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Sample records for exploiting disulfide assisted

  1. Carbon disulfide assisted polymerization of benzene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Zhanlong; Men, Zhiwei; Gao, Shuqin; Li, Zuowei; Lu, Guohui; Sun, Chenglin

    2012-03-01

    The chemical transformation of benzene (C(6)H(6)) and carbon disulfide (CS(2)) binary solution under high pressure condition is investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy up to 6.8 GPa. On increasing the pressure, all the Raman bands of benzene decrease in intensity, whereas new broad bands start to be observed at 1520 and 1450 cm(-1), indicating that a highly cross-linked polymer is formed. The recovered sample is analyzed through Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and is identified as a saturated hydrocarbon and element sulfur.

  2. Display of disulfide-rich proteins by complementary DNA display and disulfide shuffling assisted by protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Naimuddin, Mohammed; Kubo, Tai

    2011-12-01

    We report an efficient system to produce and display properly folded disulfide-rich proteins facilitated by coupled complementary DNA (cDNA) display and protein disulfide isomerase-assisted folding. The results show that a neurotoxin protein containing four disulfide linkages can be displayed in the folded state. Furthermore, it can be refolded on a solid support that binds efficiently to its natural acetylcholine receptor. Probing the efficiency of the display proteins prepared by these methods provided up to 8-fold higher enrichment by the selective enrichment method compared with cDNA display alone, more than 10-fold higher binding to its receptor by the binding assays, and more than 10-fold higher affinities by affinity measurements. Cotranslational folding was found to have better efficiency than posttranslational refolding between the two investigated methods. We discuss the utilities of efficient display of such proteins in the preparation of superior quality proteins and protein libraries for directed evolution leading to ligand discovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  4. Surface modification of amorphous substrates by disulfide derivatives: A photo-assisted route to direct functionalization of chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalric, Julien; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline

    2011-12-01

    A novel route for chalcogenide glass surface modification is disclosed. The formation of an organic monolayer from disulfide derivatives is studied on two different glasses of formula GexAsySez by water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode (FTIR-ATR). The potential anchoring group is the disulfide functionality. Since thioctic acid derivatives absorb around 335 nm, an irradiation step is included, in order to favor S-S disruption. Three types of disulfide compounds are grafted onto small glass breaks for contact angle and XPS analyses. The results show effective changes of surface state. According to contact angle measurement, the deposited organic layer functionalized by a small polyethylene glycol chain leads to a more hydrophilic surface, long alkyl chain or a perfluorinated carbon chain leads to a more hydrophobic surface. XPS shows the presence at the surface of an organic layer with sulfur and ethylene oxide chains, or augmentation of organic carbons or fluorine and Csbnd F bonds. The photo-assisted grafting of the disulfides onto an ATR prism made of chalcogenide glass shows that this surface modification process does not affect infrared transparency, despite UV treatment, and accurate structural analysis can be performed.

  5. Electrochemistry-assisted top-down characterization of disulfide-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2012-04-17

    Covalent disulfide bond linkage in a protein represents an important challenge for mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down protein structure analysis as it reduces the backbone cleavage efficiency for MS/MS dissociation. This study presents a strategy for solving this critical issue via integrating electrochemistry (EC) online with a top-down MS approach. In this approach, proteins undergo electrolytic reduction in an electrochemical cell to break disulfide bonds and then undergo online ionization into gaseous ions for analysis by electron-capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The electrochemical reduction of proteins allows one to remove disulfide bond constraints and also leads to increased charge numbers of the resulting protein ions. As a result, sequence coverage was significantly enhanced, as exemplified by β-lactoglobulin A (24 vs 75 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively) and lysozyme (5 vs 66 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively). This methodology is fast and does not need chemical reductants, which would have an important impact in high-throughput proteomics research.

  6. Electrochemistry-Assisted Top-Down Characterization of Disulfide-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Dewald, Howard D.; Chen, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Covalent disulfide bond linkage in a protein represents an important challenge for mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down protein structure analysis as it reduces the backbone cleavage efficiency for MS/MS dissociation. This study presents a strategy for solving this critical issue via integrating electrochemistry (EC) online with top-down MS approach. In this approach, proteins undergo electrolytic reduction in an electrochemical cell to break disulfide bonds and then online ionized into gaseous ions for analysis by electron-capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The electrochemical reduction of proteins allows to remove disulfide bond constraints and also leads to increased charge numbers of the resulting protein ions. As a result, sequence coverage was significantly enhanced, as exemplified by β-lactoglobulin A (24 vs. 73 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively) and lysozyme (5 vs. 66 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively). This methodology is fast and does not need chemical reductants, which would have an important impact in high-throughput proteomics research. PMID:22448817

  7. Design of electrochemical detection of thiols based on the cleavage of the disulfide bond coupled with thionine modified gold nanoparticle-assisted amplification.

    PubMed

    Hun, Xu; Sun, Wei; Zhu, Huanhuan; Du, Feng; Liu, Fang; Xu, Yaqiong; He, Yunhua

    2013-10-25

    A new strategy for the electrochemical detection of thiols based on the disulfide cleavage combined with gold nanoparticle (AuNP) assisted signal amplification and an AuNP and graphene (GR) and ionic liquid (IL) modified carbon paste electrode (AuNP/GR/CILE). A superior detection limit of 0.4 pM toward glutathione could be achieved.

  8. An Educational Program to Assist Clinicians in Identifying Elder Investment Fraud and Financial Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Whitney L.; Roush, Robert E.; Moye, Jennifer; Kunik, Mark E.; Wilson, Nancy L.; Taffet, George E.; Naik, Aanand D.

    2012-01-01

    Due to age-related factors and illnesses, older adults may become vulnerable to elder investment fraud and financial exploitation (EIFFE). The authors describe the development and preliminary evaluation of an educational program to raise awareness and assist clinicians in identifying older adults at risk. Participants (n = 127) gave high ratings…

  9. An Educational Program to Assist Clinicians in Identifying Elder Investment Fraud and Financial Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Whitney L.; Roush, Robert E.; Moye, Jennifer; Kunik, Mark E.; Wilson, Nancy L.; Taffet, George E.; Naik, Aanand D.

    2012-01-01

    Due to age-related factors and illnesses, older adults may become vulnerable to elder investment fraud and financial exploitation (EIFFE). The authors describe the development and preliminary evaluation of an educational program to raise awareness and assist clinicians in identifying older adults at risk. Participants (n = 127) gave high ratings…

  10. Lignin-assisted exfoliation of molybdenum disulfide in aqueous media and its application in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanshuang; Zhao, Chenyang; Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Zhaolin; Lu, Xuehong

    2015-05-01

    In this article, alkali lignin (AL)-assisted direct exfoliation of MoS2 mineral into single-layer and few-layer nanosheets in water is reported for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the concentration of MoS2 nanosheets in the obtained dispersion can be as high as 1.75 +/- 0.08 mg mL-1, which is much higher than the typical reported concentrations (<1.0 mg mL-1) using synthetic polymers or compounds as surfactants. The stabilizing mechanism primarily lies in the electrostatic repulsion between negative charged AL, as suggested by zeta-potential measurements. When the exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets are applied as electrode materials for lithium ion batteries, they show much improved electrochemical performance compared with the pristine MoS2 mineral because of the enhanced ion and electron transfer kinetics. This facile, scalable and eco-friendly aqueous-based process in combination with renewable and ultra-low-cost lignin opens up possibilities for large-scale fabrication of MoS2-based nanocomposites and devices. Moreover, herein we demonstrate that AL is also an excellent surfactant for exfoliation of many other types of layered materials, including graphene, tungsten disulfide and boron nitride, in water, providing rich opportunities for a wider range of applications.In this article, alkali lignin (AL)-assisted direct exfoliation of MoS2 mineral into single-layer and few-layer nanosheets in water is reported for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the concentration of MoS2 nanosheets in the obtained dispersion can be as high as 1.75 +/- 0.08 mg mL-1, which is much higher than the typical reported concentrations (<1.0 mg mL-1) using synthetic polymers or compounds as surfactants. The stabilizing mechanism primarily lies in the electrostatic repulsion between negative charged AL, as suggested by zeta-potential measurements. When the exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets are applied as electrode materials for lithium ion batteries, they show much improved

  11. An educational program to assist clinicians in identifying elder investment fraud and financial exploitation.

    PubMed

    Mills, Whitney L; Roush, Robert E; Moye, Jennifer; Kunik, Mark E; Wilson, Nancy L; Taffet, George E; Naik, Aanand D

    2012-01-01

    Due to age-related factors and illnesses, older adults may become vulnerable to elder investment fraud and financial exploitation (EIFFE). The authors describe the development and preliminary evaluation of an educational program to raise awareness and assist clinicians in identifying older adults at risk. Participants (n = 127) gave high ratings for the program, which includes a presentation, clinician pocket guide, and patient education brochure. Thirty-five respondents returned a completed questionnaire at the 6-month follow-up, with 69% (n = 24) of those indicating use of the program materials in practice and also reporting having identified 25 patients they felt were vulnerable to EIFFE. These findings demonstrate the value of providing education and practical tools to enhance clinic-based screening of this underappreciated but prevalent problem.

