those measurements are conducted with hot-wire anemometry in the absence of the wind-turbine. Detailed measurements and analysis of the upstream and downstream velocities, turbulence intensity and spectrum distributions are done. Performance measurements are conducted with and without turbulence grids and the results are compared. Performance measurements are conducted with an experimental setup that allow measuring of torque, rotational speed from the electrical parameters. The study shows the higher the turbulence level, the higher the power coefficient. This is due to many reasons. First, is the interaction of turbulence scales with the blade surface boundary layer, which in turn delay the stall. Thus, suppressing the boundary layer and preventing it from separation and hence enhancing the aerodynamics characteristics of the blade. In addition, higher turbulence helps in damping the tip vortices. Thus, reduces the tip losses. Adding winglets to the blade tip will reduce the tip vortex. Further investigations of the near and far wake-surrounding intersection are performed to understand the energy exchange and the free stream entrainment that help in retrieving the velocity.

  9. Experimental Characterization of Wind Turbine Blade Aerodynamic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingemanson, Megan Lynn

    Wind turbine noise at low frequencies less than 300Hz is not only annoying to humans but has been proven to cause serious health issues. Additionally, animals are severely affected by wind turbines because a small increase in ambient noise (as is produced by wind turbines) significantly reduces their listening ability. In an attempt to better understand and characterize the aerodynamic noise of wind turbine blades, experimental testing was completed on PowerWorks 100kW and GudCraft WG700 blade specimens in the University of California, Davis Transportation Noise Control Center's anechoic chamber. Experimental testing and data analysis proved approximately 4.0dB to 6.0dB was produced due to the blades' geometric design for both blade specimens at low frequencies. This noise was maximized at the blades' leading edge along the central portion of the blades' radius. Theoretical prediction models have been used to determine that, for typical wind speeds and low frequencies, noise generated due to the tip passing frequency is clearly predominant.

  10. Preliminary results of the large experimental wind turbine phase of the national wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Sholes, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A major phase of the wind energy program is the development of reliable wind turbines for supplying cost-competitive electrical energy. This paper discusses the preliminary results of two projects in this phase of the program. First an experimental 100 kW wind turbine design and its status are reviewed. Also discussed are the results of two parallel design studies for determining the configurations and power levels for wind turbines with minimum energy costs. These studies show wind energy costs of 7 to 1.5 c/kWH for wind turbines produced in quantities of 100 to 1000 a year and located at sites having average winds of 12 to 18 mph.

  11. On the impact of non-Gaussian wind statistics on wind turbines - an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schottler, Jannik; Reinke, Nico; Hoelling, Agnieszka; Whale, Jonathan; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The effect of intermittent and Gaussian inflow conditions on wind energy converters is studied experimentally. Two different flow situations were created in a wind tunnel using an active grid. Both flows exhibit nearly equal mean velocity values and turbulence intensities, but strongly differ in their two point uτ = u (t + τ) - u (t) on a variety of time scales τ, one being Gaussian distributed, the other one being strongly intermittent. A horizontal axis model wind turbine is exposed to both flows, isolating the effect of the differences not captured by mean values and turbulence intensities on the turbine. Thrust, torque and power data were recorded and analyzed, showing that the model turbine does not smooth out intermittency. Intermittent inflow is converted to similarly intermittent turbine data on all scales considered, reaching down to sub-rotor scales in space, indicating that it is not correct to assume a smoothing of wind speed fluctuations below the size of the rotor.

  12. Experimental wind tunnel testing of linear individual pitch control for two-bladed wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Solingen, Edwin; Navalkar, Sachin; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2014-06-01

    In this paper Linear Individual Pitch Control (LIPC) is applied to an experimental small-scale two-bladed wind turbine. LIPC is a recently introduced Individual Pitch Control (IPC) strategy specifically intended for two-bladed wind turbines. The LIPC approach is based on a linear coordinate transformation, with the special property that only two control loops are required to potentially reduce all periodic blade loads. In this study we apply LIPC to a control-oriented small-scale two-bladed wind turbine, equipped with, among others, two high- bandwidth servomotors to regulate the blade pitch angles and strain gauges to measure the blade moments. Experimental results are presented that indicate the effectiveness of LIPC.

  13. The 100 kW experimental wind turbine generator project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puthoff, R. L.; Sirocky, P.

    1975-01-01

    The Energy Research and Development Administration and the NASA Lewis Research Center engaged jointly in a Wind Energy Program which included the design and erection of a 100 kW wind turbine generator. This test machine consists of a rotor turbine, transmission, shaft, alternator, and tower. The rotor, measuring 125 feet in diameter and consisting of two variable pitch blades, operates at 40 rpm and generates 100 kW of electrical power at a wind velocity of 18 mph. The entire assembly is placed on top of a tower 100 feet above ground level. The machine was scheduled to be ready for operation in August, 1975.

  14. An Experimental Investigation on the Interferences among Multiple Turbines in Onshore and Offshore Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Hu, Hui

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental study to investigate the wake interferences among multiple wind turbines on onshore and offshore wind farms. The experimental studies are conducted in a large-scale Aerodynamic/Atmospheric Boundary Layer (AABL) Wind Tunnel with an array of scaled three-blade Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine (HAWT) models placed in atmospheric boundary layer winds with different mean and turbulence characteristics to simulate the situations in onshore and offshore wind farms. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loads (both forces and moments) and the power outputs of the scaled turbine models, a Particle Image Velocity (PIV) system is used to conduct detailed flow field measurements to quantify the turbulent wake vortex flows and the wake interferences among the wind turbines sited over onshore and offshore wind farms with non-homogenous surface winds. The detailed flow field measurements are correlated with the dynamic wind loads and power output measurements to elucidate underlying physics in order to gain further insight into the characteristics of the dynamic wind loads and wake interferences among multiple wind turbines for higher total power yield and better durability of the wind turbines. The research work is funded by NSF and IAWIND.

  15. Wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  16. Experimental data and theoretical analysis of an operating 100 kW wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Glasgow, J. C.; Anderson, W. D.; Donham, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental test data are correlated with analyses of turbine loads and complete system behavior of the ERDA-NASA 100 kW Mod-0 wind turbine generator over a broad range of steady state conditions, as well as during transient conditions. The deficit in the ambient wind field due to the upwind tower turbine support structure is found to be very significant in exciting higher harmonic loads associated with the flapping response of the blade in bending.

  17. Experimental characterization of vertical-axis wind turbine noise.

    PubMed

    Pearson, C E; Graham, W R

    2015-01-01

    Vertical-axis wind turbines are wind-energy generators suitable for use in urban environments. Their associated noise thus needs to be characterized and understood. As a first step, this work investigates the relative importance of harmonic and broadband contributions via model-scale wind-tunnel experiments. Cross-spectra from a pair of flush-mounted wall microphones exhibit both components, but further analysis shows that the broadband dominates at frequencies corresponding to the audible range in full-scale operation. This observation has detrimental implications for noise-prediction reliability and hence also for acoustic design optimization.

  18. Drone Based Experimental Investigation of Wind Turbine Wake Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Balaji, , Dr.; Chokani, Ndaona, , Dr.; Abhari, Reza, Prof. _., Dr.

    2016-11-01

    The characteristics of the wake downstream of a wind turbine has an important bearing on the optimized micrositing of wind turbines in a given land area, as well as on the loads seen by downstream turbines. We use a novel measurement system to measure the flow field upstream and in the wake of a full-scale wind turbine. The system consists of a fast response aerodynamic probe, mounted on an autonomous drone that is equipped with a suite of sensors. These measurements detail, for the first time at full-scale Reynolds number conditions, the evolution and breakdown of tip vortices that are characteristic of the near wake, as well as the turbulent mixing and entrainment of more energised flow, which are distinctive in the far wake. A short-time Fourier transform (STFT) analysis method is used to derive time-localized TKE along the drone's trajectory. Detailed upstream and wake measurements are needed to understand the flow behavior, as it helps in developing and validating simplified wake models that can approximate the wake qualities. Comparisons of these measurements to recently developed wake prediction models highlights how these measurements can support further model development.

  19. Experimental and numerical study of a 10MW TLP wind turbine in waves and wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegalajar-Jurado, Antonio; Hansen, Anders M.; Laugesen, Robert; Mikkelsen, Robert F.; Borg, Michael; Kim, Taeseong; Heilskov, Nicolai F.; Bredmose, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents tests on a 1:60 version of the DTU 10MW wind turbine mounted on a tension leg platform and their numerical reproduction. Both the experimental setup and the numerical model are Froude-scaled, and the dynamic response of the floating wind turbine to wind and waves is compared in terms of motion in the six degrees of freedom, nacelle acceleration and mooring line tension. The numerical model is implemented in the aero-elastic code Flex5, featuring the unsteady BEM method and the Morison equation for the modelling of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics, respectively. It was calibrated with the tests by matching key system features, namely the steady thrust curve and the decay tests in water. The calibrated model is used to reproduce the wind-wave climates in the laboratory, including regular and irregular waves, with and without wind. The model predictions are compared to the measured data, and a good agreement is found for surge and heave, while some discrepancies are observed for pitch, nacelle acceleration and line tension. The addition of wind generally improves the agreement with test results. The aerodynamic damping is identified in both tests and simulations. Finally, the sources of the discrepancies are discussed and some improvements in the numerical model are suggested in order to obtain a better agreement with the experiments.

  20. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Traudt, R.F.

    1986-12-30

    This patent describes a wind turbine device having a main rotatable driven shaft, elongated blades operatively mounted on the main shaft for unitary rotation with the main shaft. The blade extends substantially radially away from the main shaft and is adapted to fold downwind under naturally occurring forces and simultaneously feather in direct response to the folding movement. A means associated with the blades is included for increasing the rate of fold relative to the rate of feather as the speed of rotation increases.

  1. Dynamic stall of an experimental wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melius, Matthew; Cal, Raúl Bayoán; Mulleners, Karen

    2016-03-01

    To understand the complex flow phenomena over wind turbine blades during stall development, a scaled three-dimensional non-rotating blade model is designed to be dynamically similar to a rotating full-scale NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade. A time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigation of flow behavior during the stall cycle examines the processes of stall development and flow reattachment. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and vortex detection techniques are applied to the PIV fields to quantify relevant flow characteristics such as vortex size, separation angle, and separation point throughout a dynamic pitching cycle. The behavior of the POD coefficients provides time scales for the transitional stages which are quantified and compared, revealing that transition from attached flow to full stall is delayed to higher angles of attack and occurs at a higher rate than the transition from full stall to attached flow. The instantaneous flow fields are then reconstructed using the first four POD modes to demonstrate their prominent roles throughout the stall cycle and their ability to capture the general separation behavior over the blade surface.

  2. An Experimental Study of Lightning Overvoltages in Wind Turbine Generation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Tomokatsu; Noda, Taku; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Ametani, Akihiro

    In order to obtain good wind conditions, wind turbine generation systems are built at places like hill countries and shorefronts where few tall structures are found. However, this increases the risk of lightning strikes. To promote wind power generation, lightning-protection methodologies for such wind turbine generation systems have to be established. This paper presents the results of an experimental study which investigates the lightning overvoltages in wind turbine generation systems. The experiments were carried out on actual ground soil using a reduced-size wind turbine model with its foundations. From the experiments, the following conclusions have been deduced: (i) Voltage rise due to the grounding impedance of the foundations can cause a significant overvoltage between the tower foot and an incoming cable like a power, a communication or a control line. (ii) The voltage rise of the foundations and that of the surrounding ground soil may cause an overvoltage at the outermost insulation layer of an incoming cable, which can result in a breakdown or a deterioration of the insulation (iii) Voltage and current waveforms to understand the traveling-wave phenomenon on a wind power generation system with its foundations were obtained. The data will be useful for developing an EMTP simulation model of a wind turbine generation system for lightning overvoltage studies.

  3. Optical system design and experimental evaluation of a coherent Doppler wind Lidar system for the predictive control of wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Leilei; Tauscher, Julian Asche; Beuth, Thorsten; Heussner, Nico; Fox, Maik; Babu, Harsha Umesh; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-09-01

    The control of wind turbine blade pitch systems by Lidar assisted wind speed prediction has been proposed to increase the electric power generation and reduce the mechanical fatigue load on wind turbines. However, the sticking point of such Lidar systems is the price. Hence, our objective is to develop a more cost efficient Lidar system to support the pitch control of horizontal axis wind turbines and therefore to reduce the material requirement, lower the operation and maintenance costs and decrease the cost of wind energy in the long term. Compared to the state of the art Lidar systems, a laser with a shorter coherence length and a corresponding fiber delay line is introduced for reducing the costs. In this paper we present the experimental evaluation of different sending and receiving optics designs for such a system from a free space laboratory setup.

  4. Experimental characterization of turbulent inflow noise on a full-scale wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Steven; Oerlemans, Stefan; Palo, Scott

    2016-12-01

    An extensive experimental campaign was conducted on a 108-m diameter 2.3-MW wind turbine in order to assess the effect of inflow turbulence conditions on wind turbine acoustics. Over 50 h of continuous acoustic data was acquired at power-generating wind speeds. Twelve precision microphones were used, arranged in a one rotor radius ring about the turbine tower in order to assess the directivity of the noise emission. Turbine operational and atmospheric conditions were gathered simultaneously with acoustics measurements. The testing and analysis constitute perhaps the most thorough experimental characterization of turbulent inflow noise from a wind turbine to date. Turbulence intensities typically varied between 10 percent and 35 percent, and wind speeds covered most of the operational range of the wind turbine, from cut-on to well above its rated power. A method was developed for using blade-mounted accelerometers for determining the turbulence conditions in the immediate vicinity of the blades, which are the primary turbulence noise generating bodies. The method uses the blades' vibrational energy within a specified frequency range to estimate the overall turbulence conditions by assuming a von Kármán turbulence spectrum. Using this method, a clear positive correlation is shown between turbulence intensity and noise levels. The turbulence noise is dominant at low frequencies and is primarily observed in the upwind and downwind directions. Low frequency noise increases by as much as 6 dB for the range of turbulence conditions measured. Comparisons are made between the measured turbine noise directivity and theory using a simple acoustic model of the turbine as three point-sources. Strong agreement is found between the theoretical leading edge noise directivity model and the measured low frequency noise directivity.

  5. An Experimental Study on the Effects of Base Motion on the Aeromechanic Performance of Floating Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Morteza; Sarkar, Partha; Hu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of the wave-induced base motions experienced by floating wind turbines sited in offshore wind farms on their aeromechanic performance and wake characteristics, in comparison with those of a bottom- fixed wind turbine. The experimental study was performed in a large-scale atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel with a scaled wind turbine model placed in a turbulent boundary layer flow with similar mean and turbulence characteristics as those over a typical offshore wind farm. During the experiments, a scaled wind turbine model was mounted on a translational and rotational stage, which can generate translation and/or rotation motions to simulate the dynamic wave-induced motions (i.e., surge, pitch and heave motions) experienced by floating wind turbines in offshore wind farms. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loadings (both forces and moments)acting on the model turbine, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocity (PIV) system was also used to conduct detailed flow field measurements to characterize the turbine wakes with the turbine base in motion. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the dynamic wind load data to elucidate underlying physics for higher total power yield and better durability of floating offshore wind turbines.

  6. Wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon II, E. H.

    1985-10-15

    A wind turbine, having at least one pair of sail means, each said sail means having upper and lower portions hingedly connected together to permit said portions to move away from and towards each other to thus open and close, respectively, said sail means being in the shape of an airfoil; a vertical shaft; a support; means mounting said vertical shaft in said support for rotation about the vertical axis of said shaft; and means mounting said sail means to said shaft, said sail means being disposed to move under the action of the wind in a plane about said vertical axis; said mounting means for said sail means including means for opening and closing one sail means of each pair of sail means while the other sail means of said pair is closed and opened, respectively, as said sail means moves about said vertical axis in said plane, said mounting means for said sail means being operable to dispose said plane at a predetermined angle to the horizontal and being adjustable to change said angle as desired.

  7. Wind Turbine Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbine generators, ranging in size from a few kilowatts to several megawatts, are producing electricity both singly and in wind power stations that encompass hundreds of machines. Many installations are in uninhabited areas far from established residences, and therefore there are no apparent environmental impacts in terms of noise. There is, however, the potential for situations in which the radiated noise can be heard by residents of adjacent neighborhoods, particularly those neighborhoods with low ambient noise levels. A widely publicized incident of this nature occurred with the operation of the experimental Mod-1 2-MW wind turbine, which is described in detail elsewhere. Pioneering studies which were conducted at the Mod-1 site on the causes and remedies of noise from wind turbines form the foundation of much of the technology described in this chapter.

  8. Experimental investigations on the aerodynamics and aeromechanics of wind turbines for floating offshore applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Morteza

    There are many advantages in floating wind turbines in deep waters, however, there are also significant technological challenges associated with it too. The dynamic excitation of wind and waves can induce excessive motions along each of the 6 degrees of freedom (6-DOF) of the floating platforms. These motions will then be transferred to the turbine, and directly impact the wake characteristics of the floating wind turbines, and consequently the resultant wind loadings and performances of the wind turbines sited in offshore wind farms. In the present study, a comprehensive experimental study was performed to analyze the performance, loading, and the near wake characteristics of a rigid wind turbine model subjected to surge, heave, and pitch motions. The experimental study was performed in a large-scale atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel with a scaled three-blade Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine model placed in a turbulent boundary layer airflow with similar mean and turbulence characteristics as those over a typical offshore wind farm. The base of the 1:300 scaled model wind turbine was mounted on translation and rotation stages. These stages can be controlled to generate surge, pitch and heave motions to simulate the dynamic motions experienced by floating offshore wind turbines. During the experiments, the velocity scaling method was chosen to maintain the similar velocity ratios (i.e., the ratios of the incoming airflow flow to that of turbine base motion) between the model and the prototype. During the experiments, a high resolution digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to achieve flow field measurements to quantify the characteristics of the turbulent vortex flow in the near wake of the wind turbine model. Besides conducting ''free run'' PIV measurements to determine the ensemble-averaged statistics of the flow quantities such as mean velocity, Reynolds stress, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) distributions in the wake flow, ''phase

  9. Convective heat transfer and experimental icing aerodynamics of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    The total worldwide base of installed wind energy peak capacity reached 94 GW by the end of 2007, including 1846 MW in Canada. Wind turbine systems are being installed throughout Canada and often in mountains and cold weather regions, due to their high wind energy potential. Harsh cold weather climates, involving turbulence, gusts, icing and lightning strikes in these regions, affect wind turbine performance. Ice accretion and irregular shedding during turbine operation lead to load imbalances, often causing the turbine to shut off. They create excessive turbine vibration and may change the natural frequency of blades as well as promote higher fatigue loads and increase the bending moment of blades. Icing also affects the tower structure by increasing stresses, due to increased loads from ice accretion. This can lead to structural failures, especially when coupled to strong wind loads. Icing also affects the reliability of anemometers, thereby leading to inaccurate wind speed measurements and resulting in resource estimation errors. Icing issues can directly impact personnel safety, due to falling and projected ice. It is therefore important to expand research on wind turbines operating in cold climate areas. This study presents an experimental investigation including three important fundamental aspects: (1) heat transfer characteristics of the airfoil with and without liquid water content (LWC) at varying angles of attack; (2) energy losses of wind energy while a wind turbine is operating under icing conditions; and (3) aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil during a simulated icing event. A turbine scale model with curved 3-D blades and a DC generator is tested in a large refrigerated wind tunnel, where ice formation is simulated by spraying water droplets. A NACA 63421 airfoil is used to study the characteristics of aerodynamics and convective heat transfer. The current, voltage, rotation of the DC generator and temperature distribution along the airfoil

  10. Design and operating experience on the US Department of Energy experimental Mod-0 100-kW wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental wind turbine was designed and fabricated to assess technology requirements and engineering problems of large wind turbines. The machine has demonstrated successful operation in all of its design modes and served as a prototype developmental test bed for the Mod-0A operational wind turbines which are currently used on utility networks. The mechanical and control system are described as they evolved in operational tests and some of the experience with various systems in the downwind rotor configurations are elaborated.

  11. Design and wind tunnel experimentation of a variable blade drag type vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Samuel; Bahr, Behnam

    2012-04-01

    The primary purpose of this research effort is to propose a novel efficiency boosting design feature in a drag type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), explore practicality through design and fabrication, and test the viability of the design through wind tunnel experiments. Using adaptive control surface design and an improved blade shape can be very useful in harnessing the wind's energy in low wind speed areas. The new design is based on a series of smaller blade elements to make any shape, which changes to reduce a negative resistance as it rotates and thus maximizing the useful torque. As such, these blades were designed into a modified Savonius wind turbine with the goal of improving upon the power coefficient produced by a more conventional design. The experiment yielded some positive observations with regard to starting characteristics. Torque and angular velocity data was recorded for both the conventional configuration and the newly built configuration and the torque and power coefficient results were compared.

  12. An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Characteristics behind Dual-Rotor Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Ozbay, Ahmet; Tian, Wei; Sharma, Anupam; Hu, Hui; Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University Team

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental study to investigate the aeromechanics and wake characteristics of dual-rotor wind turbines (DRWTs) with co- and counter-rotating configurations, in comparison to those of a conventional single-rotor wind turbine (SRWT). The experiments were performed in a large-scale Aerodynamic/Atmospheric Boundary Layer (AABL) wind tunnel under neutral stability conditions. In addition to measuring the power output performance of DRWT and SRWT systems, static and dynamic wind loads acting on the SRWT and DRWT systems were also investigated. Furthermore, a high resolution PIV system was used for detailed wake flow field measurements (free-run and phase-locked) so as to quantify the characteristics of the turbulent turbine wake flow and to quantitatively visualize the transient behavior of the unsteady vortex structures in the wakes of DRWTs, in comparison with those behind a conventional SRWT systems. The detailed flow field measurements are correlated with the dynamic wind loads and power output measurements to elucidate underlying physics for higher total power yield and better durability of the wind turbines. Funding support from the Iowa Energy Center with Grant No. 14-008-OG and National Science Foundation (NSF) with Grant No. CBET- 1438099 is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. An experimental study on the effects of relative rotation direction on the wake interferences among tandem wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Hu, Hui

    2014-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of relative rotation direction on the wake interferences among two tandemwind turbines models. While the oncoming flow conditions were kept in constant during the experiments, turbine power outputs, wind loads acting on the turbines, and wake characteristics behind the turbines were compared quantitatively with turbine models in either co-rotating or counter-rotating configuration. The measurement results reveal that the turbines in counter-rotating would harvest more wind energy from the same oncoming wind, compared with the co-rotating case. While the recovery of the streamwise velocity deficits in the wake flows was found to be almost identical with the turbines operated in either co-rotating or counter-rotating, the significant azimuthal velocity generated in the wake flow behind the upstream turbine is believed to be the reason why the counter-rotating turbines would have a better power production performance. Since the azimuthal flow velocity in the wake flow was found to decrease monotonically with the increasing downstream distance, the benefits of the counter-rotating configuration were found to decrease gradually as the spacing between the tandem turbines increases. While the counter-rotating downstream turbine was found to produce up to 20% more power compared with that of co-rotating configuration with the turbine spacing being about 0.7 D, the advantage was found to become almost negligible when the turbine spacing becomes greater than 6.5 D. It suggests that the counter-rotating configuration design would be more beneficial to turbines in onshore wind farms due to the smaller turbine spacing (i.e., ˜3 rotor diameters for onshore wind farms vs. ˜7 rotor diameters for offshore wind farms in the prevailing wind direction), especially for those turbines sited over complex terrains with the turbine spacing only about 1-2 rotor diameters.

  14. An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Micropiiting in Wind Turbine Gears and Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Kahraman, Ahmet

    2012-03-28

    In this research study, the micro-pitting related contact failures of wind turbine gearbox components were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. On the experimental side, a twin-disk type test machine was used to simulate wind turbine transmission contacts in terms of their kinematic (rolling and sliding speeds), surface roughnesses, material parameters and lubricant conditions. A test matrix that represents the ranges of contact conditions of the wind turbine gear boxes was defined and executed to bring an empirical understanding to the micro-pitting problem in terms of key contact parameters and operating conditions. On the theoretical side, the first deterministic micro-pitting model based on a mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication formulations and multi-axial near-surface crack initiation model was developed. This physics-based model includes actual instantaneous asperity contacts associated with real surface roughness profiles for predicting the onset of the micro-pit formation. The predictions from the theoretical model were compared to the experimental data for validation of the models. The close agreement between the model and measurements was demonstrated. With this, the proposed model can be deemed suitable for identifying the mechanisms leading to micro-pitting of gear and bearing surfaces of wind turbine gear boxes, including all key material, lubricant and surface engineering aspects of the problem, and providing solutions to these micro-pitting problems.

  15. CFD and Experimental Studies on Wind Turbines in Complex Terrain by Improved Actuator Disk Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Yan, Shu; Mu, Yanfei; Chen, Xinming; Shi, Shaoping

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, an onshore wind farm in mountainous area of southwest China was investigated through numerical and experimental methods. An improved actuator disk method, taking rotor data (i.e. blade geometry information, attack angle, blade pitch angle) into account, was carried out to investigate the flow characteristic of the wind farm, especially the wake developing behind the wind turbines. Comparing to the classic AD method and the situ measurements, the improved AD shows better agreements with the measurements. The turbine power was automatically predicted in CFD by blade element method, which agreed well with the measurement results. The study proved that the steady CFD simulation with improved actuator disk method was able to evaluate wind resource well and give good balance between computing efficiency and accuracy, in contrary to much more expensive computation methods such as actuator-line/actuator-surface transient model, or less accurate methods such as linear velocity reduction wake model.

  16. Large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The development associated with large wind turbine systems is briefly described. The scope of this activity includes the development of several large wind turbines ranging in size from 100 kW to several megawatt levels. A description of the wind turbine systems, their programmatic status and a summary of their potential costs is included.

  17. Improving Wind Turbine Drivetrain Reliability Using a Combined Experimental, Computational, and Analytical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Jove, J.; Campbell, J.

    2015-03-01

    Nontorque loads induced by the wind turbine rotor overhang weight and aerodynamic forces can greatly affect drivetrain loads and responses. If not addressed properly, these loads can result in a decrease in gearbox component life. This work uses analytical modeling, computational modeling, and experimental data to evaluate a unique drivetrain design that minimizes the effects of nontorque loads on gearbox reliability: the Pure Torque(R) drivetrain developed by Alstom. The drivetrain has a hub-support configuration that transmits nontorque loads directly into the tower rather than through the gearbox as in other design approaches. An analytical model of Alstom's Pure Torque drivetrain provides insight into the relationships among turbine component weights, aerodynamic forces, and the resulting drivetrain loads. Main shaft bending loads are orders of magnitude lower than the rated torque and are hardly affected by wind conditions and turbine operations.

  18. Improved Wind Turbine Drivetrain Reliability using a Combined Experimental, Computational, and Analytical Approach (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Bergua, R.; van Dam, J.; Jove, J.; Campbell, J.

    2014-08-01

    Nontorque loads induced by the wind turbine rotor overhang weight and aerodynamic forces can greatly affect drivetrain loads and responses. If not addressed properly, these loads can result in a decrease in gearbox component life. This work uses analytical modeling, computational modeling, and experimental data to evaluate a unique drivetrain design that minimize the effects of nontorque loads on gearbox reliability: the Pure Torque drivetrain developed by Alstom. The drivetrain has a hub-support configuration that transmits nontorque loads directly into the tower rather than through the gearbox as in other design approaches. An analytical model of Alstom's Pure Torque drivetrain provides insight into the relationships among turbine component weights, aerodynamic forces, and the resulting drivetrain loads. Main shaft bending loads are orders of magnitude lower than the rated torque and are hardly affected by wind speed and turbine operations.

  19. Experimental study of rotating wind turbine breakdown characteristics in large scale air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Qu, Lu; Si, Tianjun; Ni, Yang; Xu, Jianwei; Wen, Xishan

    2017-06-01

    When a wind turbine is struck by lightning, its blades are usually rotating. The effect of blade rotation on a turbine’s ability to trigger a lightning strike is unclear. Therefore, an arching electrode was used in a wind turbine lightning discharge test to investigate the difference in lightning triggering ability when blades are rotating and stationary. A negative polarity switching waveform of 250/2500 μs was applied to the arching electrode and the up-and-down method was used to calculate the 50% discharge voltage. Lightning discharge tests of a 1:30 scale wind turbine model with 2, 4, and 6 m air gaps were performed and the discharge process was observed. The experimental results demonstrated that when a 2 m air gap was used, the breakdown voltage increased as the blade speed was increased, but when the gap length was 4 m or longer, the trend was reversed and the breakdown voltage decreased. The analysis revealed that the rotation of the blades changes the charge distribution in the blade-tip region, promotes upward leader development on the blade tip, and decreases the breakdown voltage. Thus, the blade rotation of a wind turbine increases its ability to trigger lightning strikes.

  20. Numerical analysis and experimental investigation of modal properties for the gearbox in wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Pengxing; Huang, Peng; Shi, Tielin

    2016-12-01

    Wind turbine gearbox (WTG), which functions as an accelerator, ensures the performance and service life of wind turbine systems. This paper examines the distinctive modal properties of WTGs through finite element (FE) and experimental modal analyses. The study is performed in two parts. First, a whole system model is developed to investigate the first 10 modal frequencies and mode shapes of WTG using flexible multibody modeling techniques. Given the complex structure and operating conditions of WTG, this study applies spring elements to the model and quantifies how the bearings and gear pair interactions affect the dynamic characteristics of WTGs. Second, the FE modal results are validated through experimental modal analyses of a 1.5 WM WTG using the frequency response function method of single point excitation and multi-point response. The natural frequencies from the FE and experimental modal analyses show favorable agreement and reveal that the characteristic frequency of the studied gearbox avoids its eigenfrequency very well.

  1. Towards an Experimental Investigation of Wind Turbine Aerodynamics at Full Dynamic Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark A.; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    As horizontal axis wind turbines continue to increase in size (with the largest approaching 200 meters in diameter) it becomes progressively more difficult to test new designs without high computational power or extensive experimental effort using conventional tools. Therefore, compromises are often made between the important non-dimensional parameters (Reynolds number and Strouhal number, or tip speed ratio) so that reasonable engineering insight can be gained. Using the unique facilities available at Princeton University, we aim to match both non-dimensional parameters and thus achieve full dynamic similarity at realistic conditions. This is accomplished by using the High Reynolds number Test Facility (or HRTF), which is a high pressure (200 atmospheres) wind tunnel. We present the design, manufacture, and testing of an apparatus suited to the unique environment of a high-pressure facility as well as future plans for investigating the underlying aerodynamics of large-scale wind turbines.

  2. Wind turbines acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Iannace, Gino

    2017-07-01

    The importance of wind turbines has increased over the last few years throughout the European Community. The European energy policy guidelines state that for the year 2020 20% of all energy must be produced by alternative energy sources. Wind turbines are an important type of energy production without petrol. A wind speed in a range from 2.5 m/s to 25.0 m/s is needed. One of the obstacles to the widespread diffusion of wind turbine is noise generation. This work presents some noise measurements of wind turbines in the South of Italy, and discusses the noise problems for the people living near wind farms.

  3. Kinetic energy entrainment in wind turbine and actuator disc wakes: an experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lignarolo, L. E. M.; Ragni, D.; Simão Ferreira, C. J.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2014-06-01

    The present experimental study focuses on the comparison between the wake of a two-bladed wind turbine and the one of an actuator disk. The flow field at the middle plane of the wake is measured with a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, in the low-speed Open Jet Facility wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology. The wind turbine wake is characterized by the complex dynamics of the tip vortex development and breakdown. Analysis of the flow statistics show anisotropic turbulent fluctuations in the turbine wake, with stronger components in the radial direction. The wake of the actuator disc is instead characterized by isotropic random fluctuations. The mixing process in the shear layer is further analysed in terms of flux of mean flow kinetic energy, to show the main differences between the kinetic energy entrainment in the actuator and the turbine wake. This project is intended to provide the basis for understanding the origin of the limitations of the current wake models based on the actuator disc assumption.

  4. An Experimental Study of Lightning Overvoltages in Wind Turbine Generation Systems Using a Reduced-Size Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Noda, Taku; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Ametani, Akihiro

    Wind turbine generation systems are built at locations where few tall structures are found nearby so as to obtain good wind conditions, and thus, they are often struck by lightning. To promote wind power generation, lightning-protection methodologies for such wind turbine generation systems have to be established. This paper presents the result of an experimental study of lightning overvoltages in wind turbine generation systems using a reduced-size wind turbine model. Overvoltages observed at wavefronts of lightning surges are focused on in this study. In the experiments, lightning strokes to one of the blades and to the nacelle were considered, and voltages and currents at various positions of the wind turbine model were measured. The following points have been deduced from the results: (i) The voltage rise due to the tower footing resistance can cause a significant voltage difference between the tower foot and an incoming conductor led from a distant point. Also, a voltage difference between the bottom of down conductors installed inside the tower and an incoming conductor can be of significance. (ii) The lightning current flowing through the tower body induces voltages in main and control circuits which form loops, and the induced voltages can cause overvoltages and malfunctions. (iii) Traveling-wave phenomena in a wind turbine generation system for a lightning strike to the tip of a blade and to the nacelle have been made clear from the measured waveforms. This information can be used for developing an EMTP simulation model of wind turbine generation systems.

  5. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  6. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  7. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema

    Takle, Gene

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  8. Performance of a steel spar wind turbine blade on the Mod-0 100 kW experimental wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, T. G., Jr.; Sullivan, T. L.; Viterna, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    The performance and loading of a large wind rotor, 38.4 m in diameter and composed of two low-cost steel spar blades were examined. Two blades were fabricated at Lewis Research Center and successfully operated on the Mod-0 wind turbine at Plum Brook. The blades were operated on a tower on which the natural bending frequency were altered by placing the tower on a leaf-spring apparatus. It was found that neither blade performance nor loading were affected significantly by this tower softening technique. Rotor performance exceeded prediction while blade loads were found to be in reasonable agreement with those predicted. Seventy-five hours of operation over a five month period resulted in no deterioration in the blade.

  9. Evolution of the shear layer during unsteady separation over an experimental wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melius, Matthew; Cal, Raul; Mulleners, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady flow separation in rotationally augmented flow fields plays a significant role in the aerodynamic performance of industrial wind turbines. Current computational models underestimate the aerodynamic loads due to the inaccurate prediction of the emergence and severity of unsteady flow separation in the presence of rotational augmentation. Through the use of time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV), the unsteady separation over an experimental wind turbine blade is examined. By applying Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), perturbation amplitudes and frequencies within the shear-layer are identified. The time dependent EMD results during the dynamic pitching cycle give insight into the spatio-temporal scales that influence the transition from attached to separated flow. The EMD modes are represented as two-dimensional fields and are analyzed together with the spatial distribution of vortices, the location of the separation point, and velocity contours focusing on the role of vortex shedding and shear layer perturbation in unsteady separation and reattachment.

  10. Dynamics of an experimental two bladed horizontal axis wind turbine with blade cyclic pitch variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotenemser, K. H.; Swift, A. H. P.

    1981-01-01

    The turbine under study incorporates the combination of two features: the application of blade cyclic pitch variation; and the use of yaw angle control for rotor speed and torque regulation. Due to its emasculation by passive cyclic pitch variation the rotor can be rapidly yawed without encountering gyroscopic and aerodynamic hub moments and without noticeable out of plane excursions. The two bladed upwind rotor is vane stabilized and of very simple and rugged design. The principle was first checked out with a small scale wind tunnel model and then tested in the atmosphere with a 7.6 meter diameter experimental fully instrumented wind turbine driving a 3 phase alternator. The test results are summarized with respect to structural dynamics and yaw dynamics.

  11. Experimental investigation of the wake behind a model of wind turbine in a water flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okulov, V. L.; Naumov, I. N.; Kabardin, I.; Mikkelsen, R.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The flow behind the model of wind turbine rotor is investigated experimentally in a water flume using Particle Image Velocimetry. The study carried out involves rotors of three bladed wind turbine designed using Glauert's optimization. The transitional regime, generally characterized as in between the regime governed by stable organized vortical structures and the turbulent wake, develops from disturbances of the tip and root vorticies through vortex paring and further complex behaviour towards the fully turbulent wake. Our PIV measurements pay special attention to the onset of the instabilities. The near wake characteristics (development of expansion, tip vortex position, deficit velocity and rotation in the wake) have been measured for different tip speed ratio to compare with main assumptions and conclusions of various rotor theories.

  12. Seismic response of a full-scale wind turbine tower using experimental and numerical modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandil, Kamel Sayed Ahmad; Saudi, Ghada N.; Eltaly, Boshra Aboul-Anen; El-khier, Mostafa Mahmoud Abo

    2016-12-01

    Wind turbine technology has developed tremendously over the past years. In Egypt, the Zafarana wind farm is currently generating at a capacity of 517 MW, making it one of the largest onshore wind farms in the world. It is located in an active seismic zone along the west side of the Gulf of Suez. Accordingly, seismic risk assessment is demanded for studying the structural integrity of wind towers under expected seismic hazard events. In the context of ongoing joint Egypt-US research project "Seismic Risk Assessment of Wind Turbine Towers in Zafarana wind Farm Egypt" (Project ID: 4588), this paper describes the dynamic performance investigation of an existing Nordex N43 wind turbine tower. Both experimental and numerical work are illustrated explaining the methodology adopted to investigate the dynamic behavior of the tower under seismic load. Field dynamic testing of the full-scale tower was performed using ambient vibration techniques (AVT). Both frequency domain and time domain methods were utilized to identify the actual dynamic properties of the tower as built in the site. Mainly, the natural frequencies, their corresponding mode shapes and damping ratios of the tower were successfully identified using AVT. A vibration-based finite element model (FEM) was constructed using ANSYS V.12 software. The numerical and experimental results of modal analysis were both compared for matching purpose. Using different simulation considerations, the initial FEM was updated to finally match the experimental results with good agreement. Using the final updated FEM, the response of the tower under the AQABA earthquake excitation was investigated. Time history analysis was conducted to define the seismic response of the tower in terms of the structural stresses and displacements. This work is considered as one of the pioneer structural studies of the wind turbine towers in Egypt. Identification of the actual dynamic properties of the existing tower was successfully performed

  13. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Greg

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  14. Wind turbine means

    SciTech Connect

    Kennon, W.A.

    1980-12-02

    A turbine wheel is described which includes a housing for enclosing the electrical generating apparatus, and track structure which engages and rotatably drives the generator or the like, i.e., through suitable coupling structure. Shroud structure is disposed in an operable exterior proximity with the turbine wheel for varying the effectiveness of the wind as it is acting upon the turbine wheel, i.e., in infinite variable stages commensurate with changing velocity of the wind. The speed of the turbine wheel is automatically controlled so as to remain substantially constant throughout a wide variance of normal wind velocity and irrespective of the direction of the wind.

  15. Experimental results of the variable speed, direct drive multipole synchronous wind turbine TWT1650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Eduardo; Garcia-Sanz, Mario

    2004-04-01

    This article presents details of the new variable speed multipole large wind turbine TWT1650 designed by the M. Torres group and summarizes some experimental results of the control system. After several years of multidisciplinary research the first prototype TWT1650 began to work at Cabanillas Wind Farm (Spain) in August 2001. Since then a large number of operational data have been collected and used to improve the behaviour of the machine. The design and controller tuning have been accomplished using advanced QFT (quantitative feedback theory) robust control strategies and have been optimized based on analysis of that information. This article introduces the main advantages of the multipole system and shows and evaluates some of the most representative experimental results under extreme wind conditions. Copyright

  16. Experimental validation of a Fluid-Structure interaction model for simulating offshore floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderer, Antoni; Feist, Christ; Ruehl, Kelley; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments reproducing a floating wind turbine in operational sea conditions, conducted in the St. Anthony Falls Lab. wave facility, are employed to validate the capabilities of the recently developed FSI-Levelset-CURVIB method of Calderer, Kang and Sotiropoulos (JCP 2014) to accurately predict turbine-wave interactions. The numerical approach is based on solving the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the level set method, which is capable of carrying out LES of two-phase flows (air and water) with complex floating structures and waves. The investigated floating turbine is a 1:100 Froude scaled version of the 13.2 MW prototype designed by Sandia National Lab; it is installed on a cylindrical barge style platform which is restricted to move with two degrees of freedom, heave and pitch in the vertical plane defined by the direction of the propagating 2D waves. The computed turbine kinematics as well as the free surface elevation results are compared with the experimental data for different free decay tests and wave conditions representative of the Maine and the Pacific North West coasts. The comparison shows promising results indicating the validity of the model for simulating operational floating turbines. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy (DE-EE0005482), the University of Minnesota IREE program, and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  17. Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Christopher Lee; Maniaci, David Charles; Resor, Brian R.

    2015-10-01

    The total energy produced by a wind farm depends on the complex interaction of many wind turbines operating in proximity with the turbulent atmosphere. Sometimes, the unsteady forces associated with wind negatively influence power production, causing damage and increasing the cost of producing energy associated with wind power. Wakes and the motion of air generated by rotating blades need to be better understood. Predicting wakes and other wind forces could lead to more effective wind turbine designs and farm layouts, thereby reducing the cost of energy, allowing the United States to increase the installed capacity of wind energy. The Wind Energy Technologies Department at Sandia has collaborated with the University of Minnesota to simulate the interaction of multiple wind turbines. By combining the validated, large-eddy simulation code with Sandia’s HPC capability, this consortium has improved its ability to predict unsteady forces and the electrical power generated by an array of wind turbines. The array of wind turbines simulated were specifically those at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Testbed (SWiFT) site which aided the design of new wind turbine blades being manufactured as part of the National Rotor Testbed project with the Department of Energy.

  18. Experimental study on the wind-turbine wake meandering inside a scale model wind farm placed in an atmospheric-boundary-layer wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudou, N.; Buckingham, S.; van Beeck, J.

    2017-05-01

    Increasing use of wind energy over the years results in more and larger clustered wind farms. It is therefore fundamental to have an in-depth knowledge of wind-turbine wakes, and especially a better understanding of the well-known but less understood wake-meandering phenomenon which causes the wake to move as a whole in both horizontal and vertical directions as it is convected downstream. This oscillatory motion of the wake is crucial for loading on downstream turbines because it increases fatigue loads and in particular yaw loads. In order to address this phenomenon, experimental investigations were carried out in an atmospheric-boundary-layer wind tunnel using a 3 × 3 scaled wind farm composed of three-bladed rotating wind-turbine models subject to a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) corresponding to a slightly rough terrain, i.e. to offshore conditions. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in a horizontal plane, at hub height, in the wake of the three wind turbines in the wind-farm centreline. From the PIV velocity fields obtained, the wake-centrelines were determined and a spectral analysis was performed to obtain the characteristics of the wake-meandering phenomenon. In addition, Hot-Wire Anemometry (HWA) measurements were performed in the wakes of the same wind turbines to validate the PIV results. The spectral analysis performed with the spatial and temporal signals obtained from PIV and HWA measurements respectively, led to Strouhal numbers St = fD/Uhub ≃ 0.20 - 0.22.

