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Sample records for experimentally induced dyspnea

  1. Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Fishman, A P; Ledlie, J F

    1979-01-01

    Dyspnea is the medical term for the patient's or subject's complaint of shortness of breath. It encompasses the respiratory discomfort experienced in many different diease states as well as the shortness of breath felt by a normal subject during or after strenuous exercise. Several parameters which have been shown to correlate with the onset or severity of dyspnea are described, including reduced vital capacity, the ratio of minute ventilation to vital capacity, reduced breathing reserve, the work of breathing, and the oxygen cost of breathing. Attempts at quantitation of dyspnea have usually consisted of measuring physiological parameters associated with the sensation, such as the "dyspneic index". The direct measurement of respiratory sensations using modern psycho-physical methods is at an early stage of development. Since the observation that the existence of dyspnea is often unrelated to any disturbance of arterial blood gas composition, it has been generally held that the mechanism of dyspnea is primarily neurophysiological. The neural pathways may conceptually be divided into those which transmit the "dyspnea message" from the respiratory apparatus to integrating centers in the brain, and those concerned with subsequently bringing the sensation to the level of consciousness. It seems likely that there is no single sensing mechanism and neural pathway which will be able to explain dyspnea in the diverse populations of patients and subjects who experience unpleasant respiratory sensations. Three theories concerning mechanisms of dyspnea are briefly described: "length-tension inappropriateness", vagal afferent activity especially from the J-receptors, and the recent concept of diaphragmatic fatigue. Some specific characteristics of the shortness of breath experienced in certain disease states are described, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, bronchial asthma, pulmonary fibrosis and congestive heart disease.

  2. Sinusitis and chronic progressive exercise-induced cough and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adam N; Simon, Ronald A; Woessner, Katharine M

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man with exercise-induced dyspnea, cough, chest tightness, and recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. Evaluation revealed IgE sensitization to grass, tree, and weed pollen, no evidence of obstruction on spirometry, and a negative methacholine challenge. Diagnostic considerations included allergic and nonallergic rhinitis, asthma, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, vocal cord dysfunction, extra-esophageal manifestations of acid reflux, and vasculitits. Further evaluation with sinus imaging, laryngoscopy, ambulatory pharyngeal pH testing, upper endoscopy, and bronchoscopy led to a diagnosis. Key issues surrounding the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to this patient's condition are reviewed.

  3. A 45-Year-Old Man With Recurrent Dyspnea and Hemoptysis during Exercise: Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Edema

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Sung; Lee, Minhyeok; Kwon, Oh Jung; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis during exercise. A chest computed tomography (CT) revealed multifocal diffuse patchy ground glass opacity and interlobular septal thickening in both the lungs. Permeability pulmonary edema or pulmonary hemorrhage was suspected. Serologic studies for autoimmune disorders and vasculitis were negative. There was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy, other hematopoietic disease or infectious disease. Considering correlation with exercise, we diagnosed exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) or exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE). The patient was managed with antifibrinolytics, antibiotics, and antitussive agent. After a week, follow-up chest CT revealed completely resolved pulmonary hemorrhage. About 2 months after the first event, he visited again with dyspnea and hemoptysis during running. In the present study, we report a case of recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage after exercise. PMID:26508928

  4. Sensory and affective aspects of dyspnea contribute differentially to the Borg scale's measurement of dyspnea.

    PubMed

    von Leupoldt, Andreas; Ambruzsova, Rita; Nordmeyer, Simone; Jeske, Nina; Dahme, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    Recent research has shown that distinct dimensions in the perception of dyspnea can be differentiated; however, most studies to date have only used a global rating scale for the measurement of this sensation. This study examined the different influence of sensory and affective aspects of perceived dyspnea on the commonly used Borg scale, which measures the global perception of dyspnea. Dyspnea was induced in 16 healthy volunteers (mean age 26.2 +/- 6.3 years) by breathing through an inspiratory resistive load (3.57 kPa/l/s) in two experimental conditions (attention and distraction). After each of the two conditions the experienced intensity (i.e., sensory dimension) and unpleasantness (i.e., affective dimension) of dyspnea were rated on separate visual analog scales (VAS), followed by a global rating of dyspnea on the Borg scale. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models were calculated to analyze the predictive validity of VAS ratings of intensity and unpleasantness on the Borg scale ratings. When subjects attended to their breathing, only VAS intensity scores showed a significant influence on Borg scale ratings (p < 0.05). In contrast, only the VAS unpleasantness scores showed a significant influence on Borg scale ratings (p < 0.05) when subjects were distracted. These findings show that sensory and affective aspects of perceived dyspnea differentially influence the global measure of dyspnea as determined by the Borg scale. A differentiation between these aspects in future studies through the use of separate rating scales could yield more detailed information on the perception and report of dyspnea.

  5. Comparing dynamic hyperinflation and associated dyspnea induced by metronome-paced tachypnea versus incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Calligaro, Gregory L; Raine, Richard I; Bateman, Mary E; Bateman, Eric D; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) during exercise is associated with both dyspnea and exercise limitation in COPD. Metronome-paced tachypnoea (MPT) is a simple alternative for studying DH. We compared MPT with exercise testing (XT) as methods of provoking DH, and assessed their relationship with dyspnea. We studied 24 patients with moderate COPD (FEV1 59 ± 9% predicted) after inhalation of ipratropium/salbutamol combination or placebo in a double-blind, crossover design. Inspiratory capacity (IC) was measured at baseline and after 30 seconds of MPT with breathing frequencies (fR) of 20, 30 and 40 breaths/min and metronome-defined I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2, in random sequence, followed by incremental cycle ergometry with interval determinations of IC. DH was defined as a decline in IC from baseline (∆IC) for both methods. Dyspnea was assessed using a Borg CR-10 scale. ∆IC during MPT was greater with higher fR and I:E ratio of 1:1 versus 1:2, and less when patients were treated with bronchodilator rather than placebo (P = 0.032). DH occurred during 19 (40%) XTs, and during 35 (73%) tests using MPT. Eleven of 18 (61%) non-congruent XTs (where DH occurred on MPT but not XT) terminated before fR of 40 breaths/min was reached. Although greater during XT, the intensity of dyspnea bore no relationship to DH during either MPT and XT. MPT at 40 breaths/min and I:E of 1:1 elicits the greatest ∆IC, and is a more sensitive method for demonstrating DH. The relationship between DH and dyspnea is complex and not determined by DH alone.

  6. Brain Responses during the Anticipation of Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckel, M. Cornelia; Esser, Roland W.; Büchel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is common in many cardiorespiratory diseases. Already the anticipation of this aversive symptom elicits fear in many patients resulting in unfavorable health behaviors such as activity avoidance and sedentary lifestyle. This study investigated brain mechanisms underlying these anticipatory processes. We induced dyspnea using resistive-load breathing in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blocks of severe and mild dyspnea alternated, each preceded by anticipation periods. Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. The left insular, parietal opercular, and cerebellar cortices showed increased activation already during dyspnea anticipation. Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. Moreover, anticipatory fear was positively correlated with anticipatory activation in right insular and anterior cingulate cortex. The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. The involvement of emotion-related areas such as insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala during dyspnea anticipation most likely reflects anticipatory fear and might underlie the development of unfavorable health behaviors in patients suffering from dyspnea. PMID:27648309

  7. Role of chemoreceptors in mediating dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Gordon F.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Dyspnea, or the uncomfortable awareness of respiratory distress, is a common symptom experienced by most people at some point during their lifetime. It is commonly encountered in individuals with pulmonary disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but can also be seen in healthy individuals after strenuous exercise, at altitude or in response to psychological stress. Dyspnea is a multifactorial sensation involving the brainstem, cortex, and limbic system, as well as mechanoreceptors, irritant receptors and chemoreceptors. Chemoreceptors appear to contribute to the sensation of dyspnea in two ways. They stimulate the respiratory control system in response to hypoxia and/or hypercapnia, and the resultant increase respiratory motor output can be consciously perceived as unpleasant. They also can induce the sensation of dyspnea through an as yet undetermined mechanism–potentially via direct ascending connections to the limbic system and cortex. The goal of this article is to briefly review how changes in blood gases reach conscious awareness and how chemoreceptors are involved in dyspnea. PMID:19118647

  8. Role of chemoreceptors in mediating dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Richerson, George B

    2009-05-30

    Dyspnea, or the uncomfortable awareness of respiratory distress, is a common symptom experienced by most people at some point during their lifetime. It is commonly encountered in individuals with pulmonary disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but can also be seen in healthy individuals after strenuous exercise, at altitude or in response to psychological stress. Dyspnea is a multifactorial sensation involving the brainstem, cortex, and limbic system, as well as mechanoreceptors, irritant receptors and chemoreceptors. Chemoreceptors appear to contribute to the sensation of dyspnea in two ways. They stimulate the respiratory control system in response to hypoxia and/or hypercapnia, and the resultant increase respiratory motor output can be consciously perceived as unpleasant. They also can induce the sensation of dyspnea through an as yet undetermined mechanism-potentially via direct ascending connections to the limbic system and cortex. The goal of this article is to briefly review how changes in blood gases reach conscious awareness and how chemoreceptors are involved in dyspnea.

  9. Rollercoaster asthma: when positive emotional stress interferes with dyspnea perception.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Simon; van Beest, Ilja

    2007-05-01

    The current study assessed how negative and positive stress is related to dyspnea perception. The participants were 25 young women with a medical diagnosis of severe asthma, and 15 matched controls. Stress was induced during repeated rollercoaster rides. Results showed that negative emotional stress and blood pressure peaked just before, and positive emotional stress and heart beat peaked immediately after rollercoaster rides. Dyspnea in women with asthma was higher just before than immediately after rollercoaster rides, even in women with asthma with a rollercoaster-evoked reduction in lung function. These results suggest that stressed and highly aroused individuals with chronic asthma tend to perceive dyspnea in terms of acquired, familiar associations between dyspnea and positive versus negative feeling states, favoring either underperception or overperception of dyspnea, depending on the emotional valence of a situation.

  10. Hospital without dyspnea: rationale and design of a multidisciplinary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Vicent, Lourdes; Olarte, Juan Manuel Nuñez; Puente-Maestu, Luis; Artajona, Esther; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is a common and disabling symptom of respiratory and heart diseases, which is growing in incidence. During hospital admission, breathlessness is under-diagnosed and under-treated, although there are treatments available for controlling the symptom. We have developed a tailored implementation strategy directed to medical staff to promote the application of these pharmacological and non-pharmacological tools in dealing with dyspnea. The primary aim is to decrease the rate of patients that do not receive an adequate relief of dyspnea. This is a four-stage quasi-experimental study. The intervention consists in two teaching talks that will be taught in Cardiology and Respiratory Medicine Departments. The contents will be prepared by Palliative Care specialists, based on available tools for management of dyspnea and patients' needs. A cross-sectional study of dyspnea in hospitalized patients will be performed before and after the intervention to ascertain an improvement in dyspnea intensity due to changes in medical practices. The last phase consists in the creation of consensus protocols for dyspnea management based in our experience. The results of this study are expected to be of great value and may change clinical practice in the near future and promote a changing for the better of dyspnea care. PMID:27605944

  11. Asynchrony and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Blakeman, Thomas C; Robinson, Bryce R H

    2013-06-01

    Patient-ventilator synchrony and patient comfort are assumed to go hand in hand, yet few studies provide support for this common sense idea. In reality, synchrony between the patient and ventilator is complex and can be affected by the ventilator settings, type of ventilator, patient-ventilator interface, and sedation. Inspections of airway pressure and flow waveforms are reliable methods for detecting asynchrony, and automated detection seems accurate. A number of types of asynchronies have been defined, and asynchrony during invasive and noninvasive ventilation have different calling cards. There is a clear association between asynchrony, ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Whether these are cause and effect or simply associated remains to be determined.

  12. Botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Woisard, Virginie; Liu, Xuelai; Bes, Marie Christine Arné; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Data, regarding the use of botulinum toxin (BT-A) in laryngeal dyspnea, are scarce, coming from some cases reports in the literature, including Vocal fold paralysis, laryngeal dystonia, vocal cord dysfunction also called paradoxical motion of the vocal fold (PMVF), and post-neuroleptic laryngeal dyskinesia. There is no consensus regarding the muscles and the doses to inject. The aim of this study is to present a retrospective review of patients treated in our ENT Department by BT-A injection in this indication. This study is a retrospective study describing patients who underwent an injection of botulinum toxin for laryngeal dyspnea in the ENT Department from 2005 to 2015 years. The inclusion criteria were a dyspnea associated with a laryngeal dysfunction, confirmed by flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. Information concerning the causes of the dyspnea, the botulinum toxin BT-A injections procedure, post-injection follow-up, and respiratory outcome were collected for all patients included. In the group of 13 patients included, the main cause identified as principal factor linked with the short breath was: a bilateral VF paralysis (Patel et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 130:686-689, 7), laryngeal dystonia (Balkissoon and Kenn, Semin Respir Crit Care Med 33:595-605, 2), Anxiety syndrome associated with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or asthma (Marcinow et al., Laryngoscope 124:1425-1430, 3), and an isolated asthma (Zwirner et al., Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 254:242-245, 1). Nine out of the thirteen patients were improved by the injections. A BT-A-induced stable benefit for four patients led them to stop the injections in the follow-up. Good outcome was observed in five other patients (main cause: bilateral VP paralysis), allowing a progressive lengthening of the delay between BT-A injections. Four patients did not report a positive risk/benefit ratio after BT-A injections; two of them (with bilateral VF paralysis), because of respiratory side effects and

  13. Routine dyspnea assessment on unit admission.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kathy; Barsamian, Jennifer; Leone, Danielle; Donovan, Barbara C; Williams, Donna; Carnevale, Kerry; Lansing, Robert; Banzett, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Dyspnea assessment is valuable in diagnosis, prognosis, symptom management, and targeted intervention, and in the allotment and management of patient care resources. The assessment of dyspnea, like that of pain, depends on patient self-report. Expert consensus panels have called for dyspnea to be measured quantitatively and documented on a routine basis, as is the practice with pain. But little information is available on how to measure and record dyspnea ratings systematically. Consequently, the prevalence of dyspnea in hospital settings may be greater than is generally recognized, and dyspnea may be insufficiently managed. This article describes a pilot study that sought to test the feasibility of measuring dyspnea as part of the initial patient assessment performed by nurses within several inpatient units of a large urban hospital.

  14. Assessing exertional dyspnea in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Swigris, Jeffrey J; Streiner, David L; Brown, Kevin K; Belkin, Amanda; Green, Kathy E; Wamboldt, Frederick S

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnea is a hallmark symptom of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and dyspnea induced physical activity limitation is a prominent driver of quality of life impairment among IPF patients. We examined response data for the 21 physical activity items (the first 21 of 24) from the University of California San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire (UCSD) collected at baseline in a recently conducted IPF trial. We used Rasch analysis and hypothesis testing with conventional statistical methodology to achieve three objectives: 1) to examine the items to identify the one characteristic that distinguishes one from another; 2) to asses these items for their ability to measure dyspnea severity in IPF; 3) to use the items to develop a dyspnea ruler. The sample comprised 178 subjects. The 21 items fit the Rasch model. There was very strong correlation between Rasch item severity and their metabolic equivalents (METS) values (r = -0.86, p < 0.0001). With the sample stratified on scores from the 21 items, there were significant between group differences in FVC%, DLCO% and distance walked during the six-minute walk test. The dyspnea ruler can be used to put dyspnea levels in a more easily understood clinical context. The first 21 items from the UCSD compose a unidimensional dyspnea-with-activity scale and are both sensibly ordered and distinguished from each other by their METS values. These 21 items can be used confidently to formulate clinically-relevant inferences about IPF patients and should be considered for use as a meaningful endpoint in IPF research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Distractive auditory stimuli reduce the unpleasantness of dyspnea during exercise in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    von Leupoldt, Andreas; Taube, Karin; Schubert-Heukeshoven, Stephan; Magnussen, Helgo; Dahme, Bernhard

    2007-11-01

    Dyspnea is the primary symptom limiting exercise in patients with COPD. Recent research has demonstrated that psychological factors can substantially influence the perception of dyspnea, but little is known about the modulation of perceived intensity or unpleasantness of dyspnea by attentional distraction. Therefore, we examined the impact of distractive auditory stimuli on the perception of exercise-induced dyspnea and the affective state in patients with COPD during 6-min walking tests (6MWTs). Twenty patients with mild-to-severe COPD (mean FEV1, 55.9% predicted) underwent two 6MWTs. Under one exercise condition, distractive auditory stimuli were presented with headphones, while the other condition was performed without auditory distraction. Lung function (FEV1), heart rate (HR), pulse oximetric saturation (SpO2), perceived intensity of dyspnea (ie, visual analog scale for perceived intensity of dyspnea [VAS-I]), and perceived unpleasantness of dyspnea (visual analog scale for perceived unpleasantness of dyspnea [VAS-U]) were measured before and after exercise. In addition, the global level of dyspnea (Borg score), positive affectivity (PA), and negative affectivity were assessed after both conditions. A similar exercise level during both conditions was confirmed by comparable results in FEV1, HR, SpO2, and distances walked. During auditory distraction, Borg scores and increases in VAS-U were smaller, while PA was higher compared to the nondistraction condition (p<0.05). VAS-I did not show differences across conditions. Distractive auditory stimuli decrease the global level of exercise-induced dyspnea in patients with COPD by reducing the perceived unpleasantness of dyspnea and lead to an additional increase in PA. Auditory distraction might therefore serve as an intervention for the reduction of dyspnea during exercise in this patient group.

  16. A sigh of relief or a sigh of expected relief: Sigh rate in response to dyspnea relief.

    PubMed

    Vlemincx, Elke; Meulders, Michel; Luminet, Olivier

    2017-08-09

    Research has suggested that sighs may serve a regulatory function during stress and emotions by facilitating relief. Evidence supports the hypotheses that sighs both express and induce relief from stress. To explore the potential role of sighs in the regulation of symptoms, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between sighs and relief of symptoms, and relief of dyspnea, specifically. Healthy volunteers participated in two studies (N = 44, N = 47) in which dyspnea was induced by mild (10 cmH2 O/l/s) or high (20 cmH2 0/l/s) inspiratory resistances. Dyspnea relief was induced by the offset of the inspiratory resistances (transitions from high and mild inspiratory resistance to no resistance). Control comparisons included dyspnea increases (transitions from no or mild inspiratory resistance to high inspiratory resistance) and dyspnea continuations (continuations of either no resistance or a high resistance). In Experiment 1, dyspnea levels were cued. In Experiment 2, no cues were provided. Sigh rate during dyspnea relief was significantly higher compared to control conditions, and sigh rate increased as self-reported dyspnea decreased. Additionally, sigh rate was higher during cued dyspnea relief compared to noncued dyspnea relief. These results suggest that sighs are important markers of dyspnea relief. Moreover, sighs may importantly express dyspnea relief, as they are related to experiential dyspnea decreases and occur more frequently during expected dyspnea relief. These findings suggest that sighs may not only be important in the regulation of stress and emotions, but also may be functional in the regulation of dyspnea. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  17. The Trajectory of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiNino, Ernest; Stefan, Mihaela S.; Priya, Aruna; Martin, Benjamin; Pekow, Penelope S.; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Context The trajectory of dyspnea for patients hospitalized with acute cardiopulmonary disease, who are not terminally ill, is poorly characterized. Objectives To investigate the natural history of dyspnea during hospitalization, and examine the role that admission diagnosis, and patient factors play in altering symptom resolution. Methods Prospective cohort study of patients hospitalized for an acute cardiopulmonary condition at a large tertiary care center. Dyspnea levels and change in dyspnea score were the main outcomes of interest and were assessed at admission, 24 and 48 hours and at discharge using the verbal 0 - 10 numeric scale. Results Among 295 patients enrolled, the median age was 68 years, and the most common admitting diagnoses were heart failure (32%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (39%), and pneumonia (13%). The median dyspnea score at admission was 9 (interquartile range [IQR] 7, 10); decreased to 4 (IQR 2, 7) within the first 24 hours; and subsequently plateaued at 48 hours. At discharge, the median score had decreased to 2.75 (IQR 1, 4). Compared to patients with heart failure, patients with COPD had higher median dyspnea score at baseline and admission, and experienced a slower resolution of dyspnea symptoms. After adjusting for patient characteristics, the change in dyspnea score from admission to discharge was not significantly different between patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure, COPD or pneumonia. Conclusion Most patients admitted with acute cardiopulmonary conditions have severe dyspnea on presentation, and their symptoms improve rapidly after admission. The trajectory of dyspnea is associated with the underlying disease process. These findings may help set expectations for the resolution of dyspnea symptoms in hospitalized patients with acute cardiopulmonary diseases. PMID:26620232

  18. Relationship between anxiety and dyspnea on exertion in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    de Voogd, Jacob N; Sanderman, Robbert; Postema, Klaas; van Sonderen, Eric; Wempe, Johan B

    2011-07-01

    Dyspnea limits exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is known to induce anxiety. Little is known whether anxiety contributes to exercise-induced dyspnea, which in turn might influence the outcome of diagnostic tests. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between general anxiety and dyspnea on exertion in patients with COPD. Ninety patients with stable COPD participated; 44 men, mean age 61 (standard deviation (SD) 10.4), and mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (%pred.) 40.5 (SD 16.9). All participants performed pulmonary function tests and an incremental cycle ergometry. The Modified Borg Scale was used to measure the level of dyspnea on exertion. Anxiety symptoms were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Data were analyzed using Spearman's correlations and multivariate regression. Dyspnea on exertion was correlated with general anxiety (r=.31), age (r=-.30), and exercise capacity (r=.27). Regression analysis showed that general anxiety was associated with dyspnea on exertion, adjusted for sex, age, baseline dyspnea, and exercise capacity. Consequently, it is reasoned that results of exercise training and activities in daily living may be influenced negatively by anxiety-worsened dyspnea. Attention should be given to anxiety management in patients with COPD to optimize exercise training.

  19. Dyspnea and pain share emotion-related brain network.

    PubMed

    von Leupoldt, Andreas; Sommer, Tobias; Kegat, Sarah; Baumann, Hans Jörg; Klose, Hans; Dahme, Bernhard; Büchel, Christian

    2009-10-15

    The early detection of stimuli signalling threat to an organism is a crucial evolutionary advantage. For example, the perception of aversive bodily sensations such as dyspnea and pain strongly motivates fast adaptive behaviour to ensure survival. Their similarly threatening and motivating characters led to the speculation that both sensations are mediated by common brain areas, which has also been suggested by neuroimaging studies on either dyspnea or pain. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we formally tested this hypothesis and compared the cortical processing of perceived heat pain and resistive load induced dyspnea in the same group of participants. Here we show that the perception of both aversive sensations is processed in similar brain areas including the insula, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala and medial thalamus. These areas have a documented role in the processing of emotions such as fear and anxiety. Thus, the current study highlights the role of a common emotion-related human brain network which underlies the perception of aversive bodily sensations such as dyspnea and pain. This network seems crucial for translating the threatening character of different bodily signals into behavioural consequences that promote survival.

  20. Nebulized furosemide for the management of dyspnea: does the evidence support its use?

    PubMed

    Newton, Phillip J; Davidson, Patricia M; Macdonald, Peter; Ollerton, Richard; Krum, Henry

    2008-10-01

    Dyspnea is a common and distressing symptom associated with multiple chronic illnesses and high levels of burden for individuals, their families and health care systems. The subjective nature dyspnea and a poor understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms challenge the clinician in developing management plans. Nebulized furosemide has been identified as a novel approach to dyspnea management. This review summarizes published studies, both clinical and experimental, reporting the use of nebulized furosemide. The search criteria yielded 42 articles published in the period 1988 to 2004. Although nebulized furosemide appeared to have a positive influence on dyspnea and physiological measurements, caution must be taken with the results primarily coming from small-scale clinical trials or observation trials. Despite the limitations of the studies reported, given the range of conditions reporting effectiveness of nebulized furosemide, further investigation of this potential novel treatment of dyspnea is warranted.

  1. Mechanisms of dyspnea in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Francesco

    2010-06-30

    Dyspnea is a general term used to characterize a range of different descriptors; it varies in intensity, and is influenced by a wide variety of factors such as cultural expectations and the patient's experiences. Healthy subjects can experience dyspnea in different situations, e.g. at high altitude, after breath-holding, during stressful situations that cause anxiety or panic, and more commonly during strenuous exercise. Discussing the mechanisms of dyspnea we need to briefly take into account the physiological mechanisms underlying the sensation of dyspnea: the functional status of the respiratory muscles, the role of chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors, and how the sense of respiratory motor output reaches a level of conscious awareness. We also need to take into account theories on the pathophysiological mechanisms of the sensation of dyspnea and the possibility that each pathophysiological mechanism produces a distinct quality of breathing discomfort. The terms used by subjects to identify different characteristics of breathing discomfort - dyspnea descriptors - may contribute to understanding the mechanisms of dyspnea and providing the rationale for a specific diagnosis.

  2. Mechanisms of dyspnea in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Dyspnea is a general term used to characterize a range of different descriptors; it varies in intensity, and is influenced by a wide variety of factors such as cultural expectations and the patient's experiences. Healthy subjects can experience dyspnea in different situations, e.g. at high altitude, after breath-holding, during stressful situations that cause anxiety or panic, and more commonly during strenuous exercise. Discussing the mechanisms of dyspnea we need to briefly take into account the physiological mechanisms underlying the sensation of dyspnea: the functional status of the respiratory muscles, the role of chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors, and how the sense of respiratory motor output reaches a level of conscious awareness. We also need to take into account theories on the pathophysiological mechanisms of the sensation of dyspnea and the possibility that each pathophysiological mechanism produces a distinct quality of breathing discomfort. The terms used by subjects to identify different characteristics of breathing discomfort - dyspnea descriptors - may contribute to understanding the mechanisms of dyspnea and providing the rationale for a specific diagnosis. PMID:22958405

  3. Variability of the perception of dyspnea in healthy subjects assessed through inspiratory resistive loading*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Bruna; Fernandes, Andréia Kist; Sanches, Paulo Roberto Stefani; Konzen, Glauco Luís; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Few studies have evaluated the variability of the perception of dyspnea in healthy subjects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the variability of the perception of dyspnea in healthy subjects during breathing against increasing inspiratory resistive loads, as well as to assess the association between the level of perception of dyspnea and the level of physical activity. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving healthy individuals 16 years of age or older. Subjects underwent inspiratory resistive loading testing, in which the level of perception of dyspnea was quantified with the modified Borg scale. We also determined body mass indices (BMIs), assessed maximal respiratory pressures, performed pulmonary function tests, applied the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ)-long form, and conducted six-minute walk tests (6MWTs). The level of perception of dyspnea was classified as low (Borg score < 2), intermediate (Borg score, 2-5), or high (Borg score > 5). Results: We included 48 healthy subjects in the study. Forty-two subjects completed the test up to a load of 46.7 cmH2O/L/s. The level of perception of dyspnea was classified as low, intermediate, and high in 13, 19, and 10 subjects, respectively. The level of perception of dyspnea was not significantly associated with age, gender, BMI, IPAQ-long form score, maximal respiratory pressures, or pulmonary function test results. Conclusions: The scores for perceived dyspnea induced by inspiratory resistive loading in healthy subjects presented wide variability. The perception of dyspnea was classified as low in 31% of the subjects, intermediate in 45%, and high in 24%. There was no association between the level of perception of dyspnea and the level of physical activity (IPAQ or six-minute walk distance). PMID:25830380

  4. [Confusion about MRC dyspnea scales in Japan--which MRC dyspnea scale should we employ?].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kenji

    2008-08-01

    Though the Hugh-Jones dyspnea scale has been widely used in Japan, the British Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea scale and/or modified MRC dyspnea scales have been used in many other countries. One of these modified MRC dyspnea scales was translated into Japanese and appeared in both the "Japanese Manual of Respiratory Rehabilitation (2003)" and the "Japanese Standards for the Diagnosis and Care of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (2004)" which were published by the Japanese Respiratory Society. Subsequently, the MRC dyspnea scale appeared in a textbook and in review articles published in Japan. However, this dyspnea scale, which was translated into Japanese, is not used by the British Thoracic Society, American Thoracic Society, European Respiratory Society, Canadian Respiratory Society, or Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). The Japanese version of the MRC dyspnea scale has two serious problems: 1) normal healthy subjects have to be classified into dyspnea grade 0 or grade 1, and 2) incorrect Japanese translation of the scale. The Japanese Respiratory Society has to decide which MRC dyspnea scale should be employed, with a well-thought-out translation.

  5. Experimental test of induced rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincher, Curtis R.; Gochanour, Craig R.

    1987-02-01

    Recent theoretical models for the nematic phase of semiflexible polymer chains predict a strong coupling between order and the conformational degrees of freedom of the chain. The presence of order in the nematic phase results in a strong preference for linear or rod-like conformations over flexible, random coil conformations. This conformational selection or induced rigidity is predicted to be general phenomenon associated with semiflexible chains. We have tested these predictions using a soluble polydiacetylene (4BCMU) as a probe. The 4BCMU chain undergoes a conformational transition (rod-coil) as a function of temperature in toluene which is accompanied by a large change in optical properties allowing the conformational transition to be followed spectroscopically in extremely dilute solutions. 4BCMU is miscible with both isotropic and nematic solutions of poly-(n-hexyl isocyanate) in toluene. If current models of induced rigidity are accurate, there should be a large shift in the transition temperature for the 4BCMU transition in nematic poly-(n-hexyl isocyanate) solutions. Experimentally we find no shift in the transition for nematic solutions when compared to dilute isotropic solutions. Possible explanations for the discrepancy between theory and experiment are discussed.

  6. Exercise dyspnea in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Stendardi, Loredana; Binazzi, Barbara; Scano, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Dyspnea, a symptom limiting exercise capacity in patients with COPD, is associated with central perception of an overall increase in central respiratory motor output directed preferentially to the rib cage muscles. On the other hand, disparity between respiratory motor output, mechanical and ventilatory response of the system is also thought to play an important role on the increased perception of exercise in these patients. Both inspiratory and expiratory muscles and operational lung volumes are important contributors to exercise dyspnea. However, the potential link between dyspnea, abnormal mechanics of breathing and impaired exercise performance via the circulation rather than a malfunctioning ventilatory pump per se should not be disregarded. Change in arterial blood gas content may affect dyspnea via direct or indirect effects. An increase in carbon dioxide arterial tension seems to be the most important stimulus overriding all other inputs from dyspnea in hypercapnic COPD patients. Hypoxia may act indirectly by increasing ventilation and indirectly independent of changes in ventilation. A greater treatment effect is often achieved after the addition of pulmonary rehabilitation with pharmacological treatment. PMID:18268917

  7. Predictors of dyspnea prevalence: Results from the BOLD study

    PubMed Central

    Grønseth, Rune; Vollmer, William M.; Hardie, Jon A.; Ólafsdóttir, Inga Sif; Lamprecht, Bernd; Buist, A. Sonia; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Gulsvik, Amund; Johannessen, Ane; Enright, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnea is a cardinal symptom for cardiorespiratory diseases. No study has assessed worldwide variation in dyspnea prevalence or predictors of dyspnea. We used cross-sectional data from population-based samples in 15 countries of the BOLD study to estimate prevalence of dyspnea in the full sample as well as in an a priori defined low-risk group (few risk factors or dyspnea-associated diseases). Dyspnea was defined by the modified Medical Research Council questions. We used ordered logistic regression analysis to study the association of dyspnea with site, sex, age, education, smoking habits, low/high BMI, self-reported disease, and spirometry results. Of the 9,484 participants, 27% reported any dyspnea. In the low-risk subsample (N=4,329), 16% reported some dyspnea. In multivariate analyses, all covariates were correlated to dyspnea, but only 13% of dyspnea variation was explained. Women reported more dyspnea than men (odds ratio ≈ 2.1). When forced vital capacity (FVC) fell below 60% of predicted, dyspnea was much more likely. There was considerable geographical variation in dyspnea, even when we adjusted for known risk factors and spirometry results. We were only able to explain 13% of dyspnea variation. PMID:24176991

  8. Is dyspnea management evidence-based?

    PubMed

    Aiello-Laws, Lisa B

    2013-11-01

    Reviewing the articles published in the past 40 years in the Oncology Nursing Forum (ONF) can assist in the identification of trends related to lung cancer treatment and management. Fifty-eight articles or studies published in ONF during that time were specific to lung cancer. The total number of published articles increased with each decade, but no articles were identified in the 1970s. The topics were quite varied, with each of the following represented by three or more articles: symptom clusters, radiation, smoking cessation, dyspnea, nutrition, and quality of life. To better focus this review on a specific aspect of lung cancer management, dyspnea was chosen.

  9. A Woman with Dyspnea and Hemoptysis

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Steven G.; Eisenman, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old female presented to the emergency department at a small community hospital with cough, fever, dyspnea and blood-streaked sputum. A chest radiograph was ordered. She was diagnosed with pneumonia and discharged home with antibiotics. She returned three days later, afebrile, with worsening dyspnea and gross hemoptysis. She was found to have a murmur reported as chronic but had never been evaluated by echocardiography. A computed tomography chest and echocardiography were performed (Figure). She was diagnosed with a left atrial myxoma (Video). She was transferred and underwent tumor excision. PMID:25493149

  10. A woman with dyspnea and hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Steven G; Eisenman, Justin C

    2014-11-01

    A 55-year-old female presented to the emergency department at a small community hospital with cough, fever, dyspnea and blood-streaked sputum. A chest radiograph was ordered. She was diagnosed with pneumonia and discharged home with antibiotics. She returned three days later, afebrile, with worsening dyspnea and gross hemoptysis. She was found to have a murmur reported as chronic but had never been evaluated by echocardiography. A computed tomography chest and echocardiography were performed (Figure). She was diagnosed with a left atrial myxoma (Video). She was transferred and underwent tumor excision.

  11. Dyspnea and pain frequently co-occur among Medicare managed care recipients.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nathan; Fan, Vincent S; Slatore, Christopher G; Locke, Emily; Whitson, Heather E; Nici, Linda; Thielke, Stephen M

    2014-07-01

    Experimental and neuroimaging studies have suggested strong associations between dyspnea and pain. The co-occurrence of these symptoms has not been examined in community samples. We sought to ascertain the co-occurrence of pain and dyspnea by self-report in a large cohort of Medicare recipients. We analyzed data from 266,000 Medicare Managed Care recipients surveyed in 2010 and 2012. Dyspnea was defined by aggregating three questions about shortness of breath (at rest, while walking one block, and while climbing stairs). Pain was measured by four questions about pain interference, chest pain, back pain, and arthritis pain. All measures were dichotomized as high or low/none. We calculated the co-occurrence of pain and dyspnea at baseline, and generated logistic regression models to find the adjusted relative risk (RR) of their co-occurrence, adjusting for patient-level factors and three potential medical causes of dyspnea (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema/asthma, congestive heart failure, and obesity). We modeled the simultaneous development and the simultaneous resolution of dyspnea and pain between baseline and 2 years. Participants with dyspnea had considerably higher prevalence of pain than those without (64 vs. 18%). In fully adjusted models, participants with any of the types of pain were substantially more likely to report dyspnea than those without these types of pain (high pain interference: relative risk [RR], 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92-2.07; chest pain: RR, 2.11; 95% CI, 2.04-2.18; back pain: RR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.71-1.82; and arthritis pain: RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.44-1.54). The relative risks of dyspnea developing or resolving at 2 years were greatly increased (RRs of 1.5 - 4) if pain also developed or resolved. Pain and dyspnea commonly occurred, developed, and resolved together. Most older adults with dyspnea also reported pain. Medical conditions typically assumed to cause dyspnea did not account for this association. The most

  12. [Dyspnea. From the concept up to diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Ewert, R; Gläser, S

    2015-08-01

    Dyspnea represents one of the most frequent and heterogeneous symptoms. The term dyspnea describes the subjective perception of an inadequate effort to breathe. In general, acute and chronic forms have to be differentiated. Due to its prognostic implications a structured work-up to find the correct diagnosis is of great importance. Depending on the condition of the patient, simple algorithms including biomarkers, an electrocardiogram, echocardiography and other imaging procedures are used when needed. Especially in its acute appearance life-threatening situations, such as myocardial ischemia, heart failure, pulmonary embolism and pneumothorax have to be rapidly and effectively excluded in the differential diagnostics. In contrast, the underlying diseases in chronic dyspnea are bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive airway diseases, heart failure and a combination of obesity and deconditioning in up to 85 % of all cases. The differential diagnosis needs a structured approach including anamnestic and medical technical methods, aiming an efficient differentiation of cardiac and pulmonary causes. As a high number of patients suffer from more than one significant disease, the differential diagnostic assessment needs to be focused on the assessment of the predominant cause of the dyspnea. For this purpose, exercise tests provide helpful algorithms to answer this question.

  13. Speaking-Related Dyspnea in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoit, Jeannette D.; Lansing, Robert W.; Perona, Kristen E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To reveal the qualities and intensity of speaking-related dyspnea in healthy adults under conditions of high ventilatory drive, in which the behavioral and metabolic control of breathing must compete. Method: Eleven adults read aloud while breathing different levels of inspired carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]). After the highest level,…

  14. Speaking-Related Dyspnea in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoit, Jeannette D.; Lansing, Robert W.; Perona, Kristen E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To reveal the qualities and intensity of speaking-related dyspnea in healthy adults under conditions of high ventilatory drive, in which the behavioral and metabolic control of breathing must compete. Method: Eleven adults read aloud while breathing different levels of inspired carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]). After the highest level,…

  15. Mechanical correlates of dyspnea in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Andrea; Crimi, Emanuele; Gobbi, Alessandro; Torchio, Roberto; Gulotta, Carlo; Dellaca, Raffaele; Scano, Giorgio; Brusasco, Vito; Pellegrino, Riccardo

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that dyspnea and its descriptors, that is, chest tightness, inspiratory effort, unrewarded inspiration, and expiratory difficulty in asthma reflect different mechanisms of airflow obstruction and their perception varies with the severity of bronchoconstriction. Eighty-three asthmatics were studied before and after inhalation of methacholine doses decreasing the 1-sec forced expiratory volume by ~15% (mild bronchoconstriction) and ~25% (moderate bronchoconstriction). Symptoms were examined as a function of changes in lung mechanics. Dyspnea increased with the severity of obstruction, mostly because of inspiratory effort and chest tightness. At mild bronchoconstriction, multivariate analysis showed that dyspnea was related to the increase in inspiratory resistance at 5 Hz (R 5) (r (2) = 0.10, P = 0.004), chest tightness to the decrease in maximal flow at 40% of control forced vital capacity, and the increase in R 5 at full lung inflation (r (2) = 0.15, P = 0.006), inspiratory effort to the temporal variability in R 5-19 (r (2) = 0.13, P = 0.003), and unrewarded inspiration to the recovery of R 5 after deep breath (r (2) = 0.07, P = 0.01). At moderate bronchoconstriction, multivariate analysis showed that dyspnea and inspiratory effort were related to the increase in temporal variability in inspiratory reactance at 5 Hz (X 5) (r (2) = 0.12, P = 0.04 and r (2) = 0.18, P < 0.001, respectively), and unrewarded inspiration to the decrease in X 5 at maximum lung inflation (r (2) = 0.07, P = 0.04). We conclude that symptom perception is partly explained by indexes of airway narrowing and loss of bronchodilatation with deep breath at low levels of bronchoconstriction, but by markers of ventilation heterogeneity and lung volume recruitment when bronchoconstriction becomes more severe.

  16. [Dyspnea in left-sided heart disease].

    PubMed

    Simonis, G; Stumpf, J; Dörr, R; Kadalie, C T; Spitzer, S G

    2015-08-01

    Shortness of breath (dyspnea) is a common symptom in left-sided heart disease but clinically, patient symptoms show a high variability. Echocardiography is the mainstay for evaluating whether left-sided heart disease is the cause of dyspnea. If left-sided heart failure is diagnosed, this symptom complex must then be subjected to further etiological evaluation. Hypertensive, ischemic and valvular heart diseases are common, as well as atrial fibrillation. If the patient does not have angina pectoris, testing for ischemic heart disease should be done non-invasively by coronary computed tomography or testing for regional myocardial ischemia. Coronary revascularization is indicated only when a prognostically relevant ischemia of more than 10 % of the left ventricle is diagnosed. Diuretics are important for the relief of dyspnea but do not improve the prognosis of patients. In patients with reduced left ventricular function, combination therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta blockers and aldosterone antagonists improve the symptoms and prognosis. For treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction evidence-based measures are still lacking. In this case the recommended therapy consists of optimal treatment of comorbidities, regulation of heart rate and blood pressure and participation in structured exercise programs. Angiotensin receptor blockers and aldosterone antagonists can be given in patients with more severe symptoms even though the available data are very sparse.

  17. Proposing a standardized method for evaluating patient report of the intensity of dyspnea during exercise testing in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hareendran, Asha; Leidy, Nancy K; Monz, Brigitta U; Winnette, Randall; Becker, Karin; Mahler, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    Measuring dyspnea intensity associated with exercise provides insights into dyspnea-limited exercise capacity, and has been used to evaluate treatment outcomes for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Three patient-reported outcome scales commonly cited for rating dyspnea during exercise are the modified Borg scale (MBS), numerical rating scale for dyspnea (NRS-D), and visual analogue scale for dyspnea (VAS-D). Various versions of each scale were found. Our objective was to evaluate the content validity of scales commonly used in COPD studies, to explore their ability to capture patients' experiences of dyspnea during exercise, and to evaluate a standardized version of the MBS. A two-stage procedure was used, with each stage involving one-on-one interviews with COPD patients who had recently completed a clinic-based exercise event on a treadmill or cycle ergometer. An open-ended elicitation interview technique was used to understand patients' experiences of exercise-induced dyspnea, followed by patients completing the three scales. The cognitive interviewing component of the study involved specific questions to evaluate the patients' perspectives of the content and format of the scales. Results from Stage 1 were used to develop a standardized version of the MBS, which was then subjected to further content validity assessment during Stage 2. Thirteen patients participated in the two-stage process (n = 6; n = 7). Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) percent predicted was 40%, mean age 57 years, and 54% were male. Participants used a variety of terms to describe the intensity and variability of exercise-induced dyspnea. Subjects understood the instructions and format of the standardized MBS, and were able to easily select a response to report the level of dyspnea associated with their recent standardized exercise. This study provides initial evidence in support of using a standardized version of the MBS version for quantifying dyspnea intensity

  18. Dyspnea in lung cancer patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kathiresan, Ganesan; Clement, Reynold F; Sankaranarayanan, Meera T

    2010-01-01

    Dyspnea is a common and distressing symptom experienced by 19%–51% of patients with advanced cancer. Higher incidences are reported in patients approaching end of life. While the prevalence of dyspnea has been reported to be as frequent as pain in people with lung cancer, less attention has been paid to the distress associated with dyspnea. This review of the literature was undertaken to investigate how dyspnea has been assessed and whether breathlessness in people with lung cancer is distressing. Using a predetermined search strategy and inclusion criteria, 31 primary studies were identified and included in this review. Different outcome measures were used to assess the experience of dyspnea, with domains including intensity, distress, quality of life, qualitative sensation, and prevalence. Overall, the studies report a high prevalence of dyspnea in lung cancer patients, with subjects experiencing a moderate level of dyspnea intensity and interference with activities of daily living. Distress associated with breathing appears to be variable, with some studies reporting dyspnea to be the most distressing sensation, and others reporting lower levels of distress. However, taking into account the prevalence, intensity, and distress of dyspnea, the general consensus appears to be that the experience of dyspnea in people with lung cancer is common, with varying degrees of intensity, but involves considerable unpleasantness. Thus, if dyspnea and pain are both distressing sensations for people with lung cancer, this has potential implications for both clinical and academic areas with regards to both management strategies and further research. PMID:28210113

  19. Routine dyspnea assessment and documentation: Nurses' experience yields wide acceptance.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kathy M; DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Banzett, Robert B

    2017-01-01

    Dyspnea (breathing discomfort) is a common and distressing symptom. Routine assessment and documentation can improve management and relieve suffering. A major barrier to routine dyspnea documentation is the concern that it will have a deleterious effect on nursing workflow and that it will not be readily accepted by nurses. Nurses at our institution recently began to assess and document dyspnea on all medical-surgical patients upon admission and once per shift throughout their hospitalization. A year after dyspnea measurement was implemented we explored nurses' approach to dyspnea assessment, their perception of patient response, and their perception of the utility and burden of dyspnea measurement. We obtained feedback from nurses using a three-part assessment of practice: 1) a series of recorded focus group interviews with nurses, 2) a time-motion observation of nurses performing routine dyspnea and pain assessment, and 3) a randomized, anonymous on-line survey based, in part, on issues raised in focus groups. Ninety-four percent of the nurses surveyed reported administering the dyspnea assessment is "easy" or "very easy". None of the nurses reported that assessing dyspnea negatively impacted workflow and many reported that it positively improved their practice by increasing their awareness. Our time-motion data showed dyspnea assessment and documentation takes well less than a minute. Nurses endorsed the importance of routine measurement and agreed that most patients were able to provide a meaningful rating of their dyspnea. Nurses found the patient report very useful, and used it in conjunction with observed signs to respond to changes in a patient's condition. In this study, we have demonstrated that routine dyspnea assessment and documentation was widely accepted by the nurses at our institution. Our nurses fully incorporated routine dyspnea assessment and documentation into their practice and felt that it improved patient-centered care.

  20. Exertional dyspnea as a symptom of infrarenal aortic occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Schott, Stacey L; Carreiro, Fernanda Porto; Harkness, James R; Malas, Mahmoud B; Sozio, Stephen M; Zakaria, Sammy

    2014-06-01

    Advanced atherosclerosis of the aorta can cause severe ischemia in the kidneys, refractory hypertension, and claudication. However, no previous reports have clearly associated infrarenal aortic stenosis with shortness of breath. A 77-year-old woman with hypertension and hyperlipidemia presented with exertional dyspnea. Despite extensive testing and observation, no apparent cause for this patient's dyspnea was found. Images revealed severe infrarenal aortic stenosis. After the patient underwent stenting of the aortic occlusion, she had immediate symptomatic improvement and complete resolution of her dyspnea within one month. Twelve months after vascular intervention, the patient remained asymptomatic. In view of the distinct and lasting elimination of dyspnea after angioplasty and stenting of a nearly occluded infrarenal aortic lesion, we hypothesize that infrarenal aortic stenosis might be a treatable cause of exertional dyspnea. Clinicians should consider infrarenal aortic stenosis as a possible cause of dyspnea. Treatment of the stenosis might relieve symptoms.

  1. Anxiety measures during induced experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, P; Rood, J P

    1993-01-01

    Results of analgesic studies obtained using experimental pain are often not comparable with those obtained from clinical studies. This may be because anxiety, which plays an important role in the pain experience, may not be evoked by experimentally induced pain. The aim of this study is to measure the level of anxiety induced by the submaximum effort tourniquet technique, which produces pain similar in quality to clinical pain. The mean time that subjects tolerated the pain from the tourniquet was 14.94 minutes. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate increased. Visual analogue scale measures of anxiety showed an overall increase during the experiment but were highly erratic individually. This study suggests that the submaximum effort tourniquet technique is incapable of inducing the same type of anxiety experienced with clinical pain.

  2. [Definition, primary examination and differential diagnostics in acute dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Hüfner, A; Dodt, C

    2015-09-01

    The topic of acute dyspnea is presented in two separate articles. This first part deals with the definition and pathophysiology of dyspnea as well as important considerations on the history of the present illness, physical examination, initial therapy and differential diagnostic considerations. The second part covers relevant diagnostic investigations and principles for the initial management. The causes, consequences and perception of acute dyspnea can be very different. The adult patient with acute dyspnea presents difficult challenges in the diagnosis and management. The emergency clinician must work through a wide range of differential diagnostic considerations while providing appropriate initial treatment for a potentially life-threatening disease.

  3. Intrathoracic caecal perforation presenting as dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Granier, Vincent; Coche, Emmanuel; Hantson, Philippe; Thoma, Maximilien

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Bochdalek hernia is a congenital defect of the diaphragm that is usually diagnosed in the neonatal period and incidentally in asymptomatic adults. Small bowel incarceration in a right-sided Bochdalek hernia is exceptional for an adult. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman was admitted for acute dyspnea, tachycardia, hypotension, and fever. Five days before, she had been experiencing an episode of diffuse abdominal pain. The admission chest X-ray was interpreted as right pleural effusion and pneumothorax with left mediastinal shift. Chest tube drainage was purulent. The thoracoabdominal CT examination suspected an intestinal incarceration through a right diaphragmatic defect. At laparotomy, a right-sided Bochdalek hernia was confirmed with a complete necrosis of the incarcerated caecum. Ileocaecal resection was performed, but the patient died from delayed septic complications. Conclusion. Intrathoracic perforation of the caecum is a rare occurrence; delayed diagnosis due to misleading initial symptoms may lead to severe complications and poor prognosis.

  4. Intrathoracic Caecal Perforation Presenting as Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Granier, Vincent; Coche, Emmanuel; Hantson, Philippe; Thoma, Maximilien

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Bochdalek hernia is a congenital defect of the diaphragm that is usually diagnosed in the neonatal period and incidentally in asymptomatic adults. Small bowel incarceration in a right-sided Bochdalek hernia is exceptional for an adult. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman was admitted for acute dyspnea, tachycardia, hypotension, and fever. Five days before, she had been experiencing an episode of diffuse abdominal pain. The admission chest X-ray was interpreted as right pleural effusion and pneumothorax with left mediastinal shift. Chest tube drainage was purulent. The thoracoabdominal CT examination suspected an intestinal incarceration through a right diaphragmatic defect. At laparotomy, a right-sided Bochdalek hernia was confirmed with a complete necrosis of the incarcerated caecum. Ileocaecal resection was performed, but the patient died from delayed septic complications. Conclusion. Intrathoracic perforation of the caecum is a rare occurrence; delayed diagnosis due to misleading initial symptoms may lead to severe complications and poor prognosis. PMID:21331329

  5. Giant Dermoid Cyst Causing Dysphagia and Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Koseoglu, Sabri; Sahan, Leyla; Dere, Yelda; Sahan, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Dermoid cysts are benign lesions seen in young adults. The second most common localization is the floor of the mouth. They are usually asymptomatic over years but can be symptomatic due to secondary changes or the size. Herein, we report a case of 19-year-old woman who applied to emergency service with dyspnea, dysphagia and enlarging of a mass in the submental region. The patient cannot be entubated because of the mass pushing the tongue base backward closing the laryngeal view. Elective tracheostomy was performed for providing airflow during the operation. After the operation a cystic mass fulfilled with keratin lined by keratinized stratified squamous epithelium in addition to the dermal appendages such as sweat glands and follicular structures were seen histopathologically and the case was diagnosed as dermoid cyst of the submental region. In such patients with quick enlarging of mass causing airway obstructions, the tracheostomy can be the preferable method because of the difficulties in entubation.

  6. Induction of dyspnea evokes increased anxiety and maladaptive breathing in individuals with high anxiety sensitivity and suffocation fear.

    PubMed

    Alius, Manuela G; Pané-Farré, Christiane A; Von Leupoldt, Andreas; Hamm, Alfons O

    2013-05-01

    Although respiratory symptoms are relevant for diagnosis and etiology of panic disorder, anxiety responses and breathing behavior evoked by induction of dyspnea have rarely been studied. Therefore, dyspnea sensations and affective evaluations evoked by inspiratory resistive loads of different intensities were first assessed in 23 individuals with high versus 24 participants with low anxiety sensitivity (AS). High AS participants with high fear of suffocation rated loads of the same physical intensity as more unpleasant and reported more intense feelings of dyspnea and more respiratory and panic symptoms than low AS individuals. In the second experiment assessing physiological responses to physically comparable loads, high suffocation fear participants showed an increase in minute ventilation to compensate for fear-induced air hunger. This ventilation behavior results in increased frequency of dyspnea sensations, thus increasing fear of suffocation. Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  7. Experimentally-induced dissociation impairs visual memory.

    PubMed

    Brewin, Chris R; Mersaditabari, Niloufar

    2013-12-01

    Dissociation is a phenomenon common in a number of psychological disorders and has been frequently suggested to impair memory for traumatic events. In this study we explored the effects of dissociation on visual memory. A dissociative state was induced experimentally using a mirror-gazing task and its short-term effects on memory performance were investigated. Sixty healthy individuals took part in the experiment. Induced dissociation impaired visual memory performance relative to a control condition; however, the degree of dissociation was not associated with lower memory scores in the experimental group. The results have theoretical and practical implications for individuals who experience frequent dissociative states such as patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intravenous Fentanyl for Dyspnea at the End of Life: Lessons for Future Research in Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Pang, G S; Qu, L M; Tan, Y Y; Yee, A C P

    2016-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of intravenous (IV) Fentanyl in dyspnoeic patients with advanced cancer. Dyspnoeic patients with advanced cancer satisfying the selection criteria received (IV) Fentanyl and were evaluated for response 24 hours post-administration in a prospective observational study. Altogether 36 patients were enrolled into the study. However, data from only 16 patients could be analysed as 20 patients had died or were too sick to self-report scores. Seven out of 16 patients responded to IV Fentanyl although the result was not statistically significant (non-responders versus responders: 56.3% vs 43.8%, p = 0.33). The strongest correlations for variables predictive of responder status were the absence of anxiety and lung metastases. This exploratory study shows that IV Fentanyl can alleviate dyspnea in some patients but is an example of the difficulties conducting dyspnea research. Future studies would benefit from novel developments in the areas of measuring dyspnea in dying patients and statistical analysis of small sample sizes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Dyspnea as a noxious sensation: inspiratory threshold loading may trigger diffuse noxious inhibitory controls in humans.

    PubMed

    Morélot-Panzini, Capucine; Demoule, Alexandre; Straus, Christian; Zelter, Marc; Derenne, Jean-Philippe; Willer, Jean-Claude; Similowski, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Dyspnea, a leading respiratory symptom, shares many clinical, physiological, and psychological features with pain. Both activate similar brain areas. The neural mechanisms of dyspnea are less well described than those of pain. The present research tested the hypothesis of common pathways between the two sensations. Six healthy men (age 30-40 yr) were studied. The spinal nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII) was first established in response to electrical sural stimulation. Dyspnea was then induced through inspiratory threshold loading, forcing the subjects to develop 70% of their maximal inspiratory pressure to inhale. This led to progressive inhibition of the RIII reflex that reached 50 +/- 12% during the fifth minute of loading (P < 0.001), was correlated to the intensity of the self-evaluated respiratory discomfort, and had recovered 5 min after removal of the load. The myotatic H-reflex was not inhibited by inspiratory loading, arguing against postsynaptic alpha motoneuron inhibition. Dyspnea, like pain, thus induced counterirritation, possibly indicating a C-fiber stimulation and activation of diffuse noxious inhibitory descending controls known to project onto spinal dorsal horn wide dynamic range neurons. This confirms the noxious nature of certain types of breathlessness, thus opening new physiological and perhaps therapeutic perspectives.

  10. Understanding mechanisms and documenting plausibility of palliative interventions for dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Donald A

    2011-06-01

    To review the mechanisms for the perception of dyspnea and to consider the plausibility of interventions that palliate dyspnea after optimal treatment of the underlying disease. Activation of sensory receptors by blood gas abnormalities, mechanical respiratory loads, and hyperinflation provides afferent information to the central nervous system for integration and processing. It has been proposed that a discriminative pathway processes afferent impulses to the somatosensory cortex that reflects the intensity of dyspnea, whereas an affective pathway projects afferent impulses to structures of the limbic system that reflects the unpleasantness of dyspnea. In one study, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease reported consistently higher ratings of breathlessness after administration of naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, compared with physiological saline during high-intensity treadmill exercise. This finding supports the role of endogenous opioids in modulating dyspnea. Nebulized furosemide, anti-inflammatory therapy, and chest wall vibration are potential approaches for modulating lung and chest wall receptors to relieve dyspnea. Targets for palliating dyspnea in patients with advanced disease include sensory receptors within the lung/chest wall and the central nervous system. The opioid system plays an important role in palliating dyspnea. Both endogenous (β-endorphins) and exogenous (morphine) opioids modulate breathlessness.

  11. Experimental investigation of bifurcation induced bandgap reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Brian P.; Mazzoleni, Michael J.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; Mann, Brian P.

    2014-08-01

    By applying an asymmetric on-site restoring force in a 1D chain of oscillators, we demonstrate experimentally that a morphing in the bandgap structure or passive bandgap reconfiguration can be triggered by an increase in environmental excitation amplitude. Recent studies on wave propagation have focused on new capabilities and behaviors resulting from intrinsic nonlinearities. This paper details a bistable experimental design that achieves amplitude dependent filtering through passive bandgap reconfiguration, which is triggered by a bifurcation. The system studied comprises a 1D chain of axially aligned pendulums in dimer unit cells with geometrically nonlinear nearest neighbor coupling where bistability is induced through repulsive magnets. When the bistability is asymmetric, each potential well has a different linear spectra. Though this paper uses mechanically coupled oscillators as an example, the phenomenon itself could be used in any wave propagation media where asymmetric bistability can be implemented.

  12. Dyspnea as the Presenting Symptom of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elizabeth; Romero, Neil; Miles, Troy; Hsu, Stephanie L.; Kondrashov, Dimitriy

    2016-01-01

    Background  A case report of acute unilateral hemidiaphragm paralysis and resultant dyspnea due to cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is described. Case Report  An 82-year-old man presented with a nonproductive cough, chest congestion, hoarseness, and shortness of breath on ambulation. The patient underwent cardiac catheterization, which revealed extensive stenosis of the major cardiac arteries. Subsequently, he underwent triple coronary artery bypass grafting. Despite the cardiac surgery, the patient's dyspnea did not improve. In addition, he developed new complaints of generalized weakness. Magnetic resonance and radiographic imaging of the cervical spine revealed extensive multilevel degenerative spondylosis with moderate to severe central canal narrowing from C2 to C7 and myelomalacia. The patient underwent C2–C6 laminectomy and instrumented fusion with local autograft. After surgery, the patient had gradual relief of dyspnea as well as improvement of strength. The dyspnea completely resolved. Conclusion  The diagnosis of CSM as the cause of dyspnea is difficult to make. When unrelated cardiac or pulmonary disease coexists, the presenting symptoms of CSM may be subtle and must be actively sought. Signs and symptoms can vary widely and may include symptoms of intermittent neck pain or headache. Dyspnea may be related to unilateral diaphragm paralysis caused by CSM. This etiology of dyspnea should be considered in elderly patients who have other comorbidities that often obscure the diagnosis. PMID:28825009

  13. How to measure dyspnea in acute heart failure?

    PubMed

    Socrates, Thenral; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2009-09-01

    Dyspnea is the most common presenting symptom of patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Although dyspnea is an important target for treatment in clinical practice and clinical trials, there remains a lack of consensus on how to assess it. We describe and recommend to use absolute scales such the Likert 5-point or the Visual Analogue Scale rather than any comparator scale such as the Likert 7-point scale. We further recommend starting dyspnea measurements in sitting position and perform, if possible, similar measurements in lying position. The same set of measurements may be repeated as needed during the time course of disease and the treatment.

  14. L-arginine-induced experimental pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Péter; Jr, Zoltán Rakonczay; Sári, Réka; Góg, Csaba; Lonovics, János; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László

    2004-01-01

    Despite medical treatment, the lethality of severe acute pancreatitis is still high (20%-30%). Therefore, it is very important to find good animal models to characterise the events of this severe disease. In 1984, Mizunuma et al[1] developed a new type of experimental necrotizing pancreatitis by intraperitoneal administration of a high dose of L-arginine in rats. This non-invasive model is highly reproducible and produces selective, dose-dependent acinar cell necrosis. Not only is this a good model to study the pathomechanisms of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, but it is also excellent to observe and influence the time course changes of the disease. By writing this review we iluminate some new aspects of cell physiology and pathology of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Unfortunately, the reviews about acute experimental pancreatitis usually did not discuss this model. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to summarise the observations and address some challenges for the future in L-arginine-induced pancreatitis. PMID:15237423

  15. Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch.

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, T; Bondesson, L; Thomas, M

    1987-12-01

    The effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch was studied in 10 healthy volunteers. Itching was induced by intradermal injections of histamine on the upper arm. 'Placebo-acupuncture', acupuncture and electro-acupuncture at 2 Hz or 80 Hz were applied over the injection site, proximal to the injection site (in the same dermatome) or extrasegmentally (ipsilateral to the injected arm) for a period of 5 min following induction of itch. In addition, the effect of a 5 min period and a 20 min period of stimulation of the skin area prior to the induction of itch were studied. The same periods of stimulation were also applied to extrasegmental points prior to the induction of itch on the arm. Acupuncture and 2 Hz and 80 Hz electro-acupuncture significantly reduced subjective itch intensity when applied intrasegmentally. No significant effects were obtained when stimulation was applied extrasegmentally. The results suggest that acupuncture or electro-acupuncture could be tried in clinical conditions associated with pruritus.