  12. Human-Assisted Machine Information Exploitation: a crowdsourced investigation of information-based problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Sue E.; Vanni, Michelle; Caylor, Justine; Hoye, Jeff

    2017-05-01

    The Human-Assisted Machine Information Exploitation (HAMIE) investigation utilizes large-scale online data collection for developing models of information-based problem solving (IBPS) behavior in a simulated time-critical operational environment. These types of environments are characteristic of intelligence workflow processes conducted during human-geo-political unrest situations when the ability to make the best decision at the right time ensures strategic overmatch. The project takes a systems approach to Human Information Interaction (HII) by harnessing the expertise of crowds to model the interaction of the information consumer and the information required to solve a problem at different levels of system restrictiveness and decisional guidance. The design variables derived from Decision Support Systems (DSS) research represent the experimental conditions in this online single-player against-the-clock game where the player, acting in the role of an intelligence analyst, is tasked with a Commander's Critical Information Requirement (CCIR) in an information overload scenario. The player performs a sequence of three information processing tasks (annotation, relation identification, and link diagram formation) with the assistance of `HAMIE the robot' who offers varying levels of information understanding dependent on question complexity. We provide preliminary results from a pilot study conducted with Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) participants on the Volunteer Science scientific research platform.

  13. Redox-assisted regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum by disulfide reductase ERdj5

    PubMed Central

    Ushioda, Ryo; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Inoue, Michio; Watanabe, Satoshi; Okumura, Masaki; Maegawa, Ken-ichi; Uegaki, Kaiku; Fujii, Shohei; Fukuda, Yasuko; Umitsu, Masataka; Takagi, Junichi; Inaba, Kenji; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is an important second messenger that regulates numerous cellular functions. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) is strictly controlled by Ca2+ channels and pumps on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membranes. The ER calcium pump, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), imports Ca2+ from the cytosol into the ER in an ATPase activity-dependent manner. The activity of SERCA2b, the ubiquitous isoform of SERCA, is negatively regulated by disulfide bond formation between two luminal cysteines. Here, we show that ERdj5, a mammalian ER disulfide reductase, which we reported to be involved in the ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins, activates the pump function of SERCA2b by reducing its luminal disulfide bond. Notably, ERdj5 activated SERCA2b at a lower ER luminal [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]ER), whereas a higher [Ca2+]ER induced ERdj5 to form oligomers that were no longer able to interact with the pump, suggesting [Ca2+]ER-dependent regulation. Binding Ig protein, an ER-resident molecular chaperone, exerted a regulatory role in the oligomerization by binding to the J domain of ERdj5. These results identify ERdj5 as one of the master regulators of ER calcium homeostasis and thus shed light on the importance of cross talk among redox, Ca2+, and protein homeostasis in the ER. PMID:27694578

  14. Exploiting Wild Relatives for Genomics-assisted Breeding of Perennial Crops

    PubMed Central

    Migicovsky, Zoë; Myles, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Perennial crops are vital contributors to global food production and nutrition. However, the breeding of new perennial crops is an expensive and time-consuming process due to the large size and lengthy juvenile phase of many species. Genomics provides a valuable tool for improving the efficiency of breeding by allowing progeny possessing a trait of interest to be selected at the seed or seedling stage through marker-assisted selection (MAS). The benefits of MAS to a breeder are greatest when the targeted species takes a long time to reach maturity and is expensive to grow and maintain. Thus, MAS holds particular promise in perennials since they are often costly and time-consuming to grow to maturity and evaluate. Well-characterized germplasm that breeders can tap into for improving perennials is often limited in genetic diversity. Wild relatives are a largely untapped source of desirable traits including disease resistance, fruit quality, and rootstock characteristics. This review focuses on the use of genomics-assisted breeding in perennials, especially as it relates to the introgression of useful traits from wild relatives. The identification of genetic markers predictive of beneficial phenotypes derived from wild relatives is hampered by genomic tools designed for domesticated species that are often ill-suited for use in wild relatives. There is therefore an urgent need for better genomic resources from wild relatives. A further barrier to exploiting wild diversity through genomics is the phenotyping bottleneck: well-powered genetic mapping requires accurate and cost-effective characterization of large collections of diverse wild germplasm. While genomics will always be used in combination with traditional breeding methods, it is a powerful tool for accelerating the speed and reducing the costs of breeding while harvesting the potential of wild relatives for improving perennial crops. PMID:28421095

  15. Carbon disulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon disulfide ; CASRN 75 - 15 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  16. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei; Kong, Rongmei; Zhang, Liangliang; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-08-05

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3'-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS2 nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS2 nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics.

  17. Manipulation of local optical properties and structures in molybdenum-disulfide monolayers using electric field-assisted near-field techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Junji; Fukumura, Musashi; Aoki, Takaaki; Maniwa, Yutaka; Yomogida, Yohei; Yanagi, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Remarkable optical properties, such as quantum light emission and large optical nonlinearity, have been observed in peculiar local sites of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers, and the ability to tune such properties is of great importance for their optoelectronic applications. For that purpose, it is crucial to elucidate and tune their local optical properties simultaneously. Here, we develop an electric field-assisted near-field technique. Using this technique we can clarify and tune the local optical properties simultaneously with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 nm due to the electric field from the cantilever. The photoluminescence at local sites in molybdenum-disulfide (MoS2) monolayers is reversibly modulated, and the inhomogeneity of the charge neutral points and quantum yields is suggested. We successfully etch MoS2 crystals and fabricate nanoribbons using near-field techniques in combination with an electric field. This study creates a way to tune the local optical properties and to freely design the structural shapes of atomic monolayers using near-field optics. PMID:28378804

  18. Exploiting Sequential Patterns Found in Users' Solutions and Virtual Tutor Behavior to Improve Assistance in ITS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier-Viger, Philippe; Faghihi, Usef; Nkambou, Roger; Nguifo, Engelbert Mephu

    2010-01-01

    We propose to mine temporal patterns in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) to uncover useful knowledge that can enhance their ability to provide assistance. To discover patterns, we suggest using a custom, sequential pattern-mining algorithm. Two ways of applying the algorithm to enhance an ITS's capabilities are addressed. The first is to…

  19. Exploiting Sequential Patterns Found in Users' Solutions and Virtual Tutor Behavior to Improve Assistance in ITS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier-Viger, Philippe; Faghihi, Usef; Nkambou, Roger; Nguifo, Engelbert Mephu

    2010-01-01

    We propose to mine temporal patterns in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) to uncover useful knowledge that can enhance their ability to provide assistance. To discover patterns, we suggest using a custom, sequential pattern-mining algorithm. Two ways of applying the algorithm to enhance an ITS's capabilities are addressed. The first is to…

  20. Exploiting co-adaptation for the design of symbiotic neuroprosthetic assistants.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Justin C; Mahmoudi, Babak; DiGiovanna, Jack; Principe, Jose C

    2009-04-01

    The success of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) is enabled by the remarkable ability of the brain to incorporate the artificial neuroprosthetic 'tool' into its own cognitive space and use it as an extension of the user's body. Unlike other tools, neuroprosthetics create a shared space that seamlessly spans the user's internal goal representation of the world and the external physical environment enabling a much deeper human-tool symbiosis. A key factor in the transformation of 'simple tools' into 'intelligent tools' is the concept of co-adaptation where the tool becomes functionally involved in the extraction and definition of the user's goals. Recent advancements in the neuroscience and engineering of neuroprosthetics are providing a blueprint for how new co-adaptive designs based on reinforcement learning change the nature of a user's ability to accomplish tasks that were not possible using conventional methodologies. By designing adaptive controls and artificial intelligence into the neural interface, tools can become active assistants in goal-directed behavior and further enhance human performance in particular for the disabled population. This paper presents recent advances in computational and neural systems supporting the development of symbiotic neuroprosthetic assistants.