  19. Design and implementation of a controllable model wind turbine for experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schottler, J.; Hölling, A.; Peinke, J.; Hölling, M.

    2016-09-01

    This technical paper describes the design and characterization of a controllable model wind turbine for wind tunnel experiments. The setup of the turbine and the implementation of the control system are described in detail and tests of the control system are shown. Finally, results of one exemplary scientific application are presented, where the model turbine was exposed to turbulent, intermittent inflow and the controller influence on torque fluctuations is investigated.

  20. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  1. Amplified wind turbine apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An invention related to the utilization of wind energy and increasing the effects thereof for power generation is described. Amplified wind turbine apparatus is disclosed wherein ambient inlet air is prerotated in a first air rotation chamber having a high pressure profile increasing the turbulence and Reynolds number thereof. A second rotation chamber adjacent and downstream of the turbine has a low pressure core profile whereby flow across the turbine is accelerated and thereafter exits the turbine apparatus through a draft anti-interference device. Interference with ambient winds at the outlet of the turbine apparatus is thus eliminated. Pivotable vanes controlled in response to prevailing wind direction admit air to the chambers and aid in imparting rotation. A central core may be utilized for creating the desired pressure profile in the chamber.

  2. Experimental study on influence of pitch motion on the wake of a floating wind turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockel, Stanislav; Cal, Raul Bayoan; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Wind energy has become a major contributor to energy from renewable sources and is still demanded to increase its portion to the overall energy supply. Offshore wind energy was found to have the highest potential to fulfill these demands, due to better and steadier wind conditions found on seas. Offshore wind turbines which have been installed lately use monopiles as foundations and are feasible in shallow water up to a depth of 50m. Such shallow areas are rare and often exploited, so floating support structures for offshore wind turbines in deep water are possible solutions. The additional degrees of freedom of a floating support structure will influence the aerodynamics at the rotor and its wake. Wind tunnel experiments were performed using a classical fixed turbine model and a streamwise oscillating turbine in free pitch motion. For both cases the turbines were operated under same inflow conditions and wakes up to 7 rotor diameters were measured using 2D-3C stereographic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). The obtained data was statistically analyzed and a direct comparison of the wake of the fixed and oscillating turbine was performed. Our results show that inclinations and oscillations of the turbine have a strong impact on the structure of the wake and its development.

  3. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  4. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; ...

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the globalmore » meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions« less

  5. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-18

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a "triplet" structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. In conclusion, the turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions

  6. Experimental investigation of aerodynamic devices for wind turbine rotational speed control. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.S.

    1995-02-01

    An investigation was undertaken to identify the aerodynamic performance of five separate trailing-edge control devices, and to evaluate their potential for wind turbine overspeed and power modulation applications. A modular two-dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and evaluated during extensive wind tunnel testing. Aerodynamic lift, drag, suction, and pressure coefficient data were acquired and analyzed for various control configurations and angles of attack. To further interpret their potential performance, the controls were evaluated numerically using a generic wind turbine geometry and a performance analysis computer program. Results indicated that the Spoiler-Flap control configuration was best softed for turbine braking applications. It exhibited a large negative suction coefficient over a broad angle-of-attack range, and good turbine braking capabilities, especially at low tip-speed ratio.

  7. Operational results for the experimental DOE/NASA Mod-OA wind turbine project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, R. K.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    The Mod-OA wind turbine project which was to gain early experience in the operation of large wind turbines in a utility environment is discussed. The Mod-OA wind turbines were a first generation design, and even though not cost effective, the operating experience and performance characteristics had a significant effect on the design and development of the second and third generation machines. The Mod-OA machines were modified as a result of the operational experience, particularly the blade development and control system strategy. The results of study to investigate the interaction of a Mod-OA wind turbine with an isolated diesel generation system are discussed. The machine configuration, its advantages and disadvantages and the machine performance and availability are discussed.

  8. Piezoelectric wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Ravi Anant; Priya, Shashank

    2013-03-01

    In past few years, there has been significant focus towards developing small scale renewable energy based power sources for powering wireless sensor nodes in remote locations such as highways and bridges to conduct continuous health monitoring. These prior efforts have led to the development of micro-scale solar modules, hydrogen fuel cells and various vibration based energy harvesters. However, the cost effectiveness, reliability, and practicality of these solutions remain a concern. Harvesting the wind energy using micro-to-small scale wind turbines can be an excellent solution in variety of outdoor scenarios provided they can operate at few miles per hour of wind speed. The conventional electromagnetic generator used in the wind mills always has some cogging torque which restricts their operation above certain cut-in wind speed. This study aims to develop a novel piezoelectric wind turbine that utilizes bimorph actuators for electro-mechanical energy conversion. This device utilizes a Savonius rotor that is connected to a disk having magnets at the periphery. The piezoelectric actuators arranged circumferentially around the disk also have magnets at the tip which interacts with the magnetic field of the rotating disk and produces cyclical deflection. The wind tunnel experiments were conducted between 2-12 mph of wind speeds to characterize and optimize the power output of the wind turbine. Further, testing was conducted in the open environment to quantify the response to random wind gusts. An attempt was made towards integration of the piezoelectric wind turbine with the wireless sensor node.

  9. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  10. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  11. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  12. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  13. Monitoring of wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    White, Jonathan R.; Adams, Douglas E.; Paquette, Josh

    2017-07-25

    Method and apparatus for determining the deflection or curvature of a rotating blade, such as a wind turbine blade or a helicopter blade. Also, methods and apparatus for establishing an inertial reference system on a rotating blade.

  14. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Krivospitski, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Maksimov, Vasili [Miass, RU; Halstead, Richard [Rohnert Park, CA; Grahov, Jurij [Miass, RU

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  15. Wind turbine apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, J.

    1985-10-08

    Wind turbine apparatus includes a plurality of sail elements secured to a circular frame rotatable in response to wind reacting with the sail elements and a control system for the sail elements includes a weight having cables extending from the weight to the sail elements. Movement of the weight in response to wind velocity results in a change in the sail elements exposed to the wind.

  16. Experimental Study on the Effects of Winglets on the Performance of Two Interacting Horizontal Axis Model Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostovan, Y.; Uzol, O.

    2016-09-01

    The focus of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of winglets on the performance of two interacting similar horizontal axis model wind turbines. For this purpose, a downwind winglet is designed and manufactured to be attached to the blade tips of the upstream turbine. A set of wing extensions with the same length as the winglets is also produced to be compared to the winglets. Power and thrust coefficients of both turbines are measured with winglets as well as with wing extensions attached to the blade tips of the upstream turbine and are compared to the baseline case (rectangular tip without any tip devices). The model turbines are three bladed and have a rotor diameter of 0.94 m. The measurements are performed in two different wind tunnels (closed test section and open jet). For both sets of measurements, winglets have a noticeable increasing effect on the power coefficient of the individual turbine. There is an increase in the thrust coefficient as well. Measurements on the second turbine are done while it is positioned at downstream locations in line with the upstream turbine. Results show that it produces less power while operating in the wake of the upstream turbine with winglets. However, the overall power efficiency of two turbines can increase for the wingletted case. Moreover, results with wing extensions show that although upstream turbine produces more power with wing extensions attached, the power coefficient remains the same as the baseline case due to growth in rotor swept area and hence, it is less than the power coefficient of wingletted turbine.

  17. Next Generation Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cheraghi, S. Hossein; Madden, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this collaborative effort between Western New England University's College of Engineering and FloDesign Wind Turbine (FDWT) Corporation to wok on a novel areodynamic concept that could potentially lead to the next generation of wind turbines. Analytical studies and early scale model tests of FDWT's Mixer/Ejector Wind Turbine (MEWT) concept, which exploits jet-age advanced fluid dynamics, indicate that the concept has the potential to significantly reduce the cost of electricity over conventional Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines while reducing land usage. This project involved the design, fabrication, and wind tunnel testing of components of MEWT to provide the research and engineering data necessary to validate the design iterations and optimize system performance. Based on these tests, a scale model prototype called Briza was designed, fabricated, installed and tested on a portable tower to investigate and improve the design system in real world conditions. The results of these scale prototype efforts were very promising and have contributed significantly to FDWT's ongoing development of a product scale wind turbine for deployment in multiple locations around the U.S. This research was mutually beneficial to Western New England University, FDWT, and the DOE by utilizing over 30 student interns and a number of faculty in all efforts. It brought real-world wind turbine experience into the classroom to further enhance the Green Engineering Program at WNEU. It also provided on-the-job training to many students, improving their future employment opportunities, while also providing valuable information to further advance FDWT's mixer-ejector wind turbine technology, creating opportunities for future project innovation and job creation.

  18. Experimental Study on the Effects of Winglets on the Wake of a Model Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Nicolas; Hamed, Ali M.; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    Wind tunnel particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the effects of winglets on the wake dynamics of a model wind turbine. The behavior of a turbine with downstream-facing winglets was compared with a turbine without winglets. The turbines were placed in a turbulent boundary layer that reached up to the hub height, allowing for investigation of behavior in both turbulent and uniform flow. The winglets did not significantly change the strength of the tip vortices in the region of uniform incoming flow. The tip vortices in the more turbulent region, however, decayed much faster, diminishing to near-zero within the first ~1.5 rotor diameters, whereas the upper tip vortices persisted potentially up to ~4 rotor diameters. The winglets also increased the power coefficient by 7.5 %, while increasing the coefficient of thrust by 10.0 %. The higher coefficient of thrust created a region of enhanced mean shear in the outer portion of the wake, leading to increased turbulence statistics in the far wake. The wingletted turbine had a similar wake deficit at 5 rotor diameters as the base turbine did at 1.5 rotor diameters, with potential implications for using wingletted turbines in wind farms.

  19. Alcoa wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ai, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of Alcoa's wind energy program is given with emphasis on the the development of a low cost, reliable Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine System. The design layouts and drawings for fabrication are now complete, while fabrication and installation to utilize the design are expected to begin shortly.

  20. Floating wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  1. Experimental study of wind turbine wakes in a convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Markfort, C. D.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the interaction of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows with wind turbines is important for optimizing the design of wind farms (maximizing energy output and mitigating fatigue loads) and improving the parameterization of wind farms in weather and climate models. Field observations have suggested that atmospheric stability affects ABL flow and its interaction with wind turbines, which in turn affects wind farm performance. However, the fluid mechanics involved has not been fully understood, highlighting the need of acquiring high quality data in clearly defined conditions. Well-controlled wind tunnel experiments of the wake of wind turbines immersed in thermally stratified or convective boundary layers are very limited. In this study, we investigate the wake structure of a miniature three-blade wind turbine model placed in a convective boundary layer (CBL) in the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory wind tunnel. The objectives of this study are: 1) to understand how the CBL flow affects the wake behind a wind turbine in terms of tip vortices distribution, mean velocity deficit, turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress and heat flux modification; 2) to provide reliable data sets for validating and developing new parameterizations of turbulent fluxes and turbine-induced forces in numerical models, such as large-eddy simulation (LES). The CBL was generated by cooling the free stream air flow to 13 οC and heating up the test section floor to 80 οC. The free stream speed was set at 2.5 m/s, resulting in the Obukhov stability of δ/L=-3.15 and the bulk Richardson number about -0.16. The wake of a wind turbine model, whose height is about 1/3 the boundary layer thickness, was systematically studied using Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) and a hot-wire/cold-wire anemometer. Results revealed the top tip vortices (in Fig.1), noticeably degraded velocity deficit and significantly enhanced turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were also

  2. Theoretical and experimental power from large horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.; Janetzke, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    A method for calculating the output power from large horizontal-axis wind turbines is presented. Modifications to the airfoil characteristics and the momentum portion of classical blade element-momentum theory are given that improve correlation with measured data. Improvement is particularly evident at low tip-speed ratios where aerodynamic stall can occur as the blade experiences high angles of attack. Output power calculated using the modified theory is compared with measured data for several large wind turbines. These wind turbines range in size from the DOE/NASA 100 kW Mod-0 (38 m rotor diameter) to the 2000 kW Mod-1 (61 m rotor diameter). The calculated results are in good agreement with measured data from these machines.

  3. On the statistics of wind turbine wake meandering: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kevin B.; Singh, Arvind; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Guala, Michele

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of the instantaneous wake flow from a model wind turbine placed in a turbulent boundary layer were obtained by wall-parallel oriented particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory wind tunnel. PIV velocity vector fields were used to investigate mean (expansion angle, wavelength, and wake velocity) and higher order statistics (local slope, curvature, and correlation) describing meandering motions in the turbine wake. These statistics were used to compare the wakes produced by four different wind turbine operating configurations, which include a single turbine operating at two different tip-speed ratios and two turbines aligned with the mean flow. The origin of meandering motions was identified for all cases in the hub vortex signature, which evolved into a stretched or compressed low speed meander in the wall parallel plane, depending on the turbine operating conditions and on the interaction with the wake shear layer. Finally, both autocorrelation and scale-dependent statistics on the velocity minima fluctuations about the meander signature suggest that small scale vortices, found in the hub shear layer and in the wake shear layer, interact with the hub vortex and govern its spatial evolution into large scale wake meandering.

  4. Predicting Noise From Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    Computer program WINDY predicts broadband noise spectra of horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators. Enables adequate assessment of impact of broadband wind-turbine noise. Effects of turbulence, trailing-edge wakes, and bluntness taken into account. Program has practical application in design and siting of wind-turbine machines acceptable to community. Written in GW-Basic.

  5. Predicting Noise From Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    Computer program WINDY predicts broadband noise spectra of horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators. Enables adequate assessment of impact of broadband wind-turbine noise. Effects of turbulence, trailing-edge wakes, and bluntness taken into account. Program has practical application in design and siting of wind-turbine machines acceptable to community. Written in GW-Basic.

  6. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  7. Fixed pitch wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, D. B.; Viterna, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Wind turbines designed for fixed pitch operation offer potential reductions in the cost of the machine by eliminating many costly components. It was shown that a rotor can be designed which produces the same energy annually as Mod-0 but which regulates its power automatically by progressively stalling the blades as wind speed increases. Effects of blade twist, taper, root cutout, and airfoil shape on performance are discussed as well as various starting technqiues.

  8. Collected Papers on Wind Turbine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    R and D projects on electricity generating wind turbines were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1973 to 1988. Most projects were sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a major element of its Federal Wind Energy Program. Another large wind turbine project was by the Bureau of Reclamation of the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI). From 1988 to 1995, NASA wind energy activities have been directed toward the transfer of technology to commercial and academic organizations. As part of these technology transfer activities, previously unpublished manuscripts have been assembled and presented here to share the wind turbine research results with the wind energy community. A variety of wind turbine technology topics are discussed: Wind and wake models; Airfoil properties; Structural analysis and testing; Control systems; Variable speed generators; and acoustic noise. Experimental and theoretical results are discussed.

  9. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting

    1984-01-01

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  10. Tornado type wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ch.-T.

    1984-06-05

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  11. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, William N.

    1985-01-01

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  12. Wind turbine spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, W.N.

    An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

  13. Horizontal axis wind turbine research: A review of commercial CFD, FE codes and experimental practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. M.; Young, T. M.; O'Mahoney, D. C.; Griffin, P. C.

    2017-07-01

    A review of wind turbine aerodynamics research is presented. The review is limited to Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) investigations. The focus is on recent near wake experiments, wake predictions by commercial CFD codes and current FSI and structural modelling attempts. For the near wake, the review considers experiments carried out in controlled conditions whereby the incoming freestream is perpendicular to the rotor plane. Additional anomalies such as wind shear, gusts and yaw transition are not considered. The survey of 3D commercial codes is also focused on HAWT models in parallel flow conditions. Finally, the structural models reviewed are divided into two separate categories: 1) blade deflection and performance under aerodynamic loads, and 2) the vibrational response of blades under aerodynamic loading. The aim is to highlight common trends within near wake experiments and investigate both CFD and FE modelling strategies - to identify current limitations and future opportunities within the sector.

  14. Experimental study of thin film sensor networks for wind turbine blade damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, A.; Laflamme, S.; Ubertini, F.; Sauder, H.; Sarkar, P.

    2017-02-01

    Damage detection of wind turbine blades is difficult due to their complex geometry and large size, for which large deployment of sensing systems is typically not economical. A solution is to develop and deploy dedicated sensor networks fabricated from inexpensive materials and electronics. The authors have recently developed a novel skin-type strain gauge for measuring strain over very large surfaces. The skin, a type of large-area electronics, is constituted from a network of soft elastomeric capacitors. The sensing system is analogous to a biological skin, where local strain can be monitored over a global area. In this paper, we propose the utilization of a dense network of soft elastomeric capacitors to detect, localize, and quantify damage on wind turbine blades. We also leverage mature off-the-shelf technologies, in particular resistive strain gauges, to augment such dense sensor network with high accuracy data at key locations, therefore constituting a hybrid dense sensor network. The proposed hybrid dense sensor network is installed inside a wind turbine blade model, and tested in a wind tunnel to simulate an operational environment. Results demonstrate the ability of the hybrid dense sensor network to detect, localize, and quantify damage.

  15. Inertial response from wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ian F.

    Wind power is an essential part of the strategy to address challenges facing the energy sector. Operation of the electricity network in 2020 will require higher levels of response and reserve from generation. The provision of inertial response from wind turbines was investigated. A model was developed for the simulation of frequency on the mainland UK system, including a simplified model for a synchronous generator to represent Full Power Converter turbines. Two different methods of inertia response, the step method and the inertia coupling method, were modelled and introduced into the turbine torque speed control. Simulations illustrated the effects on primary frequency control for a high penetration of wind turbines. Results are shown for different demand levels with generation losses of 1320GW and 1800GW. A comparison of the inertia functions is included and the effect of wind speed and the constant speed region of the maximum power extraction curve. For the scenarios modelled only a small change in turbine output was required for inertia response (0.02p.u). Without inertia response a large increase in synchronous plant response was needed. A test rig was constructed consisting of a Full Power Converter bridge and a synchronous generator driven by a dc machine. Power converters were designed and constructed by the candidate. Vector control of both the generator converter and grid converter was implemented on a dedicated control platform. The inertia coupling function was implemented and a test frequency deviation injected to represent a load generation imbalance. Results compared closely to those from the model and demonstrated the capability to closely couple turbine speed to system frequency with adjustment of the response via a filter if desired. The experimental work confirmed the adequacy of the simplified generator model and further confirmed the possibility of using inertia response. The inertia coupling function was considered suitable for use for the UK

  16. High-efficiency wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, L. A.; Myers, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine incorporates several unique features to extract more energy from wind increasing efficiency 20% over conventional propeller driven units. System also features devices that utilize solar energy or chimney effluents during periods of no wind.

  17. Wind Turbine With Concentric Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhonen, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Wind Turbine device is relatively compact and efficient. Converging inner and outer ducts increase pressure difference across blades of wind turbine. Turbine shaft drives alternator housed inside exit cone. Suitable for installation on such existing structures as water towers, barns, houses, and commercial buildings.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Bearing Slip in a Wind Turbine Gearbox During a Transient Grid Loss Event

    SciTech Connect

    Helsen, Jan; Guo, Yi; Keller, Jonathan; Guillaume, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    This work investigates the behaviour of the high speed stage of a wind turbine gearbox during a transient grid loss event. Dynamometer testing on a full scale wind turbine nacelle is used. A combination of external and internal gearbox measurements is analysed. Particular focus is on the characterization of the high speed shaft tapered roller bearing slip behaviour. This slipping behaviour is linked to dynamic events by many researchers and described as potential bearing failure initiator. However only limited full scale dynamic testing is documented. Strain gauge bridges in grooves along the circumference of the outer ring are used to characterize the bearing behaviour in detail. It is shown that during the transient event the high speed shaft experiences a combined torsional and bending deformation. These unfavourable loading conditions induce roller slip in the bearings during the torque reversals indicating the potential of the applied load case to go beyond the preload of the tapered roller bearing.

  19. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cubbers, J.

    1993-07-13

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described comprising: a vertically extending axle supported for rotation about a vertical axis; a series of wind vanes arranged around said axle; support means supporting each of said wind vanes on said axle, each of said wind vanes comprising a substantially flat main panel section of flexible material draped vertically by said support means to extend in a circumferential direction; each of said wind vanes including at least one pocket comprised of a substantially flat overlayer panel of flexible material overlying the outside of said wind vane flexible material panel section and attached thereto along a vertical side by a seam and also attached thereto along the top and bottom, but unattached along the other side to form a normally closed pocket which is able to flare open when wind is blowing from the unattached side thereof and thereby catch said wind, said pocket collapsing when wind blows from the attached side of said overlayer by said overlayer panel again overlying said main panel section.

  20. Application requirements for wind turbine gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errichello, Robert; Muller, Jane

    1994-09-01

    This report is a technical guide which documents the wind turbine gearbox experience of the GEARTECH consulting firm. The report provides a reference on wind turbine gearbox applications for the gear industry, wind turbine designers, and wind turbine operators. This report will assist in selecting, designing, manufacturing, procuring, operating, and maintaining gearboxes for use on wind turbines.

  1. Wind turbine acoustic standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise standards for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used to design specifications. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of acoustic criteria/standards are described.

  2. Teetered, tip-controlled rotor: Preliminary test results from Mod-0 100-kW experimental wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Miller, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Results of tests conducted using the MOD-0 100 kW experimental wind turbine are evaluated. The teetered rotor significantly decreased loads on the yaw drive mechanism and reduced blade cyclic flapwise bending moments by 25 percent at the 20 percent span location when compared to the rigid hub rotor. The teetered hub performed well, but impacted the teeter stops on occasion as wind speed and/or direction varied rapidly. The tip-controlled rotor performed satisfactorily with some expected loss of control when compared to the full span pitchable blade. The performance results indicate that a review of techniques used to calculate rotor power is in order.

  3. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  4. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  5. Wind Turbine Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in the analysis and prediction of the dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators is discussed. The following areas were addressed: (1) the adequacy of state of the art analysis tools for designing the next generation of wind power systems; (2) the use of state of the art analysis tools designers; and (3) verifications of theory which might be lacking or inadequate. Summaries of these informative discussions as well as the questions and answers which followed each paper are documented in the proceedings.

  6. Effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Demiglio, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of precipitation on wind turbine power output was analyzed. The tests were conducted on the two bladed Mod-0 horizontal axis wind turbine with three different rotor configurations. Experimental data from these tests are presented which clearly indicate that the performance of the Mod-0 wind turbine is affected by rain. Light rainfall degraded performance by as much as 20 percent while heavy rainfall degraded performance by as much as 30 percent. Snow mixed with drizzle degraded performance by as much as 36 percent at low windspeeds. Also presented are the results of an analysis to predict the effect of rain on wind turbine performance. This analysis used a blade element/momentum code with modified airfoil characteristics to account for the effect of rain and predicted a loss in performance of 31 percent in high winds with moderate rainfall rates. These predicted results agreed well with experimental data.

  7. Airship-floated wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    A wind turbine, by use of a tethered airship for support, may be designed for the economical recovery of power at heights of 2,000 feet or more above ground, at which height power density in the wind is typically three times the power density available to a conventionally supported wind turbine. Means can be added to such an airship-floated wind turbine which will permit its generators to be used to meet load demand even during periods of little or no wind. Described to this end is a wind turbine system which combines, among other novel features: a novel tether line system which provides access for men and materials to the supporting airship while in active service, a novel system for providing additional buoyant lift at the nose of the turbine-supporting airship to offset the vertical component of tension induced in the tether line by the downwind force exerted by the turbine blades, a novel bearing assembly at the nose of the supporting airship which permits the airship to rotate as a unit with the turbine it supports without causing a similar rotation of the tether line, a novel turbine airship structure which handles concentrated loads from the turbine efficiently and also permits the safe use of hydrogen for buoyancy, a novel ''space frame'' structure which supports the turbine blades and greatly reduces blade weight, a novel system for controlling turbine blade angle of incidence and for varying blade incidene in synchrony with blade angular position abut the turbine axis to provide greater control over airship movement, a novel system for locating propellor-driven generators out at the wind turbine perimeter and for using lightweight, high-RPM generators to produce electrical energy at a power line frequency, which greatly reduces the weight required to convert turbine blade torque into useful power, and a novel system for incorporating compressed air storage and combustion turbine components into the wind turbine's generator drive systems.

  8. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sinpyo; Lee, Inwon; Park, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Cheolmin; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-05-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG), mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine's motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT), the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  9. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sinpyo; Lee, Inwon; Park, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Cheolmin; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-09-01

    An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG), mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine's motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT), the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  10. Wind turbine sound power measurements.

    PubMed

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides experimental validation of the sound power level data obtained from manufacturers for the ten wind turbine models examined in Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study (CNHS). Within measurement uncertainty, the wind turbine sound power levels measured using IEC 61400-11 [(2002). (International Electrotechnical Commission, Geneva)] were consistent with the sound power level data provided by manufacturers. Based on measurements, the sound power level data were also extended to 16 Hz for calculation of C-weighted levels. The C-weighted levels were 11.5 dB higher than the A-weighted levels (standard deviation 1.7 dB). The simple relationship between A- and C- weighted levels suggests that there is unlikely to be any statistically significant difference between analysis based on either C- or A-weighted data.

  11. The system design and performance test of hybrid vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiyantoro, Bambang Arip; Suphandani, Vivien

    2017-04-01

    Vertical axis wind turbine is a tool that is being developed to generate energy from wind. One cause is still little use of wind energy is the design of wind turbines that are less precise. Therefore in this study will be developed the system design of hybrid vertical axis wind turbine and tested performance with experimental methods. The design of hybrid turbine based on a straight bladed Darrieus turbine along with a double step Savonius turbine. The method used to design wind turbines is by studying literature, analyzing the critical parts of a wind turbine and the structure of the optimal design. Wind turbine prototype of the optimal design characteristic tests in the wind tunnel experimentally by varying the speed of the wind. From the experimental results show that the greater the wind speed, the greater the wind turbine rotation and torque is raised. The hybrid vertical axis wind turbine has much better self-starting and better conversion efficiency.

  12. Turbulence in vertical axis wind turbine canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Matthias; Araya, Daniel B.; Dabiri, John O.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results from three different full scale arrays of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) under natural wind conditions are presented. The wind velocities throughout the turbine arrays are measured using a portable meteorological tower with seven, vertically staggered, three-component ultrasonic anemometers. The power output of each turbine is recorded simultaneously. The comparison between the horizontal and vertical energy transport for the different turbine array sizes shows the importance of vertical transport for large array configurations. Quadrant-hole analysis is employed to gain a better understanding of the vertical energy transport at the top of the VAWT arrays. The results show a striking similarity between the flows in the VAWT arrays and the adjustment region of canopies. Namely, an increase in ejections and sweeps and decrease in inward and outward interactions occur inside the turbine array. Ejections are the strongest contributor, which is in agreement with the literature on evolving and sparse canopy flows. The influence of the turbine array size on the power output of the downstream turbines is examined by comparing a streamwise row of four single turbines with square arrays of nine turbine pairs. The results suggest that a new boundary layer forms on top of the larger turbine arrays as the flow adjusts to the new roughness length. This increases the turbulent energy transport over the whole planform area of the turbine array. By contrast, for the four single turbines, the vertical energy transport due to turbulent fluctuations is only increased in the near wake of the turbines. These findings add to the knowledge of energy transport in turbine arrays and therefore the optimization of the turbine spacing in wind farms.

  13. Numerical investigation of wind turbine and wind farm aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Suganthi

    A numerical method based on the solution of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations and actuator disk representation of turbine rotor is developed and implemented in the OpenFOAM software suite for aerodynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). The method and the implementation are validated against the 1-D momentum theory, the blade element momentum theory and against experimental data. The model is used for analyzing aerodynamics of a novel dual rotor wind turbine concept and wind farms. Horizontal axis wind turbines suffer from aerodynamic inefficiencies in the blade root region (near the hub) due to several non-aerodynamic constraints (e.g., manufacturing, transportation, cost, etc.). A new dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) concept is proposed that aims at mitigating these losses. A DRWT is designed using an existing turbine rotor for the main rotor (Risoe turbine and NREL 5 MW turbine), while the secondary rotor is designed using a high lift to drag ratio airfoil (the DU 96 airfoil from TU Delft). The numerical aerodynamic analysis method developed as a part of this thesis is used to optimize the design. The new DRWT design gives an improvement of about 7% in aerodynamic efficiency over the single rotor turbine. Wind turbines are typically deployed in clusters called wind farms. HAWTs also suffer from aerodynamic losses in a wind farm due to interactions with wind turbine wakes. An interesting mesoscale meteorological phenomenon called "surface flow convergence" believed to be caused by wind turbine arrays is investigated using the numerical method developed here. This phenomenon is believed to be caused by the pressure gradient set up by wind turbines operating in close proximity in a farm. A conceptual/hypothetical wind farm simulation validates the hypothesis that a pressure gradient is setup in wind farms due to turbines and that it can cause flow veering of the order of 10 degrees. Simulations of a real wind farm (Story County) are also

  14. Wind turbine-generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1981-09-22

    A wind-turbine generator system is described which transforms the rotational energy of a wind driven turbine blade into rotation in opposite directions of a rotor and a stator of a dynamoelectric machine to generate electrical power. A bevel gear rotating with the turbine blade drives two pinion gears and associated concentric shafts in opposite directions. The two shafts combine with a planetary gear set to provide the desired oppositely directed rotation. One of the shafts is associated with a ring carrier and drives a ring gear in one rotational direction. The other shaft drives a planet carrier in the opposite rotational direction. The planetary gear set is arranged such that a sun gear is driven in the direction opposite to that of the ring gear. A rotor is affixed to the sun gear by a spider support structure, and a stator, affixed to rotate with the ring gear, surrounds the rotor. The rotor and stator are thus rotated in opposite, mechanically and electrically additive, directions.

  15. Optimal statistical damage detection and classification in an experimental wind turbine blade using minimum instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    The increasing demand for carbon neutral energy in a challenging economic environment is a driving factor for erecting ever larger wind turbines in harsh environments using novel wind turbine blade (WTBs) designs characterized by high flexibilities and lower buckling capacities. To counteract resulting increasing of operation and maintenance costs, efficient structural health monitoring systems can be employed to prevent dramatic failures and to schedule maintenance actions according to the true structural state. This paper presents a novel methodology for classifying structural damages using vibrational responses from a single sensor. The method is based on statistical classification using Bayes' theorem and an advanced statistic, which allows controlling the performance by varying the number of samples which represent the current state. This is done for multivariate damage sensitive features defined as partial autocorrelation coefficients (PACCs) estimated from vibrational responses and principal component analysis scores from PACCs. Additionally, optimal DSFs are composed not only for damage classification but also for damage detection based on binary statistical hypothesis testing, where features selections are found with a fast forward procedure. The method is applied to laboratory experiments with a small scale WTB with wind-like excitation and non-destructive damage scenarios. The obtained results demonstrate the advantages of the proposed procedure and are promising for future applications of vibration-based structural health monitoring in WTBs.

  16. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, A. B.; Mijatovic, N.; Seiler, E.; Zirngibl, T.; Træholt, C.; Nørgård, P. B.; Pedersen, N. F.; Andersen, N. H.; Østergård, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  17. Turbine-type wind machine

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, P. W.

    1984-12-04

    A wind machine which includes turbine assemblies arranged in superposed relationship and wherein the turbine assemblies may vary in size and number in accordance with power requirements, together with a plurality of deflector panels or sails associated with the turbine unit of each assembly for directing the wind to selected areas of the driving vanes of each turbine unit and at the same time shielding from the wind other areas of driving vanes which would tend to interfere with desired rotation of the turbine unit. The deflector panels or sails also accurately controlling the volume of air which bypasses each panel or sail to thereby prevent ''stacking'' or turbulence adjacent the driving vanes of the turbine unit. The panels also being arranged to recapture the major portion of the bypassed air and direct it back into the turbine unit which increases efficiency of operation.

  18. Wind Turbine Development: Press release

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has announced a new partnership with Zond Systems, Inc., of Tehachapi, California. The partnership is the firs to be announced under DOE`s new Value-Engineered Turbine (VET) project. The VET project is expected to lower the cost of manufacturing wind turbines and give the US wind industry a competitive boost.

  19. Wind turbine rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, J. M.; Miller, G. E.; Wiesner, W.

    1985-12-10

    A fixed pitch wind turbine rotor is teeter mounted onto a low speed input shaft which is connected to the input of a step-up transmission. The output of the transmission is connected to a rotary pole amplitude modulated induction machine which is operable as a generator at a plurality of discreet speeds of rotation and is also operable as a startup motor for the rotor. A switch responsive to the rotational speed of the wind turbine rotor switches the generator from one speed of operation to the other. The rotor hub and the inner body portions of two blades which extend radially outwardly in opposite directions from the hub, are constructed from steel. The outer end portions of the blade are constructed from a lighter material, such as wood, and are both thinner and narrower than the remainder of the rotor. The outer end section of each blade includes a main body portion and a trailing edge portion which is hinge-connected to the main body portion. Each blade includes a centrifugal force operated positioning means which normally holds the drag brake section in a retracted position, but operates in response to a predetermined magnitude of centrifugal force to move the drag brake section into its deployed position. Each blade has an airfoil cross section and each blade has a plus twist inner portion adjacent the hub changing to first a zero twist and then a minus twist as it extends radially outwardly from the hub.

  20. Experimental Voltage Stabilization of a Variable Speed Wind Turbine Driving Synchronous Generator using STATCOM based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zoghby, Helmy M.; Bendary, Ahmed F.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper Static Synchronous Compensator (STATCOM) is used for improving the performance of the power grid with wind turbine that drives synchronous generator. The main feature of the STATCOM is that it has the ability to absorb or inject rapidly reactive power to grid. Therefore the voltage regulation of the power grid with STATCOM device is achieved. STATCOM also improves the stability of the power system after occurring severe disturbance such as faults, or suddenly step change in wind speed. The proposed STATCOM controller is a Proportional-Integral (PI) controller tuned by Genetic Algorithm (GA). An experimental model was built in Helwan University to the proposed system. The system is tested at different operating conditions. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of the proposed STATCOM controller in damping the power system oscillations and restoring the power system voltage and stability.

  1. Design and operating experience on the U.S. Department of Energy Experimental Mod-O 100 kW Wind Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Mod-O 100 kW Experimental Wind Turbine was designed and fabricated by NASA, as part of the Federal Wind Energy Program, to assess technology requirements and engineering problems of large wind turbines. The machine became operational in October 1975 and has demonstrated successful operation in all of its design modes. During the course of its operations the machine has generated a wealth of experimental data and has served as a prototype developmental test bed for the Mod-OA operational wind turbines which are currently used on utility networks. This paper describes the mechanical and control systems as they evolved in operational tests and describes some of the experience with various systems in the downwind rotor configuration.

  2. Fixed pitch rotor performance of large horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.; Corrigan, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental fixed pitch wind turbine performance data is presented for both the DOE/NASA Mod-0 and the Danish Gedser wind turbines. Furthermore, a method for calculating the output power from large fixed pitch wind turbines is presented. Modifications to classical blade element momentum theory are given that improve correlation with measured data. Improvement is particularly evident in high winds (low tip speed ratios) where aerodynamic stall occurs as the blade experiences high angles of attack.

  3. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  4. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  5. Wind turbine rotor aileron

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Clint; Kurth, William T.

    1994-06-14

    A wind turbine has a rotor with at least one blade which has an aileron which is adjusted by an actuator. A hinge has two portions, one for mounting a stationary hinge arm to the blade, the other for coupling to the aileron actuator. Several types of hinges can be used, along with different actuators. The aileron is designed so that it has a constant chord with a number of identical sub-assemblies. The leading edge of the aileron has at least one curved portion so that the aileron does not vent over a certain range of angles, but vents if the position is outside the range. A cyclic actuator can be mounted to the aileron to adjust the position periodically. Generally, the aileron will be adjusted over a range related to the rotational position of the blade. A method for operating the cyclic assembly is also described.

  6. Teetered, tip-controlled rotor - Preliminary test results from Mod-O 100-kW experimental wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Miller, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A series of tests is currently being conducted using the DOE/NASA 100 kW Experimental Wind Turbine with a two-bladed, teetered rotor with 30% span tip control. Preliminary evaluation test results indicates that the teetered rotor significantly decreases loads on the yaw drive mechanism and reduces blade cyclic flapwise bending moments by 25% at the 20% span location when compared to rigid hub rotor. The teetered hub performed well but did impact the teeter stops on occasion as wind speed and/or direction varied rapidly. The tip-controlled rotor performed satisfactorily with some expected loss of control when compared to the full span pitchable blade. The performance results indicate that a review of techniques used to calculate rotor power is in order.

  7. Design of a novel and efficient lantern wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M. D.; Wong, L. K.; Anyi, M.; Yunos, Y. S.; Rahman, M. R. A.; Mohta, M. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Wind turbine generates renewable energy when the forces acted on the turbine blades cause the rotation of the generator to produce clean electricity. This paper proposed a novel lantern wind turbine design compared to a conventional design model. Comparison is done based on simulation on coarse and fine meshing with all the results converged. Results showed that the pressure difference on the surface of novel design lantern wind turbine is much higher compared to the conventional wind turbine. Prototype is already manufactured and experimental result would be discussed in a separate future publication

  8. Behavior of bats at wind turbines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cryan, Paul M.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Hine, Cris D.; Schirmacher, Michael; Diehl, Robert H.; Huso, Manuela M.; Hayman, David T.S.; Fricker, Paul D.; Bonaccorso, Frank J.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Heist, Kevin W.; Dalton, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbines are causing unprecedented numbers of bat fatalities. Many fatalities involve tree-roosting bats, but reasons for this higher susceptibility remain unknown. To better understand behaviors associated with risk, we monitored bats at three experimentally manipulated wind turbines in Indiana, United States, from July 29 to October 1, 2012, using thermal cameras and other methods. We observed bats on 993 occasions and saw many behaviors, including close approaches, flight loops and dives, hovering, and chases. Most bats altered course toward turbines during observation. Based on these new observations, we tested the hypotheses that wind speed and blade rotation speed influenced the way that bats interacted with turbines. We found that bats were detected more frequently at lower wind speeds and typically approached turbines on the leeward (downwind) side. The proportion of leeward approaches increased with wind speed when blades were prevented from turning, yet decreased when blades could turn. Bats were observed more frequently at turbines on moonlit nights. Taken together, these observations suggest that bats may orient toward turbines by sensing air currents and using vision, and that air turbulence caused by fast-moving blades creates conditions that are less attractive to bats passing in close proximity. Tree bats may respond to streams of air flowing downwind from trees at night while searching for roosts, conspecifics, and nocturnal insect prey that could accumulate in such flows. Fatalities of tree bats at turbines may be the consequence of behaviors that evolved to provide selective advantages when elicited by tall trees, but are now maladaptive when elicited by wind turbines.

  9. Behavior of bats at wind turbines

    PubMed Central

    Cryan, Paul. M.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Hein, Cris D.; Schirmacher, Michael R.; Diehl, Robert H.; Huso, Manuela M.; Hayman, David T. S.; Fricker, Paul D.; Bonaccorso, Frank J.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Heist, Kevin; Dalton, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbines are causing unprecedented numbers of bat fatalities. Many fatalities involve tree-roosting bats, but reasons for this higher susceptibility remain unknown. To better understand behaviors associated with risk, we monitored bats at three experimentally manipulated wind turbines in Indiana, United States, from July 29 to October 1, 2012, using thermal cameras and other methods. We observed bats on 993 occasions and saw many behaviors, including close approaches, flight loops and dives, hovering, and chases. Most bats altered course toward turbines during observation. Based on these new observations, we tested the hypotheses that wind speed and blade rotation speed influenced the way that bats interacted with turbines. We found that bats were detected more frequently at lower wind speeds and typically approached turbines on the leeward (downwind) side. The proportion of leeward approaches increased with wind speed when blades were prevented from turning, yet decreased when blades could turn. Bats were observed more frequently at turbines on moonlit nights. Taken together, these observations suggest that bats may orient toward turbines by sensing air currents and using vision, and that air turbulence caused by fast-moving blades creates conditions that are less attractive to bats passing in close proximity. Tree bats may respond to streams of air flowing downwind from trees at night while searching for roosts, conspecifics, and nocturnal insect prey that could accumulate in such flows. Fatalities of tree bats at turbines may be the consequence of behaviors that evolved to provide selective advantages when elicited by tall trees, but are now maladaptive when elicited by wind turbines. PMID:25267628

  10. Behavior of bats at wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Cryan, Paul M; Gorresen, P Marcos; Hein, Cris D; Schirmacher, Michael R; Diehl, Robert H; Huso, Manuela M; Hayman, David T S; Fricker, Paul D; Bonaccorso, Frank J; Johnson, Douglas H; Heist, Kevin; Dalton, David C

    2014-10-21

    Wind turbines are causing unprecedented numbers of bat fatalities. Many fatalities involve tree-roosting bats, but reasons for this higher susceptibility remain unknown. To better understand behaviors associated with risk, we monitored bats at three experimentally manipulated wind turbines in Indiana, United States, from July 29 to October 1, 2012, using thermal cameras and other methods. We observed bats on 993 occasions and saw many behaviors, including close approaches, flight loops and dives, hovering, and chases. Most bats altered course toward turbines during observation. Based on these new observations, we tested the hypotheses that wind speed and blade rotation speed influenced the way that bats interacted with turbines. We found that bats were detected more frequently at lower wind speeds and typically approached turbines on the leeward (downwind) side. The proportion of leeward approaches increased with wind speed when blades were prevented from turning, yet decreased when blades could turn. Bats were observed more frequently at turbines on moonlit nights. Taken together, these observations suggest that bats may orient toward turbines by sensing air currents and using vision, and that air turbulence caused by fast-moving blades creates conditions that are less attractive to bats passing in close proximity. Tree bats may respond to streams of air flowing downwind from trees at night while searching for roosts, conspecifics, and nocturnal insect prey that could accumulate in such flows. Fatalities of tree bats at turbines may be the consequence of behaviors that evolved to provide selective advantages when elicited by tall trees, but are now maladaptive when elicited by wind turbines.

  11. CFD analysis of a Darrieus wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculescu, M. L.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Pricop, M. V.; Pepelea, D.; Dumitrache, A.; Crunteanu, D. E.