  16. Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J; Solomon, L M; Lichter, E A

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of acupuncture on histamine-induced itch and flare in healthy volunteers (n = 25) and compared it with the effect of a pseudo-acupuncture procedure and of no-intervention in a single-blind randomized cross-over study. A cumulative itch index is defined and was found to be smaller with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.02) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.005). The duration of itching was shorter with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p = 0.006) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.001). In addition, maximal flare area was decreased with acupuncture compared with pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.04) and with no intervention (p = 0.003). Acupuncture had little or no effect on the itch onset time or on the maximal itch intensity after intradermal injection of histamine. Measurements of itching correlated poorly with measurements of flare size in all three experimental groups. Acupuncture appears to be an effective inhibitor of histamine-induced itch and flare. Moreover, acupuncture points displayed specificity in that needling near-by, non-acupuncture sites resulted in greater itching and larger flares.

  17. Multidimensional Dyspnea Profile: an instrument for clinical and laboratory research

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Carl R.; Guilfoyle, Tegan E.; Parshall, Mark B.; Schwartzstein, Richard M.; Meek, Paula M.; Gracely, Richard H.; Lansing, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing awareness that dyspnoea, like pain, is a multidimensional experience, but measurement instruments have not kept pace. The Multidimensional Dyspnea Profile (MDP) assesses overall breathing discomfort, sensory qualities, and emotional responses in laboratory and clinical settings. Here we provide the MDP, review published evidence regarding its measurement properties and discuss its use and interpretation. The MDP assesses dyspnoea during a specific time or a particular activity (focus period) and is designed to examine individual items that are theoretically aligned with separate mechanisms. In contrast, other multidimensional dyspnoea scales assess recalled recent dyspnoea over a period of days using aggregate scores. Previous psychophysical and psychometric studies using the MDP show that: 1) subjects exposed to different laboratory stimuli could discriminate between air hunger and work/effort sensation, and found air hunger more unpleasant; 2) the MDP immediate unpleasantness scale (A1) was convergent with common dyspnoea scales; 3) in emergency department patients, two domains were distinguished (immediate perception, emotional response); 4) test–retest reliability over hours was high; 5) the instrument responded to opioid treatment of experimental dyspnoea and to clinical improvement; 6) convergent validity with common instruments was good; and 7) items responded differently from one another as predicted for multiple dimensions. PMID:25792641

  18. Meta-analysis of prognostic implications of dyspnea versus chest pain in patients referred for stress testing.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Agarwal, Vikram; Bangalore, Sripal; Chatterjee, Saurav; Makani, Harikrishna; Rozanski, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that patients with dyspnea referred for stress testing have high mortality. However, it is not clear whether this is explained by high rates of ischemia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of ischemia in patients with dyspnea compared with patients with chest pain referred for stress testing and assess the outcomes of such patients. We systematically searched the electronic databases, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, until December 2012 to identify studies of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease undergoing stress testing. We extracted data on group-specific incidence of stress-induced ischemia and all-cause mortality. In our analyses, we identified and included 6 studies that evaluated a total of 5,753 patients with dyspnea and 24,491 patients with chest pain as the clinical indication for stress testing. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of ischemia on stress imaging in patients with dyspnea compared with patients with chest pain (37.4% vs 30.2%, odds ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 0.99 to 2.06, p = 0.06). However, during the follow-up period, patients with dyspnea had higher all-cause mortality rates compared with patients with chest pain (annual mortality 4.9% vs 2.3%), with odds ratio of 2.57 (95% confidence interval 1.75 to 3.76, p <0.001). In conclusion, in patients undergoing stress testing, those evaluated for dyspnea had a significant increase in all-cause mortality but did not have higher rates of ischemia compared with patients presenting with chest pain. Clinicians evaluating patients with self-reported dyspnea should be aware that these patients represent a high-risk group with increased risk of mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endogenous prion protein attenuates experimentally induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary R; Keenan, Catherine M; Sharkey, Keith A; Jirik, Frank R

    2011-11-01

    Although the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is expressed in the enteric nervous system and lamina propria, its function(s) in the gut is unknown. Because PrP(C) may exert a cytoprotective effect in response to various physiologic stressors, we hypothesized that PrP(C) expression levels might modulate the severity of experimental colitis. We evaluated the course of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in hemizygous Tga20 transgenic mice (approximately sevenfold overexpression of PrP(C)), Prnp(-/-) mice, and wild-type mice. On day 7, colon length, disease severity, and histologic activity indices were determined. Unlike DSS-treated wild-type and Prnp(-/-) animals, PrP(C) overexpressing mice were resistant to colitis induction, exhibited much milder histopathologic features, and did not exhibit weight loss or colonic shortening. In keeping with these results, pro-survival molecule expression and/or phosphorylation levels were elevated in DSS-treated Tga20 mice, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokine production and pSTAT3 levels were reduced. In contrast, DSS-treated Prnp(-/-) mice exhibited increased BAD protein expression and a cytokine expression profile predicted to favor inflammation and differentiation. PrP(C) expression from both the endogenous Prnp locus or the Tga20 transgene was increased in the colons of DSS-treated mice. Considered together, these findings demonstrate that PrP(C) has a previously unrecognized cytoprotective and/or anti-inflammatory function within the murine colon.

  20. Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page An Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 23, 2014 An experimental contact lens design releases a glaucoma medicine at a ...

  1. Dyspnea in COPD: beyond the modified Medical Research Council scale.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Lilia Azzi Collet da Rocha; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2010-01-01

    To determine the correlations among various dyspnea scales, spirometric data, exercise tolerance data, and the Body mass index, airway Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise capacity (BODE) index in patients with COPD. Between March of 2008 and July of 2009, 79 patients with COPD were recruited, and 50 of those patients were included in the study. After being regularly treated with formoterol for one month, the patients completed the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC, dyspnea scale), Baseline Dyspnea Index (BDI), Oxygen Cost Diagram (OCD), and Shortness Of Breath Questionnaire (SOBQ). Subsequently, the patients underwent spirometry and six-minute walk tests (6MWTs), with determination of the six-minute walk distance (6MWD), as well as initial and final SpO2. All patients also completed the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Borg scale. The best correlations were between the Borg scale and the VAS (r s = 0.79) and between the BDI and the SOBQ (r s = -0.73). Among the one-dimensional scales (the VAS, mMRC, OCD, and Borg scale), only the VAS correlated with the spirometric parameters, whereas the multidimensional scales BDI and SOBQ did correlate, but poorly. The MRC, BDI, and SOBQ correlated well with 6MWD. Among the spirometric data, inspiratory capacity (IC) and FVC had the strongest correlations with 6MWD. In the multivariate analysis, BDI and IC were selected as the best predictors of 6MWD. Multidimensional dyspnea scales should be applied in the evaluation of COPD patients.

  2. Prediction of postoperative dyspnea and chronic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junichi; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Sano, Fumiho; Hayashi, Masataro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-05-01

    Even among patients considered to be functionally eligible for major lung resection, some experience postoperative dyspnea. Based on our previous study with quantitative computed tomography (CT), we hypothesized that postoperative dyspnea is associated with the collapse of the remaining lung, and thus, prediction of the postoperative lung volume may contribute to risk assessment for postoperative dyspnea. We measured the emphysematous lung volume and functional lung volume (FLV) separately on whole lung CT using an image analysis software in 290 patients undergoing major lung resection for cancer between January 2006 and December 2012. The postoperative FLV was predicted by a stepwise multiple regression analysis. Fourteen patients complained of postoperative dyspnea (complicated group), five of them presented with chronic respiratory failure. The postoperatively measured FLV was significantly lower in the complicated group than in the control group (P < 0.01). The postoperative FLV could be calculated using preoperative variables, including the forced vital capacity, number of resected segments, FLV, and emphysematous lung volume. The predicted postoperative FLV was significantly lower in the complicated group than in the control group (P < 0.01, area under the curve = 0.78; sensitivity 86%; specificity 73%). The predicted postoperative FLV was also useful in distinguishing complicated patients from matched-control patients who had similar preoperative pulmonary function (P = 0.02). Postoperative dyspnea is likely accompanied by a collapse of the remaining lung. Quantitative assessment of the lung morphology on preoperative CT is useful to screen for patients at risk of postoperative dyspnea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Failing phrenics: an obscure cause of exertional dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Arsalan; Ijaz, Mohsin; Tariq, Hassan; Vakde, Trupti; Duncalf, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Idiopathic phrenic nerve palsy is a rare cause of exertional dyspnea. We present a case of a patient presenting with worsening dyspnea of an unknown etiology found to be related to bilateral phrenic nerve palsy. Discussion: Forty-two-year-old man presented to our emergency department with exertional dyspnea, orthopnea, and a left lower lobe consolidation treated initially as bronchitis by his primary physician as an outpatient, then subsequently as pneumonia at another institution, with no improvement in symptomatology. After admission to our hospital, CT chest demonstrated only supradiaphragmatic atelectatic changes. Echocardiography was normal. Bronchoscopy was contemplated however the patient could not lie flat. A fluoroscopic sniff test demonstrated diaphragmatic dysfunction and pulmonary function tests revealed restrictive pulmonary disease with evidence of neuromuscular etiology. Nerve conduction studies confirmed bilateral phrenic neuropathy. He was referred to a specialized neuromuscular disease center where subsequent workup did not demonstrate any specific etiology. A sleep study confirmed sleep disordered breathing suggestive of diaphragmatic paralysis and he was discharged on bi-level positive pressure ventilation. Conclusion: This is a unique case of exertional dyspnea and orthopnea from diaphragmatic paresis caused by bilateral phrenic nerve palsy where the initial workup for pulmonary and cardiovascular etiologies was essentially unremarkable. Shortness of breath and orthopnea caused by phrenic neuropathy is a rare condition, yet has a variety of etiologies. Our case suggests a template to the diagnostic approach, management, and follow up of bilateral phrenic nerve palsy. PMID:27442657

  4. The respiratory muscles in eucapnic obesity: their role in dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Scano, Giorgio; Stendardi, Loredana; Bruni, Giulia Innocenti

    2009-09-01

    Regular exercise appears to be one of the best predictors of successful weight maintenance. Although physical activity and exercise are important components in the prevention and treatment of obesity, many obese adults without coexisting disorders are unable to exercise due to dyspnea on exertion. As a result they may not participate in regular physical activity. Therefore exertional dyspnea in obese adults is also an obstacle to the prevention and treatment of obesity and coexisting comorbidities. The available data suggest that increased respiratory muscle force generation, and the concomitant increase in respiratory neural drive associated with increased ventilation are an important source of sensation of respiratory effort in obese subjects. Whether activity-related breathlessness is due to either abnormal respiratory mechanical factors (flow limitation and/or chest elastic loading) or the increased metabolic demand of locomotion in obesity, or both of these together, the available data indicate that intensity of dyspnea at any given ventilation and oxygen uptake does not increase in obese subjects as compared with normal weight control subjects. Does this mean that respiratory mechanical factors are unlikely to be contributory? Nonetheless, the component of metabolic cost of breathing may not be accounted for in the measured mechanical work of breathing because of the number of included complex variables. That a decrease in efficiency of the respiratory muscles during exercise contributes to dyspnea in hyperinflating obese subjects should not be disregarded.

  5. Is there a clinically meaningful difference in patient reported dyspnea in acute heart failure? An analysis from URGENT Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Pang, Peter S; Lane, Kathleen A; Tavares, Miguel; Storrow, Alan B; Shen, Changyu; Peacock, W Frank; Nowak, Richard; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Laribi, Said; Hollander, Judd E; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Collins, Sean P

    Dyspnea is the most common presenting symptom in patients with acute heart failure (AHF), but is difficult to quantify as a research measure. The URGENT Dyspnea study compared 3 scales: (1) 10 cm VAS, (2) 5-point Likert, and (3) a 7-point Likert (both VAS and 5-point Likert were recorded in the upright and supine positions). However, the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) to patients has not been well established. We performed a secondary analysis from URGENT Dyspnea, an observational, multi-center study of AHF patients enrolled within 1 h of first physician assessment in the ED. Using the anchor-based method to determine the MCID, a one-category change in the 7-point Likert was used as the criterion standard ('minimally improved or worse'). The main outcome measures were the change in visual analog scale (VAS) and 5-point Likert scale from baseline to 6-h assessment relative to a 1-category change response in the 7-point Likert scale ('minimally worse', 'no change', or 'minimally better'). Of the 776 patients enrolled, 491 had a final diagnosis of AHF with responses at both time points. A 10.5 mm (SD 1.6 mm) change in VAS was the MCID for improvement in the upright position, and 14.5 mm (SD 2.0 mm) in the supine position. However, there was no MCID for worsening, as few patients reported worse dyspnea. There was also no significant MCID for the 5-point Likert scale. A 10.5 mm change is the MCID for improvement in dyspnea over 6 h in ED patients with AHF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging-based assessment of dyspnea in cigarette smokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Paul J.; Schwartz, David A.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Helmers, Richard; Mori, Masaki

    1994-05-01

    Patients with pulmonary fibrosis frequently smoke cigarettes. The cause of dyspnea in these patients is often complex because of the coexistence of multiple disease processes. We investigated 10 cigarette smokers with pulmonary fibrosis who were referred for evaluation of new onset or worsening dyspnea. Chest radiographs and pulmonary function tests were obtained in addition to high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). In those patients with HRCT evidence of both diseases, spirometry and lung volumes were most often normal. Although plain films provided a reasonable assessment of fibrosis, they underestimated the severity of emphysema. Quantitation of both emphysema and fibrosis by HRCT was reproducible and correlated with key pulmonary function tests. Our findings indicate that the HRCT scan is a useful diagnostic test in patients with pulmonary fibrosis who are also cigarette smokers.

  7. [Acute dyspnea in the emergency room: from pathophysiology to ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Rosset-Zufferey, Sarah; Ramlawi, Majd

    2015-08-12

    Acute dyspnea is one of the leading clinical symptoms encountered in the emergency room. Its differential diagnosis is wide, ranging from noisy panic attacks to threatening acute heart failure. History taking and physical examination, even when exhaustive are of limited diagnostic value. Patient reported descriptions are fairly correlated to pathophysiology. Vital signs such as the respiratory rate and pulse oximetry carry prognostic significance. Ancillary tests like the chest x-ray lack sensitivity and specificity. The most astonishing adjunct to testing is the chest ultrasound. Its integration into the emergency physician's armamentarium considerably changed clinical management. Fast and accurate, ultrasonography has become the modern era stethoscope. This review discusses acute dyspnea through the main elements useful to diagnosis.

  8. Experimental and analytical investigation of flow through rocket pump inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a rocket pump inducer are discussed. The effect of the pumping requirements on the blade configuration is analyzed. The effects of viscosity on blade design were determined by tests of a four bladed inducer operated in air at a flow coefficient of 0.065. The fluid properties were measured at the exit of the inducer using conventional and hot wire probes. The experimental results and the method of predicting the outlet tangential velocity and head rise are discussed.

  9. Ionic changes during experimentally induced seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Lux, H D; Heinemann, U

    1978-01-01

    Changes in intra- and extracellular ionic activity and their relation to generation and termination of seizure phenomena can be studied with the help of ion-selective microelectrodes. Transient changes in extracellular potassium activity (aK) of the cortex regularly accompany paroxysmal activity induced by electrical stimulation and pentylenetetrazol injections or occur within active penicillin and aluminum foci. A rise of aK from baseline levels of about 3 mmoles/l up to ceiling levels of 8--12 mmoles/l, followed by subnormal K activity, is typically found during seizure discharge. Extracellular K accumulation during seizures facilitates the spread into extrafocal regions. Ceiling levels of extracellular aK are characterized by pronounced K reabsorption which is probably a limiting mechanism for the rise in extracellular aK. It may be a consequence of a simultaneous rise in intracellular Na activity that an electrogenic Na--K exchange process is involved in the termination of ictal activity. Seizures are also accompanied by significant reductions in extracellular Ca2+ activity (aCa) to as low as 0.7 mmoles/l (resting aCa 1.25 mmoles/l). There is no critical level of lowered aCa at which a seizure ultimately results. However, unlike changes in aK reductions in aCa can precede ictal activity. Thus, a fall of aCa occurs before the onset of paroxysmal periods during cyclical spike driving in a penicillin focus and before seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol. Ca2+-dependent mechanisms may contribute to seizure generation. In addition to changes in aK and aCa, intracellular chloride activity (aCl) can increase during seizure activity, as a result of an impaired chloride extrusion mechanism, which would lead to a reduced efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission and, therefore, to facilitation of seizure generation.

  10. Mechanisms for inducing nasal mucosal tolerance in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Calder, Claudia J; Nicholson, Lindsay B; Dick, Andrew D

    2006-02-01

    Delivering soluble (auto) antigenic peptides via the naso-respiratory route induces tolerance to that peptide and suppression of experimental models of autoimmune disease. In the normal lung, respiratory tract dendritic cells (RTDCs) efficiently endocytose soluble antigens, migrate to regional lymph nodes and present peptide to T cells that subsequently become tolerant. This article describes protocols for inducing tolerance via the naso-respiratory tract in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU); for the isolation of RTDCs to facilitate definition of, and conditions for, maturation and activation of cells; and to test RTDC ability to induce tolerance in murine EAU when adoptively transferred.

  11. Pulmonary emphysema induced by methylphenidate: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Rapello, Gabriel Victor Guimarães; Antoniolli, Andréia; Pereira, Daniel Martins; Facco, Gilberto; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Pazetti, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate is the most widely used drug for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, it has important side effects, such as abdominal pain, insomnia, anorexia and loss of appetite, and also some cases of early severe emphysema after drug abuse have been reported. Our aim was to investigate the development of pulmonary emphysema in rats that were subjected to different doses of methylphenidate. Experimental study carried out at the laboratory of a public university. Eighteen male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (0.9% saline solution); MP 0.8 (methylphenidate, 0.8 mg/kg); MP 1.2 (methylphenidate, 1.2 mg/kg). After 90 days of daily gavage, the animals were sacrificed and lung tissue samples were prepared for analysis on the mean alveolar diameter (Lm). The Lm was greater in MP 0.8 (47.91 ± 3.13; P < 0.01) and MP 1.2 (46.36 ± 4.39; P < 0.05) than in the control group (40.00 ± 3.48). Methylphenidate caused an increase in the alveolar diameter of rats, which was compatible with human pulmonary emphysema.

  12. ST2 in Emergency Department Patients With Noncardiac Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Engineer, Rakesh S.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Peacock, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Serum levels of soluble ST2, a member of the interleukin-1 receptor family, predict mortality in emergency department (ED) patients with dyspnea secondary to acute heart failure and acute coronary syndrome. Elevated levels of ST2 have also been described in pulmonary disease, but it is unclear if these are associated with adverse outcomes. The hypothesis for this study was that elevated ST2 levels would be associated with 180-day mortality and 180-day return ED visits or hospital readmission in patients presenting to the ED with noncardiac causes of dyspnea. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study enrolled a convenience sample of patients presenting to a single academic tertiary care ED with a chief complaint of dyspnea. Exclusion criteria included dyspnea due to chest wall trauma, airway obstruction, and known cardiac etiology (new onset heart failure, prior heart failure with current brain natriuretic peptide > 500 pg/mL, presumed ischemic chest pain, elevated troponin, electrocardiogram changes indicating myocardial infarction or ischemia, heart transplant). ST2 levels were measured at ED presentation and compared between those with and without adverse outcomes. Staff were blinded to ST2 levels. Differences between groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Of the 82 patients enrolled, 45 (55%) were female, 48 (59%) were African American, and 34 (42%) were hospitalized. The most frequent ED or hospital diagnosis was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma, in 29 (35%) patients. At 180 days, 36 of 81 patients (44%) had return ED visits, 21 of 81 patients (26%) were readmitted, and five of 82 patients (6%) were deceased. Median ST2 level was 227 ng/mL in patients who died versus 32 ng/mL in those who survived (difference = 195 ng/mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48 to 342 ng/mL, p = 0.006). Median ST2 level was 59 ng/mL in readmitted patients versus 31 ng/mL in nonreadmitted patients (difference = 28 ng

  13. [Number of patients with chronic dyspnea in three German specialist practices].

    PubMed

    Ewert, R; Bahr, C; Weirich, C; Henschel, F; Rink, A; Winkler, J

    2012-11-01

    In the second quarter 2011 the incidence of the symptoms "chronic dyspnea" among the patients in three specialist practices was determined by means of a self-developed questionnaire. 1286 anonymised questionnaires with full information could be evaluated. The proportion of the patients with a chronic dyspnea (inclusive "dyspnea and weakness feeling") in the practices amounted to between 15.3 and 57.7 %. An exclusive assessment of chronic dyspnea could be assigned to 10.4 to 31.4 % of the patients evaluated. From the view point of the treating physicians, the cause of the chronic dyspnea was sufficiently explained by the available information.

  14. EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Kihlman, B. A.

    1957-01-01

    of these enzymes were found to be totally inhibited only by potassium cyanide. In the other cases, little correlation was found between ability to inhibit the activities of these enzymes and ability to produce chromosome aberrations. In a number of experiments, hydrogen peroxide was found to be without radiomimetic effect, whether alone or in combination with potassium cyanide. t-Butyl hydroperoxide proved to be active. The effect of t-butyl hydroperoxide was substantially increased by pretreatments with 2.4.-dinitrophenol. The results are discussed, and it is concluded that the observations made do not support the hypothesis that hydrogen peroxide is involved in the production of chromosome aberrations by potassium cyanide. The possibility that organic peroxides are involved cannot be excluded on the bases of the experimental results. As an alternative hypothesis, it is suggested that iron or other heavy metals are present in the chromosomes and that cyanide and other heavy metal complexing agents produce chromosome aberrations by reacting with these metals. PMID:13438921

  15. An official American Thoracic Society statement: update on the mechanisms, assessment, and management of dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Parshall, Mark B; Schwartzstein, Richard M; Adams, Lewis; Banzett, Robert B; Manning, Harold L; Bourbeau, Jean; Calverley, Peter M; Gift, Audrey G; Harver, Andrew; Lareau, Suzanne C; Mahler, Donald A; Meek, Paula M; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2012-02-15

    Dyspnea is a common, distressing symptom of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular diseases. Since the ATS published a consensus statement on dyspnea in 1999, there has been enormous growth in knowledge about the neurophysiology of dyspnea and increasing interest in dyspnea as a patient-reported outcome. The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS Consensus Statement on dyspnea. An interdisciplinary committee of experts representing ATS assemblies on Nursing, Clinical Problems, Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and Behavioral Science determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant expertise. The final content of this statement was agreed upon by all members. Progress has been made in clarifying mechanisms underlying several qualitatively and mechanistically distinct breathing sensations. Brain imaging studies have consistently shown dyspnea stimuli to be correlated with activation of cortico-limbic areas involved with interoception and nociception. Endogenous and exogenous opioids may modulate perception of dyspnea. Instruments for measuring dyspnea are often poorly characterized; a framework is proposed for more consistent identification of measurement domains. Progress in treatment of dyspnea has not matched progress in elucidating underlying mechanisms. There is a critical need for interdisciplinary translational research to connect dyspnea mechanisms with clinical treatment and to validate dyspnea measures as patient-reported outcomes for clinical trials.

  16. An Official American Thoracic Society Statement: Update on the Mechanisms, Assessment, and Management of Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Parshall, Mark B.; Schwartzstein, Richard M.; Adams, Lewis; Banzett, Robert B.; Manning, Harold L.; Bourbeau, Jean; Calverley, Peter M.; Gift, Audrey G.; Harver, Andrew; Lareau, Suzanne C.; Mahler, Donald A.; Meek, Paula M.; O'Donnell, Denis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dyspnea is a common, distressing symptom of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular diseases. Since the ATS published a consensus statement on dyspnea in 1999, there has been enormous growth in knowledge about the neurophysiology of dyspnea and increasing interest in dyspnea as a patient-reported outcome. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS Consensus Statement on dyspnea. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts representing ATS assemblies on Nursing, Clinical Problems, Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and Behavioral Science determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant expertise. The final content of this statement was agreed upon by all members. Results: Progress has been made in clarifying mechanisms underlying several qualitatively and mechanistically distinct breathing sensations. Brain imaging studies have consistently shown dyspnea stimuli to be correlated with activation of cortico-limbic areas involved with interoception and nociception. Endogenous and exogenous opioids may modulate perception of dyspnea. Instruments for measuring dyspnea are often poorly characterized; a framework is proposed for more consistent identification of measurement domains. Conclusions: Progress in treatment of dyspnea has not matched progress in elucidating underlying mechanisms. There is a critical need for interdisciplinary translational research to connect dyspnea mechanisms with clinical treatment and to validate dyspnea measures as patient-reported outcomes for clinical trials. PMID:22336677

  17. Experimental background due to particle induced gas desorption in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    2008-08-10

    Beam-gas collision created experimental background, i.e., singles, has affected heavy ion and polarized proton operations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The gas molecules in interaction region are mainly caused by the electron induced gas desorption. and the electrons are produced from the beam induced electron multipacting, or called electron cloud. The background has a dependence on the usual electron cloud related parameters, such as the bunch intensity, bunch spacing, and the solenoid field. With the RHIC upgrade plan, the experimental background may become a luminosity limiting factor. Mitigations are discussed.

  18. Copeptin and risk stratification in patients with acute dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The identification of patients at highest risk for adverse outcome who are presenting with acute dyspnea to the emergency department remains a challenge. This study investigates the prognostic value of Copeptin, the C-terminal part of the vasopressin prohormone alone and combined to N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with acute dyspnea. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational cohort study in the emergency department of a university hospital and enrolled 287 patients with acute dyspnea. Results Copeptin levels were elevated in non-survivors (n = 29) compared to survivors at 30 days (108 pmol/l, interquartile range (IQR) 37 to 197 pmol/l) vs. 18 pmol/l, IQR 7 to 43 pmol/l; P < 0.0001). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to predict 30-day mortality were 0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76 to 0.90), 0.76 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.84) and 0.63 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.74) for Copeptin, NT-proBNP and BNP, respectively (Copeptin vs. NTproBNP P = 0.21; Copeptin vs. BNP P = 0.002). When adjusted for common cardiovascular risk factors and NT-proBNP, Copeptin was the strongest independent predictor for short-term mortality in all patients (HR 3.88 (1.94 to 7.77); P < 0.001) and especially in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) (HR 5.99 (2.55 to 14.07); P < 0.0001). With the inclusion of Copeptin to the adjusted model including NTproBNP, the net reclassification improvement (NRI) was 0.37 (P < 0.001). An additional 30% of those who experienced events were reclassified as high risk, and an additional 26% without events were reclassified as low risk. Conclusions Copeptin is a new promising prognostic marker for short-term mortality independently and additive to natriuretic peptide levels in patients with acute dyspnea. PMID:21106053

  19. Progressive dyspnea in patient with large mediastinal mass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Liposarcoma occurs very rarely in the mediastinum. Patients often remain asymptomatic until it grows large enough to cause direct invasion or compression of adjacent organs. We report a case of a 77-year-old male presented with dyspnea of exertion and was found to have a large mediastinal mass which was eventually diagnosed as primary mediastinal well-differentiated liposarcoma. The limited respiratory function at the initial presentation prompted phrenic nerve preserving incomplete resection rather than radical removal of the adjacent mediastinal structures. After surgical removal, the recurrence for well-differentiated mediastinal liposarcomas in the mediastinum is unknown; therefore, close follow-up is crucial. PMID:24393470

  20. Anesthesia for patients with diaphragmatic hernia and severe dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D V

    1992-03-01

    Problems facing a patient with severe dyspnea secondary to diaphragmatic herniation are hypoxia, hypercarbia and respiratory acidosis, and cardiovascular instability. It is easy to precipitate a crisis in these patients during anesthetic induction as a result of stress, bad positioning, induction of pneumothorax, or inappropriate anesthetic technique. These patients require a smooth, stress-free perianesthetic period with preoxygenation, positioning with the affected side down, rapid intravenous induction, endotracheal intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Maintenance with isoflurane is preferred, and nitrous oxide should be avoided. Close monitoring of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is essential. Recovery from anesthesia should include oxygen supplementation, pleural drainage, and local analgesia if required.

  1. Experimental study of plate buckling induced by spatial temperature gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Coyle, Marshall F.; Mcleod, Rory N.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of plate buckling induced by spatial temperature gradients is described. A rectangular Hastelloy-X panel is subjected to local line heating by a focused quartz heat lamp. Two parallel panel edges are maintained at constant temperature by coolant flow. Point supports provide well-defined thermal-structural boundary conditions. Test results from transient elastic and inelastic tests demonstrate that substantial panel bending occurs due to initial panel warpage and thermally induced membrane compressive stresses.

  2. Experimentally induced otitis and audiogenic seizure in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Niaussat, M M

    1977-04-15

    Audiogenic seizures can be induced in genetically non-susceptible 17-day-old mice (Rb/3 strain) with various results. Priming only induces 9% of seizures, auditory insulation 3,8%, while experimental otitis leads to 79%. The hypothesis concerning disuse supersensitivity subsequent to acoustic deprivation was not confirmed by the experiment. However, modification of acoustic transmission at middle ear level induced by otitis or ear physical damage during the maturation period, exposes the upper nervous centers to intense stimulation to which the reaction is a recruiting response.

  3. Hospitalist attitudes toward the assessment and management of dyspnea in patients with acute cardiopulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Mihaela S; Au, David H; Mularski, Richard A; Krishnan, Jerry A; Naureckas, Eduard T; Carson, Shannon S; Godwin, Patrick; Priya, Aruna; Pekow, Penelope S; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2015-11-01

    Dyspnea is a common symptom in patients hospitalized with acute cardiopulmonary diseases. Routine assessment of dyspnea severity is recommended by clinical guidelines based on the evidence that patients are not treated consistently for dyspnea relief. To evaluate attitudes and beliefs of hospitalists regarding the assessment and management of dyspnea. Cross-sectional survey. Nine hospitals in the United States. Survey questions assessed the following domains regarding dyspnea: importance in clinical care, potential benefits and challenges of implementing a standardized assessment, current approaches to assessment, and how awareness of severity affects management. A 5-point Likert scale was used to assess the respondent's level of agreement; strongly agree and agree were combined into a single category. Of the 255 hospitalists invited to participate, 69.8% completed the survey; 77.0% agreed that dyspnea relief is an important goal when treating patients with cardiopulmonary conditions. Approximately 90% of respondents stated that awareness of dyspnea severity influences their decision to intensify treatment, to pursue additional diagnostic testing, and the timing of discharge. Of the respondents, 61.0% agreed that standardized assessment of dyspnea should be part of the vital signs, and 64.6% agreed that awareness of dyspnea severity influences their decision to prescribe opioids. Hospitalists who appreciated the importance of dyspnea in clinical practice were more likely to support the implementation of a standardized scale. Most hospitalists believe that routine assessment of dyspnea severity would enhance their clinical decision making and patient care. Measurement and documentation of dyspnea severity may represent an opportunity to improve dyspnea management. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  4. Relation of dyspnea severity on admission for acute heart failure with outcomes and costs.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; Mi, Xiaojuan; Sharma, Puza P; Qualls, Laura G; DeVore, Adam D; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalization for heart failure (HF) is frequently related to dyspnea, yet associations among dyspnea severity, outcomes, and health care costs are unknown. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients hospitalized for acute HF by dyspnea severity and to examine associations among dyspnea severity, outcomes, and costs. Registry data for patients hospitalized for HF were linked with Medicare claims to evaluate dyspnea and outcomes in patients ≥65 years of age. We classified patients by patient-reported dyspnea severity at admission. Outcomes included length of stay, mortality 30 days after admission, days alive and out of the hospital, readmission, and Medicare payments 30 days after discharge. Of 48,616 patients with acute HF and dyspnea, 4,022 (8.3%) had dyspnea with moderate activity, 19,619 (40.3%) with minimal activity, and 24,975 (51.4%) at rest. Patients with dyspnea with minimal activity or at rest had greater co-morbidities, including renal insufficiency. Greater severity of baseline dyspnea was associated with mortality (moderate activity, 6.3%; minimal activity, 7.6%; at rest, 11.6%) and HF readmission (7.2%, 9.0%, and 9.4%). After multivariate adjustment, dyspnea at rest was associated with greater 30-day mortality and HF readmission, fewer days alive and out of the hospital, longer length of stay, and higher Medicare payments compared with dyspnea with moderate activity. In conclusion, dyspnea at rest on presentation was associated with greater mortality, readmission, length of stay, and health care costs in patients hospitalized with acute HF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hospitalist Attitudes towards the Assessment and Management of Dyspnea in Patients with Acute Cardiopulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Mihaela S.; Au, David; Mularski, Richard; Krishnan, Jerry; Naureckas, Eduard T.; Carson, Shannon; Godwin, Patrick; Priya, Aruna; Pekow, Penelope; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dyspnea is a common symptom in patients hospitalized with acute cardiopulmonary diseases. Routine assessment of dyspnea severity is recommended by clinical guidelines based on the evidence that patients are not treated consistently for dyspnea relief. Objective To evaluate attitudes and beliefs of hospitalists regarding the assessment and management of dyspnea. Design Cross-sectional survey Settings Nine hospitals in the United States. Measurements Survey questions assessed the following domains regarding dyspnea: importance in clinical care; potential benefits and challenges of implementing a standardized assessment; current approaches to assessment and how awareness of severity affects management. A five-point Likert scale was used to assess the respondent’s level of agreement; strongly agree and agree were combined into a single category. Results Of the 255 hospitalists invited to participate, 69.8% completed the survey; 77.0% agreed that dyspnea relief is an important goal when treating patients with cardiopulmonary conditions. Approximately 90% of respondents stated that awareness of dyspnea severity influences their decision to intensify treatment, to pursue additional diagnostic testing and the timing of discharge. 61.0% agreed that standardized assessment of dyspnea should be part of the vital signs and 64.6% that awareness of dyspnea severity influences their decision to prescribe opioids. Hospitalists who appreciated the importance of dyspnea in clinical practice were more likely to support the implementation of a standardized scale. Conclusions Most hospitalists believe that routine assessment of dyspnea severity would enhance their clinical decision-making and patient care. Measurement and documentation of dyspnea severity may represent an opportunity to improve dyspnea management. PMID:26199095

  6. Experimental Investigation of the Induced Airflow of Corona Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Xun-Nian; Wang, Wan-Bo; Huang, Zong-Bo; Li, Hua-Xing

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve the acceleration effect of corona discharge acting on air, we present an experimental study on the induced airflow produced by corona discharge between two parallel electrodes. The parameters investigated are the type of electrodes, actuation voltage and the distance in the absence of free airflow. The induced flow velocity is measured directly in the accelerated region using the particle image velocimetry technology. The results show that if corona discharge is not developed into arc discharge, the induced airflow velocity increases nearly linearly with the applied voltage and the maximum induced airflow velocity near the needle electrode reaches 36 m/s. It is expected that in the future, the result can be referred to in the research about effect of active flow control to reach much higher induced airflow speed.

  7. Gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Taha, Mona M; Younis, Nahla N; Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Hamouda, Hamdi A; Eldosouky, Mohamed A; Soliman, Hala

    2010-10-01

    Gastritis, an inflammation of gastric mucosa, may be due to many pathological factors and infection, such as with Helicobacter pylori. The use of experimental models of gastritis is important to evaluate the biochemical changes and study chemotherapeutic intervention. In a previous study we demonstrated an acute gastritis model induced by iodoacetamide. Our objective in this study was to evaluate a new gastritis model induced by H. pylori infection in experimental rats in terms of certain biomarkers in serum and mucosal tissues in addition to histopathological examination. Gastritis was induced in 20 albino Wistar rats by H. pylori isolated from antral biopsy taken from a 49-year-old male patient endoscopically diagnosed as having H. pylori infection. Another ten rats were used as controls. Serum gastrin, pepsinogen I activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were measured. Immunostaining for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation were used to further evaluate H. pylori-induced gastritis. Serum gastrin, IL-6, mucosal MPO activity, and PGE(2) demonstrated significant increases joined with a decreased serum pepsinogen I activity (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positive reaction for iNOS, nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis models demonstrated massive oxidative stress and pronounced injury in mucosal tissue. Since our model in rats reflected the clinical picture of H. pylori infection, it can be considered as a consistent model to study chemotherapeutic intervention for this type of gastritis.

  8. Measurement of dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: what is the tool telling you?

    PubMed

    Meek, P M

    2004-01-01

    Dyspnea is the most common symptom experienced by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is linked to decreases in patient activity levels and quality of life. Use of standardized tools to measure dyspnea has a long history in respiratory care. However, in many cases it is not clear what is being quantified when using a particular tool. This review will consider the definition of and mechanisms believed to contribute to dyspnea, attempting to clarify what is being quantified in common tools currently available for dyspnea measurement.

  9. Neuroendocrine mechanisms of development of experimental hyperandrogen-induced anovulation.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, A G; Sinitsyn, P V; Tarasenko, L V; Polyakova, L I

    2003-10-01

    An experimental model of hyperandrogen-induced anovulatory infertility (s.c. implantation of Silastic capsules containing testosterone into adult female rats) was used to study morphological, hormonal, and biochemical measures characterizing the state of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-ovarian system. Impairments in functional androgen metabolism in the hypothalamus were seen, with decreases in the Luliberin sensitivity of the hypophysis, changes in the structure of estral cycles, and morphological changes in the ovaries; these findings are evidence for neuroendocrine disturbances in the control of ovulation. Flutamide, an experimental antiandrogen, led to partial normalization of the hormonal, biochemical, and morphological characteristics, as well as to recovery of fertility in females with anovulatory infertility.

  10. Parapharyngeal space lipomatosis with secondary dyspnea, disphagia and disphonia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ortega, Dorian Yarih; Gomez-Pedraza, Antonio; Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parapharyngeal space tumors are a small percentage of all head and neck neoplasms. Due to their anatomic location, they represent a therapeutic challenge. To our knowledge, 11 cases of parapharyngeal lipomatous tumors have been reported in the literature. Case A 48 year old male with chief complaints of dyspnea, dysphagia and dysphonia was found to have a parapharyngeal space tumor. He was scheduled to undergo lumpectomy and neck exploration. Discussion Benign tumors represented 70% of all cases. Open neck surgery is considered the gold-standard of treatment. Conclusion It is important to bear in mind the lipomas of the parapharyngeal space to establish an accurate diagnosis and implement timely, appropriate treatment in order to avoid future complications and reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26318127

  11. [Pulmonary hypertension: a rare cause of unexplained dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, J L

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by an increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure above 25 mmHg, measured at right heart catheterization. The various conditions (up to 37) leading to PH are described in a clinical classification identifying 5 groups, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). With an incidence of 2-4 cases/million/year, PAH is a rare, rapidly progressive and incurable form or PH. The differential diagnosis of PH relies on a decision tree, which is typically triggered by the presence of unexplained dyspnea and followed by a non invasive approach that includes simple tests such as EKG, chest radiography, pulmonary function tests and echocardiography. Other tests have some value to exclude chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, such as ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy, angio CT scanner and pulmonary angiogram. Finally, right heart catheterization is mandatory to establish the diagnosis of PH.

  12. Tetracycline induced esophageal ulcers. a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Carlborg, B; Densert, O; Lindqvist, C

    1983-02-01

    Medication with oral drugs has not been considered as a cause of esophageal lesions in the general literature of esophageal disease. This study demonstrates 40 patients with complaints of sudden onset of intense retrosternal pains and odynophagia during treatment with oral tetracyclines. All patients had distinct circumferential ulcers in the esophagus. Medical history, barium swallows, esophagoscopy, biopsies and esophageal manometry revealed no other apparent etiology but a local corrosive effect of the tetracyclines. Experimental tests on the esophagus of the cat verified a severe local corrosive effect of the tetracyclines. Another tetracycline, lymecycline, not reported previously to induce esophageal lesions in man, was significantly less ulcerogenic than doxycycline and oxytetracycline. Drug induced esophageal ulcerations are likely to be more numerous than previously suspected. The experimental model used appears to be sound for investigating ulcerogenic potentials of orally administered drugs.

  13. The assessment of dyspnea during the vigorous intensity exercise by three Dyspnea Rating Scales in inactive medical personnel.

    PubMed

    Intarakamhang, Patrawut; Wangjongmeechaikul, Piyathida

    2013-07-24

    It is well recognized that exercise is good for health especially as it's known to prevent metabolic syndromes such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. To reap the benefits from exercise the most appropriate level of intensity must be determined, the level of intensity ranging from low, low to moderate to hard (vigorous). This study is aimed to 1. To investigate and evaluate 3 subjective rating scales. The Borg scale, the Combined Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) + FACES Dyspnea Rating Scale (FACES) and the Likert scale, during hard (vigorous) exercise. 2. To compare the effectiveness of the Borg scale and Combined Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) + FACES Dyspnea Rating Scale during the hard (vigorous) intensity exercise. This study uses a descriptive methodology. The sample group was 73 medical personnel that were leading an inactive life style, volunteers from Phramongkutklao Hospital. Participants were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1, those to report using the Borg Scale, group 2 using NRS + FACES, and group 3 to subjectively assess the intensity of the exercise using the Likert scale during a treadmill Exercise Stress Test (EST) using the Bruce protocol. The upper limit of the intensity in the study was equal to 85% of the maximal heart rate of all participants. The subjective reporting of the experienced level of dyspnea was undertaken immediately after the completion of exercise. The average age of participants was 23.37 years old. The 26 participants reporting using the Borg scale had mean Borg scale score of 13.46+1.77, a mode score of 15. The 24 participants reporting intensity levels through NRS +FACES had a mean NRS + FACES score of 6.83+1.09 and mode on the NRS + FACES scale equal to 7. The Likert scale group evaluated 23 participants with a mean Likert scale score of 2.74. That is those choosing Levels 2 and 3 were 6 (26.9%) and 17 participants (73.95%), respectively. Comparing the two groups with the Borg scale at equal to or greater than 15

  14. The Assessment of Dyspnea during the Vigorous Intensity Exercise by Three Dyspnea Rating Scales in Inactive Medical Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Intarakamhang, Patrawut; Wangjongmeechaikul, Piyathida

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that exercise is good for health especially as it’s known to prevent metabolic syndromes such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. To reap the benefits from exercise the most appropriate level of intensity must be determined, the level of intensity ranging from low, low to moderate to hard (vigorous). This study is aimed to 1. To investigate and evaluate 3 subjective rating scales. The Borg scale, the Combined Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) + FACES Dyspnea Rating Scale (FACES) and the Likert scale, during hard (vigorous) exercise. 2. To compare the effectiveness of the Borg scale and Combined Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) + FACES Dyspnea Rating Scale during the hard (vigorous) intensity exercise. This study uses a descriptive methodology. The sample group was 73 medical personnel that were leading an inactive life style, volunteers from Phramongkutklao Hospital. Participants were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1, those to report using the Borg Scale, group 2 using NRS + FACES, and group 3 to subjectively assess the intensity of the exercise using the Likert scale during a treadmill Exercise Stress Test (EST) using the Bruce protocol. The upper limit of the intensity in the study was equal to 85% of the maximal heart rate of all participants. The subjective reporting of the experienced level of dyspnea was undertaken immediately after the completion of exercise. The average age of participants was 23.37 years old. The 26 participants reporting using the Borg scale had mean Borg scale score of 13.46+1.77, a mode score of 15. The 24 participants reporting intensity levels through NRS +FACES had a mean NRS + FACES score of 6.83+1.09 and mode on the NRS + FACES scale equal to 7. The Likert scale group evaluated 23 participants with a mean Likert scale score of 2.74. That is those choosing Levels 2 and 3 were 6 (26.9%) and 17 participants (73.95%), respectively. Comparing the two groups with the Borg scale at equal to or greater than

  15. Impact of pulmonary rehabilitation on the major dimensions of dyspnea in COPD.

    PubMed

    Wadell, Karin; Webb, Katherine A; Preston, Megan E; Amornputtisathaporn, Naparat; Samis, Lorelei; Patelli, Jennifer; Guenette, Jordan A; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2013-08-01

    The evaluation of dyspnea and its responsiveness to therapy in COPD should consider the multidimensional nature of this symptom in each of its sensory-perceptual (intensity, quality), affective and impact domains. To gain new insights into mechanisms of dyspnea relief following pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), we examined effects on the major domains of dyspnea and their interaction with physiological training effects. This randomized, controlled study was conducted in 48 subjects with COPD. Subjects received either 8-weeks of PR or usual care (CTRL). Pre- and post-intervention assessments included: sensory-perceptual (i.e., exertional dyspnea intensity, dyspnea descriptors at end-exercise), affective (i.e., intensity of breathing-related anxiety during exercise, COPD self-efficacy, walking self-efficacy) and impact (i.e., activity-related dyspnea measured by the Baseline/Transition Dyspnea Index, Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire dyspnea component, St. George's Respiratory Disease Questionnaire activity component) domains of dyspnea; functional performance (i.e., 6-minute walk, endurance shuttle walk); pulmonary function; and physiological measurements during constant work rate cycle exercise at 75% of the peak incremental work rate. Forty-one subjects completed the study: PR (n = 17) and CTRL (n = 24) groups were well matched for age, sex, body size and pulmonary function. There were no significant between-group differences in pre- to post-intervention changes in pulmonary function or physiological parameters during exercise. After PR versus CTRL, significant improvements were found in the affective and impact domains but not in the sensory-perceptual domain of dyspnea. In conclusion, clinically meaningful improvements in the affective and impact domains of dyspnea occurred in response to PR in the absence of consistent physiological training effects.

  16. Certain bio-psychosocial-spiritual problems associated with dyspnea among advanced cancer patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chih-Te; Hsu, Hua-Shui; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Chin-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Wen-Yuan

    2012-08-01

    Dyspnea is a multidimensional phenomenon among advanced cancer patients. We aim to explore the association between bio-psychosocial-spiritual problems and dyspnea among advanced cancer patients in Taiwan. We retrospectively analyzed advanced cancer patients admitted to the hospice palliative ward in a tertiary hospital in Taiwan from 2002 to 2005. A total of 687 consecutive advanced cancer patients were enrolled. Physical, psychosocial, and spiritual problems for each patient were collected. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between dyspnea and other physical, psychosocial, and spiritual problems. The top four primary sites of cancer among these patients are the liver/biliary tract (19.9%), lung (15.6%), colon/rectum (12.8%), and head/neck (9.9%). During admission period, 260 (37.8%) patients experienced dyspnea. For primary cancer types and metastatic locations, subjects with dyspnea tended to have lung cancer, lung metastasis, or brain metastasis. The clinical symptoms/signs related to dyspnea are pain, anorexia, constipation, nausea/vomiting, coughing, pleural effusion, edema, anxiety, and propriety preparation problem, that is, arranging one's will, feelings of isolation, fear of death, and survival. After further adjustments for potential confounders, subjects with problems of propriety preparation were found to be strongly associated with dyspnea. The adjusted odds ratio of having dyspnea caused by the problem of propriety preparation was 1.91 (95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.19). Advanced cancer patients with certain psychosocial and spiritual problems, such as, the problem of propriety preparation, fear of death, and anxiety, tended to have dyspnea. Among these factors, propriety preparation plays an important role among dyspnea patients. Advanced cancer patients with dyspnea have greater needs for propriety preparation.

  17. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  18. Insulin reverses ammonia-induced anorexia and experimental cancer anorexia.

    PubMed

    Chance, W T; Thomas, I; Fischer, J E

    1994-01-01

    Previous experiments suggest that experimental cancer-induced anorexia is associated with hyperammonemia and that daily injections of insulin may attenuate the anorexia for several days. In the present study, we determined whether similar daily insulin treatments would correct anorexia induced by the infusion of ammonium salts and compared this feeding response with that of insulin-treated tumor-bearing (TB) rats. Daily treatment of control and anorectic TB rats with systemically administered insulin for six days increased feeding in all control rats and 40% of the TB rats. All insulin-treated groups exhibited equal degrees of hypoglycemia irrespective of anorexia. Basal concentrations of lactate and glucagon were elevated in saline-treated TB rats. Plasma lactate levels were normalized by insulin treatment, whereas glucagon was normalized only in the TB rats that fed to insulin and increased further in TB rats that did not feed to insulin. Elevated hypothalamic tyrosine was reduced in insulin-treated TB rats that ate, and 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid was increased further when the rats did not eat. Insulin also blocked anorexia resulting from the intravenous infusion of ammonium salts. Hypothalamic concentrations of tyrosine and tryptophan were increased by the ammonia infusion and reduced significantly in insulin-treated infused rats. These results indicate that insulin treatment can reverse experimental cancer-induced anorexia and hyperammonemia-induced anorexia. Neurochemical changes associated with these treatments are also similar, but not identical.

  19. Effects of Caffeine and Lycopene in Experimentally Induced Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Ozlem; Topsakal, Senay; Haligur, Mehmet; Aydogan, Ahmet; Dincoglu, Dilnur

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a global epidemic with increasing prevalence. The disease is chronic in nature, and patients must use antidiabetic drugs or insulin during their lifespan. Because of the difficulty of using injectable insulin preparations, patients and practitioners prefer to use oral antidiabetic drugs for prophylaxis and treatment. There are, however, numerous adverse effects of antidiabetic drugs and rapidly increasing attention is being paid to new nutraceutical drugs with fewer adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine and lycopene on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DM in rats. Caffeine and lycopene were administered to the study groups by oral gavages for 1 month whereafter experimental diabetes was induced in 90 rats in 6 groups. There were no pathological effects of lycopene and caffeine on the pancreas. Marked vacuolization and degeneration were observed in STZ-treated groups. Caffeine and lycopene decreased the pathological findings and lowered the blood and urine glucose levels in the rats with STZ-induced DM, whereas these compounds increased serum insulin levels. This study showed that caffeine and lycopene provided protective effects against experimentally induced DM. The protective effects of lycopene were observed to be much greater than those of caffeine.

  20. Microcirculation alterations in experimentally induced gingivitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masato; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Maeda, Shingo; Iimura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to morphologically examine the gingival microvascular network using a microvascular resin cast (MRC) technique, and to investigate how inflammatory disease functionally affects gingival microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We used four beagle dogs with healthy periodontal tissue as experimental animals. To cause periodontal inflammation, dental floss was placed around the cervical neck portions of the right premolars. The unmanipulated left premolars served as controls, and received plaque control every 7 days. After 90 days, gingivitis was induced in the experimental side, while the control side maintained healthy gingiva. To perform morphological examinations, we used an MRC method involving the injection of low-viscosity synthetic resin into the blood vessels, leading to peripheral soft-tissue dissolution and permitting observation of the bone, teeth, and vascular cast. Gingival blood flow was estimated using an LDF meter. The control gingival vasculature showed hairpin-loop-like networks along the tooth surface. The blood vessels had diameters of 20-40 μm and were regularly arranged around the cervical portion. On the other hand, the vasculature in the experimental group was twisted and gathered into spiral forms, with blood vessels that had uneven surfaces and smaller diameters of 8-10 μm. LDF revealed reduced gingival blood flow in the group with experimentally induced gingivitis compared to controls. The actual measurements of gingival blood flow by LDF were in agreement with the alterations that would be expected based on the gingivitis-induced morphological alterations observed with the MRC technique.

  1. A Teenage Girl with Acute Dyspnea and Hypoxemia during Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tanpowpong, P.; Thongpo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) can cause morbidity and mortality. We present the case of teenager who developed dyspnea and hypoxemia few hours after red cell transfusion. After being admitted for close monitoring and oxygen therapy, her symptoms spontaneously resolved. Message: dyspnea during red cell transfusion should raise the suspicion of TRALI. PMID:27891282

  2. Nebulized Fentanyl for Dyspnea in a Hospice Patient with True Allergy to Morphine and Hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Wahler, Robert G; Smith, David B; Mulcahy, Kimberly B

    2017-03-01

    An 86-year-old white female was admitted to hospice care with lung cancer. Even with optimal medical management, she suffered from dyspnea and required opioid therapy. However, the patient had a true morphine and hydromorphone allergy. She was administered nebulized fentanyl for symptomatic relief of dyspnea with good effect and she did not experience any allergic response.

  3. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema.

  5. Exercise therapy in the management of dyspnea in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koelwyn, Graeme J.; Jones, Lee W.; Hornsby, Whitney; Eves, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Dyspnea is a frequent, debilitating, and understudied symptom in cancer associated with poor prognosis and reduced health-related quality of life. The purpose of this study is to review the incidence, pathophysiology, and mechanisms of dyspnea in patients diagnosed with cancer. We also discuss the existing evidence supporting the efficacy of exercise therapy to complement traditional approaches to reduce the impact of this devastating symptom in persons with cancer. Recent findings In other clinical populations presenting with dyspnea, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exercise therapy is demonstrated to be an efficacious strategy. In contrast, relatively few studies to date have investigated the efficacy of exercise training as a therapeutic strategy to mitigate dyspnea in patients with cancer. Summary Although much more work is required, exercise therapy is a promising adjunct strategy to systematically reduce dyspnea in the oncology setting that may also provide additive efficacy when prescribed in combination with other adjunct therapies including pharmacologic interventions. PMID:22516976

  6. Opsin-induced experimental autoimmune retinitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Broekhuyse, R M; Winkens, H J; Kuhlmann, E D; van Vugt, A H

    1984-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune retinitis has been induced in Lewis rats by injection of opsin in mycobacterial adjuvant and Hemophilus pertussis adjuvant. Clinical, histopathological and immunological parameters of the disease are reported. Two types of opsin were prepared from purified bovine retina outer segments, one type in Triton X-100 and the other in lithium dodecyl sulfate. Both preparations were free from S-antigen. Dodecyl sulfate-denaturated-opsin displayed lower antigenicity and pathogenicity than Triton-opsin. Triton-opsin (250 micrograms) induced moderate to severe non-granulomatous uveitis (predominantly retinitis) in 70% of the Lewis rats at the end of the second week after injection. The photoreceptor cell layer was destructed within a few days. This group displayed high responses to opsin in the lymphocyte transformation test. In view of observed histological features, the possible early involvement of vasoactive factors is discussed. Low opsin doses (50 or 100 micrograms) seldomly induced severe retinitis, while the incidence of mild pathology was low. Lewis rats appeared to be more susceptible for the development of experimental autoimmune retinitis than Wistar rats.

  7. Affective and cardiovascular effects of experimentally-induced social status.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Tamar; Thurston, Rebecca C; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2008-07-01

    Observational research suggests subordinate social status is associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes. However, observational studies have limitations, including confounding of social status with other factors, limited ability to infer causality, and difficulty of obtaining detailed affective and physiologic data. This study used experimental methods to test the hypothesis that subordinate social status per se causes psychological distress and cardiovascular arousal. Forty-four women were randomly assigned to an induced subordinate or dominant status condition. Social status was manipulated using a procedure derived from status construction theory. Affective responses were assessed via self-report. Cardiovascular responses were assessed by measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressures obtained with an automated blood pressure machine. Participants in the subordinate condition perceived themselves as lower in status; the reverse was true for dominant condition participants. Compared with induced dominant status, induced subordinate status produced increased negative affect and systolic blood pressure over the course of the study. Findings suggest social status can be experimentally manipulated and short-term induction of subordinate status can have adverse effects on affect and stress-related physiological systems. Results have implications for understanding how socioeconomic status "gets under the skin" to influence health. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Dyspnea and Panic Among Patients With Newly Diagnosed Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jennifer A.; Kosiba, Jesse D.; Traeger, Lara; Greer, Joseph A.; Temel, Jennifer S.; Pirl, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Context Among patients with lung cancer, dyspnea is associated with psychological distress, fatigue, and poor coping. Respiratory symptoms are also a common trigger for panic attacks in the general population. Minimal research has addressed the prevalence of panic disorder or the association of dyspnea with risk of panic disorder in lung cancer. Objectives We explored the frequency of panic disorder symptoms and the association of dyspnea with risk of panic disorder symptoms among patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods During 2006–2010, consecutive patients presenting for initial consultation at a thoracic oncology clinic completed a survey of current symptoms, including dyspnea and panic disorder symptoms. We evaluated the frequency of panic disorder symptoms. Logistic regression was used to test the association of dyspnea with risk of panic disorder symptoms, adjusting for age, gender, disease stage, performance status, and major depression symptoms. Results Among 624 patients (M age=63.7 [SD=12.1]; 52.6% female), 48.1% reported that breathing was at least somewhat difficult and 11.2% endorsed panic disorder symptoms. Dyspnea was independently associated with higher risk of panic disorder symptoms (OR=2.19, 95% CI=1.11–4.31, P=0.02). Younger age and major depression symptoms also were associated with higher risk (P’s<0.01). Conclusion Almost half of patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC reported dyspnea, and patients with dyspnea were over twice as likely to endorse panic disorder symptoms relative to patients without dyspnea. Results highlight the need to differentiate panic disorder symptoms among patients who report dyspnea, particularly those who are younger or experiencing major depression symptoms. PMID:24766738

  9. Estimation of the severity of breathlessness in the emergency department: a dyspnea score.

    PubMed

    Gondos, Tibor; Szabó, Viktor; Sárkány, Ágnes; Sárkány, Adrienn; Halász, Gábor

    2017-04-26

    Dyspnea is a frequent complaint in emergency departments (ED). It has a significant amount of subjective and affective components, therefore the dyspnea scores, based on the patients' rating, can be ambiguous. Our purpose was to develop and validate a simple scoring system to evaluate the severity of dyspnea in emergency care, based on objectively measured parameters. We performed a double center, prospective, observational study including 350 patients who were admitted in EDs with dyspnea. We evaluated the patients' subjective feeling about dyspnea and applied our Dyspnea Severity Score (DSS), rating the dyspnea in 7 Dimensions from 0 to 3 points. The DSS was validated using the deterioration of pH, base-excess and lactate levels in the blood gas samples (Objective Classification Scale (OCS) 9 points and 13 points groups). All of the Dimensions correlated closely with the OCS values and with the subjective feeling of the dyspnea. Using multiple linear regression analysis we were able to decrease the numbers of Dimensions from seven to four without causing a significant change in the determination coefficient in any OCS groups. This reduced DSS values (exercise tolerance, cooperation, cyanosis, SpO2 value) showed high sensitivity and specificity to predict the values of OCS groups (the ranges: AUC 0.77-0.99, sensitivity 65-100%, specificity 64-99%). There was a close correlation between the subjective dyspnea scores and the OCS point values (p < 0.001), though the scatter was very large. A new DSS was validated which score is suitable to compare the severity of dyspnea among different patients and different illnesses. The simplified version of the score (its value ≥7 points without correction factors) can be useful at the triage or in pre-hospital care.

  10. Relationship between Dyspnea Descriptors and Underlying Causes of the Symptom; a Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Seyyed Mohammad Ali; Majidi, Alireza; Abdollahimajd, Fahimeh; Jalali, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    History taking and physical examination help clinicians identify the patient's problem and effectively treat it. This study aimed to evaluate the descriptors of dyspnea in patients presenting to emergency department (ED) with asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This cross-sectional study was conducted on all patients presenting to ED with chief complaint of dyspnea, during 2 years. The patients were asked to describe their dyspnea by choosing three items from the valid and reliable questionnaire or articulating their sensation. The relationship between dyspnea descriptors and underlying cause of symptom was evaluated using SPSS version 16. 312 patients with the mean age of 60.96±17.01 years were evaluated (53.2% male). Most of the patients were > 65 years old (48.7%) and had basic level of education (76.9%). "My breath doesn't go out all the way" with 83.1%, "My chest feels tight " with 45.8%, and "I feel that my airway is obstructed" with 40.7%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in asthma patients. "My breathing requires work" with 46.3%, "I feel that I am suffocating" with 31.5%, and "My breath doesn't go out all the way" with 29.6%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in COPD patients. "My breathing is heavy" with 74.4%, "A hunger for more air" with 24.4%, and "I cannot get enough air" with 23.2%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in CHF patients. Except for "My breath does not go in all the way", there was significant correlation between studied dyspnea descriptors and underlying disease (p = 0.001 for all analyses). It seems that dyspnea descriptors along with other findings from history and physical examination could be helpful in differentiating the causes of the symptom in patients presenting to ED suffering from dyspnea.

  11. Evaluation of a Provocative Dyspnea Severity Score in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    AbouEzzeddine, Omar F.; Lala, Anuradha; Khazanie, Prateeti P.; Shah, Ravi; Ho, Jennifer E.; Chen, Horng H.; Pang, Peter S.; McNulty, Steven E.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The acute heart failure (AHF) Syndromes International Working Group proposed that dyspnea be assessed under standardized, incrementally provocative maneuvers and called for studies to assess the feasibility of this approach. We sought to assess the feasibility and statistical characteristics of a novel provocative dyspnea severity score (pDS) versus the traditional dyspnea visual analogue scale (DVAS) in an AHF trial. Methods At enrollment, 24, 48 and 72 hours, 230 ROSE-AHF patients completed a DVAS. Dyspnea was then assessed with five-point Likert dyspnea scales administered during four stages (A: upright-with O2, B: upright-without O2, C: supine-without O2 and D: exercise-without O2). Patients with moderate or less dyspnea were eligible for the next stage. Results At enrollment, oxygen withdrawal and supine provocation were highly feasible (≥97%), provoking more severe dyspnea (≥ 1 Likert point) in 24% and 42% of eligible patients respectively. Exercise provocation had low feasibility with 38% of eligible patients unable to exercise due to factors other than dyspnea. A pDS was constructed from Likert scales during the three feasible assessment conditions (A–C). Relative to DVAS, the distribution of the pDS was more skewed with a high “ceiling effect” at enrollment (23%) limiting sensitivity to change. Change in pDS was not related to decongestion or 60-day outcomes. Conclusions While oxygen withdrawal and supine provocation are feasible and elicit more severe dyspnea, exercise provocation had unacceptable feasibility in this AHF cohort. The statistical characteristics of a pDS based on feasible provocation measures do not support its potential as a robust dyspnea assessment tool in AHF. Clinical Trial Registration RED-ROSE; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01132846 PMID:26856213

  12. Local and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Experimentally Induced Gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Shaneen J.; Seymour, Gregory J.; Ford, Pauline J.