  1. Chemical methods for producing disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins to study folding regulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the folding of secretory and membrane proteins. Oxidative folding reactions of disulfide bond-containing proteins typically require several hours or days, and numerous misbridged disulfide isomers are often observed as intermediates. The rate-determining step in refolding is thought to be the disulfide-exchange reaction from nonnative to native disulfide bonds in folding intermediates, which often precipitate during the refolding process because of their hydrophobic properties. To overcome this, chemical additives or a disulfide catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), are generally used in refolding experiments to regulate disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding. This unit describes such methods in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding, including (1) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptides and protein folding assisted by chemical additives, (2) reductive unfolding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, and (3) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding using PDI.

  2. Improvement of sensitivity in flow analysis by exploiting a multi-reversed software-assisted system.

    PubMed

    Neira, José Y; González, Elizabeth; Nóbrega, Joaquim A

    2007-09-15

    A multi-reversed flow system software-assisted was developed for improvement of sensitivity in flow analysis. The performance of the flow system proposed was evaluated by using as a model the conventional Griess' colorimetric reaction for determination of nitrite in waters. The manifold incorporated three 3-way solenoid valves, a relay box solenoid actuated, a peristaltic pump, and a photometric detector. A tailored software was designed and written in Visual Basic 6.0 which allows full control of all flow system components and simultaneous acquisition and processing of the data. The sensitivity measured as the slope of the calibration curve was improved 2.5- and 1.4-fold regarding those obtained by continuous- and stopped-flow systems, respectively. Other valuable features such as analytical throughput of 55 determinations per hour, limit of detection of 5mugL(-1) (3sigma(blank)/slope), relative standard deviation<2% (n=8), and a linear dynamic range up to 1800mugL(-1) were also achieved.

  3. Protein disulfide engineering.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Alan A; Sultana, Kazi Zakia; Craig, Douglas B

    2014-01-21

    Improving the stability of proteins is an important goal in many biomedical and industrial applications. A logical approach is to emulate stabilizing molecular interactions found in nature. Disulfide bonds are covalent interactions that provide substantial stability to many proteins and conform to well-defined geometric conformations, thus making them appealing candidates in protein engineering efforts. Disulfide engineering is the directed design of novel disulfide bonds into target proteins. This important biotechnological tool has achieved considerable success in a wide range of applications, yet the rules that govern the stabilizing effects of disulfide bonds are not fully characterized. Contrary to expectations, many designed disulfide bonds have resulted in decreased stability of the modified protein. We review progress in disulfide engineering, with an emphasis on the issue of stability and computational methods that facilitate engineering efforts. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Disulfide by Design 2.0: a web-based tool for disulfide engineering in proteins.

    PubMed

    Craig, Douglas B; Dombkowski, Alan A

    2013-12-01

    Disulfide engineering is an important biotechnological tool that has advanced a wide range of research. The introduction of novel disulfide bonds into proteins has been used extensively to improve protein stability, modify functional characteristics, and to assist in the study of protein dynamics. Successful use of this technology is greatly enhanced by software that can predict pairs of residues that will likely form a disulfide bond if mutated to cysteines. We had previously developed and distributed software for this purpose: Disulfide by Design (DbD). The original DbD program has been widely used; however, it has a number of limitations including a Windows platform dependency. Here, we introduce Disulfide by Design 2.0 (DbD2), a web-based, platform-independent application that significantly extends functionality, visualization, and analysis capabilities beyond the original program. Among the enhancements to the software is the ability to analyze the B-factor of protein regions involved in predicted disulfide bonds. Importantly, this feature facilitates the identification of potential disulfides that are not only likely to form but are also expected to provide improved thermal stability to the protein. DbD2 provides platform-independent access and significantly extends the original functionality of DbD. A web server hosting DbD2 is provided at http://cptweb.cpt.wayne.edu/DbD2/.

  5. Brillouin scattering signal in polymer optical fiber enhanced by exploiting pulsed pump with multimode-fiber-assisted coupling technique.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hayashi, Neisei; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2013-05-01

    A cost-effective technique for coupling a polymer optical fiber (POF) with 50 μm core diameter to a silica single-mode fiber (SMF) with 8 μm core diameter is proposed, which can, by exploiting a multimode fiber with 50 μm core diameter, avoid the damage or burning at the butt-coupled POF/SMF interface. Using this coupling technique, we also show that the Brillouin signal in a POF can be enhanced by combined use of pulsed pump and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. When the pulsed pump with average optical power of 18 dBm (63 mW), duty ratio of 15%, and pulse period of 2 μs is launched into a 200 m-long POF, 4 dB enhancement of the Stokes power is obtained compared to that with 18 dBm continuous wave pump. The relatively small enhancement is probably caused by the high Brillouin threshold of POFs. The Stokes power dependence on duty ratio is nonmonotonic, which might originate from a longer phonon lifetime in POFs than that in silica SMFs.

  6. Scalability of surrogate-assisted multi-objective optimization of antenna structures exploiting variable-fidelity electromagnetic simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziel, Slawomir; Bekasiewicz, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Multi-objective optimization of antenna structures is a challenging task owing to the high computational cost of evaluating the design objectives as well as the large number of adjustable parameters. Design speed-up can be achieved by means of surrogate-based optimization techniques. In particular, a combination of variable-fidelity electromagnetic (EM) simulations, design space reduction techniques, response surface approximation models and design refinement methods permits identification of the Pareto-optimal set of designs within a reasonable timeframe. Here, a study concerning the scalability of surrogate-assisted multi-objective antenna design is carried out based on a set of benchmark problems, with the dimensionality of the design space ranging from six to 24 and a CPU cost of the EM antenna model from 10 to 20 min per simulation. Numerical results indicate that the computational overhead of the design process increases more or less quadratically with the number of adjustable geometric parameters of the antenna structure at hand, which is a promising result from the point of view of handling even more complex problems.

  7. Quantification of Thiols and Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Jakob R.; Thorpe, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Background Disulfide bond formation is a key posttranslational modification, with implications for structure, function and stability of numerous proteins. While disulfide bond formation is a necessary and essential process for many proteins, it is deleterious and disruptive for others. Cells go to great lengths to regulate thiol-disulfide bond homeostasis, typically with several, apparently redundant, systems working in parallel. Dissecting the extent of oxidation and reduction of disulfides is an ongoing challenge due, in part, to the facility of thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. Scope of the review In the present account, we briefly survey the toolbox available to the experimentalist for the chemical determination of thiols and disulfides. We have chosen to focus on the key chemical aspects of current methodology, together with identifying potential difficulties inherent in their experimental implementation. Major conclusions While many reagents have been described for the measurement and manipulation of the redox status of thiols and disulfides, a number of these methods remain underutilized. The ability to effectively quantify changes in redox conditions in living cells presents a continuing challenge. General Significance Many unresolved questions in the metabolic interconversion of thiols and disulfides remain. For example, while pool sizes of redox pairs and their intracellular distribution are being uncovered, very little is known about the flux in thiol-disulfide exchange pathways. New tools are needed to address this important aspect of cellular metabolism. PMID:23567800

  8. Exploiting the Complementarity between Dereplication and Computer-Assisted Structure Elucidation for the Chemical Profiling of Natural Cosmetic Ingredients: Tephrosia purpurea as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jane; Chollet, Sébastien; Purson, Sylvain; Reynaud, Romain; Harakat, Dominique; Martinez, Agathe; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2015-07-24

    The aqueous-ethanolic extract of Tephrosia purpurea seeds is currently exploited in the cosmetic industry as a natural ingredient of skin lotions. The aim of this study was to chemically characterize this ingredient by combining centrifugal partition extraction (CPE) as a fractionation tool with two complementary identification approaches involving dereplication and computer-assisted structure elucidation. Following two rapid fractionations of the crude extract (2 g), seven major compounds namely, caffeic acid, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside, ethyl galactoside, ciceritol, stachyose, saccharose, and citric acid, were unambiguously identified within the CPE-generated simplified mixtures by a recently developed (13)C NMR-based dereplication method. The structures of four additional compounds, patuletin-3-O-rutinoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, guaiacylglycerol 8-vanillic acid ether, and 2-methyl-2-glucopyranosyloxypropanoic acid, were automatically elucidated by using the Logic for Structure Determination program based on the interpretation of 2D NMR (HSQC, HMBC, and COSY) connectivity data. As more than 80% of the crude extract mass was characterized without need for tedious and labor-intensive multistep purification procedures, the identification tools involved in this work constitute a promising strategy for an efficient and time-saving chemical profiling of natural extracts.