    2017-07-01

    The Darrieus wind turbine has some advantages over the horizontal-axis wind turbine. Firstly, its tip speed ratio is lower than that of the horizontal-axis wind turbine and, therefore, its noise is smaller, privileging their placement near populated areas. Secondly, the Darrieus wind turbine does needs no orientation mechanism with respect to wind direction in contrast to the horizontal-axis wind turbine. However, the efficiency of the Darrieus wind turbine is lower than that of the horizontal-axis wind turbine since its aerodynamics is much more complex. With the advances in computational fluids and computers, it is possible to simulate the Darrieus wind turbine more accurately to understand better its aerodynamics. For these reasons, the present papers deals with the computational aerodynamics of a Darrieus wind turbine applying the state of the art of CFD methods (anisotropic turbulence models, transition from laminar to turbulent, scale adaptive simulation) to better understand its unsteady behavior.

  12. Multi-objective genetic algorithms based structural optimization and experimental investigation of the planet carrier in wind turbine gearbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Pengxing; Dong, Lijian; Shi, Tielin

    2014-12-01

    To improve the dynamic performance and reduce the weight of the planet carrier in wind turbine gearbox, a multi-objective optimization method, which is driven by the maximum deformation, the maximum stress and the minimum mass of the studied part, is proposed by combining the response surface method and genetic algorithms in this paper. Firstly, the design points' distribution for the design variables of the planet carrier is established with the central composite design (CCD) method. Then, based on the computing results of finite element analysis (FEA), the response surface analysis is conducted to find out the proper sets of design variable values. And a multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) is applied to determine the direction of optimization. As well, this method is applied to design and optimize the planet carrier in a 1.5MW wind turbine gearbox, the results of which are validated by an experimental modal test. Compared with the original design, the mass and the stress of the optimized planet carrier are respectively reduced by 9.3% and 40%. Consequently, the cost of planet carrier is greatly reduced and its stability is also improved.

  13. An experimental study on the aeromechanics and wake characteristics of a novel twin-rotor wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Tian, Wei; Ozbay, Ahmet; Sharma, Anupam; Hu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    The aeromechanic performance and wake characteristics of a novel twin-rotor wind turbine (TRWT) design, which has an extra set of smaller, auxiliary rotor blades appended in front of the main rotor, was evaluated experimentally, in comparison with those of a conventional single-rotor wind turbine (SRWT) design. The comparative study was performed in a large-scale wind tunnel with scaled TRWT and SRWT models mounted in the same incoming turbulent boundary layer flow. In addition to quantifying power outputs and the dynamic wind loadings acting on the model turbines, the wake characteristics behind the model turbines were also measured by using a particle image velocimetry system and a Cobra anemometry probe. The measurement results reveal that, while the TRWT design is capable of harnessing more wind energy from the same incoming airflow by reducing the roots losses incurred in the region near the roots of the main rotor blades, it also cause much greater dynamic wind loadings acting on the TRWT model and higher velocity deficits in the near wake behind the TRWT model, in comparison with those of the SRWT case. Due to the existence of the auxiliary rotor, more complex vortex structures were found to be generated in the wake behind the TRWT model, which greatly enhanced the turbulent mixing in the turbine wake, and caused a much faster recovery of the velocity deficits in the turbine far wake. As a result, the TRWT design was also found to enable the same downstream turbine to generate more power when sited in the wake behind the TRWT model than that in the SRWT wake, i.e., by mitigating wake losses in typical wind farm settings.

  14. Wind and solar powered turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, I. D.; Koh, J. L.; Holmes, M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power generating station having a generator driven by solar heat assisted ambient wind is described. A first plurality of radially extendng air passages direct ambient wind to a radial flow wind turbine disposed in a centrally located opening in a substantially disc-shaped structure. A solar radiation collecting surface having black bodies is disposed above the fist plurality of air passages and in communication with a second plurality of radial air passages. A cover plate enclosing the second plurality of radial air passages is transparent so as to permit solar radiation to effectively reach the black bodies. The second plurality of air passages direct ambient wind and thermal updrafts generated by the black bodies to an axial flow turbine. The rotating shaft of the turbines drive the generator. The solar and wind drien power generating system operates in electrical cogeneration mode with a fuel powered prime mover.

  15. Aerodynamic and aeroacoustic for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Maizi; Rabah, Dizene

    2015-03-10

    This paper describes a hybrid approach forpredicting noise radiated from the rotating Wind Turbine (HAWT) blades, where the sources are extracted from an unsteady Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stocks (URANS) simulation, ANSYS CFX 11.0, was used to calculate The near-field flow parameters around the blade surface that are necessary for FW-H codes. Comparisons with NREL Phase II experimental results are presented with respect to the pressure distributions for validating a capacity of the solver to calculate the near-field flow on and around the wind turbine blades, The results show that numerical data have a good agreement with experimental. The acoustic pressure, presented as a sum of thickness and loading noise components, is analyzed by means of a discrete fast Fourier transformation for the presentation of the time acoustic time histories in the frequency domain. The results convincingly show that dipole source noise is the dominant noise source for this wind turbine.

  16. Experimental damage detection in a wind turbine blade model using principal components of response correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, S.; Omenzetter, P.

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of vibration signals for structural damage detection (SDD) is appealing due to the strong theoretical foundation of such approaches, ease of data acquisition and processing efficiency. Different methods are available for defining damage sensitive features (DSFs) based on vibrations, such as modal analysis or time series methods. The present paper proposes the use of partial autocorrelation coefficients of acceleration responses as DSFs. Principal component (PC) analysis is used to transform the initial DSFs to scores. The resulting scores from the healthy and damaged states are used to select the PCs which are most sensitive to damage. These are then used for making decisions about the structural state by means of statistical hypothesis testing conducted on the scores. The approach is applied to experiments with a laboratory scale wind turbine blade (WTB) made of glass-fibre reinforced epoxy composite. Damage is non-destructively simulated by attaching small masses and the WTB is excited with the help of an electrodynamic shaker using band-limited white noise. The SDD results for the selected subsets of PCs show a clear improvement of the detectability of early damages compared to other DSF selections.

  17. MOD-2 wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.; Andrews, J. S.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the Mod-2 turbine, designed to achieve a cost of electricity for the 100th production unit that will be competitive with conventional electric power generation is discussed. The Mod-2 wind turbine system (WTS) background, project flow, and a chronology of events and problem areas leading to Mod-2 acceptance are addressed. The role of the participating utility during site preparation, turbine erection and testing, remote operation, and routine operation and maintenance activity is reviewed. The technical areas discussed pertain to system performance, loads, and controls. Research and technical development of multimegawatt turbines is summarized.

  18. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    2000-01-01

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  19. Airfoils for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    2000-05-30

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  20. Experimental turbine VT-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Milčák, Petr; Noga, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The experimental air turbine VT400 is located in hall laboratories of the Department of Power System Engineering. It is a single-stage air turbine located in the suction of the compressor. It is able to solve various problems concerning the construction solution of turbine stages. The content of the article will deal mainly with the description of measurements on this turbine. The up-to-now research on this test rig will be briefly mentioned, too, as well as the description of the ongoing reconstruction.

  1. Dynamics and stability of wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.; Nolan, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous and induction generators are considered. A comparison is made between wind turbines, steam, and hydro units. The unusual phenomena associated with wind turbines are emphasized. The general control requirements are discussed, as well as various schemes for torsional damping such as speed sensitive stabilizer and blade pitch control. Integration between adjacent wind turbines in a wind farm is also considered.

  2. Foundations for offshore wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Byrne, B W; Houlsby, G T

    2003-12-15

    An important engineering challenge of today, and a vital one for the future, is to develop and harvest alternative sources of energy. This is a firm priority in the UK, with the government setting a target of 10% of electricity from renewable sources by 2010. A component central to this commitment will be to harvest electrical power from the vast energy reserves offshore, through wind turbines or current or wave power generators. The most mature of these technologies is that of wind, as much technology transfer can be gained from onshore experience. Onshore wind farms, although supplying 'green energy', tend to provoke some objections on aesthetic grounds. These objections can be countered by locating the turbines offshore, where it will also be possible to install larger capacity turbines, thus maximizing the potential of each wind farm location. This paper explores some civil-engineering problems encountered for offshore wind turbines. A critical component is the connection of the structure to the ground, and in particular how the load applied to the structure is transferred safely to the surrounding soil. We review previous work on the design of offshore foundations, and then present some simple design calculations for sizing foundations and structures appropriate to the wind-turbine problem. We examine the deficiencies in the current design approaches, and the research currently under way to overcome these deficiencies. Designs must be improved so that these alternative energy sources can compete economically with traditional energy suppliers.

  3. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  4. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-06

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  5. Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: “Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations”, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

  6. Computational examination of utility scale wind turbine wake interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Okosun, Tyamo; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2015-07-14

    We performed numerical simulations of small, utility scale wind turbine groupings to determine how wakes generated by upstream turbines affect the performance of the small turbine group as a whole. Specifically, various wind turbine arrangements were simulated to better understand how turbine location influences small group wake interactions. The minimization of power losses due to wake interactions certainly plays a significant role in the optimization of wind farms. Since wind turbines extract kinetic energy from the wind, the air passing through a wind turbine decreases in velocity, and turbines downstream of the initial turbine experience flows of lower energy, resulting in reduced power output. Our study proposes two arrangements of turbines that could generate more power by exploiting the momentum of the wind to increase velocity at downstream turbines, while maintaining low wake interactions at the same time. Furthermore, simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics are used to obtain results much more quickly than methods requiring wind tunnel models or a large scale experimental test.

  7. Computational examination of utility scale wind turbine wake interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Okosun, Tyamo; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2015-07-14

    We performed numerical simulations of small, utility scale wind turbine groupings to determine how wakes generated by upstream turbines affect the performance of the small turbine group as a whole. Specifically, various wind turbine arrangements were simulated to better understand how turbine location influences small group wake interactions. The minimization of power losses due to wake interactions certainly plays a significant role in the optimization of wind farms. Since wind turbines extract kinetic energy from the wind, the air passing through a wind turbine decreases in velocity, and turbines downstream of the initial turbine experience flows of lower energy, resultingmore » in reduced power output. Our study proposes two arrangements of turbines that could generate more power by exploiting the momentum of the wind to increase velocity at downstream turbines, while maintaining low wake interactions at the same time. Furthermore, simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics are used to obtain results much more quickly than methods requiring wind tunnel models or a large scale experimental test.« less

  8. Mod-2 wind turbine field operations experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Mod-2 wind turbine is now in a 2-year research/experimental operations phase which offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of single and multiple wind turbines interacting with each other, the power grid, and the environment. This paper addresses the field operations and research testing experienced at the Mod-2 Cluster Goodnoe Hills Research Test Site near Goldendale, WA. Field operation, both routine and nonroutine, are discussed as well as the role of the participating utility. Technical areas discussed pertain to system performance and loads. Specific research tests relating to acoustics, TV interference, and wake effects are also discussed.

  9. Wind Turbines and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Knopper, Loren D.; Ollson, Christopher A.; McCallum, Lindsay C.; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L.; Berger, Robert G.; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The association between wind turbines and health effects is highly debated. Some argue that reported health effects are related to wind turbine operation [electromagnetic fields (EMF), shadow flicker, audible noise, low-frequency noise, infrasound]. Others suggest that when turbines are sited correctly, effects are more likely attributable to a number of subjective variables that result in an annoyed/stressed state. In this review, we provide a bibliographic-like summary and analysis of the science around this issue specifically in terms of noise (including audible, low-frequency noise, and infrasound), EMF, and shadow flicker. Now there are roughly 60 scientific peer-reviewed articles on this issue. The available scientific evidence suggests that EMF, shadow flicker, low-frequency noise, and infrasound from wind turbines are not likely to affect human health; some studies have found that audible noise from wind turbines can be annoying to some. Annoyance may be associated with some self-reported health effects (e.g., sleep disturbance) especially at sound pressure levels >40 dB(A). Because environmental noise above certain levels is a recognized factor in a number of health issues, siting restrictions have been implemented in many jurisdictions to limit noise exposure. These setbacks should help alleviate annoyance from noise. Subjective variables (attitudes and expectations) are also linked to annoyance and have the potential to facilitate other health complaints via the nocebo effect. Therefore, it is possible that a segment of the population may remain annoyed (or report other health impacts) even when noise limits are enforced. Based on the findings and scientific merit of the available studies, the weight of evidence suggests that when sited properly, wind turbines are not related to adverse health. Stemming from this review, we provide a number of recommended best practices for wind turbine development in the context of human health. PMID:24995266

  10. Wind turbines and human health.

    PubMed

    Knopper, Loren D; Ollson, Christopher A; McCallum, Lindsay C; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L; Berger, Robert G; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The association between wind turbines and health effects is highly debated. Some argue that reported health effects are related to wind turbine operation [electromagnetic fields (EMF), shadow flicker, audible noise, low-frequency noise, infrasound]. Others suggest that when turbines are sited correctly, effects are more likely attributable to a number of subjective variables that result in an annoyed/stressed state. In this review, we provide a bibliographic-like summary and analysis of the science around this issue specifically in terms of noise (including audible, low-frequency noise, and infrasound), EMF, and shadow flicker. Now there are roughly 60 scientific peer-reviewed articles on this issue. The available scientific evidence suggests that EMF, shadow flicker, low-frequency noise, and infrasound from wind turbines are not likely to affect human health; some studies have found that audible noise from wind turbines can be annoying to some. Annoyance may be associated with some self-reported health effects (e.g., sleep disturbance) especially at sound pressure levels >40 dB(A). Because environmental noise above certain levels is a recognized factor in a number of health issues, siting restrictions have been implemented in many jurisdictions to limit noise exposure. These setbacks should help alleviate annoyance from noise. Subjective variables (attitudes and expectations) are also linked to annoyance and have the potential to facilitate other health complaints via the nocebo effect. Therefore, it is possible that a segment of the population may remain annoyed (or report other health impacts) even when noise limits are enforced. Based on the findings and scientific merit of the available studies, the weight of evidence suggests that when sited properly, wind turbines are not related to adverse health. Stemming from this review, we provide a number of recommended best practices for wind turbine development in the context of human health.

  11. A wind turbine hybrid simulation framework considering aeroelastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Su, Weihua

    2015-04-01

    In performing an effective structural analysis for wind turbine, the simulation of turbine aerodynamic loads is of great importance. The interaction between the wake flow and the blades may impact turbine blades loading condition, energy yield and operational behavior. Direct experimental measurement of wind flow field and wind profiles around wind turbines is very helpful to support the wind turbine design. However, with the growth of the size of wind turbines for higher energy output, it is not convenient to obtain all the desired data in wind-tunnel and field tests. In this paper, firstly the modeling of dynamic responses of large-span wind turbine blades will consider nonlinear aeroelastic effects. A strain-based geometrically nonlinear beam formulation will be used for the basic structural dynamic modeling, which will be coupled with unsteady aerodynamic equations and rigid-body rotations of the rotor. Full wind turbines can be modeled by using the multi-connected beams. Then, a hybrid simulation experimental framework is proposed to potentially address this issue. The aerodynamic-dominant components, such as the turbine blades and rotor, are simulated as numerical components using the nonlinear aeroelastic model; while the turbine tower, where the collapse of failure may occur under high level of wind load, is simulated separately as the physical component. With the proposed framework, dynamic behavior of NREL's 5MW wind turbine blades will be studied and correlated with available numerical data. The current work will be the basis of the authors' further studies on flow control and hazard mitigation on wind turbine blades and towers.

  12. Aeroelastic Design and LPV Modelling of an Experimental Wind Turbine Blade equipped with Free-floating Flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalkar, S. T.; Bernhammer, L. O.; Sodja, J.; Slinkman, C. J.; van Wingerden, J. W.; van Kuik, G. A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Trailing edge flaps located outboard on wind turbine blades have recently shown considerable potential in the alleviation of turbine lifetime dynamic loads. The concept of the free-floating flap is specifically interesting for wind turbines, on account of its modularity and enhanced control authority. Such a flap is free to rotate about its axis; camberline control of the free-floating flap allows for aeroelastic control of blade loads. This paper describes the design of a scaled wind turbine blade instrumented with free-floating flaps, intended for use in wind tunnel experiments. The nature of the flap introduces a coupled form of flutter due to the aeroelastic coupling of flap rigid-body and blade out-of-plane modes; for maximal control authority it is desired to operate close to the flutter limit. Analytical and numerical methods are used to perform a flutter analysis of the turbine blade. It is shown that the potential flow aeroelastic model can be recast as a continuous-time Linear-Parameter-Varying (LPV) state space model of a low order, for which formal controller design methodologies are readily available.

  13. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  14. Experimental Testing and Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Maple Seeds and Performance Analysis as a Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Jacob R.

    Descending maple seeds generate lift to slow their fall and remain aloft in a blowing wind; have the wings of these seeds evolved to descend as slowly as possible? A unique energy balance equation, experimental data, and computational fluid dynamics simulations have all been developed to explore this question from a turbomachinery perspective. The computational fluid dynamics in this work is the first to be performed in the relative reference frame. Maple seed performance has been analyzed for the first time based on principles of wind turbine analysis. Application of the Betz Limit and one-dimensional momentum theory allowed for empirical and computational power and thrust coefficients to be computed for maple seeds. It has been determined that the investigated species of maple seeds perform near the Betz limit for power conversion and thrust coefficient. The power coefficient for a maple seed is found to be in the range of 48-54% and the thrust coefficient in the range of 66-84%. From Betz theory, the stream tube area expansion of the maple seed is necessary for power extraction. Further investigation of computational solutions and mechanical analysis find three key reasons for high maple seed performance. First, the area expansion is driven by maple seed lift generation changing the fluid momentum and requiring area to increase. Second, radial flow along the seed surface is promoted by a sustained leading edge vortex that centrifuges low momentum fluid outward. Finally, the area expansion is also driven by the spanwise area variation of the maple seed imparting a radial force on the flow. These mechanisms result in a highly effective device for the purpose of seed dispersal. However, the maple seed also provides insight into fundamental questions about how turbines can most effectively change the momentum of moving fluids in order to extract useful power or dissipate kinetic energy.

  15. Scaling and kinematics of a floating wind turbine under ocean waves and variable thrust: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Chris; Ruehl, Kelley; Guala, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Scale model wave channel experiments were performed to study the motion of an offshore floating wind turbine in operational sea states. The model tests were conducted on a 1:100 Froude scaled Sandia National Labs 13.2 MW prototype offshore wind turbine with a barge style floating platform. The platform is modeled after the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge designed for the 5MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine. The wave environment used in the model tests is representative of the deep-water sea states off the coast of Maine as well as the Pacific Northwest. The purpose of the tests is to validate a computational model of the turbine-wave interaction where the effects of airflow are not considered. To simplify the tests and validation, the platform motion is restricted to two degrees of freedom, pitch and heave, by attaching two roller support types at the center of gravity along the pitch axis. The major aerodynamic force acting on the turbine, i.e. the rotor thrust, is provided by spinning a scaled rotor at a controlled rotational speed. A subset of experiments were performed to study the effect of a mean or fluctuating rotor thrust on the platform dynamics, exploring strategies to control the thrust as a function of platform pitch angle and minimize platform oscillations.

  16. New guidelines for wind turbine gearboxes

    SciTech Connect

    McNiff, B.; Errichello, R.

    1997-12-31

    The American Gear Manufacturers Association in cooperation with the American Wind Energy Association will soon be publishing AGMA/AWEA 921-A97 {open_quotes}Recommended Practices for Design and Specification of Gearboxes for Wind Turbine Generator Systems.{close_quotes} Much has been learned about the unique operation and loading of gearboxes in wind turbine applications since the burgeoning of the modern wind turbine industry in the early 1980`s. AGMA/AWEA 921-A97 documents this experience in a manner that provides valuable information to assist gear manufacturers and wind turbine designers, operators, and manufacturers in developing reliable wind turbine gearboxes. The document provides information on procurement specification development, wind turbine architecture, environmental considerations, and gearbox load determination, as well as the design, manufacturing, quality assurance, lubrication, operation and maintenance of wind turbine gearboxes. This paper presents the salient parts of the practices recommended in AGMA/AWEA 921-A97.

  17. Built Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01

    The market currently encourages BWT deployment before the technology is ready for full-scale commercialization. To address this issue, industry stakeholders convened a Rooftop and Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the National Wind Technology Center, located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. This report summarizes the workshop.

  18. Numerical Prediction of Experimentally Observed Behavior of a Scale Model of an Offshore Wind Turbine Supported by a Tension-Leg Platform: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Prowell, I.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Stewart, G. M.; Goupee, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Realizing the critical importance the role physical experimental tests play in understanding the dynamics of floating offshore wind turbines, the DeepCwind consortium conducted a one-fiftieth-scale model test program where several floating wind platforms were subjected to a variety of wind and wave loading condition at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands wave basin. This paper describes the observed behavior of a tension-leg platform, one of three platforms tested, and the systematic effort to predict the measured response with the FAST simulation tool using a model primarily based on consensus geometric and mass properties of the test specimen.

  19. An integrated modeling method for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadaeinedjad, Roohollah

    To study the interaction of the electrical, mechanical, and aerodynamic aspects of a wind turbine, a detailed model that considers all these aspects must be used. A drawback of many studies in the area of wind turbine simulation is that either a very simple mechanical model is used with a detailed electrical model, or vice versa. Hence the interactions between electrical and mechanical aspects of wind turbine operation are not accurately taken into account. In this research, it will be shown that a combination of different simulation packages, namely TurbSim, FAST, and Simulink can be used to model the aerodynamic, mechanical, and electrical aspects of a wind turbine in detail. In this thesis, after a review of some wind turbine concepts and software tools, a simulation structure is proposed for studying wind turbines that integrates the mechanical and electrical components of a wind energy conversion device. Based on the simulation structure, a comprehensive model for a three-bladed variable speed wind turbine with doubly-fed induction generator is developed. Using the model, the impact of a voltage sag on the wind turbine tower vibration is investigated under various operating conditions such as power system short circuit level, mechanical parameters, and wind turbine operating conditions. It is shown how an electrical disturbance can cause more sustainable tower vibrations under high speed and turbulent wind conditions, which may disrupt the operation of pitch control system. A similar simulation structure is used to model a two-bladed fixed speed wind turbine with an induction generator. An extension of the concept is introduced by adding a diesel generator system. The model is utilized to study the impact of the aeroelastic aspects of wind turbine (i.e. tower shadow, wind shears, yaw error, turbulence, and mechanical vibrations) on the power quality of a stand-alone wind-diesel system. Furthermore, an IEEE standard flickermeter model is implemented in a

  20. Preview Control for Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Ahmet Arda

    The success of wind power as a renewable energy source depends on its cost of energy. Wind turbine control has attracted much attention in the controls community due to its potential impact on the cost of wind power. However, novel methods in the literature have not transitioned well to industry. This is because the potential cost benefits of these methods are not well understood. There is a need for basic research to address this issue. This thesis is one step toward transitioning of advanced control methods in literature to the industry. Particularly, we aim to understand the limits of performance. The potential performance improvements of the advanced methods should be large enough to justify their cost and complexity. We investigate the optimal trade-offs between multiple turbine performance goals. We also explore the use of a novel wind preview sensor in closed-loop control laws. The impact of this novel sensor on the optimal turbine performance is investigated. The specific contributions of this thesis can be grouped in three categories. First, we present a preliminary, nonlinear optimization based controller design and analysis framework. This framework can simplify the design of the advanced multivariable controllers for nonlinear systems. It can also be used to investigate the optimal design trade-offs between nonlinear performance constraints and objectives. Second, engineering insight is provided into turbine design trade-offs. Third, we provide mathematical tools that quantify the limits of turbine performance in presence of preview wind measurements. Optimization tools that can analyze the trade-off between preview time and operating condition dependent turbine performance objectives are presented. In low wind speeds, our results show that simultaneous power capture improvements and structural load reductions can be obtained. In high wind speeds, a short amount of preview wind information can be used to overcome the fundamental performance limitations

  1. Dynamic survey of wind turbine vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Keng-Tsang; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Pan, Chieh-Chen; Huang, Chi-Luen; Cheng, Tao-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Six wind turbines were blown to the ground by the wind gust during the attack of Typhoon Soudelor in August 2015. Survey using unmanned aerial vehicle, UAV, found the collapsed wind turbines had been broken at the lower section of the supporting towers. The dynamic behavior of wind turbine systems is thus in need of attention. The vibration of rotor blades and supporting towers of two wind turbine systems have been measured remotely using IBIS, a microwave interferometer. However the frequency of the rotor blade can be analyzed only if the microwave measurements are taken as the wind turbine is parked and secured. Time-frequency analyses such as continuous wavelet transform and reassigned spectrograms are applied to the displacement signals obtained. A frequency of 0.44Hz exists in both turbines B and C at various operating conditions. Possible links between dynamic characteristics and structural integrity of wind turbine -tower systems is discussed.

  2. Experimental evidence for the effect of small wind turbine proximity and operation on bird and bat activity.

    PubMed

    Minderman, Jeroen; Pendlebury, Chris J; Pearce-Higgins, James W; Park, Kirsty J

    2012-01-01

    The development of renewable energy technologies such as wind turbines forms a vital part of strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Although large wind farms generate the majority of wind energy, the small wind turbine (SWT, units generating <50 kW) sector is growing rapidly. In spite of evidence of effects of large wind farms on birds and bats, effects of SWTs on wildlife have not been studied and are likely to be different due to their potential siting in a wider range of habitats. We present the first study to quantify the effects of SWTs on birds and bats. Using a field experiment, we show that bird activity is similar in two distance bands surrounding a sample of SWTs (between 6-18 m hub height) and is not affected by SWT operation at the fine scale studied. At shorter distances from operating turbines (0-5 m), bat activity (measured as the probability of a bat "pass" per hour) decreases from 84% (71-91%) to 28% (11-54%) as wind speed increases from 0 to 14 m/s. This effect is weaker at greater distances (20-25 m) from operating turbines (activity decreases from 80% (65-89%) to 59% (32-81%)), and absent when they are braked. We conclude that bats avoid operating SWTs but that this effect diminishes within 20 m. Such displacement effects may have important consequences especially in landscapes where suitable habitat is limiting. Planning guidance for SWTs is currently lacking. Based on our results we recommend that they are sited at least 20 m away from potentially valuable bat habitat.

  3. Experimental Evidence for the Effect of Small Wind Turbine Proximity and Operation on Bird and Bat Activity

    PubMed Central

    Minderman, Jeroen; Pendlebury, Chris J.; Pearce-Higgins, James W.; Park, Kirsty J.

    2012-01-01

    The development of renewable energy technologies such as wind turbines forms a vital part of strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Although large wind farms generate the majority of wind energy, the small wind turbine (SWT, units generating <50 kW) sector is growing rapidly. In spite of evidence of effects of large wind farms on birds and bats, effects of SWTs on wildlife have not been studied and are likely to be different due to their potential siting in a wider range of habitats. We present the first study to quantify the effects of SWTs on birds and bats. Using a field experiment, we show that bird activity is similar in two distance bands surrounding a sample of SWTs (between 6–18 m hub height) and is not affected by SWT operation at the fine scale studied. At shorter distances from operating turbines (0–5 m), bat activity (measured as the probability of a bat “pass” per hour) decreases from 84% (71–91%) to 28% (11–54%) as wind speed increases from 0 to 14 m/s. This effect is weaker at greater distances (20–25 m) from operating turbines (activity decreases from 80% (65–89%) to 59% (32–81%)), and absent when they are braked. We conclude that bats avoid operating SWTs but that this effect diminishes within 20 m. Such displacement effects may have important consequences especially in landscapes where suitable habitat is limiting. Planning guidance for SWTs is currently lacking. Based on our results we recommend that they are sited at least 20 m away from potentially valuable bat habitat. PMID:22859969

  4. Comparison of field and wind tunnel Darrieus wind turbine data

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldahl, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A 2-m-dia Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine with NACA-0012 blades was extensively tested in the Vought Corporation Low Speed Wind Tunnel. This same turbine was installed in the field at the Sandia National Laboratories Wind Turbine Test Site and operated to determine if field data corresponded to data obtained in the wind tunnel. It is believed that the accuracy of the wind tunnel test data was verified and thus the credibility of that data base was further established.

  5. Large wind turbine generators. [NASA program status and potential costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Donovon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The large wind turbine portion of the Federal Wind Energy Program consists of two major project efforts: (1) the Mod-0 test bed project for supporting research technology, and (2) the large experimental wind turbines for electric utility applications. The Mod-0 has met its primary objective of providing the entire wind energy program with early operations and performance data. The large experimental wind turbines to be tested in utility applications include three of the Mod-0A (200 kW) type, one Mod-1 (2000 kW), and possibly several of the Mod-2 (2500 kW) designs. This paper presents a description of these wind turbine systems, their programmatic status, and a summary of their potential costs.

  6. Large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Perkins, P.; Dennett, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generating systems are presented. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. There are several ongoing large wind system development projects and applied research efforts directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. Detailed information on these projects is provided. The Mod-O research facility and current applied research effort in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and aeroelasticity, composite and hybrid composite materials, and multiple system interaction are described. A chronology of component research and technology development for large, horizontal axis wind turbines is presented. Wind characteristics, wind turbine economics, and the impact of wind turbines on the environment are reported. The need for continued wind turbine research and technology development is explored. Over 40 references are sited and a bibliography is included.

  7. Large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Perkins, P.; Dennett, J. T.

    1984-03-01

    Development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generating systems are presented. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. There are several ongoing large wind system development projects and applied research efforts directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. Detailed information on these projects is provided. The Mod-O research facility and current applied research effort in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and aeroelasticity, composite and hybrid composite materials, and multiple system interaction are described. A chronology of component research and technology development for large, horizontal axis wind turbines is presented. Wind characteristics, wind turbine economics, and the impact of wind turbines on the environment are reported. The need for continued wind turbine research and technology development is explored. Over 40 references are sited and a bibliography is included.

  8. Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking

    DOEpatents

    Barbu, Corneliu; Teichmann, Ralph; Avagliano, Aaron; Kammer, Leonardo Cesar; Pierce, Kirk Gee; Pesetsky, David Samuel; Gauchel, Peter

    2009-02-10

    A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

  9. Chapter 14: Wind Turbine Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by gravity, stochastic wind disturbances, and gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines is nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated three-dimensional turbulent wind inflow field that drives fatigue loading. Wind turbine modeling is also complex and challenging. Accurate models must contain many degrees of freedom (DOF) to capture the most important dynamic effects. The rotation of the rotor adds complexity to the dynamics modeling. Designs of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for these complexities. Algorithms must capture the most important turbine dynamics without being too complex and unwieldy. Off-the-shelf commercial soft ware is seldom adequate for wind turbine dynamics modeling. Instead, specialized dynamic simulation codes are usually required to model all the important nonlinear effects. As illustrated in Figure 14-1, a wind turbine control system consists of sensors, actuators and a system that ties these elements together. A hardware or software system processes input signals from the sensors and generates output signals for actuators. The main goal of the controller is to modify the operating states of the turbine to maintain safe turbine operation, maximize power, mitigate damaging fatigue loads, and detect fault conditions. A supervisory control system starts and stops the machine, yaws the turbine when there is a significant yaw misalignment, detects fault conditions, and performs emergency shut-downs. Other parts of the controller are intended to maximize power and reduce loads during normal turbine operation.

  10. Progress in Wind-Wheel Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Kessel, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    New wind turbine offers important advantages over conventional propeller wind turbines according to theoretical studies and tests of small working models. Project results are described in final report now available. Windwheel turbines consists of bladed wheel, main housing, two forward ducts (front concentrators), two side ducts (side concentrators) and base to support and elevate housing.

  11. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  12. On the Fatigue Analysis of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, Herbert J.

    1999-06-01

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. Operational experiences with these large rotating machines indicated that their components (primarily blades and blade joints) were failing at unexpectedly high rates, which led the wind turbine community to develop fatigue analysis capabilities for wind turbines. Our ability to analyze the fatigue behavior of wind turbine components has matured to the point that the prediction of service lifetime is becoming an essential part of the design process. In this review paper, I summarize the technology and describe the ''best practices'' for the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine component. The paper focuses on U.S. technology, but cites European references that provide important insights into the fatigue analysis of wind turbines.

  13. Mod-2 wind turbine field operations experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The three-machine, 7.5 MW Goodnoe Hills located near Goldendale, Washington and is now in a research/experimental operations phase that offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of single and multiple wind turbines interacting with each other, the power grid; and the environment. Following a brief description of the turbine and project history, this paper addresses major problem areas and research and development test results. Field operations, both routine and nonroutine, are discussed. Routine operation to date has produced over 13,379,000 KWh of electrical energy during 11,064 hr of rotation. Nonroutine operation includes suspended activities caused by a crack in the low speed shaft that necessitated a redesign and reinstallation of this assembly on all three turbines. With the world's largest cluster back in full operation, two of the turbines will be operated over the next years to determine their value as energy producer. The third unit will be used primarily for conducting research tests requiring configuration changes to better understand the wind turbine technology. Technical areas summarized pertain to system performance and enhancements. Specific research tests relating to acoustics, TV interference, and wake effects conclude the paper.

  14. Modelling of Wind Turbine Loads nearby a Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscher, B.; Werkmeister, A.; Jacobs, G.; Schelenz, R.

    2017-05-01

    Each wind turbine experiences a variety of loads during its lifetime, especially inside a wind farm due to the wake effect between the turbines. This paper describes a possibility to observe a load spectrum while considering wake effects in a wind farm by through the turbulence intensity. The turbulence intensity is distributed along the wind rose of Alpha Ventus. For each turbulence intensity, a Weibull characteristic is calculated. The resulting wind fields are used to determine the loads through a multibody simulation of an imaginary wind turbine located at FINO-1, representing a closely placed wind turbine at the outer edge of a wind farm. These loads are analyzed and summed up. As expected, the change of the turbulence intensity due to the wake effect has an impact on the internal loading of a wind turbine inside a wind farm. Based on the assumed loading conditions, the maximum loads increased by a factor of almost 2.5.

  15. Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

    2012-04-26

    To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

  16. Performance of propeller wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortman, A.

    1983-12-01

    Presented herein is a parametric study of the performance of propeller wind turbines with realistic drag/lift ratios. Calculations were made using the complete Glauert vortex blade element theory in annular streamtube elements, with the complete turbine performance being the sum of the elemental results up to a specified tip speed ratio. The objective here is to exhibit a new computational technique which yields performance directly when tangential speed ratio and section aerodynamic characteristics are specified. It was found that for a tip speed ratio of 4, turbines with drag/lift ratios of 0.00 and 0.01 had power coefficients of 0.575 and 0.55, respectively. The off-design performance of the finite drag/lift was far better than that of their zero drag counterparts, except in a + or - 20-percent region about the design conditions. Tolerance to off-design operation increased with decreasing tip speed ratios so that the annual energy capture for tip speed ratios between 2 and 4 was about 87 percent of the ideal turbine value. The results are intended to provide a basis for re-evaluation of the power range classes of fixed pitch turbines and design tip speed ratios.

  17. Optimization of Power Coefficient of Wind Turbine Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, Sappani; Ravindran, Durairaj; Sivakumar, Mahalingam; Venkatachalam, Gopalan; Muthukumar, Shunmugavelu

    2016-06-01

    In the design of a wind turbine, the goal is to attain the highest possible power output under specified atmospheric conditions. The optimization of power coefficient of horizontal axis wind turbine has been carried out by integration of blade element momentum method and genetic algorithm (GA). The design variables considered are wind velocity, angle of attack and tip speed ratio. The objective function is power coefficient of wind turbine. The different combination of design variables are optimized using GA and then the Power coefficient is optimized. The optimized design variables are validated with the experimental results available in the literature. By this optimization work the optimum design variables of wind turbine can be found economically than experimental work. NACA44XX series airfoils are considered for this optimization work.

  18. Optimization of Power Coefficient of Wind Turbine Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, Sappani; Ravindran, Durairaj; Sivakumar, Mahalingam; Venkatachalam, Gopalan; Muthukumar, Shunmugavelu

    2017-04-01

    In the design of a wind turbine, the goal is to attain the highest possible power output under specified atmospheric conditions. The optimization of power coefficient of horizontal axis wind turbine has been carried out by integration of blade element momentum method and genetic algorithm (GA). The design variables considered are wind velocity, angle of attack and tip speed ratio. The objective function is power coefficient of wind turbine. The different combination of design variables are optimized using GA and then the Power coefficient is optimized. The optimized design variables are validated with the experimental results available in the literature. By this optimization work the optimum design variables of wind turbine can be found economically than experimental work. NACA44XX series airfoils are considered for this optimization work.

  19. ? stability of wind turbine switching control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palejiya, Dushyant; Shaltout, Mohamed; Yan, Zeyu; Chen, Dongmei

    2015-01-01

    In order to maximise the wind energy capture, wind turbines are operated at variable speeds. Depending on the wind speed, a turbine switches between two operating modes: a low wind speed mode and a high wind speed mode. During the low wind speed mode, the control objective is to maximise wind energy capture by controlling both the blade pitch angle and the electrical generator torque. During the high wind speed mode, the control goal is to maintain the rated power generation by only adjusting the blade pitch angle. This paper establishes the stability criteria for the switching operation of wind turbines using ? gain under the nonlinear control framework. Also, the performance of the wind turbine system is analysed by using the step response, a well-known measure for second-order linear systems.

  20. Wind turbine electric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J. M.

    1985-04-02

    A wind-operated electric generator system of simple design including a stationary circular arrangement of segmental wind inlet passages extending around a vertical axis and having vertical inlet openings at the outer ends, the inlet openings having inwardly and upwardly curving walls extending from the inlet openings toward the central axis, the lower walls sloping upwardly an appreciably greater extent than the upper walls to form an inwardly and upwardly extending convergence with the inner portions of the upper walls to form constricted upwardly directed exit passages that merge into a Venturi throat in which a bladed impeller is mounted upon a vertical shaft which is connected to an electric generator, and the sides of the segmental inlet passages also converging toward the central axis and cooperating with the converging upper and lower walls to form an efficient Venturi effect to increase the speed of air currents directed to the impeller.

  1. Advanced CFD methods for wind turbine analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C. Eric

    2011-12-01

    the blade surfaces. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes / Large Eddy Simulation (HRLES) turbulence model, previously developed for structured grids, was extended to an unstructured framework. It was demonstrated to improve predictions of unsteady loading and shedding frequency in massively separated cases. The sensitivity of the model to highly stretched grid topologies was also explored. For aeroelastic predictions, a methodology for tight coupling between an unstructured CFD solver and a computational structural dynamics tool was developed. Due to the lack of experimental data pertaining to a flexible turbine, the coupling algorithm was validated for a helicopter rotor, but the method is sufficiently general that it can be immediately applied to a wind turbine when suitable correlation data becomes available in the future. Finally, time-accurate overset rotor simulations of a complete turbine---blades, nacelle, and tower---were conducted using both RANS and HRLES turbulence models. The HRLES model was able to accurately predict rotor loads when stalled. In yawed flow, excellent correlations of mean blade loads with experimental data were obtained across the span, and wake asymmetry and unsteadiness were also well-predicted.

  2. Small Wind Research Turbine: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.; Meadors, M.

    2005-10-01

    The Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT) project was initiated to provide reliable test data for model validation of furling wind turbines and to help understand small wind turbine loads. This report will familiarize the user with the scope of the SWRT test and support the use of these data. In addition to describing all the testing details and results, the report presents an analysis of the test data and compares the SWRT test data to simulation results from the FAST aeroelastic simulation model.

  3. Wind turbine apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, J.

    1986-10-28

    This patent describes an air foil sail element apparatus, comprising, in combination: support rod means; and air foil means journaled for rotation on the support rod means, including a pivot rod spaced apart from the support rod means for controlling the pivoting of the air foil means, an interior form secured to the pivot rod, and a deformable outer skin secured to and disposed about the interior form and deformable against the interior form to change the camber of the air foil in response to wind.

  4. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  5. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  6. Experimental investigation of the wake characteristics of flow-powered and motorized laboratory-scale wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    We present experimental data that compares the wake characteristics of a laboratory-scale vertical-axis turbine while it is either powered by the flow or by a DC motor. This distinction is relevant for laboratory experiments in which scale turbine models are used that require the use of a motor to spin the turbine blades. Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field in a two-dimensional plane normal to the axis of rotation. This velocity field is then used to compare time-averaged streamwise velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, and power of the two configurations. The results give insight into the kinematic effect of adding energy to the flow by way of the motor, and they suggest limits on the extrapolation of laboratory results to full-scale performance. This work was supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to D.B.A and funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047.

  7. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a Darrieus wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Popelka, D.

    1982-02-01

    An aeroelastic stability analysis has been developed for predicting flutter instabilities on vertical axis wind turbines. The analytical model and mathematical formulation of the problem are described as well as the physical mechanism that creates flutter in Darrieus turbines. Theoretical results are compared with measured experimental data from flutter tests of the Sandia 2 Meter turbine. Based on this comparison, the analysis appears to be an adequate design evaluation tool.

  8. Ice Accretion Prediction on Wind Turbines and Consequent Power Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yirtici, Ozcan; Tuncer, Ismail H.; Ozgen, Serkan

    2016-09-01

    Ice accretion on wind turbine blades modifies the sectional profiles and causes alteration in the aerodynamic characteristic of the blades. The objective of this study is to determine performance losses on wind turbines due to the formation of ice in cold climate regions and mountainous areas where wind energy resources are found. In this study, the Blade Element Momentum method is employed together with an ice accretion prediction tool in order to estimate the ice build-up on wind turbine blades and the energy production for iced and clean blades. The predicted ice shapes of the various airfoil profiles are validated with the experimental data and it is shown that the tool developed is promising to be used in the prediction of power production losses of wind turbines.

  9. High-Order Numerical Simulations of Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleusberg, E.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Schlatter, P.; Ivanell, S.; Henningson, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    Previous attempts to describe the structure of wind turbine wakes and their mutual interaction were mostly limited to large-eddy and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations using finite-volume solvers. We employ the higher-order spectral-element code Nek5000 to study the influence of numerical aspects on the prediction of the wind turbine wake structure and the wake interaction between two turbines. The spectral-element method enables an accurate representation of the vortical structures, with lower numerical dissipation than the more commonly used finite-volume codes. The wind-turbine blades are modeled as body forces using the actuator-line method (ACL) in the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Both tower and nacelle are represented with appropriate body forces. An inflow boundary condition is used which emulates homogeneous isotropic turbulence of wind-tunnel flows. We validate the implementation with results from experimental campaigns undertaken at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU Blind Tests), investigate parametric influences and compare computational aspects with existing numerical simulations. In general the results show good agreement between the experiments and the numerical simulations both for a single-turbine setup as well as a two-turbine setup where the turbines are offset in the spanwise direction. A shift in the wake center caused by the tower wake is detected similar to experiments. The additional velocity deficit caused by the tower agrees well with the experimental data. The wake is captured well by Nek5000 in comparison with experiments both for the single wind turbine and in the two-turbine setup. The blade loading however shows large discrepancies for the high-turbulence, two-turbine case. While the experiments predicted higher thrust for the downstream turbine than for the upstream turbine, the opposite case was observed in Nek5000.