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P < 0.001). These results support the concept that gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual. PMID:24227893

  13. Local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Leishman, Shaneen J; Seymour, Gregory J; Ford, Pauline J

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P < 0.001). These results support the concept that gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual.

  14. Pellicle-induced reticle distortion: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Carroll, James A.; Storm, Glenn; Ivancich, Ronald G.; Maloney, John P.; Maurin, Olivier; Souleillet, Eric

    1999-04-01

    As semiconductor design rules decrease in size, total overlay performance requires a higher standard of the stepper and the photomask which affords a smaller error budget to each. Currently, photomask overlay assessment is done prior to pellicle attachment. However, the physical act of attaching a pellicle to a photomask imparts mechanical stress that distorts the reticle plane and changes the actual pattern placement from the design intent. With the advent of metrology tools capable of through-pellicle registration measurement, we are now able to assess and better characterize the effect pellicalization has on reticle distortion. The focus of this experimental investigation has been to quantify the incremental reticle distortion attributed to attaching the pellicle. To assess pellicle-induced distortion, both pattern registration and reticle flatness were evaluated. Two pellicle gasket materials were evaluated and one of the two materials was found to produce less reticle distortion. Relaxation of pellicle-induced reticle distortion after the pellicle is attached is also discussed.

  15. Pellicle-induced reticle distortion: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Carroll, James A.; Storm, Glenn; Ivancich, Ronald G.; Maloney, John P.; Maurin, Olivier; Souleillet, Eric

    1998-12-01

    As semiconductor design rules decrease in size, total overlay performance requires a higher standard of the stepper and the photomask which affords a smaller error budget to each. Currently, photomask overlay assessment is done prior to pellicle attachment. However, the physical act of attaching a pellicle to a photomask imparts mechanical stress that distorts the reticle plane and changes the actual pattern placement from the design intent. With the advent of metrology tools capable of through-pellicle registration measurement, we are now able to assess and better characterize the effect pelliclization has on reticle distortion. The focus of this experimental investigation has been to quantify the incremental reticle distortion attributed to attaching the pellicle. To assess pellicle-induced distortion, both pattern registration and reticle flatness were evaluated. Two pellicle gasket materials were evaluated and one of the two materials was found to produce less reticle distortion. Relaxation of pellicle-induced reticle distortion after the pellicle is attached is also discussed.

  16. Experimental realization of optomechanically induced non-reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhen; Zhang, Yan-Lei; Chen, Yuan; Zou, Chang-Ling; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Zou, Xu-Bo; Sun, Fang-Wen; Guo, Guang-Can; Dong, Chun-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Non-reciprocal devices, such as circulators and isolators, are indispensable components in classical and quantum information processing in integrated photonic circuits. Aside from these applications, the non-reciprocal phase shift is of fundamental interest for exploring exotic topological photonics, such as the realization of chiral edge states and topological protection. However, incorporating low-optical-loss magnetic materials into a photonic chip is technically challenging. In this study we experimentally demonstrate non-magnetic non-reciprocity using optomechanical interactions in a whispering gallery microresonator, as proposed in a previous work. Optomechanically induced non-reciprocal transparency and amplification are observed and a non-reciprocal phase shift of up to 40° is also demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of optomechanically induced non-reciprocity has great potential for all-optical controllable isolators and circulators, as well as non-reciprocal phase shifters in integrated photonic chips.

  17. Weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion in obese women.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Vipa; Babb, Tony G

    2014-12-01

    During submaximal exercise, some otherwise healthy obese women experience breathlessness, or dyspnea on exertion (+DOE), while others have mild or no DOE (-DOE). We investigated whether weight loss could reduce DOE. Twenty nine obese women were grouped based on their Ratings of Perceived Breathlessness (RPB) during constant load 60 W cycling: +DOE (n = 14, RPB ≥ 4, 34 ± 8 years, and 36 ± 3 kg/m(2)) and -DOE ( n= 15, RPB ≤ 2, 32 ± 8 years, and 36 ± 4 kg/m(2)) and then completed a 12-week weight loss program. Both groups lost a moderate amount of weight (+DOE: 6.6 ± 2.4 kg, -DOE: 8.4 ± 3.5 kg, and p < 0.001). RPB decreased significantly in the +DOE group (from 4.7 ± 1.1 to 3.1 ± 1.6) and remained low in the -DOE (from 1.5 ± 0.7 to 1.6 ± 1.1) (interaction p < 0.002). Most physiological variables measured (i.e. body composition, fat distribution, pulmonary function, oxygen cost of breathing, and cardiorespiratory measures) improved with weight loss; however, the decrease in RPB was not correlated with any of these variables (p > 0.05). In conclusion, moderate weight loss was effective in reducing breathlessness on exertion in obese women who experienced DOE at baseline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dyspnea, Dysphonia, and Cough: Varied Presentations of Tracheobronchopathia Osteochondroplastica.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Skyler W; Stevens, Jayne R; Dion, Gregory R; Howard, N Scott

    2015-10-01

    Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica (TPO) is an uncommon, benign disease consisting of submucosal, osteocartilaginous nodules that project into the tracheal lumen. Far less commonly, these nodules can occur outside the tracheal cartilage. This case series discusses the wide range of symptoms and treatments of the disease. Three patients presented to the laryngology clinic with 3 varied presentations of TPO, including dyspnea, dysphonia, and cough. These patients were evaluated, subsequently diagnosed with TPO, and treated accordingly. Two of the 3 patients presented with extratracheal lesions presenting in the cricoid and thyroid cartilages. The patient presenting with symptoms of dysphonia was found to have bilateral TPO exclusively within the thyroid cartilage, which has never been reported previously. After undergoing a partial thyroid cartilage resection removing the bulk of the lesion, the patient's symptoms drastically improved. While TPO may be a rare diagnosis in the general otolaryngologist practice, symptoms frequently bring patients into the otolaryngologist's clinic, and an awareness of the disease can help minimize unnecessary interventions and allow the surgeon to appropriately counsel patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Weight Loss Reduces Dyspnea on Exertion in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Vipa; Babb, Tony G.

    2014-01-01

    During submaximal exercise, some otherwise healthy obese women experience breathlessness, or dyspnea on exertion (+DOE), while others have mild or no DOE (−DOE). We investigated whether weight loss could reduce DOE. 29 obese women were grouped based on their Ratings of Perceived Breathlessness (RPB) during constant load 60W cycling: +DOE (n=14, RPB≥4, 34±8yr, 36±3kg/m2) and −DOE (n=15, RPB≤2, 32±8yr, 36±4kg/m2) and then completed a 12-week weight loss program. Both groups lost a moderate amount of weight (+DOE: 6.6±2.4kg, −DOE: 8.4±3.5kg, p<0.001). RPB decreased significantly in the +DOE group (from 4.7±1.1 to 3.1±1.6) and remained low in the −DOE (from 1.5±0.7 to 1.6±1.1) (interaction p<0.002). Most physiological variables measured (i.e. body composition, fat distribution, pulmonary function, oxygen cost of breathing, cardiorespiratory measures) improved with weight loss; however, the decrease in RPB was not correlated with any of these variables (p>0.05). In conclusion, moderate weight loss was effective in reducing breathlessness on exertion in obese women who experienced DOE at baseline. PMID:25220695

  20. Dyspnea in a nonagenarian: The usual suspects, an unexpected culprit.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Sérgio; Raposo, Luís; David, Raquel; Marques, Alexandre; Andrade Gomes, José; Cardim, Nuno; Anjos, Rui

    2015-09-01

    Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome (POS) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by dyspnea and hypoxemia triggered by orthostatism and relieved by recumbency. It is often associated with an interatrial shunt through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report the case of a 92-year-old woman initially admitted in the setting of a traumatic femoral neck fracture (successfully treated with hip replacement surgery) in whom a reversible decline in transcutaneous oxygen saturation from 98% (in the supine position) to 84% (in the upright position) was noted early post-operatively. Thoracic multislice computed tomography excluded pulmonary embolism and severe parenchymal lung disease. The diagnosis of POS was confirmed by tilt-table contrast transesophageal echocardiography, which demonstrated a dynamic and position-dependent right-to-left shunt (torrential when semi-upright and minimal in the supine position) through a PFO. The patient underwent percutaneous closure of the PFO with an Amplatzer device, which led to prompt symptom relief and full functional recovery.

  1. Ichnocarpus frutescens Ameliorates Experimentally Induced Convulsion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Kumar; Laloo, Damiki; Garabadu, Debapriya; Singh, Tryambak Deo; Singh, Virendra Pratap

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity and probable mechanism of action of the methanol root extract from I. frutescens (MEIF) using different experimental animal models. Anticonvulsant activity of the single dose of MEIF (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated in maximal electroshock- (MES-), pentylenetetrazole- (PTZ-), and isoniazid- (INH-) induced convulsions models in rats. The levels of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), glutamate, GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) activity and oxidative stress markers were measured in pretreated rat's brain homogenate to corroborate the mechanism of observed anticonvulsant activity. MEIF (200–400 mg/kg, p.o.) protected the animals in all the behavioral models used. Pretreatment of MEIF (200–400 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to the animals in INH-induced convulsion model showed 100% and 80% protection, respectively, as well as significant restoration of GABA and glutamate level in the rat's brain. MEIF and vigabatrin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the PTZ-induced increase in the activity of GABA-T (46%) in the brain. Further, MEIF reversed the PTZ-induced increase in lipid peroxidase (LPO) and decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The findings of this study validate the anticonvulsant activity of I. frutescens. PMID:27379268

  2. Interaction between histamine-induced itch and experimental muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Wasner, G; Schwarz, K; Schattschneider, J; Binder, A; Jensen, T S; Baron, R

    2004-06-01

    Itch sensation can be inhibited by simultaneously applied cutaneous pain at the same skin site via a central mechanism. Deep muscle pain is often associated with sensory changes in the corresponding dermatome. We investigated whether experimentally induced muscle pain has any influence on histamine-induced itch and vice versa in a double blind placebo-controlled study. Experiments were performed in 18 healthy subjects. In nine individuals control iontophoresis of histamine into the forearm produced a distinct itch sensation. Another nine individuals participated in an additional experiment in which histamine and saline were iontophoresed on the forearm in a randomized double-blinded two-way crossover design after intramuscular injection of capsaicin into the ipsilateral brachioradial muscle. Capsaicin-induced muscle pain reduced itch sensation significantly. In contrast, capsaicin-induced muscle pain increased significantly after cutaneous histamine application compared to muscle pain after iontophoresis of saline (placebo). These novel data indicate that muscle pain inhibits itch and histamine increases muscle pain. A bi-directional interaction between cutaneous histamine-sensitive afferents and nociceptive muscle afferents via central mechanisms is suggested.

  3. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Antonio; Yáñez, Antonio; León-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  4. Immediate effects of chocolate on experimentally induced mood states.

    PubMed

    Macht, Michael; Mueller, Jochen

    2007-11-01

    In this work two hypotheses were tested: (1) that eating a piece of chocolate immediately affects negative, but not positive or neutral mood, and (2) that this effect is due to palatability. Experiment 1 (48 normal-weight and healthy women and men) examined the effects of eating a piece of chocolate and drinking water on negative, positive and neutral mood states induced by film clips. Eating chocolate reduced negative mood compared to drinking water, whereas no or only marginal effects were found on neutral and positive moods. Experiment 2 (113 normal-weight and healthy women and men) compared effects of eating palatable and unpalatable chocolate on negative mood, and examined the duration of chocolate-induced mood change. Negative mood was improved after eating palatable chocolate as compared to unpalatable chocolate or nothing. This effect was short lived, i.e., it disappeared after 3 min. In both experiments, chocolate-induced mood improvement was associated with emotional eating. The present studies demonstrate that eating a small amount of sweet food improves an experimentally induced negative mood state immediately and selectively and that this effect of chocolate is due to palatability. It is hypothesized that immediate mood effects of palatable food contribute to the habit of eating to cope with stress.

  5. Mechanisms of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity: evidence from experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, João B. T.; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Neurological disorders are common, costly, and can cause enduring disability. Although mostly unknown, a few environmental toxicants are recognized causes of neurological disorders and subclinical brain dysfunction. One of the best known neurotoxins is methylmercury (MeHg), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. In the aquatic environment, MeHg is accumulated in fish, which represent a major source of human exposure. Although several episodes of MeHg poisoning have contributed to the understanding of the clinical symptoms and histological changes elicited by this neurotoxicant in humans, experimental studies have been pivotal in elucidating the molecular mechanisms that mediate MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The objective of this mini-review is to summarize data from experimental studies on molecular mechanisms of MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. While the full picture has yet to be unmasked, in vitro approaches based on cultured cells, isolated mitochondria and tissue slices, as well as in vivo studies based mainly on the use of rodents, point to impairment in intracellular calcium homeostasis, alteration of glutamate homeostasis and oxidative stress as important events in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The potential relationship among these events is discussed, with particular emphasis on the neurotoxic cycle triggered by MeHg-induced excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. The particular sensitivity of the developing brain to MeHg toxicity, the critical role of selenoproteins and the potential protective role of selenocompounds are also discussed. These concepts provide the biochemical bases to the understanding of MeHg neurotoxicity, contributing to the discovery of endogenous and exogenous molecules that counteract such toxicity and provide efficacious means for ablating this vicious cycle. PMID:21683713

  6. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  7. Experimental identification of pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingólfsson, E. T.; Georgakis, C. T.; Ricciardelli, F.; Jönsson, J.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of lateral forces generated by single pedestrians during continuous walking on a treadmill. Two different conditions are investigated; initially the treadmill is fixed and then it is laterally driven in a sinusoidal motion at varying combinations of frequencies (0.33-1.07 Hz) and amplitudes (4.5-48 mm). The experimental campaign involved 71 male and female human adults and covered approximately 55 km of walking distributed between 4954 individual tests. When walking on a laterally moving surface, motion-induced forces develop at the frequency of the movement and are herewith quantified through equivalent velocity and acceleration proportional coefficients. Their dependency on the vibration frequency and amplitude is presented, both in terms of mean values and probabilistically to illustrate the randomness associated with intra- and inter-subject variability. It is shown that the motion-induced portion of the pedestrian load (on average) inputs energy into the structure in the frequency range (normalised by the mean walking frequency) between approximately 0.6 and 1.2. Furthermore, it is shown that the load component in phase with the acceleration of the treadmill depends on the frequency of the movement, such that pedestrians (on average) subtract from the overall modal mass for low frequency motion and add to the overall modal mass at higher frequencies.

  8. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R.; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain. PMID:25871402

  9. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in experimentally infected conventional piglets.

    PubMed

    Poutahidis, T; Tsangaris, T; Kanakoudis, G; Vlemmas, I; Iliadis, N; Sofianou, D

    2001-11-01

    A conventional nonmutant animal that could be experimentally infected with Helicobacter pylori isolates would be a useful animal model for human H. pylori-associated gastritis. Gnotobiotic and barrier-born pigs are susceptible to H. pylori infection, but attempts to infect conventional pigs with this bacterium have been unsuccessful. In the present study, a litter of eight 20-day-old crossbreed piglets were purchased from a commercial farm. Six of them were orally challenged two to five times at different ages, between 29 and 49 days, with doses of H. pylori inoculum containing approximately 10(9) bacterial cells. Two animals served as controls. The inoculation program began 2 days postweaning when the piglets were 29 days of age. Prior to every inoculation, the piglets were fasted and pretreated with cimetidine, and prior to the first and second inoculation each piglet also was pretreated with dexamethasone. The challenged piglets were euthanasized between 36 and 76 days of age. H. pylori colonized all six inoculated piglets. The pathology of the experimentally induced gastritis was examined macroscopically and by light and electron microscopy. H. pylori induced a severe lymphocytic gastritis in the conventional piglets and reproduced the large majority of the pathologic features of the human disease. Therefore, the conventional piglet represents a promising new model for study of the various pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of lesions of the human H. pylori-associated gastritis.

  10. Hypolipidemic effect of arborium plus in experimentally induced hypercholestermic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Murty, Devarakonda; Rajesh, Enjamoori; Raghava, Doonaboina; Raghavan, Tangaraj Vijaya; Surulivel, Mukanthan Karupiah Munirajan

    2010-06-01

    Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors for coronary artery disease. The present study highlights the efficacy of the ayurvedic herbal formulation Arborium Plus [Hyppophae ramnoides L. fruit juice (S) and Rhododendron arboreum Sm. Linn flower juice (R) in a 1:4 ratio] on triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), atherogenic index (AI), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and high-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs CRP) in experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Four groups of rabbits were subjected to different treatments for 8 weeks: control group, CHOL group (1% w/w cholesterol for 8 weeks), S+R group (1% w/w cholesterol and Arborium Plus for 8 weeks), and A group (1% w/w cholesterol and atorvastatin for 8 weeks). The results showed significant increases in TG, TC, LDL, AI, and hs CRP in hypercholesterolemic rabbits which was significantly reduced in Arborium Plus-treated hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The data demonstrated that the Arborium Plus formulation was associated with hypolipidemic effects in experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

  11. Past Pain Experience and Experimentally induced Pain Perception.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Aude; Plansont, Brigitte; Labrunie, Anaïs; Malauzat, Dominique; Girard, Murielle

    2017-08-02

    Many intercurrent factors may be involved in the modulation of the pain message and its expression, such as the previous experience of pain built along the life. In this study, we aimed to determine whether susceptibility to experimentally induced pain is differentially influenced by the individual previous painful experience in subjects with schizophrenia (SC) major depression (MD), and controls (C). The SC (30), MD (32) and C (30) groups participated in experimental pain tests (application of pressure and induction of ischemia) after a semi-structured interview to make an inventory of the previous painful experiences, and the evaluation of anxiety either with autonomic (heart rate, blood pressure) or psychological (Hospital Anxiety Depression scale HAD) measures, and catastrophism. The reported pain intensities, severities, duration, of the previous pain events, and the number of previous painful events were equivalent in the three groups, except for the number of painful events experimented before the last six months which was lower in the MD group. Experimental pain sensitivity was influenced by the diagnosis, the HAD scores or the number and intensities of previous lived painful events. The lack of a past experience of pain was comparable for the different groups, suggesting that psychiatric disorders do not affect the experience of pain associated with daily life or past events. For each subject, the reported previous experience of pain influences the present feeling of pain.

  12. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

    PubMed

    Mularski, Richard A; Reinke, Lynn F; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Fischer, Mark D; Campbell, Margaret L; Rocker, Graeme; Schneidman, Ann; Jacobs, Susan S; Arnold, Robert; Benditt, Joshua O; Booth, Sara; Byock, Ira; Chan, Garrett K; Curtis, J Randall; Donesky, Doranne; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Heffner, John; Klein, Russell; Limberg, Trina M; Manning, Harold L; Morrison, R Sean; Ries, Andrew L; Schmidt, Gregory A; Selecky, Paul A; Truog, Robert D; Wang, Angela C C; White, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) funded an assembly project, Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis, to focus on identification, management, and optimal resource utilization for effective palliation of acute episodes of dyspnea. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature and evaluated available evidence from systematic evidence-based reviews (SEBRs) using a modified AMSTAR approach and then summarized the palliative management knowledge base for participants to use in discourse at a 2009 ATS workshop. We used an informal consensus process to develop a working definition of this novel entity and established an Ad Hoc Committee on Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis to further develop an official ATS document on the topic. The Ad Hoc Committee members defined dyspnea crisis as "sustained and severe resting breathing discomfort that occurs in patients with advanced, often life-limiting illness and overwhelms the patient and caregivers' ability to achieve symptom relief." Dyspnea crisis can occur suddenly and is characteristically without a reversible etiology. The workshop participants focused on dyspnea crisis management for patients in whom the goals of care are focused on palliation and for whom endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are not consistent with articulated preferences. However, approaches to dyspnea crisis may also be appropriate for patients electing life-sustaining treatment. The Ad Hoc Committee developed a Workshop Report concerning assessment of dyspnea crisis; ethical and professional considerations; efficient utilization, communication, and care coordination; clinical management of dyspnea crisis; development of patient education and provider aid products; and enhancing implementation with audit and quality improvement.

  13. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  14. Changes in articular cartilage in experimentally induced patellar subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J.; Saito, S.; Yamamoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Patellar subluxation was experimentally induced in young rabbits and the resulting cartilaginous changes were observed over a prolonged period of time to determine histological changes in the subluxated patellar cartilage.
METHODS—The tibial tuberosity in 12 week old rabbits was laterally displaced and fixed to the tibia with wire to induce lateral patellar subluxation. Pathological changes in patellar cartilage were examined for 120 weeks after surgery using computed tomography and stereoscopic microscopy.
RESULTS—Eight weeks after surgery, changes in articular cartilage consisting of horizontal splitting of the matrix were observed in the intermediate zone and were presumed to have been caused by shearing stress applied to the patellar cartilage. The cartilaginous changes caused by patellar subluxation progressed very little over the 120 weeks. Very few rabbits presented with osteoarthritic changes in the patellofemoral joint, most probably because the stress resulting from the malalignment of the patellofemoral joint was mild enough to permit recovery.
CONCLUSION—The mild, non-progressive pathological changes, in particular, basal degeneration, induced in this experiment in patellar cartilage were quite similar to the changes in articular cartilage seen in human chondromalacia patellae.

 PMID:9462171

  15. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  16. Effect of Angelica glauca essential oil on allergic airway changes induced by histamine and ovalbumin in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpa; Rasal, Vijaykumar P.; Patil, Paragouda A.; Joshi, Rajesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Angelica glauca Edgew (Apiaceae) is used in traditional medicine for treatment of several diseases including bronchial asthma. The present investigation was aimed to evaluate broncho-relaxant activity of A. glauca essential oil in histamine and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced broncho constriction in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Airway was induced using histamine aerosol in guinea pigs (n = 24) and OVA aerosol in albino mice (n = 24). The number of inflammatory cells, namely, absolute eosinophils count in blood, total immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum, eosinophils, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and histopathological examination of lung tissues were investigated in A. glauca oil and dexamethasone-treated groups. A. glauca oil 200 μL/kg was given orally, and dexamethasone 2 mg/kg was given intraperitoneal. Both the treatments were repeated daily for 7 days. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, and P ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Treatment with A. glauca essential oil significantly (P < 0.001) increased the time of preconvulsive dyspnea in histamine-induced guinea pigs. Oral treatment of A. glauca oil significantly (P < 0.001) decreased absolute blood eosinophil count (from 325 ± 3.69 to 200 ± 3.05 cells/mm3), serum level of IgE (from 6.10 ± 0.05 to 0.70 ± 0.08 IU/L), and the number of eosinophils (from 11.0% ±1.41% to 3.0% ±0.51%), neutrophils (from 13.0% ±1.12% to 5.0% ±1.39%) in BALF. Histopathological changes observed in lungs of untreated group were marked suppressed by treatment with A. glauca oil. Conclusion: The essential oil of A. glauca has bronchorelaxation in both histamine and OVA-induced bronchoconstriction in animals. The traditional use of A. glauca against asthma could be attributed to its bronchodilator property as observed in the present study. PMID:28458423

  17. Factor analysis of laboratory and clinical measurements of dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong Q; Altinger, Julie; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Gormley, Jenny M; Stulbarg, Michael S

    2003-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if there are three distinct factors representing ratings of dyspnea during laboratory exercise, clinical ratings of dyspnea, and pulmonary function in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 92) using factor analysis. Subjects (mean age 66 +/- 7 yrs; FEV1% predicted 44.7 +/- 14.0) were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups to test the effects of three education and exercise training programs. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline and at 2 months after the intervention. Dyspnea ratings with laboratory exercise (SOB) were measured during incremental (ITT) and endurance (ETT) treadmill tests, and a six-minute walk (6MW) using the modified Borg scale. Clinical measures of dyspnea were measured with the Baseline and Transitional Dyspnea Index (BDI/TDI), UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire (SOBQ), Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale (MRC), Dyspnea subscale of the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ-D), and a global dyspnea question. Pulmonary function parameters included FEV1% predicted, FEV1/FVC, and RV/TLC. The factor analysis yielded three factors that accounted for 58.7% of the total variance in the data: Factor 1, "Dyspnea with Laboratory Exercise" comprised ETT SOB end, ETT SOB isotime, ITTSOB end, ITT SOB isotime, ITT SOB/Time and ETT SOB/Time. Factor 2, "Clinical Dyspnea," comprised 6MW SOB, 6MW SOB/Feet, BDI, SOBQ, MRC, Global SOB, CRQ-D. Measures of airway resistance (FEV1% predicted, FEV1/FVC) and hyperinflation (RV/TLC) loaded on a third factor, "Pulmonary Function." An additional post hoc factor analysis with post-intervention data provided similar results. The Global SOB question and ITT SOB isostage variables were relatively more sensitive to change compared to the other outcome variables. We conclude that pulmonary function, clinical ratings of dyspnea, and laboratory ratings of dyspnea are three separate and independent factors and should be

  18. Practical Dyspnea Assessment: Relationship Between the 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale and the Four-Level Categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale of Dyspnea Intensity.

    PubMed

    Wysham, Nicholas G; Miriovsky, Benjamin J; Currow, David C; Herndon, James E; Samsa, Gregory P; Wilcock, Andrew; Abernethy, Amy P

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of dyspnea is important for clinical care and research. To characterize the relationship between the 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and four-level categorical Verbal Descriptor Scale (VDS) for dyspnea assessment. This was a substudy of a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing palliative oxygen to room air for relief of refractory breathlessness in patients with life-limiting illness. Dyspnea was assessed with both a 0-10 NRS and a four-level categorical VDS over the one-week trial. NRS and VDS responses were analyzed in cross section and longitudinally. Relationships between NRS and VDS responses were portrayed using descriptive statistics and visual representations. Two hundred twenty-six participants contributed responses. At baseline, mild and moderate levels of breathlessness were reported by 41.9% and 44.6% of participants, respectively. NRS scores demonstrated increasing mean and median levels for increasing VDS intensity, from a mean (SD) of 0.6 (±1.04) for VDS none category to 8.2 (1.4) for VDS severe category. The Spearman correlation coefficient was strong at 0.78 (P < 0.0001). Based on the distribution of NRS scores within VDS categories, we calculated test characteristics of two different cutpoint models. Both models yielded 75% correct translations from NRS to VDS; however, Model A was more sensitive for moderate or greater dyspnea, with fewer misses downcoded. There is strong correlation between VDS and NRS measures for dyspnea. Proposed practical cutpoints for the relationship between the dyspnea VDS and NRS are 0 for none, 1-4 for mild, 5-8 for moderate, and 9-10 for severe. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    PubMed

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy.

  20. Experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of the development tests performed on the experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections. Tests were performed on the portable clean room to demonstrate assembly, collapsability, portability and storage. Collapsing, relocating and storing within the surgery room can be accomplished in 12 minutes. The storage envelope dimensions are 1.64 m x 4.24 m x 2.62 m high. The disassembly transfer to another room, and reassembly were demonstrated. The laminar air flow velocity profile within the enclosure was measured. In the undisturbed area of the enclosure the air flow met the Federal Standard 209a requirements of 27.45 meters per minute + or - 6.10 meters per minute. Smoke tests with simulated surgery equipment and personnel in the enclosure did not indicate any detrimental air flow patterns. It is concluded that the system as designed will perform the functions required for its intended use.

  1. Usefulness of lung ultrasound in diagnosing causes of exacerbation in patients with chronic dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Rogoza, Katarzyna; Kosiak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is a non-specific symptom that requires fast diagnostics, accurate diagnosis and proper treatment. The most common causes of dyspnea include exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Distinction between these two medical conditions seems to be critical in diagnostics of emergencies. At the same time, basic diagnostic tools available in emergency room, such as classic radiography (X-ray) of the chest, electrocardiography (ECG) or b-type natriuretic peptide test, are sometimes ambiguous. Therefore looking for additional diagnostic tool seems to be justified and necessary. Transthoracic lung ultrasound assessment is a simple and easily accessible examination, enabling the early and explicit diagnostics of pulmonary oedema and its distinction from other, non-cardiac causes of dyspnea. This review outlines the current knowledge on the subject of transthoracic lung ultrasound (TLUS), particularly in respect of its clinical usefulness in distinction of causes of dyspnea exacerbation.

  2. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2017-06-01

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Experimental pleurodesis induced by antibiotics (macrolides or quinolones).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Lisete R; Vargas, Francisco S; Acencio, Milena M P; Bumlai, Renan U M; Antonangelo, Leila; Marchi, Evaldo

    2006-12-01

    Chemical pleurodesis is a therapeutic tool for the treatment of recurrent pleural effusions, mainly those of neoplastic etiology. In the past, tetracycline was the sclerosant agent of choice in clinical practice, but presently, there is no consensus about an ideal agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of macrolides (azithromycin and clarithromycin) or quinolones (levofloxacin and gatifloxacin) in inducing experimental pleurodesis in rabbits. Forty New Zealand rabbits randomized into groups of 10 received (at a total volume of 2 mL for each animal) 1 of the 4 drugs by intrapleural injection. After 28 days, the animals were euthanized and the pleural cavity was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. The intensity of the macroscopic adhesions was mild in all groups. On microscopic analysis, minimal pleural fibrosis and inflammation were observed in all animals. The macrolides (azithromycin or clarithromycin) and the quinolones (levofloxacin or gatifloxacin) when injected into the normal pleural space of rabbits are not effective in promoting pleurodesis. Additional research is required to identify sclerosing agents capable of inducing pleurodesis.

  4. Experimental germanium dioxide-induced neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumuro, K; Izumo, S; Higuchi, I; Ronquillo, A T; Takahashi, K; Osame, M

    1993-01-01

    We report an experimental model of germanium dioxide (GeO2)-induced neuropathy in rats. More than 6 months administration of GeO2 to young rats produced neuropathy characterized by segmental demyelination/remyelination and nerve edema. Electron microscopic studies demonstrated that changes in Schwann cells, such as an increased cytoplasmic volume or disintegration of the cytoplasm, were the earliest pathological findings. Schwann cell mitochondria contained high electron-dense materials. Subsequent removal of necrotic Schwann cell debris and myelin by invading macrophages was evident. These findings suggested that the Schwann cells themselves are the primary target of the toxin. The deposition of electron-dense granules in the intra-axonal vesicles, which was suggestive of glycogen granules in mitochondria, was observed in the advanced stage of the neuropathy. The findings of endoneurial edema with splitting of myelin lamellae were noted at the early stage of demyelination. Nerve edema may be the result of GeO2-induced endothelial cell injury.

  5. Experimental lung mycotoxicosis in mice induced by Stachybotrys atra

    PubMed Central

    Nikulin, Marjo; Reijula, Kari; Jarvis, Bruce B.; Hintikka, Eeva-Liisa

    1996-01-01

    Stachybotrys atra is often isolated from building materials in houses with moisture problems. Spores of S. atra can contain mycotoxins which may lead to various symptoms in exposed residents in damp houses. The pathogenesis of S. atra-induced lung diseases has not been elucidated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate lung mycotoxicosis experimentally in mice after an intranasal exposure to spores of S. atra-fungus. One group of mice received one intranasal injection of spores of a toxic strain of S. atra (1 × 106 spores) and the other group spores of a less toxic strain. Spores of both strains contained spirolactones and spirolactams while the highly toxic strain contained also trichothecene mycotoxins, satratoxins. The spores containing satratoxins caused severe intra-alveolar, bronchiolar and interstitial inflammation with haemorrhagic exudative processes in the alveolar and bronchiolar lumen. A significant difference was observed in the severity of the lung damage caused by the two strains of S. atra. The spores without satratoxins induced a milder inflammation, so that the toxic compounds of S. atra-spores are most likely responsible for the severity of the lung injury. PMID:8977373

  6. Health-related quality of life, lung function and dyspnea rating in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Justine, M; Tahirah, F; Mohan, V

    2013-01-01

    COPD is a progressive and irreversible disease, thus assessing the impact of the disease on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is important in the management of COPD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between HRQOL, lung function and dyspnea rating in patients with stable COPD. One hundred COPD patients (mean age = 64.76 +/- 11.43 years) were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Lung function test was measured using a FlowScreen portable spirometry. Dyspnea rating was measured using the baseline dyspnea index (BDI). HRQOL was assessed using the SF-36v2 which summarized two components; physical health component summary (PHCS) and mental health component summary (MHCS). The mean value of lung function (Forced expiratory volume in 1 second, FEV1% predicted) was 58.19 +/- 30.24 and dyspnea rating was 6.85 +/- 2.68. The lung function was significantly correlated with MHCS (r=.294, p < 0.05) but not with the PHCS (p > 0.05). The dyspnea rating was significantly correlated with both PHCS (r=.730, p < 0.05) and MHCS (r = .324, p < 0.05). Regression analysis indicated that dyspnea rating emerged as the most significant predictor for PHCS and MHCS accounting for 54% and 12% of the variances respectively. The findings show that dyspnea rating is an important factor in predicting HRQOL of patients with COPD. This indicates that dyspnea rating influences HRQOL to a greater extent than the physiological measurement of lung function. Therefore, focusing on such predictors at an early stage may provide meaningful benefits in the management of COPD.

  7. Airway Management & Assessment of Dyspnea in Emergency Department Patients with Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Peter S.; Zaman, Masood

    2013-01-01

    Shortness of breath is the most common symptom in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Ensuring adequate oxygenation and ventilation as well as symptomatic relief are key goals of early emergency department management. In this focused review, we describe how to assess dyspnea in clinical practice and how to treat AHF patients to relieve dyspnea, with initial discussion on Airway and Breathing management for patients who present in extremis. PMID:23795334

  8. Dyspnea as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Wooho; Lee, Jong Min; Ha, Jick Hwan; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kang, Hyeon Hui; Rhee, Chin Kook; Moon, Hwa Sik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate associations between dyspnea and clinical outcomes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods From 2001 to 2014, we retrospectively reviewed the prospective lung cancer database of St. Paul's Hospital at the Catholic University of Korea. We enrolled patients with NSCLC and evaluated symptoms of dyspnea using modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scores. Also, we estimated pulmonary functions and analyzed survival data. Results In total, 457 NSCLC patients were enrolled, and 259 (56.7%) had dyspnea. Among those with dyspnea and whose mMRC scores were available (109 patients had no mMRC score), 85 (56.6%) patients had an mMRC score <2, while 65 (43.3%) had an mMRC score ≥2. Significant decreased pulmonary functions were observed in patients with dyspnea. In multivariate analysis, aging, poor performance status, advanced stage, low forced expiratory volume in 1 second (%), and an mMRC score ≥2 were found to be significant prognostic factors for patient survival. Conclusion Dyspnea could be a significant prognostic factor in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27401635

  9. Evidence for cognitive–behavioral strategies improving dyspnea and related distress in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Norweg, Anna; Collins, Eileen G

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyspnea is a complex, prevalent, and distressing symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) associated with decreased quality of life, significant disability, and increased mortality. It is a major reason for referral to pulmonary rehabilitation. Methods We reviewed 23 COPD studies to examine the evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive–behavioral strategies for relieving dyspnea in COPD. Results Preliminary evidence from randomized controlled trials exists to support cognitive– behavioral strategies, used with or without exercise, for relieving sensory and affective components of dyspnea in COPD. Small to moderate treatment effects for relieving dyspnea were noted for psychotherapy (effect size [ES] = 0.08–0.25 for intensity; 0.26–0.65 for mastery) and distractive auditory stimuli (ES = 0.08–0.33 for intensity; 0.09 to −0.61 for functional burden). Small to large dyspnea improvements resulted from yoga (ES = 0.2–1.21 for intensity; 0.67 for distress; 0.07 for mastery; and −8.37 for functional burden); dyspnea self-management education with exercise (ES = −0.14 to −1.15 for intensity; −0.62 to −0.69 for distress; 1.04 for mastery; 0.14–0.35 for self-efficacy); and slow-breathing exercises (ES = −0.34 to −0.83 for intensity; −0.61 to −0.80 for distress; and 0.62 for self-efficacy). Cognitive–behavioral interventions may relieve dyspnea in COPD by (1) decreasing sympathetic nerve activity, dynamic hyperinflation, and comorbid anxiety, and (2) promoting arterial oxygen saturation, myelinated vagus nerve activity, a greater exercise training effect, and neuroplasticity. Conclusion While evidence is increasing, additional randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of psychosocial and self-management interventions in relieving dyspnea, in order to make them more available to patients and to endorse them in official COPD, dyspnea, and pulmonary rehabilitation practice guidelines. By

  10. Patient-Reported Dyspnea Correlates Poorly with Aerobic Exercise Capacity Measured During Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, Dany; Kass, Jonathan; Akers, Stephen; Hunter, Krystal; Pratter, Melvin

    2017-08-08

    Patient-reported dyspnea plays a central role in assessing cardiopulmonary disease. There is little evidence, however, that dyspnea correlates with objective exercise capacity measurements. If the correlation is poor, dyspnea as a proxy for objective assessment may be misleading. To compare patient's perception of dyspnea with maximum oxygen uptake (MaxVO2) during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Fifty patients undergoing CPET for dyspnea evaluation were studied prospectively. Dyspnea assessment was measured by a metabolic equivalent of task (METs) table, Mahler Dyspnea Index, Borg Index, number of blocks walked, and flights of stairs climbed before stopping due to dyspnea. These descriptors were compared to MaxVO2. MaxVO2 showed low correlation with METs table (r = 0.388, p = 0.005) and no correlation with Mahler Index (r = 0.24, p = 0.093), Borg Index (r = -0.017, p = 0.905), number of blocks walked (r = 0.266, p = 0.077) or flights of stairs climbed (r = 0.188, p = 0.217). When adjusted for weight (maxVO2/kg), there was significant correlation between MaxVO2 and METs table (r = 0.711, p < 0.001), moderate correlation with blocks walked (r = 0.614, p < 0.001), and low correlation with Mahler Index (r = 0.488 p = 0.001), Borg Index (r = -0.333 p = 0.036), and flights of stairs (r = 0.457 p = 0.004). Subgroup analysis showed worse correlation when patients with normal CPET were excluded (12/50 excluded). Patients with BMI < 30 had no correlation between Max VO2 and the assessment methods, while patients with BMI > 30 had moderate correlation between MaxVO2 and METs table (r = 0.568, p = 0.002). Patient-reported dyspnea correlates poorly with MaxVO2 and fails to predict exercise capacity. Reliance on reported dyspnea may result in suboptimal categorization of cardiopulmonary disease severity.

  11. Relationship between Dyspnea Descriptors and Underlying Causes of the Symptom; a Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Seyyed Mohammad Ali; Majidi, Alireza; Abdollahimajd, Fahimeh; jalali, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: History taking and physical examination help clinicians identify the patient’s problem and effectively treat it. This study aimed to evaluate the descriptors of dyspnea in patients presenting to emergency department (ED) with asthma, congestive heart failure (CHF), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on all patients presenting to ED with chief complaint of dyspnea, during 2 years. The patients were asked to describe their dyspnea by choosing three items from the valid and reliable questionnaire or articulating their sensation. The relationship between dyspnea descriptors and underlying cause of symptom was evaluated using SPSS version 16. Results: 312 patients with the mean age of 60.96±17.01 years were evaluated (53.2% male). Most of the patients were > 65 years old (48.7%) and had basic level of education (76.9%). "My breath doesn’t go out all the way" with 83.1%, “My chest feels tight " with 45.8%, and "I feel that my airway is obstructed" with 40.7%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in asthma patients. "My breathing requires work" with 46.3%, "I feel that I am suffocating" with 31.5%, and "My breath doesn’t go out all the way" with 29.6%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in COPD patients. "My breathing is heavy" with 74.4%, "A hunger for more air” with 24.4%, and "I cannot get enough air" with 23.2%, were the most frequent dyspnea descriptors in CHF patients. Except for “My breath does not go in all the way”, there was significant correlation between studied dyspnea descriptors and underlying disease (p = 0.001 for all analyses). Conclusion: It seems that dyspnea descriptors along with other findings from history and physical examination could be helpful in differentiating the causes of the symptom in patients presenting to ED suffering from dyspnea. PMID:28894777

  12. Exercise training improves exertional dyspnea in patients with COPD: evidence of the role of mechanical factors.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Francesco; Coli, Claudia; Bianchi, Roberto; Romagnoli, Isabella; Lanini, Barbara; Binazzi, Barbara; Scano, Giorgio

    2003-06-01

    To our knowledge, no data have been reported on the effects of exercise training (EXT) on central respiratory motor output or neuromuscular coupling (NMC) of the ventilatory pump, and their potential association with exertional dyspnea. Accurate assessment of these important clinical outcomes is integral to effective management of breathlessness of patients with COPD. Twenty consecutive patients with stable moderate-to-severe COPD were tested at 6-week intervals at baseline, after a nonintervention control period (pre-EXT), and after EXT. Patients entered an outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program involving regular exercise on a bicycle. Incremental symptom-limited exercise testing (1-min increments of 10 W) was performed on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Oxygen uptake (O(2)), carbon dioxide output (CO(2)), minute ventilation (E), time, and volume components of the respiratory cycle and, in six patients, esophageal pressure swings (Pessw), both as actual values and as percentage of maximal (most negative in sign) esophageal pressure during sniff maneuver (Pessn), were measured continuously over the runs. Exertional dyspnea and leg effort were evaluated by administering a Borg scale. Measurements at baseline and pre-EXT were similar. Significant increase in exercise capacity was found in response to EXT: (1) peak work rate (WR), O(2), CO(2), E, tidal volume (VT), and heart rate increased, while peak exertional dyspnea and leg effort did not significantly change; (2) exertional dyspnea/O(2) and exertional dyspnea/CO(2) decreased while E/O(2) and E/CO(2) remained unchanged. The slope of both exertional dyspnea and leg effort relative to E fell significantly after EXT; (3) at standardized WR, E, and CO(2), exertional dyspnea and leg effort decreased while inspiratory capacity (IC) increased. Decrease in E was accomplished primarily by decrease in respiratory rate (RR) and increase in both inspiratory time (TI) and expiratory time; VT slightly increased

  13. Experimental chaotic quantification in bistable vortex induced vibration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, B. H.; Tjahjowidodo, T.

    2017-02-01

    The study of energy harvesting by means of vortex induced vibration systems has been initiated a few years ago and it is considered to be potential as a low water current energy source. The energy harvester is realized by exposing an elastically supported blunt structure under water flow. However, it is realized that the system will only perform at a limited operating range (water flow) that is attributed to the resonance phenomenon that occurs only at a frequency that corresponds to the fluid flow. An introduction of nonlinear elements seems to be a prominent solution to overcome the problem. Among many nonlinear elements, a bistable spring is known to be able to improve the harvested power by a vortex induced vibrations (VIV) based energy converter at the low velocity water flows. However, it is also observed that chaotic vibrations will occur at different operating ranges that will erratically diminish the harvested power and cause a difficulty in controlling the system that is due to the unpredictability in motions of the VIV structure. In order to design a bistable VIV energy converter with improved harvested power and minimum negative effect of chaotic vibrations, the bifurcation map of the system for varying governing parameters is highly on demand. In this study, chaotic vibrations of a VIV energy converter enhanced by a bistable stiffness element are quantified in a wide range of the governing parameters, i.e. damping and bistable gap. Chaotic vibrations of the bistable VIV energy converter are simulated by utilization of a wake oscillator model and quantified based on the calculation of the Lyapunov exponent. Ultimately, a series of experiments of the system in a water tunnel, facilitated by a computer-based force-feedback testing platform, is carried out to validate the existence of chaotic responses. The main challenge in dealing with experimental data is in distinguishing chaotic response from noise-contaminated periodic responses as noise will smear

  14. Experimental model of arthritis induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Biazin, Samia Khalil; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia; de Franco, Marcello Fabiano; Puccia, Rosana; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira

    2012-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is highly prevalent in Brazil, where it is the principal cause of death by systemic mycoses. The disease primarily affects men aged 30-50 year old and usually starts as a pulmonary focus and then may spread to other organs and systems, including the joints. The present study aimed to develop an experimental model of paracoccidioidomycotic arthritis. Two-month-old male Wistar rats (n = 48) were used, divided in 6 groups: test groups EG/15 and EG/45 (received one dose of 100 μl of saline containing 10(5) Pb viable yeasts in the knee); heat killed Pb-group HK/15 and HK/45 (received a suspension of 10(5) Pb nonviable yeasts in the knee) and control groups CG/15 and CG/45 (received only sterile saline in the knee). The rats were killed 15 and 45 days postinoculation. In contrast with the control rats, the histopathology of the joints of rats of the test groups (EG/15 and EG/45) revealed a picture of well-established PCM arthritis characterized by extensive sclerosing granulomatous inflammation with numerous multiple budding fungal cells. The X-ray examination revealed joint alterations in these groups. Only metabolic active fungi evoked inflammation. The experimental model was able to induce fungal arthritis in the knees of the rats infected with metabolic active P. brasiliensis. The disease tended to be regressive and restrained by the immune system. No evidence of fungal dissemination to the lungs was observed.

  15. The effects of experimentally induced adelphophagy in gastropod embryos.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Olaf; Collin, Rachel; Carrillo-Baltodano, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Adelphophagy, development where embryos grow large by consuming morphologically distinct nutritive embryos or their own normal siblings is widespread but uncommon among animal phyla. Among invertebrates it is particularly common in some families of marine gastropods and segmented worms, but rare or unknown in other closely related families. In calyptraeid gastropods phylogenetic analysis indicates that adelphophagy has arisen at least 9 times from species with planktotrophic larval development. This pattern of frequent parallel evolution of adelphophagy suggests that the embryos of planktotrophic species might be predisposed to evolve adelphophagy. Here we used embryos of three species of planktotrophic calyptraeids, one from each of three major genera in the family (Bostrycapulus, Crucibulum, and Crepidula), to answer the following 3 questions: (1) Can embryos of species with planktotrophic development benefit, in terms of pre-hatching growth, from the ingestion of yolk and tissue from experimentally damaged siblings? (2) Does ingestion of this material from damaged siblings increase variation in pre-hatching size? and (3) Does this experimentally induced adelphophagy alter the allometry between the velum and the shell, increasing morphological similarity to embryos of normally adelphophagic species? We found an overall increase in shell length and velum diameter when embryos feed on damaged siblings within their capsules. There was no detectable increase in variation in shell length or velum diameter, or changes in allometry. The overall effect of our treatment was small compared to the embryonic growth observed in naturally adelphophagic development. However each embryo in our experiment probably consumed less than one sibling on average, whereas natural adelphophages often each consume 10-30 or more siblings. These results suggest that the ability to consume, assimilate, and benefit from yolk and tissue of their siblings is widespread across calyptraeids.

  16. Antioxidant Effects of Probiotics in Experimentally Induced Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Erginel, Basak; Aydin, Fatih A; Erginel, Turgay; Tanik, Canan; Abbasoglu, Semra D; Soysal, Feryal G; Keskin, Erbug; Celik, Alaaddin; Salman, Tansu

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of probiotics on gut mucosa in peritonitis through antioxidant mechanisms. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were divided equally into four groups. The rats in Group 1 (control group) underwent laparotomy only. In group 2 (peritonitis group), peritonitis was induced in the rats by the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. In group 3, the rats were treated with probiotics for five days after CLP-induced peritonitis. The last group of rats (group 4) were fed probiotics for five days before the CLP procedure and five days after the surgery. On the fifth day after surgery, all rats were killed, and tissue samples from the terminal ileum were obtained to evaluate the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH). Histopathologic examinations were also performed to evaluate the grade of intestinal injury. Myeloperoxidase and MDA activities were increased, GSH concentrations were decreased in group 2, compared with group 1. Intestinal MPO activities in group 4 were decreased compared with group 1 and group 2, indicating a reduction in oxidant activity. Malondialdehyde decreased in group 3 and decreased even more in group 4, compared with the peritonitis group (group 2). Glutathione concentrations were increased in group 4 compared with group 2 and group 3 (p < 0.05). The Chiu scores of the probiotics groups, groups 3 and 4, were lower than those in group 2, indicating reduced mucosal damage in the probiotically fed groups. Probiotics have protective effects in peritonitis, which may be related to antioxidant mechanisms. This antioxidant effect of probiotics might occur when pre-conditioning with probiotics before peritonitis because there is sufficient time to prepare the tissues for oxidative damage.

  17. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis induces microglial activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Larry; Done, Joseph D.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is unknown and factors including the host’s immune response and the nervous system have been attributed to the development of CP/CPPS. We previously demonstrated that mast cells and chemokines such as CCL2 and CCL3 play an important role in mediating prostatitis. Here, we examined the role of neuroinflammation and microglia in the CNS in the development of chronic pelvic pain. Methods Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was induced using a subcutaneous injection of rat prostate antigen. Sacral spinal cord tissue (segments S4–S5) was isolated and utilized for immunofluorescence or QRT-PCR analysis. Tactile allodynia was measured at baseline and at various points during EAP using Von Frey fibers as a function for pelvic pain. EAP mice were treated with minocycline after 30 days of prostatitis to test the efficacy of microglial inhibition on pelvic pain. Results Prostatitis induced the expansion and activation of microglia and the development of inflammation in the spinal cord as determined by increased expression levels of CCL3, IL-1β, Iba1, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Microglial activation in mice with prostatitis resulted in increased expression of P2X4R and elevated levels of BDNF, two molecular markers associated with chronic pain. Pharmacological inhibition of microglia alleviated pain in mice with prostatitis and resulted in decreased expression of IL-1β, P2X4R, and BDNF. Conclusion Our data shows that prostatitis leads to inflammation in the spinal cord and the activation and expansion of microglia, mechanisms that may contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:25263093

  18. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  19. Confabulation versus experimentally induced false memories in Korsakoff patients.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Ilse; d'Ydewalle, Géry

    2010-09-01

    The present study focuses on both the clinical symptom of confabulation and experimentally induced false memories in patients suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome. Despite the vast amount of case studies of confabulating patients and studies investigating false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, the nature of Korsakoff patients' confabulatory behaviour and its association with DRM false memories have been rarely examined. Hence, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate confabulatory responses in a large sample of chronic Korsakoff patients and matched controls by means of the Dalla Barba Confabulation Battery. Second, the association between (provoked) confabulation and the patients' DRM false recognition performance was investigated. Korsakoff patients mainly confabulated in response to questions about episodic memory and questions to which the answer was unknown. A positive association was obtained between confabulation and the tendency to accept unstudied distractor words as being old in the DRM paradigm. On the other hand, there was a negative association between confabulation and false recognition of critical lures. The latter could be attributed to the importance of strategic retrieval at delayed memory testing.

  20. Early corticosteroid administration in experimental radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Stryker, J.A.; Abt, A.A.; Chung, C.K.; Whitesell, L.; Zelis, R.

    1980-02-01

    The ability of dexamethasone (DEX) to reduce the severity of the late stage of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) was assessed in 25 New Zealand white rabbits. Ten rabbits served as unirradiated controls (CONT). In Group A, seven rabbits received intravenous DEX prior to irradiation and every 24 hours for three consecutive days. DEX was not administered to the eight rabbits in Group B. At 100 days postirradiation, the severity of the late state was determined by microscopic examination (MICRO) for myocardial fibrosis and determination of myocardial hydroxyproline content (MHP). Myocardial fibrosis was evident in groups A (40%) and B (80%) while none was present in CONT by MICRO. One rabbit in Group B with no fibrosis by MICRO had abnormally increased MHP. MHP was significantly increased in Groups A and B, as compared to CONT (p < 0.01). In addition to less fibrosis by MICRO, Group A demonstrated a significant reduction of MHP when compared to Group B (p < 0.05). Determination of MHP may be superior to MICRO in the detection of the late stage of RIHD. Also, early DEX administration appears to reduce myocardial collagen content (fibrosis) in this experimental model.

  1. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration Induced Droplet Atomization*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1999-11-01

    The atomization of a millimeter-scale liquid droplet placed on a vibrating diaphragm is investigated experimentally using high-speed imaging and particle-tracking techniques. Atomization is the result of the rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the wave crests of a hierarchy of forced surface waves on the primary droplet. The evolution and rate of ejection depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary droplet and the vibrating diaphragm. The present data indicate that secondary droplet ejection results from the collapse of surface craters formed during the evolution of capillary surface waves on the primary droplet. The collapse of the crater and the ensuing ejection of a momentary liquid jet are similar to ejection processes at free surfaces that are induced by the bursting of gas bubbles or the impingement of liquid droplets. The spray characteristics of the ejected droplets are investigated over a broad range of vibrating frequencies (up to 14 kHz) using particle-tracking velocimetry. * Supported by NASA Microgravity Res. Div., Grant NAG3-1949.

  2. Active Lifestyle Is Associated With Reduced Dyspnea and Greater Life Satisfaction in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Garshick, Eric; Mulroy, Sara; Graves, Daniel E; Greenwald, Karen; Horton, John A; Morse, Leslie R

    2016-10-01

    To assess the relations between measures of activity with dyspnea and satisfaction with life in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Cross-sectional survey. Five SCI centers. Between July 2012 and March 2015, subjects (N=347) with traumatic SCI ≥1 year after injury who used a manual wheelchair or walked with or without an assistive device reported hours spent away from home or yard on the previous 3 days, sports participation, and planned exercise. Not applicable. Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and dyspnea. Dyspnea was defined as shortness of breath when hurrying on the level or going up a slight hill, going slower than people the same age on the level because of breathlessness, or stopping for breath when going at your own pace, or after about 100yd (or after a few minutes) on the level. Dyspnea prevalence was 30%. Adjusting for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mobility mode, race, and season, there was a significant linear trend between greater SWLS scores and quartiles of time spent away from the home or yard (P=.0002). SWLS score was greater if participating in organized sports (P=.01), although was not significantly greater with planned exercise (P=.093). Planned exercise was associated with a reduced odds ratio (OR) of dyspnea (.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], .34-.95; P=.032), but organized sports was not (P=.265). Dyspnea was not significantly increased in persons who spent the fewest hours outside their home or yard (≤7h) compared with people who spent the most hours outside their home or yard (>23h) (OR=1.69; 95% CI, 0.83-3.44; P=.145). In SCI, a planned exercise program is associated with less dyspnea. An active lifestyle characterized by greater time spent away from home or yard and sports participation is associated with greater SWLS scores. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of Dyspnea in Ambulatory African Americans With Heart Failure and a Preserved or Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Karen M; DeVon, Holli A; Piano, Mariann R

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is a burdensome and disabling heart failure (HF) symptom. Few studies examining dyspnea in HF have included African Americans (AAs), despite their developing HF at a younger age and having the highest mortality rates. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine dyspnea in AA patients with HF and a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) compared with those with a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), before and after the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). A convenience sample of ambulatory AA patients (HFrEF, n = 26; HFpEF, n = 19) 50 years or older was recruited from an urban HF clinic. The Borg Scale and a visual analog scale (VAS) were used to measure dyspnea intensity before and after the 6MWT. Activity limitations related to dyspnea were described using the modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale. Group comparisons were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and χ 2tests. Convergent validity was determined between the Borg and VAS using Bland-Altman plots. No significant differences were found in age, gender, and comorbidities between HF groups. Most HFpEF patients reported dyspnea at baseline (Borg, 63%; VAS, 73%) and after the 6MWT (Borg, 78%; VAS, 79%). In the HFrEF group, the prevalence of baseline dyspnea was greater when measured with the VAS (Borg, 34%; VAS, 80%) but was similar between instruments after the 6MWT (Borg, 64%; VAS, 77%). Both groups reported a similar change in dyspnea intensity during and after the 6MWT. The Bland-Altman plots indicated moderate agreement at each time point. Most patients described walking hurriedly or uphill as dyspnea-provoking on the Modified Respiratory Council Dyspnea Scale. The prevalence of dyspnea at baseline and after the 6MWT was high for both groups, but intensity varied with the dyspnea instrument used.

  4. The Minimal Important Difference in Borg Dyspnea Score in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khair, Rubina M; Nwaneri, Chisom; Damico, Rachel L; Kolb, Todd; Hassoun, Paul M; Mathai, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a disease without a cure. Focusing on symptoms, such as dyspnea, is an important part of assessing response to therapy. To determine the minimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea score and the Borg fatigue score in adult patients undergoing initial therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. We studied 129 patients enrolled between 2003 and 2013 in the Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Program registry at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. We analyzed baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, 6-minute-walk test distance, and Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores at baseline and at follow up 3 months after initiation of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy. The minimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores were determined using distributional and anchor-based methods, using 6-minute-walk test distance as the anchor. Most subjects were in New York Heart Association functional class II or III and had moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The baseline Borg dyspnea score was 3.4 ± 1.9 units; the baseline Borg fatigue score was 2.8 ± 2.2 units. After therapy, the average change in the dyspnea score was -0.16 ± 1.9 units and the average change in the fatigue score was -0.21 ± 2.4 units. Using distributional methods, the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea score ranged from 0.7 to 1.24 units and for Borg fatigue score ranged from 0.73 to 1.39 units. Using anchor-based methods, the minimum important difference for the Borg dyspnea scales was 0.36; this could not be calculated for the Borg fatigue score. Using distributional and anchor-based methods, we estimate the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea scale in pulmonary arterial hypertension is approximately 0.9 units. Using distributional methods only, we estimate the minimum important difference for the Borg fatigue scale is around 1 unit

  5. Association of types of dyspnea including 'bendopnea' with cardiopulmonary disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Martínez Cerón, Diana María; Garcia Rosa, Maria Luiza; Lagoeiro Jorge, Antônio Jose; de Andrade Martins, Wolney; Tinoco Mesquita, Evandro; Di Calafriori Freire, Monica; da Silva Correia, Dayse Mary; Kang, Hye Chung

    2017-03-01

    Dyspnea is the symptom most commonly reported by patients with heart failure (HF) and/or pulmonary disease, the obese and the elderly. Recently 'bendopnea' (shortness of breath when bending forward) has been described in patients with HF. To determine the association of exertional dyspnea, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea and bendopnea with chronic disease, especially heart failure, and their phenotypes in primary care. This cross-sectional study included 633 individuals aged between 45 and 99 years enrolled in a primary care program in Niteroi, Brazil. Participants underwent clinical assessment and laboratory tests and completed a questionnaire, all on the same day. Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea and bendopnea were associated with HF (unadjusted OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.10-5.29 and OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.52-4.44, respectively). In multivariate models, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction were not associated with bendopnea. Bendopnea was the only type of dyspnea not linked to respiratory disease or coronary heart disease. Even after adjusting for depression and body mass index, the association remained with HF with or without preserved ejection fraction, and bendopnea thus appears to be a promising symptom to differentiate HF from the other two disease groups. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Ventilatory Inefficiency and Exertional Dyspnea in Early Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Neder, J Alberto; Berton, Danilo C; Müller, Paulo de Tarso; Elbehairy, Amany F; Rocha, Alcides; Palange, Paolo; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2017-07-01

    Exertional dyspnea is present across the spectrum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) severity. However, without realizing it themselves, patients may decrease daily physical activity to avoid distressing respiratory sensations. Dyspnea also may be associated with deconditioning. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can uncover exertional dyspnea and its physiological determinants in patients with preserved or only mildly reduced FEV1. Dyspnea in mild COPD can largely be explained by increased "wasted" ventilation in the physiological dead space, which heightens the drive to breathe and worsens the inspiratory mechanical constraints. During incremental exercise testing, this is readily identified as an excessive ventilation-to-metabolic demand, that is, a high ventilation ([Formula: see text]e) to carbon dioxide output ([Formula: see text]co2) relationship. Linking increases in [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co2 to exertional dyspnea may provide objective evidence that a patient's poor exercise tolerance is not just a consequence of deconditioning. This information should prompt a proactive therapeutic approach to increase the available ventilatory reserve by, for example, giving inhaled bronchodilators. Considering that the structural determinants of ventilatory inefficiency (early emphysema, ventilation-perfusion mismatching, and microvascular disease) may progress despite only modest changes in FEV1, serial [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co2 measurements might also prove valuable to track disease progression in these symptomatic patients.

  7. Attitudes toward opioids for refractory dyspnea in COPD among Dutch chest physicians.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Daisy J A; de Hosson, S M; bij de Vaate, Eline; Mooren, Kris J M; Baas, Albert A F

    2015-05-01

    Dyspnea is the most frequently reported symptom of outpatients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Opioids are an effective treatment for dyspnea. Nevertheless, the prescription of opioids to patients with advanced COPD seems limited. The aims of this study are to explore the attitudes of Dutch chest physicians toward prescription of opioids for refractory dyspnea to outpatients with advanced COPD and to investigate the barriers experienced by chest physicians toward opioid prescription in these patients. All chest physicians (n = 492) and residents in respiratory medicine (n = 158) in the Netherlands were invited by e-mail to complete an online survey. A total of 146 physicians (response rate 22.5%) completed the online survey. Fifty percent of the physicians reported to prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea in 20% or less of their outpatients with advanced COPD and 18.5% reported never to prescribe opioids in these patients. The most frequently reported barriers toward prescription of opioids were resistance of the patient, fear of possible adverse effects, and fear of respiratory depression. To conclude, Dutch chest physicians and residents in respiratory medicine rarely prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea to outpatients with advanced COPD. This reluctance is caused by perceived resistance of the patient and fear of adverse effects, including respiratory adverse effects.