  9. Optimizing the MALDI-TOF-MS Observation of Peptides Containing Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Huwiler, Kristin G.; Mosher, Deane F.; Vestling, Martha M.

    2003-01-01

    The observation of peaks corresponding to both disulfide-bonded and reduced peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra of disulfides could suggest that the samples are either mixtures prior to analysis or that the measurement process has converted single compounds into mixtures. This is an important distinction when characterizing potentially disulfide-bonded peptides obtained from proteolyzed proteins or from oxidized synthetic peptides. It is well documented that disulfides can undergo in-source decay (ISD) when using a 337-nm laser. However, the mixed matrix 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzoic acid:α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (1:10) not only suppresses the ISD reduction of disulfides to thiols but allows the same low threshold laser power generally used with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid to be applied. PMID:14715887

  10. Identification and Characterization of Disulfide Bonds in Proteins and Peptides from Tandem MS Data by Use of the MassMatrix MS/MS Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hua; Zhang, Liwen; Freitas, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    A new database search algorithm has been developed to identify disulfide-linked peptides in tandem MS data sets. The algorithm is included in the newly developed tandem MS database search program, MassMatrix. The algorithm exploits the probabilistic scoring model in MassMatrix to achieve identification of disulfide bonds in proteins and peptides. Proteins and peptides with disulfide bonds can be identified with high confidence without chemical reduction or other derivatization. The approach was tested on peptide and protein standards with known disulfide bonds. All disulfide bonds in the standard set were identified by MassMatrix. The algorithm was further tested on bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNaseA). The 4 native disulfide bonds in RNaseA were detected by MassMatrix with multiple validated peptide matches for each disulfide bond with high statistical scores. Fifteen nonnative disulfide bonds were also observed in the protein digest under basic conditions (pH = 8.0) due to disulfide bond interchange. After minimizing the disulfide bond interchange (pH = 6.0) during digestion, only one nonnative disulfide bond was observed. The MassMatrix algorithm offers an additional approach for the discovery of disulfide bond from tandem mass spectrometry data. PMID:18072732

  11. Interface confined hydrogen evolution reaction in zero valent metal nanoparticles-intercalated molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongxin; Leng, Kai; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Malkhandi, Souradip; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Lirong; Lin, Ming; Yeo, Boon Siang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-02-01

    Interface confined reactions, which can modulate the bonding of reactants with catalytic centres and influence the rate of the mass transport from bulk solution, have emerged as a viable strategy for achieving highly stable and selective catalysis. Here we demonstrate that 1T'-enriched lithiated molybdenum disulfide is a highly powerful reducing agent, which can be exploited for the in-situ reduction of metal ions within the inner planes of lithiated molybdenum disulfide to form a zero valent metal-intercalated molybdenum disulfide. The confinement of platinum nanoparticles within the molybdenum disulfide layered structure leads to enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction activity and stability compared to catalysts dispersed on carbon support. In particular, the inner platinum surface is accessible to charged species like proton and metal ions, while blocking poisoning by larger sized pollutants or neutral molecules. This points a way forward for using bulk intercalated compounds for energy related applications.

  12. Orthogonal Cysteine-Penicillamine Disulfide Pairing for Directing the Oxidative Folding of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwu; Zhai, Linxiang; Zhao, Yibing; Wu, Chuanliu

    2015-12-09

    Precise disulfide pairing in synthetic peptides usually is achieved using orthogonal protecting group strategies or relies on primary sequence manipulation. Orthogonal disulfide pairing technology should be promising for directing the rational folding of multicyclic peptides from the fully reduced peptides. Here, we report a discovery on the orthogonality between heterodisulfide pairing of cysteine (Cys) and penicillamine (Pen) and formation of Cys-Cys/Pen-Pen homodisulfides. The orthogonal Cys-Pen disulfide pairing can be exploited for highly selective production of certain (multi)cyclic structures (or even a sole structure without isomers) through direct oxidation in air or thiol-disulfide exchanges in redox media. This strategy makes rational folding of multicyclic peptides without protecting groups, sequence manipulation, and complex synthetic reactions a reality, thus providing invaluable assets to peptide communities, and should greatly benefit the development of multicyclic peptide therapeutics and ligands.

  13. Interface confined hydrogen evolution reaction in zero valent metal nanoparticles-intercalated molybdenum disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongxin; Leng, Kai; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Malkhandi, Souradip; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Lirong; Lin, Ming; Yeo, Boon Siang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-01

    Interface confined reactions, which can modulate the bonding of reactants with catalytic centres and influence the rate of the mass transport from bulk solution, have emerged as a viable strategy for achieving highly stable and selective catalysis. Here we demonstrate that 1T′-enriched lithiated molybdenum disulfide is a highly powerful reducing agent, which can be exploited for the in-situ reduction of metal ions within the inner planes of lithiated molybdenum disulfide to form a zero valent metal-intercalated molybdenum disulfide. The confinement of platinum nanoparticles within the molybdenum disulfide layered structure leads to enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction activity and stability compared to catalysts dispersed on carbon support. In particular, the inner platinum surface is accessible to charged species like proton and metal ions, while blocking poisoning by larger sized pollutants or neutral molecules. This points a way forward for using bulk intercalated compounds for energy related applications. PMID:28230105

  14. Intradomain Confinement of Disulfides in the Folding of Two Consecutive Modules of the LDL Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Fraga, Hugo; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Ventura, Salvador; Sancho, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The LDL receptor internalizes circulating LDL and VLDL particles for degradation. Its extracellular binding domain contains ten (seven LA and three EGF) cysteine-rich modules, each bearing three disulfide bonds. Despite the enormous number of disulfide combinations possible, LDLR oxidative folding leads to a single native species with 30 unique intradomain disulfides. Previous folding studies of the LDLR have shown that non native disulfides are initially formed that lead to compact species. Accordingly, the folding of the LDLR has been described as a "coordinated nonvectorial” reaction, and it has been proposed that early compaction funnels the reaction toward the native structure. Here we analyze the oxidative folding of LA4 and LA5, the modules critical for ApoE binding, isolated and in the LA45 tandem. Compared to LA5, LA4 folding is slow and inefficient, resembling that of LA5 disease-linked mutants. Without Ca++, it leads to a mixture of many two-disulfide scrambled species and, with Ca++, to the native form plus two three-disulfide intermediates. The folding of the LA45 tandem seems to recapitulate that of the individual repeats. Importantly, although the folding of the LA45 tandem takes place through formation of scrambled isomers, no interdomain disulfides are detected, i.e. the two adjacent modules fold independently without the assistance of interdomain covalent interactions. Reduction of incredibly large disulfide combinatorial spaces, such as that in the LDLR, by intradomain confinement of disulfide bond formation might be also essential for the efficient folding of other homologous disulfide-rich receptors. PMID:26168158

  15. In-Depth Characterization of Protein Disulfide Bonds by Online Liquid Chromatography-Electrochemistry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzar, Linda; Nicolardi, Simone; Rutten, Julie W.; Oberstein, Saskia A. J. Lesnik; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are an important class of protein post-translational modifications, yet this structurally crucial modification type is commonly overlooked in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches. Recently, the benefits of online electrochemistry-assisted reduction of protein S-S bonds prior to MS analysis were exemplified by successful characterization of disulfide bonds in peptides and small proteins. In the current study, we have combined liquid chromatography (LC) with electrochemistry (EC) and mass analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS in an online LC-EC-MS platform to characterize protein disulfide bonds in a bottom-up proteomics workflow. A key advantage of a LC-based strategy is the use of the retention time in identifying both intra- and interpeptide disulfide bonds. This is demonstrated by performing two sequential analyses of a certain protein digest, once without and once with electrochemical reduction. In this way, the "parent" disulfide-linked peptide detected in the first run has a retention time-based correlation with the EC-reduced peptides detected in the second run, thus simplifying disulfide bond mapping. Using this platform, both inter- and intra-disulfide-linked peptides were characterized in two different proteins, ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B. In order to prevent disulfide reshuffling during the digestion process, proteins were digested at a relatively low pH, using (a combination of) the high specificity proteases trypsin and Glu-C. With this approach, disulfide bonds in ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B were comprehensively identified and localized, showing that online LC-EC-MS is a useful tool for the characterization of protein disulfide bonds.