  10. Lightning protection of wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Possible damages to wind turbine components due to lightning strikes are discussed and means to prevent the damage are presented. A low resistance path to the ground is noted to be essential for any turbine system, including metal paths on nonmetal blades to conduct the strike. Surge arrestors are necessary to protect against overvoltages both from utility lines in normal operation and against lightning damage to control equipment and contactors in the generator. MOS structures are susceptible to static discharge injury, as are other semiconductor devices, and must be protected by the presence of static protection circuitry. It is recommended that the electronics be analyzed for the circuit transient response to a lightning waveform, to induced and dc current injection, that input/output leads be shielded, everything be grounded, and lightning-resistant components be chosen early in the design phase.

  11. Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the ARE442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.; Jager, D.

    2010-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the ARE 442 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the ARE 442 is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

  12. Microprocessor control of a wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnecco, A. J.; Whitehead, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A microprocessor based system was used to control the unattended operation of a wind turbine generator. The turbine and its microcomputer system are fully described with special emphasis on the wide variety of tasks performed by the microprocessor for the safe and efficient operation of the turbine. The flexibility, cost and reliability of the microprocessor were major factors in its selection.

  13. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

    1981-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

  14. Aeroacoustics of large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews published information on aerodynamically generated noise from large horizontal axis wind turbines operated for electric power generation. Methods are presented for predicting both the discrete frequency rotational noise components and the broadband noise components, and results are compared with measurements. Refraction effects that result in the formation of high-frequency shadow zones in the upwind direction and channeling effects for the low frequencies in the downwind direction are illustrated. Special topics such as distributed source effects in prediction and the role of building dynamics in perception are also included.

  15. Aeroacoustics of large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews published information on aerodynamically generated noise from large horizontal axis wind turbines operated for electric power generation. Methods are presented for predicting both the discrete frequency rotational noise components and the broadband noise components, and results are compared with measurements. Refraction effects that result in the formation of high-frequency shadow zones in the upwind direction and channeling effects for the low frequencies in the downwind direction are illustrated. Special topics such as distributed source effects in prediction and the role of building dynamics in perception are also included.

  16. The Electromagnetic Impact of Wind Turbines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    Applied Project 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE ELECTROMAGNETIC IMPACT OF WIND TURBINES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Gregory Sasarita and Charles R...the electromagnetic environment that affects communication systems. The power generation process in a wind turbine has the potential of creating

  17. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.

    1928-01-01

    The second degree nonlinear aeroelastic equations for a flexible, twisted, nonuniform wind turbine blade were developed using Hamilton's principle. The derivation of these equations has its basis in the geometric nonlinear theory of elasticity. These equations with periodic coefficients are suitable for determining the aeroelastic stability and response of large wind turbine blades. Methods for solving these equations are discussed.

  18. Design evolution of large wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    During the past five years, the goals of economy and reliability have led to a significant evolution in the basic design--both external and internal--of large wind turbine systems. To show the scope and nature of recent changes in wind turbine designs, development of three types are described: (1) system configuration developments; (2) computer code developments; and (3) blade technology developments.

  19. Advanced Wind Turbine Drivetrain Concepts. Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-12-01

    This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy’s Advanced Drivetrain Workshop, held on June 29-30, 2010, to assess different advanced drivetrain technologies, their relative potential to improve the state-of-the-art in wind turbine drivetrains, and the scope of research and development needed for their commercialization in wind turbine applications.

  20. Blade feathering system for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Harner, K.I.; Patrick, J.P.; Vosseller, K.F.

    1984-07-31

    A blade feathering system for wind turbines includes a feather actuator, control means operatively connected thereto and an adjustment means operatively connected to the control means for selectively varying the rate of operation of the feather actuator for feathering the wind turbine blades at a variable rate.

  1. Lightning protection system for a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Costin, Daniel P.; Petter, Jeffrey K.

    2008-05-27

    In a wind turbine (104, 500, 704) having a plurality of blades (132, 404, 516, 744) and a blade rotor hub (120, 712), a lightning protection system (100, 504, 700) for conducting lightning strikes to any one of the blades and the region surrounding the blade hub along a path around the blade hub and critical components of the wind turbine, such as the generator (112, 716), gearbox (708) and main turbine bearings (176, 724).

  2. Certification testing for small wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.; Link, H.; Butterfield, S.; Stork, C.; Newcomb, C.

    1999-10-20

    This paper describes the testing procedures for obtaining type certification for a small wind turbine. Southwest Windpower (SWWP) is seeking type certification from Underwriters Laboratory (UL) for the AIR 403 wind turbine. UL is the certification body and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is providing technical assistance including conducting the certification testing. This is the first small turbine to be certified in the US, therefore standards must be interpreted and test procedures developed.

  3. Design Mining Interacting Wind Turbines.

    PubMed

    Preen, Richard J; Bull, Larry

    2016-01-01

    An initial study has recently been presented of surrogate-assisted evolutionary algorithms used to design vertical-axis wind turbines wherein candidate prototypes are evaluated under fan-generated wind conditions after being physically instantiated by a 3D printer. Unlike other approaches, such as computational fluid dynamics simulations, no mathematical formulations were used and no model assumptions were made. This paper extends that work by exploring alternative surrogate modelling and evolutionary techniques. The accuracy of various modelling algorithms used to estimate the fitness of evaluated individuals from the initial experiments is compared. The effect of temporally windowing surrogate model training samples is explored. A surrogate-assisted approach based on an enhanced local search is introduced; and alternative coevolution collaboration schemes are examined.

  4. MOD-2 wind turbine farm stability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of single and multiple 2.5 ME, Boeing MOD-2 wind turbine generators (WTGs) connected to utility power systems were investigated. The analysis was based on digital simulation. Both time response and frequency response methods were used. The dynamics of this type of WTG are characterized by two torsional modes, a low frequency 'shaft' mode below 1 Hz and an 'electrical' mode at 3-5 Hz. High turbine inertia and low torsional stiffness between turbine and generator are inherent features. Turbine control is based on electrical power, not turbine speed as in conventional utility turbine generators. Multi-machine dynamics differ very little from single machine dynamics.

  5. 'Wind turbine syndrome': fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Farboud, A; Crunkhorn, R; Trinidade, A

    2013-03-01

    Symptoms, including tinnitus, ear pain and vertigo, have been reported following exposure to wind turbine noise. This review addresses the effects of infrasound and low frequency noise and questions the existence of 'wind turbine syndrome'. This review is based on a search for articles published within the last 10 years, conducted using the PubMed database and Google Scholar search engine, which included in their title or abstract the terms 'wind turbine', 'infrasound' or 'low frequency noise'. There is evidence that infrasound has a physiological effect on the ear. Until this effect is fully understood, it is impossible to conclude that wind turbine noise does not cause any of the symptoms described. However, many believe that these symptoms are related largely to the stress caused by unwanted noise exposure. There is some evidence of symptoms in patients exposed to wind turbine noise. The effects of infrasound require further investigation.

  6. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  7. Experimental Comparison of Dynamic Responses of a Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine Platform with and without Spring Dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C.; O'Sullivan, K.; Murphy, J.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-07-01

    The offshore wind industry is rapidly maturing and is now expanding to more extreme environments in deeper water and farther from shore. To date fixed foundation types (i.e. monopoles, jackets) have been primarily used but become uneconomical in water depths greater than 50m. Floating foundations have more complex dynamics but at the moment no design has reached commercialization, although a number of devices are being tested at prototype stage. The development of concepts is carried out through physical model testing of scaled devices such that to better understand the dynamics of the system and validate numerical models. This paper investigates the testing of a scale model of a tension moored wind turbine at two different scales and in the presence and absence of a spring damper controlling its dynamic response. The models were tested under combined wave and wind thrust loading conditions. The analysis compares the motions of the platform at different scales and structural conditions through RAO, testing a mooring spring damper for load reductions.

  8. CFD modeling of wind turbine wake in wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lijian

    Wind energy is one of the most common and preferred renewable energy sources. Accurate predictions of atmospheric boundary layer flow, wind turbine induced wakes and their interaction are essential to maximize wind power output and efficiently harness wind energy. In this dissertation, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow model is developed utilizing a three dimensional weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) high order Finite Volume Model system including Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and the Actuator Line Method (ALM). The developed model system is thus able to accurately capture and simulate wind turbine wakes and their interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer, thereby providing insight into the phenomenon of turbine wake interaction and its effect on the external aerodynamic loads on wind turbines. This enables the wind energy production to be maximized and also minimizes turbine fatigue loading in the evaluation of wind farm layouts. By using LES model to simulate the Atmospheric Boundary Layer flow rather than the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model, the error introduced by turbulence modeling is reduced. The Actuator Line Model, ALM, is used to model the rotor by replacing the rotor with radially distributed body forces. It is more accurate than the actuator disc method as it captures the influence of the blade tip vortices. It can focus on a larger portion of the wake without resolving the actual wind turbine blades' geometry, thereby reducing computational cost. It is suitable and a promising method for wind turbine wake simulation. Classic non-trivial turbulent benchmark cases are used to validate the high order LES algorithms. Simulation results are compared with available results whenever possible, with good agreement observed. Results for the atmospheric boundary layer under neutral conditions are presented. By using LES coupled with the Actuator Line model, simulation results are obtained for detailed wake flow features around

  9. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  10. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jens N.; Mikkelsen, Robert F.; Henningson, Dan S.; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  11. Meteorological Controls on Wind Turbine Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthelmie, RJ; Hansen, KS; Pryor, SC

    2013-04-01

    The primary control on the magnitude of the power losses induced by wind turbine wakes in large wind farms is the hub-height wind speed via its link to the turbine thrust coefficient. Hence, at low to moderate wind speeds (between cut-in and rated turbine wind speeds) when the thrust coefficient is high, wake losses are proportionally larger and decrease to be virtually undetectable at wind speeds above rated wind speeds. Wind direction is also critical. Not only does it determine the effective spacing between turbines but also the wind speed distribution is primarily determined by synoptic forcing and typically has a predominant direction from which wind speeds tend to be higher (from southwest for much of the central United States and northern Europe). Two other interlinked variables, turbulence intensity (TI), and atmospheric stability also dictate wake losses. Quantifying, understanding, modeling, and predicting this complex and interdependent system is therefore critical to understanding and modeling wind farm power losses due to wakes, and to optimizing wind farm layout. This paper quantifies the impact of these variables on the power loss due to wakes using data from the large offshore wind farms located at Horns Rev and Nysted in Denmark.

  12. PowerJet Wind Turbine Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Raymond J.

    2008-11-30

    The PowerJet wind turbine overcomes problems characteristic of the small wind turbines that are on the market today by providing reliable output at a wide range of wind speeds, durability, silent operation at all wind speeds, and bird-safe operation. Prime Energy's objective for this project was to design and integrate a generator with an electrical controller and mechanical controls to maximize the generation of electricity by its wind turbine. The scope of this project was to design, construct and test a mechanical back plate to control rotational speed in high winds, and an electronic controller to maximize power output and to assist the base plate in controlling rotational speed in high winds.

  13. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  14. The 200-kilowatt wind turbine project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The three 200 kilowatt wind turbines described, compose the first of three separate systems. Proposed wind turbines of the two other systems, although similar in design, are larger in both physical size and rated power generation. The overall objective of the project is to obtain early operation and performance data while gaining initial experience in the operation of large, horizontal-axis wind turbines in typical utility environments. Several of the key issues addressed include the following: (1) impact of the variable power output (due to varying wind speeds) on the utility grid (2) compatibility with utility requirements (voltage and frequency control of generated power) (3) demonstration of unattended, fail-safe operation (4) reliability of the wind turbine system (5) required maintenance and (6) initial public reaction and acceptance.

  15. Wind response characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W.; Holley, W. E.; Jafarey, N.

    1981-01-01

    It was the objective of the work reported here, and in the companion paper 1 . A broader examination of wind turbine dynamic response to turbulence, and attempts to ascertain the features of turbulence that wind turbines are most sensitive to were made. A statistical description of the wind input including all three wind components and allowing linear wind gradients across the rotor disk, was used together with quasi-static aerodynamic theory and an elementary structural model involving only a few degrees of freedom. The idea was to keep the turbine model simple and show the benefits of this type of statistical wind representation before attempting to use a more complex turbine model. As far as possible, the analysis was kept in the simplest form, while still preserving key physical responses.

  16. An Investigation into Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Steven

    Wind turbine acoustic noise has been the subject of significant research in recent decades due to rapid growth in the wind energy industry. Available space with a reliable wind resource and that does not reside near populated areas is becoming extremely scarce, particularly in Europe. This decline in available space then results in a heightened need for wind turbine designs to be optimized for both acoustic emission and power-performance. Due to highly variable operating conditions, wind turbine acoustic noise emission may deviate from design levels, causing irritation to local residents and requiring reduced power production of the contributing turbines. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate two parameters that contribute to this variability--atmospheric turbulence in the inflow field, and aerodynamic flow separation--such that they may be more fully understood and properly accounted for in design. Results are achieved through an extensive experimental campaign on a full-scale turbine equipped with a thorough sensor network. Several novel flow characterization methods are developed, including a method of in-situ turbulence measurement using blade-mounted accelerometers. Turbulent inflow noise is shown to dominate the low frequency portion of the emitted spectrum for normal turbine operation and increases levels by as much as 6 dB for the conditions observed at the research facility. Experimental observations are typically within 2-3 dB of a commonly implemented noise prediction model. Finally, a study into the effects of high angle of attack operation shows that aerodynamic flow separation--detected using static pressure sensors along one blade of the turbine--can increase overall noise levels by more than 10 dB, thus dominating turbulent inflow noise at low frequencies. The studies of both turbulent inflow noise and flow separation noise represent the most thorough experimental observations and analysis of the respective noise mechanisms on a full

  17. Computational analysis of diffuser-augmented wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, C. A. J.

    Diffuser-augmented wind turbines are suitable candidates for the generation of electricity from jet-stream winds. A blade element, computational analysis is developed that includes wake rotation effects and blade Reynolds number effects. The influence of the diffuser is allowed for by introducing empirical values for the diffuser efficiency and exit-plane pressure coefficient. Good agreement is obtained for power coefficient and turbine axial velocity with experimental results. The use of screens to simulate the turbine is found to overestimate the turbine output by neglecting blade profile drag but to underestimate turbine output by neglecting favorable rotational influences on diffuser efficiency. Maximum power is delivered with a solidity ratio of 0.10 to 0.15 depending on the aerofoil section used.

  18. Qualitative analysis of wind-turbine wakes over hilly terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, A.; Segalini, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, wind-turbine wakes are studied over flat and hilly terrains. Measurements made by using stereoscopic PIV are compared to data obtained from numerical simulations using RANS equations and an actuator-disc method. The numerical and experimental data show similar qualitative trends, indicating that the wind-turbine wake is perturbed by the presence of the hills. Additionally, a faster flow recovery at hub height is seen with the hilly terrain, indicating that the hills presence is beneficial for downstream turbines exposed to wake-interaction effects. The Jensen wake model is implemented over the hilly terrain and it is shown that this model cannot accurately capture the wake modulations induced by the hills. However, by superimposing a wind-turbine wake simulated over flat terrain on the hilly-terrain flow field, it is illustrated that the commonly-used wake-superposition technique can yield reasonable results if the used wake model has sufficient accuracy.

  19. Review of fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Maolin; Wang, Yixuan; Jiao, Zongxia; Shi, Yan

    2017-09-01

    This study examines the development of the fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines. The current state of hydraulic wind turbines as a new technology is described, and its basic fluid model and typical control method are expounded by comparing various study results. Finally, the advantages of hydraulic wind turbines are enumerated. Hydraulic wind turbines are expected to become the main development direction of wind turbines.

  20. Wind Turbines Adaptation to the Variability of the Wind Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianov, Yuriy; Martynenko, Gennadii; Misaylov, Vitaliy; Soliannikova, Iuliia

    2010-05-01

    WIND TURBINES ADAPTATION TO THE VARIABILITY OF THE WIND FIELD The subject of our scientific research is wind power turbines (WPT) with the horizontal axis which were now common in the world. Efficient wind turbines work is largely determined by non-stationarity of the wind field, expressed in its gustiness, the presence of vertical and horizontal shifts of wind speed and direction. At critical values of the wind parameters WPT has aerodynamic and mechanical overload, leading to breakdowns, premature wear and reduce the life of the wind turbine. To prevent accidents at the peak values of wind speed it is used the regulatory system of windwheels. WPT control systems provide a process orientation of the wind turbine rotor axis in the line of the mean wind. Wind turbines are also equipped with braking device used to protect against breakdowns when a significant increase in the wind. In general, all these methods of regulation are not always effective. Thus, in practice there may be situations when the wind speed is many times greater than the stated limit. For example, if there are microbursts in the atmospheric boundary layer, low-level wind shears caused by its gust front, storms, etc. It is required for a wind power turbine adaptation to intensive short-term wind impulses and considerable vertical wind shifts that the data about them shall be obtained ahead of time. To do this it is necessary to have the information on the real structure of the wind field in the area of the blade sweep for the minimum range against the wind that is determined by the mean speed and the system action time. The implementation of acoustic and laser traditional wind sounding systems is limited by ambient acoustic noise, by heavy rain, snowfall and by fog. There are free of these disadvantages the inclined radioacoustic sounding (IRASS) technique which works for a system of remote detection and control of wind gusts. IRASS technique is realized as low-potential Doppler pulse radar

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  2. Wind turbine maximum power tracking device

    SciTech Connect

    Wertheim, M. M.; Herbermann, R. J.

    1985-06-25

    A method and apparatus for controlling the level of power transferred through a stand-alone wind power generating system utilizing a wind turbine whose output is converted to electrical power by means of an induction generator are disclosed. In the disclosed system, the velocity of the wind incident upon the blade of the turbine is sensed by a velocity sensor. This information is then used to vary the excitation frequency applied to the generator to adjust the shaft speed of the turbine in proportion to the change in wind velocity. The excitation frequency is adjusted in accordance with a control algorithm so that the power output of the system is equal to a maximum fraction of available wind power at wind velocities below a pre-determined power/velocity point.

  3. Investigations of a building-integrated ducted wind turbine module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannecker, Robert K. W.; Grant, Andrew D.

    2002-01-01

    So far, wind energy has not played a major role in the group of technologies for embedded generation in the built environment. However, the wind flow around conventional tall buildings generates differential pressures, which may cause an enhanced mass flow through a building-integrated turbine. As a first step, a prototype of a small-scale ducted wind turbine has been developed and tested, which seems to be feasible for integration into the leading roof edge of such a building. Here an experimental and numerical investigation of the flow through building-integrated ducting is presented. Pressure and wind speed measurements have been carried out on a wind tunnel model at different angles of incident wind, and different duct configurations have been tested. It was confirmed that wind speeds up to 30% higher than in the approaching freestream may be induced in the duct, and good performance was obtained for angles of incident wind up to ±60°. The experimental work proceeded in parallel with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. The geometry of the system was difficult to represent to the required level of accuracy, and modelling was restricted to a few simple cases, for which the flow field in the building-integrated duct was compared with experimental results. Generally good agreement was obtained, indicating that CFD techniques could play a major role in the design process. Predicted power of the proposed device suggests that it will compare favourably with conventional small wind turbines and photovoltaics in an urban environment.

  4. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Kenneth M.; Gilbert, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  5. Environmental effect of large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, T.B.A.; Sengupta, D.L.

    1981-08-01

    Because a wind turbine blade reflects electromagnetic radiation, it can produce ghost images and jitter on television. From simulation experiments using different strengths and time delays of the secondary signals relative to the primary signal at the receiver, a criterion has been established for interference that is unacceptable for extended periods of viewing. For a given TV transmission and given wind turbine, the interference zone can be computed by considering the propagation conditions. Small wind turbines of a few kilowatts capacity are found to produce interference with zones extending only a few tens of feet. The effect of a large wind turbine on other electromagnetic systems has been investigated, including aircraft navigational radars and Loran-C, which are relatively insensitive to interference. (LEW)

  6. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  7. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  8. Vertical axis wind turbine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollrock, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    The work reported consisted of the fabrication and whirl testing of a vertical axis wind turbine. Problems are reported in blade fabrication and balancing. It is planned to provide speed control with a water agitator. (LEW)

  9. Structural analysis considerations for wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Approaches to the structural analysis of wind turbine blade designs are reviewed. Specifications and materials data are discussed along with the analysis of vibrations, loads, stresses, and failure modes.

  10. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  11. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-01-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  12. Investigation of Wind Turbine Rotor Concepts for Offshore Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyhan, Özlem; Grasso, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Current plans in offshore wind energy developments call for further reduction of cost of energy. In order to contribute to this goal, several wind turbine rotor concepts have been investigated. Assuming the future offshore wind turbines will operate only in the offshore wind farms, the rotor concepts are not only evaluated for their stand-alone performances and their potential in reducing the loads, but also for their performance in an offshore wind farm. In order to do that, the 10MW reference wind turbine designed in Innwind.EU project is chosen as baseline. Several rotor parameters have been modified and their influences are investigated for offshore wind turbine design purposes. This investigation is carried out as a conceptual parametrical study. All concepts are evaluated numerically with BOT (Blade optimisation tool) software in wind turbine level and with Farmflow software in wind farm level for two wind farm layouts. At the end, all these concepts are compared with each other in terms of their advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Mariah Windspire Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-07-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. The test equipment includes a Mariah Windspire wind turbine mounted on a monopole tower. L&E Machine manufactured the turbine in the United States. The inverter was manufactured separately by Technology Driven Products in the United States. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Mariah Power.

  14. Preliminary wind tunnel tests on the pedal wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinayagalingam, T.

    1980-06-01

    High solidity-low speed wind turbines are relatively simple to construct and can be used advantageously in many developing countries for such direct applications as water pumping. Established designs in this class, such as the Savonius and the American multiblade rotors, have the disadvantage that their moving surfaces require a rigid construction, thereby rendering large units uneconomical. In this respect, the pedal wind turbine recently reported by the author and which incorporates sail type rotors offers a number of advantages. This note reports preliminary results from a series of wind tunnel tests which were carried out to assess the aerodynamic torque and power characteristics of the turbine.

  15. Performance Investigation of A Mix Wind Turbine Using A Clutch Mechanism At Low Wind Speed Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamanun, M. J.; Misaran, M. S.; Rahman, M.; Muzammil, W. K.

    2017-07-01

    Wind energy is one of the methods that generates energy from sustainable resources. This technology has gained prominence in this era because it produces no harmful product to the society. There is two fundamental type of wind turbine are generally used this day which is Horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) and Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). The VAWT technology is more preferable compare to HAWT because it gives better efficiency and cost effectiveness as a whole. However, VAWT is known to have distinct disadvantage compared to HAWT; self-start ability and efficiency at low wind speed condition. Different solution has been proposed to solve these issues which includes custom design blades, variable angle of attack mechanism and mix wind turbine. A new type of clutch device was successfully developed in UMS to be used in a mix Savonius-Darrieus wind turbine configuration. The clutch system which barely audible when in operation compared to a ratchet clutch system interconnects the Savonius and Darrieus rotor; allowing the turbine to self-start at low wind speed condition as opposed to a standalone Darrieus turbine. The Savonius height were varied at three different size in order to understand the effect of the Savonius rotor to the mix wind turbine performance. The experimental result shows that the fabricated Savonius rotor show that the height of the Savonius rotor affecting the RPM for the turbine. The swept area (SA), aspect ratio (AR) and tip speed ratio (TSR) also calculated in this paper. The highest RPM recorded in this study is 90 RPM for Savonius rotor 0.22-meter height at 2.75 m/s. The Savonius rotor 0.22-meter also give the highest TSR for each range of speed from 0.75 m/s, 1.75 m/s and 2.75 m/s where it gives 1.03 TSR, 0.76 TSR, and 0.55 TSR.

  16. Passively cooled direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2008-03-18

    A wind turbine is provided that passively cools an electrical generator. The wind turbine includes a plurality of fins arranged peripherally around a generator house. Each of the fins being oriented at an angle greater than zero degrees to allow parallel flow of air over the fin. The fin is further tapered to allow a constant portion of the fin to extend beyond the air stream boundary layer. Turbulence initiators on the nose cone further enhance heat transfer at the fins.

  17. Wind Turbine Modeling Overview for Control Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Butterfield, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of wind turbine systems is of paramount importance for controls engineers seeking to reduce loads and optimize energy capture of operating turbines in the field. When designing control systems, engineers often employ a series of models developed in the different disciplines of wind energy. The limitations and coupling of each of these models is explained to highlight how these models might influence control system design.

  18. Site-optimization of wind turbine generators

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, T.J. de; Thillerup, J.

    1997-12-31

    The Danish Company Nordtank is one of the pioneers within the wind turbine industry. Since 1981 Nordtank has installed worldwide more than 2500 wind turbine generators with a total name plate capacity that is exceeding 450 MW. The opening up of new and widely divergent markets has demanded an extremely flexible approach towards wind turbine construction. The Nordtank product range has expanded considerable in recent years, with the main objective to develop wind energy conversion machines that can run profitable in any given case. This paper will describe site optimization of Nordtank wind turbines. Nordtank has developed a flexible design concept for its WTGs in the 500/750 kW range, in order to offer the optimal WTG solution for any given site and wind regime. Through this flexible design, the 500/750 turbine line can adjust the rotor diameter, tower height and many other components to optimally fit the turbine to each specific project. This design philosophy will be illustrated with some case histories of recently completed projects.

  19. Modelling of a chaotic load of wind turbines drivetrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, Andrzej; Barszcz, Tomasz; Wójcik, Mateusz

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a model of the load of the wind turbine gears for simulation of real, varying operational conditions for modelling of wind turbine vibration. The characteristics of the wind, which generates chaotically varying loads on the drivetrain components generating load in teeth and bearings of gears during torque transfer, are discussed. A generator of variable load of wind turbines drivetrain is proposed. Firstly, the module for generation of wind speed is designed. It is based on the approach in which the wind speed was considered as a time series approximated by the Weierstrass function. Secondly, the rotational speed of the main shaft is proposed as a function of the wind speed value. The function depends on a few parameters that are fitted by using a genetic algorithm. Finally, the model of torque of the main shaft is introduced. This model has been created by using a multi-layer artificial neural network. The results show that the proposed approach yields a very good fit for the experimental data. The fit brings about the proper reproducing of all the aspects of the load that are crucial for causing fatigue and, as a consequence, damaging of gears of the wind turbines.

  20. Wind Farm Turbine Type and Placement Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Peter; Dykes, Katherine; Scott, George; Fields, Jason; Lunacek, Monte; Quick, Julian; Rethore, Pierre-Elouan

    2016-09-01

    The layout of turbines in a wind farm is already a challenging nonlinear, nonconvex, nonlinearly constrained continuous global optimization problem. Here we begin to address the next generation of wind farm optimization problems by adding the complexity that there is more than one turbine type to choose from. The optimization becomes a nonlinear constrained mixed integer problem, which is a very difficult class of problems to solve. This document briefly summarizes the algorithm and code we have developed, the code validation steps we have performed, and the initial results for multi-turbine type and placement optimization (TTP_OPT) we have run.

  1. Wind farm turbine type and placement optimization

    DOE PAGES

    Graf, Peter; Dykes, Katherine; Scott, George; ...

    2016-10-03

    The layout of turbines in a wind farm is already a challenging nonlinear, nonconvex, nonlinearly constrained continuous global optimization problem. Here we begin to address the next generation of wind farm optimization problems by adding the complexity that there is more than one turbine type to choose from. The optimization becomes a nonlinear constrained mixed integer problem, which is a very difficult class of problems to solve. Furthermore, this document briefly summarizes the algorithm and code we have developed, the code validation steps we have performed, and the initial results for multi-turbine type and placement optimization (TTP_OPT) we have run.

  2. Anechoic wind tunnel study of turbulence effects on wind turbine broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, B.; Harris, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent results obtained at MIT on the experimental and theoretical modelling of aerodynamic broadband noise generated by a downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine. The aerodynamic broadband noise generated by the wind turbine rotor is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The turbulence was generated in the MIT anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of biplanar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the aerodynamic broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of wind turbine performance parameters. Specifically, the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence, the size scale of turbulence, the number of turbine blades, and free stream velocity were varied. Simultaneous measurements of acoustic and turbulence signals were made. The sound pressure level was found to vary directly with the integral scale of the ingested turbulence but not with its intensity level. A theoretical model based on unsteady aerodynamics is proposed.

  3. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, Jack D.; Kadlec, Emil G.; Klimas, Paul C.

    1985-01-01

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the ends thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby inducing stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  4. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, J.D.; Kadlec, E.G.; Klimas, P.C.

    1983-09-15

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the end thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby including stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  5. Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulstich, S.; Berkhout, V.; Mayer, J.; Siebenlist, D.

    2016-09-01

    Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines is an essential part of offshore wind farm simulation software as it leads to optimized decision making when specifying the necessary resources for the operation and maintenance of wind farms. In order to optimize O&M strategies, a thorough understanding of a wind turbine's failure behaviour is vital and is therefore being developed at Fraunhofer IWES. Within this article, first the failure models of existing offshore O&M tools are presented to show the state of the art and strengths and weaknesses of the respective models are briefly discussed. Then a conceptual framework for modelling different failure mechanisms of wind turbines is being presented. This framework takes into account the different wind turbine subsystems and structures as well as the failure modes of a component by applying several influencing factors representing wear and break failure mechanisms. A failure function is being set up for the rotor blade as exemplary component and simulation results have been compared to a constant failure rate and to empirical wind turbine fleet data as a reference. The comparison and the breakdown of specific failure categories demonstrate the overall plausibility of the model.

  6. Control of hydrostatic transmission wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop

    In this study, we proposed a control strategy for a wind turbine that employed a hydrostatic transmission system for transmitting power from the wind turbine rotor via a hydraulic transmission line to a ground level generator. Wind turbine power curve tracking was achieved by controlling the hydraulic pump displacement and, at the other end of the hydraulic line, the hydraulic motor displacement was controlled so that the overall transmission loss was minimized. Steady state response, dynamic response, and system stability were assessed. The maximum transmission efficiency obtained ranged from 79% to 84% at steady state when the proposed control strategy was implemented. The leakage and friction losses of the hydraulic components were the main factors that compromised the efficiency. The simulation results showed that the system was stable and had fast and well-damped transient response. Double wind turbine system sharing hydraulic pipes, a hydraulic motor, and a generator were also studied. The hydraulic pipe diameter used in the double-turbine system increased by 27% compared to the single-turbine system in order to make the transmission coefficient comparable between both systems. The simulation results suggested that the leakage losses were so significant that the efficiency of the system was worsened compared with the single-turbine system. Future studies of other behavioral aspects and practical issues such as fluid dynamics, structure strength, materials, and costs are needed.

  7. Local blockage effect for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Takafumi; Draper, Scott

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a combined theoretical and CFD study on the fluid-mechanical limit of power extraction by a closely-spaced lateral array of wind turbines. The idea of this study originates in recent studies on the array optimisation of tidal/marine turbines, for which the power coefficient of each turbine is known to increase significantly if the lateral spacing between turbines, or the local blockage, is optimised. The present study, using 3D Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of a boundary-layer flow over a closely-spaced lateral array of up to 9 actuator discs, suggests that a similar—albeit less significant—power increase due to the effect of local blockage can be achieved even for wind turbines. A possible theoretical approach to estimating this power increase is also discussed.

  8. Infrasound emission generated by wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceranna, Lars; Pilger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Aerodynamic noise emissions from the continuously growing number of wind turbines in Germany are creating increasing problems for infrasound recording systems. Such systems are equipped with highly sensitive micro pressure sensors, which are accurately measuring acoustic signals in a frequency range inaudible to humans. At infrasound station IGADE, north of Bremen, a constantly increasing background noise has been observed throughout the years since its installation in 2005. The spectral peaks are reflecting well the blade passing harmonics, which vary with prevailing wind speeds. Overall, a decrease is noted for the infrasound array's detection capability. This aspect is particularly important for the other two sites of the German infrasound stations I26DE in the Bavarian Forest and I27DE in Antarctica, because plans for installing wind turbines near these locations are being under discussion. These stations are part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and have to meet stringent specifications with respect to infrasonic background noise. Therefore data obtained during a field experiment with mobile micro-barometer stations for measuring the infrasonic pressure level of a single horizontal-axis wind turbine have been revisited. The results of this experiment successfully validate a theoretical model which estimates the generated sound pressure level of wind turbines and makes it possible to specify the minimum allowable distance between wind turbines and infrasound stations for undisturbed recording. Since the theoretical model also takes wind turbine design parameters into account, suitable locations for planned infrasound stations outside the determined disturbance range can be found, which will be presented; and vice versa, the model calculations' results for fixing the minimum distance for wind turbines planned for installation in the vicinity of an existing infrasound array.

  9. Prediction of the hub vortex instability within wind turbine wakes and effects of the incoming wind and turbine aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Instability of the hub vortex, which is a vorticity structure present in wind turbine near-wake and mainly oriented along the streamwise direction, is predicted from wake velocity measurements. In this work, stability analysis is performed on wind tunnel velocity measurements acquired in the wake produced from a wind turbine model immersed in a uniform flow. Turbulence effects on wake dynamics are taken into account by modeling the Reynolds stresses through eddy-viscosity models, which are calibrated on the wind tunnel data. This formulation leads to the identification of one dominant mode associated with the hub vortex instability, which is characterized by a counter-winding single-helix mode. Moreover, this analysis also predicts accurately the frequency of the hub vortex instability observed experimentally. The hub vortex instability is also investigated by considering incoming wind fields with different turbulence characteristics, different turbine aerodynamic designs and operational regimes, which affect the morphology of the wake vorticity structures and their dynamics. The ultimate goal of this work consists in providing useful information for predicting wind turbine wake dynamics and their effects on downstream wake recovery, thus to maximize wind power harvesting.

  10. Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    McNerney, G.M.

    1981-08-01

    Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  11. Wind Turbine Blade Design for Subscale Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Arash; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Kelley, Christopher L.; Maniaci, David C.

    2016-09-01

    Two different inverse design approaches are proposed for developing wind turbine blades for sub-scale wake testing. In the first approach, dimensionless circulation is matched for full scale and sub-scale wind turbine blades for equal shed vorticity in the wake. In the second approach, the normalized normal and tangential force distributions are matched for large scale and small scale wind turbine blades, as these forces determine the wake dynamics and stability. The two approaches are applied for the same target full scale turbine blade, and the shape of the blades are compared. The results show that the two approaches have been successfully implemented, and the designed blades are able to produce the target circulation and target normal and tangential force distributions.

  12. Wind Turbine Controller to Mitigate Structural Loads on a Floating Wind Turbine Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Paul A.; Peiffer, Antoine; Schlipf, David

    2016-06-24

    This paper summarizes the control design work that was performed to optimize the controller of a wind turbine on the WindFloat structure. The WindFloat is a semi-submersible floating platform designed to be a support structure for a multi-megawatt power-generating wind turbine. A controller developed for a bottom-fixed wind turbine configuration was modified for use when the turbine is mounted on the WindFloat platform. This results in an efficient platform heel resonance mitigation scheme. In addition several control modules, designed with a coupled linear model, were added to the fixed-bottom baseline controller. The approach was tested in a fully coupled nonlinear aero-hydroelastic simulation tool in which wind and wave disturbances were modeled. This testing yielded significant improvements in platform global performance and tower-base-bending loading.

  13. Field verification program for small wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Windward Engineering, LLC

    2003-11-30

    In 1999 Windward Engineering (Windward) was awarded a Cooperative Agreement under the Field Verification Program with the Department of Energy (DOE) to install two Whisper H40 wind turbines, one at the NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) and one at a test site near Spanish Fork, Utah. After installation, the turbine at the NWTC was to be operated, maintained, and monitored by NREL while the turbine in Spanish Fork was to be administered by Windward. Under this award DOE and Windward defined the primary objectives of the project as follows: (1) Determine and demonstrate the reliability and energy production of a furling wind turbine at a site where furling will be a very frequent event and extreme gusts can be expected during the duration of the tests. (2) Make engineering measurements and conduct limited computer modeling of the furling behavior to improve the industry understanding of the mechanics and nature of furling. We believe the project has achieved these objectives. The turbine has operated for approximately three and a half years. We have collected detailed engineering data approximately 75 percent of that time. Some of these data were used in an ADAMS model validation that highlighted the accuracies and inaccuracies of the computer modeling for a passively furling wind turbine. We also presented three papers at the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Windpower conferences in 2001, 2002, and 2003. These papers addressed the following three topics: (a) general overview of the project [1], (b) furling operation during extreme wind events [2], and (c) extrapolation of extreme (design) loads [3]. We believe these papers have given new insight into the mechanics and nature of furling and have set the stage for future research. In this final report we will highlight some of the more interesting aspects of the project as well as summarize the data for the entire project. We will also present information on the installation of the turbines as well as

  14. Pitch-controlled variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    2000-03-01

    Wind energy is a viable option to complement other types of pollution-free generation. In the early development of wind energy, the majority of wind turbines were operated at constant speed. Recently, the number of variable-speed wind turbines installed in wind farms has increased and more wind turbine manufacturers are making variable-speed wind turbines. This paper covers the operation of variable-speed wind turbines with pitch control. The system the authors considered is controlled to generate maximum energy while minimizing loads. The maximization of energy was only carried out on a static basis and only drive train loads were considered as a constraint. In medium wind speeds, the generator and power converter control the wind turbine to capture maximum energy from the wind. In the high wind speed region, the wind turbine is controlled to maintain the aerodynamic power produced by the wind turbine. Two methods to adjust the aerodynamic power were investigated: pitch control and generator load control, both of which are employed to control the operation of the wind turbine. The analysis and simulation shows that the wind turbine can be operated at its optimum energy capture while minimizing the load on the wind turbine for a wide range of wind speeds.

  15. Compressible Flow About Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    WIND program numerically solves exact full-potential equation for three dimensional, stead inviscid flow through isolated wind-turbine rotor. Proram automatically generates three dimensional, boundary-conforming grid and iteratively solves full-potential equation while fully accounting for rotating and Coriolis effects. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  16. Compressible Flow About Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    WIND program numerically solves exact full-potential equation for three dimensional, stead inviscid flow through isolated wind-turbine rotor. Proram automatically generates three dimensional, boundary-conforming grid and iteratively solves full-potential equation while fully accounting for rotating and Coriolis effects. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  17. Influence of Wind Turbines on Seismological Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammler, Klaus; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    In the area of the Gräfenberg array in Southern Germany a large number of wind turbines has been installed since 2011. The wind turbines are located in various distances to the 13 stations of the array, down to distances of 1.4 km at two sites. The noise spectra of the sensitive GRF stations are significantly affected between 1 and 10 Hz by wind dependent influences of the turbine towers. The effects of the wind turbines are visible in the seismograms at least up to distances of 15 km. Also the borehole station GRFO in about 100 m depth shows wind turbine noise signals comparable to the collocated surface station GRA1. This leads to severely reduced recording and detection capabilities of the single stations and of the whole array at high wind speeds. The results were found by systematically analyzing continuous data records at all GRF stations over many years. The effect of the sedimentary limestone layer beneath all GRF stations as propagation medium for the noise signals is currently under investigation.

  18. Large Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The proceedings of a workshop held in Cleveland, July 28-30, 1981 are described. The workshop emphasized recent experience in building and testing large propeller-type wind turbines, expanding upon the proceedings of three previous DOE/NASA workshops at which design and analysis topics were considered. A total of 41 papers were presented on the following subjects: current and advanced large wind turbine systems, rotor blade design and manufacture, electric utility activities, research and supporting technology, meteorological characteristics for design and operation, and wind resources assessments for siting.

  19. Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-12-06

    A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

  20. Large horizontal axis wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the NASA activities concerning ongoing wind systems oriented toward utility application is presented. First-generation-technology large wind turbines were designed and are in operation at selected utility sites. In order to make a significant energy impact, costs of 2 to 3 cents per kilowatt hour must be achieved. The federal program continues to fund the development by industry of wind turbines which can meet the cost goals of 2 to 3 cents per kilowatt hour. Lower costs are achieved through the incorporation of new technology and innovative system design to reduce weight and increase energy capture.

  1. Large, low cost composite wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gewehr, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    A woven roving E-glass tape, having all of its structural fibers oriented across the tape width was used in the manufacture of the spar for a wind turbine blade. Tests of a 150 ft composite blade show that the transverse filament tape is capable of meeting structural design requirements for wind turbine blades. Composite blades can be designed for interchangeability with steel blades in the MOD-1 wind generator system. The design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of the 150 ft blade are discussed.

  2. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, KS; Larsen, GC; Menke, R.; Vasiljevic, N.; Angelou, N.; Feng, J.; Zhu, WJ; Vignaroli, A.; W, W. Liu; Xu, C.; Shen, WZ

    2016-09-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large downstream distances (more than 5 diameters) from the wake generating turbine, the wake changes according to local atmospheric conditions e.g. vertical wind speed. In very complex terrain the wake effects are often “overruled” by distortion effects due to the terrain complexity or topology.

  3. Broad band sound from wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Brief descriptions are given of the various types of large wind turbines and their sound characteristics. Candidate sources of broadband sound are identified and are rank ordered for a large upwind configuration wind turbine generator for which data are available. The rotor is noted to be the main source of broadband sound which arises from inflow turbulence and from the interactions of the turbulent boundary layer on the blade with its trailing edge. Sound is radiated about equally in all directions but the refraction effects of the wind produce an elongated contour pattern in the downwind direction.

  4. Laser vibrometry for wind turbines inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.

    2016-04-01

    The maintenance and repair of wind energy converters is a significant cost factor. Therefore it is mandatory to minimise the downtime caused by unnoticed faults. A key contributor to the load on the wind turbine installation and to material fatigue is the plant's unavoidable vibration. We report about a development of a new 1.5 μm laser vibrometer system to measure vibrations of rotating blades of wind turbines up to a distance of several hundred meters - based on a very precise imaged tracking system.

  5. LES of wind turbine wakes: Evaluation of turbine parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porte-Agel, Fernando; Wu, Yu-Ting; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2009-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES), coupled with a wind-turbine model, is used to investigate the characteristics of wind turbine wakes in turbulent boundary layers under different thermal stratification conditions. The subgrid-scale (SGS) stress and SGS heat flux are parameterized using scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic models (Stoll and Porte-Agel, 2006). The turbine-induced lift and drag forces are parameterized using two models: an actuator disk model (ADM) that distributes the force loading on the rotor disk; and an actuator line model (ALM) that distributes the forces on lines that follow the position of the blades. Simulation results are compared to wind-tunnel measurements collected with hot-wire and cold-wire anemometry in the wake of a miniature 3-blade wind turbine at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. In general, the characteristics of the wakes simulated with the proposed LES framework are in good agreement with the measurements. The ALM is better able to capture vortical structures induced by the blades in the near-wake region. Our results also show that the scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic SGS models are able to account, without tuning, for the effects of local shear and flow anisotropy on the distribution of the SGS model coefficients.