  8. Spirometric correlates of dyspnea improvement among emergency department patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carlos A; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Clark, Sunday; Kenney, Patrick A; Radeos, Michael S

    2008-07-01

    To examine whether change in slow vital capacity (SVC) correlates to dyspnea improvement during emergency department (ED) treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. We performed a prospective cohort study and enrolled consecutive patients during a 3-week period. ED patients > or = 55 years old with COPD exacerbation were asked to perform bedside spirometry shortly after ED arrival and again at discharge. SVC was measured first, then forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and forced vital capacity (FVC). Concurrent with spirometry, patients rated their dyspnea on a 10-cm visual analogue scale. Thirty-six patients were enrolled. The median ED stay was 271 min (interquartile range 219-370 min). Seventy-one percent of the patients reported dyspnea improvement during their ED stay. Change in SVC was significantly higher among the patients whose dyspnea improved than among those whose did not (median increase of 0.15 L vs median decrease of 0.25 L, respectively, p < 0.01). By contrast, the change in spirometry values were similar for FEV1, PEF, and FVC (all p > 0.30). Spearman correlation supported these findings: SVC r = 0.45 (p = 0.02) versus nonsignificant correlation with FEV(1) (r = 0.33), PEF (r = -0.22), and FVC (r = 0.35). Increase in SVC significantly correlated with dyspnea improvement among ED patients with moderate-to-severe COPD exacerbation. Change in SVC merits consideration when evaluating therapeutic response during COPD exacerbation.

  9. Effectiveness of Corticosteroid Monotherapy for Dyspnea Relief in Patients with Terminal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Toru

    2017-03-30

    Dyspnea is a common symptom in patients with cancer, particularly those with late-stage terminal disease. It markedly affects terminal cancer patients, reducing their quality of life. Reduced quality of life also affects survival; therefore, dyspnea is a prognostic factor. However, the role of corticosteroids, which often are used to alleviate dyspnea, has not been sufficiently validated. In this study, we retrospectively investigated whether corticosteroid monotherapy was effective for dyspnea palliation. The effectiveness rate of corticosteroid therapy was 45% in nine male and two female study subjects (mean age: 74.5 years; range: 64-86 years). No significant differences were found between responders and nonresponders in the first-day corticosteroid doses (25.5 ± 10.86 vs. 36.1 ± 16.39 mg, P = .29) or doses administered on 2 days (47.7 ± 25.99 vs. 72.2 ± 32.78 mg, P = .25). The mean ± standard error assessment score changed significantly from 2.7 ± 0.14 at the beginning of corticosteroid administration to 1.5 ± 0.37 at the time of maximum effect (P = .028); however, the decrease to 2.1 ± 0.25 at the final administration was not significant (P = .068). This indicates that corticosteroid therapy relieved dyspnea and could provide an early-stage treatment option.

  10. Evaluation of praziquantel for treatment of experimentally induced paragonimiasis in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bowman, D D; Frongillo, M K; Johnson, R C; Beck, K A; Hornbuckle, W E; Blue, J T

    1991-01-01

    Praziquantel was used successfully for treatment of a small number of dogs and 1 cat infected with Paragonimus kellicotti. To further evaluate the usefulness of this drug in treating such infections, 7 cats and 7 dogs were inoculated orally with metacercariae (12 and 20 to 22, respectively) obtained from crayfish, then were treated after the infections became patent; 2 cats and 2 dogs served as noninfected controls. Beginning 1 week before infection, and continuing weekly thereafter, physical, hematologic, and fecal examinations were performed on each animal; thoracic radiography was performed every other week. By postinoculation week 6, all dogs given metacercariae had patent infection diagnosed on the basis of positive results of fecal examination. By postinoculation week 7, 5 cats had confirmed patent infection, but 2 cats given metacercariae never had patent infection or had signs of infection. Clinical signs of infection were minor and included increased respiratory tract noise, slight inducible cough, or mild dyspnea. Transient eosinophilia was detected in dogs around postinoculation week 3. Pretreatment radiography revealed cavitated lesions in cats only; pleural lines and patchy infiltrates in cats and dogs; or pneumothorax in dogs only. The treatment regimen consisted of 23 mg of praziquantel/kg of body weight given every 8 hours for 3 days; 1 infected cat and dog were not treated. By 11 days after treatment, eggs had disappeared from the feces of infected animals, and marked resolution of lung lesions was evident radiographically.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  12. Anticoccidial effect of mananoligosacharide against experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler.

    PubMed

    Chand, Naila; Faheem, Hassan; Khan, Rifat Ullah; Qureshi, Muhammad Subhan; Alhidary, Ibrahim A; Abudabos, Alaeldein M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to find the effect of mananoligosacharide (MOS) in comparison with amprolium hydrochloride on performance and integrity of gut in experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler. A total of 300, day-old male broiler chickens (Ross 308) was randomly allocated to four treatments. Each group was further divided into five replicates of 15 birds each. Group A was kept as control; group B was contaminated with Eimeria tenella, while groups C and D were infected with E. tenella and treated with MOS (0.8 g/kg feed) and anticoccidial drug, amprolium hydrochloride (12 g/100 l water), respectively. The results showed that weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in infected + MOS-treated group compared to the other groups. The result of oocyte per gram (OPG) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the group infected with coccidiosis during 5th, 7th, 10th, and 12th day post infection (dpi). Furthermore, the OPG was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in infected groups treated with MOS and amprolium at the studied periods (5, 7, and 10 dpi). At 12 dpi, the infected group treated with MOS showed significantly lower OPG compared to the other groups suggesting the effectiveness of MOS in comparison to amprolium. The result of pinpoint hemorrhages, thickness of cecal wall, bloody fecal contents, and mucoid contents in the cecum were significant highly (P < 0.05) in birds fed with infected oocytes. It was also noted that the differences were not significant in these parameters between amprolium and MOS-treated birds showing the effectiveness of the prebiotic agent. It was concluded from the results of the present study that MOS improved growth performance and reversed the lesions of E. tenella.

  13. TENS attenuates repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain following experimentally induced muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Mankovsky-Arnold, Tsipora; Wideman, Timothy H; Larivière, Christian; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2013-11-01

    This study sought to determine whether repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain (RISP) could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain. This study also assessed the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on RISP. The relation between the index of RISP and psychological factors such as catastrophizing and fear of pain was also explored. The sample consisted of 56 healthy (35 women, 21 men) participants who underwent 2 testing sessions, separated by 24 hours. In the first session, musculoskeletal pain was induced with a delayed-onset muscle soreness protocol. During the second session, participants were randomly assigned to the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or placebo condition and were asked to rate their pain as they lifted a series of 18 weighted canisters. An index of RISP was derived as the change in pain ratings across repeated lifts. Approximately 25% of participants showed evidence of RISP. Results also revealed that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuated the RISP effect. Psychological measures (fear of pain, catastrophizing) were not significantly correlated with the index of RISP, but the index of RISP was significantly correlated with a measure of physical tolerance. Discussion addresses the clinical implications of the findings as well as the potential mechanisms underlying RISP. This study showed that RISP could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain with delayed-onset muscle soreness. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation led to a significant reduction in RISP. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental investigation on the pathogenesis of tartrazine-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Y; Kitamura, S

    1979-11-01

    The effects of tartrazine on the synthesis of prostaglandin-like substances (PGLS) from arachidonic acid in isolated perfused guinea pig lung, and on the contractile responses of guinea pig tracheal tissues induced by histamine, acetylcholine, bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin F2 alpha were studied. The synthesis of PGLS from arachidonic acid was not inhibited by tartrazine. The contractile responses of guinea pig tracheal tissues induced by various bronchoconstrictors were potentiated in the presence of tartrazine. These results may suggest that tartrazine-induced asthma is not induced by inhibition of PGLS synthesis, but induced by potentiation of bronchoconstrictor responses.

  15. Assessment of Dyspnea Early in Acute Heart Failure: Patient Characteristics and Response Differences Between Likert and Visual Analog Scales

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Peter S.; Collins, Sean P.; Sauser, Kori; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Storrow, Alan B.; Hollander, Judd E.; Tavares, Miguel; Spinar, Jindrich; Macarie, Cezar; Raev, Dimitar; Nowak, Richard; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyspnea is the most common symptom in acute heart failure (AHF), yet how to best measure it has not been well defined. Prior studies demonstrate differences in dyspnea improvement across various measurement scales, yet these studies typically enroll patients well after the ED phase of management. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine predictors of early dyspnea improvement for three different, commonly used dyspnea scales (i.e. five point absolute Likert scale, 10 cm visual analogue scale [VAS], or seven point relative Likert scale). Methods This was a post-hoc analysis of URGENT Dyspnea, an observational study of 776 patients in 17 countries enrolled within one hour of first physician encounter. Inclusion criteria were broad to reflect real-world clinical practice. Prior literature informed the a priori definition of clinically significant dyspnea improvement. Resampling-based multivariable models were created to determine patient characteristics significantly associated with dyspnea improvement. Results Of the 524 AHF patients, approximately 40% of patients did not report substantial dyspnea improvement within the first 6 hours. Baseline characteristics were similar between those who did or did not improve, though there were differences in history of heart failure, coronary artery disease, and initial systolic blood pressure. For those who did improve, patient characteristics differed across all three scales, with the exception of baseline dyspnea severity for the VAS and five point Likert scale (c-index ranged from 0.708 to 0.831 for each scale). Conclusions Predictors of early dyspnea improvement differ from scale to scale, with the exception of baseline dyspnea. Attempts to use one scale to capture the entirety of the dyspnea symptom may be insufficient. PMID:25039550

  16. Assessment of dyspnea early in acute heart failure: patient characteristics and response differences between likert and visual analog scales.

    PubMed

    Pang, Peter S; Collins, Sean P; Sauser, Kori; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Storrow, Alan B; Hollander, Judd E; Tavares, Miguel; Spinar, Jindrich; Macarie, Cezar; Raev, Dimitar; Nowak, Richard; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2014-06-01

    Dyspnea is the most common symptom in acute heart failure (AHF), yet how to best measure it has not been well defined. Prior studies demonstrate differences in dyspnea improvement across various measurement scales, yet these studies typically enroll patients well after the emergency department (ED) phase of management. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of early dyspnea improvement for three different, commonly used dyspnea scales (i.e., five-point absolute Likert scale, 10-cm visual analog scale [VAS], or seven-point relative Likert scale). This was a post hoc analysis of URGENT Dyspnea, an observational study of 776 patients in 17 countries enrolled within 1 hour of first physician encounter. Inclusion criteria were broad to reflect real-world clinical practice. Prior literature informed the a priori definition of clinically significant dyspnea improvement. Resampling-based multivariable models were created to determine patient characteristics significantly associated with dyspnea improvement. Of the 524 AHF patients, approximately 40% of patients did not report substantial dyspnea improvement within the first 6 hours. Baseline characteristics were similar between those who did or did not improve, although there were differences in history of heart failure, coronary artery disease, and initial systolic blood pressure. For those who did improve, patient characteristics differed across all three scales, with the exception of baseline dyspnea severity for the VAS and five-point Likert scale (c-index ranged from 0.708 to 0.831 for each scale). Predictors of early dyspnea improvement differ from scale to scale, with the exception of baseline dyspnea. Attempts to use one scale to capture the entirety of the dyspnea symptom may be insufficient. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Venous pressure and dyspnea on exertion in cardiac failure: was Tinsley Randolph Harrison right?

    PubMed

    Haouzi, Philippe

    2009-05-30

    More than 70 years ago, Harrison and his group proposed that in the absence of pulmonary edema, an increased systemic venous pressure could be a major source of dyspnea upon exertion in cardiac patients. Harrison provided evidence that in resting animals systemic venous pressure can affect ventilatory control through afferent information originating from the right side of the central circulation (i.e. right ventricle and large veins) via the vagus nerves. This review explores the concept that "increased venous pressure acts as a cause of dyspnea", which emerged from the remarkable work performed by Harrison and co-workers. Their conclusion will be however extended by developing the hypothesis that the load imposed on the venous blood returning from the skeletal muscles during any muscular activity is sensed by slow conducting muscle afferent fibers and provides a source of dyspnea in heart failure patients.

  18. Lung volume reduction surgery for the management of refractory dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Asad A; D'Amico, Thomas A

    2009-06-01

    This review describes the role of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) for the management of refractory dyspnea and other debilitating conditions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Recent studies, including a randomized trial comparing LVRS to medical therapy, are analyzed. LVRS plus optimal medical therapy is superior to medical therapy alone in treating certain subsets of patients with severe emphysema. In patients with predominantly upper lobe emphysema and low-exercise capacity, LVRS not only improves symptoms of dyspnea and exercise intolerance, but also is associated with improved survival. Furthermore, LVRS has recently been shown to be superior to medical therapy in improving other quality of life parameters, such as nutritional status, sleep quality, and the frequency of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations in patients with severe emphysema. LVRS is an effective strategy in the treatment of properly selected patients with COPD, improving survival and quality of life, including exercise tolerance, dyspnea, oxygen requirement and functional status.

  19. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory muscle electromyography and dyspnea during exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Ramsook, Andrew H; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Schaeffer, Michele R; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Camp, Pat G; Reid, W Darlene; Romer, Lee M; Guenette, Jordan A

    2017-03-02

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has consistently been shown to reduce exertional dyspnea in health and disease; however, the physiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. A growing body of literature suggests that dyspnea intensity can largely be explained by an awareness of increased neural respiratory drive, as indirectly measured using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi). Accordingly, we sought to determine if improvements in dyspnea following IMT can be explained by decreases in inspiratory muscle EMG activity. Twenty-five healthy recreationally-active men completed a detailed familiarization visit followed by two maximal incremental cycle exercise tests separated by 5 weeks of randomly assigned pressure threshold IMT or sham control training (SC). The IMT group (n=12) performed 30 inspiratory efforts twice daily against a 30 repetition maximum intensity. The SC group (n=13) performed a daily bout of 60 inspiratory efforts against 10% maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), with no weekly adjustments. Dyspnea intensity was measured throughout exercise using the modified 0-10 Borg scale. Sternocleidomastoid and scalene EMG were measured using surface electrodes whereas EMGdi was measured using a multi-pair esophageal electrode catheter. IMT significantly improved MIP (pre:-138±45 vs. post:-160±43cmH2O, p<0.01) whereas the SC intervention did not. Dyspnea was significantly reduced at the highest equivalent work rate (pre:7.6±2.5 vs. post:6.8±2.9Borg units, p<0.05), but not in the SC group, with no between-group interaction effects. There were no significant differences in respiratory muscle EMG during exercise in either group. Improvements in dyspnea intensity ratings following IMT in healthy humans cannot be explained by changes in the electrical activity of the inspiratory muscles.

  20. Correlation of chest computed tomography findings with dyspnea and lung functions in post-tubercular sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Mohan, Anant; Sreenivas, Vishnu; Kalaimannan, Umasankar; Upadhyay, Ashish Dutt

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the correlation between dyspnea, radiological findings, and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Materials and Methods: Clinical history, chest computed tomography (CT), and PFT of patients with post-TB sequelae were recorded. Dyspnea was graded according to the Modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale. CT scans were analyzed for fibrosis, cavitation, bronchiectasis, consolidation, nodules, and aspergilloma. Semi-quantitative analysis was done for these abnormalities. Scores were added to obtain a total morphological score (TMS). The lungs were also divided into three zones and scores added to obtain the total lung score (TLS). Spirometry was done for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and FEV1/FVC. Results: Dyspnea was present in 58/101 patients. A total of 22/58 patients had mMRC Grade 1, and 17/58 patients had Grades 2 and 3 dyspnea each. There was a significant difference in median fibrosis, bronchiectasis, nodules (P < 0.01) scores, TMS, and TLS (P < 0.0001) between dyspnea and nondyspnea groups. Significant correlations were obtained between grades of dyspnea and fibrosis (r = 0.34, P = 0.006), bronchiectasis (r = 0.35, P = 0.004), nodule (r = 0.24, P = 0.016) scores, TMS (r = 0.398, P = 0.000), and TLS (r = 0.35, P = 0.0003). PFTs were impaired in 78/101 (77.2%) patients. Restrictive defect was most common in 39.6% followed by mixed in 34.7%. There was a negative but statistically insignificant trend between PFT and fibrosis, bronchiectasis, nodule scores, TMS, and TLS. However, there were significant differences in median fibrosis, cavitation, and bronchiectasis scores in patients with normal, mild to moderate, and severe respiratory defects. No difference was seen in TMS and TLS according to the severity of the respiratory defect. Conclusion: Both fibrosis and bronchiectasis correlated with dyspnea and with PFT. However, this correlation was not

  1. Experimentally Induced Sandfly Fever Virus Infection in Man: Effects on Physical Performance,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-23

    REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Experimentally Induced Sandfly Fever Virus Infec- tion in Man: Effects on Physical Performance 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...7 experimentals, 2 controls) were studied before, during and after an experimentally induced episode of sandfly fever. During the fever, experi...subjects were unable to complete a submaximal exercise walk during the fever. Rectal temperature was elevated throughout the walk but no other

  2. [A 35-year-old woman with fever, dyspnea, and pain in the left thigh].

    PubMed

    Picardi, A; Navajas, F; De Iorio, F; Amicarelli, M; Spoto, S; De Galasso, L; Vespaciani Gentilucci, U; Scarlata, S; Zardi, E; Di Cuonzo, G

    2001-01-01

    A thirty-five years old woman during her twelfth pregnancy presented fever and pain at the left thigh. After cesarean delivery dyspnea added to the first two symptoms and pulmonary embolism was suspected. A clinical history revaluation suggested a diagnosis of infectious endocarditis and femoural osteomielitis due to a septic embolus.

  3. Anthropometric Indicators Associated with Dyspnea and Spirometric Parameters in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Emami Ardestani, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Nasrin

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine anthropometric indicators associated with dyspnea and spirometric parameters in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional and observational study was carried out on 88 patients with COPD, who were visited in an outpatient respiratory clinic of a university hospital during two months. Patient height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT) and subscapular skinfold thickness (SST) were recorded. Also, data on lung function and dyspnea were collected. The association between anthropometric indices and other parameters was studied. Results: Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed that forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)% predicted was positively correlated with BMI (R=0.239, P<0.05) and MUAC (R=0.431, P<0.01). By applying ANOVA, we found that the relationship between FEV1% predicted and BMI (P=0.007), WC (P=0.019) and MUAC (P<0.001) was statistically significant. Chi-square test showed that there was an association between MUAC and dyspnea (P<0.05). Conclusion: There was a relationship between FEV1% predicted and some anthropometric indices such as BMI, MUAC and WC; also, we found an association between MUAC and dyspnea. PMID:28210277

  4. Giant Osteoma of Mandible Causing Dyspnea: A Rare Case Presentation and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Hassan Mirmohammad; Shamloo, Nafise; Taghavi, Nasim; Safi, Yaser; Aghdashi, Farzad; Ismaeilnejad, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Osteomas are benign slow growing tumors of bone. Tumors are usually asymptomatic until they attain remarkable size and cause asymmetry or dysfunction. In view of few reported cases of giant osteoma of mandible, this article presents a case of giant osteoma of left mandible in a 53-year old male causing dyspnea due to compression of air way space.

  5. Emergency endotracheal intubation under fluoroscopy guidance for patients with acute dyspnea or asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Dechao; Xie, Na; Han, Xinwei; Wu, Gang

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endotracheal intubation (EEI) under fluoroscopy guidance for patients with acute dyspnea or asphyxia. From October 2011 to October 2014, of 1521 patients with acute dyspnea or asphyxia who required EEI in 6 departments, 43 patients who experienced intubation difficulty or failure were entered into this study. Data on technical success, procedure time, complications, and clinical outcome were collected. The pulse oxygen saturation and Hugh-Jones classification changes were analyzed. Fluoroscopy-guided EEI was technically successful in all patients. Acute dyspnea had resolved in all patients with clinical success rate 100% after the procedure. There were no serious complications during or after the procedure. The pulse oxygen saturation and Hugh-Jones classification showed significant increase after EEI (P < .05). Further treatments, including tracheal stents (n = 21), surgical resection (n = 16), palliative tracheotomy (n = 4), and bronchoscopic treatment (n = 2), were performed 1 to 72 hours after EEI. During a mean follow-up period of 13.2 months, 13 patients had died and 30 patients remained alive without dyspnea. Fluoroscopy-guided EEI is a safe and feasible procedure, and may serve as an alternative treatment option for patients when traditional EEI is unsuccessful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anthropometric Indicators Associated with Dyspnea and Spirometric Parameters in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Emami Ardestani, Mohammad; Sajadi, Ghazaleh; Jazayeri, Nasrin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine anthropometric indicators associated with dyspnea and spirometric parameters in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cross-sectional and observational study was carried out on 88 patients with COPD, who were visited in an outpatient respiratory clinic of a university hospital during two months. Patient height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT) and subscapular skinfold thickness (SST) were recorded. Also, data on lung function and dyspnea were collected. The association between anthropometric indices and other parameters was studied. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed that forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)% predicted was positively correlated with BMI (R=0.239, P<0.05) and MUAC (R=0.431, P<0.01). By applying ANOVA, we found that the relationship between FEV1% predicted and BMI (P=0.007), WC (P=0.019) and MUAC (P<0.001) was statistically significant. Chi-square test showed that there was an association between MUAC and dyspnea (P<0.05). There was a relationship between FEV1% predicted and some anthropometric indices such as BMI, MUAC and WC; also, we found an association between MUAC and dyspnea.

  7. Dyspnea-12 Is a Valid and Reliable Measure of Breathlessness in Patients With Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Swigris, Jeffrey; Russell, Anne-Marie; Moosavi, Shakeeb H.; Ng Man Kwong, Georges; Longshaw, Mark; Jones, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Dyspnea-12 questionnaire (D-12) for the assessment of breathlessness in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Methods: A total of 101 patients with ILD completed the D-12 (scale range, 0-36, with a high score indicating worse dyspnea), Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea scale, St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at baseline, and 84 patients completed the D-12 and a global health transition score at follow-up 2 weeks later. D-12 psychometric properties, including floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity were examined. Results: The D-12 showed good internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.93) and repeatability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.94). Its scores were significantly associated with MRC grade (r = 0.59; P < .001), SGRQ (symptoms, r = 0.57; activities, r = 0.78; impacts, r = 0.75; total, r = 0.79; P < .001). Factor analysis confirmed the previously determined structure of the D-12 in this patient group. Conclusion: In patients with ILD, the D-12, a patient-reported measure of dyspnea severity that requires no reference to activity, is a reliable and valid instrument. It is short, simple to complete, and easy to score. PMID:20595454

  8. Efficacy of guided imagery with theta music for advanced cancer patients with dyspnea: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Shu; Chao, Co-Shi Chantal; Yang, Wan-Ping; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2010-10-01

    Dyspnea is a frequent and devastating symptom among advanced cancer patients for which improved and low-cost palliative techniques are needed. A one-group repeated measures research design investigated the efficacy of guided imagery (GI) with theta music (M) on dyspnea in advanced cancer patients. The intervention consisted of four periods: (a) pretest; (b) intervention with peaceful non-M; (c) intervention with 10 min of GI with M (GI/M), with the first and last 3 min being M only (i.e., the middle 4 min was GI/M); and (d) posttest. Dyspnea outcome was measured with the Modified Borg Scale (MBS) for self-reported evaluation of dyspneic symptoms. Physiological parameters measured were pulse oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), end-tidal CO( 2) (EtCO(2)), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR). Posttest qualitative data were obtained via interview for subjective patient experience. Participants included 53 patients, 33% with lung cancer. GI/M produced a significant decrease in MBS scores; 90% of the subjects gave positive qualitative reviews of GI/M. SpO(2) did not change significantly over time. GI/M significantly increased EtCO(2), decreased RR, and decreased HR. This study demonstrates that GI/M is a useful intervention for palliative care of patients with dyspnea. M alone was demonstrated to be effective, while soothing non-M was not effective. GI/M was more effective than M alone. GI/M should be considered low-cost end-of-life palliative care for dyspnea.

  9. Trajectory of Dyspnea and Respiratory Distress among Patients in the Last Month of Life.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Margaret L; Kiernan, Jason M; Strandmark, John; Yarandi, Hossein N

    2017-08-17

    The trajectory of dyspnea has been reported among patients approaching the end of life. However, patients near death have been dropped from longitudinal studies or excluded altogether because of an inability to self-report; proxy estimates have been reported. It is not known whether dyspnea or respiratory distress remains stable, escalates, or abates as patients reach last days. Determine trajectory of dyspnea (self-reported) and respiratory distress (observed) among patients who were approaching death. A prospective, repeated-measures study of dyspnea/respiratory distress among a sample of hospice patients was done. Measures were collected at each patient encounter from hospice enrollment until patient death. Dyspnea was measured in response to "Are you short of breath?" and using the numeric rating scale anchored at 0 and 10. Nurses measured respiratory distress with the Respiratory Distress Observation Scale (RDOS). Patient consciousness (Reaction Level Scale), nearness to death (Palliative Performance Scale), diagnoses, and demographics were recorded. Data for the 30-day interval before death were analyzed. The sample was 91 patients who were female (58%) and Caucasian (83%) with dementia (32%), heart failure (26%), and cancer (13%). RDOS increased significantly from mild distress 30 days before death to moderate/severe distress on the day of death (F = 10.8, p < 0.0001). Distress was strongly correlated with nearness to death (r = -0.97, p < 0.0001) and consciousness (r = 0.97, p < 0.0001). Respiratory distress escalated in the last days. Inability to self-report raises care concerns about under-recognition and under-treatment of respiratory distress.

  10. Value of arterial blood gas analysis in patients with acute dyspnea: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The diagnostic and prognostic value of arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA) parameters in unselected patients presenting with acute dyspnea to the Emergency Department (ED) is largely unknown. Methods We performed a post-hoc analysis of two different prospective studies to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of ABGA parameters in patients presenting to the ED with acute dyspnea. Results We enrolled 530 patients (median age 74 years). ABGA parameters were neither useful to distinguish between patients with pulmonary disorders and other causes of dyspnea nor to identify specific disorders responsible for dyspnea. Only in patients with hyperventilation from anxiety disorder, the diagnostic accuracy of pH and hypoxemia rendered valuable with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of 0.86. Patients in the lowest pH tertile more often required admission to intensive care unit (28% vs 12% in the first tertile, P < 0.001) and had higher in-hospital (14% vs 5%, P = 0.003) and 30-day mortality (17% vs 7%, P = 0.002). Cumulative mortality rate was higher in the first (37%), than in the second (28%), and the third tertile (23%, P = 0.005) during 12 months follow-up. pH at presentation was an independent predictor of 12-month mortality in multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis both for patients with pulmonary (P = 0.043) and non-pulmonary disorders (P = 0.038). Conclusions ABGA parameters provide limited diagnostic value in patients with acute dyspnea, but pH is an independent predictor of 12 months mortality. PMID:21663600

  11. Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea during exercise with external thoracic restriction: Role of increased neural respiratory drive

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Cassandra T.; Schaeffer, Michele R.; Riley, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that neuromechanical uncoupling of the respiratory system forms the mechanistic basis of dyspnea during exercise in the setting of “abnormal” restrictive constraints on ventilation (VE). To this end, we examined the effect of chest wall strapping (CWS) sufficient to mimic a “mild” restrictive lung deficit on the interrelationships between VE, breathing pattern, dynamic operating lung volumes, esophageal electrode-balloon catheter-derived measures of the diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi) and the transdiaphragmatic pressure time product (PTPdi), and sensory intensity and unpleasantness ratings of dyspnea during exercise. Twenty healthy men aged 25.7 ± 1.1 years (means ± SE) completed symptom-limited incremental cycle exercise tests under two randomized conditions: unrestricted control and CWS to reduce vital capacity (VC) by 21.6 ± 0.5%. Compared with control, exercise with CWS was associated with 1) an exaggerated EMGdi and PTPdi response; 2) no change in the relationship between EMGdi and each of tidal volume (expressed as a percentage of VC), inspiratory reserve volume, and PTPdi, thus indicating relative preservation of neuromechanical coupling; 3) increased sensory intensity and unpleasantness ratings of dyspnea; and 4) no change in the relationship between increasing EMGdi and each of the intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea. In conclusion, the increased intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea during exercise with CWS could not be readily explained by increased neuromechanical uncoupling but likely reflected the awareness of increased neural respiratory drive (EMGdi) needed to achieve any given VE during exercise in the setting of “abnormal” restrictive constraints on tidal volume expansion. PMID:24356524

  12. Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea during exercise with external thoracic restriction: role of increased neural respiratory drive.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Cassandra T; Schaeffer, Michele R; Riley, Patrick; Jensen, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that neuromechanical uncoupling of the respiratory system forms the mechanistic basis of dyspnea during exercise in the setting of "abnormal" restrictive constraints on ventilation (VE). To this end, we examined the effect of chest wall strapping (CWS) sufficient to mimic a "mild" restrictive lung deficit on the interrelationships between VE, breathing pattern, dynamic operating lung volumes, esophageal electrode-balloon catheter-derived measures of the diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi) and the transdiaphragmatic pressure time product (PTPdi), and sensory intensity and unpleasantness ratings of dyspnea during exercise. Twenty healthy men aged 25.7 ± 1.1 years (means ± SE) completed symptom-limited incremental cycle exercise tests under two randomized conditions: unrestricted control and CWS to reduce vital capacity (VC) by 21.6 ± 0.5%. Compared with control, exercise with CWS was associated with 1) an exaggerated EMGdi and PTPdi response; 2) no change in the relationship between EMGdi and each of tidal volume (expressed as a percentage of VC), inspiratory reserve volume, and PTPdi, thus indicating relative preservation of neuromechanical coupling; 3) increased sensory intensity and unpleasantness ratings of dyspnea; and 4) no change in the relationship between increasing EMGdi and each of the intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea. In conclusion, the increased intensity and unpleasantness of dyspnea during exercise with CWS could not be readily explained by increased neuromechanical uncoupling but likely reflected the awareness of increased neural respiratory drive (EMGdi) needed to achieve any given VE during exercise in the setting of "abnormal" restrictive constraints on tidal volume expansion.

  13. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for Evaluation of Acute Dyspnea in the ED.

    PubMed

    Zanobetti, Maurizio; Scorpiniti, Margherita; Gigli, Chiara; Nazerian, Peiman; Vanni, Simone; Innocenti, Francesca; Stefanone, Valerio T; Savinelli, Caterina; Coppa, Alessandro; Bigiarini, Sofia; Caldi, Francesca; Tassinari, Irene; Conti, Alberto; Grifoni, Stefano; Pini, Riccardo

    2017-06-01

    Acute dyspnea is a common symptom in the ED. The standard approach to dyspnea often relies on radiologic and laboratory results, causing excessive delay before adequate therapy is started. Use of an integrated point-of-care ultrasonography (PoCUS) approach can shorten the time needed to formulate a diagnosis, while maintaining an acceptable safety profile. Consecutive adult patients presenting with dyspnea and admitted after ED evaluation were prospectively enrolled. The gold standard was the final diagnosis assessed by two expert reviewers. Two physicians independently evaluated the patient; a sonographer performed an ultrasound evaluation of the lung, heart, and inferior vena cava, while the treating physician requested traditional tests as needed. Time needed to formulate the ultrasound and the ED diagnoses was recorded and compared. Accuracy and concordance of the ultrasound and the ED diagnoses were calculated. A total of 2,683 patients were enrolled. The average time needed to formulate the ultrasound diagnosis was significantly lower than that required for ED diagnosis (24 ± 10 min vs 186 ± 72 min; P = .025). The ultrasound and the ED diagnoses showed good overall concordance (κ = 0.71). There were no statistically significant differences in the accuracy of PoCUS and the standard ED evaluation for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, pneumonia, pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and dyspnea from other causes. PoCUS was significantly more sensitive for the diagnosis of heart failure, whereas a standard ED evaluation performed better in the diagnosis of COPD/asthma and pulmonary embolism. PoCUS represents a feasible and reliable diagnostic approach to the patient with dyspnea, allowing a reduction in time to diagnosis. This protocol could help to stratify patients who should undergo a more detailed evaluation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impaired perception of dyspnea in patients with severe asthma. Relation to sputum eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Veen, J C; Smits, H H; Ravensberg, A J; Hiemstra, P S; Sterk, P J; Bel, E H

    1998-10-01

    Poor dyspnea perception might be a risk factor for developing asthma exacerbations. We investigated whether severe asthmatics with recurrent exacerbations (brittle asthma) have different dyspnea perception and sputum cells compared with equally severe, but stable asthmatics, or patients with mild steroid-naive asthma. Fifteen brittle asthmatics (13 female, median age 28 yr [range, 20 to 47 yr]), 15 matched severe-stable asthmatics (14 female, median age 26 yr [range, 17 to 52 yr]), and 11 mild asthmatics (8 female, median age 25 yr [range, 19 to 43 yr]) underwent inhalation tests with methacholine (MCh), and hypertonic saline combined with sputum induction. Dyspnea was assessed by Borg and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), plotted against the percent fall in FEV1, and expressed as the slope of the regression line (Slope-Borg and Slope-VAS). The brittle and stable asthmatics had poorer perception than patients with mild asthma (Slope-Borg [p = 0.036], Slope-VAS [p < 0.001] for MCh). In patients with brittle asthma the perception was less as compared with severe-stable asthma (Slope-Borg for MCh: p = 0.05). In the severe asthmatics there was an inverse correlation between sputum eosinophilia and Slope-Borg and Slope-VAS (R = -0.55, p = 0. 002 and R = -0.37, p = 0.049), whereas this correlation was a positive one in the mild asthmatics (R = 0.79, p = 0.012 and R = 0. 67, p = 0.05). In conclusion, patients with severe asthma, particularly those with recurrent exacerbations, have blunted perception of dyspnea, which is related to the degree of sputum eosinophilia. This suggests that increased sputum eosinophilia is an indicator of clinical instabililty, and that eosinophilic airways inflammation might affect dyspnea perception in severe asthma.

  15. Physical activity, fitness, and dyspnea perception in children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Turchetta, Attilio; Fintini, Danilo; Cafiero, Giulia; Calzolari, Armando; Giordano, Ugo; Cutrera, Renato; Morini, Francesco; Braguglia, Annabella; Bagolan, Pietro

    2011-10-01

    We assessed whether physical activity could influence the performance and perception of dyspnea in children who were operated on for high risk congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We hypothesized that CDH children with normal activity would have better lung function and exercise performance level when compared to sedentary CDH subjects. We studied 18 children (11 males and 7 females, mean age 6.6 ± 2.6 years) who were surgically corrected. All children underwent physical examination, ECG at rest, and a maximal exercise stress test on a treadmill to measure the duration of exercise, maximal heart rate and blood pressure, maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)  max and VO(2)  ml/kg/min). Lung function testing to measure forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1) ), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) was also performed. Following the stress test, the Dalhousie dyspnea and effort scale was shown to children as a pictorial panel with three groups of increasing (from 1 to 7) levels of effort perception, throat discomfort, and chest dyspnea. Children were divided into group A (sedentary) and group B (regular physical participation). There was no difference in CDH severity between the two groups. Group A had a statistically significant lower duration of exercise (P < 0.01), maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)  max P < 0.0001), VO(2)  ml/kg/min (P < 0.001), higher throat closing feeling (P < 0.004), chest dyspnea (P < 0.001), and effort perception (P < 0.04) compared to group B. No differences were found in lung function tests. In conclusion, our data may suggest that children with a history of CDH who are active maintain a higher level of performance with less perception of dyspnea and effort.

  16. Caring for dying patients in the intensive care unit: managing pain, dyspnea, anxiety, delirium, and death rattle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    Critically ill patients receiving palliative care at the end of life are at high risk for experiencing pain, dyspnea, and death rattle. Nearly all these patients are at risk for the development of delirium. Patients who are alert may experience anxiety. Advanced practice nurses and staff nurses are integral to detecting and treating these symptoms. Pain, dyspnea, and anxiety should be routinely assessed by patient self-report when possible. Routine behavioral screening for delirium is recommended. Behavioral observation tools to detect pain and dyspnea and proxy assessments guide symptom identification when the patient cannot provide a self-report. Evidence-based interventions are offered for both prevention and treatment of pain, dyspnea, anxiety, and delirium. Death rattle does not produce patient distress, and current pharmacological treatment lacks an evidence base. Pain management has a robust evidence base compared to management of dyspnea, anxiety, and delirium among this population; well-designed, adequately powered studies are needed.

  17. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery and Pulmonary Rehabilitation Improve Exercise Capacity and Reduce Dyspnea During Functional Activities in People with Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effects of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) and pulmonary rehabilitation on levels of dyspnea during functional activities in patients with diffuse emphysema. Methods: Fifteen subjects who had undergone LVRS participated in this study. A visual analog scale (VAS) Activity Dyspnea Scales (VADS) measurement tool developed for this study was determined reliable in 10 subjects. The VADS was used to assess changes in dyspnea with functional activity in 10 subjects prior to and following the interventions of LVRS and pulmonary rehabilitation. Results: Results of this study indicate that LVRS followed by pulmonary rehabilitation significantly reduces levels of dyspnea during functional activities. Conclusion: The VADS developed for this study is a valid and reliable method of assessing changes in levels of dyspnea during functional activities in the LVRS population. PMID:20467532

  18. Experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevebaugh, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    The development tests to be performed on the experimental system are described in detail. The test equipment, conditions, and procedures are given. The portable clean room tests include assembly, collapsability, portability, and storage; laminar flow rate; static pressure; air flow pattern; and electrostatic buildup. The other tests are on the ventilation system, human factors evaluation, electrical subsystem, and material compatibility.

  19. Experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The experimental system is described, and the procedures for surgery usage and maintenance are outlined. Basically the system consists of the following: (1) a portable clean room comprised of a horizontal laminar flow filter system and a transparent walled enclosure, (2) a helmet-shoulder pad assembly, (3) a communications system, (4) a helmet ventilation system, and (5) surgical gowns.

  20. Induced thermoluminescence study of experimentally shock-loaded oligoclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivliev, A. I.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Badjukov, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Artificially induced thermoluminescence (TL) in oligoclase samples which were shock-loaded up to 27 GPa was measured. The essential increase of the TL sensitivity in relation to the total gamma-ray irradiation dose was observed only in samples at the 27 GPa pressure. This result can be explained by the initiation of additional radiation damages in the shocked oligoclace crystal lattice.

  1. Impact of Blunted Perception of Dyspnea on Medical Care Use and Expenditure, and Mortality in Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Ebihara, Satoru; Niu, Kaijun; Ebihara, Takae; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Hozawa, Atsushi; Ohmori-Matsuda, Kaori; Nakaya, Naoki; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Dyspnea is an alarming symptom responsible for millions of patient visits each year. Poor perception of dyspnea might be reasonably attributed to an inappropriately low level of fear and inadequate earlier medical treatment for both patients and physicians, resulting in subsequent intensive care. This study was conducted to evaluate medical care use and cost, and mortality according to the perception of dyspnea in community-dwelling elderly people. We analyzed baseline data from a community-based Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment in 2002. The perception of dyspnea in 479 Japanese community-dwelling elderly people with normal lung function was measured in August 2002. The sensation of dyspnea during breathing with a linear inspiratory resistance of 10, 20, and 30 cmH2O/L/s was rated using the Borg scale. According to the perception of dyspnea, we divided the elderly into tertiles and compared all hospitalizations, out-patient visits, costs, and death through computerized linkage with National Health Insurance beneficiaries claims history files between August 2002 and March 2008. In-patient hospitalization days and medical care costs significantly increased with the blunted perception of dyspnea, resulting in an increase in total medical-costs with blunted perception of dyspnea. With low perception group as reference, the hazard ratios of all-cause mortality were 0.65 (95% CI 0.23–1.89) for intermediate perception group and 0.31 (0.10–0.97) for high perception group, indicating the mortality rate also significantly increased with the blunted perception of dyspnea after multivariates adjustment (p = 0.04). The blunted perception of dyspnea is related to hospitalization, large medical costs, and all-cause mortality in community-dwelling elderly people. These findings provide a rational for preventing serious illness with careful monitoring of objective conditions in the elderly. PMID:22783203

  2. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  3. Field experimental study of traffic-induced turbulence on highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Estébanez, A.; Pascual-Muñoz, P.; Yagüe, C.; Laina, R.; Castro-Fresno, D.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is focused on traffic-induced turbulence (TIT) analysis from a field campaign performed in 2011, using ultrasonic anemometers deployed in the M-12 Highways, Madrid (Spain). The study attempts to improve knowledge about the influence of traffic-related parameters on turbulence. Linear relationships between vehicle speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) values are found with coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.75 and 0.55 for the lorry and van respectively. The vehicle-induced fluctuations in the wind components (u‧, v‧ and w‧) showed the highest values for the longitudinal component (v) because of the wake-passing effect. In the analysis of wake produced by moving vehicles it is indicated how the turbulence dissipates in relation to a distance d and height h. The TKE values were found to be higher at the measuring points closer to the surface during the wake analysis.

  4. Chemopreventive potential of zinc in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dani, Vijayta; Goel, Ajay; Vaiphei, K; Dhawan, D K

    2007-06-15

    The present study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of zinc treatment on colonic antioxidant defense system and histoarchitecture in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine- (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, zinc treated, DMH+zinc treated. Colon carcinogenesis was induced through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Zinc (in the form of zinc sulphate) was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in drinking water, ad libitum for the entire duration of the study. Increased tumor incidence, tumor size and number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were accompanied by a decrease in lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. On the contrary, significantly increased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione reductase (GR) were observed in DMH treated rats. Administration of zinc to DMH treated rats significantly decreased the tumor incidence, tumor size and aberrant crypt foci number with simultaneous enhancement of lipid peroxidation, SOD, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase. Further, the levels of GSH and GR were also decreased following zinc supplementation to DMH treated rats. Well-differentiated signs of dysplasia were evident in colonic tissue sections by DMH administration alone. However, zinc treatment to DMH treated rats greatly restored normalcy in the colonic histoarchitecture, with no apparent signs of neoplasia. EDXRF studies revealed a significant decrease in tissue concentrations of zinc in the colon following DMH treatment, which upon zinc supplementation were recovered to near normal levels. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that zinc has a positive beneficial effect against chemically induced colonic preneoplastic progression in rats induced by DMH.

  5. Experimental approach of the single pedestrian-induced excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, J.; Bajer, M.; Barnat, J.; Smutný, J.

    2010-12-01

    Pedestrian-induced vibrations are a criterion for serviceability. This loading is significant for light-weight footbridge structures, but was established as a basic loading for the ceilings of various ordinary buildings. Wide variations of this action exist. To verify the different conclusions of various authors, vertical pressure measurements invoked during walking were performed. In the article the approaches of different design codes are also shown.

  6. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor ameliorates DSS induced experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sainathan, Satheesh K.; Hanna, Eyad M.; Gong, Qingqing; Bishnupuri, Kumar S.; Luo, Qizhi; Colonna, Marco; White, Frances V.; Croze, Ed; Houchen, Courtney; Anant, Shrikant; Dieckgraefe, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sargramostim, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, stimulates cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Clinical trials show that Sargramostim induces clinical response and remission in patients with active Crohn's disease. To study the mechanism, we examined the effects of GM-CSF in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) induced acute colitis model. We hypothesized that GM-CSF may work through effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Methods Acute colitis was induced in Balb/c mice by administration of DSS in drinking water. Mice were treated with daily GM-CSF or PBS. To probe the role of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the response to GM-CSF, we further examine the effects of monoclonal antibody 440c, which is specific for a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin expressed on pDCs. Results GM-CSF ameliorates acute DSS-induced colitis; resulting in significantly improved clinical parameters and histology. Microarray analysis showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory genes including TNFα and IL1β; results further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and serum Bio-plex analysis. GM-CSF treatment significantly expands pDCs and type 1 IFN production. Administration of mAb 440c completely blocked the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF. GM-CSF is also effective in RAG1−/− mice, demonstrating activity independent effects on T and B cells. IFN-β administration mimics the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF in DSS-treated mice. GM-CSF increases systemic and mucosal type 1 IFN expression and exhibits synergy with pDC activators, such as microbial CpG DNA. Conclusions GM-CSF is effective in the treatment of DSS colitis in a mechanism involving the 440c+ plasmacytoid DC population. PMID:17932977

  7. Interleukin 19 reduces inflammation in chemically induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yukiko; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Natsuho; Ikeda, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease results from chronic dysregulation of the mucosal immune system and aberrant activation of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Interleukin (IL)-19, a member of the IL-10 family, functions as an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Here, we investigated the contribution of IL-19 to intestinal inflammation in a model of T cell-mediated colitis in mice. Inflammatory responses in IL-19-deficient mice were assessed using the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis. IL-19 deficiency aggravated TNBS-induced colitis and compromised intestinal recovery in mice. Additionally, the exacerbation of TNBS-induced colonic inflammation following genetic ablation of IL-19 was accompanied by increased production of interferon-gamma, IL-12 (p40), IL-17, IL-22, and IL-33, and decreased production of IL-4. Moreover, the exacerbation of colitis following IL-19 knockout was also accompanied by increased production of CXCL1, G-CSF and CCL5. Using this model of induced colitis, our results revealed the immunopathological relevance of IL-19 as an anti-inflammatory cytokine in intestinal inflammation in mice.

  8. Experimental study of microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ryan T.

    Microwave-Induced Thermoacoustic Imaging (TAI) is a noninvasive hybrid modality which improves contrast by using thermoelastic wave generation induced by microwave absorption. Ultrasonography is widely used in medical practice as a low-cost alternative and supplement to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although ultrasonography has relatively high image resolution (depending on the ultrasonic wavelength at diagnostic frequencies), it suffers from low image contrast of soft tissues. In this work samples are irradiated with sub-microsecond electromagnetic pulses inducing acoustic waves in the sample that are then detected with an unfocused transducer. The advantage of this hybrid modality is the ability to take advantage of the microwave absorption coefficients which provide high contrast in tissue samples. This in combination with the superior spatial resolution of ultrasound waves is important to providing a low-cost alternative to MRI and early breast cancer detection methods. This work describes the implementation of a thermoacoustic experiment using a 5 kW peak power microwave source.

  9. Acute phase proteins in experimentally induced pregnancy toxemia in goats.

    PubMed

    González, Félix H D; Hernández, Fuensanta; Madrid, Josefa; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Tecles, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The present work aimed to study the behavior of acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, acid soluble glycoprotein, fibrinogen, and albumin) in fasting-induced pregnancy toxemia in goats and their relationship with classical indicators of this disorder such as beta-hydroxybutyrate and nonesterified fatty acids in the blood and decreased urine pH and ketonuria. Twelve adult Murciano-Granadina goats at the final stage of gestation were used in this experiment. Pregnancy toxemia was induced in 6 goats by fasting for 72 hr. The other 6 animals were used as control group. Ketonuria was present in 4 out of 5 fasting animals at 24 hr and in all fasting animals at 48 hr of fasting. Serum nonesterified fatty acids were significantly increased at 24, 48, and 72 hr of fasting. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and haptoglobin achieved significantly increased concentrations at 48 hr and 72 hr, respectively, remaining increased during the entire study. Serum amyloid A, acid soluble glycoprotein, fibrinogen, and albumin were not affected by fasting. In conclusion, acute phase proteins (including haptoglobin) seemed not to have an advantage over traditional markers in diagnosis of fasting-induced pregnancy toxemia in goats.

  10. Comparison of methods for evaluation of experimentally induced emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.H.; Buschbom, R.L.; Smith, L.G.

    1984-04-01

    Four methods to quantify induced emphysema, in a manner economically applicable to large numbers of animals, are compared by correlation analyses. Lung tissue used was from rats pretreated intratracheally with elastase or saline prior to exposure to air or (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ aerosols. The most sensitive quantitative evaluation was from mean chord length (MCL) measurements on scanning electron micrographs (SEM). Four-corner and parallel-line grids provided similar results, and reducing sample size to one selected field per lobe yielded a high degree of reliability for MCL measurements. Alveolar-pore perimeter and area (also measured on SEM photographs) were increased by induced emphysema, but were not reliable indicators for degree of pulmonary involvement. Both subjective score (grading the degree of emphysema) and percentage-area-affected determinations indicated the presence of emphysema, but with less sensitivity than MCL measurements. However, these two subgross methods (performed with a dissecting microscope) provided valuable information on the distribution of pulmonary lesions; emphysema was induced in a nonuniform but consistent and progressive pattern in the two lobes of the lung studied. 23 studied.

  11. Corilagin Attenuates Aerosol Bleomycin-Induced Experimental Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Guo, Qiong-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Xiao; Li, Wen-Ting; Ma, Xi-Tao; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressing lethal disease with few clinically effective therapies. Corilagin is a tannin derivative which shows anti-inflammatory and antifibrotics properties and is potentiated in treating IPF. Here, we investigated the effect of corilagin on lung injury following bleomycin exposure in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. Corilagin abrogated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as assessed by H&E; Masson’s trichrome staining and lung hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Corilagin reduced the number of apoptotic lung cells and prevented lung epithelial cells from membrane breakdown, effluence of lamellar bodies and thickening of the respiratory membrane. Bleomycin exposure induced expression of MDA, IKKα, phosphorylated IKKα (p-IKKα), NF-κB P65, TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduced I-κB expression in mice lung tissue or in BALF. These changes were reversed by high-dose corilagin (100 mg/kg i.p) more dramatically than by low dose (10 mg/kg i.p). Last, corilagin inhibits TGF-β1 production and α-SMA expression in lung tissue samples. Taken together, these findings confirmed that corilagin attenuates bleomycin-induced epithelial injury and fibrosis via inactivation of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling. Corilagin may serve as a promising therapeutic agent for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24886817

  12. Effects of dead space loading on neuro-muscular and neuro-ventilatory coupling of the respiratory system during exercise in healthy adults: implications for dyspnea and exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dennis; O'Donnell, Denis E; Li, Ruifa; Luo, Yuan-Ming

    2011-12-15

    We examined the effects of dead space loading (DSL) on ventilation (V˙E), neural respiratory drive (EMGdi%max, diaphragm EMG expressed as a % of maximal EMGdi), contractile respiratory muscle effort (Pes,tidal%P(Imax), tidal esophageal pressure swing expressed as a % of maximal inspiratory Pes) and exertional dyspnea intensity ratings in 11 healthy adults with normal spirometry. Subjects completed, in random order, symptom-limited incremental cycle exercise tests under control (CTRL) and DSL (500 ml) conditions. Compared with CTRL, DSL decreased exercise tolerance by 20-25%; increased exertional dyspnea intensity ratings in direct proportion to concurrent increases in EMGdi%max, Pes,tidal%P(Imax) and V˙E; and had little/no effect on the inter-relationships between EMGdi%max, Pes,tidal%P(Imax) and V˙E during exercise. In conclusion, DSL was associated with an earlier onset of intolerable dyspnea; however, neuro-muscular and neuro-ventilatory coupling of the respiratory system remained relatively preserved during exercise in the presence of an increased external dead space. Under these circumstances, DSL-induced increases in exertional dyspnea intensity ratings reflected, at least in part, the awareness of increased neural respiratory drive, contractile respiratory muscle effort and ventilatory output. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental Protocol for Manipulating Plant-induced Soil Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Angela J.; del Pino, Gaston A.; Burns, Jean H.

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence theory has often treated environmental heterogeneity as being independent of the community composition; however biotic feedbacks such as plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) have large effects on plant performance, and create environmental heterogeneity that depends on the community composition. Understanding the importance of PSF for plant community assembly necessitates understanding of the role of heterogeneity in PSF, in addition to mean PSF effects. Here, we describe a protocol for manipulating plant-induced soil heterogeneity. Two example experiments are presented: (1) a field experiment with a 6-patch grid of soils to measure plant population responses and (2) a greenhouse experiment with 2-patch soils to measure individual plant responses. Soils can be collected from the zone of root influence (soils from the rhizosphere and directly adjacent to the rhizosphere) of plants in the field from conspecific and heterospecific plant species. Replicate collections are used to avoid pseudoreplicating soil samples. These soils are then placed into separate patches for heterogeneous treatments or mixed for a homogenized treatment. Care should be taken to ensure that heterogeneous and homogenized treatments experience the same degree of soil disturbance. Plants can then be placed in these soil treatments to determine the effect of plant-induced soil heterogeneity on plant performance. We demonstrate that plant-induced heterogeneity results in different outcomes than predicted by traditional coexistence models, perhaps because of the dynamic nature of these feedbacks. Theory that incorporates environmental heterogeneity influenced by the assembling community and additional empirical work is needed to determine when heterogeneity intrinsic to the assembling community will result in different assembly outcomes compared with heterogeneity extrinsic to the community composition. PMID:24686854

  14. Experimental protocol for manipulating plant-induced soil heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Angela J; del Pino, Gaston A; Burns, Jean H

    2014-03-13

    Coexistence theory has often treated environmental heterogeneity as being independent of the community composition; however biotic feedbacks such as plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) have large effects on plant performance, and create environmental heterogeneity that depends on the community composition. Understanding the importance of PSF for plant community assembly necessitates understanding of the role of heterogeneity in PSF, in addition to mean PSF effects. Here, we describe a protocol for manipulating plant-induced soil heterogeneity. Two example experiments are presented: (1) a field experiment with a 6-patch grid of soils to measure plant population responses and (2) a greenhouse experiment with 2-patch soils to measure individual plant responses. Soils can be collected from the zone of root influence (soils from the rhizosphere and directly adjacent to the rhizosphere) of plants in the field from conspecific and heterospecific plant species. Replicate collections are used to avoid pseudoreplicating soil samples. These soils are then placed into separate patches for heterogeneous treatments or mixed for a homogenized treatment. Care should be taken to ensure that heterogeneous and homogenized treatments experience the same degree of soil disturbance. Plants can then be placed in these soil treatments to determine the effect of plant-induced soil heterogeneity on plant performance. We demonstrate that plant-induced heterogeneity results in different outcomes than predicted by traditional coexistence models, perhaps because of the dynamic nature of these feedbacks. Theory that incorporates environmental heterogeneity influenced by the assembling community and additional empirical work is needed to determine when heterogeneity intrinsic to the assembling community will result in different assembly outcomes compared with heterogeneity extrinsic to the community composition.

  15. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-time, linear quadratic methods were used to design feedback controllers for reducing tones generated by flow over a cavity. The dynamics of a synthetic jet actuator mounted at the leading edge of the cavity as observed by two microphones in the cavity were modeled over a broad frequency range using state space models computed from experimental data. Variations in closed loop performance as a function of model order, control order, control bandwidth, and state estimator design were studied using a cavity in the Probe Calibration Tunnel at NASA Langley. The controller successfully reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at the tested flow speeds of Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. In some cases, the closed loop results were limited by excitation of sidebands of the cavity tones, or the creation of new tones at frequencies away from the cavity tones. Nonetheless, the results validate the combination of optimal control and experimentally-generated state space models, and suggest this approach may be useful for other flow control problems. The models were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  16. Laparoscopic correction of experimentally induced diaphragmatic rupture in dogs.

    PubMed

    Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Andrade, Paulo Sérgio Cruz de; Coelho, Gabriela Correa; Abílio, Edmundo Jorge

    2015-08-01

    To describe the dog as a model for studying laparoscopic correction of experimental diaphragmatic ruptures. Five male dogs were used in this study. Under laparoscopic approach, a defect of 7 cm was created on the left ventral insertion of the diaphragm. Fourteen days after this procedure, the abdomen was explored using laparoscopic access and the diaphragmatic defect was corrected with intracorporeal suture. The dislocated organs, surgical time, and suturing time were recorded. Analgesia and clinical condition were monitored during the postoperative period. All animals recovered well from the diaphragmatic rupture creation. After 14 days, abdominal organs (liver, spleen, omentum and/or intestine) were found inside the thoracic cavity in all animals. It was possible to reposition the organs and suture the defect by laparoscopic access in three animals. These animals showed excellent postoperative recovery. It was not possible to reposition the liver safely when it was friable. Laparoscopic creation of diaphragmatic rupture in dogs is feasible. Dogs are a good model for training and studying the correction of experimentally created diaphragmatic rupture by the laparoscopic approach. A friable liver is a complicating factor that should be taken into account. Animals submitted to laparoscopic correction showed excellent postoperative recovery.

  17. Appraisal of experimental and commercial Marek's disease vaccines to induce bursal and thymic atrophy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, several experimental Marek’s disease (MD) vaccines were developed that appear to protect equally or better than the best commercial vaccines. However, some of the experimental vaccines were reported to induce transient bursal and thymic atrophies. We will report on two promising experiment...

  18. Experimental distinction of Autler-Townes splitting from electromagnetically induced transparency using coupled mechanical oscillators system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingliang; Yang, Hujiang; Wang, Chuan; Xu, Kun; Xiao, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Here we experimentally demonstrated the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) effects in mechanical coupled pendulums. The analogue of EIT and ATS has been studied in mechanical systems and the intrinsic physics between these two phenomena are also been discussed. Exploiting the Akaike Information Criterion, we discern the ATS effect from EIT effect in our experimental results. PMID:26751738

  19. The role of nitric oxide in experimental cerulein induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Um, Soon Ho; Kwon, Yong Dae; Kim, Chang Duck; Lee, Hong Sik; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jae Hyun; Ryu, Ho Sang; Hyun, Jin Hai

    2003-08-01

    An enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO), due to the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of shock and inflammation, but its role in acute pancreatitis still remains controversial. To clarify the role of NO in acute pancreatitis, the present experiment investigated the expression of iNOS and the effect of NOS inhibition on cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. Group I received intraperitoneal (ip) injection of normal saline. Group II received two ip injections of cerulein (20 microgram/kg). Group III received injections of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (30 mg/kg) with cerulein. Group IV received L-arginine (250 mg/kg) with cerulein and L-NAME. The expression of iNOS in the pancreas was examined by western blot analysis. The plasma concentration of NO metabolites was measured. The severity of pancreatitis was assessed by measuring serum amylase, pancreas water content and histopathological examination. Compared with controls, the cerulein group displayed significantly increased expression of iNOS and raised plasma NO metabolites. Treatment with L-NAME significantly decreased hyperamylasemia, plasma NO level, and the extent of pancreatic injury. Treatment with L-arginine reversed the effects of L-NAME. These findings suggest that an enhanced formation of NO by iNOS plays an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis, and inhibition of NO production has the beneficial effects in reducing pancreas injury.

  20. [Fetal experimentation, transplantations, cosmetics and their connection with induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Redondo Calderón, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    The increase in induced abortion produces large numbers of cells, tissues and organs, which are used in several fields of Medicine, either in research or in treatment. The main uses are in Cardiology, Hematology, Metabolism, Embryology, Neurology, Immunology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and Transplantations. Flavor enhancers and cosmetics also benefit. Utilitarianism has led to an increase in abortion-originated cell and tissue banks. Abortion is justified through the manipulation of language. Vested interests give rise to complicity in researchers and society as a whole. Abortion and tissue 'donation' cannot be split; since fresh tissues are involved there is a symbiotic relationship between them. Valid consent is not possible. A contradiction emerges, the nasciturus is not desired or valued but fetal organs are. When someone is deprived of his rights it is because another wants to enslave them. Research must have a moral base. Knowledge should not be increased at any price. Something that is legal and well intentioned is not always morally acceptable. The duty of omission is applicable. Means to achieve a goal must be ethical means. Educational efforts to restore respect for the human embryo and fetus must be promoted. Technical advances are not always in accordance with human nature and dignity. Research and treatment that do not resort to cells, tissues and organs obtained from induced abortions should be promoted.

  1. Experimental acute pancreatitis induced by platelet activating factor in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Emanuelli, G.; Montrucchio, G.; Gaia, E.; Dughera, L.; Corvetti, G.; Gubetta, L.

    1989-01-01

    This study indicates that a single injection of platelet activating factor (PAF, 50-500 ng) into the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery of rabbits induces dose-dependent morphologic alterations of pancreatic tissue and increases serum amylase levels, both consistent with the development of an acute pancreatitis. The main histologic findings observed by light microscopy 24-72 hours after the injection of PAF were edema, polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration, cell vacuolization, and acinar cell necrosis. Fat cell necrosis was present in 30% of animals. By electron microscopy an increase of the number of zymogen granules in the apical region of acinar cells was observed 3 hours after PAF challenge. At 24-72 hours, many acinar cells showed vacuoles containing myelinlike figures, zymogen granules, and cellular debris. Pancreatic lesions developed in the area supplied by the artery injected with PAF and they were completely antagonized by the pretreatment of rabbits with CV 3988, a specific antagonist of PAF. In addition, the significant protective effect of atropine suggests a potential role for cholinergic mechanisms in the pancreatic alterations induced by PAF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2464939

  2. [A comparison of several measurement scales for assessing dyspnea in their daily activities in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease].