  16. DIsulfide Mapping PLanner Software Tool.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Lampert, Angelika; O'Reilly, Andrias O

    2017-08-17

    Disulfide bridges are side-chain-mediated covalent bonds between cysteines that stabilize many protein structures. Disulfide mapping experiments to resolve these linkages typically involve proteolytic cleavage of the protein of interest followed by mass spectroscopy to identify fragments corresponding to linked peptides. Here we report the sequence-based "DIMPL" web tool to facilitate the planning and analysis steps of experimental mapping studies. The software tests permutations of user-selected proteases to determine an optimal peptic digest that produces cleavage between cysteine residues, thus separating each to an individual peptide fragment. The webserver returns fragment sequence and mass data that can be dynamically ordered to enable straightforward comparative analysis with mass spectroscopy results, facilitating dipeptide identification.

  17. Disulfide Trapping for Modeling and Structure Determination of Receptor:Chemokine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Holden, Lauren G.; Qin, Ling; Zheng, Yi; Handel, Tracy M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent breakthrough advances in GPCR crystallography, structure determination of protein-protein complexes involving chemokine receptors and their endogenous chemokine ligands remains challenging. Here we describe disulfide trapping, a methodology for generating irreversible covalent binary protein complexes from unbound protein partners by introducing two cysteine residues, one per interaction partner, at selected positions within their interaction interface. Disulfide trapping can serve at least two distinct purposes: (i) stabilization of the complex to assist structural studies, and/or (ii) determination of pairwise residue proximities to guide molecular modeling. Methods for characterization of disulfide-trapped complexes are described and evaluated in terms of throughput, sensitivity, and specificity towards the most energetically favorable cross-links. Due to abundance of native disulfide bonds at receptor:chemokine interfaces, disulfide trapping of their complexes can be associated with intramolecular disulfide shuffling and result in misfolding of the component proteins; because of this, evidence from several experiments is typically needed to firmly establish a positive disulfide crosslink. An optimal pipeline that maximizes throughput and minimizes time and costs by early triage of unsuccessful candidate constructs is proposed. PMID:26921956

  18. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis in asphalt workers.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ömer Hınç; Bal, Ceylan; Neşelioglu, Salim; Büyükşekerci, Murat; Gündüzöz, Meşide; Eren, Funda; Tutkun, Lutfiye; Yilmaz, Fatma Meric

    2016-09-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate thiol/disulfide homeostasis in asphalt workers who are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons occupationally. The study was carried out in 34 nonsmoker asphalt workers. Additionally, 35 healthy nonsmoker volunteers were recruited as control group. Thiol and disulfide concentrations were determined using the novel automated measurement method. Levels of urinary 1-OH-pyrene were analyzed by liquid chromatography. Disulfide/thiol ratio was significantly higher in exposed group (p = .034). Also, a positive correlation was detected between disulfide/thiol ratio and 1-OH-pyrene values (r = .249, p = .036). Thiol/disulfide homeostasis was found to be disturbed in asphalt workers. The novel test used in this study may be useful for evaluating the oxidative status in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure.

  19. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-21

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.

  20. A pulse--radiolysis approach to fast reductive cleavage of a disulfide bond to uncage enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Lilia; Tomas, Salvador; Hunter, Christopher A; Weinstein, Julia A; Edge, Ruth; Navaratnam, Suppiah; Waltho, Jonathan P; Best, Jonathan

    2008-11-01

    The essential thiol of the enzyme papain has been caged by linking to an aromatic thiol. The resulting caged protein is inactive but enzymatic activity is fully restored upon chemical cleavage of the protective disulfide bond. We have exploited the chemistry of this disulfide bond to uncage papain by pulse radiolysis. We have shown that up to 10% of the enzyme activity can be restored by reductive pulse radiolysis. This approach has been tested on a small-molecule model system, and experiments on this model compound show that pulse radiolysis of the mixed cysteine-aromatic disulfide results in selective reduction of the disulfide bond to generate a thiol in 10-20% yield, consistent with the radiolytically restored activity of the caged papain quantified by the biochemical assay.

  1. Disulfide bonding patterns and protein topologies.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C. J.; Jafri, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the topological properties of protein disulfide bonding patterns. First, a description of these patterns in terms of partially directed graphs is developed. The topologically distinct disulfide bonding patterns available to a polypeptide chain containing n disulfide bonds are enumerated, and their symmetry and reducibility properties are examined. The theoretical probabilities are calculated that a randomly chosen pattern of n bonds will have any combination of symmetry and reducibility properties, given that all patterns have equal probability of being chosen. Next, the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence and Brookhaven National Laboratories protein structure (PDB) databases are examined, and the occurrences of disulfide bonding patterns in them are determined. The frequencies of symmetric and/or reducible patterns are found to exceed theoretical predictions based on equiprobable pattern selection. Kauzmann's model, in which disulfide bonds form during random encounters as the chain assumes random coil conformations, finds that bonds are more likely to form with near neighbor cysteines than with remote cysteines. The observed frequencies of occurrence of disulfide patterns are found here to be virtually uncorrelated with the predictions of this alternative random bonding model. These results strongly suggest that disulfide bond pattern formation is not the result of random factors, but instead is a directed process. Finally, the PDB structure database is examined to determine the extrinsic topologies of polypeptides containing disulfide bonds. A complete survey of all structures in the database found no instances in which two loops formed by disulfide bonds within the same polypeptide chain are topologically linked. Similarly, no instances are found in which two loops present on different polypeptide chains in a structure are catenated. Further, no examples of topologically knotted loops occur. In contrast, pseudolinking

  2. Transfer of molybdenum disulfide to various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, G. C.; Pepper, S. V.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with molybdenum disulfide single crystals in contact with sputter cleaned surfaces of copper, nickel, gold, and 304 stainless steel. Transfer of the molybdenum disulfide to the metals was monitored with Auger electron spectroscopy. Results of the investigation indicate molybdenum disulfide transfers to all clean metal surfaces after a single pass over the metal surface with film thickness observed to increase with repeated passes over the same surfaces. Large particle transfer occurs when the orientation of the crystallites is other than basal. This is frequently accompanied by abrasion of the metal. Adhesion of molybdenum disulfide films occurred readily to copper and nickel, less readily to 304 stainless steel, and even less effectively to the gold, which indicates a chemical effect.