  6. Advanced Fluid--Structure Interaction Techniques in Application to Horizontal and Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Artem

    During the last several decades engineers and scientists put significant effort into developing reliable and efficient wind turbines. As a wind power production demands grow, the wind energy research and development need to be enhanced with high-precision methods and tools. These include time-dependent, full-scale, complex-geometry advanced computational simulations at large-scale. Those, computational analysis of wind turbines, including fluid-structure interaction simulations (FSI) at full scale is important for accurate and reliable modeling, as well as blade failure prediction and design optimization. In current dissertation the FSI framework is applied to most challenging class of problems, such as large scale horizontal axis wind turbines and vertical axis wind turbines. The governing equations for aerodynamics and structural mechanics together with coupled formulation are explained in details. The simulations are performed for different wind turbine designs, operational conditions and validated against field-test and wind tunnel experimental data.

  7. Aerodynamic research on tipvane wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    van Bussel, G.J.W.; van Holten, Th.; van Kuik, G.A.M.

    1982-04-01

    The research on tipvane turbines aims at a process improvement of the wind energy conversion system, which is more than component improvement such as efficient aerofoils and optimized transmission systems. These latter developments make it possible for a modern wind turbine to approach the Betz maximum power coefficient. However, process improvements are possible based on flow phenomena which are not consistent with the assumptions made in Betz theory. Power coefficients far above the Betz maximum value are possible when for example forces are applied perpendicular to the wind direction and when viscous effects play an important role. At the Delft University of Technology, the wind energy group investigates the effect of tipvanes, which are small auxiliary wings at the end of the turbine blades inducing a mass flow augmentation by the creation of a venturi flow.

  8. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  9. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-07

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  10. Wind Turbine Micropitting Workshop: A Recap

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.

    2010-02-01

    Micropitting is a Hertzian fatigue phenomenon that affects many wind turbine gearboxes, and it affects the reliability of the machines. With the major growth and increasing dependency on renewable energy, mechanical reliability is an extremely important issue. The U.S. Department of Energy has made a commitment to improving wind turbine reliability and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has started a gearbox reliability project. Micropitting as an issue that needed attention came to light through this effort. To understand the background of work that had already been accomplished, and to consolidate some level of collective understanding of the issue by acknowledged experts, NREL hosted a wind turbine micropitting workshop, which was held at the National Wind Technology Center in Boulder, Colorado, on April 15 and 16, 2009.

  11. Computer control for remote wind turbine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Manwell, J.F.; Rogers, A.L.; Abdulwahid, U.; Driscoll, J.

    1997-12-31

    Light weight wind turbines located in harsh, remote sites require particularly capable controllers. Based on extensive operation of the original ESI-807 moved to such a location, a much more sophisticated controller than the original one has been developed. This paper describes the design, development and testing of that new controller. The complete control and monitoring system consists of sensor and control inputs, the control computer, control outputs, and additional equipment. The control code was written in Microsoft Visual Basic on a PC type computer. The control code monitors potential faults and allows the turbine to operate in one of eight states: off, start, run, freewheel, low wind shut down, normal wind shutdown, emergency shutdown, and blade parking. The controller also incorporates two {open_quotes}virtual wind turbines,{close_quotes} including a dynamic model of the machine, for code testing. The controller can handle numerous situations for which the original controller was unequipped.

  12. Development of large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, D. H.; Kennard, J.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop large, horizontal-axis wind turbines is discussed. The program is directed toward developing the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that can generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with those of conventional electricity-generating systems. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. Several ongoing projects in large-wind-turbine development are directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. The machines based on first-generation technology (Mod-OA and Mod-1) successfully completed their planned periods of experimental operation in June, 1982. The second-generation machines (Mod-2) are in operation at selected utility sites. A third-generation machine (Mod-5) is under contract. Erection and initial operation of the Mod-5 in Hawaii should take place in 1986. Each successive generation of technology increased reliability and energy capture while reducing the cost of electricity. These advances are being made by gaining a better understanding of the system-design drivers, improving the analytical design tools, verifying design methods with operating field data, and incorporating new technology and innovative designs. Information is given on the results from the first- and second-generation machines (Mod-OA, - 1, and -2), the status of the Department of Interior, and the status of the third-generation wind turbine (Mod-5).

  13. Guy cable design and damping for vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carne, T. G.

    1981-01-01

    Guy cables are frequently used to support vertical axis wind turbines since guying the turbine reduces some of the structural requirements on the tower. The guys must be designed to provide both the required strength and the required stiffness at the top of the turbine. The axial load which the guys apply to the tower, bearings, and foundations is an undesirable consequence of using guys to support the turbine. Limiting the axial load so that it does not significantly affect the cost of the turbine is an important objective of the cable design. The lateral vibrations of the cables is another feature of the cable design which needs to be considered. These aspects of the cable design are discussed, and a technique for damping cable vibrations was mathematically analyzed and demonstrated with experimental data.

  14. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Methodology for Noise Assessment of Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method. PMID:25075621

  15. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology for noise assessment of wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  16. Active robust control of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Vahid

    The research work conducted in this thesis focuses on robustness of wind energy conversion system with respect to faults in pitch actuator in order to prevent unnecessary emergency shutdown, and keep the turbine operational without significant inefficiency in its overall performance. The objective is to investigate the feasibility of using a fault estimator and a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system as additional sensors to design a suitable control system for wind turbines. Robust control technique is used to address these issues. Three controllers are proposed in this work that try to address sources of inaccuracy in wind turbine operation: An active fault tolerant controller is first designed using a fault estimator. It is shown that a set of locally robust controllers with respect to the fault, together with a suitable smooth mixing approach, manages to overcome the problem of faults in the pitch actuator. To address the wind-dependent behavior of turbines, a second controller is designed using the LIDAR sensor. In this configuration, LIDAR provides the look ahead wind information and generates a smooth scheduling signal to provide active robustness with respect to the changes in wind speed. Lastly, utilizing both the fault estimator and LIDAR, a 2-dimensional wind-dependent active fault tolerant controller is developed to control the wind turbine in region 3 of operation. The feasibility of the proposed ideas is verified in simulation. For this purpose, the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory's FAST code is used to model the 3-balded controls advanced research turbine. A discussion on practical considerations and ideas for future work are also presented.

  17. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Gyuhae; Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Farrar, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  18. Wind turbine control applications of turbine-mounted LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossanyi, E. A.; Kumar, A.; Hugues-Salas, O.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the possible use of LIDAR systems for improving the performance of wind turbine controllers, by providing preview information about the approaching wind field. Various potential benefits have been suggested, and experimental measurements have sometimes been used to claim surprising gains in performance. This paper reports on an independent study which has used detailed analytical methods for two main purposes: firstly to try to evaluate the likely benefits of LIDAR-assisted control objectively, and secondly to provide advice to LIDAR manufacturers about the characteristics of LIDAR systems which are most likely to be of value for this application. Many different LIDAR configurations were compared: as a general conclusion, systems should be able to sample at least 10 points every second, reasonably distributed around the swept area, and allowing a look-ahead time of a few seconds. An important conclusion is that the main benefit of the LIDAR will be to enhance of collective pitch control to reduce thrust-related fatigue loads; there is some indication that extreme loads can also be reduced, but this depends on other considerations which are discussed in the paper. LIDAR-assisted individual pitch control, optimal Cp tracking and yaw control were also investigated, but the benefits over conventional methods are less clear.

  19. Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads

    DOEpatents

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2007-02-13

    A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the wind turbine and determining a yaw error of the wind turbine relative to the measured instantaneous wind direction. The method further includes comparing the yaw error to a yaw error trigger that has different values at different wind speeds and shutting down the wind turbine when the yaw error exceeds the yaw error trigger corresponding to the measured or estimated instantaneous wind speed.

  20. Industrial wind turbines and adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Roy D; Krogh, Carmen M E; Horner, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Some people living in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWTs) report experiencing adverse health and socioeconomic effects. This review considers the hypothesis that annoyance from audible IWTs is the cause of these adverse health effects. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published since 2000 that included the terms "wind turbine health," "wind turbine infrasound," "wind turbine annoyance," "noise annoyance" or "low frequency noise" in the title or abstract. Industrial wind turbines produce sound that is perceived to be more annoying than other sources of sound. Reported effects from exposure to IWTs are consistent with well-known stress effects from persistent unwanted sound. If placed too close to residents, IWTs can negatively affect the physical, mental and social well-being of people. There is sufficient evidence to support the conclusion that noise from audible IWTs is a potential cause of health effects. Inaudible low-frequency noise and infrasound from IWTs cannot be ruled out as plausible causes of health effects.

  1. Flow interaction of diffuser augmented wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göltenbott, U.; Ohya, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Jamieson, P.

    2016-09-01

    Up-scaling of wind turbines has been a major trend in order to reduce the cost of energy generation from the wind. Recent studies however show that for a given technology, the cost always rises with upscaling, notably due to the increased mass of the system. To reach capacities beyond 10 MW, multi-rotor systems (MRS) have promising advantages. On the other hand, diffuser augmented wind turbines (DAWTs) can significantly increase the performance of the rotor. Up to now, diffuser augmentation has only been applied to single small wind turbines. In the present research, DAWTs are used in a multi-rotor system. In wind tunnel experiments, the aerodynamics of two and three DAWTs, spaced in close vicinity in the same plane normal to a uniform flow, have been analysed. Power increases of up to 5% and 9% for the two and three rotor configurations are respectively achieved in comparison to a stand-alone turbine. The physical dynamics of the flows are analysed on the basis of the results obtained with a stand-alone turbine.

  2. An Induction Motor Based Wind Turbine Emulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovs, A.; Grigans, L.; Kamolins, E.; Voitkans, J.

    2014-04-01

    The authors present a small-scale wind turbine emulator based on the AC drive system and discuss the methods for power coefficient calculation. In the work, the experimental set-up consisting of an AC induction motor, a frequency converter, a synchronous permanent magnet generator, a DC-DC boost converter and DC load was simulated and tested using real-life equipment. The experimentally obtained wind turbine power and torque diagrams using the emulator are in a good agreement with the theoretical ones. Šajā rakstā parādīta mazas jaudas vēja turbīnas emulatora izveide ar maiņstrāvas piedziņas sistēmu, kā arī analizētas vairākas turbīnas jaudas koeficienta analītiskās aprēķina metodes. Vēja turbīnas emulatora eksperimentālais stends, kas sastāv no asinhronā elektromotora, frekvenču pārveidotāja, sinhronā pastāvīgo magnētu ģeneratora, līdzstrāvas paaugstinošā pārveidotāja un slodzes, tika pārbaudīts gan simulēšanas vidē, gan uz reālām iekārtām. Eksperimentāli iegūtās vēja turbīnas emulatora jaudas un momenta diagrammas ir salīdzinātas ar teorētiskajām.

  3. Panel resonant behavior of wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Joshua A.; Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2010-03-01

    The principal design drivers in the certification of wind turbine blades are ultimate strength, fatigue resistance, adequate tip-tower clearance, and buckling resistance. Buckling resistance is typically strongly correlated to both ultimate strength and fatigue resistance. A composite shell with spar caps forms the airfoil shape of a blade and reinforcing shear webs are placed inside the blade to stiffen the blade in the flap-wise direction. The spar caps are dimensioned and the shear webs are placed so as to add stiffness to unsupported panel regions and reduce their length. The panels are not the major flap-wise load carrying element of a blade; however, they must be designed carefully to avoid buckling while minimizing blade weight. Typically, buckling resistance is evaluated by consideration of the load-deflection behavior of a blade using finite element analysis (FEA) or full-scale static testing of blades under a simulated extreme loading condition. The focus of this paper is on the use of experimental modal analysis to measure localized resonances of the blade panels. It can be shown that the resonant behavior of these panels can also provide a means to evaluate buckling resistance by means of analytical or experimental modal analysis. Further, panel resonances have use in structural health monitoring by observing changes in modal parameters associated with panel resonances, and use in improving panel laminate model parameters by correlation with test data. In recent modal testing of wind turbine blades, a set of panel modes were measured. This paper will report on the findings of these tests and accompanying numerical and analytical modeling efforts aimed at investigating the potential uses of panel resonances for blade evaluation, health monitoring, and design.

  4. Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

    2010-02-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests that were performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power quality tests. Test results provide manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes an ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 100-ft free-standing lattice tower. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

  5. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Mariah Power Windspire Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-05-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of the first round of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. This duration test report focuses on the Mariah Power Windspire wind turbine.

  6. Crack Diagnosis of Wind Turbine Blades Based on EMD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong-yu, CUI; Ning, DING; Ming, HONG

    2016-11-01

    Wind turbine blades are both the source of power and the core technology of wind generators. After long periods of time or in some extreme conditions, cracks or damage can occur on the surface of the blades. If the wind generators continue to work at this time, the crack will expand until the blade breaks, which can lead to incalculable losses. Therefore, a crack diagnosis method based on EMD for wind turbine blades is proposed in this paper. Based on aerodynamics and fluid-structure coupling theory, an aero-elastic analysis on wind turbine blades model is first made in ANSYS Workbench. Second, based on the aero-elastic analysis and EMD method, the blade cracks are diagnosed and identified in the time and frequency domains, respectively. Finally, the blade model, strain gauge, dynamic signal acquisition and other equipment are used in an experimental study of the aero-elastic analysis and crack damage diagnosis of wind turbine blades to verify the crack diagnosis method proposed in this paper.

  7. Detection of Wind Turbine Power Performance Abnormalities Using Eigenvalue Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    seen for Turbine #09 in figure 9. Then, a noise reduction mode was enabled for the current wind turbine (and for the vast major- ity of the turbines ...Production, Wind Speed and Power Curve - Case: Enabling of noise reduction mode. Figure 11. Turbine #07 - Noise reduction mode - Trending behaviour of...Detection of Wind Turbine Power Performance Abnormalities Using Eigenvalue Analysis Georgios Alexandros Skrimpas1, Christian Walsted Sweeney2, Kun S

  8. Experimental investigation of the dynamic installation of a slip joint connection between the monopile and tower of an offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segeren, M. L. A.; Hermans, K. W.

    2014-06-01

    The failure of the traditional grouted connections of offshore wind turbines has led to the investigation of alternatives that provide a connection between the foundation pile and the turbine tower. An alternative to the traditional joint is a steel-to-steel connection also called a slip joint. To ensure a proper fit of the slip joint a dynamic installation of the joint is proposed. In this contribution, the effectiveness of harmonic excitation as an installation procedure is experimentally investigated using a 1:10 scaled model of the joint. During the dynamic installation test the applied static load, settlements and dynamic response of the joint are monitored using respectively load cells, taut wires and strain gauges placed both inside and outside the conical surfaces. The results show that settlement occurs only when applying a harmonic load at specific forcing frequencies. The settlement stabilizes to a certain level for each of the specific frequencies, indicating that a controlled way of installation is possible. The results show that it is essential to vibrate at specific frequencies and that a larger amplitude of the harmonic force does not automatically lead to additional settlement.

  9. Enhancing wind turbines efficiency with passive reconfiguration of flexible blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cognet, Vincent P. A.; Thiria, Benjamin; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain; MSC Team; PMMH Team

    2015-11-01

    Nature provides excellent examples where flexible materials are advantageous in a fluid stream. By folding, leaves decrease the drag caused by air stream; and birds' flapping is much more efficient with flexible wings. Motivated by this, we investigate the effect of flexible blades on the performance of a wind turbine. The effect of chordwise flexible blades is studied both experimentally and theoretically on a small wind turbine in steady state. Four parameters are varied: the wind velocity, the resisting torque, the pitch angle, and the blade's bending modulus. We find an optimum efficiency with respect to the bending modulus. By tuning our four parameters, the wind turbine with flexible blades has a high-efficiency range significantly larger than rigid blades', and, furthermore enhances the operating range. These results are all the more important as one of the current issues concerning wind turbines is the enlargement of their operating range. To explain these results, we propose a simple two-dimensional model by discretising the blade along the radius. We take into account the variation of drag and lift coefficients with the bending ability. This model matches experimental observations and demonstrates the contribution of the reconfiguration of the blade. Matiere et Systemes Complexes.

  10. The Darrieus wind turbine for electrical power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. L.

    1981-06-01

    Aspects of wind as an energy source and the momentum theory of wind turbines are briefly examined. Types of Darrieus wind turbine are described; attention is given to a turbine with airfoil blades curved in troposkein form, and a turbine with straight blades of fixed or variable pitch. The Darrieus vertical-axis wind turbine is then considered with regard to aerodynamics, annual energy output, structures, control systems, and energy storage. Brief reviews of selected Darrieus wind turbine projects are given, including those at Magdalen Islands, Canada, Sandia Laboratories, Reading University, and Australia and New Zealand.

  11. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verelst, D. R. S.; Larsen, T. J.; van Wingerden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is given as well as a brief summary of the design process. The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy's aeroelastic simulation program HAWC2.

  12. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  13. A review of large wind turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, H.; Lerner, J. I.

    Research areas in the design and operation of large wind turbines in the U.S. and Europe are detailed, with attention given to current and completed programs. Theoretical work in the U.S. is focused on aerodynamics of blades, structural dynamics, control systems, and safety through safe life design, redundancy, and quality assurance. Work is continuing on wind characteristics over the rotor disk and design criteria with regard to cost/benefits and tradeoffs involving various configurations and materials for the rotor blades, placement, pitch control, blade articulation, the tower, the drive train, the gear box, a quill shaft, generator type, and reliability and maintenance. Costing models are being developed. Test experience has been gained through the manufacture and operation of the five Mod 0A, one Mod-1, four Mod-2, and one WTS-4 wind turbines. The European work on blade loading, wind turbine dimensioning, materials, wind structure, environmental impacts, and economics are reviewed, together with the operational experience with the Gedser, two Nibe, the Tvind, and Growian machines. Several countries are also testing smaller wind turbines manufactured indigenously or imported.

  14. Diffuser augmented wind turbine analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jonathan

    Wind Energy is becoming a significant source of energy throughout the world. This ever increasing field will potentially reach the limit of availability and practicality with the wind farm sites and size of the turbine itself. Therefore, it is necessary to develop innovative wind capturing devices that can produce energy in the locations where large conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) are too impractical to install and operate. A diffuser augmented wind turbine (DAWT) is one such innovation. DAWTs increase the power output of the rotor by increasing the wind speed into the rotor using a duct. Currently, developing these turbines is an involved process using time consuming Computational Fluid Dynamics codes. A simple and quick design tool is necessary for designers to develop efficient energy capturing devices. This work lays out the theory for a quick analysis tool for DAWTs using an axisymmetric surface vorticity method. This method allows for quick analysis of duct, hubs and rotors giving designers a general idea of the power output of the proposed hub, blade and duct geometry. The method would be similar to the way blade element momentum theory is used to design conventional HAWTs. It is determined that the presented method is viable for preliminary design of DAWTs.

  15. Wind Energy Resource Assessment for Airborne Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, A.

    2015-12-01

    Google, through its Makani project, is developing a new type of wind energy conversion device called an energy kite. Using a tethered airfoil flying in vertical loops, energy kites access stronger, more consistent wind resources at altitudes between 100-500m AGL. By eliminating mass and cost of the tower, nacelle, and gearbox of a conventional wind turbine, and by increasing the capacity factor of energy generation, energy kites promise to significantly reduce the levelized cost of wind energy. The focus of this presentation will be on the approach Makani has taken to characterize the wind resource at 100-500m, where far less study has taken place compared to the atmosphere accessed by conventional wind turbines.

  16. Shoosing the appropriate size wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lynette, R.

    1996-12-31

    Within the past several years, wind turbines rated at 400 kW and higher have been introduced into the market, and some manufacturers are developing machines rated at 750 - 1,000+ kW. This raises the question: What is the appropriate size for utility-grade wind turbines today? The answer depends upon the site where the machines will be used and the local conditions. The issues discussed in the paper are: (1) Site-Related (a) Visual, noise, erosion, television interference, interference with aviation (b) Siting efficiency (2) Logistics (a) Adequacy of roads and bridges to accept large vehicles (b) Availability and cost of cranes for erection and maintenance (c) Capability of local repair/overhauls (3) Cost Effectiveness (a) Capital costs (1) Wind Turbine (2) Infrastructure costs (b) Maintenance costs (4) Technical/Financial Risk. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Methods of making wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, Jamie T.; Burke, Arthur H. E.; Bakhuis, Jan Willem; Van Breugel, Sjef; Billen, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    A method of manufacturing a root portion of a wind turbine blade includes, in an exemplary embodiment, providing an outer layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, providing an inner layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, and positioning at least two bands of reinforcing fibers between the inner and outer layers, with each band of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers. The method further includes positioning a mat of randomly arranged reinforcing fibers between each pair of adjacent bands of reinforcing fibers, introducing a polymeric resin into the root potion of the wind turbine blade, infusing the resin through the outer layer, the inner layer, each band of reinforcing fibers, and each mat of random reinforcing fibers, and curing the resin to form the root portion of the wind turbine blade.

  18. The NASA Lewis large wind turbine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Baldwin, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The program is directed toward development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generation systems. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. Advances are made by gaining a better understanding of the system design drivers, improvements in the analytical design tools, verification of design methods with operating field data, and the incorporation of new technology and innovative designs. An overview of the program activities is presented and includes results from the first and second generation field machines (Mod-OA, -1, and -2), the design phase of the third generation wind turbine (Mod-5) and the advanced technology projects. Also included is the status of the Department of Interior WTS-4 machine.

  19. Methods of making wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Livingston, Jamie T.; Burke, Arthur H. E.; Bakhuis, Jan Willem; Van Breugel, Sjef; Billen, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    A method of manufacturing a root portion of a wind turbine blade includes, in an exemplary embodiment, providing an outer layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, providing an inner layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, and positioning at least two bands of reinforcing fibers between the inner and outer layers, with each band of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers. The method further includes positioning a mat of randomly arranged reinforcing fibers between each pair of adjacent bands of reinforcing fibers, introducing a polymeric resin into the root potion of the wind turbine blade, infusing the resin through the outer layer, the inner layer, each band of reinforcing fibers, and each mat of random reinforcing fibers, and curing the resin to form the root portion of the wind turbine blade.

  20. Wind turbine blade waste in 2050.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Barlow, Claire Y

    2017-04-01

    Wind energy has developed rapidly over the last two decades to become one of the most promising and economically viable sources of renewable energy. Although wind energy is claimed to provide clean renewable energy without any emissions during operation, but it is only one side of the coin. The blades, one of the most important components in the wind turbines, made with composite, are currently regarded as unrecyclable. With the first wave of early commercial wind turbine installations now approaching their end of life, the problem of blade disposal is just beginning to emerge as a significant factor for the future. This paper is aimed at discovering the magnitude of the wind turbine blade waste problem, looking not only at disposal but at all stages of a blade's lifecycle. The first stage of the research, the subject of this paper, is to accurately estimate present and future wind turbine blade waste inventory using the most recent and most accurate data available. The result will provide a solid reference point to help the industry and policy makers to understand the size of potential environmental problem and to help to manage it better. This study starts by estimating the annual blade material usage with wind energy installed capacity and average blade weight. The effect of other waste contributing factors in the full lifecycle of wind turbine blades is then included, using industrial data from the manufacturing, testing and in-service stages. The research indicates that there will be 43 million tonnes of blade waste worldwide by 2050 with China possessing 40% of the waste, Europe 25%, the United States 16% and the rest of the world 19%. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radar Cross Section (RCS) Simulation for Wind Turbines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    research, some basic scattering characteristics of wind turbines are discussed. Several computational methods of RCS prediction are examined, citing...a wind turbine and assess its effect on the performance of radar and communication systems. In this research, some basic scattering characteristics ... characteristics of wind turbines. The radar cross section (RCS) is a parameter that is used to estimate the effect of a wind turbine on a system’s

  2. Methods and apparatus for rotor load control in wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2006-08-22

    A wind turbine having a rotor, at least one rotor blade, and a plurality of generators, of which a first generator is configured to provide power to an electric grid and a second generator is configured to provide power to the wind turbine during times of grid loss. The wind turbine is configured to utilize power provided by the second generator to reduce loads on the wind turbine during times of grid loss.

  3. Wind turbine on line in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The largest wind machine in the United States started generating electricity in late July in Hawaii. The Mod-5B wind-powered turbine, located on the northern tip of the island of Oahu, is rated at 3.2 megawatts and is expected to generate enough clean electricity to supply the needs of 1300 homes. The machine was developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, and paid for by the Department of Energy.The turbine is based on new technology that allows its 320-ft (˜100-m) rotor to operate at variable speeds to suit changing wind conditions. It is the result of 15 years of federally sponsored research at NASA-Lewis. Conventional turbines operate at a fixed speed. After 6 months of tests, Mod-5B will be taken over and operated by the Hawaiian Electric Company, under a sales agreement with NASA. The turbine was located at the northend of Oahu primarily because of the high incidence of steady trade winds in that part of the Hawaiian chain. Renewable energy sources like the turbine are also desirable in Hawaii because of the high cost of electricity on the islands, which is principally the result of the need to import all diesel fuel and a prohibition on nuclear power plants in the state.

  4. Effectiveness of Changing Wind Turbine Cut-in Speed to Reduce Bat Fatalities at Wind Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Huso, Manuela M. P.; Hayes, John P.

    2009-04-01

    This report details an experiment on the effectiveness of changing wind turbine cut-in speed on reducing bat fatality from wind turbines at the Casselman Wind Project in Somerset County, Pennsylvania.

  5. A Study on the Active Induction Control of Upstream Wind Turbines for total power increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungyu; Kim, Kwansoo; Paek, Insu; Bottasso, Carlo L.; Campagnolo, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of active induction control of upstream wind turbines is investigated. Two scaled wind turbines having a rotor diameter of 1 m with a spacing of four times of the rotor diameter were used to experimentally validate the concept. Also, an in-house c code was used to simulate the same two wind turbines and see if the experimental observations can be obtained. From the experiment, approximately 0.81% increase of total power could be observed. Although the simulation results were not exactly the same as the experimental results but the shape was similar and the maximum power increase of 0.27% was predicted. Also from further simulation using NREL 5MW wind turbines instead of scaled wind turbines with realistic ambient turbulence intensity, it was found that the power increase could become more than 1%.

  6. Unsteady aerodynamic analysis for offshore floating wind turbines under different wind conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, B F; Wang, T G; Yuan, Y; Cao, J F

    2015-02-28

    A free-vortex wake (FVW) model is developed in this paper to analyse the unsteady aerodynamic performance of offshore floating wind turbines. A time-marching algorithm of third-order accuracy is applied in the FVW model. Owing to the complex floating platform motions, the blade inflow conditions and the positions of initial points of vortex filaments, which are different from the fixed wind turbine, are modified in the implemented model. A three-dimensional rotational effect model and a dynamic stall model are coupled into the FVW model to improve the aerodynamic performance prediction in the unsteady conditions. The effects of floating platform motions in the simulation model are validated by comparison between calculation and experiment for a small-scale rigid test wind turbine coupled with a floating tension leg platform (TLP). The dynamic inflow effect carried by the FVW method itself is confirmed and the results agree well with the experimental data of a pitching transient on another test turbine. Also, the flapping moment at the blade root in yaw on the same test turbine is calculated and compares well with the experimental data. Then, the aerodynamic performance is simulated in a yawed condition of steady wind and in an unyawed condition of turbulent wind, respectively, for a large-scale wind turbine coupled with the floating TLP motions, demonstrating obvious differences in rotor performance and blade loading from the fixed wind turbine. The non-dimensional magnitudes of loading changes due to the floating platform motions decrease from the blade root to the blade tip.

  7. Unsteady aerodynamic analysis for offshore floating wind turbines under different wind conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, B. F.; Wang, T. G.; Yuan, Y.; Cao, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    A free-vortex wake (FVW) model is developed in this paper to analyse the unsteady aerodynamic performance of offshore floating wind turbines. A time-marching algorithm of third-order accuracy is applied in the FVW model. Owing to the complex floating platform motions, the blade inflow conditions and the positions of initial points of vortex filaments, which are different from the fixed wind turbine, are modified in the implemented model. A three-dimensional rotational effect model and a dynamic stall model are coupled into the FVW model to improve the aerodynamic performance prediction in the unsteady conditions. The effects of floating platform motions in the simulation model are validated by comparison between calculation and experiment for a small-scale rigid test wind turbine coupled with a floating tension leg platform (TLP). The dynamic inflow effect carried by the FVW method itself is confirmed and the results agree well with the experimental data of a pitching transient on another test turbine. Also, the flapping moment at the blade root in yaw on the same test turbine is calculated and compares well with the experimental data. Then, the aerodynamic performance is simulated in a yawed condition of steady wind and in an unyawed condition of turbulent wind, respectively, for a large-scale wind turbine coupled with the floating TLP motions, demonstrating obvious differences in rotor performance and blade loading from the fixed wind turbine. The non-dimensional magnitudes of loading changes due to the floating platform motions decrease from the blade root to the blade tip. PMID:25583859

  8. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbines with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. The contingency control involves de-rating the generator operating point to achieve reduced loads on the wind turbine. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  9. Aileron controls for wind turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.; Putoff, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbines which utilize partial or full variable blade pitch to regulate rotor speed were examined. The weight and costs of these systems indicated a need for alternate methods of rotor control. Aileron control is an alternative which has potential to meet this need. Aileron control rotors were tested on the Mod-O wind turbine to determine their power regulation and shutdown characteristics. Test results for a 20 and 38% chord aileron control rotor are presented. Test is shown that aileron control is a viable method for safety for safely controlling rotor speed, following a loss of general load.

  10. Dynamic stall on wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D.; Scott, G. ); Hansen, A.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Dynamic loads must be predicted accurately in order to estimate the fatigue life of wind turbines operating in turbulent environments. Dynamic stall contributes to increased dynamic loads during normal operation of all types of horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWTs). This report illustrates how dynamic stall varies throughout the blade span of a 10 m HAWT during yawed and unyawed operating conditions. Lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients during dynamics stall are discussed. Resulting dynamic loads are presented, and the effects of dynamic stall on yaw loads are demonstrated using a yaw loads dynamic analysis (YAWDYN). 12 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Aileron controls for wind turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.; Puthoff, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbines which utilize partial or full variable blade pitch to regulate rotor speed were examined. The weight and costs of these systems indicated a need for alternate methods of rotor control. Aileron control is an alternative which has potential to meet this need. Aileron control rotors were tested on the Mod-O wind turbine to determine their power regulation and shutdown characteristics. Test results for a 20 and 38 percent chord aileron control rotor are presented. Test is shown that aileron control is a viable method for safety for safely controlling rotor speed, following a loss of general load.

  12. Dynamic stall on wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P; Simms, D; Scott, G; Hansen, A C

    1991-12-01

    Dynamic loads must be predicted accurately in order to estimate the fatigue life of wind turbines operating in turbulent environments. Dynamic stall contributes to increased dynamic loads during normal operation of all types of horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWTs). This report illustrates how dynamic stall varies throughout the blade span of a 10 m HAWT during yawed and unyawed operating conditions. Lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients during dynamics stall are discussed. Resulting dynamic loads are presented, and the effects of dynamic stall on yaw loads are demonstrated using a yaw loads dynamic analysis (YAWDYN). 12 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Aileron controls for wind turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.; Puthoff, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbines which utilize partial or full variable blade pitch to regulate rotor speed were examined. The weight and costs of these systems indicated a need for alternate methods of rotor control. Aileron control is an alternative which has potential to meet this need. Aileron control rotors were tested on the Mod-O wind turbine to determine their power regulation and shutdown characteristics. Test results for a 20 and 38 percent chord aileron control rotor are presented. Test is shown that aileron control is a viable method for safety for safely controlling rotor speed, following a loss of general load.

  14. Duration Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of a duration test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  15. A model of rotationally-sampled wind turbulence for predicting fatigue loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Empirical equations are presented with which to model rotationally-sampled (R-S) turbulence for input to structural-dynamic computer codes and the calculation of wind turbine fatigue loads. These equations are derived from R-S turbulence data which were measured at the vertical-plane array in Clayton, New Mexico. For validation, the equations are applied to the calculation of cyclic flapwise blade loads for the NASA/DOE Mod-2 2.5-MW experimental HAWT's (horizontal-axis wind turbines), and the results compared to measured cyclic loads. Good correlation is achieved, indicating that the R-S turbulence model developed in this study contains the characteristics of the wind which produce many of the fatigue loads sustained by wind turbines. Empirical factors are included which permit the prediction of load levels at specified percentiles of occurrence, which is required for the generation of fatigue load spectra and the prediction of the fatigue lifetime of structures.

  16. Modal testing of a rotating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carne, T. G.; Nord, A. R.

    1982-11-01

    A testing technique was developed to measure the modes of vibration of a rotating vertical-axis wind turbine. This technique was applied to the Sandia Two-Meter Turbine, where the changes in individual modal frequencies as a function of the rotational speed were tracked from 0 rpm (parked) to 600 rpm. During rotational testing, the structural response was measured using a combination of strain gages and accelerometers, passing the signals through slip rings. Excitation of the turbine structure was provided by a scheme which suddenly released a pretensioned cable, thus plucking the turbine as it was rotating at a set speed. In addition to calculating the real modes of the parked turbine, the modes of the rotating turbine were also determined at several rotational speeds. The modes of the rotating system proved to be complex due to centrifugal and Coriolis effects. The modal data for the parked turbine were used to update a finite-element model. Also, the measured modal parameters for the rotating turbine were compared to the analytical results, thus verifying the analytical procedures used to incorporate the effects of the rotating coordinate system.

  17. Crack Monitoring of Operational Wind Turbine Foundations.

    PubMed

    Perry, Marcus; McAlorum, Jack; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; McKeeman, Iain; Rubert, Tim

    2017-08-21

    The degradation of onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundations is usually assessed via above-ground inspections, or through lengthy excavation campaigns that suspend wind power generation. Foundation cracks can and do occur below ground level, and while sustained measurements of crack behaviour could be used to quantify the risk of water ingress and reinforcement corrosion, these cracks have not yet been monitored during turbine operation. Here, we outline the design, fabrication and field installation of subterranean fibre-optic sensors for monitoring the opening and lateral displacements of foundation cracks during wind turbine operation. We detail methods for in situ sensor characterisation, verify sensor responses against theoretical tower strains derived from wind speed data, and then show that measured crack displacements correlate with monitored tower strains. Our results show that foundation crack opening displacements respond linearly to tower strain and do not change by more than ±5 μ m. Lateral crack displacements were found to be negligible. We anticipate that the work outlined here will provide a starting point for real-time, long-term and dynamic analyses of crack displacements in future. Our findings could furthermore inform the development of cost-effective monitoring systems for ageing wind turbine foundations.

  18. Crack Monitoring of Operational Wind Turbine Foundations

    PubMed Central

    McAlorum, Jack; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; McKeeman, Iain; Rubert, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The degradation of onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundations is usually assessed via above-ground inspections, or through lengthy excavation campaigns that suspend wind power generation. Foundation cracks can and do occur below ground level, and while sustained measurements of crack behaviour could be used to quantify the risk of water ingress and reinforcement corrosion, these cracks have not yet been monitored during turbine operation. Here, we outline the design, fabrication and field installation of subterranean fibre-optic sensors for monitoring the opening and lateral displacements of foundation cracks during wind turbine operation. We detail methods for in situ sensor characterisation, verify sensor responses against theoretical tower strains derived from wind speed data, and then show that measured crack displacements correlate with monitored tower strains. Our results show that foundation crack opening displacements respond linearly to tower strain and do not change by more than ±5 μm. Lateral crack displacements were found to be negligible. We anticipate that the work outlined here will provide a starting point for real-time, long-term and dynamic analyses of crack displacements in future. Our findings could furthermore inform the development of cost-effective monitoring systems for ageing wind turbine foundations. PMID:28825687

  19. Tacholess order-tracking approach for wind turbine gearbox fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Xie, Yong; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Sicong; Hou, Chenggang

    2017-09-01

    Monitoring of wind turbines under variable-speed operating conditions has become an important issue in recent years. The gearbox of a wind turbine is the most important transmission unit; it generally exhibits complex vibration signatures due to random variations in operating conditions. Spectral analysis is one of the main approaches in vibration signal processing. However, spectral analysis is based on a stationary assumption and thus inapplicable to the fault diagnosis of wind turbines under variable-speed operating conditions. This constraint limits the application of spectral analysis to wind turbine diagnosis in industrial applications. Although order-tracking methods have been proposed for wind turbine fault detection in recent years, current methods are only applicable to cases in which the instantaneous shaft phase is available. For wind turbines with limited structural spaces, collecting phase signals with tachometers or encoders is difficult. In this study, a tacholess order-tracking method for wind turbines is proposed to overcome the limitations of traditional techniques. The proposed method extracts the instantaneous phase from the vibration signal, resamples the signal at equiangular increments, and calculates the order spectrum for wind turbine fault identification. The effectiveness of the proposed method is experimentally validated with the vibration signals of wind turbines.

  20. Tacholess order-tracking approach for wind turbine gearbox fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Xie, Yong; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Sicong; Hou, Chenggang

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring of wind turbines under variable-speed operating conditions has become an important issue in recent years. The gearbox of a wind turbine is the most important transmission unit; it generally exhibits complex vibration signatures due to random variations in operating conditions. Spectral analysis is one of the main approaches in vibration signal processing. However, spectral analysis is based on a stationary assumption and thus inapplicable to the fault diagnosis of wind turbines under variable-speed operating conditions. This constraint limits the application of spectral analysis to wind turbine diagnosis in industrial applications. Although order-tracking methods have been proposed for wind turbine fault detection in recent years, current methods are only applicable to cases in which the instantaneous shaft phase is available. For wind turbines with limited structural spaces, collecting phase signals with tachometers or encoders is difficult. In this study, a tacholess order-tracking method for wind turbines is proposed to overcome the limitations of traditional techniques. The proposed method extracts the instantaneous phase from the vibration signal, resamples the signal at equiangular increments, and calculates the order spectrum for wind turbine fault identification. The effectiveness of the proposed method is experimentally validated with the vibration signals of wind turbines.

  1. Wind Turbine Generator System Power Quality Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, A.; Gevorgian, V.

    2011-07-01

    This report details the power quality test on the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Independent Testing Project. In total five turbines are being tested as part of the project. Power quality testing is one of up to five test that may be performed on the turbines including power performance, safety and function, noise, and duration tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

  2. Bioinspired turbine blades offer new perspectives for wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cognet, V.; Courrech du Pont, S.; Dobrev, I.; Massouh, F.; Thiria, B.

    2017-02-01

    Wind energy is becoming a significant alternative solution for future energy production. Modern turbines now benefit from engineering expertise, and a large variety of different models exists, depending on the context and needs. However, classical wind turbines are designed to operate within a narrow zone centred around their optimal working point. This limitation prevents the use of sites with variable wind to harvest energy, involving significant energetic and economic losses. Here, we present a new type of bioinspired wind turbine using elastic blades, which passively deform through the air loading and centrifugal effects. This work is inspired from recent studies on insect flight and plant reconfiguration, which show the ability of elastic wings or leaves to adapt to the wind conditions and thereby to optimize performance. We show that in the context of energy production, the reconfiguration of the elastic blades significantly extends the range of operating regimes using only passive, non-consuming mechanisms. The versatility of the new turbine model leads to a large increase of the converted energy rate, up to 35%. The fluid/elasticity mechanisms involved for the reconfiguration capability of the new blades are analysed in detail, using experimental observations and modelling.

  3. Neuro-fuzzy computing for vibration-based damage localization and severity estimation in an experimental wind turbine blade with superimposed operational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Fueled by increasing demand for carbon neutral energy, erections of ever larger wind turbines (WTs), with WT blades (WTBs) with higher flexibilities and lower buckling capacities lead to increasing operation and maintenance costs. This can be counteracted with efficient structural health monitoring (SHM), which allows scheduling maintenance actions according to the structural state and preventing dramatic failures. The present study proposes a novel multi-step approach for vibration-based structural damage localization and severity estimation for application in operating WTs. First, partial autocorrelation coefficients (PACCs) are estimated from vibrational responses. Second, principal component analysis is applied to PACCs from the healthy structure in order to calculate scores. Then, the scores are ranked with respect to their ability to differentiate different damage scenarios. This ranking information is used for constructing hierarchical adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (HANFISs), where cross-validation is used to identify optimal numbers of hierarchy levels. Different HANFISs are created for the purposes of structural damage localization and severity estimation. For demonstrating the applicability of the approach, experimental data are superimposed with signals from numerical simulations to account for characteristics of operational noise. For the physical experiments, a small scale WTB is excited with a domestic fan and damage scenarios are introduced non-destructively by attaching small masses. Numerical simulations are also performed for a representative fully functional small WT operating in turbulent wind. The obtained results are promising for future applications of vibration-based SHM to facilitate improved safety and reliability of WTs at lower costs.

  4. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

    2010-05-01

    This test is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines are being tested at the NWTC as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a grid connected ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 30.5 meter (100 ft) lattice tower manufactured by Abundant Renewable Energy. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

  5. Wind turbine wake characterization using long-range Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Hestmark, K.; Banta, R. M.; Pichugina, Y.; Brewer, A.

    2012-12-01

    Wind turbines extract energy from the freestream flow, resulting in a waked region behind the rotor which is characterized by reduced wind speed and increased turbulence. The velocity deficit in the wake diminishes with distance, as faster-moving air outside is gradually entrained. In a concentrated group of turbines, then, downwind machines experience very different inflow conditions compared to those in the front row. As utility-scale turbines rarely exist in isolation, detailed knowledge of the mean flow and turbulence structure inside wakes is needed to correctly model both power production and turbine loading at modern wind farms. To this end, the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) was conducted in the spring of 2011 to determine the reduction in wind speeds downstream from a multi-MW turbine located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado. Full-scale measurements of wake dynamics are hardly practical or even possible with conventional sensors, such as cup anemometers mounted on meteorological (met) masts. Accordingly, the High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Earth System Research Laboratory was employed to investigate the formation and propagation of wakes under varying levels of ambient wind speed, shear, atmospheric stability, and turbulence. HRDL remotely senses line-of-sight wind velocities and has been used in several previous studies of boundary layer aerodynamics. With a fully steerable beam and a maximum range up to about 5 km, depending on atmospheric conditions, HRDL performed a comprehensive survey of the wind flow in front of and behind the turbine to study the shape, meandering, and attenuation of wakes. Due in large part to limited experimental data availability, wind farm wake modeling is still subject to an unacceptable amount of uncertainty, particularly in complex terrain. Here, analytical

  6. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  7. Experiments in the wind turbine far wake for the evaluation of an analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Luis; Vatn, Mari; Mühle, Franz; Sætran, Lars

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, not only the size of single wind turbines but also the size of wind farms is increasing. Understanding the interaction between the turbines and especially the wakes formed behind them are getting more important to further improve such wind turbine arrays. Consequently, new issues in wind energy research arise. An experimental wind tunnel study was conducted, in order to analyze and understand the far wake of a wind turbine. The experimental results were used to test if an analytical wake model derived by H. Schilichting for blunt bodies can be used to describe the velocity and width development in the far wake of wind turbines. The results of the evaluation show that the wake of a wind turbine agrees fairly well with the model according to Schlichting. The velocity deficit as well as the width in the wake behind the turbine, are found to deviate with around only 2% from the results obtained applying the analytical model. Thus, it can be concluded that the analytical wake model by Schlichting is well suited to estimate the velocity deficit and the width in the far wake of a wind turbine.