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Oña Lacasta, J M; Puente Maestu, L; Rodríguez Hermosa, J L; Tatay Martí, E; Cubillo Marcos, J M

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two instruments for measuring dyspnea to functional capacity, defined as maximal oxygen uptake in a stress test limited by symptoms. We carried out a descriptive study to determine correlation between the methods. Subjects with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were enrolled and dyspnea during daily activities was evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale and the chronic respiratory disease health perception questionnaire (CRQ). Dyspnea was also assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Borg scale. Patients performed a progressive treadmill test limited by symptoms to measure peak VO2 and VE. Correlation analysis of the two measures of dyspnea and the objective measures of functional capacity (peak VO2 and VE) showed that the clinical dyspnea measures (CRQ and MRC) correlated well with peak aerobic capacity and with maximal ventilation, whereas the VAS and Borg scale were not significantly related to the aforementioned variables. We also observed that the clinical scales for dyspnea correlated with each other, as did the VAS and Borg scale, but that there was no correlation between the two types of measurement. We conclude that clinical dyspnea indexes (CRQ and MRC) correlate well with maximal aerobic capacity and with each other. However, the VAS and Borg scale do not correlate with functional capacity measured by peak VO2 and VE.

  3. Experimental characterization of yield induced by surface flaws.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. H.; Davidson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Recent experimental findings related to the surface deformation and plastic zones associated with a deep surface flaw in Mode I tension loading are surveyed. Results of front and back surface dimpling, as determined by replica profiling and interferometry, are presented. The stresses required to initiate back surface dimpling are inversely related both to the crack depth and to the crack length. The plastic zone at the crack tip is described using results obtained from Fe-3Si specimens which have been studied with the electrolytic etching technique. It is shown that the plastic zone may be identified with a state of plane strain around the entire crack perimeter, except for the very thin layer near the crack tips on the front surface, where the deformation state approximates plane stress.

  4. Experimentation and numerical modeling of forging induced bending (FIB) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, S.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the final shape using numerical modeling has been a top priority in the field of sheet and bulk forming. Better shape prediction is the result of a better estimation of the physical stress and strain state. For experimental and numerical investigations of such estimations, simple benchmark processes are used. In this paper a benchmark process involving forging (flattening) of sheet metal between punch and die with negative clearance is proposed. The introduced material flow results in bending. Easy measurability of the angle of this bend makes this process suitable for validation purpose. Physical experiments are performed to characterize this bending angle due to flattening. Furthermore a numerical model is developed to capture this phenomenon. The main focus of this paper is the validation of the numerical model in terms of accurate prediction of the physical results.

  5. Dietary oregano essential oil alleviates experimentally induced coccidiosis in broilers.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, M; Ghanaatparast-Rashti, M

    2015-06-15

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of oregano essential oil on growth performance and coccidiosis prevention in mild challenged broilers. A total of 250 1-d-old chicks were used in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 5 replicates with 10 birds in each replication. Experimental treatments included: (1) negative control (NC; unchallenged), (2) positive control (PC; challenged with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria), (3) PC fed 200 ppm Diclazuril in diet, (4) PC fed 300 ppm oregano oil in diet, and (5) PC fed 500 ppm oregano oil in diet. At 22 d of age, all the experimental groups except for NC were challenged with 50-fold dose of Livacox T as a trivalent live attenuated coccidiosis vaccine. On d 28, two birds were slaughtered and intestinal coccidiosis lesions were scored 0-4. Moreover, dropping was scored in the scale of 0-3, and oocysts per gram feces (OPG) were measured. Oregano oil at either supplementation rate increased body weight gain (P=0.039) and improved feed conversion ratio (P=0.010) from d 22 to 28, when compared with PC group. Using 500 ppm oregano oil in challenged broilers diet increased European efficiency factor than PC group (P=0.020). Moreover, challenged broilers fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets displayed lower coccidiosis lesions scores in upper (P=0.003) and middle (P=0.018) regions of intestine than PC group, with the effect being similar to unchallenged birds. In general, challenged birds fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets had lower OPG (P=0.001), dropping scores (P=0.001), litter scores (P=0.001), and pH of litter (P=0.001) than PC group. It could be concluded that supplementation of oregano oil at the dose of 500 ppm in diet may have beneficial effect on prevention of coccidiosis in broilers.

  6. 29-year-old man presenting with progressive dyspnea, oculocutaneous albinism, and epistaxis.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Golriz; Lahiji, Arta; Kamangar, Nader

    2015-06-01

    A 29-year-old man with a history of oculocutaneous albinism presented to the ED complaining of progressive dyspnea on exertion. One month prior to admission, the patient had begun to experience worsening dyspnea provoked by routine household activities. Additionally, he had developed a nonproductive cough, exacerbated by cold weather. He denied associated chest pain, hemoptysis, fever, chills, or night sweats. He denied any new exposures or sick contacts in the recent past. A review of systems was significant for a history of epistaxis and frequent bruising. Born in Honduras, he had immigrated to the United States approximately 10 years prior to his presentation to our facility. Furthermore, there was no family history of albinism, bleeding disorders, or pulmonary disease.

  7. Thyrotoxicosis presenting as exertional dyspnea and pulmonary hypertension: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Farid; Sate, Hossein; Faraji, Esmaeil; Tahsini Tekantapeh, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    In this case study, we describe a 35-year-old woman with pulmonary hypertension that was secondary to thyrotoxicosis who presented with exertional dyspnea. In the approach to exertional dyspnea, detailed physical examination and laboratory findings helped to get the diagnosis. Echocardiography showed right ventricular systolic pressure = 60 mmHg. A suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone was seen in lab tests. The patient was treated with radioactive iodine. Palpitations and shortness of breath improved, and both her thyroid-stimulating hormone and T4 levels decreased. Echocardiography and the pulmonary pressure were normal after treatment. Thyrotoxicosis is one of the etiologies of pulmonary hypertension, but the exact etiology and pathogenesis remain unknown. Some patients may have symptomatic pulmonary hypertension that can be resolved by hyperthyroidism treatment.

  8. Involution of the rat thymus in experimentally induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abou-Rabia, N; Kendall, M D

    1994-09-01

    The thymus, as part of the immune-neuroendocrine axis, is greatly influenced by factors from most endocrine glands, especially the thyroid. Antithyroid drugs (carbimazole and methimazole) were used to induce hypothyroidism in rats. Histological and ultrastructural examination of the thymus showed progressive thymic involution after 4 weeks of drug treatment to the end of observations (7 weeks). The involution was characterised by increased thymocyte apoptosis and thymocyte phagocytosis by macrophages. This resulted in thymocyte depopulation, increases in numbers of interdigitating cells, alterations to mainly subcapsular and medullary epithelial cells, an apparent increase of mast cells and collagen in the capsule and septa, and increased numbers of B cells and plasma cells. Lymphoid cells immuno-reactive with MRC OX12 (which detects B cells) were observed within blood vessel walls, suggesting that they may have been moving in and out of the thymus. The administration of drugs causing hypothyroidism, therefore, also caused marked involution of the thymus.

  9. Postmortem biochemical markers of experimentally induced hypomagnesaemic tetany in cattle.

    PubMed

    McCoy, M A; Hutchinson, T; Davison, G; Fitzpatrick, D A; Rice, D A; Kennedy, D G

    2001-03-03

    Severe hypomagnesaemia and tetany were induced in 10 lactating cows by feeding them semi-synthetic low magnesium diets and the animals were used to study the stability of postmortem markers of hypomagnesaemic tetany. There were significant relationships between the concentrations of magnesium in either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or plasma and either aqueous or vitreous humour. The onset of hypomagnesamic tetany was also associated with low magnesium concentrations in plasma, CSF and aqueous and vitreous humour. Magnesium concentrations less than 0.25 mmol/litre in fresh aqueous humour may be indicative of severe hypomagnesaemia and possible tetany in lactating cows, but the concentration of magnesium in aqueous humour was unstable postmortem. The concentration of magnesium in vitreous humour was relatively stable and a concentration of less than 0.55 mmol/litre could be used as a diagnostic marker of tetany in cattle for up to at least 48 hours postmortem, at ambient temperatures typical of Northern Ireland.

  10. Experimental Investigation of High-Pressure Steam Induced Stall of a Transonic Rotor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    engine, so the steam -induced stall characteristic of its compressor must be well understood to help prevent any catastrophic failures of the aircraft...INVESTIGATION OF HIGH-PRESSURE STEAM INDUCED STALL OF A TRANSONIC ROTOR by Joesph J. Koessler June 2007 Thesis Advisor: Garth V. Hobson...2007 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Investigation of High-Pressure Steam Induced Stall of a

  11. Experimental Studies of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Transparent Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Christopher Wren

    2003-09-23

    The mechanisms by which transparent dielectrics damage when exposed to high power laser radiation has been of scientific and technological interest since the invention of the laser. In this work, a set of three experiments are presented which provide insight into the damage initiation mechanisms and the processes involved in laser-induced damage. Using an OPO (optical parametric oscillator) laser, we have measured the damage thresholds of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) from the near ultraviolet into the visible. Distinct steps, whose width is of order KbT, are observed in the damage threshold at photon energies associated with the number of photons (3→2 or 4→3) needed to promote a ground state electron across the energy gap. The wavelength dependence of the damage threshold suggests that a primary mechanism for damage initiation in DKDP is a multi-photon process in which the order is reduced through excited defect state absorption. In-situ fluorescence microscopy, in conjunction with theoretical calculations by Liu et al., has been used to establish that hydrogen displacement defects are potentially responsible for the reduction in the multi-photon cross-section. During the damage process, the material absorbs energy from the laser pulse and produces an ionized region that gives rise to broadband emission. By performing a time-resolved investigation of this emission, we demonstrate both that it is blackbody in nature, and we provide the first direct measurement of the localized temperature during and following laser damage initiation for various optical materials. For excitation using nanosecond laser pulses, the plasma, when confined in the bulk, is in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. These results allow for a detailed characterization of temperature, pressure, and electron densities occurring during laser-induced damage.

  12. Mechanisms of Murine Lacrimal Gland Repair after Experimentally Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zoukhri, Driss; Fix, Amanda; Alroy, Joseph; Kublin, Claire L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The authors recently reported that a severe inflammatory response resulting in substantial loss of acinar cells was induced by a single injection of interleukin-1α into the lacrimal gland and that this effect was reversible. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in lacrimal gland injury and repair. Methods Inflammation was induced by direct injection of recombinant human interleukin-1α (IL-1α, 1 μg in 2 μL) into the exorbital lacrimal glands of anesthetized female BALB/c mice. Animals were killed 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 days after injection. Exorbital lacrimal glands were then removed and processed for measurement of protein secretion, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Results The results show that lacrimal gland acinar cells are lost through programmed cell death (apoptosis) and autophagy. They also show that the number of nestin (a stem cell marker)–positive cells increased 2 to 3 days after injury and that some of these cells were also positive for Ki67 (a cell proliferation marker) and α-smooth muscle actin (a marker of myoepithelial cells). Finally, they show that the amount of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 (effector molecules of bone morphogenetic protein 7 [BMP7]) increased 2 to 3 days after injury and could also be detected in nestin-positive cells. Conclusions The lacrimal gland contains stem/progenitor cells capable of tissue repair after injury. Programmed cell death after injury triggers proliferation and differentiation of these cells, presumably through activation of the BMP7 pathway. PMID:18586880

  13. Experimental diet-induced atherosclerosis in Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, H; Nevarez, J G; Wakamatsu, N; Clubb, S; Cray, C; Tully, T N

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous atherosclerosis is common in psittaciformes, and clinical signs associated with flow-limiting stenosis are encountered in pet birds. Nevertheless, a psittacine model of atherosclerosis has not been developed for research investigations. Sixteen captive-bred Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) were used in this study. While 4 control birds were fed a maintenance diet, 12 other birds were fed an atherogenic diet composed of 1% cholesterol controlling for a calorie-to-protein ratio for periods ranging from 2 to 8 months. The birds were euthanized at the end of their respective food trial period. Histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and cholesterol measurement were performed on the ascending aorta and brachiocephalic and pulmonary arteries. Plasma lipoproteins, cholesterol, and triglycerides were also measured on a monthly basis. Significant atherosclerotic lesions were induced within 2 months and advanced atherosclerotic lesions within 4 to 6 months. The advanced lesions were histologically similar to naturally occurring lesions identified in the same parrot species with a lipid core and a fibrous cap. Ultrastructurally, there were extracellular lipid, foam cell, and endothelial changes. Arterial cholesterol content increased linearly over time. Plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) significantly increased over time by an average of 5- and 15-fold, respectively, with a shift from high-density lipoprotein to LDL as the main plasma lipoprotein. Quaker parrots also exhibited high plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity that increased, although not significantly, over time. This experiment demonstrates that in Quaker parrots fed 1% cholesterol, advanced atherosclerosis can be induced relatively quickly, and lesions resemble those found in other avian models and humans.

  14. [Chronic cough and worsening dyspnea: a case of idiopathic tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Conti, Valentina; Calia, Nunzio; Pasquini, Claudio; Zardi, Silvia; Finetti, Cinzia; Stomeo, Francesco; Ravenna, Franco

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of idiopathic tracheal stenosis in a 75-year-old woman, who presented to our observation with a diagnosis of asthmatic bronchitis characterized by cough and exertional dyspnea, later complicated by the appearance of tirage. Biopsy of the lesion showed focal squamous metaplasia of the epithelium lining, multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory infiltration of the corium. The patient was treated with endoscopic destruction via rigid bronchoscopy, through the combined action of YAG laser and mechanical debulking.

  15. An 84-Year-Old Man With Progressive Dyspnea and an Abnormal Chest CT Scan.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Hafiz Abdul Moiz; Samra, Yasser; Ataya, Ali; Prasad, Ashish; Papierniak, Eric; Wakefield, Dara; Urbine, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    An 84-year-old man without a history of smoking presented with progressive dyspnea of 6 months' duration accompanied by fatigue and unintentional weight loss. He denied fever, chills, chest pain, hemoptysis, rash, joint pains, or muscle aches. He had multiple hospitalizations for similar presentations that were diagnosed as pneumonia. History was significant for diastolic heart failure, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Relationship Among Pulmonary Hypertension, Autoimmunity, Thyroid Hormones and Dyspnea in Patients With Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Zuhur, Sayid Shafi; Baykiz, Derya; Kara, Sonat Pinar; Sahin, Ertan; Kuzu, Idris; Elbuken, Gulsah

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reported conflicting results regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PHT) in patients with hyperthyroidism. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the association between PHT and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody, thyroglobulin antibody, TSH, fT3, fT4 and dyspnea during daily activities in a large population of patients with hyperthyroidism. A total of 129 consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism, 37 with hypothyroidism and 38 euthyroid controls were enrolled in this study. The modified medical research council scale was used for the assessment of dyspnea in daily activities. All the patients and euthyroid controls underwent transthoracic echocardiography for the assessment of PHT. Mild PHT was present in 35%, 36%, 13.5% and 5% of the patients with Graves׳ disease, toxic multinodular goiter, hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls, respectively. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was higher in hyperthyroid patients with PHT than in those without PHT. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between modified medical research council scale and pulmonary artery systolic pressure as well as PVR in patients with hyperthyroidism. No association was found between PHT and serum TSH receptor antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody, thyroglobulin antibody, TSH, fT3 and fT4 levels. Mild PHT is present in a significant proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism, regardless of etiology. PVR appears to be the main cause of PHT in patients with hyperthyroidism, and neither autoimmunity nor thyroid hormones are associated with PHT in these patients. Mild dyspnea during daily activities in patients with hyperthyroidism may be related to PHT; however, severe dyspnea requires further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Three-minute constant rate step test for detecting exertional dyspnea relief after bronchodilation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Benoit; Wilkinson-Maitland, Courtney A; Hamilton, Alan; Bourbeau, Jean; Perrault, Hélène; Jensen, Dennis; Maltais, François

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of the 3-minute constant rate step test (3-MST) to detect the relief of exertional dyspnea (respiratory discomfort) after acute bronchodilation in COPD patients. Patients and methods A total of 40 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 45.7 (±14.7), % predicted) performed four 3-MSTs at randomly assigned stepping rates of 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min after inhalation of nebulized ipratropium bromide (500 µg)/salbutamol (2.5 mg) and saline placebo, which were randomized to order. Patients rated their intensity of perceived dyspnea at the end of each 3-MST using Borg 0–10 category ratio scale. Results A total of 37 (92.5%), 36 (90%), 34 (85%) and 27 (67.5%) patients completed all 3 minutes of exercise at 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min under both treatment conditions, respectively. Compared with placebo, ipratropium bromide/salbutamol significantly decreased dyspnea at the end of the third minute of exercise at 14 steps/min (by 0.6±1.0 Borg 0–10 scale units, P<0.01) and 16 steps/min (by 0.7±1.3 Borg 0–10 scale units, P<0.01); however, no statically significant differences were observed between treatments at 20 and 24 steps/min (both P>0.05). Conclusion The 3-MST, when performed at 14 and 16 steps/min, was responsive to detect the relief of exertional dyspnea after acute bronchodilation in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. PMID:27942208

  18. Range of Effective Corticosteroid Doses for Alleviating Dyspnea in Terminal Cancer Patients: A Retrospective Review.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Toru

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the range of mean cumulative corticosteroid doses that could effectively palliate dyspnea in opioid-treated patients with terminal cancer and to investigate the demographic or biochemical factors predictive of corticosteroid responsiveness. To this end, responders and nonresponders were compared with regard to corticosteroid dose and whether they had initiated opioid use before or concomitantly with corticosteroid use. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the impacts of demographic and biochemical factors on corticosteroid effectiveness. The final sample comprised 20 patients who satisfied the selection criteria. The responders accounted for 70% of the total sample (n = 14) and experienced the strongest effect with regard to dyspnea palliation at a mean cumulative dose equivalent to 64.4 mg prednisolone. However, no factors predictive of response were identified. In summary, this retrospective study identified effective corticosteroid doses for dyspnea alleviation in terminal cancer patients. Although our study sample was limited in size, the results support further prospective research.

  19. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  20. Experimental Studies of Mitigation Materials for Blast Induced Tbi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.; Christou, G.; Goel, R.; Young, L.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods of energy transfer in blast wave flows are expected including: material interfaces with impedance mismatches, density changes in a given material, internal shearing, and particle fracture. Our hypothesis is that the greatest energy transfer within the obstructing material will yield the greatest mitigation effects to the blast. Sample configurations of foam were varied to introduce material interfaces and filler materials with varying densities and impedances (liquids and powders). The samples were dynamically loaded using a small scale blast produced by an explosive driven shock tube housing gram-scale explosive charges. The transmitted blast profiles were analyzed for variations in impulse characteristics and frequency components as compared to standard free field profiles. The results showed a rounding effect of the transmitted blast profile for all samples with the effects of the high density fillers surpassing all others tested. These results lead to a conclusion that low porosity, high density materials offer superior attenuation by reducing air blast features and spatially distributing the transmitted wave.

  1. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    The atomization process in a mm-scale liquid droplet placed on a vibrating membrane is investigated experimentally. When the wavelength of the Faraday surface waves is smaller than the characteristic dimension of the droplet, the waves grow in amplitude as the excitation amplitude increases and ultimately begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. The high membrane acceleration needed to attain ejection (typically 300g) is achieved by driving a light-weight membrane near its resonant frequencies (nominally 1000-6000 Hz). The evolution and rate of the droplet-ejection process depend on a coupled system dynamic between the liquid droplet and the vibrating membrane. Depending on the excitation frequency and amplitude, various types of droplet-ejection processes can occur. For example, when step forcing (with prescribed frequency and amplitude) is applied, rapid atomization occurs. This event is triggered along the circumference of the droplet near the contact line by a strong azimuthal instability. In the present experiments, the droplet-ejection process and the resulting spray characteristics are investigated using high-speed video and two-frame particle tracking velocimetry.

  2. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson’s disease dementia and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders. PMID:27598124

  3. Epileptogenesis following experimentally induced traumatic brain injury - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Shammy; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex neurotrauma in civilian life and the battlefield with a broad spectrum of symptoms, long-term neuropsychological disability, as well as mortality worldwide. Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a common outcome of TBI with unknown mechanisms, followed by posttraumatic epileptogenesis. There are numerous rodent models of TBI available with varying pathomechanisms of head injury similar to human TBI, but there is no evidence for an adequate TBI model that can properly mimic all aspects of clinical TBI and the first successive spontaneous focal seizures follow a single episode of neurotrauma with respect to epileptogenesis. This review aims to provide current information regarding the various experimental animal models of TBI relevant to clinical TBI. Mossy fiber sprouting, loss of dentate hilar neurons along with recurrent seizures, and epileptic discharge similar to human PTE have been studied in fluid percussion injury, weight-drop injury, and cortical impact models, but further refinement of animal models and functional test is warranted to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. A multifaceted research approach in TBI model may lead to exploration of the potential treatment measures, which are a major challenge to the research community and drug developers. With respect to clinical setting, proper patient data collection, improved clinical trials with advancement in drug delivery strategies, blood-brain barrier permeability, and proper monitoring of level and effects of target drug are also important.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  5. Experimentally induced metamorphosis in axolotls reduces regenerative rate and fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Stier, Adrian C.; Michonneau, François; Smith, Matthew D.; Pasch, Bret; Maden, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Abstract While most tetrapods are unable to regenerate severed body parts, amphibians display a remarkable ability to regenerate an array of structures. Frogs can regenerate appendages as larva, but they lose this ability around metamorphosis. In contrast, salamanders regenerate appendages as larva, juveniles, and adults. However, the extent to which fundamental traits (e.g., metamorphosis, body size, aging, etc.) restrict regenerative ability remains contentious. Here we utilize the ability of normally paedomorphic adult axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) to undergo induced metamorphosis by thyroxine exposure to test how metamorphosis and body size affects regeneration in age‐matched paedomorphic and metamorphic individuals. We show that body size does not affect regeneration in adult axolotls, but metamorphosis causes a twofold reduction in regeneration rate, and lead to carpal and digit malformations. Furthermore, we find evidence that metamorphic blastemal cells may take longer to traverse the cell cycle and display a lower proliferative rate. This study identifies the axolotl as a powerful system to study how metamorphosis restricts regeneration independently of developmental stage, body size, and age; and more broadly how metamorphosis affects tissue‐specific changes. PMID:27499857

  6. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration-Induced Single Droplet Ejection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Range, Kai; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet atomization occurs when small secondary droplets are ejected from the free surface of a larger droplet placed on a vibrating membrane. To model a single ejection event, a liquid droplet is placed on a small piston and vibrated using an electromagnetic driver. The droplet oscillates in a characteristic mode shape that depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the properties of the liquid, and the size of the droplet. When the excitation amplitude is large enough, a small secondary droplet is ejected from the primary droplet. Observations of this process using high-speed digital video imaging show that droplet ejection occurs when a small liquid column or jet appears on the primary droplet and a secondary droplet forms on the column by a capillary-pinching mechanism. The liquid column or jet emanates from a crater in the primary droplet. As the driving frequency increases, this crater becomes smaller and the diameter of the ejected droplet decreases. We shall present results showing how the ejected droplet diameter and speed depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the liquid properties, and the primary droplet volume.

  7. Predictions of experimentally observed stochastic ground vibrations induced by blasting.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry "Suva Vrela" near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions.

  8. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone. PMID:478635

  9. Experimental study on shock-induced doping of titania photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Liu, Jianjun; Chen, Pengwan

    2009-06-01

    Titania is a most effective photo-functional material and is widely used. But since the band gap of titania is large (Eg=3.2 eV), it is only active in the ultraviolet region, which accouts only 3%-5% of the overall solar intensity. Therefore, it is very important to enhance the visible light activity of the titania photocatalyst. In this study, the nitrogen-doping of titania photocatalysts were induced by shock waves, which were generated through detonation-driven flyer impact. The samples were shocked at different flyer impact velocities and recovered successfully. Two nitrogen resources containing hexamethylene tetramine(HMT) and dicyandiamide were considered. The phase composition, light absorption spectra and N doping status of the recovered samples under different shock conditions were characterized. The absorption edge of the N-doped titania photocatalysts by shock wave was extended to 450nm corresponding to visible light region. The photocatalytic degradation to rhodamine B of the samples doped with dicyandiamide increased with the increase of the flyer velocity due to the higher N doping concentration and wider response to visible light.

  10. Experimental treatment of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shireen, Erum

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are extensively prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia and other related psychiatric disorders. These drugs produced their action by blocking dopamine (DA) receptors, and these receptors are widely present throughout the brain. Therefore, extended antipsychotic use also leads to severe extrapyramidal side effects. The short-term effects include parkinsonism and the later appearing tardive dyskinesia. Currently available treatments for these disorders are mostly symptomatic and insufficient, and are often linked with a number of detrimental side effects. Antipsychotic-drug-induced tardive dyskinesia prompted researchers to explore novel drugs with fewer undesirable extrapyramidal side effects. Preclinical studies suggest a role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)-1A and 2A/2C receptors in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission and motivating a search for better therapeutic strategies for schizophrenia and related disorders. In addition, adjunctive treatment with antioxidants such as vitamin E, red rice bran oil, and curcumin in the early phases of illness may prevent additional oxidative injury, and thus improve and prevent further possible worsening of related neurological and behavioral deficits in schizophrenia. This review explains the role of serotonergic receptors and oxidative stress, with the aim of providing principles for prospect development of compounds to improve therapeutic effects of antischizophrenic drugs. PMID:27540314

  11. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  12. Pristane-induced lupus: considerations on this experimental model.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Eduarda Correa; de Oliveira, Mayara Souza; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2017-09-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial, autoimmune inflammatory disease with pleomorphic clinical manifestations involving different organs and tissues. The etiology of this disease has been associated with a dysfunctional response of B and T lymphocytes against environmental stimuli in individuals genetically susceptible to SLE, which determines an immune response against different autoantigens and, consequently, tissue damage. The study of different murine models has provided a better understanding of these autoimmune phenomena. This review primarily focuses on that has been learned from the pristane-induced lupus (PIL) model and how this model can be used to supplement recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of SLE. We also consider both current and future therapies for this disease. The PubMed, SciELO, and Embase databases were searched for relevant articles published from 1950 to 2016. PIL has been shown to be a useful tool for understanding the multiple mechanisms involved in systemic autoimmunity. In addition, it can be considered an efficient model to evaluate the environmental contributions and interferon signatures present in patients with SLE.

  13. Serum transaminase levels after experimental paracetamol-induced hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M F; Fulker, M J; Walker, B E; Kelleher, J; Losowsky, M S

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between serum transaminase levels and the extent of paracetamol-induced liver necrosis has been investigated in the rat. Three methods of histological quantitation were used to assess of necrosis--arbitrary grading, point counting, and the image-analysis computer. Highly significant correlations were obtained between the three methods and all were found to be reproducible. A close correlation was found between the extent of hepatic necrosis and the serum ASAT and ALAT 24 hours after a large dose (4 g/kg) of paracetamol. Likewise, the mean grade of necrosis correlated reasonably well with the serum enzyme levels in the recovery phase at 36 and 72 hours, although the transaminase level for a given degree of necrosis was considerably lower at 72 hours than at 24 hours. These findings suggest that serum transaminase levels gives a reliable indication of the severity of hepatic necrosis if the time of ingestion of the paracetamol is known and taken into account. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:1205274

  14. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Moriyama, L. T.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed.

  15. Experimentally induced anxiety attenuates alcohol-related aggression in men.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua P; Giancola, Peter R

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that state anxiety operates as moderator of the alcohol-aggression relation. Participants were 80 healthy male social drinkers between 21 and 33 years of age. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: (a) alcohol + anxiety induction (n = 20), (b) placebo + anxiety induction (n = 20), (c) alcohol + no anxiety induction (n = 20), and (d) placebo + no anxiety induction (n = 20). Anxiety was induced by informing participants that they had to deliver a speech about what they liked and disliked about their body in front of a video camera. A modified version of the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (S. Taylor, 1967) was then used to measure aggressive behavior in a situation where electric shocks were administered to, and received from, a fictitious opponent under the guise of a competitive reaction time task. Results indicated that the anxiety induction was successful in suppressing aggression for participants who received alcohol equal to levels seen in placebo controls. Findings are discussed within the context of a number of theories of alcohol's anxiolytic effects in relation to intoxicated aggression.

  16. Postmortem biochemical markers of experimentally induced hypomagnesaemic tetany in sheep.

    PubMed

    McCoy, M A; Bingham, V; Hudson, A J; Cantley, L; Hutchinson, T; Davison, G; Fitzpatrick, D A; Kennedy, D G

    2001-02-24

    Hypomagnesaemic tetany was induced in non-lactating and lactating ewes by feeding them semi-synthetic low magnesium diets containing additional potassium chloride and citric acid. Aqueous and vitreous humour were sampled from one eye at the time of death (fresh) and from the second eye after the head had been stored at ambient temperature for 24 hours (24-hour). There were significant relationships between the concentrations of magnesium in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma and its concentrations in fresh aqueous humour and fresh vitreous humour. Magnesium concentrations of < 0.33 mmol/litre in fresh aqueous humour and < 0.50 mmol/litre in 24-hour aqueous humour were associated with severe hypomagnesaemia and tetany. However, the concentration of magnesium in aqueous humour is relatively unstable and, unless the time of death was known accurately, its interpretation would be difficult. Magnesium concentrations of < 0.60 mmol/litre in fresh vitreous humour and < 0.65 mmol/litre in 24-hour vitreous humour were associated with severe hypomagnesaemia and tetany in adult sheep. The concentration of magnesium in vitreous humour was relatively stable for up to 48 hours postmortem.

  17. Attenuation by daptomycin of gentamicin-induced experimental nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, N; Grenier, L; Simard, M; Bergeron, M G; Beauchamp, D

    1994-01-01

    Previously, daptomycin was shown to reduce tobramycin nephrotoxicity in vivo (D. Beauchamp, M. Pellerin, P. Gourde, M. Pettigrew, and M. G. Bergeron, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 34:139-147, 1990; C. A. Wood, H. C. Finkbeiner, S. J. Kohlhepp, P. W. Kohnen, and D. C. Gilbert, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 33:1280-1285, 1989). Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with saline (NaCl, 0.9%), daptomycin (10 mg/kg of body weight every 12 h, subcutaneously), gentamicin (30 mg/kg/12 h, intraperitoneally) or with a combination of daptomycin plus gentamicin over a 10-day period. Animals were killed 4, 10, and 20 days after the end of treatment. Four days after the end of drug administration, gentamicin and daptomycin levels in the renal cortices of animals treated with the combination of daptomycin and gentamicin were significantly higher than in those of rats given gentamicin or daptomycin alone (P < 0.01). Despite the higher cortical concentrations of gentamicin, rats given the combination of gentamicin and daptomycin had less reduction in renal cortex sphingomyelinase activity, less evidence of regeneration of cellular cortical cells ([3H]thymidine incorporation into cortex DNA), lower creatinine concentration in serum, and less histopathologic evidence of injury than rats given gentamicin alone. By immunogold technique, both daptomycin and gentamicin were localized to the lysosomes of proximal tubular cells, regardless of whether animals received the drugs alone or in combination. Interestingly, myeloid body formation occurred in both those animals given gentamicin alone and those given daptomycin plus gentamicin. No significant changes were observed for all groups between 10 and 20 days after the end of therapy, suggesting that the toxicity of gentamicin was not delayed by the concomitant injection of daptomycin. The results confirm that daptomycin can attenuate experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity. Images PMID:8067733

  18. Skin colour changes during experimentally-induced sickness.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Audrey J; Lasselin, Julie; Lekander, Mats; Olsson, Mats J; Powis, Simon J; Axelsson, John; Perrett, David I

    2017-02-01

    Skin colour may be an important cue to detect sickness in humans but how skin colour changes with acute sickness is currently unknown. To determine possible colour changes, 22 healthy Caucasian participants were injected twice, once with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, at a dose of 2ng/kg body weight) and once with placebo (saline), in a randomised cross-over design study. Skin colour across 3 arm and 3 face locations was recorded spectrophotometrically over a period of 8h in terms of lightness (L(∗)), redness (a(∗)) and yellowness (b(∗)) in a manner that is consistent with human colour perception. In addition, carotenoid status was assessed as we predicted that a decrease it skin yellowness would reflect a drop in skin carotenoids. We found an early change in skin colouration 1-3h post LPS injection with facial skin becoming lighter and less red whilst arm skin become darker but also less red and less yellow. The LPS injection also caused a drop in plasma carotenoids from 3h onwards. However, the timing of the carotenoid changes was not consistent with the skin colour changes suggesting that other mechanisms, such as a reduction of blood perfusion, oxygenation or composition. This is the first experimental study characterising skin colour associated with acute illness, and shows that changes occur early in the development of the sickness response. Colour changes may serve as a cue to health, prompting actions from others in terms of care-giving or disease avoidance. Specific mechanisms underlying these colour changes require further investigation.

  19. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  20. Predictions of Experimentally Observed Stochastic Ground Vibrations Induced by Blasting

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry “Suva Vrela” near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions. PMID:24358140

  1. Experimental investigation of the flow induced by artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; Westerweel, J

    2011-06-21

    The fluid transport produced by rectangular shaped, magnetically actuated artificial cilia of 70 μm length and 20 μm width was determined by means of phase-locked Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) measurements in a closed microfluidic chamber. The phase-averaged flow produced by the artificial cilia reached up to 130 μm s(-1) with an actuation cycle frequency of 10 Hz. Analysis of the measured flow data indicate that the present system is capable of achieving volume flow rates of V[combining dot above](cilia) = 14 ± 4 μl min(-1) in a micro channel of 0.5 × 5 mm(2) cross-sectional area when no back pressure is built up. This corresponds to an effective pressure gradient of 6 ± 1 Pa m(-1), which equals a pressure difference of 0.6 ± 0.1 mPa over a distance of 100 μm between two rows of cilia. These results were derived analytically from the measured velocity profile by treating the cilia as a thin boundary layer. While the cilia produce phase-averaged velocities of the order of O(10(2)μm s(-1)), time-resolved measurements showed that the flow field reverses two times during one actuation cycle inducing instantaneous velocities of up to approximately 2 mm s(-1). This shows that the flow field is dominated by fluid oscillations and flow rates are expected to increase if the beating motion of the cilia is further improved.

  2. The potential role of amlodipine on experimentally induced bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Korkmaz, Mukadder; Yayla, Muhammed; Polat, Elif; Uslu, Hakan; Halici, Zekai; Parlak, Secil N

    2016-09-28

    For the treatment of rhinosinusitis antibiotics are used frequently. Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse effects of antibiotics and growing resistance. The lack of discovery of new antibiotic compounds has increased the necessity for exploration of non-antibiotic compounds that have antibacterial activity. Amlodipine is a non-antibiotic compound with anti-inflammatory activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the potential role of amlodipine in treatment of rhinosinusitis by evaluating its effects on tissue oxidative status, mucosal histology and inflammation. Fifteen adult albino guinea pigs were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with saline, cefazolin sodium, or amlodipine for 7 days. The control group was five healthy guinea pigs. Animals were sacrificed after the treatment. Histopathological changes were identified using Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. Inflammation was assessed by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte (PMNL) infiltration density. Tissue levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione) and an oxidative product (malondialdehyde) were determined. In rhinosinusitis induced animals, amlodipine reduced loss of cilia, lamina propria edema and collagen deposition compared to placebo (saline) and although not superior to cefazolin, amlodipine decreased PMNL infiltration. The superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were reduced, whereas the malondialdehyde levels were increased significantly in all three-treatment groups compared to the control group. Amlodipine treated group showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels and decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to all treatment groups. The non-antibiotic compound amlodipine may have a role in acute rhinosinusitis treatment through tissue protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All

  3. Generation of hydroxyl radicals during ascites experimentally induced in broilers.

    PubMed

    Arab, H A; Jamshidi, R; Rassouli, A; Shams, G; Hassanzadeh, M H

    2006-04-01

    Increased metabolic rates, pulmonary hypertension and cardiac dysfunction are the most important features of the ascites syndrome in broiler chickens. However, the mechanism of cell injury causing the pathogenesis of the syndrome is not clearly understood. Our study aimed to examine the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH*) in broiler chickens experiencing ascites. The hundred and fifty 1-d-old chickens were purchased from a local hatchery and reared in an open poultry house for 46 d. They were divided at random into three groups and ascites was induced in two groups by exposing them to low temperature or administration of triiodothyronine (T(3)). The third group served as control and was reared normally. Haematological, biochemical and pathological tests were used to determine the incidence of ascites: including total red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), release of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) and ratio of right ventricular weight to total ventricular weight (RV/TV). A salicylate hydroxylation method was used to examine the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH*) in treated groups. TWo hydroxylated salicylic acid metabolites, 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (2,3- and 2,5-DHBA), were measured by HPLC to detect the generation of OH*. An ascites syndrome was observed in T(3) and low-temperature treated groups, as shown by necropsy changes and increases in f RBC, PCV, ALT, AST and the ratio of RV/TV. Concentrations of 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA were increased in groups experiencing ascites compared to control group. It is suggested that reactive oxygen species that is OH* ions, may be involved in the pathogenesis of the ascites syndrome in broiler chickens.

  4. Experimentally induced thiamine deficiency in beagle dogs: clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Read, D H; Harrington, D D

    1981-06-01

    Twenty-three 2- to 5-month-old Beagle dogs were fed a purified thiamine-deficient ration (2 to 3 micrograms of thiamine/100 g of ration) at a rate of 40 to 70 g/kg of body weight/day depending on age. Eleven dogs were used as principles, 6 as pair-fed controls, and 6 as ad libitum-fed controls. Controls were treated once a week with an IM dose of 300 micrograms of thiamine hydrochloride/kg of body weight. Three stages of clinical disease occurred in the principals: (i) an initial short (18.0 +/- 7.9 days) stage of induction, during which the dogs usually grew suboptimally, but were otherwise healthy, (ii) an intermediate stage of preliminary clinical signs of deficiency, characterized by a variable period (58.5 +/- 37.0 days) of progressive inappetance, failure to grow, loss of body weight, and coprophagia, and (iii) a terminal stage, which, in most dogs, was abrupt in onset and short (7.6 +/- 6.0 days) and consisted of either a neurologic syndrome or sudden unexpected death syndrome. Eight of the principals developed the neurologic syndrome characterized by anorexia, emesis, CNS depression, paraparesis, sensory ataxia, torticollis, circling, exophthalmos, tonic-clonic convulsions, profound muscular weakness, recumbency, and then died. Common reflex abnormalities included exaggerated patella reflex, proprioceptive and supporting reflex deficits, induced torticollis and ventroflexion of head, and absent eye menace (blink) reflex. Three other principals developed the sudden unexpected death syndrome. Common signs of deficiency were inappetance and paresis. Two were found dead and 1, with severe ECG abnormalities (including elevation of ST segment and tall or deeply inverted T waves), was killed.

  5. Dyspnea in Community-Dwelling Older Persons: A Multifactorial Geriatric Health Condition.

    PubMed

    Miner, Brienne; Tinetti, Mary E; Van Ness, Peter H; Han, Ling; Leo-Summers, Linda; Newman, Anne B; Lee, Patty J; Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the associations between a broad array of cardiorespiratory and noncardiorespiratory impairments and dyspnea in older persons. Cross-sectional. Cardiovascular Health Study. Community-dwelling persons (N = 4,413; mean age 72.6, 57.1% female, 4.5% African American, 27.2% Dyspnea severity (moderate to severe defined as American Thoracic Society Grade ≥2) and several impairments, including those established using spirometry (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 )), maximal inspiratory pressure (respiratory muscle strength), echocardiography, ankle-brachial index, blood pressure, whole-body muscle mass (bioelectrical impedance), single chair stand (lower extremity function), grip strength, serum hemoglobin and creatinine, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Mini-Mental State Examination, medication use, and body mass index (BMI). In a multivariable logistic regression model, impairments that had strong associations with moderate to severe dyspnea were FEV1 less than the lower limit of normal (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.37-3.49), left ventricular ejection fraction less than 45% (aOR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.43, 3.16), unable to perform a single chair stand (aOR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.61-2.73), depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥16; aOR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.26-3.23), and obesity (BMI ≥30; aOR = 2.07, 95% CI = 1.67-2.55). Impairments with modest but still statistically significant associations with moderate to severe dyspnea included respiratory muscle weakness, diastolic cardiac dysfunction, grip weakness, anxiety symptoms, and use of cardiovascular and psychoactive medications (aORs = 1.31-1.71). In community-dwelling older persons, several cardiorespiratory and noncardiorespiratory impairments were significantly associated with moderate to severe dyspnea, akin to a multifactorial geriatric health condition. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal

  6. Bilevel exercise training and directed breathing relieves exertional dyspnea for male smokers.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Manuel; Saavedra, Pedro; Martin, Nieves; Polu, Jean Marie; López, Daniel; Gómez, Arturo; Servera, Emilio

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects on exertional dyspnea and exercise capacity of square wave (bilevel) cycle ergometry endurance exercise training (SWEET) and comprehensive directed breathing vs. walking while pushing an OxCar and traditional diaphragmatic breathing for male smokers with normal spirometry but reduced exercise capacity. This was a prospective randomized trial of 24 unmedicated men with exertional dyspnea assigned to SWEET or OxCar groups. Exertional dyspnea was assessed using the Borg scale during four tests: incremental exercise, constant exercise at 80% of the peak work rate (PWR) (maximum tolerated for 3 mins before exhaustion), SWEET, and 6-min walk test. Both groups trained for 45 mins, 5 days a week, for 6 wks. Before, during, and after training, 32 lung function parameters were studied at ventilatory anaerobic threshold, at PWR, and during incremental exercise (30 W/3 mins). For the SWEET group, exertional dyspnea and the dyspnea index decreased during incremental exercise, at the ventilatory anaerobic threshold, and at PWR (P < 0.01). At the ventilatory anaerobic threshold, oxygen consumption increased by 74%; minute ventilation, 30%; tidal volume, 91%; and ventilatory efficiency and oxygen pulse (O(2)P), 25%; and breathing rate (breathing frequency) decreased by 32% (all significant at P < 0.001). At PWR, oxygen consumption increased by 30%; minute ventilation, 37%; breathing rate, 21%; and ventilatory efficiency and oxygen pulse, 25% (P < 0.01). During the full incremental test, minute ventilation, breathing frequency, and heart rate (cardiac frequency) decreased significantly (P < 0.01). In addition, there was significant improvement (P < 0.001) in SWEET intensity by 63%, constant exercise intensity at 80% of PWR by 38%, and 6-min walk test by 30%. No significant changes were observed for the OxCar group other than for the 6-min walk test, which increased by 7% (P < 0.05). This study suggests that the decline in

  7. Plant-induced weathering of a basaltic rock: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsinger, Philippe; Fernandes Barros, Omar Neto; Benedetti, Marc F.; Noack, Yves; Callot, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    The active role of higher plants in the weathering of silicate minerals and rocks is still a question for debate. The present work aimed at providing experimental evidence of the important role of a range of crop plants in such processes. In order to quantitatively assess the possible effect of these diverse plant species on the weathering of a basaltic rock, two laboratory experiments were carried out at room temperature. These compared the amounts of elements released from basalt when leached with a dilute salt solution in the presence or absence of crop plants grown for up to 36 days. For Si, Ca, Mg, and Na, plants resulted in an increase in the release rate by a factor ranging from 1 to 5 in most cases. Ca and Na seemed to be preferentially released relative to other elements, suggesting that plagioclase dissolved faster than the other constituents of the studied basalt. Negligible amounts of Fe were released in the absence of plants as a consequence of the neutral pH and atmospheric pO 2 that were maintained in the leaching solution. However, the amounts of Fe released from basalt in the presence of plants were up to 100- to 500-fold larger than in the absence of plants, for banana and maize. The kinetics of dissolution of basalt in the absence of plants showed a constantly decreasing release rate over the whole duration of the experiment (36 days). No steady state value was reached both in the absence and presence of banana plants. However, in the latter case, the rates remained at a high initial level over a longer period of time (up to 15 days) before starting to decrease. For Fe, the maximum rate of release was reached beyond 4 days and this rate remained high up to 22 days of growth of banana. The possible mechanisms responsible for this enhanced release of elements from basalt in the presence of plants are discussed. Although these mechanisms need to be elucidated, the present results clearly show that higher plants can considerably affect the kinetics

  8. Experimental demonstration of population inversion driven by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Yatsenko, Leonid P.; Klein, Jens; Oberst, Martin; Halfmann, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    We present experimental data to demonstrate coherently driven population inversion by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage in metastable helium atoms. Complete and robust population transfer from an initial to a target state is induced by coherent interaction of the atoms in a supersonic beam with two counterpropagating and temporally delayed laser pulses of different intensities. The radiation fields intersect the atomic beam slightly tilted away from normal incidence, thereby inducing Doppler shifts of the atomic resonance between the initial and the target state. Thus the laser pulses produce a bichromatic field in the rest frame of each atom, which induces complete coherent population transfer by an adiabatic passage process.

  9. [When the cause of dyspnea is on larynx. Asthma of difficult control, resistant to treatment? Vocal cords dysfunction? or Both?].

    PubMed

    Sacre Hazouri, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Dyspnea is a symptom whose diagnosis requires the exclusion of other diseases with which it can be confused, such as asthma and a variety of pulmonary and heart diseases. Dyspnea originated in the larynx may occur due to obstruction by a tumor or other affections in situ, interfering the airway, such as: edema by infections or inflammatory processes, a traumatism, an abnormal movement of the larynx structures, such as the inappropriate or absent of the vocal cords or the laryngospasm. Severity of larynx dyspnea may be to mild to acute, risking the life. This paper reviews the normal laryngeal function and the anatomic, obstructive, and functional disorders that can lead to dyspnea. Some suggestions are also made to determine the cause and treat these diseases.

  10. Buspirone for management of dyspnea in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a randomized placebo-controlled URCC CCOP study.

    PubMed

    Peoples, Anita R; Bushunow, Peter W; Garland, Sheila N; Heckler, Charles E; Roscoe, Joseph A; Peppone, Luke L; Dudgeon, Deborah J; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Banerjee, Tarit K; Hopkins, Judith O; Dakhil, Shaker R; Flannery, Marie A; Morrow, Gary R

    2016-03-01

    Cancer-related dyspnea is a common, distressing, and difficult-to-manage symptom in cancer patients, resulting in diminished quality of life and poor prognosis. Buspirone, a non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic which does not suppress respiration and has proven efficacy in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, has been suggested to relieve the sensation of dyspnea in patients with COPD. The main objective of our study was to evaluate whether buspirone alleviates dyspnea in cancer patients. We report on a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 432 patients (mean age 64, female 51%, lung cancer 62%) from 16 participating Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) sites with grade 2 or higher dyspnea, as assessed by the Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale. Dyspnea was assessed by the Oxygen Cost Diagram (OCD; higher scores are better) and anxiety by the state subscale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S; lower scores are better) at baseline and after the 4-week intervention (post-intervention). Mean scores from baseline to post-intervention for buspirone were OCD 8.7 to 9.0 and STAI-S 40.5 to 40.1 and for placebo were OCD 8.4 to 9.3 and STAI-S 40.9 to 38.6 with raw improvements over time on both measures being greater in the placebo group. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for baseline scores showed no statistically significant difference between groups for OCD (P = 0.052) or STAI-S (P = 0.062). Buspirone did not result in significant improvement in dyspnea or anxiety in cancer patients. Thus, buspirone should not be recommended as a pharmacological option for dyspnea in cancer patients.

  11. Activity-related dyspnea is not modified by psychological status in people with COPD, interstitial lung disease or obesity.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Olivier; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Gillet-Juvin, Karine; Callens, Etienne; Graba, Semia; Essalhi, Mohamed; Chevalier-Bidaud, Brigitte; Israël-Biet, Dominique; Mahut, Bruno; Delclaux, Christophe

    2012-06-15

    Sensory (physiological) and affective (psychological) dimensions of dyspnea have been described but the usefulness of measuring psychological status in addition to ventilatory capacity (spirometry, lung volumes) in the assessment of exertional dyspnea remains controversial. We hypothesized that activity-related dyspnea would not be modified by psychological status. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the number of parameters (psychological or functional) to fewer independent dimensions in 328 patients with altered ventilatory capacity: severe obesity (BMI ≥ 35, n = 122), COPD (n = 128) or interstitial lung disease (n = 78). PCA demonstrated that psychological status (Hospital Anxiety-Depression, Fatigue Impact scales) and dyspnea (Medical Research Council [MRC] scale) were independent dimensions. Ventilatory capacity was described by three main dimensions by PCA related to airways, volumes, and their combination (specific airway resistance, FEV(1)/FVC), which were weakly correlated with dyspnea. In conclusion, in patients with COPD, interstitial lung disease or severe obesity, psychological status does not modify activity-related dyspnea rating as evaluated by the MRC scale. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Managing dyspnea in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Marciniuk, Darcy D; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Rocker, Graeme; Balter, Meyer; Bailey, Pat; Ford, Gordon; Bourbeau, Jean; O’Donnell, Denis E; Maltais, Francois; Mularski, Richard A; Cave, Andrew J; Mayers, Irvin; Kennedy, Vicki; Oliver, Thomas K; Brown, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Dyspnea is a cardinal symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and its severity and magnitude increases as the disease progresses, leading to significant disability and a negative effect on quality of life. Refractory dyspnea is a common and difficult symptom to treat in patients with advanced COPD. There are many questions concerning optimal management and, specifically, whether various therapies are effective in this setting. The present document was compiled to address these important clinical issues using an evidence-based systematic review process led by a representative interprofessional panel of experts. The evidence supports the benefits of oral opioids, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, chest wall vibration, walking aids and pursed-lip breathing in the management of dyspnea in the individual patient with advanced COPD. Oxygen is recommended for COPD patients with resting hypoxemia, but its use for the targeted management of dyspnea in this setting should be reserved for patients who receive symptomatic benefit. There is insufficient evidence to support the routine use of anxiolytic medications, nebulized opioids, acupuncture, acupressure, distractive auditory stimuli (music), relaxation, hand-held fans, counselling programs or psychotherapy. There is also no evidence to support the use of supplemental oxygen to reduce dyspnea in nonhypoxemic patients with advanced COPD. Recognizing the current unfamiliarity with prescribing and dosing of opioid therapy in this setting, a potential approach for their use is illustrated. The role of opioid and other effective therapies in the comprehensive management of refractory dyspnea in patients with advanced COPD is discussed. PMID:21499589

  13. Managing dyspnea in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Marciniuk, Darcy D; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Rocker, Graeme; Balter, Meyer; Bailey, Pat; Ford, Gord; Bourbeau, Jean; O'Donnell, Denis E; Maltais, Francois; Mularski, Richard A; Cave, Andrew J; Mayers, Irvin; Kennedy, Vicki; Oliver, Thomas K; Brown, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Dyspnea is a cardinal symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and its severity and magnitude increases as the disease progresses, leading to significant disability and a negative effect on quality of life. Refractory dyspnea is a common and difficult symptom to treat in patients with advanced COPD. There are many questions concerning optimal management and, specifically, whether various therapies are effective in this setting. The present document was compiled to address these important clinical issues using an evidence-based systematic review process led by a representative interprofessional panel of experts. The evidence supports the benefits of oral opioids, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, chest wall vibration, walking aids and pursed-lip breathing in the management of dyspnea in the individual patient with advanced COPD. Oxygen is recommended for COPD patients with resting hypoxemia, but its use for the targeted management of dyspnea in this setting should be reserved for patients who receive symptomatic benefit. There is insufficient evidence to support the routine use of anxiolytic medications, nebulized opioids, acupuncture, acupressure, distractive auditory stimuli (music), relaxation, handheld fans, counselling programs or psychotherapy. There is also no evidence to support the use of supplemental oxygen to reduce dyspnea in nonhypoxemic patients with advanced COPD. Recognizing the current unfamiliarity with prescribing and dosing of opioid therapy in this setting, a potential approach for their use is illustrated. The role of opioid and other effective therapies in the comprehensive management of refractory dyspnea in patients with advanced COPD is discussed.

  14. Experimental gastric ulcers induced by immobilization and electric shock of rats and their pharmacotherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabrodin, O. N.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of development of experimental gastric ulcers, induced in rats by combined immobilization and electric shock, was analyzed pharmacologically with peripheral neurotropic agents. It is concluded that: (1) The most marked preventive effect in the development of the experimentally induced gastric ulcers was displayed by agents capable of blocking the ascending activation system of the reticular formation. (2) Sympathetic fibers, which disrupt the trophism of the gastric wall, form the efferent portion of the reflex arc. (3) Gastric secretion does not appear to be the primary cause of ulceration.

  15. Colloid-induced kidney injury: experimental evidence may help to understand mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schortgen, Frédérique; Brochard, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is widely used, and many patients are therefore exposed to plasma volume expanders. Among these, colloids, particularly hydroxyethyl starches, have been shown in recent experiments and clinical studies to induce acute kidney injury. The mechanisms of colloid-induced acute kidney injury remain incompletely elucidated. The risks associated with colloid osmotic pressure elevation in vivo and the high incidence of osmotic nephrosis lesions in experimental models and clinical studies indicate that hydroxyethyl starches can no longer be considered safe. PMID:19435473

  16. Nasal flaring as a clinical sign of respiratory acidosis in patients with dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Riveiro, José Gregorio; Arnau-Bartés, Anna; Rafat-Sellarés, Ramón; García-Pérez, Dolors; Mas-Serra, Arantxa; Fernández-Fernández, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether the presence of nasal flaring is a clinical sign of respiratory acidosis in patients attending emergency departments for acute dyspnea. Single-center, prospective, observational study of patients aged over 15 requiring urgent attention for dyspnea, classified as level II or III according to the Andorran Triage Program and who underwent arterial blood gas test on arrival at the emergency department. The presence of nasal flaring was evaluated by two observers. Demographic and clinical variables, signs of respiratory difficulty, vital signs, arterial blood gases and clinical outcome (hospitalization and mortality) were recorded. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. The sample comprised 212 patients, mean age 78years (SD=12.8), of whom 49.5% were women. Acidosis was recorded in 21.2%. Factors significantly associated with the presence of acidosis in the bivariate analysis were the need for pre-hospital medical care, triage level II, signs of respiratory distress, presence of nasal flaring, poor oxygenation, hypercapnia, low bicarbonates and greater need for noninvasive ventilation. Nasal flaring had a positive likelihood ratio for acidosis of 4.6 (95% CI 2.9-7.4). In the multivariate analysis, triage level II (aOR 5.16; 95% CI: 1.91 to 13.98), the need for oxygen therapy (aOR 2.60; 95% CI: 1.13-5.96) and presence of nasal flaring (aOR 6.32; 95% CI: 2.78-14.41) were maintained as factors independently associated with acidosis. Nasal flaring is a clinical sign of severity in patients requiring urgent care for acute dyspnea, which has a strong association with acidosis and hypercapnia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sex differences in the intensity and qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea in physically active young adults

    PubMed Central

    Cory, Julia M.; Schaeffer, Michele R.; Wilkie, Sabrina S.; Ramsook, Andrew H.; Puyat, Joseph H.; Arbour, Brandon; Basran, Robbi; Lam, Michael; Les, Christian; MacDonald, Benjamin; Jensen, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Understanding sex differences in the qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea may provide insight into why women are more affected by this symptom than men. This study explored the evolution of the qualitative dimensions of dyspnea in 70 healthy, young, physically active adults (35 M and 35 F). Participants rated the intensity of their breathing discomfort (Borg 0-10 scale) and selected phrases that best described their breathing from a standardized list (work/effort, unsatisfied inspiration, and unsatisfied expiration) throughout each stage of a symptom-limited incremental-cycle exercise test. Following exercise, participants selected phrases that described their breathing at maximal exercise from a list of 15 standardized phrases. Intensity of breathing discomfort was significantly higher in women for a given ventilation, but differences disappeared when ventilation was expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary ventilation. The dominant qualitative descriptor in both sexes throughout exercise was increased work/effort of breathing. At peak exercise, women were significantly more likely to select the following phrases: “my breathing feels shallow,” “I cannot get enough air in,” “I cannot take a deep breath in,” and “my breath does not go in all the way.” Women adopted a more rapid and shallow breathing pattern and had significantly higher end-inspiratory lung volumes relative to total lung capacity throughout exercise relative to men. These findings suggest that men and women do not differ in their perceived quality of dyspnea during submaximal exercise, but subjective differences appear at maximal exercise and may be related, at least in part, to underlying sex differences in breathing patterns and operating lung volumes during exercise. PMID:26338458

  18. Excess Ventilation in COPD-heart Failure Overlap: Implications for Dyspnea and Exercise Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Alcides; Arbex, Flavio F; Sperandio, Priscilla A; Souza, Aline; Biazzim, Ligia; Mancuso, Frederico; Berton, Danilo C; Hochhegger, Bruno; Alencar, Maria Clara N; Nery, Luiz E; O'Donnell, Denis E; Neder, J Alberto

    2017-06-30

    An increased ventilatory response to exertional metabolic demand (high ventilation (⩒E)-carbon dioxide output (⩒CO2) relationship) is a common finding in patients with coexistent COPD-heart failure. We aimed to determine the mechanisms underlying high ⩒E-⩒CO2 and its impact on operating lung volumes, dyspnea and exercise tolerance in these patients. Twenty-two ex-smokers with combined COPD and heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) undertook, after careful treatment optimization, a progressive cycle exercise test with capillary (c) blood gas collection. Regardless the chosen metric (increased ⩒ E-⩒CO2 slope, ⩒E/⩒CO2 nadir or end-exercise ⩒E/⩒CO2), ventilatory inefficiency was closely related to PcCO2 (r values from -0.80 to -0.84; p<0.001) but not dead space /tidal volume ratio. Ten patients consistently maintained exercise PcCO2 ≤35 mmHg (hypocapnia). These patients had particularly poor ventilatory efficiency than non-hypocapnic patients. (p<0.05). Despite the lack of between-group differences in spirometry, resting lung volumes and LVEF, hypocapnic patients had lower resting PaCO2 and lung diffusing capacity (p<0.01). Excessive ventilatory response in this group was associated with higher exertional PcO2. The hypocapnic group, however, had worse mechanical inspiratory constraints and higher dyspnea scores for a given work rate leading to poorer exercise tolerance compared to their counterparts (p<0.05). Heightened neural drive promoting a ventilatory response beyond that required to overcome an increased "wasted" ventilation led to hypocapnia and poor exercise ventilatory efficiency in COPD-heart failure overlap. Excessive ventilation led to better arterial oxygenation but at the expense of earlier critical mechanical constraints and intolerable dyspnea.

  19. Gender and perception of dyspnea. The role of the variation in the forced expiratory volume in one second.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Carlos A; Alais, María Eugenia; Rhodius, Edgardo E

    2010-01-01

    During bronchoconstriction women perceive more breathlessness than men. The aims of study were 1) to evaluate if quality of dyspnea in bronchoconstriction was different in women and men 2) to assess if gender difference in the perception of dyspnea could be related to the level of bronchoconstriction. 457 subjects (257 women) inhaled methacholine to a 20% decrease in FEV1, or 32 mg/ml. Dyspnea was evaluated using the modified Borg scale and a list of expressions of dyspnea. Borg scores were recorded immediately before the challenge test baseline and at the maximum FEV1 decrease. The prevalence of descriptors of dyspnea reported by women and men was similar. Dyspnea was related to the level of FEV1 (FEV1: OR 1.05, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0095), females (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.33-6.33, p 0.0072), younger subjects (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.89-0.97, p 0.0013) and body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023). As the FEV1 fell less than 20% from baseline, only the FEV1 was significantly associated with dyspnea (FEV1:OR 1.15, 95%CI 1.07-1.24, p 0.0002). Instead, if the FEV1 fell higher > or = 20%, the presence of dyspnea was related to the degree of bronchoconstriction (FEV1: OR 1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.09, p 0.0187), females (OR 3.02, 95%CI 1.36-6.72, p 0.0067), younger subjects (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.88-0.96, p 0.0007) and BMI (OR 1.12, 95%CI 1.01-1.23, p 0.023). The quality of dyspnea during the bronchoconstriction was similar in women and men; women showed a higher perception of dyspnea than men only when the FEV1 fell more than 20% from baseline.

  20. [The gastric volvulus as a cause of dyspnea. A case report].

    PubMed

    León Valdivies, Yusbiel José; Saínz Menéndez, Benito; Fernández García, Sergio; Osés Herrera, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    The gastric volvulus is a not very frequent entity that can show up in acute form or chronic. The acute volvulus can show up with the triad of Borchardt, the chronic one can be asymptomatic and its diagnosis is usually incidental. We present shows a case of an airplane pilot that presents dyspnea to the medium efforts with cough related with episodes of gastric acidity mainly after profuse foods. The diagnostic confirmation was carried out by means of radiological simple and contrasted studies. A surgical intervention was performed and the symptoms disappeared without other alterations in a period of pursuit of one year.