  3. Soft Computing Methods for Disulfide Connectivity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Chamorro, Alfonso E.; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jesús S.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of protein structure prediction (PSP) is one of the main challenges in structural bioinformatics. To tackle this problem, PSP can be divided into several subproblems. One of these subproblems is the prediction of disulfide bonds. The disulfide connectivity prediction problem consists in identifying which nonadjacent cysteines would be cross-linked from all possible candidates. Determining the disulfide bond connectivity between the cysteines of a protein is desirable as a previous step of the 3D PSP, as the protein conformational search space is highly reduced. The most representative soft computing approaches for the disulfide bonds connectivity prediction problem of the last decade are summarized in this paper. Certain aspects, such as the different methodologies based on soft computing approaches (artificial neural network or support vector machine) or features of the algorithms, are used for the classification of these methods. PMID:26523116

  4. Identification of Allosteric Disulfides from Prestress Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Beifei; Baldus, Ilona B.; Li, Wenjin; Edwards, Scott A.; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bonds serve to form physical cross-links between residues in protein structures, thereby stabilizing the protein fold. Apart from this purely structural role, they can also be chemically active, participating in redox reactions, and they may even potentially act as allosteric switches controlling protein functions. Specific types of disulfide bonds have been identified in static protein structures from their distinctive pattern of dihedral bond angles, and the allosteric function of such bonds is purported to be related to the torsional strain they store. Using all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations for ∼700 disulfide bonded proteins, we analyzed the intramolecular mechanical forces in 20 classes of disulfide bonds. We found that two particular classes, the −RHStaple and the −/+RHHook disulfides, are indeed more stressed than other disulfide bonds, but the stress is carried primarily by stretching of the S-S bond and bending of the neighboring bond angles, rather than by dihedral torsion. This stress corresponds to a tension force of magnitude ∼200 pN, which is balanced by repulsive van der Waals interactions between the cysteine Cα atoms. We confirm stretching of the S-S bond to be a general feature of the −RHStaples and the −/+RHHooks by analyzing ∼20,000 static protein structures. Given that forced stretching of S-S bonds is known to accelerate their cleavage, we propose that prestress of allosteric disulfide bonds has the potential to alter the reactivity of a disulfide, thereby allowing us to readily switch between functional states. PMID:25099806

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Some Alkyl Disulfide Copolymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-12-01

    disulfide polymer in this paper. Polymer sheets were prepared by molding the rubber crumb in a hydraulic press. Ten second torsion modulus...DISULFIDE COPOLYMERS by ¥. J. MacKnight, M. Takahashi and A. V. Tobolsky Introduction Polysulfide polymers were the first synthetic rubbers produced in...Gaylord, ed., Interscience, New York, 1962, Chap. XIII, contains many references to the original literature. 2. Gee, G., Trans. Inst. Rubber Ind

  6. Automatic determination of disulfide bridges in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sokolowska, Izabela; Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Woods, Alisa G; Darie, Costel C

    2012-12-01

    Precise determination of disulfide linkages between cysteine (Cys) residues in proteins is essential in the determination of protein structure. Therefore, a reliable automated method for the identification of disulfide bridges can serve as an important tool in the analysis of the tertiary structure of proteins of interest. Here, we describe the current and past methods used to identify disulfide bridges in proteins, with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods and a particular emphasis on nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS)-based methods. We also show the development of an easy method based on the separation of disulfide-linked proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing and nonreducing conditions and selective in-gel digestion of proteins using reducing and nonreducing conditions, followed by analysis of the resulting peptide mixture by nanoACQUITY UPLC coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) Micro mass spectrometer (nanoLC-MS/MS). Data-dependent analysis (DDA) nanoLC-MS/MS and information-dependent analysis (IDA) nanoLC-MS/MS were used for random and targeted identification of disulfide-linked peptides. Finally, an example of electrospray-MS (ESI-MS) and ESI-MS/MS-based determination of disulfide-linked peptides is shown.

  7. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, V; Kurdoglu, Z; Alisik, M; Turgut, E; Sezgın, O O; Korkmaz, H; Ergun, Y; Erel, O

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of postmenopausal osteoporosis on thiol/disulfide homeostasis. A total of 75 participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 40) was composed of healthy postmenopausal women, and group 2 (n = 35) was composed of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Clinical findings and thiol/disulfide homeostasis were compared between the two groups. The disulfide/native thiol ratio was 8.6% ± 3.6 in group 1 and 12.7% ± 8.4 in group 2 (p = 0.04). The disulfide/native thiol percent ratio was significantly higher in group 2 after adjustment for the years since menopause and age (p < 0.05). The native thiol/total thiol percent ratio was 85.6% ± 4.8 in group 1 and 73.8% ± 24.9 in group 2 (p = 0.01). The native thiol/total thiol percent ratio was significantly lower in group 2 after adjustment for the years since menopause and age (p < 0.05). Thiol/disulfide homeostasis shifted to the disulfide side independent of age and years since menopause in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  8. Overexpression of Protein Disulfide Isomerase DsbC Stabilizes Multiple-Disulfide-Bonded Recombinant Protein Produced and Transported to the Periplasm in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Yoichi; Yanagi, Hideki; Yura, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    Dsb proteins (DsbA, DsbB, DsbC, and DsbD) catalyze formation and isomerization of protein disulfide bonds in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. By using a set of Dsb coexpression plasmids constructed recently, we analyzed the effects of Dsb overexpression on production of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) isozyme C that contains complex disulfide bonds and tends to aggregate when produced in E. coli. When transported to the periplasm, HRP was unstable but was markedly stabilized upon simultaneous overexpression of the set of Dsb proteins (DsbABCD). Whereas total HRP production increased severalfold upon overexpression of at least disulfide-bonded isomerase DsbC, maximum transport of HRP to the periplasm seemed to require overexpression of all DsbABCD proteins, suggesting that excess Dsb proteins exert synergistic effects in assisting folding and transport of HRP. Periplasmic production of HRP also increased when calcium, thought to play an essential role in folding of nascent HRP polypeptide, was added to the medium with or without Dsb overexpression. These results suggest that Dsb proteins and calcium play distinct roles in periplasmic production of HRP, presumably through facilitating correct folding. The present Dsb expression plasmids should be useful in assessing and dissecting periplasmic production of proteins that contain multiple disulfide bonds in E. coli. PMID:10966415

  9. Cellular disulfide bond formation in bioactive peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nitin A; Tailhades, Julien; Hughes, Richard Anthony; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2015-01-14

    Bioactive peptides play important roles in metabolic regulation and modulation and many are used as therapeutics. These peptides often possess disulfide bonds, which are important for their structure, function and stability. A systematic network of enzymes--a disulfide bond generating enzyme, a disulfide bond donor enzyme and a redox cofactor--that function inside the cell dictates the formation and maintenance of disulfide bonds. The main pathways that catalyze disulfide bond formation in peptides and proteins in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are remarkably similar and share several mechanistic features. This review summarizes the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins by cellular and recombinant machinery.

  10. Cellular Disulfide Bond Formation in Bioactive Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Nitin A.; Tailhades, Julien; Hughes, Richard Anthony; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D.; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides play important roles in metabolic regulation and modulation and many are used as therapeutics. These peptides often possess disulfide bonds, which are important for their structure, function and stability. A systematic network of enzymes—a disulfide bond generating enzyme, a disulfide bond donor enzyme and a redox cofactor—that function inside the cell dictates the formation and maintenance of disulfide bonds. The main pathways that catalyze disulfide bond formation in peptides and proteins in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are remarkably similar and share several mechanistic features. This review summarizes the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins by cellular and recombinant machinery. PMID:25594871

  11. Reactive sputter deposition of pyrite structure transition metal disulfide thin films: Microstructure, transport, and magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Baruth, A.; Manno, M.; Narasimhan, D.; Shankar, A.; Zhang, X.; Johnson, M.; Aydil, E. S.; Leighton, C.

    2012-09-01

    Transition metal disulfides crystallizing in the pyrite structure (e.g., TMS{sub 2}, with TM = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) are a class of materials that display a remarkably diverse array of functional properties. These properties include highly spin-polarized ferromagnetism (in Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S{sub 2}), superconductivity (in CuS{sub 2}), an antiferromagnetic Mott insulating ground state (in NiS{sub 2}), and semiconduction with close to optimal parameters for solar absorber applications (in FeS{sub 2}). Exploitation of these properties in heterostructured devices requires the development of reliable and reproducible methods for the deposition of high quality pyrite structure thin films. In this manuscript, we report on the suitability of reactive sputter deposition from metallic targets in an Ar/H{sub 2}S environment as a method to achieve exactly this. Optimization of deposition temperature, Ar/H{sub 2}S pressure ratio, and total working gas pressure, assisted by plasma optical emission spectroscopy, reveals significant windows over which deposition of single-phase, polycrystalline, low roughness pyrite films can be achieved. This is illustrated for the test cases of the ferromagnetic metal CoS{sub 2} and the diamagnetic semiconductor FeS{sub 2}, for which detailed magnetic and transport characterization are provided. The results indicate significant improvements over alternative deposition techniques such as ex situ sulfidation of metal films, opening up exciting possibilities for all-sulfide heterostructured devices. In particular, in the FeS{sub 2} case it is suggested that fine-tuning of the sputtering conditions provides a potential means to manipulate doping levels and conduction mechanisms, critical issues in solar cell applications. Parenthetically, we note that conditions for synthesis of phase-pure monosulfides and thiospinels are also identified.