  8. Wind River Experimental Forest.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    The Wind River Experimental Forest, known as the cradle of forest research in the Pacific Northwest, is a major center for ecological and silvicultural research in west-side Pacific Northwest forests. In the state of Washington, Wind River Experimental Forest is in the south-central area of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, north of the Columbia River Gorge National...

  9. Effective solidity in vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-11-01

    The flow surrounding vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) is investigated using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). This is done in a low-speed wind tunnel with a scale model that closely matches geometric and dynamic properties tip-speed ratio and Reynolds number of a full size turbine. Previous results have shown a strong dependance on the tip-speed ratio on the wake structure of the spinning turbine. However, it is not clear whether this is a speed or solidity effect. To determine this, we have measured the wakes of three turbines with different chord-to-diameter ratios, and a solid cylinder. The flow is visualized at the horizontal mid-plane as well as the vertical mid-plane behind the turbine. The results are both ensemble averaged and phase averaged by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine. By keeping the Reynolds number constant with both chord and diameter, we can determine how each effects the wake structure. As these parameters are varied there are distinct changes in the mean flow of the wake. Additionally, by looking at the vorticity in the phase averaged profiles we can see structural changes to the overall wake pattern.

  10. Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01

    Although only a small contributor to total electricity production needs, built-environment wind turbines (BWTs) nonetheless have the potential to influence the public's consideration of renewable energy, and wind energy in particular. Higher population concentrations in urban environments offer greater opportunities for project visibility and an opportunity to acquaint large numbers of people to the advantages of wind projects on a larger scale. However, turbine failures will be equally visible and could have a negative effect on public perception of wind technology. This roadmap provides a framework for achieving the vision set forth by the attendees of the Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The BWT roadmap outlines the stakeholder actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers identified. The actions are categorized as near-term (0 - 3 years), medium-term (4 - 7 years), and both near- and medium-term (requiring immediate to medium-term effort). To accomplish these actions, a strategic approach was developed that identifies two focus areas: understanding the built-environment wind resource and developing testing and design standards. The authors summarize the expertise and resources required in these areas.

  11. Study of composite wind turbine spars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Syed Shahrukh

    This report presents a theoretical, numerical and experimental study of composite wind turbine spars under bending loads. Spars were made from commercially available glass/ carbon fiber material. The spars were composed of uniaxial (0°) flanges and biaxial (+/-45°) shear webs. Items of particular study were co-block polymer additives in vinyl ester resins, a presumably new spar design, and using carbon fiber pultrusions for spar caps (flanges). Composites are very strong and thus tend to be thin, which exacerbates the problem of buckling. Further, fibers also buckle at the micro level, leading to lower effective compression strength than tensile strength of a composite. Many structures tend to buckle in out of plane direction which can cause early and abrupt failure. A 3-point bend test rig was manufactured in-house for experimentally testing composite spars. The experiments indicated abrupt failure without any sign or other form of damage. Limited number of spars was made with slightly different construction. All spars were subjected to same testing environment. Finite element analyses were performed in order to shed light on the failure mechanisms leading to catastrophic failure. The FE code Ansys was used for the analyses. 3D models were developed, loads were applied, and linear elastic static as well as buckling analyses were performed. The results obtained from analysis were in reasonable agreement with the experimental tests.

  12. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  13. Axial pico turbine - construction and experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peczkis, G.; Goryca, Z.; Korczak, A.

    2017-08-01

    The paper concerns axial water turbine of power equal to 1 kW. The example of axial water turbine constructional calculations was provided, as well as turbine rotor construction with NACA profile blades. The laboratory test rig designed and built to perform measurements on pico turbine was described. The turbine drove three-phase electrical generator. On the basis of highest efficiency parameters, pico turbine basic characteristics were elaborated. The experimental research results indicated that pico turbine can achieve maximum efficiency close to the values of larger water turbines.

  14. Large wind turbine development in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Zervos, A.

    1996-12-31

    During the last few years we have witnessed in Europe the development of a new generation of wind turbines ranging from 1000-1500 kW size. They are presently being tested and they are scheduled to reach the market in late 1996 early 1997. The European Commission has played a key role by funding the research leading to the development of these turbines. The most visible initiative at present is the WEGA program - the development, together with Europe`s leading wind industry players of a new generation of turbines in the MW range. By the year 1997 different European manufacturers will have introduced almost a dozen new MW machine types to the international market, half of them rated at 1.5 MW. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Detecting wind turbine wakes with nacelle lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, D. P.; Larvol, A.; Mann, J.

    2017-05-01

    Because the horizontal homogeneity assumption is violated in wakes flows, lidars face difficulties when reconstructing wind fields. Further, small-scale turbulence which is prevalent in wake flows causes Doppler spectrum widths to be broader than in the free stream. In this study the Doppler peak variance is used as a detection parameter for wakes. A one month long measurement campaign, where a continuous-wave lidar on a turbine has been exposed to multiple wake situations, is used to test the detection capabilities. The results show that it is possible to identify situation where a downstream turbine is in wake by comparing the peak widths. The used lidar is inexpensive and brings instalments on every turbine within economical reach. Thus, the information gathered by the lidars can be used for improved control at wind farm level.

  16. Power Performance Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

  17. Wooden wind turbine blade manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Clint

    1986-01-01

    A wooden wind turbine blade is formed by laminating wood veneer in a compression mold having the exact curvature needed for one side of the blade, following which the other side of the blade is ground flat along its length but twisted with respect to the blade axis.

  18. Infrasound from Wind Turbines Could Affect Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.; Kaltenbach, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbines generate low-frequency sounds that affect the ear. The ear is superficially similar to a microphone, converting mechanical sound waves into electrical signals, but does this by complex physiologic processes. Serious misconceptions about low-frequency sound and the ear have resulted from a failure to consider in detail how the ear…

  19. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  20. Infrasound from Wind Turbines Could Affect Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.; Kaltenbach, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbines generate low-frequency sounds that affect the ear. The ear is superficially similar to a microphone, converting mechanical sound waves into electrical signals, but does this by complex physiologic processes. Serious misconceptions about low-frequency sound and the ear have resulted from a failure to consider in detail how the ear…

  1. Evaluation of airfoils for small wind turbines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new set of blades have been designed, fabricated, and tested at the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service-Conservation and Production Research Laboratory in Bushland, Texas in an attempt to improve the overall performance of small (1-10 kilowatt) wind turbines. The ...

  2. Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar - A Recap

    SciTech Connect

    Errichello, R.; Sheng, S.; Keller, J.; Greco, A.

    2012-02-01

    Tribology is the science and engineering of interacting surfaces in relative motion. It includes the study and application of the principles of friction, lubrication, and wear. It is an important phenomenon that not only impacts the design and operation of wind turbine gearboxes, but also their subsequent maintenance requirements and overall reliability. With the major growth and increasing dependency on renewable energy, mechanical reliability is an extremely important issue. The Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar was convened to explore the state-of-the-art in wind turbine tribology and lubricant technologies, raise industry awareness of a very complex topic, present the science behind each technology, and identify possible R&D areas. To understand the background of work that had already been accomplished, and to consolidate some level of collective understanding of tribology by acknowledged experts, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted a wind turbine tribology seminar. It was held at the Renaissance Boulder Flatiron Hotel in Broomfield, Colorado on November 15-17, 2011. This report is a summary of the content and conclusions. The presentations given at the meeting can be downloaded. Interested readers who were not at the meeting may wish to consult the detailed publications listed in the bibliography section, obtain the cited articles in the public domain, or contact the authors directly.

  3. Flutter of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, N. D.

    1978-01-01

    The testing of Darrieus wind turbines has indicated that under certain conditions, serious vibrations of the blades can occur, involving flatwise bending, torsion, and chordwise bending. A theoretical method of predicting the aeroelastic stability of the coupled bending and torsional motion of such blades with a view to determining the cause of these vibrations, and a means of suppressing them was developed.

  4. Smith-Putnam wind turbine experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    A brief outline of the many problems encountered during testing of a wind turbine generator prototype unit is given. Its feasibility was demonstrated by the generation of electricity in commercial quantities with delivery to a utility transmission network. The experiment was terminated after blade failure occurred.

  5. Determining Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbine performance using a combined CFD/BEM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesby, JE; Bradney, D. R.; Clausen, PD

    2016-09-01

    The optimisation of a Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbine has traditionally focused on maximising its power output. Optimising the design of the blade and the shape of the diffuser for maximum turbine power over a range of wind velocities is a complex process, as each will influence the others flow regime. In this paper we propose a method that combines the predictions of flow through a diffuser, using computational fluid dynamics, and the flow from a turbine blade using a modified blade element theory to predict the power output of a diffuser augmented wind turbine. Good agreement was found between the predictions from this new method and experimental data from the literature.

  6. Duration Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roadman, J.; Murphy, M.; van Dam, J.

    2013-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a duration noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Viryd CS8 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with Clause 9.4 of the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind turbines - Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed. 2.0:2006-03. NREL researchers evaluated the turbine based on structural integrity and material degradation, quality of environmental protection, and dynamic behavior.

  7. Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

  8. Performance characteristics of aerodynamically optimum turbines for wind energy generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, C.; Worobel, R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a brief discussion of the aerodynamic methodology for wind energy generator turbines, an approach to the design of aerodynamically optimum wind turbines covering a broad range of design parameters, some insight on the effect on performance of nonoptimum blade shapes which may represent lower fabrication costs, the annual wind turbine energy for a family of optimum wind turbines, and areas of needed research. On the basis of the investigation, it is concluded that optimum wind turbines show high performance over a wide range of design velocity ratios; that structural requirements impose constraints on blade geometry; that variable pitch wind turbines provide excellent power regulation and that annual energy output is insensitive to design rpm and solidity of optimum wind turbines.

  9. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; van Dam, J.

    2010-11-01

    This test was conducted on the ARE 442 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Acoustic noise testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including duration, safety and function, power performance, and power quality tests. The acoustic noise test was conducted to the IEC 61400-11 Edition 2.1.

  10. Scale Adaptive Simulation Model for the Darrieus Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, K.; Hansen, M. O. L.; Maroński, R.; Lichota, P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of aerodynamic loads for the Darrieus wind turbine using more or less complex aerodynamic models is still a challenge. One of the problems is the small amount of experimental data available to validate the numerical codes. The major objective of the present study is to examine the scale adaptive simulation (SAS) approach for performance analysis of a one-bladed Darrieus wind turbine working at a tip speed ratio of 5 and at a blade Reynolds number of 40 000. The three-dimensional incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are used. Numerical results of aerodynamic loads and wake velocity profiles behind the rotor are compared with experimental data taken from literature. The level of agreement between CFD and experimental results is reasonable.

  11. The Mod-2 wind turbine development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Dennett, J. T.; Gordon, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    A major phase of the Federal Wind Energy Program, the Mod-2 wind turbine, a second-generation machine developed by the Boeing Engineering and Construction Co. for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is described. The Mod-2 is a large (2.5-MW power rating) horizontal-axis wind turbine designed for the generation of electrical power on utility networks. Three machines were built and are located in a cluster at Goodnoe Hills, Washington. All technical aspects of the project are described: design approach, significant innovation features, the mechanical system, the electrical power system, the control system, and the safety system.

  12. Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2011-10-01

    The primary objective of this report was to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind turbine and wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Manufacturer-specific models of wind turbines are favored for use in wind power interconnection studies. While they are detailed and accurate, their usages are limited to the terms of the non-disclosure agreement, thus stifling model sharing. The primary objective of the work proposed is to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Each of these models includes representations of general turbine aerodynamics, the mechanical drive-train, and the electrical characteristics of the generator and converter, as well as the control systems typically used. To determine how realistic model performance is, the performance of one of the models (doubly-fed induction generator model) has been validated using real-world wind power plant data. This work also documents selected applications of these models.

  13. Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, C.H.

    1996-05-01

    Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

  14. Flow visualization study of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu H.T.; Waite, J.W.; Hiester, T.R.; Tacheron, P.H.; Srnsky, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The specific objectives of the study reported were: to determine the geometry of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake in terms of wake height and width as a function of downstream distance under two conditions of atmospheric stability; to estimate the mean velocity deficit at several downstream stations in the turbine wake; and to investigate the behavior of the rotor-generated vortices, particularly their configuration and persistence. The background of the wake problem is briefly examined, including a discussion of the critical issues that the flow visualization study addresses. Experimental techniques and data analysis methods are described in detail. (LEW)

  15. Wind Turbine Experiments at Full Dynamic Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark; Kiefer, Janik; Westergaard, Carsten; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Performing experiments with scaled-down wind turbines has traditionally been difficult due to the matching requirements of the two driving non-dimensional parameters, the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR) and the Reynolds number. Typically, full-size turbines must be used to provide the baseline cases for engineering models and computer simulations where flow similarity is required. We present a new approach to investigating wind turbine aerodynamics at full dynamic similarity by employing a high-pressure wind tunnel at Princeton University known as the High Reynolds number Test Facility (or HRTF). This facility allows for Reynolds numbers of up to 3 million (based on chord and velocity at the tip) while still matching the TSR, on a geometrically similar, small-scale model. The background development of this project is briefly presented including the design and manufacture of a model turbine. Following this the power, thrust and wake data are discussed, in particular the scaling dependence on the Reynolds number. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1435254 (program manager Gregory Rorrer).

  16. Contributions to the understanding of wind turbine aerodynamics using a RANS solver with transition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Taylor Jay

    Wind turbine sizes have been steadily increasing to reduce the cost of generating electricity using wind energy. The increased wind turbine blade size has led to increased interest in the accurate prediction of the aerodynamics of large wind turbine blades. In this work, two-dimensional simulations of wind turbine airfoils and three-dimensional simulations of the Sandia 100 m wind turbine blade were conducted. The focus of the simulations was to evaluate improvements in turbulence modeling for wind turbine applications. The flow field was modeled using a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver. The turbulence model included transition modeling to capture the significant regions of laminar flow found on wind turbine airfoils and wind turbine blades. The turbulence model was also modified to increase sensitivity to adverse pressure gradients. The effects of modifying the turbulence modeling were quantified using lift and drag for two-dimensional simulations while wind turbine thrust and power were used as metrics for three-dimensional simulations. The two-dimensional studies showed that the adverse pressure gradient correction lowered lift predictions post-stall by about 13%, significantly reducing lift over-prediction and bringing simulations closer to experimental results. Transition modeling lowered drag predictions by 30% to 50% at low angles of attack bringing the predicted values into good agreement with experimental results. The addition of transition modeling in the three-dimensional simulations increased the predicted thrust by 1% to 3% and predicted power by 3% to 6%. The extent of laminar flow was visualized using intermittency. Laminar flow was observed on large portions of the Sandia 100 m blade at normal operating conditions. A preliminary study on the effects of leading edge tubercles on the Sandia 100 m blade was performed, no significant changes in wind turbine performance were observed at nominal operating conditions.

  17. Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a

  18. Savonius wind turbines: Design and testing of unique blade designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, Paul B.

    As the idea of implementing alternative energy systems into urbanized areas continues to gain popularity, there is a growing need to improve the efficiency of such systems. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to determine whether or not six unique blade designs, developed by the researcher, would lead to a more efficient vertical axis Savonius wind turbine. This report provides details regarding the study of aerodynamic forces, drag coefficients, and flow characteristics around each blade as well as information pertaining to the assembly and field testing of a turbine. The researcher began by conducting wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamic simulations on a single blade with the proposed designs. The data from these experiments was then used to calculate the driving and opposing forces and drag coefficients that would be present when each blade design is used in a fully assembled turbine. Lastly, the researcher determined the theoretical maximum efficiency of each turbine by multiplying the difference between the drag coefficients with the Betz Limit (4/27). Upon analyzing the results, the researcher discovered that the forces that were reported in the CFD analysis were more than double those measured in the wind tunnel. In addition, upon calculating the performance of each blade design when assembled into a full turbine, it was found that the turbines may not perform as well as the researcher initially expected; with only one having an efficiency of greater than 12%. However, because of the differences between the wind tunnel and CFD results, the researcher suggests that further experimentation and analysis needs to be completed to accurately justify the performance calculations.

  19. Examination of forced unsteady separated flow fields on a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Huyer, S

    1993-04-01

    The wind turbine industry faces many problems regarding the construction of efficient and predictable wind turbine machines. Steady state, two-dimensional wind tunnel data are generally used to predict aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that some of the underlying fluid dynamic phenomena could be attributed to dynamic stall, or more specifically to generation of forced unsteady separated flow fields. A collaborative research effort between the University of Colorado and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was conducted to systematically categorize the local and global effects of three- dimensional forced unsteady flow fields.

  20. Lightning discharges produced by wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar; Williams, Earle R.

    2014-02-01

    New observations with a 3-D Lightning Mapping Array and high-speed video are presented and discussed. The first set of observations shows that under certain thunderstorm conditions, wind turbine blades can produce electric discharges at regular intervals of 3 s in relation to its rotation, over periods of time that range from a few minutes up to hours. This periodic effect has not been observed in static towers indicating that the effect of rotation is playing a critical role. The repeated discharges can occur tens of kilometers away from electrically active thunderstorm areas and may or may not precede a fully developed upward lightning discharge from the turbine. Similar to rockets used for triggering lightning, the fast movement of the blade tip plays an important role on the initiation of the discharge. The movement of the rotor blades allows the tip to "runaway" from the generated corona charge. The second observation is an uncommon upward/downward flash triggered by a wind turbine. In that flash, a negative upward leader was initiated from a wind turbine without preceding lightning activity. The flash produced a negative cloud-to-ground stroke several kilometers from the initiation point. The third observation corresponds to a high-speed video record showing simultaneous upward positive leaders from a group of wind turbines triggered by a preceding intracloud flash. The fact that multiple leaders develop simultaneously indicates a poor shielding effect among them. All these observations provide some special features on the initiation of lightning by nonstatic and complex tall structures.

  1. Effectiveness enhancement of a cycloidal wind turbine by individual active control of blade motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Seong; Lee, Yun Han; Kim, Seung Jo

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, a research for the effectiveness enhancement of a Cycloidal Wind Turbine by individual active control of blade motion is described. To improve the performance of the power generation system, which consists of several straight blades rotating about axis in parallel direction, the cycloidal blade system and the individual active blade control method are adopted. It has advantages comparing with horizontal axis wind turbine or conventional vertical axis wind turbine because it maintains optimal blade pitch angles according to wind speed, wind direction and rotor rotating speed to produce high electric power at any conditions. It can do self-starting and shows good efficiency at low wind speed and complex wind condition. Optimal blade pitch angle paths are obtained through CFD analysis according to rotor rotating speed and wind speed. The individual rotor blade control system consists of sensors, actuators and microcontroller. To realize the actuating device, servo motors are installed to each rotor blade. Actuating speed and actuating force are calculated to compare with the capacities of servo motor, and some delays of blade pitch angles are corrected experimentally. Performance experiment is carried out by the wind blowing equipment and Labview system, and the rotor rotates from 50 to 100 rpm according to the electric load. From this research, it is concluded that developing new vertical axis wind turbine, Cycloidal Wind Turbine which is adopting individual active blade pitch control method can be a good model for small wind turbine in urban environment.

  2. Mod-2 wind turbine system development. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Progress in the design, fabrication, and testing of a wind turbine system is reported. The development of the MOD-2 wind turbine through acceptance testing and initial operational evaluation is documented. The MOD-2 project intends to develop early commercialization of wind energy. The first wind turbine farm (three MOD-2 units) are now being operated at the Bonneville Power Administration site near Goldendale, Washington.

  3. Lidar configurations for wind turbine control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Mann, Jakob

    2016-09-01

    Lidar sensors have proved to be very beneficial in the wind energy industry. They can be used for yaw correction, feed-forward pitch control and load verification. However, the current lidars are expensive. One way to reduce the price is to use lidars with few measurement points. Finding the best configuration of an inexpensive lidar in terms of number of measurement points, the measurement distance and the opening angle is the subject of this study. In order to solve the problem, a lidar model is developed and used to measure wind speed in a turbulence box. The effective wind speed measured by the lidar is compared against the effective wind speed on a wind turbine rotor both theoretically and through simulations. The study provides some results to choose the best configuration of the lidar with few measurement points.

  4. Control of large wind turbine generators connected to utility networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1983-01-01

    This is an investigation of the control requirements for variable pitch wind turbine generators connected to electric power systems. The requirements include operation in very small as well as very large power systems. Control systems are developed for wind turbines with synchronous, induction, and doubly fed generators. Simulation results are presented. It is shown how wind turbines and power system controls can be integrated. A clear distinction is made between fast control of turbine torque, which is a peculiarity of wind turbines, and slow control of electric power, which is a traditional power system requirement.

  5. Description of an 8 MW reference wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Cian; Murphy, Jimmy; Blonk, Lindert; Haans, Wouter

    2016-09-01

    An 8 MW wind turbine is described in terms of mass distribution, dimensions, power curve, thrust curve, maximum design load and tower configuration. This turbine has been described as part of the EU FP7 project LEANWIND in order to facilitate research into logistics and naval architecture efficiencies for future offshore wind installations. The design of this 8 MW reference wind turbine has been checked and validated by the design consultancy DNV-GL. This turbine description is intended to bridge the gap between the NREL 5 MW and DTU 10 reference turbines and thus contribute to the standardisation of research and development activities in the offshore wind energy industry.

  6. Detecting salt deposition on a wind turbine blade using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiesh Kumar, V.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.

    2013-07-01

    The study of pollution performance on a wind turbine blade due to lightning is important, as it can cause major damage to wind turbine blades. In the present work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique is used to understand the influence of pollutant deposited on a wind turbine blade in an off-shore environment. A methodical experimental study was carried out by adopting IEC 60507 standards, and it was observed that the lightning discharge propagates at the interface between the pollutant and the glass fiber reinforced plastic (Material used in manufacturing of wind turbine blades). In addition, as a diagnostic condition monitoring technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed and demonstrated to rank the severity of pollutant on the wind turbine blades from a remote area. Optical emission spectra observed during surface discharge process induced by lightning impulse voltage is in agreement with the spectra observed during LIBS.

  7. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1% by volume steel

  8. Offshore Wind Turbines - Estimated Noise from Offshore Wind Turbine, Monhegan Island, Maine: Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, Pamela M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-23

    Deep C Wind, a consortium headed by the University of Maine will test the first U.S. offshore wind platforms in 2012. In advance of final siting and permitting of the test turbines off Monhegan Island, residents of the island off Maine require reassurance that the noise levels from the test turbines will not disturb them. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the request of the University of Maine, and with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program, modeled the acoustic output of the planned test turbines.

  9. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F; Henningson, Dan S; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J

    2015-02-28

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Wind Turbine Development at Montana State University

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, Douglas S.; Riddle, William; Nelson, Jared; Peterson, William

    2015-02-23

    A survey of wind turbine blade manufacturers, repair companies, wind farm operators, and third party investigators has directed the focus of this investigation on several types of flaws commonly found in wind turbine blades: waviness and porosity/voids. Several commercial scale wind turbine blades were inspected for the development of metrics for the identification, analysis and disposition. Analysis of flaw geometries yielded metrics which utilize specific parameters to physically characterize a defect. Data as it relates flaw parameters to frequencies of occurrence have been complied. Basic statistical analysis shows that the frequency of flaw parameters generally follows standard distributions. A testing program was then developed around this flaw data. Results from static testing indicate that there is strong correlation between flaw parameters and mechanical response. Preliminary results from the in-field data collection effort and coupon level testing have established a protocol by which a defect in a blade can be characterized quantifiably. With this data it is possible to develop probabilistic analysis, damage progression models and criticality assessment tools that will enable improved blade design methodology and the development of a risk management framework which describes the probability of failure for blades with defects.

  11. Wind Turbine Control for Load Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossanyi, E. A.

    2003-07-01

    This article reviews techniques for the control of wind turbines during power production. Pitch control is used primarily to limit power in high winds, but it also has an important effect on structural loads. Particularly as turbines become larger, there is increasing interest in designing controllers to mitigate loads as far as possible. Torque control in variable-speed turbines is used primarily to maximize energy capture below rated wind speed, and to limit the torque above rated, but it can also be used to reduce certain loads. The design of the control algorithms is clearly of prime importance. Additional sensors such as accelerometers and load sensors can also help the controller to achieve its objectives more effectively. By controlling the pitch of each blade independently, it is also possible to achieve important further reductions in loading. It is important to be able to quantify the benefits of any new controller. Although computer simulations are useful, field trials are also vital. The variability of the real wind means that particular care is needed in the design of the trials.

  12. Alternative methods of estimating hub-height wind speed for small wind turbine performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziter, Brett

    Current industry standards for evaluating wind turbine power performance require erecting a meteorological mast on site to obtain reference measurements of hub-height wind speed. New considerations for small wind turbines (SWTs) offer the alternative of using an anemometer extending from a lower elevation on the turbine tower. In either case, SWT owners face questions and impracticalities when applying this standard in-situ. Alternative methods of predicting hub-height wind speed for SWT performance evaluation have been assessed experimentally using a Bergey XL.1 SWT collocated with a meteorological mast. Findings indicate that vertical extrapolation can increase the accuracy of tower-mounted anemometry for predicting hub-height wind speed. It is recommended to use concurrent wind speed measurements from anemometers at two elevations to develop site-specific wind shear parameters. Three-dimensional wind speed data from a sonic anemometer were used alongside a theoretical model to determine the optimal location for the topmost anemometer but results were inconclusive.

  13. System Identification for the Clipper Liberty C96 Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, Daniel

    System identification techniques are powerful tools that help improve modeling capabilities of real world dynamic systems. These techniques are well established and have been successfully used on countless systems in many areas. However, wind turbines provide a unique challenge for system identification because of the difficulty in measuring its primary input: wind. This thesis first motivates the problem by demonstrating the challenges with wind turbine system identification using both simulations and real data. It then suggests techniques toward successfully identifying a dynamic wind turbine model including the notion of an effective wind speed and how it might be measured. Various levels of simulation complexity are explored for insights into calculating an effective wind speed. In addition, measurements taken from the University of Minnesota's Clipper Liberty C96 research wind turbine are used for a preliminary investigation into the effective wind speed calculation and system identification of a real world wind turbine.

  14. Wind and turbine characteristics needed for integration of wind turbine arrays into a utility system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    Wind data and wind turbine generator (WTG) performance characteristics are often available in a form inconvenient for use by utility planners and engineers. The steps used by utility planners are summarized and the type of wind and WTG data needed for integration of WTG arrays suggested. These included long term yearly velocity averages for preliminary site feasibility, hourly velocities on a 'wind season' basis for more detailed economic analysis and for reliability studies, worst-case velocity profiles for gusts, and various minute-to-hourly velocity profiles for estimating the effect of longer-term wind fluctuations on utility operations. wind turbine data needed includes electrical properties of the generator, startup and shutdown characteristics, protection characteristics, pitch control response and control strategy, and electro-mechanical model for stability analysis.

  15. High resolution wind turbine wake measurements with a scanning lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herges, T. G.; Maniaci, D. C.; Naughton, B. T.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution lidar wake measurements are part of an ongoing field campaign being conducted at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using a customized scanning lidar from the Technical University of Denmark. One of the primary objectives is to collect experimental data to improve the predictive capability of wind plant computational models to represent the response of the turbine wake to varying inflow conditions and turbine operating states. The present work summarizes the experimental setup and illustrates several wake measurement example cases. The cases focus on demonstrating the impact of the atmospheric conditions on the wake shape and position, and exhibit a sample of the data that has been made public through the Department of Energy Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  16. Condition monitoring system of wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdusamad, Khaled B.

    The development and implementation of the condition monitoring systems (CMS) play a significant role in overcoming the number of failures in the wind turbine generators that result from the harsh operation conditions, such as over temperature, particularly when turbines are deployed offshore. In order to increase the reliability of the wind energy industry, monitoring the operation conditions of wind generators is essential to detect the immediate faults rapidly and perform appropriate preventative maintenance. CMS helps to avoid failures, decrease the potential shutdowns while running, reduce the maintenance and operation costs and maintain wind turbines protected. The knowledge of wind turbine generators' faults, such as stator and rotor inter-turn faults, is indispensable to perform the condition monitoring accurately, and assist with maintenance decision making. Many techniques are utilized to avoid the occurrence of failures in wind turbine generators. The majority of the previous techniques that are applied to monitor the wind generator conditions are based on electrical and mechanical concepts and theories. An advanced CMS can be implemented by using a variety of different techniques and methods to confirm the validity of the obtained electrical and mechanical condition monitoring algorithms. This thesis is focused on applying CMS on wind generators due to high temperature by contributing the statistical, thermal, mathematical, and reliability analyses, and mechanical concepts with the electrical methodology, instead of analyzing the electrical signal and frequencies trends only. The newly developed algorithms can be compared with previous condition monitoring methods, which use the electrical approach in order to establish their advantages and limitations. For example, the hazard reliability techniques of wind generators based on CMS are applied to develop a proper maintenance strategy, which aims to extend the system life-time and reduce the potential

  17. Braking System for Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krysiak, J. E.; Webb, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Operating turbine stopped smoothly by fail-safe mechanism. Windturbine braking systems improved by system consisting of two large steel-alloy disks mounted on high-speed shaft of gear box, and brakepad assembly mounted on bracket fastened to top of gear box. Lever arms (with brake pads) actuated by spring-powered, pneumatic cylinders connected to these arms. Springs give specific spring-loading constant and exert predetermined load onto brake pads through lever arms. Pneumatic cylinders actuated positively to compress springs and disengage brake pads from disks. During power failure, brakes automatically lock onto disks, producing highly reliable, fail-safe stops. System doubles as stopping brake and "parking" brake.

  18. Performance test of a low cost roof-mounted wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-Espinoza, Bernardo; Quintal, Roberto; Gou, Clément; Aguilar, Alicia

    2013-11-01

    A low cost wind turbine was implemented based on the ideas put forward by Hugh Piggot in his book ``A wind turbine recipe book,'' where such device is developed using materials and manufacturing processes available (as much as possible) in developing countries or isolated communities. The wind turbine is to be mounted on a two stories building roof in a coastal zone of Mexico. The velocity profiles and turbulence intensities for typical wind conditions on top of the building roof were analyzed using numerical simulations (RANS) in order to locate the turbine hub above any recirculation and near the maximum average speed. The coefficient of performance is going to be evaluated experimentally by measuring the electrical power generation and wind characteristics that drive the wind turbine on the field. These experimental results will be applied on the improvement of the wind turbine design, as well as the validation of a numerical simulation model that couples the wind characteristics obtained through CFD with the Blade Element Method (BEM) and an electro-mechanical model of the turbine-shaft-generator ensemble. Special thanks to the Coordinación de Investigación Científica of the Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo for their support.

  19. Final Report - Certifying the Performance of Small Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, Larry

    2015-08-28

    The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) created a successful accredited certification program for small and medium wind turbines using the funding from this grant. SWCC certifies small turbines (200 square meters of swept area or less) to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Small Wind Turbine Performance and Safety Standard (AWEA Standard 9.1 – 2009). SWCC also certifies medium wind turbines to the International Electrical Commission (IEC) Power Performance Standard (IEC 61400-12-1) and Acoustic Performance Standard (IEC 61400-11).

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezaveh, Seyed Hossein

    Due to several design advantages and operational characteristics, particularly in offshore farms, vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are being reconsidered as a complementary technology to horizontal axial turbines (HAWTs). However, considerable gaps remain in our understanding of VAWT performance since they have been significantly less studied than HAWTs. This thesis examines the performance of isolated VAWTs based on different design parameters and evaluates their characteristics in large wind farms. An actuator line model (ALM) is implemented in an atmospheric boundary layer large eddy simulation (LES) code, with offline coupling to a high-resolution blade-scale unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model. The LES captures the turbine-to-farm scale dynamics, while the URANS captures the blade-to-turbine scale flow. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with existing experimental datasets. Subsequently, a parametric study of the flow over an isolated VAWT is carried out by varying solidities, height-to-diameter aspect ratios, and tip speed ratios. The analyses of the wake area and power deficits yield an improved understanding of the evolution of VAWT wakes, which in turn enables a more informed selection of turbine designs for wind farms. One of the most important advantages of VAWTs compared to HAWTs is their potential synergistic interactions that increase their performance when placed in close proximity. Field experiments have confirmed that unlike HAWTs, VAWTs can enhance and increase the total power production when placed near each other. Based on these experiments and using ALM-LES, we also present and test new approaches for VAWT farm configuration. We first design clusters with three turbines then configure farms consisting of clusters of VAWTs rather than individual turbines. The results confirm that by using a cluster design, the average power density of wind farms can be increased by as much as 60% relative to regular

  1. Effects of wake-turbine blade interactions on power production of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, Maki; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Iida, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    In offshore wind farms, deterioration in power generation performance due to the mutual interference of flow around the wind turbines is a serious issue. To clarify the effects of wake-turbine blade interactions on the performance of wind farms, we conducted large-scale simulations of the flow around two full-scale wind turbines in a tandem-arrangement with two different spacings. The spacing between the two turbines was L/D = 1.0 and L/D = 2.0, with D being the rotor diameter. The predicted results show that vortices generated in the wake of the first turbine interfere with the blades of the second turbine and the interference becomes more intense for the case of L/D = 1.0. Thus, the power coefficient of the downstream turbine becomes lower by 80% for the case of L/D = 1.0 compared with the case of a single wind turbine.

  2. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-09-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  3. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  4. The development and testing of a novel cross axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, W. T.; Muzammil, W. K.; Gwani, M.; Wong, K. H.; Fazlizan, A.; Wang, C. T.; Poh, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    A novel cross axis wind turbine (CAWT) which comprises of a cross axis blades arrangement was presented and investigated experimentally. The CAWT is a new type of wind turbine that extracts wind energy from airflow coming from the horizontal and vertical directions. The wind turbine consists of three vertical blades and six horizontal blades arranged in a cross axis orientation. Hubs in the middle of the CAWT link the horizontal and vertical blades through connectors to form the CAWT. The study used a 45° deflector to guide the oncoming airflow upward (vertical wind direction). The results from the study showed that the CAWT produced significant improvements in power output and rotational speed performance compared to a conventional straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT).

  5. Mod 2 Wind Turbine Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The primary objective in the development of Mod 2 was to design a wind turbine to produce energy for less than 5 cents/kWh based on 1980 cost forecasts. The pricing method used to project the Mod 2 energy costs is the levelized fixed charge rate approach, generally accepted in the electric utility industry as a basis for relative ranking of energy alternatives. This method derives a levelized energy price necessary to recover utility's purchasing, installing, owning, operating, and maintenance costs.

  6. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  7. Utility Scale Wind turbine Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Fredericks

    2006-03-31

    The purpose of the Three Affiliated Tribes proposing to Department of Energy was nothing new to Denmark. National Meteorological Studies have proved that North Dakota has some of the most consistence wind resources in the world. The Three Affiliated Tribes wanted to assess their potential and become knowledgeable to developing this new and upcoming resource now valuable. By the Tribe implementing the Utility-scale Wind Turbine Project on Fort Berthold, the tribe has proven the ability to complete a project, and has already proceeded in a feasibility studies to developing a large-scale wind farm on the reservation due to tribal knowledge learned, public awareness, and growing support of a Nation wanting clean renewable energy. The tribe is working through the various measures and regulations with the want to be self-sufficient, independent, and marketable with 17,000 times the wind energy needed to service Fort Berthold alone.

  8. Wear Analysis of Wind Turbine Gearbox Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Walker, Larry R; Xu, Hanbing; Parten, Randy J; Qu, Jun; Geer, Tom

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to investigate and characterize the nature of surface damage and wear to wind turbine gearbox bearings returned from service in the field. Bearings were supplied for examination by S. Butterfield and J. Johnson of the National Wind Technology Center (NREL), Boulder, Colorado. Studies consisted of visual examination, optical and electron microscopy, dimensional measurements of wear-induced macro-scale and micro-scale features, measurements of macro- and micro-scale hardness, 3D imaging of surface damage, studies of elemental distributions on fracture surfaces, and examinations of polished cross-sections of surfaces under various etched and non-etched conditions.

  9. Modeling and robust control of wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilev, Bogdan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper a model of a wind turbine is evaluated, consisting of: wind speed model, mechanical and electrical model of generator and tower oscillation model. This model is linearized around of a nominal point. By using the linear model with uncertainties is synthesized a uncertain model. By using the uncertain model and robust control theory is developed a robust controller, which provide mode of stabilizing the rotor frequency and damping the tower oscillations. Finally is simulated work of nonlinear system and robust controller

  10. An overview of DOE's wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Laxson, A.S.; Hock, S.M.; Musial, W.D. ); Goldman, P.R. )

    1992-12-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation at $0.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s, and with fossil-fuel-based generators $0.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine (VET) Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. These value-engineered turbines will stem from units with known and well-documented records of performance. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate advanced technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near term (1993--1995), and to develop a new generation of innovative turbines for the year 2000. The Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program, a collaborative agreement between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments to provide a bridge from development programs currently under way to commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines.

  11. Effects of precipitation on wind turbine performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, S.N.; Wade, J.E.

    1988-03-01

    This report examines the effects of precipitation on the performance of a wind turbine, with an airfoil section similar to that of the MOD-O (23000 series), at an operating wind farm. Earlier NASA research noted a performance degradation of up to 24% for the MOD-OA when precipitation occurred. The objective of this study was to collect sufficient data at a wind farm where rainfall occurs frequently so that the effect of precipitation could be discriminated from the effects of the turbulence that may be associated with rain. The rainfall rates were considerably lower than the rates of rainfall considered in the previous NASA study. The rainfall rates experienced at the wind farm are generally below 8mm/h and would usually fall under the ''light rain'' classification of the previous NASA study. For light rain conditions, the NASA report showed as high as an 18% decrease in machine performance. The study described here did not show a decrease in performance from light rain; rather an increase of approximately 3% was indicated. The 3% increase may be attributable to a reduction of blade roughness, rain effects on the anemometer, or a combination of the two. The general conclusion is drawn for this study: for the ESI-54 wind turbine studied, for rainfall rates generally less than 8mm/h, the rain has a beneficial effect on performance by slightly improving the aerodynamic properties (maintaining clean blades). 9 refs., 22 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. The spectrum of power from wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apt, Jay

    The power spectral density of the output of wind turbines provides information on the character of fluctuations in turbine output. Here both 1-second and 1-hour samples are used to estimate the power spectrum of several wind farms. The measured output power is found to follow a Kolmogorov spectrum over more than four orders of magnitude, from 30 s to 2.6 days. This result is in sharp contrast to the only previous study covering long time periods, published 50 years ago. The spectrum defines the character of fill-in power that must be provided to compensate for wind's fluctuations when wind is deployed at large scale. Installing enough linear ramp rate generation (such as a gas generator) to fill in fast fluctuations with amplitudes of 1% of the maximum fluctuation would oversize the fill-in generation capacity by a factor of two for slower fluctuations, greatly increasing capital costs. A wind system that incorporates batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, or other fast-ramp-rate energy storage systems would match fluctuations much better, and can provide an economic route for deployment of energy storage systems when renewable portfolio standards require large amounts of intermittent renewable generating sources.

  13. The Federal Advanced Wind Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hock, S M; Thresher, R W; Goldman, P R

    1991-12-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines has been identified as a high priority activity by the US wind industry. The Department of Energy's Wind Energy Program has begun a multi-year development program aimed at assisting the wind industry with the design, development, and testing of advanced wind turbine systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $0.05/kWh at 13 mph sites by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $0.04/kWh at 13 mph sites by the year 2000. The development plan consists of four phases: (1) Conceptual Design Studies; (2) Near-Term Product Development; (3) Next Generation Technology Integration and Design, and (4) Next- Generation Technology Development and Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies were begun in late 1990, and are scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1992. Preliminary results from these analyses are very promising and indicate that the goals stated above are technically feasible. This paper includes a brief summary of the Conceptual Design Studies and presents initial plans for the follow-on activities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

  15. WEST-3 wind turbine simulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.; Sridhar, S.

    1985-01-01

    The software developed for WEST-3, a new, all digital, and fully programmable wind turbine simulator is given. The process of wind turbine simulation on WEST-3 is described in detail. The major steps are, the processing of the mathematical models, the preparation of the constant data, and the use of system software generated executable code for running on WEST-3. The mechanics of reformulation, normalization, and scaling of the mathematical models is discussed in detail, in particulr, the significance of reformulation which leads to accurate simulations. Descriptions for the preprocessor computer programs which are used to prepare the constant data needed in the simulation are given. These programs, in addition to scaling and normalizing all the constants, relieve the user from having to generate a large number of constants used in the simulation. Also given are brief descriptions of the components of the WEST-3 system software: Translator, Assembler, Linker, and Loader. Also included are: details of the aeroelastic rotor analysis, which is the center of a wind turbine simulation model, analysis of the gimbal subsystem; and listings of the variables, constants, and equations used in the simulation.

  16. Yaw dynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xudong, C.; Hansen, A.; Siedschlag, N.

    1988-02-01

    Numerous problems associated with yaw exists on free-yaw and yaw-driven wind turbines. Yaw-driven machines experience failures in the yaw drive due to excessive loads, while free-yaw machines experience high yaw rates and frequent misalignment problems. This report describes a theoretical investigation of the yaw behavior of wind turbines, which was carried out by the University of Utah. The basic approach to this analysis was to develop a series of analytical and computer models such that each successive model added complexity and increased accuracy. These models are described and compared to results from other models and also to test data. Comments are made on the models' ability to predict yaw moments and response. Also, useful insight is presented regarding the free-yaw behavior of wind turbines as observed using these models. The most complex of these models is used to predict the coupled free-yaw and flap motions of a rotor. This model, YawDyn, is operational; however, experience with it is limited. Future plans, for further enhancing and validating this model, are also discussed.