  1. Gender and respiratory factors associated with dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    de Torres, Juan P; Casanova, Ciro; Montejo de Garcini, Angela; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Celli, Bartolome R

    2007-01-01

    Rationale We had shown that COPD women expressed more dyspnea than men for the same degree of airway obstruction. Objectives Evaluate gender differences in respiratory factors associated with dyspnea in COPD patients. Methods In a FEV1 % matched population of 100 men and women with COPD we measured: age, MMRC, FEV1, FVC, TLC, IC/TLC, PaO2, PaCO2, DLCO, Pimax, P0.1, Ti/Ttot, BMI, ffmi, 6MWD and VAS scale before and after the test, the Charlson score and the SGRQ. We estimated the association between these parameters and MMRC scores. Multivariate analysis determined the independent strength of those associations. Results MMRC correlated with: BMI (men:-0.29, p = 0.04; women:-0.28, p = 0.05), ffmi (men:-0.39, p = 0.01), FEV1 % (men:-0.64, p < 0.001; women:-0.29, p = 0.04), FVC % (men:-0.45, p = 0.001; women:-0.33, p = 0.02), IC/TLC (men:-0.52, p < 0.001; women: -0.27, p = 0.05), PaO2 (men:-0.59, p < 0.001), PaCO2 (men:0.27, p = 0.05), DLCO (men:-0.54, p < 0.001), P0.1/Pimax (men:0.46, p = 0.002; women:0.47, p = 0.005), dyspnea measured with the Visual Analog Scale before (men:0.37, p = 0.04; women:0.52, p = 0.004) and after 6MWD (men:0.52, p = 0.002; women:0.48, p = 0.004) and SGRQ total (men:0.50, p < 0.001; women:0.59, p < 0.001). Regression analysis showed that P0.1/Pimax in women (r2 = 0.30) and BMI, DLCO, PaO2 and P0.1/Pimax in men (r2 = 0.81) were the strongest predictors of MMRC scores. Conclusion In mild to severe COPD patients attending a pulmonary clinic, P0.1/Pimax was the unique predictor of MMRC scores only in women. Respiratory factors explain most of the variations of MMRC scores in men but not in women. Factors other than the respiratory ones should be included in the evaluation of dyspnea in women with COPD. PMID:17341300

  2. [A 76-year-old dog owner with fever and dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Jüch, M; Böttcher-Lorenz, J; Gross, M

    2012-09-01

    A 76-year-old female patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented with dyspnea, fever and productive coughing. The chest X-ray revealed upper lobe pneumonia. Intravenous antibiotic therapy with moxifloxacine was initiated but soon afterwards the patient developed septic shock with hypotension, acute respiratory and renal failure. Pressure-controlled ventilation, continuous veno-venous hemodialysis and administration of catecholamines were initiated but the patient died 22 h after hospitalization due to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Microbiology of blood cultures revealed Pasteurella multocida which was probably transmitted through close contact with the pet dog.

  3. Platypnea–Orthodeoxia Syndrome: Multiple Pathophysiological Interpretations of a Clinical Picture Primarily Consisting of Orthostatic Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Baldi, Cesare; Ariano, Carmelina

    2016-01-01

    Platypnea–orthodexia syndrome (POS) is often a challenging diagnostic problem. It is characterized by dyspnea that is accentuated by standing or sitting positions due to a marked fall in blood oxygen saturation, and instead is improved by assuming the lying position. In the present brief review, the authors address the pathophysiology of POS, and outline its clinical symptoms as well as the main modalities of diagnostic evaluation and possible therapeutic options. Moreover, some problems concerning much-debated issues and persistent uncertainties about the pathophysiology of POS are presented along with the description of the diagnostic and therapeutic resources currently available for this syndrome. PMID:27669319

  4. An uncommon case of dyspnea with unilateral laryngeal paralysis in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lerat, Justine; Lacoste, Marie; Prechoux, Jean-Marc; Aubry, Karine; Nadalon, Sylvie; Ly, Kim Heang; Bessede, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    A 61-year-old man with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and normal BMI complained of dyspnea. Nasofibroscopy revealed a global and major oedema of the glottis and supraglottis and also a paralysis of the left vocal fold. CT-scan pointed out a spontaneous hyperdensity of the left arytenoid cartilage. A tracheostomy was performed. Clinical examination revealed large hands and macroglossy with high IGF1 rate. MRI confirmed a supracentimetric pituitary adenoma. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a case of acute respiratory distress due to unilateral larynx paralysis leading to acromegaly diagnosis. This is due to submucosal hypertrophy and vocal cord immobility.

  5. A 59-year-old liver-transplanted woman with fever, dyspnea and pulmonary infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Del Bono, L; Filipponi, F; Marchetti, G; Ferranti, S; Menichetti, F; Mosca, F

    2003-10-01

    A 59-year-old woman was admitted to hospital 10 months after receiving a liver transplant (LT) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis because of fever, dyspnea and basal patchy peripheral infiltrates. Microscopic examinations and blood, sputum and BAL cultures were negative. Empirical anti-infective therapy was ineffective. Thoracoscopic lung biopsy was performed, and histology showed a pattern suggesting bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). Prednisone led to rapid clinical and radiologic improvement. BOOP has been anecdotally reported in LT cases, and this case was unrelated to any infectious agent. BOOP should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia in LT.

  6. Episodes of flushing, dyspnea and hypertension after carotid stenting for severe carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Giani, L; Lovati, C; Rosa, S; Gambaro, P; De Angeli, F; Mariani, C

    2015-12-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is a treatment option for carotid stenosis in high surgical risk patients. As it implies instrumentation of the carotid bulb, baroreceptors dysfunction may be provoked with consequent hemodynamic instability. An 83-year-old woman treated by CAS presented with episodes of flushing, dyspnea and palpitations accompanied by transitory desaturation, hypertension, agitation and anxiety. Symptoms started 12h after the procedure. Each episode lasted 10 min. Five episodes in 3 days were observed. A dysfunction of the carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors was hypothesized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A 60-year-old woman with cough, dyspnea, and atelectasis 19 years after liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Mehta, Atul C; Almeida, Francisco A

    2015-10-01

    A 60-year-old black woman presented with nonproductive cough of 1-month duration. She had also experienced rapidly progressive dyspnea for 1 week and one bout of vomiting a day before presentation. Her symptoms had failed to improve with a course of amoxicillin-clavulanate. Her medical history was significant for diabetes mellitus and liver transplant 19 years earlier for hepatitis C cirrhosis, for which she was receiving tacrolimus and mycophenolate. She was a current smoker with 40 pack-years of smoking history.

  8. Histometric assessment of the effect of diabetes mellitus on experimentally induced periodontitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pepelassi, Eudoxie; Xynogala, Ioanna; Perrea, Despina; Agrogiannis, George; Pantopoulou, Alkistis; Patsouris, Efstratios; Vrotsos, Ioannis

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this interventional animal study was to assess histologically the effect of experimental diabetes in rats with experimental periodontitis in terms of alveolar bone loss and the effect of experimental periodontitis on glucose levels in diabetes. Forty-seven Wistar rats were studied: 12 healthy controls (C), 10 with experimental diabetes (D), 12 with experimental diabetes and experimental periodontitis (DP) and 13 with experimental periodontitis (P). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection and periodontitis was induced at the right second maxillary molar by ligation. Serum glucose levels were measured at specific time points. Sixty-one days after ligation, the rats were sacrificed. Histometric analysis assessed alveolar crest level. For ligated groups, alveolar bone loss was expressed as the difference in alveolar crest level between right and left maxillary molars. Diabetes alone did not statistically significantly affect alveolar crest level. The combination of diabetes and periodontitis caused greater alveolar bone loss (946.1 +/- 719.9 microm) than periodontitis alone (639.7 +/- 294.2 microm); however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. Periodontitis did not significantly increase glucose levels in diabetic rats. The average glucose levels were 545.4 (499 - 563) and 504.5 (445 - 560) mg/dL for diabetic and diabetic ligated rats, respectively. Within its limits, this study demonstrated that the severity of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis was not significantly aggravated by diabetes and the serum glucose levels in diabetes were not affected by periodontitis.

  9. Experimental coronary sclerosis induced by immobilization of rabbits: A new model of arteriosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyavokin, V. V.; Tjawokin, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for producing arteriosclerosis with coronary insufficiency in rabbits by means of immobilization is described and discussed. The experimentally induced atherosclerosis develops due to hypodynamics imposed by the reduced muscular activity without overloading with exogenous cholesterol. The atherosclerosis and coronary insufficiency are associated. With variations in the duration and extent of immobilization, coronary insufficiency alone or with atherosclerosis can be produced.

  10. Experimental investigation of chirp properties induced by signal amplification in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Motoharu; Ohta, Hiroaki; Seki, Ryota

    2015-03-15

    We experimentally show the dynamic frequency chirp properties induced by signal amplification in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) for the first time. We also compare the red and blue chirp peak values and temporal chirp changes while changing the gain and injected signal powers of the QD-SOA with those of a common SOA.

  11. Hepatoprotective activity of chitosan against isoniazid and rifampicin-induced toxicity in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sethumadhavan; Sini, Theruvathil K; Anandan, Rangasamy; Mathew, Paruthapara T

    2007-10-15

    Tuberculosis is a dangerous disease and its death toll is increasing year by year. Intake of isoniazid and rifampicin, the most common antitubercular drugs, lead to fatal hepatotoxic condition. We have studied the protective effect of chitosan supplementation against the hepatotoxicity induced by antitubercular drugs with respect to the changes in the levels of protein, albumin-globulin ratio, urea and bilirubin in the serum and diagnostic marker enzymes (alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase), protein, glycoprotein conjugates (hexose, hexosamine and sialic acid), lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione in the liver tissue of normal and experimental groups of rats. Co-administration of chitosan was found to significantly prevent the antitubercular drugs-induced alterations in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes, bilirubin and albumin/globulin ratio in experimental groups of rats. Isoniazid and rifampicin-induced lipid peroxidation was also found to be prevented by the administration of chitosan. Further, chitosan administration increased the levels of urea and protein (in serum and liver) in experimental groups compared to hepatotoxicity-induced group of rats. Levels of glycoconjugates were also maintained to near normal level by chitosan co-administration. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that chitosan is beneficial against antitubercualr drugs-induced hepatoxicity.

  12. Experimental investigations of radial loads induced by partial cavitation with the LH2 Vulcain inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goirand, B.; Mertz, A. L.; Joussellin, F.; Rebattet, C.

    Radial forces generated by partial cavitation were investigated both in water and liquid hydrogen (LH2) with the four bladed inducer of the Vulcain liquid hydrogen turbopump. A specific shaft mounted six component balance was developed for inducer water tests, in which force measurements were completed by unsteady pressure measurements and high speed flow visualizations. From water results, a good qualitative agreement with previous experiences was obtained but the influence of blade number was demonstrated. Characteristic frequencies of unsteady cavitation phenomena were identified at different operating points. The force measurements in hydrogen gave promising results about thermodynamics delay, in the scope of establishing transposition rules.

  13. Dangers of flying high and diving low! An unusual case of dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Poornima; Chakravarty, Rumon; Krishnan, Prathik; Nadkarni, Anupa

    2017-01-01

    Giant bullae are bullae that occupy at least 30 percent of a hemi thorax. This condition can rarely be idiopathic and not usually suspected in young patients with no risk factors. We describe a case of a giant solitary pulmonary bulla in a healthy young female with no known risk factors. 23-year-old female presented to the Emergency department with dyspnea and pleuritic right sided chest pain. She started experiencing these symptoms when she was on a 7-h flight and later experienced similar symptoms when she went scuba diving. Lung exam revealed decreased breath sounds on the right and she was saturating well on room air. Chest X-ray done showed a large bleb at the right lung apex. CT angiogram done was negative for pulmonary embolism, but confirmed a large bulla involving the right upper lobe. She had no history of lung diseases, marfanoid features, cigarette smoking, drug use or family history of similar condition. She underwent VAT assisted mini thoracotomy with resection of the right apical bulla and tube thoracostomy. Surgical pathology showed a pulmonary bleb with pleural fibrosis and prominent adhesions with parietal pleura and no evidence of malignancy. She was advised to avoid air travel and diving for 3 months and is doing well. Idiopathic giant pulmonary bullae have rarely been reported. It is a rare cause of dyspnea and chest pain in young adults. This may be suspected when patients develop symptoms with air travel and deep sea diving.

  14. Aggressive verbal behaviour as a function of experimentally induced anger in persons with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Niemeier, V; Fritz, J; Kupfer, J; Gieler, U

    1999-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial factors on the etiology and fluctuating disease activity of psoriasis has been discussed in recent years. The present experiment investigated whether psoriatics in an anger-inducing situation show less aggressive verbal behaviour than average person. Twenty-six psoriatics and 26 matched healthy controls were randomly assigned to either an anger-inducing or a non-anger-inducing social situation. The experimental conditions were arranged so that the persons were confronted with either negative, derogatory, or positive, favorable feedback on eight characteristics (intelligence, appearance, maturity, tolerance, honesty, friendliness, humor, and helpfulness). Standardized feedback was given by a confederate of the experimenter. Immediately after the feedback was received by the subjects the photo hand test (PHT) was applied. The PHT is an item-analyzed, validated projective test for aggression. Two independent raters categorized the subjects' responses into six mutually exclusive categories, including a category for responses with aggressive content. 2 x 2 analysis of variance (psoriatics vs controls; anger-induced vs non-anger induced) were calculated for the aggressive responses and the acting-out score (AOS). The results showed a significant interaction, suggesting that psoriatics did indeed exhibit fewer verbal aggression responses under anger-inducing circumstances than the controls.

  15. Effect of Nebulized Morphine on Dyspnea of Mustard Gas-Exposed Patients: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Shohrati, Majid; Ghanei, Mostafa; Harandi, Asghar Amini; Foroghi, Soniya; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2012-01-01

    Background. Dyspnea is one of the main complaints in a group of COPD patients due to exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) and is refractory to conventional therapies. We designed this study to evaluate effectiveness of nebulized morphine in such patients. Materials and Methods. In a double-blind clinical trial study, 40 patients with documented history of exposure to SM were allocated to two groups: group 1 who received 1 mg morphine sulfate diluted by 4 cc normal saline 0.5% using nebulizer once daily for 5 days and group 2 serving as control who received normal saline as placebo. They were visited by pulmonologist 7 times per day to check symptoms and signs and adverse events. Different parameters including patient-scored peak expiratory flow using pick flow meter, visual analogue scale (VAS) for dyspnea, global quality of life and cough, and number of respiratory rate, night time awaking for dyspnea and cough have been assessed. Results. The scores of VAS for dyspnea, cough and quality of life and also respiratory rate, heart rate, and night time awaking due to dyspnea and night time awaking due to cough improved significantly after morphine nebulization without any major adverse events. Also pick expiratory flow has been improved significantly after nebulization in each day. Conclusion. Our results showed the clinical benefit of nebulized morphine on respiratory complaints of patients due to exposure to SM without significant side effects. PMID:22530119

  16. [Development of an activity of daily living scale for patients with COPD: the Activity of Daily Living Dyspnea scale].

    PubMed

    Yoza, Yoshiyasu; Ariyoshi, Koya; Honda, Sumihisa; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Senjyu, Hideaki

    2009-10-01

    Patients with COPD often experience restriction in their activities of daily living (ADL) due to dyspnea. This type of restriction is unique to patients with COPD and cannot be adequately evaluated by the generic ADL scales. This study developed an ADL scale (the Activity of Daily Living Dyspnea scale [ADL-D scale]) for patients with COPD and investigated its validity and internal consistency. Patients with stable COPD were recruited and completed a pilot 26-item questionnaire. Patients also performed the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT), and completed the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea grade. There were 83 male participants who completed the pilot questionnaire. Following the pilot, 8 items that were not undertaken by the majority of subjects, and 3 items judged to be of low clinical importance by physical therapists were removed from the pilot questionnaire. The final ADL-D scale contained 15 items. Scores obtained with the ADL-D scale were significantly correlated with the MRC dyspnea grades, distance walked on the ISWT and SGRQ scores. The ADL-D scores were significantly different across the five grades of the MRC dyspnea grade. The ADL-D scale showed high consistency (Chronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.96). The ADL-D scale is a useful scale for assessing impairments in ADL in Japanese male patients with COPD.

  17. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  18. The Chemopreventive Peptide Lunasin Inhibits d-Galactose- Induced Experimental Cataract in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guangzhi; Zhang, Ping; Ye, Pei; Zhang, Miaoqing; Han, Ning; Shuai, Haoyue; Tan, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage to the constituents of the eye lens is a major mechanism in the initiation and development of cataract. Lunasin, a 43-amino acids chemoprevention peptide, has been proved to possess potent anti-oxidative activity other than its established anticancer activities. Herein, we explored whether lunasin has preventative effects on d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rat. After modeling, SD rats were administrated by instillation, 80 µM of lunasin eye drops to each eye thrice daily and consecutively for 30 days. As a result, lunasin treatment effectively inhibited the progression of d-galactose-induced experimental cataract, and protected the lenses of rats from oxidative damage and attenuated the lipid peroxidation through up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and inhibited the activation of polyol pathway by decreasing AR activity. Additionally, in vitro studies proved that lunasin treatment could protect human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) against d-galactose induced cell damage and apoptosis, and up-regulate antioxidant enzymes. This is the first demonstration that lunasin could inhibit d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rats by protecting against oxidative damage and inhibiting the activation of polyol pathway.

  19. Peripheral site of action of levodropropizine in experimentally-induced cough: role of sensory neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Lavezzo, A; Melillo, G; Clavenna, G; Omini, C

    1992-06-01

    The mechanism of action of levodropropizine has been investigated in different models of experimentally-induced cough in guinea-pigs. In particular it has been demonstrated that the antitussive drug has a peripheral site of action by injecting the drug intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). In these experiments levodropropizine (40 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) did not prevent electrically-induced cough. On the other hand, codeine (5 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) markedly prevented coughing. A difference in the potency ratio of levodropropizine and codeine has been demonstrated in capsaicin-induced cough; after oral administration, codeine was about two to three times more potent than levodropropizine. However, after aerosol administration the two compounds were equipotent. These data might suggest a peripheral site of action for levodropropizine which is related to sensory neuropeptides. Further support for the role of sensory neuropeptides in the mechanism of action of levodropropizine comes from the results obtained in capsaicin-desensitized animals. In this experimental model levodropropizine failed to prevent the vagally elicited cough in neuropeptide-depleted animals, whereas codeine did not differentiate between control and capsaicin-treated animals. In conclusion, our results support the suggestion that levodropropizine has a peripheral site of action. In addition, the interference with the sensory neuropeptide system may explain, at least in part, its activity in experimentally-induced cough.

  20. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Equivalent properties of single event burnout induced by different sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi-Yu; Cao, Zhou; Da, Dao-An; Xue, Yu-Xiong

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results of single event burnout induced by heavy ions and 252Cf fission fragments in power MOSFET devices have been investigated. It is concluded that the characteristics of single event burnout induced by 252Cf fission fragments is consistent to that in heavy ions. The power MOSFET in the “turn-off" state is more susceptible to single event burnout than it is in the “turn-on" state. The thresholds of the drain-source voltage for single event burnout induced by 173 MeV bromine ions and 252Cf fission fragments are close to each other, and the burnout cross section is sensitive to variation of the drain-source voltage above the threshold of single event burnout. In addition, the current waveforms of single event burnouts induced by different sources are similar. Different power MOSFET devices may have different probabilities for the occurrence of single event burnout.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of lycopene against MPTP induced experimental Parkinson's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Prema, Asokan; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin

    2015-07-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that mainly affects the movement of the aged populations. Lycopene is a carotenoid with unique pharmacological properties and its efficacy on experimental Hunginton's disease and brain ischemia has shown intense neuroprotective effects. The present study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effect of lycopene against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced PD mice. Administration of lycopene (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day orally) protected MPTP induced depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in a dose dependent manner. It also attenuated MPTP-induced oxidative stress and motor abnormalities seen in PD mice. Our western blot studies showed that treatment with lycopene reversed MPTP induced apoptosis may be due to its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. As to conclude, lycopene reverses neurochemical deficts, oxidative stress, apoptosis and physiological abnormalities in PD mice and offer promise strategy in the treatment of this neurodegenerative disease.

  2. A novel experimental setup for simultaneous adsorption and induced deformation measurements in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, L.; Plantier, F.; Grégoire, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental setup is presented allowing the simultaneous measurement of adsorption isotherms and adsorption-induced deformations. It is composed of a manometric technique coupled with a digital image correlation setup for full-field displacement measurements. The manometric part is validated by comparing adsorption isotherms with those obtained by a gravimetric method. The principles and methods of both adsorption isotherm and induced deformation measurements are presented in detail. As a first application of this new apparatus, the coupling between adsorption and induced deformation is characterised for a microporous media (activated carbon) saturated by pure CO2 (318.15 K, [0-60] bars) and pure CH4 (303.15 K, [0-130] bars). For this very homogeneous porous material, the induced deformation is characteristic of a pure volumetric swelling but the full-field setup may allow the characterisation of the localised pattern of deformation for heterogenous or cracked microporous media.

  3. Microbiological profile and calprotectin expression in naturally occurring and experimentally induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Farina, Roberto; Guarnelli, Maria Elena; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the microbiological profile and the calprotectin expression in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in spontaneous and experimentally induced gingival inflammation. Thirty-seven periodontally healthy subjects were evaluated in real life conditions (N-O gingivitis) as well as after 21 days of experimental gingivitis trial (E-I gingivitis). During the experimental gingivitis trial, in one maxillary quadrant (test quadrant), gingival inflammation was induced by oral hygiene abstention, while in the contralateral (control) quadrant, oral hygiene was routinely continued. The results of the study showed that (1) the microbiological profile of quadrants where gingival inflammation was experimentally induced (i.e., E-I test quadrants) differed significantly from that of either quadrants where gingival inflammation was controlled by proper plaque control (i.e., E-I control quadrants) or quadrants with N-O gingivitis, and (2) GCF calprotectin was significantly higher at E-I test quadrants compared to either E-I control quadrants or quadrants with N-O gingivitis. A positive intrasubject correlation was found between GCF concentration of calprotectin at sites presenting N-O and E-I gingivitis. N-O and E-I gingivitis showed a different microbiological profile of the subgingival environment. GCF calprotectin is a reliable marker of gingival inflammation, and its concentration in N-O gingivitis is correlated with its expression in E-I gingivitis. The modality of plaque accumulation seems to affect the subgingival microbiological profile associated with a gingivitis condition. Calprotectin levels in GCF may be regarded as a promising marker of the individual susceptibility to develop gingival inflammation in response to experimentally induced plaque accumulation.

  4. Four different synthetic peptides of proteolipid protein induce a distinct antibody response in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Grether, Nicolai B; van der Broeck, Franziska; Ganscher, Alla; Wagner, Nicole; Henke, Erik; Ergün, Süleyman; Schroeter, Michael; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-07-01

    Here we studied the autoantibody specificity elicited by proteolipid protein (PLP) in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In C57BL/6 (B6) mice, antibodies were induced by immunization with one of the two extracellular and by the intracellular PLP domain. Antibodies against extracellular PLP were myelin-reactive in oligodendrocyte cultures and induced mild spinal cord demyelination upon transfer into B cell-deficient J(H)T mice. Remarkably, also antibodies against intracellular PLP showed binding to intact oligodendrocytes and were capable of inducing myelin pathology upon transfer into J(H)T mice. In MP4-immunized mice peptide-specific T(H)1/T(H)17 responses were mainly directed against the extracellular PLP domains, but also involved the intracellular epitopes. These data suggest that both extracellular and intracellular epitopes of PLP contribute to the pathogenesis of MP4-induced EAE already in the setting of intact myelin. It remains to be elucidated if this concept also applies to MS itself.

  5. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  6. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  7. Induced membrane for treatment of critical sized bone defect: a review of experimental and clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Bégué, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review experimental and clinical experiences about the use of an induced membrane to address critical bone size defect of the limbs. From a review of published experimental and clinical data and from our clinical experience, we present the key data about the use of an induced membrane to address critical bone size defect of the limbs. After reviewing the concept of critical sized bone defect, we present the different indications of an induced membrane, the key points of the surgical technique and the strategy of bone grafting given the indication, localization and importance of the critical sized bone defect. Finally, we discuss the perspective of the use of an induced membrane with various bone substitutes. The use of an induced membrane to treat critical sized bone defects of the limbs is a simple, reliable and reproducible technique. Certain technical steps should be pointed out and observed with great caution in order to avoid any pitfalls. This technique will probably be a key step for facilitating bone inclusion of new bone substitutes proposed by recent bioengineering.

  8. Geographic Health's Way to Prevention of Diseases: A Case Study on Arsenic Spatial Dispersion and Dyspnea in Isfahan Province

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Maasoume; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: As geographic science discusses the analysis of environment, human beings and their mutual relations, thus the field of medical geography consists of being inspired from the relations between these two factors, analyzing environmental factors, their identification them and the state of their effects on human health, as well as determining the location of these factors. Some hazards that threat human health are the results of environmental factors and the relevant pollutions. Some important categories of diseases including (Shortness of Breath or, Dyspnea) have considerable differences in various places, as observed in their spatial prevalence and distribution maps. Methods: The record of patients with Dyspnea diseases were prepared for this descriptive research, for the period of 2009-2011, from the provincial health center, with the questionnaires were excluded patients with a family history of disease and the spatial diagram for disease prevalence was drawn according to the prepared data. The arsenic geographical distribution diagram in Isfahan province was also prepared and then the relation between an element of Arsenic in the province and the Dyspnea diseases were analyzed. Results: The analyses showed that the highest rate of Arsenic is entered the soil via fertilizers to come eventually into the food cycle of humans. By analyzing the amount of used fertilizers in Isfahan province and the dispersion diagram of Arsenic in Isfahan province, it was found that the highest frequency of Arsenic is in places having agricultural base. The spatial dispersion of Dyspnea diseases also showed that the spreading of Dyspnea diseases is greater in places with higher scale of Arsenic. Conclusions: This study is a logical justification between the two diagrams to confirm the hypothesis regarding the effect of arsenic on Dyspnea. PMID:25538832

  9. Induced decay of 178Hfm2: Theoretical analysis of experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalya, Eugene V.

    2005-02-01

    This article reviews experimental results obtained recently on the x-ray-induced acceleration of the decay of the long-lived isomer 178Hfm2. Two basic mechanisms for the induced decay are considered: (1) direct interaction of the incident x rays with the nucleus and (2) the nucleus-ray interaction proceeding via atomic shells. We establish that the absence of K forbiddenness for all transitions to a hypothetical “mixedK“ level cannot explain the measured cross sections even if collective nuclear matrix elements, resonant conditions, and so on, are assumed. We also tested, and rejected, the hypothesis that the enhancement is due to normal nuclear transitions in the inverse nuclear excitation by electron transition process. The possibility to make measurements with intense laser radiation is considered too. Thus, there appears to be no explanation of these experimental results within quantum electrodynamics and the contemporary concepts of atomic nuclei.

  10. Experimental study of the spectral characteristics of laser-induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhaoxiang; Wu Jinquan; Sun Fenglou; Gong Shunsheng

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced air, N2, and O2 plasma spectra are investigated spectroscopically. The study concentrates mainly on the temporal behavior of laser-induced plasma after breakdown. We used delayed spectra and spectra evolution for this study. Except for the general one-beam laser-induced breakdown experiment, a second laser beam was added to further probe the behavior of plasma during its decay. We report the experimental results of spectra composition, spectra time evolution, and spectra affected by a second laser beam. We determined that all the laser-induced air plasma spectra are from a continuous spectrum and some line spectra superposed on the continuous spectrum. The stronger short wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons in the plasma, and the weaker long wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by electron and ion recombination. Line spectra originate from excited molecules, atoms, and their first-order ions, but no line spectra form higher-order ions. The results show that the temporal behavior of some spectra is a decay-rise-redecay pattern. With the two laser beam experiment we found that all the spectra intensities are enhanced by the second laser beam, but the response of various spectra to the delay of the second laser beam is quite different, in particular, the intensity increments of some spectra increase with the delay of the second laser beam. Some microscopic processes of laser-induced plasma obtained from the experimental results are discussed. These results are useful for a better understanding of some laser-induced air plasma related applications, such as laser-guided lightning and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  11. The modified Medical Research Council scale for the assessment of dyspnea in daily living in obesity: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Launois, Claire; Barbe, Coralie; Bertin, Eric; Nardi, Julie; Perotin, Jeanne-Marie; Dury, Sandra; Lebargy, François; Deslee, Gaëtan

    2012-10-01

    Dyspnea is very frequent in obese subjects. However, its assessment is complex in clinical practice. The modified Medical Research Council scale (mMRC scale) is largely used in the assessment of dyspnea in chronic respiratory diseases, but has not been validated in obesity. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of the mMRC scale in the assessment of dyspnea in obese subjects and to analyze its relationships with the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), lung function and biological parameters. Forty-five obese subjects (17 M/28 F, BMI: 43 ± 9 kg/m2) were included in this pilot study. Dyspnea in daily living was evaluated by the mMRC scale and exertional dyspnea was evaluated by the Borg scale after 6MWT. Pulmonary function tests included spirometry, plethysmography, diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide and arterial blood gases. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein and hemoglobin levels were analyzed. Eighty-four percent of patients had a mMRC ≥ 1 and 40% a mMRC ≥ 2. Compared to subjects with no dyspnea (mMRC = 0), a mMRC ≥ 1 was associated with a higher BMI (44 ± 9 vs 36 ± 5 kg/m2, p = 0.01), and a lower expiratory reserve volume (ERV) (50 ± 31 vs 91 ± 32%, p = 0.004), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (86 ± 17 vs 101 ± 16%, p = 0.04) and distance covered in 6MWT (401 ± 107 vs 524 ± 72 m, p = 0.007). A mMRC ≥ 2 was associated with a higher Borg score after the 6MWT (4.7 ± 2.5 vs 6.5 ± 1.5, p < 0.05). This study confirms that dyspnea is very frequent in obese subjects. The differences between the "dyspneic" and the "non dyspneic" groups assessed by the mMRC scale for BMI, ERV, FEV1 and distance covered in 6MWT suggests that the mMRC scale might be an useful and easy-to-use tool to assess dyspnea in daily living in obese subjects.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Upstream Boundary Layer Acceleration on Unsteadiness of Shock-Induced Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Experimental Study of the Driving Mechanism and Control of the Unsteady Shock Induced Turbulent Separation in a Mach 5 compression Corner Flow...University of Tokyo, Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan, Oct. 25-29, 1987. 12 Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the test section with compression...ramp. Seeding System Optics FLOW CCD Cameras Dual-Cavity Nd: Yag Laser Photodiode Beam Splitter Timing Electronics ``` FLC Shutter Controller

  13. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Plunging Liquid Jet - The Air Entrainment Process". It is intended that this paper will be finalized and...the fifth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion" (Lahey...Drew - CoPI). rhis report period has been concerned with performing an analysis of the air entrainment process associated with a plunging liquid

  14. The effect of various drugs on experimentally induced ulcers in immobilized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, H.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments related to the importance of functional disorders in the central nervous system in connection with stomach diseases were performed on Wistar rats. Assuming that severe mental strains may be triggering factors for such disorders, testing of the effects of different drugs on experimentally induced ulcers in these rats was done. The immobilization method described by Bonfils was used. Particular importance was placed on the sex related difference which appeared.

  15. Experimental realization of an on-chip all-optical analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianfan; Sandhu, Sunil; Povinelli, Michelle L; Shakya, Jagat; Fan, Shanhui; Lipson, Michal

    2006-03-31

    We provide the first experimental observation of structure tuning of the electromagnetically induced transparency-like spectrum in integrated on-chip optical resonator systems. The system consists of coupled silicon ring resonators with 10 microm diameter on silicon, where the coherent interference between the two coupled resonators is tuned. We measured a transparency-resonance mode with a quality factor of 11,800.

  16. Nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: a clinical approach. Part 1: cervicofacial swelling, dysphagia, and dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M; Esteban García, L; García Hidalgo, C Y; Ruiz Peralbo, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons: first, they affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Various publications focus on nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck from the viewpoints of anatomic location or of particular diseases. However, these are not the most helpful viewpoints for dealing with patients in the emergency department, who present with particular signs and symptoms. We propose an analysis starting from the four most common clinical presentations of patients who come to the emergency department for nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: cervical swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and loss of vision. Starting from these entities, we develop an approach to the radiologic management and diagnosis of these patients.

  17. Focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound for assessment of dyspnea in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachita P; Shah, Sachin P; Fils-Aime, Reginald; Desir, Walkens; Joasil, Joanel; Venesy, David M; Muruganandan, Krithika Meera

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis and management of acutely dyspneic patients in resource-limited developing world settings poses a particular challenge. Focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound (CPUS) may assist in the emergency diagnosis and management of patients with acute dyspnea by identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction, pericardial effusion, interstitial pulmonary edema, and pleural effusion. We sought to assess the accuracy of emergency providers performing CPUS after a training intervention in a limited-resource setting; a secondary objective was to assess the ability of CPUS to affect change of clinician diagnostic assessment and acute management in patients presenting with undifferentiated dyspnea. After a training intervention for Haitian emergency providers, patients with dyspnea presenting urgently to a regional referral center in Haiti underwent a rapid CPUS examination by the treating physician. One hundred seventeen patients (median age of 36 years, 56 % female) were prospectively evaluated with a standardized CPUS exam. Blinded expert review of ultrasound images was performed by two board certified cardiologists and one ultrasound fellowship trained emergency physician. Inter-observer agreement was determined using an agreement coefficient (kappa). Sensitivity and Specificity with confidence intervals were calculated. Pre-test and post-test clinician impressions and management plans were compared to assess for a change. We enrolled 117 patients with undifferentiated dyspnea. Upon expert image review, prevalence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction was 40.2 %, and in those with systolic dysfunction, the average EF was 14 % (±9 %). The parasternal long axis (PLAX) single view was predictive of an overall abnormal echo with PPV of abnormal PLAX 95 % and NPV 93 % of normal PLAX. Weighted kappa for pericardial effusion between the Haitian physicians and two cardiology reviewers was 0.81 (95 % CI 0.75-0.87, p value <0.001) and for ejection fraction was 0

  18. [Training response in COPD. Differences between fatigue-limited and dyspnea-limited patients].

    PubMed

    Sívori, Martín; Bustamante, Laura; Martínez Fraga, Alejandro; Almeida, Marta; Saenz, César

    2011-01-01

    Our objective was to study the post-training response to exercise, comparing fatigue-limited (FL) vs. dyspnea-limited (DL) COPD patients. Moderate and severe COPD patients (GOLD definition) were included. They were classified as FL if Borg score of fatigue at maximal exercise testing was ≥ 2 points vs. dyspnea; and DL if it was the reverse. Also, each patient was evaluated with submaximal cycloergometry, 6 minutes walking test and quality of life score (SGRQ). All patients were trained 3 times/week, 90 min/session with aerobic and strength exercises by 8 weeks. A total of 14 patients in LF and 11 in LD group were evaluated with same tools. Means of age were 69 and 66 years respectively. They presented severe airway flow obstruction (FEV1: 49%). There was not any baseline difference between both groups, except body-mass index, which was lower in FL. Both groups significantly improved p exercise variables post-training in comparison with baseline and SGRQ, except maximal workload in DL. Comparing both groups, FL had the highest maximal workload (48.7 ± 9.2 vs. 40.04 ± 15.48 watts, p = 0.033), 6 minute walking test (505.42 ± 50.75 vs. 454.9 ± 64.3 meters, p = 0.048) and endurance time (14.57 ± 9.55 vs. 6.71 ± 4.18 min, p = 0.025), respectively. It can be concluded that FL patients had better response after training in maximal and submaximal exercise tests in comparison with DL. Perhaps, different training strategies would be performed to train different COPD phenotypes.

  19. Cardioprotective effect of ammonium glycyrrhizinate against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Munish; Singhal, Tinku; Sharma, Hitender

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the cardioprotective effect of herbal bioactive compound ammonium glycyrrhizinate against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy, in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Ammonium glycyrrhizinate (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for four weeks in albino rats. Cardiomyopathy was induced with a dose of 2.5 mg/kg i.p. of doxorubicin on 1th, 7th, 14th, 21th, 28th day in the experimental animals. At the end of the experiment, on 29th day, serum and heart tissues were collected and hemodynamic, biochemical and histopathological studies were carried out. Results: Administration of doxorubicin in normal rats showed significant (P < 0.001) changes in body weight, feed intake, urine output, hemodynamic parameters like (blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output) and in lipid profile (cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein) indicating cardiomyopathy symptoms. Animals treated with ammonium glycyrrhizinate significantly (P < 0.05) decreased triglyceride, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels. Moreover, high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels increased in rats treated with ammonium glycyrrhizinate as compared with the normal group. Conclusion: Ammonium glycyrrhizinate is effective in controlling serum lipid profile and cardiac complications in experimentally induced cardiomyopathy in animals. PMID:25298583

  20. Gallic acid attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Mohebali, Nooshin; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA) is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound that has been detected in various natural products, such as green tea, strawberries, grapes, bananas, and many other fruits. In inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation is promoted by oxidative stress. GA is a strong antioxidant; thus, we evaluated the cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory role of GA in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse colitis model. Experimental acute colitis was induced in male BALB/c mice by administering 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days. The disease activity index; colon weight/length ratio; histopathological analysis; mRNA expressions of IL-21 and IL-23; and protein expression of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were compared between the control and experimental mice. The colonic content of malondialdehyde and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activity were examined as parameters of the redox state. We determined that GA significantly attenuated the disease activity index and colon shortening, and reduced the histopathological evidence of injury. GA also significantly (P<0.05) reduced the expressions of IL-21 and IL-23. Furthermore, GA activates/upregulates the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream targets, including UDP-GT and NQO1, in DSS-induced mice. The findings of this study demonstrate the protective effect of GA on experimental colitis, which is probably due to an antioxidant nature of GA. PMID:26251571

  1. Evaluation of the efficacy of curcumin in experimentally induced acute otitis media in rats.

    PubMed

    Birdane, Leman; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal; Burukoglu, Dilek; Fidan, Vural; Incesulu, Armagan

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the effect of curcumin (CMN) in the treatment of experimentally induced acute otitis media (AOM) in rats. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley female rats were used, yielding 64 temporal bones. Group 1 was the control group. For groups 2 to 4, AOM was induced experimentally, and saline, antibiotics (sulbactam-ampicillin), or CMN were administered for 14 days to groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. During the histological examination, thickening of the tympanic membrane, damage to the epithelium, inflammation, and sclerosis were evaluated. The AOM+antibiotic and AOM+CMN groups exhibited reduced histological damage compared with the AOM+saline group. No significant differences in thickening of the tympanic membrane or damage to the epithelium or inflammation were observed between the AOM+antibiotic and the AOM+CMN groups. However, the sclerosis values of the AOM+CMN group were significantly lower than those of the AOM+antibiotic group. CMN treatment resulted in similar effects on the experimentally induced AOM model as did the antibiotic treatment. The efficacy of this treatment may be related to its effects on the production of various inflammatory cytokines. In light of the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance and the mild side effects of CMN, we suggest that CMN therapy may be a promising option in AOM treatment.

  2. Respiratory muscle endurance training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: impact on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Scherer, T A; Spengler, C M; Owassapian, D; Imhof, E; Boutellier, U

    2000-11-01

    Inspiratory muscle training may have beneficial effects in certain patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of the lack of a home training device, normocapnic hyperpnea has rarely been used as a training mode for patients with COPD, and is generally considered unsuitable to large-scale application. To study the effects of hyperpnea training, we randomized 30 patients with COPD and ventilatory limitation to respiratory muscle training (RMT; n = 15) with a new portable device or to breathing exercises with an incentive spirometer (controls; n = 15). Both groups trained twice daily for 15 min for 5 d per week for 8 wk. Training-induced changes were significantly greater in the RMT than in the control group for the following variables: respiratory muscle endurance measured through sustained ventilation (+825 +/- 170 s [mean +/- SEM] versus -27 +/- 61 s, p < 0.001), inspiratory muscle endurance measured through incremental inspiratory threshold loading (+58 +/- 10 g versus +21.7 +/- 9.5 g, p = 0.016), maximal expiratory pressure (+20 +/- 7 cm H(2)O versus -6 +/- 6 cm H(2)O, p = 0.009), 6-min walking distance (+58 +/- 11 m versus +11 +/- 11 m, p = 0.002), V O(2peak) (+2.5 +/- 0.6 ml/kg/min versus -0.3 +/- 0.9 ml/kg/min, p = 0.015), and the SF-12 physical component score (+9.9 +/- 2.7 versus +1.8 +/- 2.4, p = 0.03). Changes in dyspnea, maximal inspiratory pressure, treadmill endurance, and the SF-12 mental component score did not differ significantly between the RMT and control groups. In conclusion, home-based respiratory muscle endurance training with the new device used in this study is feasible and has beneficial effects in subjects with COPD and ventilatory limitation.

  3. Effect of transdermal opioids in experimentally induced superficial, deep and hyperalgesic pain.

    PubMed

    Andresen, T; Staahl, C; Oksche, A; Mansikka, H; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Drewes, A M

    2011-10-01

    Chronic pain and hyperalgesia can be difficult to treat with classical opioids acting predominately at the µ-opioid receptor. Buprenorphine and its active metabolite are believed to act through µ-, κ- and δ-receptors and may therefore possess different analgesic and anti-hyperalgesic effects compared with pure µ-receptor agonists, for example, fentanyl. Here, we have compared the analgesic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of buprenorphine and fentanyl. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were randomized to treatment with transdermal buprenorphine (20 µg·h(-1), 144 h), fentanyl (25 µg·h(-1), 72 h) or placebo patches in a double-blind, cross-over experimental pain study. The experimental pain tests (phasic pain, sensitization) involved pressure at the tibial bone, cutaneous electrical and thermal stimulation, intramuscular nerve growth factor, UVB light burn injury model and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia. Pain testing was carried out at baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 144 h after application of the drugs. Compared with placebo, buprenorphine, but not fentanyl, significantly attenuated pressure at the tibial bone as well as pressure pain in the primary hyperalgesic area induced by UVB light The two drugs were equipotent and better than placebo against cutaneous thermal pain stimulation), but failed to show significant analgesic effect to cutaneous electrical stimulation, nerve growth factor-induced muscle soreness and to capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia. Buprenorphine, but not fentanyl, showed analgesic effects against experimentally induced, bone-associated pain and primary hyperalgesia compared with placebo. These tissue- and modality-differentiated properties may reflect the variable effects of opioid drugs observed in individual patients. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Experimental investigation of flow induced limit cycle oscillations in a tensioned ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Punnag; Mazzoleni, Nicholas; Bryant, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Researchers have performed theoretical investigations of flow induced limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) of tensioned ribbons. Furthermore, attempts have been made to tap into the energy harvesting capability of such ribbons, owing to its structural simplicity, low weight and ease of fabrication. However, in order to tune the ribbon to perform optimally at a given location, a robust, reliable model of the ribbon is essential to predict the limit cycle behavior. The model needs validation across a broad spectrum of its operating envelope based on experimentally obtained results. This paper seeks to provide experimental data for a sample tensioned ribbon in cross flow to serve as basis for validation of an aeroelastic model. This paper experimentally characterizes a PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) ribbon of aspect ratio 18 across a range of applied axial preload tension and wind speeds.

  5. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    PubMed

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology.

  6. [Experimental choroidal neovascularization induced by laser in the eyes of rhesus monkeys].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Yan, Mi; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jun-jun; Liu, Bin; Meng, Dan; Du, Cai-feng

    2008-07-01

    To establish an experimental model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) through perimacular laser treatment in the eyes of rhesus Monkey. The experimental CNV was induced by perimacular laser injury in the eyes of 8 rhesus monkeys and confirmed by a comparison before and after the laser treatment (20 d, 34 d, 48 d) with fluorescence fundus angiography (FFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Classic CNV similar to human CNV appeared in 68.8% of the laser spots. Hypofluorescence in the early phase and fluorescence leakage in the late phase were detected by the FFA. High reflect light echogenic mass and retina edema were detected by the OCT. The histopathologic examinations found proliferated fiber-vasculosa membranes in the laser burnt spots. The pathological changes lasted 48 days until the monkeys were killed. The laser induced experimental CNV in rhesus monkey has a high prevalence and stability, which maintains a long period. It is an ideal experimental model for studying the pathologic mechanism of CNV and effective treatment for CNV.

  7. Chemokine ligand 2 in the trigeminal ganglion regulates pain induced by experimental tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Luo, Wei; Wang, Jing; Tan, Yu; Fu, Runqing; Fang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that the chemokine ligand 2/chemokine receptor 2 (CCL2/CCR2) signaling pathway plays an important role in pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Expression of CCL2/CCR2 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) was determined by Western blotting 0 hours, 4 hours, 1 day, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after tooth movement. CCL2 localization and cell size distribution were revealed by immunohistochemistry. The effects of increasing force on CCL2 expression and behavioral changes were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of CCL2/CCR2 antagonists on these changes in pain behaviors were all evaluated. Exogenous CCL2 was injected into periodontal tissues and cultured TG neurons with different concentrations, and then the pain responses or c-fos expression were assessed. Experimental tooth movement led to a statistically significant increase in CCL2/CCR2 expression from day 3 to day 7, especially in small to medium-sized TG neurons. It also triggered an increase in the time spent on directed face-grooming behaviors in a force magnitude-dependent and CCL2 dose-dependent manner. Pain induced by experimental tooth movement was effectively blocked by a CCR2 antagonist and by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. Also, exogenous CCL2 led to an increase in c-fos expression in cultured TG neurons, which was blocked by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. The peripheral CCL2/CCR2 axis is modulated by experimental tooth movement and involved in the development of tooth movement pain.

  8. Suppressive effect of berberine on experimental dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tie; Yang, Zhen; Lv, Chuan-Feng; Zhang, Yu

    2012-06-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of berberine was evaluated in murine model of acute experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Berberine, given orally at 40, 20, 10 mg/kg for 10 days, ameliorated all the supposed inflammatory symptoms of the induced colitis, such as body weightloss, blood hemoglobin reduction, high myeloperoxidase levels, and malondialdehyde content-inflamed mucosa. Furthermore, the cytokine production of splenic lymphocytes was analyzed. The results showed the IFN-γ and IL-12 were increased, but IL-4 and IL-10 were decreased in DSS-induced colitis,when those were compared with the normal control. But the administration of berberine to DSS-induced colitis mice showed lower production of IFN-γ and IL-12 and higher production of IL-4 and IL-10 than the DSS-induced colitis mice. The results suggest that the protective effects of berberine against the DSS-induced colitis may be associated with the regulation of cytokine production.

  9. Analytical and experimental study of flow phenomena in noncavitating rocket pump inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1981-01-01

    The flow processes in rocket pump inducers are summarized. The experimental investigations were carried out with air as the test medium. The major characteristics features of the rocket pump inducers are low flow coefficient (0.05 to 0.2) large stagger angle (70 deg to 85 deg) and high solidity blades of little or no camber. The investigations are concerned with the effect of viscosity not the effects of cavitation. Flow visualization, conventional and hot wire probe measurement inside and at the exit of the blade passage, were the analytical methods used. The experiment was carried out using four three and two bladed inducers with cambered blades. Both the passage and the exit flow were measured. The basic research and boundary layer investigation was carried out using a helical flat plate (of some dimensions as the inducer blades tested), and flat plate helical inducer (four bladed). Detailed mean and turbulence flow field inside the passage as well as the exit of the rotor were derived from these measurement. The boundary layer, endwall, and other passage data reveal extremely complex nature of the flow, with major effects of viscosity present across the entire passage. Several analyses were carried out to predict the flow field in inducers. These included an approximate analysis, the shear pumping analysis, and a numerical solution of exact viscous equations with approximate modeling for the viscous terms.

  10. Allergen-induced Interleukin-18 promotes experimental eosinophilic esophagitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Parmesh; Shukla, Jai Shankar; Ventateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Mariswamy, Siddesha Jalahalli.; Mattner, Jochen; Shukla, Anshi; Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of IL-18 have been reported in a number of allergic diseases. We recently reported that IL-18 in the blood and IL-18Rα mRNA in the oesophagus are induced during human eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). Additionally, we earlier showed that iNKT cells are critical to EoE pathogenesis; however, the mechanism of iNKT cell activation in EoE is not well understood. Therefore, the current study focused on the hypothesis that allergen-induced IL-18 may have an important role in iNKT cell-mediated EoE pathogenesis. We first validated the human EoE findings of IL-18 in experimental EoE by examining blood levels of IL-18 and oesophageal IL-18Rα mRNA levels in aeroallergen- and food allergen-induced experimental mouse models of EoE. We demonstrate that blood IL-18 protein and oesophageal IL-18Rα mRNA are induced in the mouse model of EoE and that IL-18Rα is expressed by iNKT cells in the oesophagus. Intranasal delivery of rIL-18 induced both mast cells and eosinophilic inflammation in the oesophagus in a time- and dose-dependent manner. To establish the significance of IL-18 in EoE pathogenesis, we examined DOX-inducible rtTA-CC10-IL-18 bitransgenic mice that induce IL-18 protein expression in the oesophagus. Our analysis indicated that induction of IL-18 in these mice resulted in the development of many of the characteristics of EoE, including oesophageal intraepithelial eosinophilia, increased mast cells, oesophageal remodelling and fibrosis. The current study provides evidence that IL-18 may induce iNKT cell activation to release the eosinophil activating cytokine IL-5, as IL-5-deficient mice and iNKT cell-deficient (CD1d null) mice do not induce EoE in response to intranasal IL-18 challenge. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that allergen-induced IL-18 has a significant role in promoting IL-5- and iNKT-dependent EoE pathogenesis. PMID:25801352

  11. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33.

    PubMed

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-08-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m(3)) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m(3)) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10.

  12. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m3) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m3) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10. PMID:24730559

  13. Effects of nabumetone and dipyrone on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Engin; Sağıroğlu, Oya; Kılıç, Fatma S; Erol, Kevser

    2013-04-01

    Nabumetone and dipyrone are non-acidic, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Both of them are known to have weak inhibitory effects of cyclooxygenases. Gastric side effects represent the most common adverse drug effects of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The gastric effects of these drugs may be comparable in experimental ulcer models. In the present study, the gastric ulcerogenic activity of nabumetone and dipyrone were investigated on stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced experimental ulcer models by determining the ulcer index and gastric mucus secretion in rats. It was found that diethyldithiocarbamate increased both ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited dose-dependently the increase of diethyldithiocarbamate-induced mucus secretion. Dipyrone inhibited both stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited stress-induced ulcer index at 25-mg/kg dose but stimulated dose-dependently mucus secretion. These effects may be attributed to their non-acidic structures and weak inhibitory effects on gastric mucosal cyclooxygenases.

  14. Effect of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard against experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mamta B; Goswami, S S; Santani, D D

    2004-10-01

    Effects of the flavonoid rich fraction of the stem bark of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard, have been studied on ethanol, ethanol-indomethacin and pylorus ligated gastric ulcers in experimental animals. Oral administration of the ethyl acetate extract (extract A3) inhibited the formation of gastric lesions induced by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. The protective effect of extract A3 against ethanol induced gastric lesions was not abolished by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg(-1)). Further, extract A3 inhibited increase in vascular permeability due to ethanol administration. Extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in animals treated with extract. Extract A3 also inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers induced by pylorus ligation, when administered both orally and intraperitoneally. Moreover, pretreatment with extract A3 increased mucus production and glycoprotein content, which was evident from the rise in mucin activity and TC: PR ratio.

  15. The role of periodontal ASIC3 in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meiya; Long, Hu; Ma, Wenqiang; Liao, Lina; Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yang; Shan, Di; Huang, Renhuan; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the roles of Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the experimental group (40g, n = 30) and the sham group (0g, n = 30). Closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary incisor and molars to achieve experimental tooth movement. Rat grimace scale (RGS) scores were assessed at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after the placement of the springs. ASIC3 immunostaining was performed and the expression levels of ASIC3 were measured through integrated optical density/area in Image-Pro Plus 6.0. Moreover, 18 rats were divided into APETx2 group (n = 6), amiloride group (n = 6), and vehicle group (n = 6), and RGS scores were obtained compared among them to verify the roles of ASIC3 in orofacial pain following tooth movement. ASIC3 expression levels became significantly higher in the experimental group than in sham group on 1, 3, and 5 days and became similar on 7 and 14 days. Pain levels (RGS scores) increased in both groups and were significantly higher in the experimental group on 1, 3, 5, and 7 days and were similar on 14 days. Periodontal ASIC3 expression levels were correlated with orofacial pain levels following experimental tooth movement. Periodontal administrations of ASIC3 antagonists (APETx2 and amiloride) could alleviate pain. This study needs to be better evidenced by RNA interference of ASIC3 in periodontal tissues in rats following experimental tooth movement. Moreover, we hope further studies would concentrate on the pain perception of ASIC3 knockout (ASIC3(-/-)) mice. Our results suggest that periodontal ASIC3 plays an important role in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes. PMID:26058036

  17. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-10-01

    A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes.

  18. Experimental Diabetes Induces Structural, Inflammatory and Vascular Changes of Achilles Tendons

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo R.; Martins, Conceição S.; Rocha, Yuri R.; Braga, Allysson B. R.; Mattos, Rômulo M.; Hecht, Fábio; Brito, Gerly A. C.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g) of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98) vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68) vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18) vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99) vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy. PMID:24130676

  19. Experimental diabetes induces structural, inflammatory and vascular changes of Achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo R; Martins, Conceição S; Rocha, Yuri R; Braga, Allysson B R; Mattos, Rômulo M; Hecht, Fábio; Brito, Gerly A C; Nasciutti, Luiz E

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g) of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98) vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68) vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18) vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99) vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy.

  20. Experimental investigations of phase error caused by electrode impedance in laboratory spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Seleznev, N. V.

    2016-12-01

    High frequency phase errors that plague spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements are partly due to the effects of electrode impedance. Others have recently proposed an experimental correction procedure based on a simplified electrical model of the system under test. The application of the method is limited due to the dependence of the correction on the input capacitance (Ci) of SIP instruments. With this study, we evaluated the correction procedure with a new experimental set up, confirming the improved phase accuracy at high frequency. In addition, we propose an experimental method to calculate Ci based on the experimental set up used for each measurement. The method utilizes well characterized fluids, with known electrical properties, for the accurate estimation of Ci. Following this new procedure, Ci of the used set up was determined to be 6.30 ± 0.29 pF. High frequency errors were further suppressed when the calculated, versus the estimated, Ci was used. Correction results suggest that Ci is weakly dependent on sample properties. The correction procedure with the experimental determination of Ci significantly improves the quality of SIP measurements on unconsolidated sediments and rock cores.

  1. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, P<0.0001). This local inflammation was associated with a systemic increase in hsCRP (0.24 mg/L, P = 0.038), IL-6 (12.52 ng/L, P = 0.0002) and MCP-1 (9.10 ng/l, P = 0.124) in peripheral blood samples between baseline and day 21, which decreased at day 42. Monocytes showed an enhanced adherence to endothelial cells and increased foam cell formation after oxLDL uptake (P<0.050) at day 21 of gingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  2. Effects of aging on sensation of dyspnea and health-related quality of life in elderly asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Salvatore; Sandrini, Maria Cristina; Catalano, Filippo; Arcoleo, Giuseppe; Giardini, Gianluca; Vergani, Carlo; Bellia, Vincenzo

    2005-08-01

    As the awareness of sensory stimuli is often impaired in older subjects, it has been hypothesized that the aging process may influence the perception of dyspnea. This study aimed at evaluating the aging-related difference in perception of spontaneously occurring dyspnea in adult asthmatics and at whether any such aging-related differences have an effect on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL). 18 elderly asthmatics (EA) aged >65 years and 20 young asthmatics (YA) (age range 16-44 years) were recruited. In all subjects, 12-month asthma symptom score and respiratory function were recorded. Dyspnea was measured at rest by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and HRQOL by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Although the groups did not differ for FEV1% predicted, the EA showed lower VAS scores (9.9+/-19.8 mm vs 19.5+/-17.0, p<0.05). As regards HRQOL, only the "Symptom" section of SGRQ showed lesser impairment in EA. Aging is associated with blunted sensation of dyspnea. This only partly attenuates the disease-related impairment in quality of life, and other factors are presumed to counterbalance this effect.

  3. Immediate versus delayed integrated point-of-care-ultrasonography to manage acute dyspnea in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Concetta; Numis, Fabio G; Pagano, Antonio; Melillo, Paolo; Copetti, Roberto; Schiraldi, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnea is one of the most frequent complaints in the Emergency Department. Thoracic ultrasound should help to differentiate cardiogenic from non-cardiogenic causes of dyspnea. We evaluated whether the diagnostic accuracy can be improved by adding a point-of-care-ultrasonography (POC-US) to routine exams and if an early use of this technique produces any advantage. One hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled and randomized in two groups: Group 1 received an immediate POC-US in addition to routine laboratory and instrumental tests; group 2 received an ultrasound scan within 1 h from the admission to the Emergency Department. The concordance between initial and final diagnosis and the percentage of wrong diagnosis in the two groups were evaluated. Mortality, days of hospitalization in Emergency Medicine department and transfers to other wards were compared. Sensitivity and specificity of the routine protocol and the one including ultrasonography for the diagnosis of the causes of dyspnea were also analyzed. Eighty-eight patients were randomized in group 1 and 80 in group 2. The concordance rate between initial and final diagnoses was significantly different (0.94 in group 1 vs. 0.22 in group 2, p < 0.005). The percentage of wrong initial diagnosis was 5% in group 1 and 50% in group 2 (p < 0.0001). Adding POC-US to routine exams improves the diagnostic accuracy of dyspnea and reduces errors in the Emergency Department.

  4. Assessing validity by comparing transition and static measures of dyspnea in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Smithline, Howard A; Caglar, Selin; Blank, Fidela S J

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the convergent validity of 2 dyspnea measures, the transition measure and the change measure, by comparing them with each other in patients admitted to the hospital with acute decompensated heart failure. Static measures of dyspnea were obtained at baseline (pre-static measure) and at time 1 hour and 4 hour (post-static measures). The change measure was calculated as the difference between the pre-static and post-static measures. Transition measures were obtained at time 1 hour and 4 hour. Visual analog scales and Likert scales were used. Both physicians and patients measured the dyspnea independently. A total of 112 patients had complete data sets at time 0 and 1 hour and 86 patients had complete data sets at all 3 time points. Correlations were calculated between the transition measures and static measures (pre-static, post-static, and change measure). Bland-Altman plots were generated and the mean difference and limits of agreement between the transition measures and the change measures were calculated. In general, short-term dyspnea assessment using transition measures and serial static measures can not be used to validate each other in this population of patients being admitted with acute decompensated heart failure.

  5. Agreement between a simple dyspnea-guided treatment algorithm for stable COPD and the GOLD guidelines: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Carlos; Casanova, Ciro; Martín, Yolanda; Mirabal, Virginia; Sánchez, María del Carmen; Álvarez, Felisa; Juliá, Gabriel; Cabrera-Navarro, Pedro; García-Bello, Miguel Ángel; Marín, José María; de-Torres, Juan Pablo; Divo, Miguel; Celli, Bartolomé

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Guidelines recommendations for the treatment of COPD are poorly followed. This could be related to the complexity of classification and treatment algorithms. The purpose of this study was to validate a simpler dyspnea-based treatment algorithm for inhaled pharmacotherapy in stable COPD, comparing its concordance with the current Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guideline. Methods We enrolled patients who had been diagnosed with COPD in three primary care facilities and two tertiary hospitals in Spain. We determined anthropometric data, forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (percent), exacerbations, and dyspnea based on the modified Medical Research Council scale. We evaluated the new algorithm based on dyspnea and exacerbations and calculated the concordance with the current GOLD recommendations. Results We enrolled 100 patients in primary care and 150 attending specialized care in a respiratory clinic. There were differences in the sample distribution between cohorts with 41% vs 26% in grade A, 16% vs 12% in grade B, 16% vs 22% in grade C, and 27% vs 40% in grade D for primary and respiratory care, respectively (P=0.005). The coincidence of the algorithm with the GOLD recommendations in primary care was 93% and 91.8% in the respiratory care cohort. Conclusion A simple dyspnea-based treatment algorithm for inhaled pharmacotherapy of COPD could be useful in the management of COPD patients and concurs very well with the recommended schema suggested by the GOLD initiative. PMID:27354780

  6. Effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism on crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Skandali, Nikolina; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2014-06-01

    Hypothyroidism is known to exert significant structural and functional changes to the developing central nervous system, and can lead to the establishment of serious mental retardation and neurological problems. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil-induced experimental hypothyroidism on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, at two time-points of their lives: at birth (day-1) and at 21 days of age (end of lactation). Under all studied experimental conditions, offspring brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was found to be significantly decreased due to maternal hypothyroidism, in contrast to the two studied adenosinetriphosphatase (Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activities that were only found to be significantly altered right after birth (increased and decreased, respectively, following an exposure to gestational maternal hypothyroidism) and were restored to control levels by the end of lactation. As our findings regarding the pattern of effects that maternal hypothyroidism has on the above-mentioned crucial offspring brain enzyme activities are compared to those reported in the literature, several differences are revealed that could be attributed to both the mode of the experimental simulation approach followed as well as to the time-frames examined. These findings could provide the basis for a debate on the need of a more consistent experimental approach to hypothyroidism during neurodevelopment as well as for a further evaluation of the herein presented and discussed neurochemical (and, ultimately, neurodevelopmental) effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism, in a brain region-specific manner.