  12. Reactive sputter deposition of pyrite structure transition metal disulfide thin films: Microstructure, transport, and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruth, A.; Manno, M.; Narasimhan, D.; Shankar, A.; Zhang, X.; Johnson, M.; Aydil, E. S.; Leighton, C.

    2012-09-01

    Transition metal disulfides crystallizing in the pyrite structure (e.g., TMS2, with TM = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) are a class of materials that display a remarkably diverse array of functional properties. These properties include highly spin-polarized ferromagnetism (in Co1-xFexS2), superconductivity (in CuS2), an antiferromagnetic Mott insulating ground state (in NiS2), and semiconduction with close to optimal parameters for solar absorber applications (in FeS2). Exploitation of these properties in heterostructured devices requires the development of reliable and reproducible methods for the deposition of high quality pyrite structure thin films. In this manuscript, we report on the suitability of reactive sputter deposition from metallic targets in an Ar/H2S environment as a method to achieve exactly this. Optimization of deposition temperature, Ar/H2S pressure ratio, and total working gas pressure, assisted by plasma optical emission spectroscopy, reveals significant windows over which deposition of single-phase, polycrystalline, low roughness pyrite films can be achieved. This is illustrated for the test cases of the ferromagnetic metal CoS2 and the diamagnetic semiconductor FeS2, for which detailed magnetic and transport characterization are provided. The results indicate significant improvements over alternative deposition techniques such as ex situ sulfidation of metal films, opening up exciting possibilities for all-sulfide heterostructured devices. In particular, in the FeS2 case it is suggested that fine-tuning of the sputtering conditions provides a potential means to manipulate doping levels and conduction mechanisms, critical issues in solar cell applications. Parenthetically, we note that conditions for synthesis of phase-pure monosulfides and thiospinels are also identified.

  13. Disulfide-Functionalized Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels.

    PubMed

    Warren, Nicholas J; Rosselgong, Julien; Madsen, Jeppe; Armes, Steven P

    2015-08-10

    Two strategies for introducing disulfide groups at the outer surface of RAFT-synthesized poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PGMA-PHPMA, or Gx-Hy for brevity) diblock copolymer worms are investigated. The first approach involved statistical copolymerization of GMA with a small amount of disulfide dimethacrylate (DSDMA, or D) comonomer to afford a G54-D0.50 macromolecular chain transfer agent (macro-CTA); this synthesis was conducted in relatively dilute solution in order to ensure mainly intramolecular cyclization and hence the formation of linear chains. Alternatively, a new disulfide-based bifunctional RAFT agent (DSDB) was used to prepare a G45-S-S-G45 (or (G45-S)2) macro-CTA. A binary mixture of a non-functionalized G55 macro-CTA was utilized with each of these two disulfide-based macro-CTAs in turn for the RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). By targeting a PHPMA DP of 130 and systematically varying the molar ratio of the two macro-CTAs, a series of disulfide-functionalized diblock copolymer worm gels were obtained. For both formulations, oscillatory rheology studies confirmed that higher disulfide contents led to stronger gels, presumably as a result of inter-worm covalent bond formation via disulfide/thiol exchange. Using the DSDB-based macro-CTA led to the strongest worm gels, and this formulation also proved to be more effective in suppressing the thermosensitive behavior that is observed for the nondisulfide-functionalized control worm gel. However, macroscopic precipitation occurred when the proportion of DSDB-based macro-CTA was increased to 50 mol %, whereas the DSDMA-based macro-CTA could be utilized at up to 80 mol %. Finally, the worm gel modulus could be reduced to that of a nondisulfide-containing worm gel by reductive cleavage of the inter-worm disulfide bonds using excess tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) to yield thiol groups. These new biomimetic worm gels are

  14. Selective and efficient electrochemical biosensing of ultrathin molybdenum disulfide sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Vusa, Chiranjeevi S. R.; Alwarappan, Subbiah

    2014-08-01

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) sheets were synthesized and isolated via solvent-assisted chemical exfoliation. The charge-dependent electrochemical activities of these MoS2 sheets were studied using positively charged hexamine ruthenium (III) chloride and negatively charged ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox probes. Ultrathin MoS2 sheet-based electrodes were employed for the electrochemical detection of an important neurotransmitter, namely dopamine (DA), in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). MoS2 electrodes were identified as being capable of distinguishing the coexistence of the DA and the AA with an excellent stability. Moreover, the enzymatic detection of the glucose was studied by immobilizing glucose oxidase on the MoS2. This study opens enzymatic and non-enzymatic electrochemical biosensing applications of atomic MoS2 sheets, which will supplement their established electronic applications.

  15. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  16. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  17. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  18. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  19. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  20. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  1. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  2. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  3. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  4. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  5. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  6. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  7. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  8. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  9. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; ...

    2016-05-09

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. In this paper, we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a librarymore » of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ~9 °C was identified. Finally, this result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes.« less

  10. Preliminary Hazards Assessment: Iron disulfide purification system

    SciTech Connect

    1991-07-30

    A process for the purification (washing) of iron disulfide (FeS{sub 2}) powder is conducted in the Northeast corner (Area 353) of the main plant building (Building 100). This location is about 130 feet from the fenced boundary of the Partnership School/Child Development Center. In the first steps of the process, raw iron disulfide powder is ground and separated by particle size. The ground and sized powder is then purified in a three-step acid washing process using both hydrochloric acid (HCI) and hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The iron disulfide process is an intermittent batch process conducted four to eight times a year. This study is a Preliminary Hazards Assessment (PHA) to assess the hazards associated with the iron disulfide process. This is a preliminary study and will be used to determine if additional safety analysis is necessary. The scope of the PHA includes assessment of the process steps of grinding, size classification, and purification. The purpose is to identify major hazards and determine if the current and newly added safeguards are adequate for operation. The PHA also lists recommendations for additional safety features that should be added to reduce the risks of operation.

  11. Disulfide Bond Requirements for Active Wnt Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Bryan T.; Hien, Annie; Zhang, Xinjun; Iranloye, Oladoyin; Virshup, David M.; Waterman, Marian L.; He, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Secreted Wnt lipoproteins are cysteine-rich and lipid-modified morphogens that bind to the Frizzled (FZD) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). Wnt engages FZD through protruding thumb and index finger domains, which are each assembled from paired β strands secured by disulfide bonds and grasp two sides of the FZD ectodomain. The importance of Wnt disulfide bonds has been assumed but uncharacterized. We systematically analyzed cysteines and associated disulfide bonds in the prototypic Wnt3a. Our data show that mutation of any individual cysteine of Wnt3a results in covalent Wnt oligomers through ectopic intermolecular disulfide bond formation and diminishes/abolishes Wnt signaling. Although individual cysteine mutations in the amino part of the saposin-like domain and in the base of the index finger are better tolerated and permit residual Wnt3a secretion/activity, those in the amino terminus, the thumb, and at the tip of the index finger are incompatible with secretion and/or activity. A few select double cysteine mutants based on the disulfide bond pattern restore Wnt secretion/activity. Further, a double cysteine mutation at the index finger tip results in a Wnt3a with normal secretion but minimal FZD binding and dominant negative properties. Our results experimentally validate predictions from the Wnt crystal structure and highlight critical but different roles of the saposin-like and cytokine-like domains, including the thumb and the index finger in Wnt folding/secretion and FZD binding. Finally, we modified existing expression vectors for 19 epitope-tagged human WNT proteins by removal of a tag-supplied ectopic cysteine, thereby generating tagged WNT ligands active in canonical and non-canonical signaling. PMID:24841207

  12. Assigning Peptide Disulfide Linkage Pattern Among Regio-Isomers via Methoxy Addition to Disulfide and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Kirt L.; Tan, Lei; Stinson, Craig A.; Love-Nkansah, Chasity B.; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yu