  17. Lidar-Enhanced Wind Turbine Control: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Scholbrock, Andrew; Fleming, Paul; Schlipf, David; Wright, Alan; Johnson, Kathryn; Wang, Na

    2016-08-01

    The main challenges in harvesting energy from the wind arise from the unknown incoming turbulent wind field. Balancing the competing interests of reduction in structural loads and increasing energy production is the goal of a wind turbine controller to reduce the cost of producing wind energy. Conventional wind turbines use feedback methods to optimize these goals, reacting to wind disturbances after they have already impacted the wind turbine. Lidar sensors offer a means to provide additional inputs to a wind turbine controller, enabling new techniques to improve control methods, allowing a controller to actuate a wind turbine in anticipation of an incoming wind disturbance. This paper will look at the development of lidar-enhanced controls and how they have been used for various turbine load reductions with pitch actuation, as well as increased energy production with improved yaw control. Ongoing work will also be discussed to show that combining pitch and torque control using feedforward nonlinear model predictive control can lead to both reduced loads and increased energy production. Future work is also proposed on extending individual wind turbine controls to the wind plant level and determining how lidars can be used for control methods to further lower the cost of wind energy by minimizing wake impacts in a wind farm.

  18. Atmospheric turbulence affects wind turbine nacelle transferfunctions

    SciTech Connect

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Clifton, Andrew; Poulos, Gregory S.; Schreck, Scott J.

    2016-12-14

    Despite their potential as a valuable source of individual turbine power performance and turbine array energy production optimization information, nacelle-mounted anemometers have often been neglected because complex flows around the blades and nacelle interfere with their measurements. This work quantitatively explores the accuracy of and potential corrections to nacelle anemometer measurements to determine the degree to which they may be useful when corrected for these complex flows, particularly for calculating annual energy production (AEP) in the absence of other meteorological data. Using upwind meteorological tower measurements along with nacelle-based measurements from a General Electric (GE) 1.5sle model, we calculate empirical nacelle transfer functions (NTFs) and explore how they are impacted by different atmospheric and turbulence parameters. This work provides guidelines for the use of NTFs for deriving useful wind measurements from nacelle-mounted anemometers. Corrections to the nacelle anemometer wind speed measurements can be made with NTFs and used to calculate an AEP that comes within 1 % of an AEP calculated with upwind measurements. We also calculate unique NTFs for different atmospheric conditions defined by temperature stratification as well as turbulence intensity, turbulence kinetic energy, and wind shear. During periods of low stability as defined by the Bulk Richardson number (RB), the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of high stability at some wind speed bins below rated speed, leading to a more steep NTF during periods of low stability. Similarly, during periods of high turbulence, the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of low turbulence at most wind bins between cut-in and rated wind speed. Based on these results, we suggest different NTFs be calculated for different regimes of atmospheric stability

  19. Atmospheric turbulence affects wind turbine nacelle transferfunctions

    DOE PAGES

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Clifton, Andrew; ...

    2016-12-14

    Despite their potential as a valuable source of individual turbine power performance and turbine array energy production optimization information, nacelle-mounted anemometers have often been neglected because complex flows around the blades and nacelle interfere with their measurements. This work quantitatively explores the accuracy of and potential corrections to nacelle anemometer measurements to determine the degree to which they may be useful when corrected for these complex flows, particularly for calculating annual energy production (AEP) in the absence of other meteorological data. Using upwind meteorological tower measurements along with nacelle-based measurements from a General Electric (GE) 1.5sle model, we calculate empiricalmore » nacelle transfer functions (NTFs) and explore how they are impacted by different atmospheric and turbulence parameters. This work provides guidelines for the use of NTFs for deriving useful wind measurements from nacelle-mounted anemometers. Corrections to the nacelle anemometer wind speed measurements can be made with NTFs and used to calculate an AEP that comes within 1 % of an AEP calculated with upwind measurements. We also calculate unique NTFs for different atmospheric conditions defined by temperature stratification as well as turbulence intensity, turbulence kinetic energy, and wind shear. During periods of low stability as defined by the Bulk Richardson number (RB), the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of high stability at some wind speed bins below rated speed, leading to a more steep NTF during periods of low stability. Similarly, during periods of high turbulence, the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of low turbulence at most wind bins between cut-in and rated wind speed. Based on these results, we suggest different NTFs be calculated for different regimes of atmospheric stability and turbulence for

  20. Atmospheric turbulence affects wind turbine nacelle transferfunctions

    DOE PAGES

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Clifton, Andrew; ...

    2017-06-02

    Despite their potential as a valuable source of individual turbine power performance and turbine array energy production optimization information, nacelle-mounted anemometers have often been neglected because complex flows around the blades and nacelle interfere with their measurements. This work quantitatively explores the accuracy of and potential corrections to nacelle anemometer measurements to determine the degree to which they may be useful when corrected for these complex flows, particularly for calculating annual energy production (AEP) in the absence of other meteorological data. Using upwind meteorological tower measurements along with nacelle-based measurements from a General Electric (GE) 1.5sle model, we calculate empiricalmore » nacelle transfer functions (NTFs) and explore how they are impacted by different atmospheric and turbulence parameters. This work provides guidelines for the use of NTFs for deriving useful wind measurements from nacelle-mounted anemometers. Corrections to the nacelle anemometer wind speed measurements can be made with NTFs and used to calculate an AEP that comes within 1 % of an AEP calculated with upwind measurements. We also calculate unique NTFs for different atmospheric conditions defined by temperature stratification as well as turbulence intensity, turbulence kinetic energy, and wind shear. During periods of low stability as defined by the Bulk Richardson number (RB), the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of high stability at some wind speed bins below rated speed, leading to a more steep NTF during periods of low stability. Similarly, during periods of high turbulence, the nacelle-mounted anemometer underestimates the upwind wind speed more than during periods of low turbulence at most wind bins between cut-in and rated wind speed. Based on these results, we suggest different NTFs be calculated for different regimes of atmospheric stability and turbulence for

  1. The Inception of OMA in the Development of Modal Testing Technology for Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George H., III; Carne. Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    Wind turbines are immense, flexible structures with aerodynamic forces acting on the rotating blades at harmonics of the turbine rotational frequency, which are comparable to the modal frequencies of the structure. Predicting and experimentally measuring the modal frequencies of wind turbines has been important to their successful design and operation. Performing modal tests on wind turbine structures over 100 meters tall is a substantial challenge, which has inspired innovative developments in modal test technology. For wind turbines, a further complication is that the modal frequencies are dependent on the turbine rotation speed. The history and development of a new technique for acquiring the modal parameters using output-only response data, called the Natural Excitation Technique (NExT), will be reviewed, showing historical tests and techniques. The initial attempts at output-only modal testing began in the late 1980's with the development of NExT in the 1990's. NExT was a predecessor to OMA, developed to overcome these challenges of testing immense structures excited with environmental inputs. We will trace the difficulties and successes of wind turbine modal testing from 1982 to the present. Keywords: OMA, Modal Analysis, NExT, Wind Turbines, Wind Excitation

  2. Coordinate Control of Wind Turbine and Battery in Wind Turbine Generator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjyu, Tomonobu; Kikunaga, Yasuaki; Tokudome, Motoki; Uehara, Akie; Yona, Atsushi; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    Battery is installed for with wind power generator to level the output power fluctuations, since output power fluctuations of wind power generator are large. However, if large battery is installed in wind turbine generator, the capital cost for wind power system will increase. Hence, the smallest size of battery should be preferable to save the capital cost. In this paper, we propose a methodology for controlling combined system output power and storage energy capacity of battery system. The system consists of wind turbine generator and battery energy storage system. The generated power fluctuation in low and high frequency range are smoothed by pitch angle control and battery charge or discharge. This coordinated control reduces the rated battery capacity and windmill blade stress. In our proposed method, we apply H∞ control theory to achieve good response and robustness. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is simulated.

  3. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

    2012-03-05

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

  4. Proposition for the measurement of power characteristics of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuik, W.

    1983-07-01

    A method to measure the power curve and the curve of the dimensionless power as a function of the high speed of a tip vane rotor with blades of a certain angle (Cp-lambda curve), was developed. The standardized bin method demands a 3 month measuring period, too long for tip vane design. From rough data the dispersion in torque direction was made small, so that mediation in wind velocity direction yields a good estimate of the wind velocity related to the torque. In experimental tip vane turbine measurements, a large part of the Cp-lambda curves were determined in 15 min.

  5. Wind turbine wake tracking and its correlations with wind turbine monitoring sensors. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrun, S.; Torres Garcia, E.; Boquet, M.; Coupiac, O.; Girard, N.

    2016-09-01

    Within the frame of the French project ANR SMARTEOLE, a 6-month measurement campaign has been set-up in the north of France to study the wake behaviour of two wind turbines, with an original set-up using: one ground based scanning LIght Detection And Ranging system (LIDAR), 2 nacelle-mounted LIDARs and a nacelle-embedded 2-axis inclinometer. The present paper will give first insight into the results and describe the different post-processing strategies used to prepare the data to be cross-correlated; within the project the final objective is to characterise the influence of the large-scale atmospheric turbulent eddies on the overall wind turbine nacelle displacement and wind turbine wake behaviour.

  6. Flexible Blades for Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Madeline Carlisle; Macphee, David; Harris, Caleb

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has shown that windmills with flexible blades are more efficient than those with rigid blades. Flexibility offers passive pitch control, preferable to active pitch control which is costly and requires maintenance. Flexible blades morph such that the blade more closely resembles its design point at part load and over load. The lift-to-drag ratios on individual blades was investigated. A mold was designed and machined from an acrylic slab for the casting of blades with a NACA 0012 cross section. A flexible blade was cast from silicone and a rigid blade was cast from polyurethane. Each of these blades was tested in a wind tunnel, cantilever mounted, spanning the whole test section. The angle of attack was varied by rotating the mount. All tests were performed at the same wind speed. A load cell within the mount measured forces on the blade, from which the lift and drag forces were calculated. The stall point for the flexible blade occurred later than for the rigid blade, which agrees with previous research. Lift-to-drag ratios were larger for the flexible blade at all angles of attack tested. Flexible blades seem to be a viable option for passive pitch control. Future research will include different airfoil cross sections, wind speeds, and blade materials. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  7. Wind flow characteristics in the wakes of large wind turbines. Volume 1: Analytical model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the wake downwind of a wind turbine was developed. Turbine wake characteristics are useful for determining optimum arrays for wind turbine farms. The analytical model is based on the characteristics of a turbulent coflowing jet with modification for the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The program calculates overall wake characteristics, wind profiles, and power recovery for a wind turbine directly in the wake of another turbine, as functions of distance downwind of the turbine. The calculation procedure is described in detail, and sample results are presented to illustrate the general behavior of the wake and the effects of principal input parameters.

  8. Understanding the unbalanced-voltage problem in wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Batan, T.; Yildirim, D.

    2000-02-28

    Most wind turbines are equipped with line-connected induction generators. Induction generators are very attractive as wind turbine generators due to their low cost, ruggedness and the need for little or no maintenance. At constant frequency, the induction generator operates in a small range of speeds and, therefore, it operated with a small range of slips with respect to synchronous speed. Compared to a synchronous generator, an induction generator provides lower stiffness, thus alleviating the mechanical stress. In a weak power system network, an unbalanced load at the distribution lines can cause unbalanced voltage conditions. If an induction generator is connected to an unbalanced voltage, the resulting stator current will be unbalanced. The unbalanced current creates unequal heating (hot spots) on the stator winding. The heat may increase the winding temperature, which degrades the insulation of the winding, i.e., the life expectancy of the winding. Unbalanced currents also create torque pulsation on the shaft resulting in audible noise and extra mechanical stress. This paper explores the unbalanced voltage problem in induction generators. The levels of unbalance and the loads are varied. Experimental and predicted results are presented in this paper.

  9. United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) Vertical Axis Wind Turbine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    from the Savonius starting turbine alone. -63- SECTION VII CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMIENDATIONS 1. CONCLUSIONS One objective of the USAF Academy Wind ...Rotors, SAND76-0131. Albuquerque: July 1977. 10. Oliver, R.C. and P.R. Nixon. "Design Procedure for Coupling Savonius and Darrieus Wind Turbines ", Air...CHART -4 ESL-TR-8048 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY (USAFAI VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE THOMAS E. KULLGREN DENNIS W. WIEDEMEIER DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

  10. Flow separation on wind turbines blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corten, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    In the year 2000, 15GW of wind power was installed throughout the world, producing 100PJ of energy annually. This contributes to the total electricity demand by only 0.2%. Both the installed power and the generated energy are increasing by 30% per year world-wide. If the airflow over wind turbine blades could be controlled fully, the generation efficiency and thus the energy production would increase by 9%. Power Control To avoid damage to wind turbines, they are cut out above 10 Beaufort (25 m/s) on the wind speed scale. A turbine could be designed in such a way that it converts as much power as possible in all wind speeds, but then it would have to be to heavy. The high costs of such a design would not be compensated by the extra production in high winds, since such winds are rare. Therefore turbines usually reach maximum power at a much lower wind speed: the rated wind speed, which occurs at about 6 Beaufort (12.5 m/s). Above this rated speed, the power intake is kept constant by a control mechanism. Two different mechanisms are commonly used. Active pitch control, where the blades pitch to vane if the turbine maximum is exceeded or, passive stall control, where the power control is an implicit property of the rotor. Stall Control The flow over airfoils is called "attached" when it flows over the surface from the leading edge to the trailing edge. However, when the angle of attack of the flow exceeds a certain critical angle, the flow does not reach the trailing edge, but leaves the surface at the separation line. Beyond this line the flow direction is reversed, i.e. it flows from the trailing edge backward to the separation line. A blade section extracts much less energy from the flow when it separates. This property is used for stall control. Stall controlled rotors always operate at a constant rotation speed. The angle of attack of the flow incident to the blades is determined by the blade speed and the wind speed. Since the latter is variable, it determines

  11. Onshore industrial wind turbine locations for the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Compton, Roger; Kramer, Louisa; Ancona, Zach; Norton, Donna

    2017-01-01

    This dataset provides industrial-scale onshore wind turbine locations in the United States, corresponding facility information, and turbine technical specifications. The database has wind turbine records that have been collected, digitized, locationally verified, and internally quality controlled. Turbines from the Federal Aviation Administration Digital Obstacles File, through product release date July 22, 2013, were used as the primary source of turbine data points. The dataset was subsequently revised and reposted as described in the revision histories for the report. Verification of the turbine positions was done by visual interpretation using high-resolution aerial imagery in Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri) ArcGIS Desktop. Turbines without Federal Aviation Administration Obstacles Repository System numbers were visually identified and point locations were added to the collection. We estimated a locational error of plus or minus 10 meters for turbine locations. Wind farm facility names were identified from publicly available facility datasets. Facility names were then used in a Web search of additional industry publications and press releases to attribute additional turbine information (such as manufacturer, model, and technical specifications of wind turbines). Wind farm facility location data from various wind and energy industry sources were used to search for and digitize turbines not in existing databases. Technical specifications for turbines were assigned based on the wind turbine make and model as described in literature, specifications listed in the Federal Aviation Administration Digital Obstacles File, and information on the turbine manufacturer’s Web site. Some facility and turbine information on make and model did not exist or was difficult to obtain. Thus, uncertainty may exist for certain turbine specifications. That uncertainty was rated and a confidence was recorded for both location and attribution data quality.

  12. Streamwise vortex generator for separation reduction on wind turbine profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Suarez, J.; Flaszyński, P.; Doerffer, P.

    2016-10-01

    High angles of attack of the wind turbine blades induce severe flow conditions which lead to flow separation and, as the consequence, aerodynamic performance reduction. Implementation of a new type of passive streamwise vortex generator (Rod Vortex Generator - RVG), on a wind turbine profile in order to reduce the flow separation is presented. Numerical model validation is carried out for the S809 aerofoil and a wide range of angles of attack (AoA) employed as reference for flow control cases. Investigation of proposed passive control method involves attached as well as incipient and massive flow separation. A study of chordwise location of RVGs for different inflow conditions is performed. The numerical and experimental results are in good agreement. Obtained numerical results based on the RANS approach reveal a large potential of selected passive devices in reduction of flow separation and increase of aerodynamic performance.

  13. Downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, F. B.; Klatte, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    NASA and industry are currently cooperating in the conduct of extensive experimental and analytical studies to understand and predict the noise of large, horizontal axis wind turbines. This effort consists of (1) obtaining high quality noise data under well controlled and documented test conditions, (2) establishing the annoyance criteria for impulse noise of the type generated by horizontal axis wind turbines with rotors downwind of the support tower, (3) defining the wake characteristics downwind of the axial location of the plane of rotation, (4) comparing predictions with measurements made by use of wake data, and (5) comparing predictions with annoyance criteria. The status of work by Hamilton Standard in the above areas which was done in support of the cooperative NASA and industry studies is briefly summarized.

  14. Atmospheric testing of wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.S.; Migliore, P.G.; Quandt, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    An experimental investigation was conducted using an instrumented horizontal-axis wind turbine that incorporated variable span trailing-edge aerodynamic brakes. A primary goal was to directly compare study results with (infinite-span) wind tunnel data and to provide information on how to account for device span effects during turbine design or analysis. Comprehensive measurements were utilized to define effective changes in the aerodynamic coefficients, as a function of angle of attack and control deflection, for three device spans and configurations. Differences in the lift and drag behavior are most pronounced near stall and for device spans of less than 15%. Drag performance is affected only minimally (<70%) for 15% or larger span devices. Interestingly, aerodynamic controls with characteristic vents or openings appear most affected by span reductions and three-dimensional flow.

  15. Customized DSP-based vibration measurement for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    LaWhite, N.E.; Cohn, K.E.

    1996-12-31

    As part of its Advanced Distributed Monitoring System (ADMS) project funded by NREL, Second Wind Inc. is developing a new vibration measurement system for use with wind turbines. The system uses low-cost accelerometers originally designed for automobile airbag crash-detection coupled with new software executed on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) device. The system is envisioned as a means to monitor the mechanical {open_quotes}health{close_quotes} of the wind turbine over its lifetime. In addition the system holds promise as a customized emergency vibration detector. The two goals are very different and it is expected that different software programs will be executed for each function. While a fast Fourier transform (FFT) signature under given operating conditions can yield much information regarding turbine condition, the sampling period and processing requirements make it inappropriate for emergency condition monitoring. This paper briefly reviews the development of prototype DSP and accelerometer hardware. More importantly, it reviews our work to design prototype vibration alarm filters. Two-axis accelerometer test data from the experimental FloWind vertical axis wind turbine is analyzed and used as a development guide. Two levels of signal processing are considered. The first uses narrow band pre-processing filters at key fundamental frequencies such as the 1P, 2P and 3P. The total vibration energy in each frequency band is calculated and evaluated as a possible alarm trigger. In the second level of signal processing, the total vibration energy in each frequency band is further decomposed using the two-axis directional information. Directional statistics are calculated to differentiate between linear translations and circular translations. After analyzing the acceleration statistics for normal and unusual operating conditions, the acceleration processing system described could be used in automatic early detection of fault conditions. 9 figs.

  16. Development of methodology for horizontal axis wind turbine dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine dynamics were studied. The following findings are summarized: (1) review of the MOSTAS computer programs for dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines; (2) review of various analysis methods for rotating systems with periodic coefficients; (3) review of structural dynamics analysis tools for large wind turbine; (4) experiments for yaw characteristics of a rotating rotor; (5) development of a finite element model for rotors; (6) development of simple models for aeroelastics; and (7) development of simple models for stability and response of wind turbines on flexible towers.

  17. Wind turbine inspection tests at UCSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippmann, Jeffery D.; Manohar, Arun; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The wind energy industry is rapidly growing in order to meet the increasing world energy demands as well as the need for clean and renewable energy sources. With the goal to explore new technologies and innovations which could help potentially improve the efficiency and effectiveness of wind energy, the NDE/SHM laboratory at UCSD acquired a unique wind turbine blade that will be used for performing several research projects related to wind turbine blade technology and non-destructive inspection techniques. The blade was built using the CX-100 design developed by TPI Composites, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The 9-m blade was constructed with several embedded defects that represent the most common manufacturing defects typically found, such as out-of-plane waviness, composite delamination, and adhesive disbond. The defects were embedded during the manufacturing process by using similar methods developed by both TPI and SNL for simulating actual defect characteristics. Though the blade is small in comparison to the average utility sized blade of around 40 meters, the blade features similar materials and manufacturing methods, allowing for several inspections techniques to be studied on a representative platform. The inspection techniques include advanced infrared thermography and other guided wave techniques.

  18. Superconductivity for Large Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    R. Fair; W. Stautner; M. Douglass; R. Rajput-Ghoshal; M. Moscinski; P. Riley; D. Wagner; J. Kim; S. Hou; F. Lopez; K. Haran; J. Bray; T. Laskaris; J. Rochford; R. Duckworth

    2012-10-12

    A conceptual design has been completed for a 10MW superconducting direct drive wind turbine generator employing low temperature superconductors for the field winding. Key technology building blocks from the GE Wind and GE Healthcare businesses have been transferred across to the design of this concept machine. Wherever possible, conventional technology and production techniques have been used in order to support the case for commercialization of such a machine. Appendices A and B provide further details of the layout of the machine and the complete specification table for the concept design. Phase 1 of the program has allowed us to understand the trade-offs between the various sub-systems of such a generator and its integration with a wind turbine. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) analysis have been completed resulting in the identification of high risk components within the design. The design has been analyzed from a commercial and economic point of view and Cost of Energy (COE) calculations have been carried out with the potential to reduce COE by up to 18% when compared with a permanent magnet direct drive 5MW baseline machine, resulting in a potential COE of 0.075 $/kWh. Finally, a top-level commercialization plan has been proposed to enable this technology to be transitioned to full volume production. The main body of this report will present the design processes employed and the main findings and conclusions.

  19. Boundary layer development over a large array of porous-disk-modeled wind turbines via stereo particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Elizabeth; Vuppuluri, Vasant; Cal, Raúl

    2014-11-01

    The increasing size of wind turbine arrays in service highlights the importance of understanding the flow physics within such large turbine arrays. Thus, the development of a wind turbine array boundary layer (WTBL) was investigated experimentally for an 8 × 5 array of model wind turbines. Model wind turbines were on a 1:2000 scale and turbine rotors were represented by porous disks. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements were done along the centerline of the wind turbine array at several streamwise positions both within and above the canopy. Measurements and analysis of the mean and streamwise-averaged statistics of the SPIV fields focus on the rotors in the furthest downstream positions. Statistics will be used to determine if a fully developed WTBL has been achieved.

  20. Development of wind turbine towers using fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungkurapinan, Nibong

    With an ongoing trend in the wind turbine market, the size of wind turbines has been increasing continuously. Larger wind turbines imply an increase in size, weight, and loads acting on the wind turbine tower. This requires towers to be stronger and stiffer, and consequently leads to bigger tower diameters. Because of their size and weight, transportation and erection require heavy equipment that makes the use of such towers prohibitive in remote communities. To tackle this problem, a research program was initiated at the University of Manitoba to develop the technology required for the fabrication of wind turbine towers constructed of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) for use in remote communities in Canada. The research program was carried out in stages. During the first stage, a feasibility study and an analytical investigation on various shapes of FRP towers were conducted. The concept of a multi-cellular composite tower was examined in great detail and the finite element results showed that such a tower could result in almost 45 percent reduction in weight. In the second stage of this research program, a robotic filament winding machine was designed and constructed in the Composites Laboratory of the University of Manitoba. It was used to fabricate the multi-cell tower specimens for testing. The third stage of the research program involved the experimental investigation, which was carried out in three phases. In the first phase, two single cell specimens were tested to failure under lateral loading. The specimens were 8 ft (2.44 m) long. The second phase involved the testing of two single cells loaded in compression. The third phase of the experimental investigation involved the testing of two eight-cell jointed tower specimens. The specimens were octagonal and tapered, with a diameter of 21.4 in (543 mm) at the base and 17.4 in (441 mm) at the top. They were 16 ft (4.88 m) in height and tested as cantilever under static loading. Local buckling was the dominant

  1. Comparative study on the wake deflection behind yawed wind turbine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schottler, Jannik; Mühle, Franz; Bartl, Jan; Peinke, Joachim; Adaramola, Muyiwa S.; Sætran, Lars; Hölling, Michael

    2017-05-01

    In this wind tunnel campaign, detailed wake measurements behind two different model wind turbines in yawed conditions were performed. The wake deflections were quantified by estimating the rotor-averaged available power within the wake. By using two different model wind turbines, the influence of the rotor design and turbine geometry on the wake deflection caused by a yaw misalignment of 30° could be judged. It was found that the wake deflections three rotor diameters downstream were equal while at six rotor diameters downstream insignificant differences were observed. The results compare well with previous experimental and numerical studies.

  2. Wind turbines and health: a critical review of the scientific literature.

    PubMed

    McCunney, Robert J; Mundt, Kenneth A; Colby, W David; Dobie, Robert; Kaliski, Kenneth; Blais, Mark

    2014-11-01

    This review examines the literature related to health effects of wind turbines. We reviewed literature related to sound measurements near turbines, epidemiological and experimental studies, and factors associated with annoyance. (1) Infrasound sound near wind turbines does not exceed audibility thresholds. (2) Epidemiological studies have shown associations between living near wind turbines and annoyance. (3) Infrasound and low-frequency sound do not present unique health risks. (4) Annoyance seems more strongly related to individual characteristics than noise from turbines. Further areas of inquiry include enhanced noise characterization, analysis of predicted noise values contrasted with measured levels postinstallation, longitudinal assessments of health pre- and postinstallation, experimental studies in which subjects are "blinded" to the presence or absence of infrasound, and enhanced measurement techniques to evaluate annoyance.

  3. A review of damage detection methods for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Ho, Siu-Chun M.; Song, Gangbing; Ren, Liang; Li, Hongnan

    2015-03-01

    Wind energy is one of the most important renewable energy sources and many countries are predicted to increase wind energy portion of their whole national energy supply to about twenty percent in the next decade. One potential obstacle in the use of wind turbines to harvest wind energy is the maintenance of the wind turbine blades. The blades are a crucial and costly part of a wind turbine and over their service life can suffer from factors such as material degradation and fatigue, which can limit their effectiveness and safety. Thus, the ability to detect damage in wind turbine blades is of great significance for planning maintenance and continued operation of the wind turbine. This paper presents a review of recent research and development in the field of damage detection for wind turbine blades. Specifically, this paper reviews frequently employed sensors including fiber optic and piezoelectric sensors, and four promising damage detection methods, namely, transmittance function, wave propagation, impedance and vibration based methods. As a note towards the future development trend for wind turbine sensing systems, the necessity for wireless sensing and energy harvesting is briefly presented. Finally, existing problems and promising research efforts for online damage detection of turbine blades are discussed.

  4. Structural Dynamic Behavior of Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, Robert W.; Mirandy, Louis P.; Carne, Thomas G.; Lobitz, Donald W.; James, George H. III

    2009-01-01

    The structural dynamicist s areas of responsibility require interaction with most other members of the wind turbine project team. These responsibilities are to predict structural loads and deflections that will occur over the lifetime of the machine, ensure favorable dynamic responses through appropriate design and operational procedures, evaluate potential design improvements for their impact on dynamic loads and stability, and correlate load and control test data with design predictions. Load prediction has been a major concern in wind turbine designs to date, and it is perhaps the single most important task faced by the structural dynamics engineer. However, even if we were able to predict all loads perfectly, this in itself would not lead to an economic system. Reduction of dynamic loads, not merely a "design to loads" policy, is required to achieve a cost-effective design. The two processes of load prediction and structural design are highly interactive: loads and deflections must be known before designers and stress analysts can perform structural sizing, which in turn influences the loads through changes in stiffness and mass. Structural design identifies "hot spots" (local areas of high stress) that would benefit most from dynamic load alleviation. Convergence of this cycle leads to a turbine structure that is neither under-designed (which may result in structural failure), nor over-designed (which will lead to excessive weight and cost).

  5. Aeroelastic Stability of Idling Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Riziotis, Vasilis A.; Voutsinas, Spyros G.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine rotors in idling operation mode can experience high angles of attack, within the post stall region that are capable of triggering stall-induced vibrations. In the present paper rotor stability in slow idling operation is assessed on the basis of non-linear time domain and linear eigenvalue analysis. Analysis is performed for a 10 MW conceptual wind turbine designed by DTU. First the flow conditions that are likely to favour stall induced instabilities are identified through non-linear time domain aeroelastic analysis. Next, for the above specified conditions, eigenvalue stability simulations are performed aiming at identifying the low damped modes of the turbine. Finally the results of the eigenvalue analysis are evaluated through computations of the work of the aerodynamic forces by imposing harmonic vibrations following the shape and frequency of the various modes. Eigenvalue analysis indicates that the asymmetric and symmetric out-of-plane modes have the lowest damping. The results of the eigenvalue analysis agree well with those of the time domain analysis.

  6. Computational analysis of vertical axis wind turbine arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremseth, J.; Duraisamy, K.

    2016-10-01

    Canonical problems involving single, pairs, and arrays of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are investigated numerically with the objective of understanding the underlying flow structures and their implications on energy production. Experimental studies by Dabiri (J Renew Sustain Energy 3, 2011) suggest that VAWTs demand less stringent spacing requirements than their horizontal axis counterparts and additional benefits may be obtained by optimizing the placement and rotational direction of VAWTs. The flowfield of pairs of co-/counter-rotating VAWTs shows some similarities with pairs of cylinders in terms of wake structure and vortex shedding. When multiple VAWTs are placed in a column, the extent of the wake is seen to spread further downstream, irrespective of the direction of rotation of individual turbines. However, the aerodynamic interference between turbines gives rise to regions of excess momentum between the turbines which lead to significant power augmentations. Studies of VAWTs arranged in multiple columns show that the downstream columns can actually be more efficient than the leading column, a proposition that could lead to radical improvements in wind farm productivity.

  7. A comparison between 2-and 3-bladed wind turbine rotors with focus on wake characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, Franz; Adaramola, Muyiwa Samuel; Sætran, Lars

    2016-11-01

    Due to cost benefit and weight reduction, 2-bladed wind turbines have the potential to become more important for offshore wind applications. In order to optimize the arrangement of wind turbines in wind farms and for accurate forecasts of the power production, a detailed knowledge of the wake flow is needed. In the presented study, three different rotors with varying number of blades and similar performance behavior have been designed and manufactured using the 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The performance characteristics of these rotors as well as their wake features are measured experimentally in wind tunnel tests and compared. The velocity deficit is seen to vary only insignificantly for the wakes in distances of 3D (where D is the rotor diameter), 5D and 7D behind the turbine. However, higher turbulence intensity levels are recorded in the wake of the 2-bladed rotors. This could have potential for a faster wake recovery and thus a narrower turbine spacing.

  8. Rotationally sampled wind characteristics and correlations with MOD-OA wind turbine response

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.L.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents results of a comprehensive wind and wind turbine measurement program: the Clayton, New Mexico, vertical plane array/MOD-OA project. In this experiment, the turbulent wind was measured for a large array of fixed anemometers located two blade diameters upwind of a 200-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). Simultaneously, key wind turbine response parameters were also measured. The first of two major objectives of this experiment was to determine the turbulent wind, rotationally sampled to emulate the motion of the wind turbine blade, for the range of different wind speeds and stability classes actually experienced by the wind turbine. The second major objective was to correlate this rotationally sampled wind with the wind turbine blade stress and power, in order to assess the usefulness of the wind measurements for wind turbine loads testing a prediction. Time series of rotationally sampled winds and wind turbine blade bending moments and power were converted to frequency spectra using Fourier transform techniques. These spectra were used as the basis for both qualitative and quantitative comparisons among the various cases. A quantitative comparison between the rotationally sampled wind input and blade bending response was made, using the Fourier spectra to estimate the blade transfer function. These transfer functions were then used to calculate an approximate damping coefficient for the MOD-OA fiberglass blade.

  9. Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2009-12-01

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. It is a power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW small wind turbine.

  10. A computational analysis of wind turbine and wind farm aerodynamics with a focus on dual rotor wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Aaron John

    This dissertation serves to summarize my research into wind farm and wind turbine aerodynamics. Included in this thesis is a summary of the methods I use as well as the four research problems that I investigated. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  11. Wireless Sensors for Wind Turbine Blades Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftimie, N.; Steigmann, R.; Danila, N. A.; Rosu, D.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Savin, A.

    2017-06-01

    The most common defects in turbine blades may be faulty microscopic and mesoscopic appeared in matrix, no detected by classical nondestructive testing (i.e. using phased array sensors), broken fibers can also appear and develop under moderated loads, or cracks and delaminations due to low energy impacts, etc. The paper propose to present the results obtained from testing of glass fiber reinforced plastic used in the construction of the wind turbine blades as well as the monitoring of the entire scalable blade using wireless sensors placed on critical location on blade. In order to monitories the strain/stress during the tests, the determination of the location and the nature of defects have been simulated using FEM.

  12. A Biomimetic Ultrasonic Whistle for Use as a Bat Deterrent on Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievert, Paul; Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Carlson, Daniel; Dowling, Zara; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2016-11-01

    As wind energy continues to gain worldwide prominence, more and more turbines are detrimentally influencing bat colonies. In 2012 alone, an estimated 600,000 bats were killed by wind turbines in the United States. Bats show a tendency to fly towards turbines. The objective of this work is to deter bats from the proximity of the swept area of operational wind turbine blades. Established field studies have shown that bats avoid broadband ultrasonic noise on the same frequency spectrum as their echolocation chirps. A biomimetic ultrasonic pulse generator for use as a bat deterrent on wind turbines is designed and studied experimentally. This device, which works based on the fundamentals of flow-induced oscillations of a flexible sheet is a whistle-like device inspired by a bat larynx, mechanically powered via air flow on a wind turbine blade. Current device prototypes have proven robust at producing ultrasound across the 20 - 70 kHz range for flow inlet velocities of 4 - 14 m/s. Ultimately, a deterrent as described here could provide a reliable, cost-effective means of alerting bats to the presence of moving turbine blades, reducing bat mortality at wind facilities, and reducing regulatory uncertainty for wind facility developers. The financial support provided by the US Department of Energy, and the Massachusetts Clean Energy center is acknowledged.

  13. Field measurements in the wake of a model wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pol, Suhas; Taylor, Amelia; Bilbao, Argenis; Doostalab, Ali; Novoa, Santiago; Westergaard, Carsten; Hussain, Fazle; Sheng, Jian; Ren, Beibei; Giesselmann, Michael; Glauser, Mark; Castillo, Luciano

    2014-06-01

    As a first step to study the dynamics of a wind farm' we experimentally explored the flow field behind a single wind turbine of diameter 1.17 m at a hub height of 6.25 m. A 10 m tower upstream of the wind farm characterizes the atmospheric conditions and its influence on the wake evolution. A vertical rake of sonic anemometers is clustered around the hub height on a second tower' 6D downstream of the turbine. We present preliminary observations from a 1- hour block of data recorded in near-neutral atmospheric conditions. The ratio of the standard deviation of power to the inflow velocity is greater than three' revealing adverse effects of inflow turbulence on the power and load fluctuations. Furthermore' the wake defect and Reynolds stress and its gradient are pronounced at 6D. The flux of energy due to Reynolds stresses is similar to that reported in wind tunnel studies. The swirl and mixing produces a constant temperature wake which results in a density jump across the wake interface. Further field measurements will explore the dynamics of a model wind farm' including the effects of atmospheric variability.

  14. The 1.5 MW wind turbine of tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    De Wolff, T.J.; Sondergaard, H.

    1996-12-31

    The Danish company Nordtank is one of the pioneers within the wind turbine industry. Since 1981 Nordtank has installed worldwide more than 2300 wind turbine generators with a total name plate capacity that is exceeding 350 MW. This paper will describe two major wind turbine technology developments that Nordtank has accomplished during the last year: Site Optimization of Nordtank wind turbines: Nordtank has developed a flexible design concept for its WTGs in the 500/600 kW range, in order to offer the optimal WTG solution for any given site and wind regime. Nordtank`s 1.5 MW wind turbine: In September 1995, Nordtank was the first company to install a commercial 1.5 NM WTG. This paper will document the development process, the design as well as operations of the Nordtank 1.5 MW WTG.

  15. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Yang, W.

    2013-07-01

    High operation and maintenance costs still hamper the development of the wind industry despite its quick growth worldwide. To reduce unscheduled downtime and avoid catastrophic failures of wind turbines and their components have been and will be crucial to further raise the competitiveness of wind power. Condition monitoring is one of the key tools for achieving such a goal. To enhance the research and development of advanced condition monitoring techniques dedicated to wind turbines, we present an overview of wind turbine condition monitoring, discuss current practices, point out existing challenges, and suggest possible solutions.

  16. NREL Software Aids Offshore Wind Turbine Designs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    NREL researchers are supporting offshore wind power development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of both fixed and floating offshore wind turbines. While existing computer-aided engineering (CAE) models can simulate the conditions and stresses that a land-based wind turbine experiences over its lifetime, offshore turbines require the additional considerations of variations in water depth, soil type, and wind and wave severity, which also necessitate the use of a variety of support-structure types. NREL's core wind CAE tool, FAST, models the additional effects of incident waves, sea currents, and the foundation dynamics of the support structures.

  17. Design and development of nautilus whorl-wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Pramod; Kumar, G. B. Veeresh; Harsha, P. Sai Sri; Kumar, K. A. Udaya

    2017-07-01

    Our life is directly related to energy and its consumption, and the issues of energy research are extremely important and highly sensitive. Scientists and researchers attempt to accelerate solutions for wind energy generation, design parameters under the influence of novel policies adopted for energy management and the concerns for global warming and climate change. The objective of this study is to design a small wind turbine that is optimized for the constraints that come with residential use. The study is aimed at designing a wind turbine for tapping the low speed wind in urban locations. The design process includes the selection of the wind turbine type and the determination of the blade airfoil, finding the maximum drag model and manufacturing of the turbine economically. In this study, the Nautilus turbine is modeled, simulated and the characteristic curves are plotted. The cutting in wind speed for the turbine is around 1m/s. The turbine rotates in a range of 20 rpm to 500 rpm at wind speeds 1m/s to 10m/s On a below average day at noon where the wind speed are usually low the turbine recorded an rpm of 120 (average value) at 4m/s wind speeds. This study focuses on a computational fluid dynamics analysis of compressible radially outward flow.

  18. Wind turbine speed control by automatic yawing

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenemser, K.H.; Swift, A.H.P.

    1983-05-01

    A yaw dynamics analysis was developed for a two-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine with passive cyclic pitch variation achieved by letting the blade pair freely oscillate about a common axis with which the blades formed a small prelag angle. This type of rotor was found capable of high yaw rates without imposing vibratory hub moments and without producing noticeable flapping amplitudes. Experiments were conducted with a tail vane stabilized 7.6-m-diam wind rotor driving a three-phase alternator tuned and loaded to produce a rotor torque proportional to the square of the rotor speed. Two yaw control systems which replaced the usual blade feathering controls were investigated: an active yaw control system using a hydraulic rotor speed governor, and a passive system responding to a combination of rotor thrust and torque. During strong gusts both systems limited rotor speed quite accurately. The passive system appeared to be more promising because of its greater reliability and because of the greater ease of adapting it to larger size wind turbines.

  19. Bonding quality evaluation of wind turbine blades by pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui-gang; Kong, De-juan; Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Zhang, Cun-lin; Feng, Li-chun

    2011-08-01

    The glue defects of the wind turbine blades which are composed of the glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite plates make its strength greatly reduced, so security issues could be caused. To improve the safety of wind turbine blades, nondestructive testing technique using pulsed thermography is being investigated in this study. The results of ultrasonic C scan test were compared with the results of thermography. The current results indicated that both methods can successfully detect two gluing situations. However, the inspect specimens need to be putted in the water in the detection process by ultrasonic C scan, and the detection time lasts much longer than pulsed thermography. And in situ applications, the measured wind turbine blades are normally in the size of several tens meter, and also only one side is available for the inspection especially at the tip of blades. Thus, ultrasonic C scan of current experimental setup is not suitable for the applications in the field. Pulsed thermography is not necessary to contact with inspected specimens. The infrared results by pulsed thermography indicate that the shape and size of deficiency glue defects in the specimens show good agreement with the real situation, so it is more suitable for the inspection in the field. The preliminary results in this study indicate that pulse thermography can be used to detect glue faults of GFRP which are not too thick.

  20. Wind Turbine Clutter Mitigation in Coastal UHF Radar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caijun; Jiang, Dapeng; Wen, Biyang

    2014-01-01

    Coastal UHF radar provides a unique capability to measure the sea surface dynamic parameters and detect small moving targets, by exploiting the low energy loss of electromagnetic waves propagating along the salty and good conducting ocean surface. It could compensate the blind zone of HF surface wave radar at close range and reach further distance than microwave radars. However, its performance is susceptible to wind turbines which are usually installed on the shore. The size of a wind turbine is much larger than the wavelength of radio waves at UHF band, which results in large radar cross section. Furthermore, the rotation of blades adds time-varying Doppler frequency to the clutter and makes the suppression difficult. This paper proposes a mitigation method which is based on the specific periodicity of wind turbine clutter and performed mainly in the time-frequency domain. Field experimental data of a newly developed UHF radar are used to verify this method, and the results prove its effectiveness. PMID:24550709

  1. Wind turbine clutter mitigation in coastal UHF radar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Pan, Chao; Wang, Caijun; Jiang, Dapeng; Wen, Biyang

    2014-01-01

    Coastal UHF radar provides a unique capability to measure the sea surface dynamic parameters and detect small moving targets, by exploiting the low energy loss of electromagnetic waves propagating along the salty and good conducting ocean surface. It could compensate the blind zone of HF surface wave radar at close range and reach further distance than microwave radars. However, its performance is susceptible to wind turbines which are usually installed on the shore. The size of a wind turbine is much larger than the wavelength of radio waves at UHF band, which results in large radar cross section. Furthermore, the rotation of blades adds time-varying Doppler frequency to the clutter and makes the suppression difficult. This paper proposes a mitigation method which is based on the specific periodicity of wind turbine clutter and performed mainly in the time-frequency domain. Field experimental data of a newly developed UHF radar are used to verify this method, and the results prove its effectiveness.

  2. Model Wind Turbines Tested at Full-Scale Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. A.; Kiefer, J.; Westergaard, C.; Hultmark, M.

    2016-09-01

    The enormous length scales associated with modern wind turbines complicate any efforts to predict their mechanical loads and performance. Both experiments and numerical simulations are constrained by the large Reynolds numbers governing the full- scale aerodynamics. The limited fundamental understanding of Reynolds number effects in combination with the lack of empirical data affects our ability to predict, model, and design improved turbines and wind farms. A new experimental approach is presented, which utilizes a highly pressurized wind tunnel (up to 220 bar). It allows exact matching of the Reynolds numbers (no matter how it is defined), tip speed ratios, and Mach numbers on a geometrically similar, small-scale model. The design of a measurement and instrumentation stack to control the turbine and measure the loads in the pressurized environment is discussed. Results are then presented in the form of power coefficients as a function of Reynolds number and Tip Speed Ratio. Due to gearbox power loss, a preliminary study has also been completed to find the gearbox efficiency and the resulting correction has been applied to the data set.