  7. Acute experimental tabun-induced intoxication and its therapy in rats.

    PubMed

    Krejcová, G; Kassa, J

    2004-03-01

    Pharmacological pretreatment and antidotal treatment on tabun-induced neurotoxicity were studied in male albino rats that were poisoned with a lethal dose of tabun (280 microg/kg i.m.; 100% of LD50 value) and observed at 24 hours and 7 days following tabun challenge. The neurotoxicity of tabun was evaluated using a Functional observational battery and an automatic measurement of motor activity. Pharmacological pretreatment as well as antidotal treatment were able to reverse most of tabun-induced neurotoxic signs observed at 24 hours following tabun poisoning. However, there was not significant difference between the efficacy of profylaxis and antidotal treatment to eliminate tabun-induced neurotoxicity. The combination of profylactic pretreatment and antidotal treatment seems to be slightly more effective in the elimination of tabun-induced neurotoxicity in rats at 24 hours following tabun challenge in comparison with the administration of profylactic pretreatment or antidotal treatment alone. At 7 days following tabun poisoning, very few neurotoxic signs in tabun-poisoned rats were observed regardless of administration of pharmacological pretreatment or antidotal treatment. Thus, our findings confirm that the combination of pharmacological pretreatment and antidotal treatment is not only able to protect the experimental animals from the lethal effects of tabun but also to eliminate most of tabun-induced signs of neurotoxicity in tabun-poisoned rats.

  8. Effects of Guchang Capsule on Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Experimental Ulcerative Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoshan; Liu, Tong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Hong; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Guchang capsule (GC) is a Chinese materia medica standardized product extracted from 15 Chinese traditional medical herbs and it has been clinically used in the treatment of intestinal disease. In this study, in order to extend the research of GC in intestinal disease, we were aiming to evaluate potential effects of GC on dextran sulphate sodium- (DSS-) induced murine experimental colitis and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. GC treatment attenuated DSS-induced body weight loss and reduced the mortality. Moreover, GC treatment prevented DSS-induced colonic pathological damage; meanwhile it inhibited proinflammatory cytokines production in colon tissues. In vitro, GC significantly reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines production via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB in macrophage cells, and the expressions of several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) which were reported in regulating NF-κB signaling pathway were obviously affected by adding GC into culture medium. In conclusion, our data suggested that administration of GC exhibits therapeutic effects on DSS-induced colitis partially through regulating the expression of NF-κB related lncRNAs in infiltrating immune cells. PMID:27313642

  9. Experimental Study of the Unsteady Actuation Effect on Induced Flow Characteristics in DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein, Pouryoussefi; Masoud, Mirzaei

    2015-05-01

    The main aim of this paper is to investigate unsteady actuation effects on the operation of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators and to study induced flow characteristics of steady and unsteady actuators in quiescent air. The parameters affecting the operation of unsteady plasma actuators were experimentally measured and compared with the ones for steady actuators. The effects of excitation frequency and duty cycle on the induced flow pattern properties were studied by means of hot-wire anemometers, and the smoke visualization method was also used. It was observed that the current and the mean induced velocity linearly increase with increasing duty cycle while they are not sensitive to excitation frequency. Furthermore, with increasing excitation frequency, the magnitude of vortices shedding from the actuator decreases while their frequency increases. Nevertheless, when the excitation frequency grows beyond a certain level, the induced flow downstream of the actuator behaves as a steady flow. However, the results for steady actuators show that by increasing the applied voltage and carrier frequency, the velocity of the induced flow first increases and then decreases with actuator saturation and the onset of the emission of streaky glow discharge.

  10. RAE-1 expression is induced during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is correlated with microglia cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Djelloul, Mehdi; Popa, Natalia; Pelletier, Florence; Raguénez, Gilda; Boucraut, José

    2016-11-01

    Retinoic acid early induced transcript-1 (RAE-1) glycoproteins are ligands of the activating immune receptor NKG2D. They are known as stress molecules induced in pathological conditions. We previously reported that progenitor cells express RAE-1 in physiological conditions and we described a correlation between RAE-1 expression and cell proliferation. In addition, we showed that Raet1 transcripts are induced in the spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. EAE is a model for multiple sclerosis which is accompanied by microglia proliferation and activation, recruitment of immune cells and neurogenesis. We herein studied the time course expression of the two members of the Raet1 gene family present in C57BL/6 mice, namely Raet1d and Raet1e, in the spinal cord during EAE. We report that Raet1d and Raet1e genes are induced early upon EAE onset and reach a maximal expression at the peak of the pathology. We show that myeloid cells, i.e. macrophages as well as microglia, are cellular sources of Raet1 transcripts. We also demonstrate that only Raet1d expression is induced in microglia, whereas macrophages expressed both Raet1d and Raet1e. Furthermore, we investigated the dynamics of RAE-1 expression in microglia cultures. RAE-1 induction correlated with cell proliferation but not with M1/M2 phenotypic orientation. We finally demonstrate that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a major factor controlling RAE-1 expression in microglia.

  11. Etanercept attenuates TNBS-induced experimental colitis: role of TNF-α expression.

    PubMed

    Paiotti, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Miszputen, Sender Jankiel; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Artigiani Neto, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Franco, Marcello

    2011-10-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with gut barrier dysfunction. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role into the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases because its expression is increased in inflamed mucosa of CD patients. Anti-TNF therapy improves significantly mucosal inflammation. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Etanercept (ETC), a tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antagonist on the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced experimental colitis. A total of 18 Wistar rats were randomized into four groups, as follows: (1) Sham: sham induced-colitis; (2) TNBS: non-treated induced-colitis; (3) ETC control; (4) ETC-treated induced-colitis. Rats from group 4 presented significant improvement either of macroscopic or of histopathological damage in the distal colon. The gene expression of TNF-α mRNA, decreased significantly in this group compared to the TNBS non-treated group. The treatment with etanercept attenuated the colonic damages and reduced the inflammation caused by TNBS. Taken together, our results suggest that ETC attenuates intestinal colitis induced by TNBS in Wistar rats by TNF-α downregulation.

  12. Greater dyspnea is associated with lower health-related quality of life among European patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Gruenberger, Jean-Bernard; Vietri, Jeffrey; Keininger, Dorothy L; Mahler, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Objective Dyspnea is a defining symptom in the classification and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the degree of variation in burden among symptomatic COPD patients and the possible correlates of burden remain unclear. This study was conducted to characterize patients in Europe currently being treated for COPD according to the level of dyspnea in terms of sociodemographics, health-related quality of life, work productivity impairment, and health care resource use assessed by patient reports. Methods Data were derived from the 5-EU 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey (N=62,000). Respondents aged ≥40 years who reported currently using a prescription for COPD were grouped according to their level of dyspnea as per the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines and compared on health status (revised Short Form 36 [SF-36]v2), work impairment (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire), and number of health care visits in the past 6 months using generalized linear models with appropriate distributions and link functions. Results Of the 768 respondents who met the inclusion criteria, 245 (32%) were considered to have higher dyspnea (equivalent to modified Medical Research Council score ≥2). Higher dyspnea was associated with decrements ranging from 3.9 to 8.2 points in all eight domains of the SF-36 health profile after adjustment for sociodemographics, general health characteristics, and length of COPD diagnosis; mental component summary scores and Short Form-6D health utility scores were lower by 3.5 and 0.06 points, respectively. Adjusted mean activity impairment (55% vs 37%, P<0.001) and number of emergency room visits (0.61 vs 0.40, P=0.030) were higher in patients with greater dyspnea. Conclusion Many European patients with COPD continue to experience dyspnea despite treatment and at levels associated with notable impairments in the patients’ ability to function across a multitude of

  13. Marginal biotin deficiency can be induced experimentally in humans using a cost-effective outpatient design.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Shawna L; Henrich, Cindy L; Matthews, Nell I; Bogusiewicz, Anna; Dawson, Amanda M; Horvath, Thomas D; Owen, Suzanne N; Boysen, Gunnar; Moran, Jeffery H; Mock, Donald M

    2012-01-01

    To date, marginal, asymptomatic biotin deficiency has been successfully induced experimentally by the use of labor-intensive inpatient designs requiring rigorous dietary control. We sought to determine if marginal biotin deficiency could be induced in humans in a less expensive outpatient design incorporating a self-selected, mixed general diet. We sought to examine the efficacy of three outpatient study designs: two based on oral avidin dosing and one based on a diet high in undenatured egg white for a period of 28 d. In study design 1, participants (n = 4; 3 women) received avidin in capsules with a biotin binding capacity of 7 times the estimated dietary biotin intake of a typical self-selected diet. In study design 2, participants (n = 2; 2 women) received double the amount of avidin capsules (14 times the estimated dietary biotin intake). In study design 3, participants (n = 5; 3 women) consumed egg-white beverages containing avidin with a biotin binding capacity of 7 times the estimated dietary biotin intake. Established indices of biotin status [lymphocyte propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity; urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid, 3-hydroxyisovaleryl carnitine (3HIA-carnitine), and biotin; and plasma concentration of 3HIA-carnitine] indicated that study designs 1 and 2 were not effective in inducing marginal biotin deficiency, but study design 3 was as effective as previous inpatient study designs that induced deficiency by egg-white beverage. Marginal biotin deficiency can be induced experimentally by using a cost-effective outpatient design by avidin delivery in egg-white beverages. This design should be useful to the broader nutritional research community.

  14. Experimental investigations on flow induced vibration of an externally excited flexible plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Ashish; Darpe, Ashish K.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a harmonically actuated flexible plate in the wake of an upstream bluff body is experimentally investigated. The experiments are performed in an open-ended wind tunnel. A flexible plate trailing a bluff body is under fluid induced excitation due to the flowing fluid. The additional external excitation to the trailing plate is applied using an electro-magnetic exciter. The frequency and amplitude of the external harmonic excitation are selected as variable parameters in the experiments and their effect on the plate vibration and is investigated. To know the nature of acoustic pressure wave generated from the vibrating system, near-field acoustic pressure is also measured. A laser vibrometer, a pressure microphone and a high-speed camera are employed to measure the plate vibration, pressure signal, and instantaneous images of the plate motion respectively. The results obtained indicate that the dynamics of the plate is influenced by both the flow-induced excitation and external harmonic excitation. When frequency of the two excitations is close enough, a large vibration level and a high tonal sound pressure are observed. At higher amplitude of external excitation, the frequency component corresponding to the flow-induced excitation is found to reduce significantly in the frequency spectrum of the vibration signal. It is observed that, for certain range of excitation frequency, the plate vibration first reduces, reaches a minimum value and then increases with increase in the level of external excitation. A fair qualitative agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulation result of the past study has been noted. In addition to the experiments, the role of phase difference between the flow-induced excitation generated from the front obstacle and externally applied harmonic excitation is investigated through numerical simulations. The result obtained reveals that the final steady state vibration of the coupled system is

  15. Eszopiclone Prevents Excitotoxicity and Neurodegeneration in the Hippocampus Induced by Experimental Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Xi, Ming-Chu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Yamuy, Jack; Sampogna, Sharon; Tsai, Kevin L.; Lim, Vincent; Morales, Francisco R.; Chase, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: This study was designed to determine the effects of eszopiclone on apnea-induced excitotoxic synaptic processes and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Design: Recurrent periods of apnea, which consisted of a sequence of apnea (75% SpO2), followed by ventilation with recovery to normoxia (> 95% SpO2), were induced for a period of three hours in anesthetized guinea pigs. The CA3 Schaffer collateral pathway in the hippocampus was stimulated and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) response was recorded in CA1. Animals in the experimental group received an intravenous injection of eszopiclone (3 mg/kg) 10 min prior to the initiation of the periods of recurrent apnea, and once every 60 min thereafter; control animals received comparable injections of vehicle. At the end of the 3-h period of recurrent apnea, the animals were perfused, and hippocampal sections were immunostained in order to determine the presence of apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Analyses and Results: Apnea resulted in a persistent increase in synaptic responsiveness of CA1 neurons as determined by analyses of the fEPSP. Eszopiclone antagonized the apnea-induced increase in the fEPSP. Morphological analyses revealed significant apoptosis of CA1 neurons in control animals; however, there was no significant apoptosis in eszopiclone-treated animals. Conclusions: Eszopiclone was determined to suppress the apnea-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons, thereby reducing/eliminating neurotoxicity. These data lend credence to our hypothesis that eszopiclone, exclusive of its hypnotic actions, has the capacity to function as a potent neuroprotective agent. Citation: Fung SJ; Xi MC; Zhang JH; Yamuy J; Sampogna S; Tsai KL; Lim V; Morales FR; Chase MH. Eszopiclone prevents excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus induced by experimental apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(12):1593-1601. PMID:20041595

  16. Dyspnea and respiratory muscle strength in end-stage liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaltsakas, Georgios; Antoniou, Efstathios; Palamidas, Anastasios F; Gennimata, Sofia-Antiopi; Paraskeva, Panorea; Smyrnis, Anastasios; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Milic-Emili, Joseph; Koulouris, Nickolaos G

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of chronic dyspnea and its relationship to respiratory muscle function in end-stage liver disease. METHODS: Sixty-eight consecutive, ambulatory, Caucasian patients with end-stage liver disease, candidates for liver transplantation, were referred for preoperative respiratory function assessment. Forty of these (29 men) were included in this preliminary study after applying strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Seventeen of 40 patients (42%) had ascites, but none of them was cachectic. Fifteen of 40 patients (38%) had a history of hepatic encephalopathy, though none of them was symptomatic at study time. All patients with a known history and/or presence of co-morbidities were excluded. Chronic dyspnea was rated according to the modified medical research council (mMRC) 6-point scale. Liver disease severity was assessed according to the Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD). Routine lung function tests, maximum static expiratory (Pemax) and inspiratory (Pimax) mouth pressures were measured. Respiratory muscle strength (RMS) was calculated from Pimax and Pemax values. In addition, arterial blood gases and pattern of breathing (VE: minute ventilation; VT: tidal volume; VT/TI: mean inspiratory flow; TI: duration of inspiration) were measured. RESULTS: Thirty-five (88%) of 40 patients aged (mean ± SD) 52 ± 10 years reported various degrees of chronic dyspnea (mMRC), ranging from 0 to 4, with a mean value of 2.0 ± 1.2. MELD score was 14 ± 6. Pemax, percent of predicted (%pred) was 105 ± 35, Pimax, %pred was 90 ± 29, and RMS, %pred was 97 ± 30. These pressures were below the normal limits in 12 (30%), 15 (38%), and 14 (35%) patients, respectively. Furthermore, comparing the subgroups of ascites to non-ascites patients, all respiratory muscle indices measured were found significantly decreased in ascites patients. Patients with ascites also had a significantly worse MELD score compared to non-ascites ones (P = 0

  17. Muscarinic receptors involved in airway vascular leakage induced by experimental gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong-Yao; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Hao; Advenier, Charles; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Devillier, Philippe

    2008-04-23

    Gastro-oesophageal acid reflux may cause airway responses such as cough, bronchoconstriction and inflammation in asthmatic patients. Studies in humans or in animals have suggested that these responses involve cholinergic nerves. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the efferent vagal component on airway microvascular leakage induced by instillation of hydrochloric acid (HCl) into the oesophagus of guinea-pigs and the subtype of muscarinic receptors involved. Airway microvascular leakage induced by intra-oesophageal HCl instillation was abolished by bilateral vagotomy or by the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium. HCl-induced leakage was inhibited by pretreatment with atropine, a non-specific muscarinic receptor antagonist, and also by pretreatment with either pirenzepine, a muscarinic M(1) receptor antagonist, or 4-DAMP, a muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonist. Pirenzepine was more potent than atropine and 4-DAMP. These antagonists were also studied on airway microvascular leakage or bronchoconstriction induced by intravenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh). Atropine, pirenzepine and 4-DAMP inhibited ACh-induced airway microvascular leakage with similar potencies. In sharp contrast, 4-DAMP and atropine were more potent inhibitors of ACh-induced bronchoconstriction than pirenzepine. Methoctramine, a muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonist, was ineffective in all experimental conditions. These results suggest that airway microvascular leakage caused by HCl intra-oesophageal instillation involves ACh release from vagus nerve terminals and that M(1) and M(3) receptors play a major role in cholinergic-mediated microvascular leakage, whereas M(3) receptors are mainly involved in ACh-induced bronchoconstriction.

  18. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-song; Li, Guo-xiu; Jia, Tao-ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results. PMID:28054555

  19. The effect of experimentally induced sedentariness on mood and psychobiological responses to mental stress

    PubMed Central

    Endrighi, Romano; Steptoe, Andrew; Hamer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests a link between sedentary behaviours and depressive symptoms. Mechanisms underlying this relationship are not understood, but inflammatory processes may be involved. Autonomic and inflammatory responses to stress may be heightened in sedentary individuals contributing to risk, but no study has experimentally investigated this. Aims To examine the effect of sedentary time on mood and stress responses using an experimental design. Method Forty-three individuals were assigned to a free-living sedentary condition and to a control condition (usual activity) in a cross-over, randomised fashion and were tested in a psychophysiology laboratory after spending 2 weeks in each condition. Participants completed mood questionnaires (General Health Questionnaire and Profile of Mood States) and wore a motion sensor for 4 weeks. Results Sedentary time increased by an average of 32 min/day (P = 0.01) during the experimental condition compared with control. Being sedentary resulted in increases in negative mood independent of changes in moderate to vigorous physical activity (ΔGHQ = 6.23, ΔPOMS = 2.80). Mood disturbances were associated with greater stress-induced inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses (β = 0.37). Conclusions Two weeks of exposure to greater free-living sedentary time resulted in mood disturbances independent of reduction in physical activity. Stress-induced IL-6 responses were associated with changes in mood. PMID:26294364

  20. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-Song; Li, Guo-Xiu; Jia, Tao-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results.

  1. New and safe experimental model of radiation-induced neurovascular histological changes for microsurgical research.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Ochoa, Sergi; Gallardo-Calero, Irene; Sallent, Andrea; López-Fernández, Alba; Vergés, Ramona; Giralt, Jordi; Aguirre-Canyadell, Marius; Velez, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The aim is to create a new and safe experimental model of radiation-induced neurovascular histological changes with reduced morbidity and mortality for use with experimental microsurgical techniques. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were divided as follows: Group I: control group, 24 rats clinically evaluated during six weeks; Group II: evaluation of acute side-effects (two-week follow-up period), 24 irradiated (20 Gy) rats; and Group III: evaluation of subacute side-effects (six-week follow-up period), 24 irradiated (20 Gy) rats. Variables included clinical assessments, weight, vascular permeability (arterial and venous), mortality and histological studies. No significant differences were observed between groups with respect to the variables studied. Significant differences were observed between groups I vs II-III regarding survival rates and histological changes to arteries, veins and nerves. Rat body weights showed progressive increases in all groups, and the mortality rate of the present model is 10.4% compared with 30-40% in the previous models. In conclusion, the designed model induces selective changes by radiotherapy in the neurovascular bundle without histological changes affecting the surrounding tissues. This model allows therapeutic experimental studies to be conducted, including the viability of microvascular and microneural sutures post radiotherapy in the cervical neurovascular bundle.

  2. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  3. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid induces antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    González-Cuevas, J; Navarro-Partida, J; Marquez-Aguirre, A L; Bueno-Topete, M R; Beas-Zarate, C; Armendáriz-Borunda, J

    2011-01-01

    Experimental liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) is associated with oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammation. This work was focused on elucidating the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in this model of hepatotoxicity. Wistar male rats were treated with CCl(4) and EDTA (60, 120, or 240 mg/kg). Morphometric analyses were carried out in Masson's stained liver sections to determine fibrosis index. Coagulation tests prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) were also determined. Gene expression for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1), alpha1(I) procollagen gene (alpha1 Col I), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was monitored by real-time PCR. Antioxidant effect of EDTA was measured by its effects on lipid peroxidation; biological activity of ceruloplasmin (Cp), SOD, and catalase (Cat) were analyzed by zymography assays. Animals with CCl(4)-hepatic injury that received EDTA showed a decrement in fibrosis (20%) and lipid peroxidation (22%). The mRNA expression for TNF-alpha (55%), TGF-beta1 (50%), IL-6 (52%), and alpha1 Col I (60%) was also decreased. This group of animals showed increased Cp (62%) and SOD (25%) biological activities. Coagulation blood tests, Cat activity, and gene expression for SOD were not modified by EDTA treatment. This study demonstrates that EDTA treatment induces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, decreases lipid peroxidation, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis in experimental liver fibrosis induced by CCl(4).

  4. Female and male chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with severe dyspnea do not profit less from pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lizak, Maria Karolina; Singh, Sally; Lubina, Szymon; Zembala, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an established component of COPD management. The lack of exercise performance improvement (EPI) in severely dyspnoeic patients (Medical Research Council [MRC] score 5) has been questioned. The data on the gender impact on EPI after PR remain scarce. The impact of dyspnea severity on PR outcomes was investigated and a question was raised whether severe dyspnea at training onset limits the profit from PR in COPD patients. Additionally, the impact of gender on PR results was analyzed. 263 consecutive COPD patients underwent outpatient PR. Exercise capacity was assessed by the incremental shuttle walking test (SWT) and dyspnea with the MRC dyspnea score at inclusion (preSWT, preMRC) and at the end of PR (postSWT, postMRC). The data were analyzed in groups according to preMRC. The grade of improvement (deltaSWT, deltaSWT% and deltaMRC) was compared between groups. The influence of gender was analyzed in 138 men and 125 women. A significant absolute increase in SWT and a decrease in MRC score were shown in all groups and for both sexes (p < 0.05) with no significant intergroup differences (p > 0.05). deltaSWT% rose significantly with preMRC score and exceeded the values of a clinically important increase (exception: group 2 with preMRC score 2). No significant differences between men and women were observed (deltaMRC: -0.6 vs. -0.7, deltaSWT: 66.7 vs. 56.0 m, deltaSWT%: 63.7 vs. 58.1%, p > 0.05, respectively). Patients with severe dyspnea did not benefit less from PR. Gender did not influence PR outcome in this study.

  5. Usefulness of the culturally adapted oxygen-cost diagram in the assessment of dyspnea in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    De Jesús-Berrios, Yohana; Santos-Rodríguez, Ruth A; Dexter, Donald; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Nazario, Cruz M

    2015-03-01

    Breathlessness is a common and disabling symptom of pulmonary disease. Measuring its severity is recommended as such measurements can be helpful in both clinical and research settings. The oxygen-cost diagram (OCD) and the Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea scale were developed in English to measure severity of dyspnea. These scales were previously translated to Spanish and adapted for use in a Hispanic population. The objective of this study is to assess the psychometric properties of these scales. We propose the scales correlate well with measures of physiological impairment. Subjects having pulmonary disease rated their perceptions of dyspnea using the scales, performed a spirometry test, and did a 6-min walk. Spearman correlation coefficients (p) were used to correlate dyspnea scores with spirometric parameters and distance walked (6MWD). Sixty-six patients having stable asthma (n = 36), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 19), or interstitial lung disease (n = 11) participated in the study. OCD scores showed a significant correlation with FEV1 (p = 0.41; p < 0.01), FEV1% (p = 0.36; p < 0.01), FVC (p = 0.44; p < 0.01), and FVC% (p = 0.37; p < 0.01) in the study population. The OCD scores were highly correlated with 6MWD (p = 0.59, p < 0.01). The MRC dyspnea scale showed significant inverse correlation with FEV1 (p = -0.34; p < 0.01) and 6MWD (p = -0.33; p < 0.05), but the correlations were weaker compared to the correlations with the OCD scale. The severity of breathlessness as measured by the adapted Spanish OCD showed a moderate to high correlation with spirometric parameters and 6MWD; therefore, the adapted OCD should prove to be useful in Puerto Rico.

  6. Preliminary investigation of cardiopulmonary function in stroke patients with stable heart failure and exertional dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Wang, Lin-Yi; Pong, Ya-Ping; Tsai, Yu-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, perceived dyspnea, degree of fatigue, and activity of daily living with motor function and neurological status in stroke patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF). This was a cohort study in a tertiary care medical center. Stroke patients with CHF and exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association class I–III) were recruited. The baseline characteristics included duration of disease, Brunnstrom stage, spirometry, resting heart rate, resting oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), Borg scale, fatigue scale, and Barthel index. A total of 47 stroke patients (24 males, 23 females, mean age 65.9 ± 11.5 years) were included. The average Brunnstrom stages of affected limbs were 3.6 ± 1.3 over the proximal parts and 3.5 ± 1.4 over the distal parts of upper limbs, and 3.9 ± 0.9 over lower limbs. The average forced vital capacity (FVC) was 2.0 ± 0.8 L, with a predicted FVC% of 67.9 ± 18.8%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) of 1.6 ± 0.7 L, predicted FEV1% of 70.6 ± 20.1%, FEV1/FVC of 84.2 ± 10.5%, and maximum mid-expiratory flow of 65.4 ± 29.5%. The average MIP and MEP were −52.9 ± 33.3 cmH2O and 60.8 ± 29.0 cmH2O, respectively. The Borg scale was 1.5 ± 0.8. MIP was negatively associated with the average Brunnstrom stage of the proximal (r = −0.318, P < 0.05) and distal (r = −0.391, P < 0.01) parts of the upper extremities and lower extremities (r = −0.288, P < 0.05), FVC (r = −0.471, P < 0.01), predicted FVC% (r = −0.299, P < 0.05), and FEV1 (r = −0.397, P < 0.01). MEP was positively associated with average Brunnstrom stage of the distal area of the upper extremities (r = 0.351, P < 0.05), FVC (r = 0.526, P < 0

  7. Preliminary investigation of cardiopulmonary function in stroke patients with stable heart failure and exertional dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Wang, Lin-Yi; Pong, Ya-Ping; Tsai, Yu-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, perceived dyspnea, degree of fatigue, and activity of daily living with motor function and neurological status in stroke patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF).This was a cohort study in a tertiary care medical center. Stroke patients with CHF and exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association class I-III) were recruited. The baseline characteristics included duration of disease, Brunnstrom stage, spirometry, resting heart rate, resting oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), Borg scale, fatigue scale, and Barthel index.A total of 47 stroke patients (24 males, 23 females, mean age 65.9 ± 11.5 years) were included. The average Brunnstrom stages of affected limbs were 3.6 ± 1.3 over the proximal parts and 3.5 ± 1.4 over the distal parts of upper limbs, and 3.9 ± 0.9 over lower limbs. The average forced vital capacity (FVC) was 2.0 ± 0.8 L, with a predicted FVC% of 67.9 ± 18.8%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) of 1.6 ± 0.7 L, predicted FEV1% of 70.6 ± 20.1%, FEV1/FVC of 84.2 ± 10.5%, and maximum mid-expiratory flow of 65.4 ± 29.5%. The average MIP and MEP were -52.9 ± 33.3 cmH2O and 60.8 ± 29.0 cmH2O, respectively. The Borg scale was 1.5 ± 0.8. MIP was negatively associated with the average Brunnstrom stage of the proximal (r = -0.318, P < 0.05) and distal (r = -0.391, P < 0.01) parts of the upper extremities and lower extremities (r = -0.288, P < 0.05), FVC (r = -0.471, P < 0.01), predicted FVC% (r = -0.299, P < 0.05), and FEV1 (r = -0.397, P < 0.01). MEP was positively associated with average Brunnstrom stage of the distal area of the upper extremities (r = 0.351, P < 0.05), FVC (r = 0.526, P < 0.01), FEV1 (r = 0

  8. A Phosphorylatable Sphingosine Analog Induces Airway Smooth Muscle Cytostasis and Reverses Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Experimental Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, David R.; Lecours, Pascale B.; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Beaulieu, Marie-Josée; Huppé, Carole-Ann; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Flamand, Nicolas; Don, Anthony S.; Bissonnette, Élyse; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laplante, Mathieu; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.; Bossé, Ynuk; Marsolais, David

    2017-01-01

    In asthma, excessive bronchial narrowing associated with thickening of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) causes respiratory distress. Numerous pharmacological agents prevent experimental airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) when delivered prophylactically. However, most fail to resolve this feature after disease is instated. Although sphingosine analogs are primarily perceived as immune modulators with the ability to prevent experimental asthma, they also influence processes associated with tissue atrophy, supporting the hypothesis that they could interfere with mechanisms sustaining pre-established AHR. We thus assessed the ability of a sphingosine analog (AAL-R) to reverse AHR in a chronic model of asthma. We dissected the pharmacological mechanism of this class of agents using the non-phosphorylatable chiral isomer AAL-S and the pre-phosphorylated form of AAL-R (AFD-R) in vivo and in human ASM cells. We found that a therapeutic course of AAL-R reversed experimental AHR in the methacholine challenge test, which was not replicated by dexamethasone or the non-phosphorylatable isomer AAL-S. AAL-R efficiently interfered with ASM cell proliferation in vitro, supporting the concept that immunomodulation is not necessary to interfere with cellular mechanisms sustaining AHR. Moreover, the sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase inhibitor SM4 and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor antagonist VPC23019 failed to inhibit proliferation, indicating that intracellular accumulation of sphingosine-1-phosphate or interference with cell surface S1P1/S1P3 activation, are not sufficient to induce cytostasis. Potent AAL-R-induced cytostasis specifically related to its ability to induce intracellular AFD-R accumulation. Thus, a sphingosine analog that possesses the ability to be phosphorylated in situ interferes with cellular mechanisms that beget AHR. PMID:28270767

  9. Experimental invalidation of phase-transition-induced elastic softening in CrN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanmin; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Chen, Miao; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Liping; He, Duanwei; Lin, Zhijun; Zhang, Ruifeng; Leinenweber, Kurt; Zhao, Yusheng

    2012-08-01

    We report experimental results of phase stability and incompressibility of CrN. The obtained bulk moduli for cubic and orthorhombic CrN are 257 and 262 GPa, respectively. These results invalidate the conclusion of phase-transition-induced elastic softening recently reported based on nonmagnetic simulations for cubic CrN [Nature Mater.NMAACR1476-112210.1038/nmat2549 8, 947 (2009)]. On the other hand, they provide the only experimental evidence to support the computational models involving the local magnetic moment of Cr atoms [Nature Mater.NMAACR1476-112210.1038/nmat2722 9, 283 (2010)], indicating that atomic spin has a profound influence on the material's elastic properties. We also demonstrate that nonstoichiometry in CrNx has strong effects on its structural stability.

  10. Theoretical modeling and experimental demonstration of Raman probe induced spectral dip for realizing a superluminal laser.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Joshua; Zhou, Zifan; Zhou, Minchuan; Wang, Ye; Tseng, S; Shahriar, M S

    2016-11-28

    We have demonstrated experimentally a Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) with a Raman resonance induced dip in the center of the gain profile, in order to produce an anomalous dispersion, necessary for making the laser superluminal. Numerical calculations match closely with experimental results, and indicate that the laser is operating superluminally, with the group index far below unity (~0.00526) at the center of the dip. The estimated factor of enhancement in the sensitivity to cavity length perturbation is ~190, approximately equaling the inverse of the group index. This enhancement factor can be made much higher via optimal tuning of parameters. Such a laser has the potential to advance significantly the field of high-precision metrology, with applications such as vibrometry, accelerometry, and rotation sensing.

  11. Antidiarrhoeal activity of leaf extract of celosia argentea in experimentally induced diarrhoea in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Vidyasagar, Gali; Singh, Sunder; Ghule, Santosh; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2010-01-01

    In order to scientifically apprise some of the anecdotal, folkloric, ethno medical uses of celosia argentea, the present study was undertaken to examine the antidiarrhoeal properties of alcoholic extract of leaves of Celosia argentea on diarrhoea by using different experimental models. Anti-diarrhoeal effect was evaluated by castor oil induced diarrhoea, charcoal meal test and PGE(2) induced diarrhoea. Loperamide (2 mg/kg) and atropine (0.1mg/kg) were used as standard drugs. Extract was used in 100 and 200 mg/kg dose. It produced dose related anti-diarrhoeal effect. Results suggest that it may act centrally and may inhibit the PGE(2) to give anti-diarrhoeal effects. Result of charcoal meal test also suggests its anti-muscarinic activity.

  12. ANTIDIARRHOEAL ACTIVITY OF LEAF EXTRACT OF CELOSIA ARGENTEA IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED DIARRHOEA IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Praveen; Vidyasagar, Gali; Singh, Sunder; Ghule, Santosh; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2010-01-01

    In order to scientifically apprise some of the anecdotal, folkloric, ethno medical uses of celosia argentea, the present study was undertaken to examine the antidiarrhoeal properties of alcoholic extract of leaves of Celosia argentea on diarrhoea by using different experimental models. Anti-diarrhoeal effect was evaluated by castor oil induced diarrhoea, charcoal meal test and PGE2 induced diarrhoea. Loperamide (2 mg/kg) and atropine (0.1mg/kg) were used as standard drugs. Extract was used in 100 and 200 mg/kg dose. It produced dose related anti-diarrhoeal effect. Results suggest that it may act centrally and may inhibit the PGE2 to give anti-diarrhoeal effects. Result of charcoal meal test also suggests its anti-muscarinic activity. PMID:22247831

  13. Study of haemostatic disorders in experimentally induced leishmaniasis in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Valladares, J E; Ruiz De Gopegui, R; Riera, C; Alberola, J; Gállego, M; Espada, Y; Portús, M; Arboix, M

    1998-01-01

    Haemostatic alterations in dogs experimentally infected with Leishmania infantum were studied before and after therapy with meglumine antimonate. Haemostatic function tests including platelet count, collagen-induced platelet aggregation, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, plasma fibrinogen determination, and serum fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products concentration were performed. In the course of infection and before treatment, moderate thrombocytopenia (P<0.00001), decreased collagen induced platelet aggregation (P=0.0003), prolonged thrombin time (P=0.0117) and increased fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products were observed. Statistically significant differences of plasma fibrinogen concentration, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time were not encountered. Haemostatic parameters returned to normal values after therapy. The results indicate that Leishmania infection may impair haemostasis suggesting induction of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and that treating dogs in an early stage of infection may potentially avoid the possibility of developing an uncompensated DIC.

  14. Echinococcus granulosus: different cytokine profiles are induced by single versus multiple experimental infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Marqués, Juan M; Gavidia, Cesar M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Carmona, Carlos; García, Hector H; Chabalgoity, José A

    2012-02-01

    Modulation of host responses is an important strategy by which parasites ensure successful establishment and persistence. Host counteraction against this modulation may be required for the host to develop resistance to infection. In this pilot study, experimental infection of dogs with Echinococcus granulosus induced a strong polarization of the cytokine response towards a Th2 phenotype. Consecutive rounds of infection and cure induced resistance to infection resulting in a dramatically lower parasite burden. Repeatedly-infected resistant dogs also lost immune polarization and developed a balanced Th1/Th2 response. No major differences were observed in the production of regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) between dogs with high parasite load and dogs with only few intestinal parasites. These results suggest that E. granulosus-driven immunomodulation contributes to successful infection in the definitive host. This information might be relevant for the development of more effective vaccines against this stage of the parasite. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The antioxidant response induced by Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts in animals bearing experimental solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gruia, Maria Iuliana; Oprea, Eliza; Gruia, Ion; Negoita, Valentina; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2008-03-27

    Lonicera caerulea is a species of bush native to the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russian Far East) whose berries have been extensively studied due to their potential high antioxidant activity. The aim of our work was to investigate the in vivo effects of the antioxidant action of Lonicera caerulea berry extracts on the dynamics of experimentally-induced tumors. Our data showed that aqueous Lonicera caerulaea extracts reduced the tumor volume when administered continuously during the tumor growth and development stages, but augmented the tumor growth when the administration of extracts started three weeks before tumor grafting. Prolonged administration of Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts induced the antioxidant defense mechanism in the tumor tissues, while surprisingly amplifying the peripheral oxidative stress.

  16. Prophylactic efficacy of buparvaquone in experimentally induced Theileria annulata infection in calves.

    PubMed

    Bansal, G C; Sharma, N N

    1989-10-01

    The antitheilerial activity of buparvaquone (BW 720C) was evaluated in experimentally induced Theileria annulata infections in cross-bred male calves. T. annulata infections were induced by injecting a suspension of infected ground tick tissue suspension (GUTTS) equivalent to two ticks subcutaneously into each calf. Buparvaquone at a dose of 2.5 mg kg-1 body weight was given as a single injection (intramuscularly) on Day 0 (Group 1), Day 8 (Group 2) and Day 12 (Group 3) post-infection. The animals in Groups 4 and 5 were untreated and challenged controls, respectively. All of the recovered animals from Groups 1-4 were challenged with a lethal dose of T. annulata at 6 weeks post-infection. The immunized animals were resistant to the homologous challenge, which killed three of four control animals (Group 5); the controls showed typical antemortem and post-mortem lesions of theileriosis.

  17. An experimental investigation of airflow-induced vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Bosze, E.; Boissevain, J.; Simon-Gillo, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report summarizes an experimental investigation of vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector (MVD). In particular, the maximum displacements of several MVD components were determined from accelerometer measurements of vibrations induced by an electronics air-cooling system. For an MVD inlet air volumetric flow rate of 0.022 m{sup 3}/s, maximum displacements of several MVD components including a multi-chip module, the Rohacell inlet air plenum, and an aluminum structural cross support, were found to be on the order of 1.5 {mu}m. Consequently, it was concluded that air induced vibrations will not significantly interfere with the MVD`s long-term structural integrity or operating performance. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Microparticles bearing encephalitogenic peptides induce T-cell tolerance and ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R; Martin, Aaron J; McCarthy, Derrick P; Terry, Rachael L; Hunter, Zoe N; Yap, Woon Teck; Getts, Meghann Teague; Pleiss, Michael; Luo, Xunrong; King, Nicholas JC; Shea, Lonnie D; Miller, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant T-cell activation underlies many autoimmune disorders, yet most attempts to induce T-cell tolerance have failed. Building on previous strategies for tolerance induction that exploited natural mechanisms for clearing apoptotic debris, we show that antigen-decorated microparticles (500-nm diameter) induce long-term T-cell tolerance in mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Specifically, intravenous infusion of either polystyrene or biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles bearing encephalitogenic peptides prevents the onset and modifies the course of the disease. These beneficial effects require microparticle uptake by marginal zone macrophages expressing the scavenger receptor MARCO and are mediated in part by the activity of regulatory T cells, abortive T-cell activation and T-cell anergy. Together these data highlight the potential for using microparticles to target natural apoptotic clearance pathways to inactivate pathogenic T cells and halt the disease process in autoimmunity. PMID:23159881

  19. Antifungal activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. and thymol on experimentally induced dermatomycoses.

    PubMed

    Soković, M; Glamoclija, J; Cirić, A; Kataranovski, D; Marin, P D; Vukojević, J; Brkić, D

    2008-12-01

    The in vivo evaluation of the toxicological and antifungal activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. and its main component thymol was made on 2-month-old male Wistar rats. We examined the therapeutic potency against experimentally induced dermatomycoses in rats, using the most frequent dermatomycetes, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, and T. tonsurans. The therapeutic efficacy of a 1% solution of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris and thymol as well as the commercial preparation bifonazole was evaluated. During the 37-day observation period the oil-treated animals were cured.

  20. [Protective Activity of Prion Protein Fragments after Immunization of Annimals with Experimentally Induced Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Volpina, O M; Volkova, T D; Medvinskaya, N I; Kamynina, A V; Zaporozhskaya, Y V; Aleksandrova, I J; Koroev, D O; Samokhin, A N; Nesterova, I V; Deygin, V I; Bobkova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The prion protein is considered as one of the membrane targets of neurotoxic beta-amyloid during Alzheimer's disease development. We have chosen and synthesized 17-33, 23-33, 95-110 and 101-115 prion fragments involved in beta-amyloid binding. The effect of immunization with the peptides on the features of Alzheimer's disease was investigated in animals with an experimentally induced form of the disease. It was shown that immunization either with peptide 17-33 or with protein conjugates of peptides 23-33 and 101-115 increases the level of brain beta-amyloid and improves morfofunctional state of the brain.

  1. Experimentally induced fatty liver and kidney syndrome in the young turkey.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, C C; Siller, W G

    1983-01-01

    Turkeys were fed up to four weeks of age on diets of low biotin content and then fasted for 18 hours. Three birds developed clinical signs of fatty liver and kidney syndrome (FLKS) and on autopsy had pale and swollen livers and kidneys. Morphological studies showed fatty accumulations in liver, kidney, heart and proventriculus but no signs of inflammatory or degenerative changes. The infiltrated lipid had an abnormal fatty acid composition, with an increased proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids. Affected birds suffered from severe hypoglycaemia and hepatic glycogen was depleted. These findings demonstrate that FLKS can be induced experimentally in turkeys.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin E on experimental lens-induced uveitis.

    PubMed

    Cid, L; Pararajasegaram, G; Sevanian, A; Gauderman, W; Romero, J L; Marak, G E; Rao, N A

    1992-01-01

    The anti-phlogistic effect of dietary vitamin E supplementation on the acute inflammation observed in experimental lens-induced uveitis in Brown Norway rats was studied. The effects of vitamin E were examined using histopathologic parameters as well as by measuring the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites. Histologic examination of the eyes revealed that the vitamin E-deficient animals had the most severe destruction of the retina, while those animals receiving the vitamin E-supplemented diet exhibited the best preservation of the retinal architecture. Levels of arachidonic acid metabolites, as determined by radioimmunoassay, were significantly higher in vitamin E deficient rats as compared with rats on a normal diet.

  3. Experimental Studies of Noise-Induced Phenomena in a Tunnel Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario N.; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    Noise induced phenomena are investigated in a physical system based on a tunnel diode. The stochastic differential equation describing this physical system is analog to the Langevin equation of an overdamped Brownian particle diffusing in a nonlinear potential. This simple and versatile physical system allows a series of experiments testing and clarifying the role of the noise and of its correlation in the stochastic dynamics of bistable or metastable Systems. Experimental investigatio ns of stochastic resonance, resonant activation and noise enhanced stability are discussed.

  4. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  5. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of α-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Szúcs, Z.

    2005-05-01

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to Eα=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi(α,2n)211At, 209Bi(α,3n)210At, 209Bi(α,x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  6. Experimental studies of excitations in a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Niffenegger, Robert; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of various excitation processes in a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields. We have systematically studied controllable inter-band excitations by modulating the strength of the Raman coupling, and probed the resultant decay from the upper dressed bands and heating of the BEC. We also present preliminary results probing the effects of synthetic spin-orbit coupling and gauge fields on collective excitations as well as photoassociation processes in the BEC.

  7. Experimental and computational investigation of confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Yuan, Hao; Fu, Yangting; Wang, Zhe

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for both unconfined flat surface and confined cavity cases. An integrated LIBS system is employed to acquire the shockwave and plasma plume images. The computational model consists of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, which are necessary to describe shockwave behaviors. The numerical predictions are validated against shadowgraphic images in terms of shockwave expansion and reflection. The three-dimensional (3D) shockwave morphology and velocity fields are displayed and discussed.

  8. Theoretical and experimental optical studies of cholesteric liquid crystal films with thermally induced pitch gradients.

    PubMed

    Zografopoulos, Dimitrios C; Kriezis, Emmanouil E; Mitov, Michel; Binet, Corinne

    2006-06-01

    The reflection properties of cholesteric films with thermally induced pitch gradients are theoretically and experimentally studied. It is shown that the optical behavior of such films corresponds to the averaged contribution of a number of stochastic pitch variation profiles, due to the transversal and longitudinal nonuniformities that develop in the helical structure of such samples. Depending on the annealing time, both narrow-band and broadband behavior can be selectively achieved. The influence of the pitch profile gradient on the broadband reflection performance of cholesteric samples is theoretically analyzed, and a multi-slab structure for achieving optimum efficiency is proposed.

  9. Catechin averts experimental diabetes mellitus-induced vascular endothelial structural and functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Khanna, Deepa; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), an initial event that could lead to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Previous studies showed that catechin, a key component of green tea, possesses vascular beneficial effects. We investigated the effect of catechin hydrate in diabetes mellitus-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities (VEA). Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once) administration to rats produced diabetes mellitus, which subsequently induced VEA in 8 weeks by markedly attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated aortic ring preparation, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentrations and impairing aortic endothelial integrity. These abnormalities in diabetic rats were accompanied with elevated aortic superoxide anion generation and serum lipid peroxidation in addition to hyperglycemia. Catechin hydrate treatment (50 mg/kg/day p.o., 3 weeks) markedly prevented diabetes mellitus-induced VEA and vascular oxidative stress. Intriguingly, in vitro incubation of L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, or Wortmannin (100 nM), a selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), markedly prevented catechin hydrate-induced improvement in acetylcholine-provoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in the diabetic rat aorta. Moreover, catechin hydrate treatment considerably reduced the elevated level of serum glucose in diabetic rats. In conclusion, catechin hydrate treatment prevents diabetes mellitus-induced VED through the activation of endothelial PI3K signal and subsequent activation of eNOS and generation of nitric oxide. In addition, reduction in high glucose, vascular oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation might additionally contribute to catechin hydrate-associated prevention of diabetic VEA.

  10. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats (“EAE” group). 2- “N. sativa + EAE” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- “EAE + N. sativa” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE. PMID:26261504

  11. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats ("EAE" group). 2- "N. sativa + EAE" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- "EAE + N. sativa" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE.

  12. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology. PMID:25563619

  14. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology.

  15. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela Petiti, Juan Pablo; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Gutierrez, Silvina; Paul, Ana Lucia de; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Ines

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC{delta} in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC{delta} in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC{delta}, ERK1/2 and p38.

  16. Modeling Chemotherapy-Induced Hair Loss: From Experimental Propositions toward Clinical Reality.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is one of the most devastating side effects of cancer treatment. To study the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the hair follicle, a number of experimental models have been proposed. Yoon et al. report that transplantation of human scalp hair follicles onto chemotherapy-treated immunodeficient mice serves as an excellent in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Yoon et al. demonstrate that (i) the response of human hair follicles grafted onto immunodeficient mice to cyclophosphamide resembles the key features of the chemotherapy-induced hair loss seen in patients with cancer and (ii) this human in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss is closer to clinical reality than to any earlier models. Undoubtedly, this model will serve as a valuable tool for analyses of the mechanisms that underlie this devastating side effect of anti-cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk.

    PubMed

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-07

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology.

  18. Ameliorative potential of fluoxetine/raloxifene combination on experimentally induced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kabel, Ahmed M; Elkhoely, Abeer A

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies in females worldwide. Targeting the estrogen receptors alone with raloxifene (RAL) reduces the incidence of estrogen receptor positive tumors. Fluoxetine (FLX) is one of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors that was proven to have anticancer properties. Our aim was to detect the effects of RAL/FLX combination on experimentally induced breast cancer. Eighty female Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups: 7,12-Dimethyl Benzanthracene (DMBA) induced breast cancer group, DMBA+RAL, DMBA+FLX and DMBA+RAL+FLX. Tumor volume, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) were determined in the tumor tissues. Parts of the tumor were subjected to histopathological examination. RAL or FLX alone or in combination induced significant increase in tumor CAT and SOD with significant decrease in tumor volume, tissue MDA, TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β1 and alleviated the histopathological and immunohistochemical changes compared to DMBA group. In conclusion, RAL/FLX combination had a better effect than each of RAL or FLX alone against DMBA-induced breast cancer in rats which may represent a new therapeutic modality for management of breast cancer.

  19. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Gutiérrez, Silvina; De Paul, Ana Lucía; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Inés

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC delta in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC delta in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC delta, ERK1/2 and p38.

  20. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF HESPERIDIN ON CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATION IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN DIABETES IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Kakadiya, Jagdish; Mulani, Haresh; Shah, Nehal

    2010-01-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate effect Hesperidin on Cardiovascular Complication in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in normal and Streptozotocin-Nicotinamide induced in diabetic rats. Hesperidin (100 mg/kg, p.o) was administered for 28 days in rats injected with single dose of Streptozotocin (65 mg/kg, i.p, STZ) and Nicotinamide (110 mg/kg, i.p, NIC) and after isoproterenol (200 mg/kg, s.c.) induced myocardial infarction in rats on 29th and 30th day. At the end of experimental period (i.e. on the day 31) serum and heart tissues sample were collected, and glucose, HbA1c and Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and High density lipoprotein (HDL) and cholesterol ester synthetase (CES), lecithin Cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), systolic and diastolic blood pressure were find out. Administration of STZ–NIC in rats showed a significant (p<0.001) increased in the levels of serum glucose, glycosylated heamoglobin (HbA1c), Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and Low density lipoprotein (LDL) whereas the levels of High density lipoprotein (HDL) were found to be non significant but significant (p<0.001) increased in the level of heart tissues CES and significant (p<0.001, p<0.01) decreased LCAT and LPL, significantly (p<0.01) increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure as compared to respective control groups. Treatment with Hesperidin significantly (P<0.05) decreased HbA1c, glucose, CES level and significantly (P<0.01) decreased LDL, TC, TG, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and significant (P<0.01) increased LCAT and LPL level but no significantly change HDL in compared to diabetic control group. We concluded that HES (100 mg/kg) is effective in controlling blood glucose levels and reduced cardiac complication in experimentally induced myocardial infarction diabetic rats. PMID:24825971

  1. Aerobic exercise training without weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion in obese women.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Vipa; Stickford, Jonathon L; Bhammar, Dharini M; Babb, Tony G

    2016-01-15

    Dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a common symptom in obesity. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training without weight loss could reduce DOE. Twenty-two otherwise healthy obese women participated in a 12-week supervised aerobic exercise training program, exercising 30 min/day at 70-80% heart rate reserve, 4 days/week. Subjects were grouped based on their Ratings of Perceived Breathlessness (RPB) during constant load 60 W cycling: +DOE (n=12, RPB≥4, 37±7 years, 34±4 kg/m(2)) and -DOE (n=10, RPB≤2, 32±6 years, 33±3 kg/m(2)). No significant differences between the groups in body composition, pulmonary function, or cardiorespiratory fitness were observed pre-training. Post-training,peak was improved significantly in both groups (+DOE: 12±7, -DOE: 14±8%). RPB was significantly decreased in the +DOE (4.7±1.0-2.5±1.0) and remained low in the -DOE group (1.2±0.6-1.3±1.0) (interaction p<0.001). The reduction in RPB was not significantly correlated with the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. Aerobic exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness and DOE and thus appears to be an effective treatment for DOE in obese women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiological mechanisms of dyspnea relief following ivacaftor in cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Schaeffer, Michele R; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Wilcox, Pearce G; Guenette, Jordan A

    2015-01-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel oral pharmacologic agent that specifically targets the genetic defect of cystic fibrosis (CF) by augmenting chloride conductance through the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein. For individuals with CF and at least one copy of the G551D gating mutation, improvements in sweat chloride, nutritional parameters, lung function, respiratory symptoms, and exercise tolerance (i.e., 6-min walk distance) are attained within 2 weeks of initiating ivacaftor. However, there are no reports detailing the physiological and sensory implications of these improvements and their underlying mechanisms. We performed detailed cardiopulmonary exercise testing pre- and post-initiation of ivacaftor in a 27-year old male with CF (CFTR genotype F508del/G551D) and chronic airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC=0.44). An improvement of FEV1 (by 16%) following ivacaftor was accompanied by clinically significant improvements in exercise capacity (by 14%) and exertional dyspnea (by up to 5 Borg scale units). These improvements were attributable, at least in part, to favorable alterations in the ventilatory response to exercise, including improvements in breathing patterns (e.g., increased tidal volume and reduced breathing frequency) and dynamic operating lung volumes (e.g., increased inspiratory reserve volume and inspiratory capacity) and decreases in dynamic mechanical ventilatory constraints.

  3. Aerobic exercise training without weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Vipa; Stickford, Jonathon L.; Bhammar, Dharini M.; Babb, Tony G.

    2015-01-01

    Dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a common symptom in obesity. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training without weight loss could reduce DOE. Twenty-two otherwise healthy obese women participated in a 12-week supervised aerobic exercise training program, exercising 30 min/day at 70–80% heart rate reserve, 4 days/week. Subjects were grouped based on their Ratings of Perceived Breathlessness (RPB) during constant load 60W cycling: +DOE (n = 12, RPB ≥ 4, 37 ± 7 years, 34 ± 4kg/m2) and −DOE (n = 10, RPB ≤ 2, 32 ± 6 years, 33 ± 3kg/m2). No significant differences between the groups in body composition, pulmonary function, or cardiorespiratory fitness were observed pre-training. Post-training, peak was improved significantly in both groups (+DOE: 12 ± 7, −DOE: 14 ± 8%). RPB was significantly decreased in the + DOE (4.7 ± 1.0–2.5 ± 1.0) and remained low in the −DOE group (1.2 ± 0.6–1.3 ± 1.0) (interaction p < 0.001). The reduction in RPB was not significantly correlated with the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness. Aerobic exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness and DOE and thus appears to be an effective treatment for DOE in obese women. PMID:26593640

  4. Belching, regurgitation, chest tightness and dyspnea: not gastroesophageal reflux disease but asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Xi; Zhan, Xian-Bao; Bai, Chong; Li, Qiang

    2015-02-07

    Belching is a common symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease. If the symptoms are not relieved after anti-reflux treatment, another etiology should be considered. Here, we report a case of a 43-year-old man who presented with belching, regurgitation, chest tightness and dyspnea for 18 mo, which became gradually more severe. Gastroscopic examination suggested superficial gastritis. Twenty-four-hour esophageal pH monitoring showed that the Demeester score was 11.4, in the normal range. High-resolution manometry showed that integrated relaxation pressure and intrabolus pressure were higher than normal (20 mmHg and 22.4 mmHg, respectively), indicating gastroesophageal junction outflow tract obstruction. Pulmonary function test showed severe obstructive ventilation dysfunction [forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity 32%, FEV1 was 1.21 L, occupying 35% predicted value after salbuterol inhalation], and positive bronchial dilation test (∆FEV1 260 mL, ∆FEV1% 27%). Skin prick test showed Dermatophagoides farinae (++), house dust mite (++++), and shrimp protein (++). Fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement was 76 ppb. All the symptoms were alleviated completely and pulmonary function increased after combination therapy with corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonist. Bronchial asthma was eventually diagnosed by laboratory tests and the effect of anti-asthmatic treatment, therefore, physicians, especially the Gastrointestinal physicians, should pay attention to the belching symptoms of asthma.

  5. The effects of experimental pain and induced optimism on working memory task performance.

    PubMed

    Boselie, Jantine J L M; Vancleef, Linda M G; Peters, Madelon L

    2016-07-01

    Pain can interrupt and deteriorate executive task performance. We have previously shown that experimentally induced optimism can diminish the deteriorating effect of cold pressor pain on a subsequent working memory task (i.e., operation span task). In two successive experiments we sought further evidence for the protective role of optimism on pain-induced working memory impairments. We used another working memory task (i.e., 2-back task) that was performed either after or during pain induction. Study 1 employed a 2 (optimism vs. no-optimism)×2 (pain vs. no-pain)×2 (pre-score vs. post-score) mixed factorial design. In half of the participants optimism was induced by the Best Possible Self (BPS) manipulation, which required them to write and visualize about a life in the future where everything turned out for the best. In the control condition, participants wrote and visualized a typical day in their life (TD). Next, participants completed either the cold pressor task (CPT) or a warm water control task (WWCT). Before (baseline) and after the CPT or WWCT participants working memory performance was measured with the 2-back task. The 2-back task measures the ability to monitor and update working memory representation by asking participants to indicate whether the current stimulus corresponds to the stimulus that was presented 2 stimuli ago. Study 2 had a 2 (optimism vs. no-optimism)×2 (pain vs. no-pain) mixed factorial design. After receiving the BPS or control manipulation, participants completed the 2-back task twice: once with painful heat stimulation, and once without any stimulation (counter-balanced order). Continuous heat stimulation was used with temperatures oscillating around 1°C above and 1°C below the individual pain threshold. In study 1, the results did not show an effect of cold pressor pain on subsequent 2-back task performance. Results of study 2 indicated that heat pain impaired concurrent 2-back task performance. However, no evidence was found

  6. A Computational and Experimental Study of Nonlinear Aspects of Induced Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen C.

    1996-01-01

    performance of the split-tip wing was also investigated by wing tunnel experiments. Induced drag was determined from force measurements by subtracting the estimated viscous drag, and from an analytical drag-decomposition method using a wake survey. The experimental results confirm the computational prediction.

  7. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  8. Dynamics of leukocytes and cytokines during experimentally induced Streptococcus uberis mastitis.

    PubMed

    Rambeaud, M; Almeida, R A; Pighetti, G M; Oliver, S P

    2003-12-15

    Streptococcus uberis causes a significant proportion of clinical and subclinical intramammary infections (IMI) in lactating and non-lactating dairy cows. In spite of this, its pathogenesis is incompletely understood. A study was conducted to determine leukocyte and cytokine dynamics during experimentally induced S. uberis mastitis. Five Jersey and five Holstein cows were challenged via intramammary inoculation of S. uberis into two uninfected mammary glands. Sixteen of 20 challenged mammary glands developed clinical mastitis with peak clinical signs observed at 144 h. The number of S. uberis in milk increased (P<0.05) 48 h after challenge, in spite of an increase in milk somatic cells that began at 18 h (P<0.001) and remained elevated throughout the study. Increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in milk were detected 66 h after challenge (P<0.05). Peak TNF-alpha and IL-8 concentrations occurred 120 h after challenge and preceded peak clinical signs. Experimental S. uberis IMI induced local production of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-8, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of S. uberis mastitis. Other mediators may be involved in initial leukocyte recruitment to the mammary gland, since increases in milk somatic cells occurred earlier than cytokine production.

  9. The impact of neurodynamic testing on the perception of experimentally induced muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Coppieters, Michel W; Kurz, Kimberly; Mortensen, Thor Einar; Richards, Nicola L; Skaret, Ingrid A; McLaughlin, Laurie M; Hodges, Paul W

    2005-02-01

    Neurodynamic tests such as the straight leg raising (SLR) and slump test are frequently used for assessment of mechanosensitivity of neural tissues. However, there is ongoing debate in the literature regarding the contributions of neural and non-neural tissues to the elicited symptoms because many structures are affected by these tests. Sensitizing manoeuvres are limb or spinal movements added to neurodynamic tests, which aim to identify the origin of the symptoms by preferentially loading or unloading neural structures. A prerequisite for the use of sensitizing manoeuvres to identify neural involvement is that the addition of sensitizing manoeuvres has no impact on pain perception when the origin of the pain is non-neural. In this study, experimental muscle pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline in tibialis anterior or soleus in 25 asymptomatic, naive volunteers. A first experiment investigated the impact of hip adduction, abduction, medial and lateral rotation in the SLR position. In a second experiment, the different stages of the slump test were examined. The intensity and area of experimentally induced muscle pain did not increase when sensitizing manoeuvres were added to the SLR or throughout the successive stages of the slump test. The findings of this study lend support to the validity of the use of sensitizing manoeuvres during neurodynamic testing.

  10. Do cool water or physiologic saline compresses enhance resolution of experimentally-induced irritant contact dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Levin, C Y; Maibach, H I

    2001-09-01

    Acute irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is frequently treated with cool water or saline compresses. While presumed effective, little quantitative evaluation documents the treatment's benefit. This study sought to determine the efficacy of both distilled water and physiologic saline compresses on experimentally-induced ICD. 24-h application of both the lipophilic nonanoic acid (NAA) and the hydrophilic sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were used to induce irritant contact dermatitis in 9 healthy volunteers. Following irritation, compresses were applied 0.5 h 2x daily for 4 consecutive days. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), chromametry and visual scoring were used to quantify results. Cool compresses of both water and saline significantly reduced TEWL and LDF, with no statistically significant difference between the efficacy of the saline or water compresses. Chromametry and visual scoring did not detect a significant effect with either the water or saline compresses. The results suggest an improvement with 2x-daily application of either water or physiologic saline compresses in the treatment of acute ICD, though true clinical benefit will be elucidated through further experimentation. Certainly, the current recommendation regarding the use of cool compresses for treating ICD should not be discarded.

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of turbulent flow induced pipe vibration in fully developed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, Matthew T.; Evans, Robert P.; Maynes, R. Daniel; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2004-07-01

    Flow-induced pipe vibration caused by fully developed pipe flow has been observed but not fully investigated when turbulent flow prevails. This article presents experimental results that indicate a strong correlation between the volume flow rate and a measure of the pipe vibration. In this work, the standard deviation of the frequency-averaged time-series signal, measured using an accelerometer attached to the pipe, is used as the measure of pipe vibration. A numerical, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model used to investigate the relationship between pipe wall vibration and the physical characteristics of turbulent flow is also presented. This numerical FSI approach, unlike commercial FSI software packages, which are based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes flow models, is based on large eddy simulation (LES) flow models that compute the instantaneous pressure fluctuations in turbulent flow. The results from the numerical LES models also indicate a strong correlation between pipe vibration and flow rate. In general, the numerical simulations show that the standard deviation of the pipe wall vibration is proportional to the pressure fluctuations at the wall induced by the flow turbulence. This research, indicates that the pressure fluctuations on the pipe wall have a near quadratic relationship with the flow rate. Furthermore, the experimental results and the numerical modeling show that there is a definite relationship between the acceleration of the pipe (pipe vibration) and the flow rate. These last two concepts open possible avenues for the development of a non-intrusive flow sensor.

  12. Human experimental anxiety: actual public speaking induces more intense physiological responses than simulated public speaking.

    PubMed

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Gorayeb, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    a) To perform a systematic and meta-analytic review to verify whether the Simulated Public Speaking Task (SPST) leads to a greater increase in self-rated anxiety than in physiological correlates of anxiety; and b) to compare the results obtained with the SPST with an actual public speaking task involving healthy volunteers. a) The PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge databases were searched for studies involving the SPST prior to 2012. Eleven publications were eligible and provided data from 143 healthy volunteers for meta-analysis; b) 48 university students without somatic or psychiatric disorders were divided into three experimental groups of 16 subjects to undergo one of the following: SPST, real-world public speaking task (real-world), and control situation (control). The meta-analysis showed that the SPST induced a significant increase in the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) anxiety factor, but no significant increases in systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The empirical study showed that the real-world public speaking task increased heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure significantly more than the control and SPST conditions. These results suggest that real public speaking might be better than SPST in inducing experimental anxiety.