  3. Wind Turbines Make Waves: Why Some Residents near Wind Turbines Become Ill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havas, Magda; Colling, David

    2011-01-01

    People who live near wind turbines complain of symptoms that include some combination of the following: difficulty sleeping, fatigue, depression, irritability, aggressiveness, cognitive dysfunction, chest pain/pressure, headaches, joint pain, skin irritations, nausea, dizziness, tinnitus, and stress. These symptoms have been attributed to the…

  4. Multi-piece wind turbine rotor blades and wind turbines incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Moroz,; Mieczyslaw, Emilian [San Diego, CA

    2008-06-03

    A multisection blade for a wind turbine includes a hub extender having a pitch bearing at one end, a skirt or fairing having a hole therethrough and configured to mount over the hub extender, and an outboard section configured to couple to the pitch bearing.

  5. Wind Turbines Make Waves: Why Some Residents near Wind Turbines Become Ill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havas, Magda; Colling, David

    2011-01-01

    People who live near wind turbines complain of symptoms that include some combination of the following: difficulty sleeping, fatigue, depression, irritability, aggressiveness, cognitive dysfunction, chest pain/pressure, headaches, joint pain, skin irritations, nausea, dizziness, tinnitus, and stress. These symptoms have been attributed to the…

  6. Wind turbine airfoil investigations in customized turbulent inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Experimental airfoil characterizations are usually performed in laminar or unsteady periodical flows. Neither of these matches the flow conditions of natural atmospheric flows as experienced by wind turbine blades. In the presented experimental study, an active grid is used to generate turbulent inflow with customized properties, like reduced frequencies or inflow angles. This is used not only to tune flow properties, but also to mimic time series of measured atmospheric wind speeds and inflow angles in the wind tunnel. Experiments were performed on a wind turbine dedicated DU 00-W-212 airfoil to obtain highly resolved force data and chord-wise pressure distributions at Re=500,000 and Re=900,000. Additional to a laminar baseline case, unsteady sinusoidal inflow fluctuations were applied as well as three different turbulent inflows with comparable turbulence intensity, but different inflow angle fluctuations to grasp the impact of inflow characteristics on the airfoil performance. In comparison with the laminar inflow case, the lift peak of the polar is shifted to higher angles of attack in the turbulent flows. While the laminar lift polars show a rather sudden transition to stall, a softer transition with an extended stall region is found for all turbulent cases. The presented work was performed within the project AVATAR and is funded from the European Unions Seventh Program for research, technological development and demonstration under Grand Agreement No FP7-ENERGY-2013-1/n 608396.

  7. Low-cost Triangular Lattice Towers for Small Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ram Chandra

    This thesis focuses on the study of low-cost steel and bamboo triangular lattice towers for small wind turbines. The core objective is to determine the material properties of bamboo and assess the feasibility of bamboo towers. Using the experimentally determined buckling resistance, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio, a 12 m high triangular lattice tower for a 500W wind turbine has been modeled as a tripod to formulate the analytical solutions for the stresses and tower deflections, which enables design of the tower based on buckling strength of tower legs. The tripod formulation combines the imposed loads, the base distance between the legs and tower height, and cross-sectional dimensions of the tower legs. The tripod model was used as a reference for the initial design of the bamboo tower and extended to finite element analysis. A 12 m high steel lattice tower was also designed for the same turbine to serve as a comparison to the bamboo tower. The primary result of this work indicates that bamboo is a valid structural material. The commercial software package ANSYS APDL was used to carry out the tower analysis, evaluate the validity of the tripod model, and extend the analysis for the tower design. For this purpose, a 12 m high steel lattice tower for a 500 W wind turbine was examined. Comparison of finite element analysis and analytical solution has shown that tripod model can be accurately used in the design of lattice towers. The tower designs were based on the loads and safety requirements of international standard for small wind turbine safety, IEC 61400-2. For connecting the bamboo sections in the lattice tower, a steel-bamboo adhesive joint combined with conventional lashing has been proposed. Also, considering the low durability of bamboo, periodic replacement of tower members has been proposed. The result of this study has established that bamboo could be used to construct cost-effective and lightweight lattice towers for wind turbines of 500 Watt

  8. Mod-0A Wind Turbine in Block Island, Rhode Island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-06-21

    A Mod-0A 200-kilowatt wind turbine designed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center and constructed in Block Island, Rhode Island. The wind turbine program was a joint program between NASA and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) during the 1970s to develop less expensive forms of energy. NASA Lewis was assigned the responsibility of developing large horizontal-axis wind turbines. The program included a series of increasingly powerful wind turbines, designated: Mod-0A, Mod-1, WTS-4, and Mod-5. The program’s first device was a Mod-0 100-kilowatt wind turbine test bed at NASA’s Plum Brook Station. This Mod-0A 200-kilowatt turbine, completed in 1977, was the program’s second-generation device. It included a 125-foot diameter blade atop a 100-foot tall tower. This early wind turbine was designed determine its operating problems, integrate with the local utilities, and assess the attitude of the local community. There were additional Mod-0A turbines built in Culebra, Puerto Rico; Clayton, New Mexico; and Oahu, Hawaii. The Mod-0A turbines suffered durability issues with the rotor blade and initially appeared unreliable. NASA engineers addressed the problems, and the turbines proved to be reliable and efficient devices that operated for a number of years. The information gained from these early models was vital to the design and improvement of the later generations.

  9. Wind speed reductions by large-scale wind turbine deployments lower turbine efficiencies and set low wind power potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lee; Kleidon, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Wind turbines generate electricity by removing kinetic energy from the atmosphere. Large numbers of wind turbines are likely to reduce wind speeds, which lowers estimates of electricity generation from what would be presumed from unaffected conditions. Here, we test how well wind power potentials that account for this effect can be estimated without explicitly simulating atmospheric dynamics. We first use simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) that explicitly simulates the effects of wind turbines to derive wind power limits (GCM estimate), and compare them to a simple approach derived from the climatological conditions without turbines [vertical kinetic energy (VKE) estimate]. On land, we find strong agreement between the VKE and GCM estimates with respect to electricity generation rates (0.32 and 0.37 We m-2) and wind speed reductions by 42 and 44%. Over ocean, the GCM estimate is about twice the VKE estimate (0.59 and 0.29 We m-2) and yet with comparable wind speed reductions (50 and 42%). We then show that this bias can be corrected by modifying the downward momentum flux to the surface. Thus, large-scale limits to wind power can be derived from climatological conditions without explicitly simulating atmospheric dynamics. Consistent with the GCM simulations, the approach estimates that only comparatively few land areas are suitable to generate more than 1 We m-2 of electricity and that larger deployment scales are likely to reduce the expected electricity generation rate of each turbine. We conclude that these atmospheric effects are relevant for planning the future expansion of wind power.

  10. Evaluation of feasibility of prestressed concrete for use in wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiblein, S.; Londahl, D. S.; Furlong, D. B.; Dreier, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of the use of prestressed concrete as a material for low cost blades for wind turbines was conducted. A baseline blade design was achieved for an experimental wind turbine that met aerodynamic and structural requirements. Significant cost reductions were indicated for volume production. Casting of a model blade section showed no fabrication problems. Coupled dynamic analysis revealed that adverse rotor tower interactions can be significant with heavy rotor blades.

  11. Long-period gratings for selective monitoring of loads on a wind turbine blade.

    PubMed

    Glavind, L; Buggy, S; Canning, J; Gao, S; Cook, K; Luo, Y; Peng, G D; Skipper, B F; Kristensen, M

    2014-06-20

    An optical fiber sensor based on long-period gratings (LPG) for selective measurements of flap- and edge-wise bending of a wind turbine blade is presented. Two consecutive LPGs separated by 40 mm interfere to improve resolution and reduce noise in a D-shaped fiber. The mode profile of the device was characterized experimentally to provide a model describing the mode couplings. The sensor was tested on a wind turbine blade.

  12. Wind Resource Assessment and Requested Wind Turbine Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ken; Wolar, John

    2012-10-22

    Alternate Energy Solutions, Inc. (“AESWR”) was engaged by the Town of Brookston (“Brookston”) to assemble, erect and maintain one 60 m XHD meteorological tower manufactured by NRG Systems, Inc.; for monitoring, recording and evaluating collected wind data. It is the opinion of AESWR staff that study results support the development of a wind turbine project at the Bol Family Farm provided: a) additional land is leased for the project; b) project construction costs are controlled; and c) a prudent power purchase agreement is negotiated with a power take-off entity. We believe that a project having an aggregate nameplate rating sized from 6.0 MW to 20 MW would be appropriate for this location. We recommend 100-125 acres of land per installed MW be used as a general rule for acquiring wind energy land lease agreements, total land lease holdings to be acquired would then approach 750 acres to 2,500 acres.

  13. Control of Wind Turbines: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Laks, J. H.; Pao, L. Y.; Wright, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We review the objectives and techniques used in the control of horizontal axis wind turbines at the individual turbine level, where controls are applied to the turbine blade pitch and generator. The turbine system is modeled as a flexible structure operating in the presence of turbulent wind disturbances. Some overview of the various stages of turbine operation and control strategies used to maximize energy capture in below rated wind speeds is given, but emphasis is on control to alleviate loads when the turbine is operating at maximum power. After reviewing basic turbine control objectives, we provide an overview of the common basic linear control approaches and then describe more advanced control architectures and why they may provide significant advantages.

  14. Turbulence within variable-size wind turbine arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, L. P.; Arndt, R. E. A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2014-12-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was performed to study turbulence processes within a model wind turbine array of 3 by 8 model wind turbines of alternating sizes placed aligned with the mean flow. The model wind farm was placed in a boundary layer developed over both smooth and rough surfaces under neutrally stratified conditions. Turbulence statistics, TKE budget terms, and the spectral structure of the turbulence generated within and above the wind farm reveal relevant information about the processes modulating the turbulent energy transfer from the boundary layer to the turbines. The results of the experiment suggest that heterogeneity in turbine size within a wind farm introduce complex flow interactions not seen in a homogeneous farm, and may have positive effects on turbulent loading on the turbines and turbulent exchange with the atmosphere. In general, large scale motions are heavily dampened behind the first row of turbines but a portion of such structures are generated far inside the wind farm, and the scale of the most energetic eddy motions was relatively consistent at different elevations. Overall, the experiment revealed the possibility that heterogeneity of wind turbine size within wind farms have the potential to change the overall potential to harvest energy from the wind, and alter the economics of a project.

  15. Small Wind Turbine Installation Compatibility Demonstration Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    11160) on a small ridge (44°03.793’ N, 75°47.644’ W) (see red circle with “1” in Fig. 4). The area has a dense tree cover that is approximately 40...14 6 Tall flagged trees in foreground near Candidate Site 2 suggest strong, persistent winds from left to...modified from Figures 2 and 3 of Niver (2009). Red circle indicates the approximate area of Figure 3 below with all of the considered turbine sites. We

  16. Model 0A wind turbine generator FMEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, William E.; Lalli, Vincent R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) conducted for the Wind Turbine Generators are presented. The FMEA was performed for the functional modes of each system, subsystem, or component. The single-point failures were eliminated for most of the systems. The blade system was the only exception. The qualitative probability of a blade separating was estimated at level D-remote. Many changes were made to the hardware as a result of this analysis. The most significant change was the addition of the safety system. Operational experience and need to improve machine availability have resulted in subsequent changes to the various systems which are also reflected in this FMEA.

  17. Wind turbine blade with viscoelastic damping

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Ryan A.; Mullings, Justin L.

    2017-01-10

    A wind turbine blade (60) damped by viscoelastic material (54, 54A-F) sandwiched between stiffer load-bearing sublayers (52A, 52B, 56A, 56B) in portions of the blade effective to damp oscillations (38) of the blade. The viscoelastic material may be located in one or more of: a forward portion (54A) of the shell, an aft portion (54D) of the shell, pressure and suction side end caps (54B) of an internal spar, internal webbing walls (54C, 54E), and a trailing edge core (54F).

  18. Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system

    DOEpatents

    Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-10-04

    A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener loads and pitch bearing loads. The shroud may further incorporate a ring gear for driving an electric generator. In one embodiment, the electric generator may be cantilevered from the nacelle such that the gear on the generator drive shaft is contacted by the ring gear of the shroud. The shroud also provides protection for the gearing and aids in preventing gear lubricant contamination.

  19. MOD-0 wind turbine dynamics test correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    The behavior of the teetered, downwind, free yaw, MOD-0 wind turbine, as represented by NASA dynamic test data, was used to support confidence in the Hamilton Standard computer code simulations. Trim position, performance at trim, and teeter response as predicted by the computer codes were compared to test results. Using the computer codes, other possible configurations for MOD-0 were investigated. Several new test configurations are recommended for exploring free yaw behavior. It is shown that eliminating rotor tilt and optimizing cooling and blade twist can contribute to good free yaw behavior and stability. The effects of rotor teeter, teeter gravity balance, inflow and other physical and operating parameters were also investigated.

  20. Aerodynamic design of optimum wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, A. M.

    1982-11-01

    A design procedure is presented and illustrated for one-, two- or three-bladed horizontal axis, constant chord wind turbines of optimum performance. Following specification of the number of blades, the lift coefficient, and the lift-to-drag ratio at the design point, algorithms are developed for finding: the tip-speed ratio at which the optimum power coefficient is developed, the ratio of blade chord to radius, and the manner in which each blade should be twisted along its axis. Programs are given for implementing the calculations iteratively on a programmable calculator.

  1. Wind turbine wake properties from Doppler lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichugina, Y.; Banta, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Wake properties were estimated from the High-Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) measurements during the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) in the spring of 2011. Velocity deficit, wake downwind extent, and wake meandering were obtained by detailed analysis of both lidar vertical-slice scans, performed straddling along the lidar-turbine centerline, and lidar conical scans, performed in narrow, nearly horizontal sectors that include the wind turbine inflow, and its wake at four levels. Simultaneous measurements of inflow and turbine outflow were corrected by terrain and wind direction to obtain mean wake properties. It has been found out that an operating wind turbine generates a wake with the maximum velocity deficit varying from 20% to 70% extending up to 10 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine, depending on the wind strength and atmospheric turbulence. Details including images and animations of the wake behavior will be presented.

  2. DOE/NASA Lewis large wind turbine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the large wind turbine activities managed by NASA is given. These activities include resuls from the first and second generation field machines (Mod-0A, -1, and -2), the status of the Department of Interior WTS-4 machine for which NASA is responsible for technical management, and the design phase of the third generation wind turbines (Mod-5).

  3. Noise generation of upwind motor wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Noise sources of wind turbines with rotors upstream of the support structure are discussed along with methodology for sound level prediction. Estimated noise levels for the MOD-2 wind turbine are presented operating in both the upwind and downwind configurations. Results indicate that upwind rotor configurations may be advantageous from an acoustical standpoint.

  4. DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C.P.; Smith, B.; Laxson, A.; Thresher, B. ); Goldman, P. . Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.)

    1993-05-01

    The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

  5. DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P; Smith, B; Laxson, A; Thresher, B; Goldman, P

    1993-05-01

    The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

  6. General review of the MOSTAS computer code for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungundji, J.; Wendell, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The MOSTAS computer code for wind turbine analysis is reviewed, and techniques and methods used in its analyses are described. Impressions of its strengths and weakness, and recommendations for its application, modification, and further development are made. Basic techniques used in wind turbine stability and response analyses for systems with constant and periodic coefficients are reviewed.

  7. Reduction of radar cross-section of a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah; Brock, Billy C.; Clem, Paul G.; Loui, Hung; Allen, Steven E.

    2016-08-02

    The various technologies presented herein relate to formation of a wind turbine blade having a reduced radar signature in comparison with a turbine blade fabricated using conventional techniques. Various techniques and materials are presented to facilitate reduction in radar signature of a wind turbine blade, where such techniques and materials are amenable for incorporation into existing manufacturing techniques without degradation in mechanical or physical performance of the blade or major alteration of the blade profile.

  8. Detection of Wind Turbine Power Performance Abnormalities Using Eigenvalue Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    Detection of Wind Turbine Power Performance Abnormalities Using Eigenvalue Analysis Georgios Alexandros Skrimpas1, Christian Walsted Sweeney2, Kun S...University of Denmark, Lyngby, 2800, Denmark nm@elektro.dtu.dk jh@elektro.dtu.dk ABSTRACT Condition monitoring of wind turbines is a field of continu...ous research and development as new turbine configurations enter into the market and new failure modes appear. Systems utilising well established

  9. Is a wind turbine a point source? (L).

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2011-02-01

    Measurements show that practically all noise of wind turbine noise is produced by turbine blades, sometimes a few tens of meters long, despite that the model of a point source located at the hub height is commonly used. The plane of rotating blades is the critical location of the receiver because the distances to the blades are the shortest. It is shown that such location requires certain condition to be met. The model is valid far away from the wind turbine as well.

  10. Avian Hearing and the Avoidance of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Dooling, R.

    2002-06-01

    This report provides a complete summary of what is known about basic hearing capabilities in birds in relation to the characteristics of noise generated by wind turbines. It is a review of existing data on bird hearing with some preliminary estimates of environmental noise and wind turbine noise at Altamont Pass, California, in the summer of 1999. It is intended as a resource in future discussions of the role that hearing might play in bird avoidance of turbines.

  11. Modal testing in the design evaluation of wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Lauffer, J.P.; Carne, T.G.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1988-04-01

    This report reviews several techniques of low-frequency excitation used successfully to measure modal parameters for wind turbines, including impact, wind, step-relaxation, and human input. As one application of these techniques, a prototype turbine was tested and two modal frequencies were found to be close to integral multiples of the operating speed, which caused a resonant condition. The design was modified to shift these frequencies, and the turbine was retested to confirm expected changes in modal frequencies.

  12. (Construction of a wind turbine). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, L.E.

    1982-03-22

    A wind powered electrical generator was built by industrial arts students working in electricity, woodworking, and metal technology facilities. The blades were originally aluminum frames covered with sailcloth. These were replaced with hand-carved laminated basswood blades. Original plans called for a bullet and downwind propeller, but this was replaced with an upwind propeller and an aft-mounted tailfin. A V-belt and pulley drive transmits power from the turbine and a motorcycle brake stops the machine during high winds and/or for safe servicing. The original 13 volt, 105 amp alternator was replaced by a 12 volt, 100 amp dc generator. Publicity and dissemination events are listed as well as expenditures. (LEW)

  13. Wind turbine generator with improved operating subassemblies

    DOEpatents

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1985-01-01

    A wind turbine includes a yaw spring return assembly to return the nacelle from a position to which it has been rotated by yawing forces, thus preventing excessive twisting of the power cables and control cables. It also includes negative coning restrainers to limit the bending of the flexible arms of the rotor towards the tower, and stop means on the rotor shaft to orient the blades in a vertical position during periods when the unit is upwind when the wind commences. A pendulum pitch control mechanism is improved by orienting the pivot axis for the pendulum arm at an angle to the longitudinal axis of its support arm, and excessive creep is of the synthetic resin flexible beam support for the blades is prevented by a restraining cable which limits the extent of pivoting of the pendulum during normal operation but which will permit further pivoting under abnormal conditions to cause the rotor to stall.

  14. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitates specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.

  15. Wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P G; Miller, L S; Quandt, G A

    1995-04-01

    Five trailing-edge devices were investigated to determine their potential as wind-turbine aerodynamic brakes, and for power modulation and load alleviation. Several promising configurations were identified. A new device, called the spoiler-flap, appears to be the best alternative. It is a simple device that is effective at all angles of attack. It is not structurally intrusive, and it has the potential for small actuating loads. It is shown that simultaneous achievement of a low lift/drag ratio and high drag is the determinant of device effectiveness, and that these attributes must persist up to an angle of attack of 45{degree}. It is also argued that aerodynamic brakes must be designed for a wind speed of at least 45 m/s (100 mph).

  16. Passive load control for large wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.

    2010-05-01

    Wind energy research activities at Sandia National Laboratories focus on developing large rotors that are lighter and more cost-effective than those designed with current technologies. Because gravity scales as the cube of the blade length, gravity loads become a constraining design factor for very large blades. Efforts to passively reduce turbulent loading has shown significant potential to reduce blade weight and capture more energy. Research in passive load reduction for wind turbines began at Sandia in the late 1990's and has moved from analytical studies to blade applications. This paper discusses the test results of two Sandia prototype research blades that incorporate load reduction techniques. The TX-100 is a 9-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling with the use of off-axis carbon in the skin. The STAR blade is a 27-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling by sweeping the blade in a geometric fashion.

  17. Physical Model Study of the Fully Developed Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer in the UNH Flow Physics Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Results from an experimental study of an array of up to 100 model wind turbines with 0.25 m diameter are reported. The study was conducted in the UNH Flow Physics Facility (FPF), which has test section dimensions of 6.0 m wide, 2.7 m high and 72.0 m long. For a given configuration (spacing, initial conditions, etc.), the model wind farm reaches a ``fully developed'' condition, in which turbulence statistics remain the same from one row to the next within and above the wind turbine array. Of interest is the transport of kinetic energy within the wind turbine array boundary layer (WTABL). Model wind farms of up to 20 rows are possible in the FPF at the wind turbine scale used. The present studies in the FPF are able to achieve the fully developed WTABL condition, which can provide valuable insight to the optimization of wind farm energy production. The FPF can achieve a boundary layer height on the order of 1 m at the beginning of the wind turbine array. The wind turbine array was constructed of porous disks, which where drag (thrust) matched to wind turbines at typical operating conditions and therefore act as momentum sinks similar to wind turbines. The flow in the WTABL was measured with constant temperature anemometry using an X-wire.

  18. Wind shear at turbine rotor heights from Doppler lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichugina, Y.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N.; Brewer, A.; Sandberg, S.

    2009-12-01

    As the capacity and size of modern wind turbines increase to take advantage of stronger winds at higher elevations, the confidence in wind resource assessment by “extrapolation method”, routinely used in the wind energy industry, decreases. Error in wind resource approximation at elevated heights can lead to substantial uncertainty in power production and wind farm economics. Remote sensing measurements of wind and turbulence profiles through the entire layer of turbine rotor heights, can provide accurate information on wind flow, thereby improving preliminary evaluation of turbine performance and power production. This paper presents lidar measurements of wind profiles during two experiments in the south-eastern part of the Great Plains and shows mean wind shear at turbine rotor heights as being greater than predicted by the assumption of logarithmic wind profile or power law relation. In addition to the regional climatology over relatively flat terrain, frequent development of the nocturnal Low-Level Jet can lead to significant deviations of wind profile from theoretical extrapolations. Analysis of wind and turbulence characteristics over a wide range of heights, variations of wind shear in time during strong and calm wind nights, along with examples of error in the actual and predicted wind resources will be given.

  19. Calibrated Blade-Element/Momentum Theory Aerodynamic Model of the MARIN Stock Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Goupee, A.; Kimball, R.; de Ridder, E. J.; Helder, J.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2015-04-02

    In this paper, a calibrated blade-element/momentum theory aerodynamic model of the MARIN stock wind turbine is developed and documented. The model is created using open-source software and calibrated to closely emulate experimental data obtained by the DeepCwind Consortium using a genetic algorithm optimization routine. The provided model will be useful for those interested in validating interested in validating floating wind turbine numerical simulators that rely on experiments utilizing the MARIN stock wind turbine—for example, the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30’s Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continued, with Correlation project.

  20. Duration Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2013-06-01

    This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines. Five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a part of round one of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality. Test results will provide manufacturers with reports that can be used to fulfill part of the requirements for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment included a grid-connected Ventera Energy Corporation VT10 wind turbine mounted on an 18.3-m (60-ft) self-supporting lattice tower manufactured by Rohn.

  1. On the biological plausibility of Wind Turbine Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert V

    2015-01-01

    An emerging environmental health issue relates to potential ill-effects of wind turbine noise. There have been numerous suggestions that the low-frequency acoustic components in wind turbine signals can cause symptoms associated with vestibular system disorders, namely vertigo, nausea, and nystagmus. This constellation of symptoms has been labeled as Wind Turbine Syndrome, and has been identified in case studies of individuals living close to wind farms. This review discusses whether it is biologically plausible for the turbine noise to stimulate the vestibular parts of the inner ear and, by extension, cause Wind Turbine Syndrome. We consider the sound levels that can activate the semicircular canals or otolith end organs in normal subjects, as well as in those with preexisting conditions known to lower vestibular threshold to sound stimulation.

  2. Wind turbines: is there a human health risk?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer D; Roberts, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    The term "Wind Turbine Syndrome" was coined in a recently self-published book, which hypothesized that a multitude of symptoms such as headache and dizziness resulted from wind turbines generating low frequency sound (LFS). The objective of this article is to provide a summary of the peer-reviewed literature on the research that has examined the relationship between human health effects and exposure to LFS and sound generated from the operation of wind turbines. At present, a specific health condition has not been documented in the peer-reviewed literature that has been classified as a disease caused by exposure to sound levels and frequencies generated by the operation of wind turbines. Communities are experiencing a heightened sense of annoyance and fear from the development and siting of wind turbine farms. High-quality research and effective risk communication can advance this course from one of panic to one of understanding and exemplification for other environmental advancements.

  3. Darrieus wind-turbine airfoil configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Fritschen, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what aerodynamic performance improvement, if any, could be achieved by judiciously choosing the airfoil sections for Darrieus wind turbine blades. Analysis was limited to machines using two blades of infinite aspect ratio, having rotor solidites from seven to twenty-one percent, and operating at maximum Reynolds numbers of approximately three million. Ten different airfoils, having thickness to chord ratios of twelve, fifteen and eighteen percent, were investigated. Performance calculations indicated that the NACA 6-series airfoils yield peak power coefficients at least as great as the NACA four-digit airfoils which have historically been chosen for Darrieus turbines. Furthermore, the power coefficient-tip speed ratio curves were broader and flatter for the 6-series airfoils. Sample calculations for an NACA 63/sub 2/-015 airfoil showed an annual energy output increase of 17 to 27% depending upon rotor solidity, compared to an NACA 0015 airfoil. An attempt was made to account for the flow curvature effects associated with Darrieus turbines by transforming the NACA 63/sub 2/-015 airfoil to an appropriate shape.

  4. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2010-01-01

    This Wyoming wind-turbine data set represents locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 1, 2009. Each wind turbine is assigned to a wind farm. For each turbine, this report contains information about the following: potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, land ownership, county, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with its wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some attributes are estimates based on information that was obtained through the American Wind Energy Association and miscellaneous online reports. The locations are derived from August 2009 true-color aerial photographs made by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of approximately ?5 meters. The location of wind turbines under construction during the development of this data set will likely be less accurate than the location of turbines already completed. The original purpose for developing the data presented here was to evaluate the effect of wind energy development on seasonal habitat used by greater sage-grouse. Additionally, these data will provide a planning tool for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Team and for other wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey's Fort Collins Science Center. Specifically, these data will be used to quantify disturbance of the landscape related to wind energy as well as quantifying indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set was developed for the 2010 project 'Seasonal predictive habitat models for greater sage-grouse in Wyoming.' This project's spatially explicit seasonal distribution models of sage-grouse in Wyoming will provide resource managers with tools for conservation planning. These

  5. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  6. Synchronization of wind turbine generators against an infinite bus under gusting wind conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, H. H.; Gilbert, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of synchronizing a wind turbine generator against an infinite bus are performed on a digital computer. In the digital simulation, wind gusts of different magnitudes and durations are hypothesized. Prior to the synchronization, differences of the frequency and phase position between voltages of the alternator and the bus are also included in the simulation. Solutions for rotor speed, generator power angle, electromagnetic torque, wind turbine torque, wind turbine blade pitch angle, and armature current are simulated and presented graphically. The ERDA-NASA 100-kW wind turbine is used as a case study. The results so obtained will thus have immediate applications.

  7. Synchronization of wind turbine generators against an infinite bus under gusting wind conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, H. H.; Gilbert, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of synchronizing a wind turbine generator against an infinite bus are performed on a digital computer. In the digital simulation, wind gusts of different magnitudes and durations are hypothesized. Prior to the synchronization, differences of the frequency and phase position between voltages of the alternator and the bus are also included in the simulation. Solutions for rotor speed, generator power angle, electromagnetic torque, wind turbine torque, wind turbine blade pitch angle, and armature current are simulated and presented graphically. The ERDA-NASA 100-kW wind turbine is used as a case study. The results so obtained will thus have immediate applications.

  8. Annoyance, detection and recognition of wind turbine noise.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, Timothy; Bockstael, Annelies; De Weirt, Valentine; Botteldooren, Dick

    2013-07-01

    Annoyance, recognition and detection of noise from a single wind turbine were studied by means of a two-stage listening experiment with 50 participants with normal hearing abilities. In-situ recordings made at close distance from a 1.8-MW wind turbine operating at 22 rpm were mixed with road traffic noise, and processed to simulate indoor sound pressure levels at LAeq 40 dBA. In a first part, where people were unaware of the true purpose of the experiment, samples were played during a quiet leisure activity. Under these conditions, pure wind turbine noise gave very similar annoyance ratings as unmixed highway noise at the same equivalent level, while annoyance by local road traffic noise was significantly higher. In a second experiment, listeners were asked to identify the sample containing wind turbine noise in a paired comparison test. The detection limit of wind turbine noise in presence of highway noise was estimated to be as low as a signal-to-noise ratio of -23 dBA. When mixed with local road traffic, such a detection limit could not be determined. These findings support that noticing the sound could be an important aspect of wind turbine noise annoyance at the low equivalent levels typically observed indoors in practice. Participants that easily recognized wind-turbine(-like) sounds could detect wind turbine noise better when submersed in road traffic noise. Recognition of wind turbine sounds is also linked to higher annoyance. Awareness of the source is therefore a relevant aspect of wind turbine noise perception which is consistent with previous research.

  9. Aeroelastic measurements and simulations of a small wind turbine operating in the built environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. P.; Bradney, D. R.; Clausen, P. D.

    2016-09-01

    Small wind turbines, when compared to large commercial scale wind turbines, often lag behind with respect to research investment, technological development, and experimental verification of design standards. In this study we assess the simplified load equations outlined in IEC 61400.2-2013 for use in determining fatigue loading of small wind turbine blades. We compare these calculated loads to fatigue damage cycles from both measured in-service operation, and aeroelastic modelling of a small 5 kW Aerogenesis wind turbine. Damage cycle ranges and corresponding stress ratios show good agreement when comparing both aeroelastic simulations and operational measurements. Loads calculated from simplified load equations were shown to significantly overpredict load ranges while underpredicting the occurrence of damage cycles per minute of operation by 89%. Due to the difficulty in measuring and acquiring operational loading, we recommend the use of aeroelastic modelling as a method of mitigating the over-conservative simplified load equation for fatigue loading.

  10. Structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Mark A.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2008-03-01

    As electric utility wind turbines increase in size, and correspondingly, increase in initial capital investment cost, there is an increasing need to monitor the health of the structure. Acquiring an early indication of structural or mechanical problems allows operators to better plan for maintenance, possibly operate the machine in a de-rated condition rather than taking the unit off-line, or in the case of an emergency, shut the machine down to avoid further damage. This paper describes several promising structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques that were recently exercised during a fatigue test of a 9 meter glass-epoxy and carbon-epoxy wind turbine blade. The SHM systems were implemented by teams from NASA Kennedy Space Center, Purdue University and Virginia Tech. A commercial off-the-shelf acoustic emission (AE) NDT system gathered blade AE data throughout the test. At a fatigue load cycle rate around 1.2 Hertz, and after more than 4,000,000 fatigue cycles, the blade was diagnostically and visibly failing at the out-board blade spar-cap termination point at 4.5 meters. For safety reasons, the test was stopped just before the blade completely failed. This paper provides an overview of the SHM and NDT system setups and some current test results.

  11. Wind turbine wake meandering at the laboratory and field scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisel, Michael; Musa, Mirko; Hong, Jiarong; Guala, Michele

    2016-11-01

    Flow measurements were collected in the wake of the utility-scale (2.5MW) Eolos wind turbine using a ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR) wind profiler to identify the characteristics of wake meandering at the field scale. The investigation seeks to establish the influence of scale and atmospheric turbulence on wake meandering, which has been observed to leave a strong spectral signature on laboratory measurements in wind tunnel and channel flows. The experimental data include multiple test periods at various downstream distances within the turbine wake. Inflow conditions were assessed using a meteorological tower equipped with sonic anemometers. Additionally, an experiment was conducted in the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel to provide a direct comparison for the utility-scale results and to reaffirm the findings of previous laboratory-scale investigations. Estimates of the wake and inflow one-dimensional velocity spectra were compared to determine whether wake meandering characteristics are present at both scales. An empirical correction to the velocity spectra of the LiDAR and a few options to extract a more local velocity signal are discussed to compensate for the inherent limitations of LiDAR in capturing turbulent fluctuations.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is combined with a turbine model to investigate the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) in a three dimensional turbulent flow. Two methods are used to model the subgrid-scale (SGS) stresses: (a) the Smagorinsky model, and (b) the modulated gradient model. To parameterize the effects of the VAWT on the flow, two VAWT models are developed: (a) the actuator surface model (ASM), in which the time-averaged turbine-induced forces are distributed on a surface swept by the turbine blades, i.e. the actuator surface, and (b) the actuator line model (ALM), in which the instantaneous blade forces are only spatially distributed on lines representing the blades, i.e. the actuator lines. This is the first time that LES is applied and validated for simulation of VAWT wakes by using either the ASM or the ALM techniques. In both models, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces on the blades. The results are compared with flow measurements in the wake of a model straight-bladed VAWT, carried out in the Institute de Méchanique et Statistique de la Turbulence (IMST) water channel. Different combinations of SGS models with VAWT models are studied and a fairly good overall agreement between simulation results and measurement data is observed. In general, the ALM is found to better capture the unsteady-periodic nature of the wake and shows a better agreement with the experimental data compared with the ASM. The modulated gradient model is also found to be a more reliable SGS stress modeling technique, compared with the Smagorinsky model, and it yields reasonable predictions of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics of a VAWT wake using its theoretically-determined model coefficient. Keywords: Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs); VAWT wake; Large-eddy simulation; Actuator surface model; Actuator line model; Smagorinsky model; Modulated gradient model

  13. ERCOT's Dynamic Model of Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Conto, J.; Donoho, K.

    2005-08-01

    By the end of 2003, the total installed wind farm capacity in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system was approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) and the total in the United States was about 5 GW. As the number of wind turbines installed throughout the United States increases, there is a greater need for dynamic wind turbine generator models that can properly model entire power systems for different types of analysis. This paper describes the ERCOT dynamic models and simulations of a simple network with different types of wind turbine models currently available.

  14. Tribological advancements for reliable wind turbine performance.

    PubMed

    Kotzalas, Michael N; Doll, Gary L

    2010-10-28

    Wind turbines have had various limitations to their mechanical system reliability owing to tribological problems over the past few decades. While several studies show that turbines are becoming more reliable, it is still not at an overall acceptable level to the operators based on their current business models. Data show that the electrical components are the most problematic; however, the parts are small, thus easy and inexpensive to replace in the nacelle, on top of the tower. It is the tribological issues that receive the most attention as they have higher costs associated with repair or replacement. These include the blade pitch systems, nacelle yaw systems, main shaft bearings, gearboxes and generator bearings, which are the focus of this review paper. The major tribological issues in wind turbines and the technological developments to understand and solve them are discussed within. The study starts with an overview of fretting corrosion, rolling contact fatigue, and frictional torque of the blade pitch and nacelle yaw bearings, and references to some of the recent design approaches applied to solve them. Also included is a brief overview into lubricant contamination issues in the gearbox and electric current discharge or arcing damage of the generator bearings. The primary focus of this review is the detailed examination of main shaft spherical roller bearing micropitting and gearbox bearing scuffing, micropitting and the newer phenomenon of white-etch area flaking. The main shaft and gearbox are integrally related and are the most commonly referred to items involving expensive repair costs and downtime. As such, the latest research and developments related to the cause of the wear and damage modes and the technologies used or proposed to solve them are presented.

  15. Mars Technologies Spawn Durable Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    2013-01-01

    crews and their power requirements are less, says Bubenheim. In the summers, they bring in larger groups and photovoltaics could supply a lot of power. Using renewable energy technology could be a way of reducing the amount of fuel they have to fly in.Technology TransferTo advance wind turbine technology to meet the requirements of extremely harsh environments like that on Mars, Ames partnered with NSF and the Department of Energy. It was clear that a lot of the same features were also desirable for the cold regions of the Earth, says Bubenheim. NASA took the leadership on the team because we had the longest-term technology a Mars turbine. Years before, NSF had worked with a company called Northern Power Systems (NPS), based in Barre, Vermont, to deploy a 3-kilowatt wind turbine on Black Island off the coast of Antarctica.Sometimes referred to as regenerative life support systems, the concept includes an enclosed self-sufficient habitat that can independently support life for years on end. Such a system aims not only to produce its own food and water but to purify air and convert waste into useful byproducts. In the early 1990s, NASA was planning for an extended stay on Mars, and Bubenheim and his Ames colleagues were concentrating efforts on creating a complete ecological system to sustain human crewmembers during their time on the Red Planet. The main barrier to developing such a system, he says, is energy. Mars has no power plants, and a regenerative system requires equipment that runs on electricity to do everything from regulating humidity in the atmosphere to monitoring the quality of recycled water. The Ames group started looking at how to best make power on a planet that is millions of miles away from Earth and turned to a hybrid concept combining wind and solar power technologies. The reason was that Mars experiences frequent dust storms that can block nearly all sunlight. When there's a dust storm and the wind is blowing, the wind system could be the dominant

  16. Effect of radial inflow on vortex intensification for a tornado-type wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.; Ide, H.

    1982-09-01

    A new wind vortex turbine, called tornado-type wind turbine, was studied both theoretically and experimentally for the purpose of better understanding the basic nature of a vortex flow and further improvement of its power efficiencies. Analytical solutions were obtained from the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity distributions along the radial distance. The result demonstrates the important nature of a vortex structure that, in order to intensify a vortex inside the tower, radial inflow must be provided from the side walls. Based upon this concept, the essential contribution of our experimental work was to furnish the radial inflow by utilizing the dynamic head of incoming wind.

  17. Dissipation of turbulence in the wake of a wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J. K.; Bariteau, L.

    2014-11-06

    The wake of a wind turbine is characterized by increased turbulence and decreased wind speed. Turbines are generally deployed in large groups in wind farms, and so the behaviour of an individual wake as it merges with other wakes and propagates downwind is critical in assessing wind-farm power production. This evolution depends on the rate of turbulence dissipation in the wind-turbine wake, which has not been previously quantified in field-scale measurements. In situ measurements of winds and turbulence dissipation from the wake region of a multi-MW turbine were collected using a tethered lifting system (TLS) carrying a payload of high-rate turbulence probes. Ambient flow measurements were provided from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower located near the turbine. Good agreement between the tower measurements and the TLS measurements was established for a case without a wind-turbine wake. When an operating wind turbine is located between the tower and the TLS so that the wake propagates to the TLS, the TLS measures dissipation rates one to two orders of magnitude higher in the wake than outside of the wake. These data, collected between two and three rotor diameters D downwind of the turbine, document the significant enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate within the wind-turbine wake. These wake measurements suggest that it may be useful to pursue modelling approaches that account for enhanced dissipation. Furthermore. comparisons of wake and non-wake dissipation rates to mean wind speed, wind-speed variance, and turbulence intensity are presented to facilitate the inclusion of these measurements in wake modelling schemes.

  18. Dissipation of turbulence in the wake of a wind turbine

    DOE PAGES

    Lundquist, J. K.; Bariteau, L.

    2014-11-06

    The wake of a wind turbine is characterized by increased turbulence and decreased wind speed. Turbines are generally deployed in large groups in wind farms, and so the behaviour of an individual wake as it merges with other wakes and propagates downwind is critical in assessing wind-farm power production. This evolution depends on the rate of turbulence dissipation in the wind-turbine wake, which has not been previously quantified in field-scale measurements. In situ measurements of winds and turbulence dissipation from the wake region of a multi-MW turbine were collected using a tethered lifting system (TLS) carrying a payload of high-ratemore » turbulence probes. Ambient flow measurements were provided from sonic anemometers on a meteorological tower located near the turbine. Good agreement between the tower measurements and the TLS measurements was established for a case without a wind-turbine wake. When an operating wind turbine is located between the tower and the TLS so that the wake propagates to the TLS, the TLS measures dissipation rates one to two orders of magnitude higher in the wake than outside of the wake. These data, collected between two and three rotor diameters D downwind of the turbine, document the significant enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate within the wind-turbine wake. These wake measurements suggest that it may be useful to pursue modelling approaches that account for enhanced dissipation. Furthermore. comparisons of wake and non-wake dissipation rates to mean wind speed, wind-speed variance, and turbulence intensity are presented to facilitate the inclusion of these measurements in wake modelling schemes.« less

  19. Fatigue testing of low-cost fiberglass composite wind turbine blade materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, K. E.; Bennett, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The static and fatigue behavior of transverse filament tape (TFT) fiberglass/epoxy and TFT/polyester composites was established by the testing of specimens cut from panels fabricated by a filament winding process used for the construction of large experimental wind turbine blades.

  20. Statistical fault diagnosis of wind turbine drivetrain applied to a 5MW floating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghane, Mahdi; Nejad, Amir R.; Blanke, Mogens; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2016-09-01

    Deployment of large scale wind turbine parks, in particular offshore, requires well organized operation and maintenance strategies to make it as competitive as the classical electric power stations. It is important to ensure systems are safe, profitable, and cost-effective. In this regards, the ability to detect, isolate, estimate, and prognose faults plays an important role. One of the critical wind turbine components is the gearbox. Failures in the gearbox are costly both due to the cost of the gearbox itself and also due to high repair downtime. In order to detect faults as fast as possible to prevent them to develop into failure, statistical change detection is used in this paper. The Cumulative Sum Method (CUSUM) is employed to detect possible defects in the downwind main bearing. A high fidelity gearbox model on a 5-MW spar-type wind turbine is used to generate data for fault-free and faulty conditions of the bearing at the rated wind speed and the associated wave condition. Acceleration measurements are utilized to find residuals used to indirectly detect damages in the bearing. Residuals are found to be nonGaussian, following a t-distribution with multivariable characteristic parameters. The results in this paper show how the diagnostic scheme can detect change with desired false alarm and detection probabilities.