  13. T Helper 1–Inducing Adjuvant Protects against Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Coltri, Kely Cristine; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro Barros; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson

    2008-01-01

    Immunostimulatory therapy is a promising approach to improving the treatment of systemic fungal infections such as paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), whose drug therapy is usually prolonged and associated with toxic side effects and relapses. The current study was undertaken to determine if the injection of a T helper (Th) 1–stimulating adjuvant in P. brasiliensis–infected mice could have a beneficial effect on the course of experimental PCM. For this purpose, mice were infected and treated with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), a well-established Th1 experimental inductor, or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA - control group) on day 20 postinfection. Four weeks after treatment, the CFA-treated mice presented a mild infection in the lungs characterized by absence of epithelioid cell granulomas and yeast cells, whereas the control mice presented multiple sites of focal epithelioid granulomas with lymphomonocytic halos circumscribing a high number of viable and nonviable yeast cells. In addition, CFA administration induced a 2.4 log reduction (>99%) in the fungal burden when compared to the control group, and led to an improvement of immune response, reversing the immunosuppression observed in the control group. The immunotherapy with Th1-inducing adjuvant, approved to be used in humans, might be a valuable tool in the treatment of PCM and potentially useful to improve the clinical cure rate in humans. PMID:18335066

  14. Influence of plaque control on the healing of experimentally-induced bone defects in the dog.

    PubMed

    Hugoson, A; Schmidt, G

    1978-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to induce alveolar bone defects experimentally in dogs and to study the effects of mechanical tooth cleaning on their subsequent development. Thirty premolars from four beagle dogs were used. Bone defects were created by surgically exposing the adjacent alveolar bone and applying steel or silk ligatures around the roots of the chosen teeth. After 8 weeks the ligatures were removed. Dental plaque was allowed to accumulate on 20 premolars whereas daily plaque elimination by toothbrushing was carefully performed on 10 premolars. After 1, 3, and 6 months of plaque accumulation, gingival inflammation, periodontal pocket depth, gingival recession and the radiographically observed degree of bone destruction were registered. Histological examination was performed in conjunction with the registrations made 6 months after removal of the ligatures. The clinical, radiographic and histologic findings all confirm that a regeneration of the experimentally induced destruction of the periodontal tissues had taken place. This reaction was most evident in teeth exposed to mechanical plaque control. The remaining bone defects were consistently accompanied by recession of the gingival margin.

  15. Effects of a Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist on Experimentally Induced Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jeon, Eun-ju; Park, Shi-Nae; Park, Kyung-Ho; Park, Yong-Soo; Yeo, Sang Won

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, and controlled study examined the effects of tumor necrosis factor soluble receptor type I (sTNFRI, a TNF-α antagonist) on experimentally induced rhinosinusitis in rats. The experimental groups received an instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus an intramuscular injection of amoxicillin/clavulanate (antibiotic group), an instillation of sTNFRI (sTNFRI group), an instillation of sTNFRI and an injection of amoxicillin/clavulanate (sTNFRI/antibiotic group), or no additional treatment (LPS group). Histopathological changes were determined using hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. Leakage of exudate was determined using fluorescence microscopy. Vascular permeability was measured using the Evans blue dye technique. Expression of MUC5AC was measured using reverse transcriptase PCR. The sTNFRI, antibiotic, and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups had significantly less capillary permeability, mucosal edema, PAS staining, and expression of MUC5AC than the LPS group. There were no differences in capillary permeability, mucosal edema, PAS staining, and MUC5AC expression between the sTNFRI and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups. The antibiotic group had PAS staining similar to that of the sTNFRI and sTNFRI/antibiotic groups but had a greater increase in capillary permeability, mucosal edema, and MUC5AC expression. This study shows that sTNFRI reduces inflammatory activity and mucus hypersecretion in LPS-induced rhinosinusitis in rats. PMID:21772791

  16. Experimental and observational evidence for plume-induced subduction on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, A.; Smrekar, S. E.; Tomlinson, S.

    2017-04-01

    Why Venus lacks plate tectonics remains an unanswered question in terrestrial planet evolution. There is observational evidence for subduction--a requirement for plate tectonics--on Venus, but it is unclear why the features have characteristics of both mantle plumes and subduction zones. One explanation is that mantle plumes trigger subduction. Here we compare laboratory experiments of plume-induced subduction in a colloidal solution of nanoparticles to observations of proposed subduction sites on Venus. The experimental fluids are heated from below to produce upwelling plumes, which in turn produce tensile fractures in the lithosphere-like skin that forms on the upper surface. Plume material upwells through the fractures and spreads above the skin, analogous to volcanic flooding, and leads to bending and eventual subduction of the skin along arcuate segments. The segments are analogous to the semi-circular trenches seen at two proposed sites of plume-triggered subduction at Quetzalpetlatl and Artemis coronae. Other experimental deformation structures and subsurface density variations are also consistent with topography, radar and gravity data for Venus. Scaling analysis suggests that this regime with limited, plume-induced subduction is favoured by a hot lithosphere, such as that found on early Earth or present-day Venus.

  17. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, S. Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-15

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  18. Respiratory Impairment and Dyspnea and Their Associations With Physical Inactivity and Mobility in Sedentary Community-Dwelling Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Hankinson, John L.; Flynn, Gail; Berra, Kathy; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Christine K.; McDermott, Mary M.; Manini, Todd M.; Rejeski, W. Jack; Gill, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the prevalence of respiratory impairment and dyspnea, and their associations with objectively-measured physical inactivity and performance-based mobility in sedentary older persons. DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING Lifestyle Interventions and Independence in Elder (LIFE) Study. PARTICIPANTS 1635 community-dwelling older persons, mean age 78.9, who reported a sedentary status (<20 minutes/week in the past month of regular physical activity and <125 minutes/week of moderate physical activity). MEASUREMENTS Respiratory impairment was defined by a reduced ventilatory capacity (forced expiratory volume in 1-second < lower limit of normal [LLN]) and respiratory muscle weakness (maximal inspiratory pressure Dyspnea was defined as moderate-to-severe ratings on the modified Borg index, immediately after a 400-meter walk test (400MWT). Physical inactivity was defined by high sedentary time, as the highest quartile of participants with accelerometry-measured activity <100 counts/min. Performance-based mobility was evaluated by the Short Physical Performance Battery (<7 defined moderate-to-severe mobility impairment) and 400MWT gait speed (<0.8 meter/second was defined as slow). RESULTS Prevalence rates of reduced ventilatory capacity, respiratory muscle weakness, and dyspnea were 17.7%, 14.7%, and 31.6%, and of moderate-to-severe mobility impairment and slow gait speed were 44.7% and 43.6%, respectively. Significant associations were found between reduced ventilatory capacity and slow gait speed (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.41 [1.03, 1.92]), respiratory muscle weakness and moderate-to-severe mobility impairment (1.42 [1.03, 1.95]), and dyspnea with high sedentary time and slow gait speed (1.98 [1.28, 3.06] and 1.70 [1.22, 2.38], respectively). CONCLUSION Among sedentary older persons, respiratory impairment and dyspnea are prevalent and associated with objectively-measured physical inactivity or decreased performance

  19. Experimental Gingivitis Induces Systemic Inflammatory Markers in Young Healthy Individuals: A Single-Subject Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Background Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. Methods 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. Results The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, P<0.0001). This local inflammation was associated with a systemic increase in hsCRP (0.24 mg/L, P = 0.038), IL-6 (12.52 ng/L, P = 0.0002) and MCP-1 (9.10 ng/l, P = 0.124) in peripheral blood samples between baseline and day 21, which decreased at day 42. Monocytes showed an enhanced adherence to endothelial cells and increased foam cell formation after oxLDL uptake (P<0.050) at day 21 of gingivitis. Conclusions Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http

  20. Numerical and experimental investigation of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Lelong, Alexandra; Astolfi, Jacques Andre; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present combined numerical and experimental studies of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils. The focus is on identifying the dependence of the foil's vibration frequencies and damping characteristics on the inflow velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. Experimental results are shown for a cantilevered polyacetate (POM) hydrofoil tested in the cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy Research Institute (IRENav). The foil is observed to primarily behave as a chordwise rigid body and undergoes spanwise bending and twisting deformations, and the flow is observed to be effectively two-dimensional (2D) because of the strong lift retention at the free tip caused by a small gap with a thickness less than the wall boundary layer. Hence, the viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is formulated by coupling a 2D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model with a two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model representing the spanwise tip bending and twisting deformations. Good agreements were observed between viscous FSI predictions and experimental measurements of natural flow-induced vibrations in fully turbulent and attached flow conditions. The foil vibrations were found to be dominated by the natural frequencies in absence of large scale vortex shedding due to flow separation. The natural frequencies and fluid damping coefficients were found to vary with velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. In addition, the numerical results showed that the in-water to in-air natural frequency ratios decreased rapidly, and the fluid damping coefficients increased rapidly, as the solid-to-fluid added mass ratio decreases. Uncoupled mode (UM) linear potential theory was found to significantly over-predict the fluid damping for cases of lightweight flexible hydrofoils, and this over-prediction increased with higher velocity and lower solid-to-fluid added mass ratio.

  1. Effects of an acceptance/defusion intervention on experimentally induced generalized avoidance: a laboratory demonstration.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Carmen; Valdivia-Salas, Sonsoles; Ruiz, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Dougher, Michael J; López-López, Juan C; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Gutierrez-Martínez, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the effectiveness of an acceptance/defusion intervention in reducing experimentally induced generalized avoidance. After the formation of two 6-member equivalence classes, 23 participants underwent differential conditioning with two elements from each class: A1 and B1 were paired with mild electric shock, whereas A2 and B2 were paired with earning points. Participants learned to produce avoidance and approach responses to these respective stimuli and subsequently showed transfer of functions to non-directly conditioned equivalent stimuli from Class 1 (i.e., D1 and F1 evoked avoidance responses) and Class 2 (i.e., D2 and F2 evoked approach responses). Participants were then randomly assigned to either a motivational protocol (MOT) in which approaching previously avoided stimuli was given a general value, or to a defusion protocol (DEF) in which defusion (a component of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) was trained while approaching previously avoided stimuli was connected to personally meaningful examples. A post-hoc control group (CMOT) was conducted with 16 participants to control for differences in protocol length between the former two groups. All participants in the DEF group showed a complete suppression of avoidance responding in the presence of Class 1 stimuli (A1-F1 and additional novel stimuli in relation to them), as compared to 40% of participants in the MOT condition and 20% in the CMOT condition. The acceptance/defusion protocol eliminated experimentally induced avoidance responding even for stimuli that elicited autonomic fear responses. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  2. Serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity in experimentally induced and naturally occurring canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).

    PubMed

    Mylonakis, Mathios E; Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Theodorou, Konstantina; Siarkou, Victoria I; Steiner, Jörg M; Harrus, Shimon; Leontides, Leonidas; Rallis, Timoleon; Suchodolski, Jan S; Koutinas, Christos K; Koutinas, Alexander F

    2014-03-14

    Ehrlichia canis infection causes multisystemic disease in dogs (canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, CME) which is associated with variable morbidity and mortality. Atypical clinical manifestations, including gastrointestinal signs, may occasionally occur in CME and approximately 10-15% of dogs are presented with historical or clinical evidence of vomiting, diarrhea, and/or abdominal discomfort. The objective of this study was to investigate if there are any alterations in serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) in dogs with experimentally induced or naturally occurring monocytic ehrlichiosis. Serum samples from 10 Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis and two healthy uninfected Beagles were serially examined; samples from 20 naturally infected dogs (10 with non-myelosuppressive [NME] and 10 with myelosuppressive [ME] ehrlichiosis) were also examined at a given point in time (cross-sectional sampling). None of the experimentally infected Beagles showed gastrointestinal signs or increased cPLI concentrations prior to or following the artificial infection. Three naturally infected dogs with NME and one with ME demonstrated serum cPLI concentrations in the diagnostic range for pancreatitis (>400 μg/L) without showing gastrointestinal signs. The results of the present study indicated that 4/20 (20%) of dogs naturally infected with E. canis demonstrated increased serum cPLI concentrations consistent with mild and clinically inapparent pancreatitis.

  3. STUDIES ON THE ETIOLOGY OF RABBIT POX : II. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Rosahn, P D; Hu, C K; Pearce, L

    1936-01-31

    The clinical manifestations and course of disease observed in experimental rabbit pox have been described and analyzed. The condition differed from the acute fulminating and rapidly fatal type of experimental infection (1) in that the period of survival was longer, a variety of clinical manifestations developed and a considerable proportion of the cases recovered. The most conspicuous symptom was a generalized papular eruption on the skin and mucocutaneous borders. The production of the disease was associated with routes of inoculation other than the intratesticular or with a small dosage. The majority of cases were inoculated with Berkefeld V filtrates of tissue-virus emulsions and not with the more potent unfiltered emulsions. The local reactions resulting from various routes of inoculation were described. Of special interest were the pronounced cutaneous reactions induced by intradermal injection, the high instance of marked clinical manifestations after intravenous inoculation, the failure of lesions to localize in the lines of scarification of skin and cornea even in cases with a profuse cutaneous eruption, and the development of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in the epithelial cells of the cornea following scarification and conjunctival instillation of virus. In the character of its clinical manifestations and course of disease, experimental rabbit pox was indistinguishable from cases of the spontaneous pox.

  4. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-02-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased.

  5. Radiating plasma species density distribution in EUV-induced plasma in argon: a spatiotemporal experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; van de Ven, T. H. M.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we experimentally study temporally and spatially resolved radiating plasma species density distribution in plasma induced by irradiating a low pressure argon gas with high energy photons with a wavelength of 13.5 nm, i.e. extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This is done by recording the optical emission spatially and temporally resolved by an iCCD camera as a function of the argon gas pressure. Our experimental results show that the emission intensity, i.e. density of radiating plasma species, depends quadratically on the gas pressure. The linear term is due to photoionization and simultaneous excitation by EUV photons, the quadratic term due to electron impact excitation by electrons generated by photoionization. The decay of radiating plasma species can be divided into two phases. At time scales shorter than 10 μs (first phase), the decay is governed by radiative decay of radiating plasma species. At longer time scales (second phase, >10 μs), the decay is dominated by diffusion and subsequent de-excitation at the wall. The experimental decay and expansion during this phase corresponds well with a simplified diffusion model. In order to gain more insight in this exotic type of plasma, we compare the electron density from previous measurements with the results obtained here.

  6. Effects of Experimental Sarcocystis neurona-Induced Infection on Immunity in an Equine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S. Rochelle; Ellison, Siobhan P.; Dascanio, John J.; Lindsay, David S.; Gogal, Robert M.; Werre, Stephen R.; Surendran, Naveen; Breen, Meghan E.; Heid, Bettina M.; Andrews, Frank M.; Buechner-Maxwell, Virginia A.; Witonsky, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most common cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM), affecting 0.5–1% horses in the United States during their lifetimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the equine immune responses in an experimentally induced Sarcocystis neurona infection model. Neurologic parameters were recorded prior to and throughout the 70-day study by blinded investigators. Recombinant SnSAG1 ELISA for serum and CSF were used to confirm and track disease progression. All experimentally infected horses displayed neurologic signs after infection. Neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes from infected horses displayed significantly delayed apoptosis at some time points. Cell proliferation was significantly increased in S. neurona-infected horses when stimulated nonspecifically with PMA/I but significantly decreased when stimulated with S. neurona compared to controls. Collectively, our results suggest that horses experimentally infected with S. neurona manifest impaired antigen specific response to S. neurona, which could be a function of altered antigen presentation, lack of antigen recognition, or both. PMID:26464923

  7. Effects of Experimental Sarcocystis neurona-Induced Infection on Immunity in an Equine Model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S Rochelle; Ellison, Siobhan P; Dascanio, John J; Lindsay, David S; Gogal, Robert M; Werre, Stephen R; Surendran, Naveen; Breen, Meghan E; Heid, Bettina M; Andrews, Frank M; Buechner-Maxwell, Virginia A; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most common cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM), affecting 0.5-1% horses in the United States during their lifetimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the equine immune responses in an experimentally induced Sarcocystis neurona infection model. Neurologic parameters were recorded prior to and throughout the 70-day study by blinded investigators. Recombinant SnSAG1 ELISA for serum and CSF were used to confirm and track disease progression. All experimentally infected horses displayed neurologic signs after infection. Neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes from infected horses displayed significantly delayed apoptosis at some time points. Cell proliferation was significantly increased in S. neurona-infected horses when stimulated nonspecifically with PMA/I but significantly decreased when stimulated with S. neurona compared to controls. Collectively, our results suggest that horses experimentally infected with S. neurona manifest impaired antigen specific response to S. neurona, which could be a function of altered antigen presentation, lack of antigen recognition, or both.

  8. CXC chemokines and antimicrobial peptides in rhinovirus-induced experimental asthma exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, G; Message, S D; Haas, J J; Kebadze, T; Parker, H; Laza-Stanca, V; Khaitov, M R; Kon, O M; Stanciu, L A; Mallia, P; Edwards, M R; Johnston, S L

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Rhinoviruses (RVs) are the major triggers of asthma exacerbations. We have shown previously that lower respiratory tract symptoms, airflow obstruction, and neutrophilic airway inflammation were increased in experimental RV-induced asthma exacerbations. Objectives We hypothesized that neutrophil-related CXC chemokines and antimicrobial peptides are increased and related to clinical, virologic, and pathologic outcomes in RV-induced exacerbations of asthma. Methods Protein levels of antimicrobial peptides (SLPI, HNP 1–3, elafin, and LL-37) and neutrophil chemokines (CXCL1/GRO-α, CXCL2/GRO-β, CXCL5/ENA-78, CXCL6/GCP-2, CXCL7/NAP-2, and CXCL8/IL-8) were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of 10 asthmatics and 15 normal controls taken before, at day four during and 6 weeks post-experimental infection. Results BAL HNP 1–3 and Elafin were higher, CXCL7/NAP-2 was lower in asthmatics compared with controls at day 4 (P = 0.035, P = 0.048, and P = 0.025, respectively). BAL HNP 1–3 and CXCL8/IL-8 were increased during infection (P = 0.003 and P = 0.011, respectively). There was a trend to increased BAL neutrophils at day 4 compared with baseline (P = 0.076). BAL HNP 1–3 was positively correlated with BAL neutrophil numbers at day 4. There were no correlations between clinical parameters and HNP1–3 or IL-8 levels. Conclusions We propose that RV infection in asthma leads to increased release of CXCL8/IL-8, attracting neutrophils into the airways where they release HNP 1–3, which further enhances airway neutrophilia. Strategies to inhibit CXCL8/IL-8 may be useful in treatment of virus-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:24673807

  9. Indoor insect allergens are potent inducers of experimental eosinophilic esophagitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rayapudi, Madhavi; Mavi, Parm; Zhu, Xiang; Pandey, Akhilesh K.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Mishra, Anil

    2010-01-01

    EE is an emerging disease reported in children and adults of urbanized countries, where indoor insect allergens are major health risk factors. Review of our hospital patient database uncovered that a number of EE patients have hypersensitivity to indoor cat, dog, cockroach, and dust mite allergens. We tested the hypothesis whether inhaled indoor insect allergens are effective inducers of experimental EE. We delivered cat, dog, cockroach, and dust mite allergen extracts intranasally to wild-type and eotaxin-1/2-, CCR3-, and IL-5-deficient mice. Interestingly, wild-type mice exposed to cockroach or dust mite allergens develop a significant increase in the levels of esophageal eosinophils and mast cells compared with saline-challenged mice. The eosinophil numbers in the esophagus of cockroach- and dust mite-exposed mice were 18.3 ± 6.8/mm2 and 33.4 ± 11.1/mm2 compared with 2.3 ± 1.8/mm2 and 2.1 ± 1.2/mm2 in saline-challenged mice. Additionally, we observed an additive effect of these two allergens in inducing esophageal eosinophilia and mastocytosis. Histopathological analysis detected intraepithelial esophageal eosinophilia in mice exposed to both allergens. Furthermore, mice exposed to cockroach and/or dust mite had increased levels of total IgE and antigen-specific IgG1 in the blood and increased esophageal expression of eosinophil-active cytokines (IL-13) and chemokines (eotaxin-1). Notably, mice deficient in eotaxin-1/2, CCR3, and IL-5 showed ablated esophageal eosinophilia following cockroach or dust mite allergen exposure. These data indicate that indoor insect allergens are potent inducers of IL-5 and eotaxin-mediated esophageal eosinophilia. These experimental studies are in accordance with clinical data but may have some limitations inherent to animal models of human disease. PMID:20413729

  10. Strong protection induced by an experimental DIVA subunit vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 8 in cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jenna; Hägglund, Sara; Bréard, Emmanuel; Riou, Mickaël; Zohari, Siamak; Comtet, Loic; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Gélineau, Robert; Martin, Guillaume; Elvander, Marianne; Blomqvist, Gunilla; Zientara, Stéphan; Valarcher, Jean Francois

    2014-11-20

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infections in ruminants pose a permanent agricultural threat since new serotypes are constantly emerging in new locations. Clinical disease is mainly observed in sheep, but cattle were unusually affected during an outbreak of BTV seroype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe. We previously developed an experimental vaccine based on recombinant viral protein 2 (VP2) of BTV-8 and non-structural proteins 1 (NS1) and NS2 of BTV-2, mixed with an immunostimulating complex (ISCOM)-matrix adjuvant. We demonstrated that bovine immune responses induced by this vaccine were as good or superior to those induced by a classic commercial inactivated vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the experimental vaccine in cattle and, based on the detection of VP7 antibodies, assessed its DIVA compliancy following virus challenge. Two groups of BTV-seronegative calves were subcutaneously immunized twice at a 3-week interval with the subunit vaccine (n=6) or with adjuvant alone (n=6). Following BTV-8 challenge 3 weeks after second immunization, controls developed viremia and fever associated with other mild clinical signs of bluetongue disease, whereas vaccinated animals were clinically and virologically protected. The vaccine-induced protection was likely mediated by high virus-neutralizing antibody titers directed against VP2 and perhaps by cellular responses to NS1 and NS2. T lymphocyte responses were cross-reactive between BTV-2 and BTV-8, suggesting that NS1 and NS2 may provide the basis of an adaptable vaccine that can be varied by using VP2 of different serotypes. The detection of different levels of VP7 antibodies in vaccinated animals and controls after challenge suggested a compliancy between the vaccine and the DIVA companion test. This BTV subunit vaccine is a promising candidate that should be further evaluated and developed to protect against different serotypes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Indoor insect allergens are potent inducers of experimental eosinophilic esophagitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Rayapudi, Madhavi; Mavi, Parm; Zhu, Xiang; Pandey, Akhilesh K; Abonia, J Pablo; Rothenberg, Marc E; Mishra, Anil

    2010-08-01

    EE is an emerging disease reported in children and adults of urbanized countries, where indoor insect allergens are major health risk factors. Review of our hospital patient database uncovered that a number of EE patients have hypersensitivity to indoor cat, dog, cockroach, and dust mite allergens. We tested the hypothesis whether inhaled indoor insect allergens are effective inducers of experimental EE. We delivered cat, dog, cockroach, and dust mite allergen extracts intranasally to wild-type and eotaxin-1/2-, CCR3-, and IL-5-deficient mice. Interestingly, wild-type mice exposed to cockroach or dust mite allergens develop a significant increase in the levels of esophageal eosinophils and mast cells compared with saline-challenged mice. The eosinophil numbers in the esophagus of cockroach- and dust mite-exposed mice were 18.3+/-6.8/mm2 and 33.4+/-11.1/mm2 compared with 2.3+/-1.8/mm2 and 2.1+/-1.2/mm2 in saline-challenged mice. Additionally, we observed an additive effect of these two allergens in inducing esophageal eosinophilia and mastocytosis. Histopathological analysis detected intraepithelial esophageal eosinophilia in mice exposed to both allergens. Furthermore, mice exposed to cockroach and/or dust mite had increased levels of total IgE and antigen-specific IgG1 in the blood and increased esophageal expression of eosinophil-active cytokines (IL-13) and chemokines (eotaxin-1). Notably, mice deficient in eotaxin-1/2, CCR3, and IL-5 showed ablated esophageal eosinophilia following cockroach or dust mite allergen exposure. These data indicate that indoor insect allergens are potent inducers of IL-5 and eotaxin-mediated esophageal eosinophilia. These experimental studies are in accordance with clinical data but may have some limitations inherent to animal models of human disease.

  12. Tramadol-induced hyperalgesia and its prevention by ketamine in rats: A randomised experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana; Aguado, Delia; Benito, Javier; García-Fernández, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2015-10-01

    Opioid analgesia not only reduces inhalational anaesthetic requirements but may also induce delayed hyperalgesia, with potential effects on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anaesthetics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the development of tramadol-induced hyperalgesia and the associated changes in MAC, and whether ketamine prevents both processes. A randomised, experimental study. Experimental Surgery Unit, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Thirty-nine adult male Wistar rats. Mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNT) were determined up to 21 days after the intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of tramadol (50 mg kg) with or without ketamine (10 mg kg), or 0.9% saline. The MNT and the MAC of sevoflurane were also assessed in a second experiment before, early (30 min) and 7 days after drug administration with the same treatments. The MAC and MNT were evaluated. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was employed to determine differences between treatments and times on MAC and MNT. Tramadol, alone or combined with ketamine, produced an early increase in MNT. However, tramadol given alone decreased MNT from day 1 up to 3 weeks, which was associated with an increase in the MAC of sevoflurane (P < 0.05; day 7). Ketamine administration prevented both the reduction in MNT and the increase in MAC (P > 0.05). Tramadol-induced hyperalgesia in the rat lasted for several weeks and was associated with an increase in the MAC of sevoflurane. Prior administration of ketamine blocked both phenomena.

  13. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stormanns, Eva R.; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Limited availability of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Methods Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. Results B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. In addition, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Conclusions Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute

  14. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Johanna; Karacivi, Aylin; Stormanns, Eva R; Recks, Mascha S; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Lack of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. Additionally, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute useful instruments to study the diverse histopathological

  15. Gene biomarkers in peripheral white blood cells of horses with experimentally induced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kamm, J Lacy; Frisbie, David D; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Orr, Kindra E

    2013-01-01

    To use microarray analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed in horses with experimentally induced osteoarthritis. 24 horses. During arthroscopic surgery, a fragment was created in the distal aspect of the radiocarpal bone in 1 forelimb of each horse to induce osteoarthritis. At day 14 after osteoarthritis induction, horses began exercise on a treadmill. Blood and synovial fluid samples were collected before and after surgery. At day 70, horses were euthanized and tissues were harvested for RNA analysis. An equine-specific microarray was used to measure RNA expression in peripheral WBCs. These data were compared with mRNA expression (determined via PCR assay) in WBCs, cartilage, and synovium as well as 2 protein biomarkers of cartilage matrix turnover in serum and synovial fluid. A metalloproteinase domain-like protein decysin-1 (ADAMDEC1), glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 94, hematopoietic cell signal transducer (HCST), Unc-93 homolog A (hUNC-93A), and ribonucleotide reductase M2 polypeptide (RRM2) were significantly differentially regulated in WBCs of horses with osteoarthritis, compared with values prior to induction of osteoarthritis. There was correlation between the gene expression profile in WBCs, cartilage, and synovium and the cartilage turnover proteins. Gene expression of ADAMDEC1, hUNC-93A, and RRM2 in WBCs were correlated when measured via microarray analysis and PCR assay. Expression of ADAMDEC1, GRP94, HCST, hUNC-93A, and RRM2 was differentially regulated in peripheral WBCs obtained from horses with experimentally induced osteoarthritis. Gene expression of ADAMDEC1, hUNC-93A, and RRM2 in peripheral WBCs has the potential for use as a diagnostic aid for osteoarthritis in horses.

  16. Experimental tonic hand pain modulates the corticospinal plasticity induced by a subsequent hand deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Mavromatis, N; Gagné, M; Voisin, J I A V; Reilly, K T; Mercier, C

    2016-08-25

    Sensorimotor reorganization is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of phantom limb pain, but pain itself might modulate sensorimotor plasticity induced by deafferentation. Clinical and basic research support this idea, as pain prior to amputation increases the risk of developing post-amputation pain. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of experimental tonic cutaneous hand pain on the plasticity induced by temporary ischemic hand deafferentation. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (Pain, No Pain) in which transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticospinal excitability in two forearm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis) before (T0, T10, T20, and T40) and after (T60 and T75) inflation of a cuff around the wrist. The cuff was inflated at T45 in both sessions and in the Pain session capsaicin cream was applied on the dorsum of the hand at T5. Corticospinal excitability was significantly greater during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.002) and increased similarly in both muscles (p=0.861). Importantly, the excitability increase in the Post-inflation phase was greater for the Pain than the No-Pain condition (p=0.006). Post-hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between the two conditions during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.030) but no difference during the Pre-inflation phase (p=0.601). In other words, the corticospinal facilitation was greater when pain was present prior to cuff inflation. These results indicate that pain can modulate the plasticity induced by another event, and could partially explain the sensorimotor reorganization often reported in chronic pain populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone versus ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone on lipopolysaccharide-induced experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dattaray, Piali; Pudrith, Charles; Nyc, Mary Ann; Martin, Dusan; Kim, You Hyun; Jahng, Patrick; Chung, You Sun; Wall, G Michael; Jung, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of topical ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone versus topical ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone on the outcome of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced otitis media with effusion in chinchillas. A randomized experimental animal study. Jerry L. Pettis Veteran's Medical Center. Otitis media with effusion was induced in 5 groups of chinchillas, 6 per group, by injecting 0.3 mL (1 mg/mL) of Salmonella enteric LPS into the superior bullae of each chinchilla with a venting needle in place. Each group was treated with 0.2 mL of test substance at –2, 24, 48, and 72 hours relative to the 0-hour LPS induction. Group 1 was treated with vehicle control. Groups 2 to 5 received 0.3% ciprofloxacin with either 0.1% dexamethasone (group 2), 1% dexamethasone (group 3), 0.1% hydrocortisone (group 4), or 1% hydrocortisone (group 5). The outcome of each treatment was measured by the amount of middle ear effusion present and mucosal thickness at 120 hours posttreatment. Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone 1% significantly (P = .0150) reduced middle ear effusion compared with control. Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone 1% significantly reduced the mucosal thickness when compared with vehicle control (P = .0005), ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone 0.1% (P = .0240), and ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone 0.1% (P = 1.00). Results also showed a dose-response effect between the ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone concentrations. This study demonstrated that treatment with a combination of topical ciprofloxacin and corticosteroid decreased the middle ear effusion when compared with the control group and that ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone suspension reduced the severity of LPS-induced experimental otitis media more than ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone did.

  18. Assessing potential abiotic and biotic complications of crayfish-induced gravel transport in experimental streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statzner, Bernhard; Peltret, Odile

    2006-03-01

    Biogeomorphology adds the element "biological dynamics" (of populations or communities) to chemical and physical geomorphic factors and thus complicates the framework of geomorphic processes. Such biological complications of the animal-induced transport of solids in streams should be particularly important in crayfish, as crayfish affect this transport through their overall activity and intraspecific aggression levels, which could be modified by shelter availability or the establishment of dominance hierarchies among individuals not knowing each other. Using experimental streams, we tested these hypotheses by measuring how shelter availability or residential crayfish group invasion by unknown individuals affected the impact of the crayfish Orconectes limosus on the (i) transport of gravel at baseflow (during 12 experimental days); (ii) sediment surface characteristics (after 12 days); and (iii) critical shear stress causing incipient gravel motion during simulated floods (after 12 days). The two potentially important factors shelter availability or residential group invasion negligibly affected the crayfish impact on gravel sediments, suggesting that habitat unfamiliarity (a third potentially important factor affecting crayfish activity) should increase the crayfish-induced sediment transport. Because habitat unfamiliarity is associated with sporadic long-distance migrations of a few crayfish individuals, this third factor should play a minor role in real streams, where crayfish biomass should be a key factor in relations with crayfish effects on sediments. Therefore, we combined the results of this study with those of previous crayfish experiments to assess how crayfish biomass could serve in modelling the gravel transport. Crayfish biomass explained 47% of the variability in the baseflow gravel transport and, in combination with the coefficient of variation of the bed elevation and algal cover, 72% of the variability in the critical gravel shear stress. These

  19. Ipsilateral and contralateral sensory changes in healthy subjects after experimentally induced concomitant sensitization and hypoesthesia.

    PubMed

    Enax-Krumova, Elena K; Pohl, Stephanie; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2017-03-23

    In unilateral neuropathic pain. e.g. after peripheral nerve injury, both positive and negative sensory signs occur often, accompanied by minor but equally directed contralateral sensory changes. To mimic this feature, we experimentally aimed to induce concomitant c-fibre sensitization and block in healthy subjects and analyzed the bilateral sensory changes by quantitative sensory testing (QST) using the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. Twenty eight healthy subjects were firstly randomized in 2 groups to receive either topical capsaicin (0.6%, 12 cm(2), application duration: 15 min.) or a lidocaine/prilocaine patch (25/25 mg, 10 cm(2), application duration: 60 min.) on the right volar forearm. Secondly, 7-14 days later in the same area either at first capsaicin (for 15 min.) and immediately afterwards local anesthetics (for 60 min.) was applied (Cap/LA), or in inversed order with the same application duration (LA/Cap). Before, after each application and 7-14 days later a QST was performed bilaterally. Wilcoxon-test, ANOVA, p < 0.05. Single application of 0,6% capsaicin induced thermal hypoesthesia, cold hypoalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia. Lidocaine/prilocaine alone induced thermal and tactile hypoesthesia as well as mechanical and cold hypoalgesia, and a heat hyperalgesia (to a smaller extent). Ipsilaterally both co-applications induced a combination of the above mentioned changes. Significant contralateral sensory changes occurred only after the co-application with concomitant sensitization and hypoesthesia and comprised increased cold (Cap/LA, LA/Cap) and mechanical detection as well as cold pain threshold (LA/Cap). The present experimental model using combined application of capsaicin and LA imitates partly the complex sensory changes observed in patients with unilateral neuropathic pain and might be used as an additional surrogate model. Only the concomitant use both agents in the same area induces both

  20. Microscopic evaluation of induced tooth movement after subluxation trauma: an experimental study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Busato, Mauro Carlos Agner; Pereira, Alex Luiz Pozzobon; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido; de Mendonça, Marcos Rogério

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the histological alterations that occurred in the periodontal area of rat molars submitted to induced tooth movement (ITM) right after an intentional trauma (subluxation). Methods Forty adult male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were selected. The animals were divided into eight groups (n = 5), according to the combination of variables: Group 1 - control (neither trauma nor ITM); Group 2 - ITM; Groups 3, 4, 5 and 6 - dentoalveolar trauma groups corresponding, respectively, to 1, 3, 8 and 10 days after trauma; Groups 7 and 8 - the animals' molars were subjected to a 900 cN impact and, one and three days after the trauma event, tooth movement was induced. The rats' maxillary first molars were mesially moved during seven days with a closed coil (50 cN). After the experimental period of each group, the animals were sacrificed by anesthetic overdose and the right maxillas were removed and processed for histological analysis under light microscopy. Results In the animals of group 3, 4, 5 and 6, the histological alterations were not very significant. Consequently, the effect of induced tooth movement right after a subluxation event (groups 7 and 8) was very similar to those described for Group 2. Conclusion There was no difference in the quality of periodontal repair when ITM was applied to teeth that had suffered a subluxation trauma. PMID:24713565

  1. Chocolate eating in healthy men during experimentally induced sadness and joy.

    PubMed

    Macht, M; Roth, S; Ellgring, H

    2002-10-01

    The study compared influences of qualitatively different emotions on eating. Motivation to eat, affective responses to chocolate and chewing of chocolate were investigated in healthy normal weight males during experimentally induced emotions. Subjects abstained from eating 2 h (n = 24) or 8 h (n = 24) before testing. They received pieces of chocolate after viewing film clips presented to induce anger, fear, sadness and joy. Motivation to eat and most affective responses to eating chocolate were higher after 8 h than after 2 h of deprivation. Sadness and joy affected motivation to eat in opposite directions: joy increased and sadness decreased appetite (p < 0.001). In joy, a higher tendency to eat more chocolate was reported (p < 0.001), and chocolate tasted more pleasant (p < 0.001) and was experienced as more "stimulating" than in sadness (p < 0.01). No effects of deprivation could be found for chewing time and number of chews. Results indicate that the quality of emotions can affect motivation to eat and affective responses to eating chocolate. Our findings on decreased eating responses to sadness in healthy males and the contradictory increased eating responses to sadness reported by others supports two types of emotion-induced changes of eating: emotion-congruent modulation of eating and eating to regulate emotions.

  2. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K. N. S.; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:26793262

  3. Aloe vera gel protects liver from oxidative stress-induced damage in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Taslima; Uddin, Borhan; Hossain, Shahdat; Sikder, Abdul Mannan; Ahmed, Sohel

    2013-05-07

    Aloe vera is a semi-tropical plant of Liliaceae family which has a wide range of applications in traditional medicine. In the present study, we sought to investigate the heptaoprotective potential of Aloe vera gel as a diet supplement. To achieve this goal, we have designed in vitro and in vivo experimental models of chemical-induced liver damage using male Sprague-Dawley rat. In the in vitro model, its effect was evaluated on Fenton's reaction-induced liver lipid peroxidation. Co-incubation with gel significantly reduced the generation of liver lipid peroxide (LPO). Next, to see the similar effect in vivo, gel was orally administered to rats once daily for 21 successive days. Following 1 hour of the last administration of gel, rats were treated with intra-peritoneal injection of CCl4. Dietary gel showed significant hepatoprotection against CCl4-induced damage as evident by restoration of liver LPO, serum transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin towards near normal. The beneficial effects were pronounced with the doses used (400 and 800 mg/kg body weight). Besides, we did not observe any significant drop in serum albumin, globulin as well as total protein levels of gel-administered rats. Histopathology of the liver tissue further supported the biochemical findings confirming the hepatoprotective potential of dietary gel.

  4. Diet shifts and population dynamics of estuarine foraminifera during ecosystem recovery after experimentally induced hypoxia crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, G. M.; Duijnstee, I. A. P.; Hazeleger, J. H.; Rossi, F.; Lourens, L. J.; Middelburg, J. J.; Wolthers, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study shows foraminiferal dynamics after experimentally induced hypoxia within the wider context of ecosystem recovery. 13C-labeled bicarbonate and glucose were added to the sediments to examine foraminiferal diet shifts during ecosystem recovery and test-size measurements were used to deduce population dynamics. Hypoxia-treated and undisturbed patches were compared to distinguish natural (seasonal) fluctuations from hypoxia-induced responses. The effect of timing of disturbance and duration of recovery were investigated. The foraminiferal diets and population dynamics showed higher fluctuations in the recovering patches compared to the controls. The foraminiferal diet and population structure of Haynesina germanica and Ammonia beccarii responded differentially and generally inversely to progressive stages of ecosystem recovery. Tracer inferred diet estimates in April and June and the two distinctly visible cohorts in the test-size distribution, discussed to reflect reproduction in June, strongly suggest that the ample availability of diatoms during the first month of ecosystem recovery after the winter hypoxia was likely profitable to A. beccarii. Enhanced reproduction itself was strongly linked to the subsequent dietary shift to bacteria. The distribution of the test dimensions of H. germanica indicated that this species had less fluctuation in population structure during ecosystem recovery but possibly reproduced in response to the induced winter hypoxia. Bacteria seemed to consistently contribute more to the diet of H. germanica than diatoms. For the diet and test-size distribution of both species, the timing of disturbance seemed to have a higher impact than the duration of the subsequent recovery period.

  5. Experimental diabetes induced by alloxan and streptozotocin: The current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Radenković, Miroslav; Stojanović, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder with a high prevalence worldwide. Animal models of diabetes represent an important tool in diabetes investigation that helps us to avoid unnecessary and ethically challenging studies in human subjects, as well as to obtain a comprehensive scientific viewpoint of this disease. Although there are several methods through which diabetes can be induced, chemical methods of alloxan- and streptozotocin-induced diabetes represent the most important and highly preferable experimental models for this pathological condition. Therefore, the aim of this article was to review the current knowledge related to quoted models of diabetes, including to this point available information about mechanism of action, particular time- and dose-dependent protocols, frequent problems, as well as major limitations linked to laboratory application of alloxan and sterptozotocin in inducing diabetes. Given that diabetes is known to be closely associated with serious health consequences it is of fundamental importance that current animal models for induction of diabetes should be continuously upgraded in order to improve overall prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this pathological condition.

  6. Systemic inflammatory response induced by dacron graft and modulation by antimicrobial agents: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Francisco S; García-Criado, Francisco J; Fresnadillo, Maria J; García, Enrique; García, José E; Gómez-Alonso, Alberto

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect that different antimicrobial agents and different forms of administering them would have over a systemic inflammatory response (SIR) induced by an intraperitoneally implanted collagen-coated Dacron graft. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were randomly allocated into six groups of 6 animals each: (I) control, (II) "sham," (III) graft but no antibiotic, (IV) graft plus systemic cefazolin, (V) graft plus locally applied gentamicin, and (VI) graft soaked in rifampicin. After 72 h, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, kidney, and the implanted graft were sent to the microbiology laboratory and cultured for aerobic and anaerobic organisms in order to evaluate bacterial translocation. Serum cytokines (IL-1beta and TNF-alpha), myeloperoxidase activity in liver and kidney, and superoxide anion and superoxide dismutase activities in liver were also determined to evaluate the level of SIR. Microbiologic and biochemical data indicated that intraperitoneal implantation of a collagen-coated Dacron graft induced a significant (P < 0.05) bacterial translocation and a high inflammatory response, both of which decreased significantly with antibiotic treatment regardless of the means of administration (P < 0.05). The present experimental model shows that the antibiotics used, in different means of administration, reduce bacterial translocation and behave as modulators of the SIR induced by an intraperitoneal collagen-coated Dacron graft.

  7. Analytical and Experimental Characterization of Gravity Induced Deformations In Subscale Gossamer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Blandino, Joseph R.; McEvoy, Kiley C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of gossamer space structures such as solar sails and sunshields presents many challenges due to their large size and extreme flexibility. The post-deployment structural geometry exhibited during ground testing may significantly depart from the in-space configuration due to the presence of gravity-induced deformations (gravity sag) of lightly preloaded membranes. This paper describes a study carried out to characterize gravity sag in two subscale gossamer structures: a single quadrant from a 2 m, 4 quadrant square solar sail and a 1.7 m membrane layer from a multi-layer sunshield The behavior of the test articles was studied over a range of preloads and in several orientations with respect to gravity. An experimental study was carried out to measure the global surface profiles using photogrammetry, and nonlinear finite element analysis was used to predict the behavior of the test articles. Comparison of measured and predicted surface profiles shows that the finite dement analysis qualitatively predicts deformed shapes comparable to those observed in the laboratory. Quantitatively, finite element analysis predictions for peak gravity-induced deformations in both test articles were within 10% of measured values. Results from this study provide increased insight into gravity sag behavior in gossamer structures, and demonstrates the potential to analytically predict gravity-induced deformations to within reasonable accuracy.

  8. Zymosan-induced luminol-dependent chemiluminescence response of circulating and extravasated leukocytes in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2004-01-01

    This study examines a concurrent profiling of circulating and extravasated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in a rat model of experimental sepsis. Fecal peritonitis was induced in Wistar male rats by intraperitoneal instillation of a fecal suspension in saline (1:1 w/v). Blood and peritoneal fluid were collected 8 h following fecal inoculation for the evaluation of inflammatory response of PMNs using zymosan-induced luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Fifty microliters of pre-diluted blood or peritoneal fluid samples were mixed with 150 microl of reaction mixture (4 x 10(-4) M luminol+50 microg opsonized zymosan+0.1% gelatin in Hank's balanced salt solution) and the chemiluminescence signal was measured in a luminometer at 37 degrees C. Fecal peritonitis caused a significant leukocytopenia (3540+/-297 mm(-3) versus control value of 7525+/-711 mm(-3), p < 0.001) accompanied by massive infiltration of PMNs in the peritoneal cavity (34700+/-4006 versus 7325+/-425 mm(-3), p < 0.001). The phagocytic activity of circulating blood PMNs was down-regulated whereas a significant up-regulation was observed in the activity of PMNs from peritoneal fluid. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates sepsis-induced alterations in both blood and peritoneal fluid PMNs and their quantitative assessment may be helpful in disease evaluation and designing effective therapies. PMID:15203554

  9. Microscopic evaluation of induced tooth movement after subluxation trauma: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Busato, Mauro Carlos Agner; Pereira, Alex Luiz Pozzobon; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido; de Mendonça, Marcos Rogério

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the histological alterations that occurred in the periodontal area of rat molars submitted to induced tooth movement (ITM) right after an intentional trauma (subluxation). Forty adult male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were selected. The animals were divided into eight groups (n=5), according to the combination of variables: Group 1--control (neither trauma nor ITM); Group 2--ITM; Groups 3, 4, 5 and 6--dentoalveolar trauma groups corresponding, respectively, to 1, 3, 8 and 10 days after trauma; Groups 7 and 8 - the animals' molars were subjected to a 900 cN impact and, one and three days after the trauma event, tooth movement was induced. The rats' maxillary first molars were mesially moved during seven days with a closed coil (50 cN). After the experimental period of each group, the animals were sacrificed by anesthetic overdose and the right maxillas were removed and processed for histological analysis under light microscopy. In the animals of group 3, 4, 5 and 6, the histological alterations were not very significant. Consequently, the effect of induced tooth movement right after a subluxation event (groups 7 and 8) was very similar to those described for Group 2. There was no difference in the quality of periodontal repair when ITM was applied to teeth that had suffered a subluxation trauma.

  10. Effects of Schizolobium parahyba Extract on Experimental Bothrops Venom-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martines, Monique Silva; Mendes, Mirian M.; Shimizu, Maria H. M.; Melo Rodrigues, Veridiana; de Castro, Isac; Filho, Sebastião R. Ferreira; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Venom-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite with relevant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Schizolobium parahyba (SP) extract, a natural medicine with presumed anti-Bothrops venom effects, in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BV)-induced AKI. Methodology Groups of 8 to 10 rats received infusions of 0.9% saline (control, C), SP 2 mg/kg, BV 0.25 mg/kg and BV immediately followed by SP (treatment, T) in the doses already described. After the respective infusions, animals were assessed for their glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance), renal blood flow (RBF, Doppler), blood pressure (BP, intra-arterial transducer), renal vascular resistance (RVR), urinary osmolality (UO, freezing point), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, kinetic method), hematocrit (Hct, microhematocrit), fibrinogen (Fi, Klauss modified) and blinded renal histology (acute tubular necrosis score). Principal Findings BV caused significant decreases in GFR, RBF, UO, HcT and Fi; significant increases in RVR, NGAL and LDH; and acute tubular necrosis. SP did not prevent these changes; instead, it caused a significant decrease in GFR when used alone. Conclusion SP administered simultaneously with BV, in an approximate 10∶1 concentration, did not prevent BV-induced AKI, hemolysis and fibrinogen consumption. SP used alone caused a decrease in GFR. PMID:24551041

  11. Experimental Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Induces Blunted Vasoconstriction and Functional Changes in the Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Tufiño, Cecilia; Villanueva-López, Cleva; Ibarra-Barajas, Maximiliano; Bracho-Valdés, Ismael; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic conditions increase vascular reactivity to angiotensin II in several studies but there are scarce reports on cardiovascular effects of hypercaloric diet (HD) induced gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), so the objective of this work was to determine the effects of HD induced GDM on vascular responses. Angiotensin II as well as phenylephrine induced vascular contraction was tested in isolated aorta rings with and without endothelium from rats fed for 7 weeks (4 before and 3 weeks during pregnancy) with standard (SD) or hypercaloric (HD) diet. Also, protein expression of AT1R, AT2R, COX-1, COX-2, NOS-1, and NOS-3 and plasma glucose, insulin, and angiotensin II levels were measured. GDM impaired vasoconstrictor response (P < 0.05 versus SD) in intact (e+) but not in endothelium-free (e−) vessels. Losartan reduced GDM but not SD e− vasoconstriction (P < 0.01 versus SD). AT1R, AT2R, and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression were significantly increased in GDM vessels (P < 0.05 versus SD). Results suggest an increased participation of endothelium vasodilator mediators, probably prostaglandins, as well as of AT2 vasodilator receptors as a compensatory mechanism for vasoconstrictor changes generated by experimental GDM. Considering the short term of rat pregnancy findings can reflect early stage GDM adaptations. PMID:25610861

  12. Carnosic acid attenuates renal injury in an experimental model of rat cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Rentam, Kiran Kumar Reddy; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Vegi, Ganga Modi Naidu; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2011-12-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the serious dose limiting side effects of cisplatin when used in the treatment of various malignant conditions. Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress caused by free radicals and apoptosis of renal cells contributes to the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Present study was aimed to explore the effect of carnosic acid, a potent antioxidant, against cisplatin induced oxidative stress and nephrotoxicity in rats. A single dose of cisplatin (7.5mg/kg) caused marked renal damage, characterized by a significant (P<0.05) increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and relative weight of kidney with higher kidney MDA (malondialdehyde), tROS (total reactive oxygen species), caspase 3, GSH (reduced glutathione) levels and lowered tissue nitrite, SOD (superoxide dismutase), CAT (catalase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), GR (glutathione reductase) and GST (glutathione S-transferase) levels compared to normal control. Carnosic acid treatment significantly (P<0.05) attenuated the increase in lipid peroxidation, caspase-3 and ROS generation and enhanced the levels of reduced glutathione, tissue nitrite level and activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, GR and GST compared to cisplatin control. The present study demonstrates that carnosic acid has a protective effect on cisplatin induced experimental nephrotoxicity and is attributed to its potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interleukin 1-induced augmentation of experimental metastases from a human melanoma in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Giavazzi, R.; Garofalo, A.; Bani, M.R.; Abbate, M.; Ghezzi, P.; Boraschi, D.; Mantovani, A.; Dejana, E. )

    1990-08-01

    This study has examined the effect of the cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) on metastasis formation by the human melanoma A375M in nude mice. We have found that human recombinant IL-1 beta (a single injection greater than 0.01 micrograms per mouse i.v. given before tumor cells) induced an augmentation of experimental lung metastases from the A375M tumor cells in nude mice. This effect was rapidly induced and reversible within 24 h after IL-1 injection. A similar effect was induced by human recombinant IL-1 alpha and human recombinant tumor necrosis factor, but not by human recombinant interleukin 6. 5-(125I)odo-2'-deoxyuridine-radiolabeled A375M tumor cells injected i.v. remained at a higher level in the lungs of nude mice receiving IL-1 than in control mice. In addition, IL-1 injected 1 h, but not 24 h, after tumor cells enhanced lung colonization as well, thus suggesting an effect of IL-1 on the vascular transit of tumor cells. These findings may explain the observation of enhanced secondary localization of tumor cells at inflammatory sites and suggest that modulation of secondary spread should be carefully considered when assessing the ability of this cytokine to complement cytoreductive therapies.

  14. Effects of sensory denervation by neonatal capsaicin administration on experimental pancreatitis induced by dibutyltin dichloride.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Kataoka, Yosky; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Takamori, Yasuharu; Takamido, Shoichiroh; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Yamada, Hisao

    2007-09-01

    Increase in the number of intrapancreatic sensory nerve fibers has been implicated in the generation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Because some sensory neurotransmitters (e.g., substance P) are known to have proinflammatory effects, we hypothesized that denervation of intrapancreatic nerves might influence not only pain generation but also inflammation. Neonatal Lewis rats were injected with capsaicin (50 mg/kg or 0 mg/kg), a neurotoxin, to induce denervation of primary sensory neurons. When rats reached 170-190 g body weight, experimental pancreatitis was induced by a single administration of dibutyltin dichloride (7 mg/mg). The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated in both groups in the acute phase (at 3 and 7 days) and chronic phase (at 28 days). At day 7, the sensory denervation induced by neonatal capsaicin administration inhibited pancreatic inflammation on both histological (determination of interstitial edema, expansion of interlobular septa and intercellular spaces, and inflammatory cell infiltration) and biochemical (intrapancreatic myeloperoxidase activity) evaluation. Furthermore, at day 28, glandular atrophy, pseudotubular complexes, and rate of fibrosis were each significantly lower in the capsaicin-pretreated group than in the vehicle-pretreated group. Our findings provide in vivo evidence that primary sensory neurons play important roles in both acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatic inflammation with fibrosis.

  15. NLRP3 inflammasome induces chemotactic immune cell migration to the CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Makoto; Williams, Kristi L.; Gunn, Michael D.; Shinohara, Mari L.

    2012-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of three kinds of proteins, NLRP3, ASC, and pro-caspase-1, and plays a role in sensing pathogens and danger signals in the innate immune system. The NLRP3 inflammasome is thought to be involved in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism by which the NLRP3 inflammasome induces EAE is not clear. In this study, we found that the NLRP3 inflammasome played a critical role in inducing T-helper cell migration into the CNS. To gain migratory ability, CD4+ T cells need to be primed by NLRP3 inflammasome-sufficient antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate chemotaxis-related proteins, such as osteopontin, CCR2, and CXCR6. In the presence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, dendritic cells and macrophages also induce chemotactic ability and up-regulate chemotaxis-related proteins, such as α4β1 integrin, CCL7, CCL8, and CXCL16. On the other hand, reduced Th17 cell population size in immunized Nlrp3−/− and Asc−/− mice is not a determinative factor for their resistance to EAE. As currently applied in clinical interventions of MS, targeting immune cell migration molecules may be an effective approach in treating MS accompanied by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. PMID:22699511

  16. Evaluation of anti-urolithiatic activity of Pashanabhedadi Ghrita against experimentally induced renal calculi in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Baghel, Madhav Singh; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Ravishankar, B.; Ashok, B. K.; Patil, Panchakshari D.

    2012-01-01

    Population in an industrialized world is afflicted by urinary stone disease. Kidney stones are common in all kinds of urolithiasis. One distinguished formulation mentioned by Sushruta for management of Ashmari (urolithiasis) is Pashanabhedadi Ghrita (PBG), which is in clinical practice since centuries. Validation of drug is the requirement of time through the experimental study. In this study, trial of PBG has been made against ammonium oxalate rich diet and gentamicin injection induced renal calculi in albino rats. The calculi were induced by gentamicin injection and ammonium oxalate rich diet. Test drug was administered concomitantly in the dose of 900 mg/kg for 15 consecutive days. Rats were sacrificed on the 16th day. Parameters like kidney weight, serum biochemical, kidney tissue and histopathology of kidney were studied. Concomitant treatment of PBG attenuates blood biochemical parameters non-significantly, where as it significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation and enhanced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities. It also decreased crystal deposition markedly into the renal tubules in number as well as size and prevented damage to the renal tubules. The findings showed that PBG is having significant anti-urolithiatic activities against ammonium oxalate rich diet plus gentamicine injection induced urolithiasis in rats. PMID:23723654

  17. Toxoplasma gondii Upregulates Interleukin-12 To Prevent Plasmodium berghei-Induced Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Settles, Erik W.; Moser, Lindsey A.; Harris, Tajie H.

    2014-01-01

    A chronic infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii has previously been shown to protect mice against subsequent viral, bacterial, or protozoal infections. Here we have shown that a chronic T. gondii infection can prevent Plasmodium berghei ANKA-induced experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with soluble T. gondii antigens (STAg) reduced parasite sequestration and T cell infiltration in the brains of P. berghei-infected mice. Administration of STAg also preserved blood-brain barrier function, reduced ECM symptoms, and significantly decreased mortality. STAg treatment 24 h post-P. berghei infection led to a rapid increase in serum levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). By 5 days after P. berghei infection, STAg-treated mice had reduced IFN-γ levels compared to those of mock-treated mice, suggesting that reductions in IFN-γ at the time of ECM onset protected against lethality. Using IL-10- and IL-12βR-deficient mice, we found that STAg-induced protection from ECM is IL-10 independent but IL-12 dependent. Treatment of P. berghei-infected mice with recombinant IL-12 significantly decreased parasitemia and mortality. These data suggest that IL-12, either induced by STAg or injected as a recombinant protein, mediates protection from ECM-associated pathology potentially through early induction of IFN-γ and reduction in parasitemia. These results highlight the importance of early IL-12 induction in protection against ECM. PMID:24396042

  18. Cardiac metabolomics and autopsy in a patient with early diffuse systemic sclerosis presenting with dyspnea: a case report.

    PubMed

    Frech, Tracy M; Revelo, Monica P; Ryan, John J; Shah, Ami A; Gordon, Jessica; Domsic, Robyn; Hant, Faye; Assassi, Shervin; Shanmugam, Victoria K; Hinchcliff, Monique; Steen, Virginia; Khanna, Dinesh; Bernstein, Elana J; Cox, James; Luem, Nick; Drakos, Stavros

    2015-06-10

    Diffuse systemic sclerosis is associated with high mortality; however, the pathogenesis of cardiac death in these patients is not clear. A 56-year-old Caucasian female patient presented with dyspnea and requested to donate her body to science in order to improve understanding of diffuse systemic sclerosis pathogenesis. She had extensive testing for dyspnea including pulmonary function tests, an echocardiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and right heart catheterization to characterize her condition. Her case highlights the morbidity seen in this disease, including the presence of extensive skin thickening, digital ulcerations, and scleroderma renal crisis. In this case report, we present the finding of cardiac tissue metabolomics, which may indicate a problem with vasodilation as a contributor to cardiac death in diffuse systemic sclerosis. The use of autopsy and tissue metabolomics in rare disease may help clarify disease pathogenesis.

  19. New onset right ventricular enlargement in recent dyspnea: Is echocardiography enough for a diagnosis of pulmonary thrombo-embolism?

    PubMed

    De Gennaro, Luisa; Giannoccaro, Viviana; Lopriore, Vincenzo; Caldarola, Pasquale; Lentini, Salvatore; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism may be often promptly diagnosed just by bedside echocardiography, in the case of new onset severe right ventricular enlargement, increased pulmonary pressure and dyspnea. However, CT confirmation could be required in the presence of contrasting findings during diagnostic work up. We report the case of a 79-year old woman who presented with acute dyspnea, right ventricular enlargement and leftward septal shift. Despite first diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, an irregular mass was detected at CT scan in mid left lung, apparently infiltrating left pulmonary artery branches, without signs of evident pulmonary thrombo-embolism. Visceral pleural and lymphonodular infiltration suspected for malignancy was also present. We hypothesize that acutely increased pulmonary pressures and enlarged right ventricle were caused by the infiltrating pulmonary mass, presumably a lung tumor, partly involving left pulmonary artery branches and by tumor pulmonary embolism. A diagnosis of pulmonary thrombo-embolism exclusively based on echocardiography may be occasionally misleading without a careful diagnostic work-up.

  20. Spontaneous and experimental glycoprotein storage disease of goats induced by Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Armién, A G; Tokarnia, C H; Peixoto, P Vargas; Frese, K

    2007-03-01

    Spontaneous and experimental poisoning with the swainsonine-containing and calystegine-containing plant Ipomoea carnea subsp fistulosa is described. Three of 8 goats presenting with emaciation, weakness, symmetrical ataxia, posterior paresis, proprioceptive deficits, abnormal posture, abnormal postural reaction, and muscle hypertonia were necropsied. I fistulosa was suspected to be the cause of the neurologic disease in all cases. An experiment was conducted to confirm the diagnosis using 12 goats and diets containing 3 different concentrations of the plant. All goats fed I fistulosa developed neurological signs that were similar to those observed in the spontaneous intoxication. Muscle atrophy and pallor were the only macroscopic changes observed in spontaneous and in experimental intoxication. Histological lesions of spontaneous and experimental animals were similar. The most prominent lesion was cytoplasmic vacuolation in neurons of the central and the autonomous nervous system, pancreatic acinar cells, hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, follicular epithelial cells of the thyroid gland, and macrophages of the lymphatic tissues. Neuronal necrosis, axonal spheroids formation, and astrogliosis were additionally observed in the brain. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasmic vacuoles consisted of distended lysosomes surrounded by a single-layered membrane. Nonreduced end-rests or sequence of alpha-Man, alpha-Glc, beta(1-4)-GlcNAc, and NeuNAc on lysosomal membrane were revealed by lectin histochemistry. Samples of plants used in the experimental trial contained swainsonine and calystegine and their intermediary derivate. We conclude that I fistulosa induces a glycoprotein storage disease primarily based on the inhibition of the lysosomal alpha-mannosidase by the alkaloid swainsonine.

  1. Effects of transdermal tulobuterol on dyspnea and respiratory function during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Masako; Yoshimi, Kaku; Shiota, Satomi; Kotajima, Masaki; Nakajyo, Mami; Seyama, Kuniaki; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor exercise tolerability is a major barrier to improving the quality of life of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although COPD is often treated with long-acting β2 adrenergic agonists, few studies have examined their effects on exercise tolerability. Methods In this study, Japanese COPD patients were tre