    2017-02-01

    Pinpointing disulfide linkage pattern is critical in the characterization of proteins and peptides consisting of multiple disulfide bonds. Herein, we report a method based on coupling online disulfide modification and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to distinguish peptide disulfide regio-isomers. Such a method relies on a new disulfide bond cleavage reaction in solution, involving methanol as a reactant and 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This reaction leads to selective cleavage of a disulfide bond and formation of sulfenic methyl ester (-SOCH3) at one cysteine residue and a thiol (-SH) at the other. Under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), cysteine sulfenic methyl ester motif produces a signature methanol loss (-32 Da), allowing its identification from other possible isomeric structures such as S-hydroxylmethyl (-SCH2OH) and methyl sulfoxide (-S(O)-CH3). Since disulfide bond can be selectively cleaved and modified upon methoxy addition, subsequent MS2 CID of the methoxy addition product provides enhanced sequence coverage as demonstrated by the analysis of bovine insulin. More importantly, this reaction does not induce disulfide scrambling, likely due to the fact that radical intermediates are not involved in the process. An approach based on methoxy addition followed by MS3 CID has been developed for assigning disulfide linkage patterns in peptide disulfide regio-isomers. This methodology was successfully applied to characterizing peptide systems having two disulfide bonds and three disulfide linkage isomers: side-by-side, overlapped, and looped-within-a-loop configurations.

  13. Assigning Peptide Disulfide Linkage Pattern Among Regio-Isomers via Methoxy Addition to Disulfide and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Kirt L.; Tan, Lei; Stinson, Craig A.; Love-Nkansah, Chasity B.; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Pinpointing disulfide linkage pattern is critical in the characterization of proteins and peptides consisting of multiple disulfide bonds. Herein, we report a method based on coupling online disulfide modification and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to distinguish peptide disulfide regio-isomers. Such a method relies on a new disulfide bond cleavage reaction in solution, involving methanol as a reactant and 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This reaction leads to selective cleavage of a disulfide bond and formation of sulfenic methyl ester (-SOCH3) at one cysteine residue and a thiol (-SH) at the other. Under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), cysteine sulfenic methyl ester motif produces a signature methanol loss (-32 Da), allowing its identification from other possible isomeric structures such as S-hydroxylmethyl (-SCH2OH) and methyl sulfoxide (-S(O)-CH3). Since disulfide bond can be selectively cleaved and modified upon methoxy addition, subsequent MS2 CID of the methoxy addition product provides enhanced sequence coverage as demonstrated by the analysis of bovine insulin. More importantly, this reaction does not induce disulfide scrambling, likely due to the fact that radical intermediates are not involved in the process. An approach based on methoxy addition followed by MS3 CID has been developed for assigning disulfide linkage patterns in peptide disulfide regio-isomers. This methodology was successfully applied to characterizing peptide systems having two disulfide bonds and three disulfide linkage isomers: side-by-side, overlapped, and looped-within-a-loop configurations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Protein stabilization by introduction of cross-strand disulfides.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kausik; Thakurela, Sudhir; Prajapati, Ravindra Singh; Indu, S; Ali, P Shaik Syed; Ramakrishnan, C; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2005-11-08

    Disulfides cross-link residues in a protein that are separated in primary sequence and stabilize the protein through entropic destabilization of the unfolded state. While the removal of naturally occurring disulfides leads to protein destabilization, introduction of engineered disulfides does not always lead to significant stabilization of a protein. We have analyzed naturally occurring disulfides that span adjacent antiparallel strands of beta sheets (cross-strand disulfides). Cross-strand disulfides have recently been implicated as redox-based conformational switches in proteins such as gp120 and CD4. The propensity of these disulfides to act as conformational switches was postulated on the basis of the hypothesis that this class of disulfide is conformationally strained. In the present analysis, there was no evidence to suggest that cross-strand disulfides are more strained compared to other disulfides as assessed by their torsional energy. It was also observed that these disulfides occur solely at non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) registered pairs of adjacent antiparallel strands and not at hydrogen-bonded (HB) positions as suggested previously. One of the half-cystines involved in cross-strand disulfide formation often occurs at an edge strand. Experimental confirmation of the stabilizing effects of such disulfides was carried out in Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Four pairs of cross-strand cysteines were introduced, two at HB and two at NHB pairs. Disulfides were formed in all four cases. However, as predicted from our analysis, disulfides at NHB positions resulted in an increase in melting temperature of 7-10 degrees C, while at HB positions there was a corresponding decrease of -7 degrees C. The reduced state of all proteins had similar stability.

  15. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes as inherently electroactive labels for DNA hybridization detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for sensing and biosensing purposes represents an upcoming research area which holds great promise. Hence, our findings are anticipated to have significant contributions towards the fabrication of future DNA biosensors.The detection of specific DNA sequences plays a critical role in the areas of medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, drug discovery and food safety. This has therefore become a strong driving force behind the ever-increasing demand for simple, cost-effective, highly sensitive and selective DNA biosensors. In this study, we report for the first time, a novel approach for the utilization of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes, a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family, in the detection of DNA hybridization. Herein, molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes serve as inherently electroactive labels, with the inherent oxidation peak exploited as the analytical signal. The principle of detection is based on the differential affinity of molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes towards single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. The employment of transition metal dichalcogenide

  16. Exploitability Assessment with TEASER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    executable xor writable, or that executable images cannot have write permissions over the course of the program’s execution. DWARF Debugging With...feature a Proof of Concept (POC), or input to a program demonstrating the ability to use a bug to exploit the application. For example, a recent write -up...TEASER Exploit Development Workflow Tainted Malloc Reads, Tainted Function Arguments, Tainted Pointer Reads/ Writes , Tainted Data Reads Tainted

  17. 25 CFR 20.516 - How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.516 How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled? Reported child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases and...

  18. 25 CFR 20.516 - How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.516 How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled? Reported child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases and...

  19. 25 CFR 20.516 - How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.516 How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled? Reported child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases and...

  20. 25 CFR 20.516 - How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.516 How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled? Reported child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases and...

  1. 25 CFR 20.516 - How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.516 How are child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases to be handled? Reported child abuse, neglect or exploitation cases and...

  2. Alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Study of some of the physicochemical properties of compounds obtained by subjecting natural molybdenite and single crystals of molybdenum disulfide grown by chemical vapor transport to intercalation with the alkali group of metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Reported data and results include: (1) the intercalation of the entire alkali metal group, (2) stoichiometries and X-ray data on all of the compounds, and (3) superconductivity data for all the intercalation compounds.

  3. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  4. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  5. Application of MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation for the identification of disulfide-bonded peptides.

    PubMed

    Janecki, Dariusz J; Nemeth, Jennifer F

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a method for the fast identification and composition of disulfide-bonded peptides. A unique fragmentation signature of inter-disulfide-bonded peptides is detected using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry and high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). This fragmentation pattern identifies peptides with an interconnected disulfide bond and provides information regarding the composition of the peptides involved in the pairing. The distinctive signature produced using CID is a triplet of ions resulting from the cleavage of the disulfide bond to produce dehydroalanine, cysteine or thiocysteine product ions. This method is not applicable to intra-peptide disulfide bonds, as the cleavage mechanism is not the same and a triplet pattern is not observed. This method has been successfully applied to identifying disulfide-bonded peptides in a number of control digestions, as well as study samples where disulfide bond networks were postulated and/or unknown.

  6. Disulfide Bonding in Neurodegenerative Misfolding Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years an increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases has been linked to the misfolding of a specific protein and its subsequent accumulation into aggregated species, often toxic to the cell. Of all the factors that affect the behavior of these proteins, disulfide bonds are likely to be important, being very conserved in protein sequences and being the enzymes devoted to their formation among the most conserved machineries in mammals. Their crucial role in the folding and in the function of a big fraction of the human proteome is well established. The role of disulfide bonding in preventing and managing protein misfolding and aggregation is currently under investigation. New insights into their involvement in neurodegenerative diseases, their effect on the process of protein misfolding and aggregation, and into the role of the cellular machineries devoted to disulfide bond formation in neurodegenerative diseases are emerging. These studies mark a step forward in the comprehension of the biological base of neurodegenerative disorders and highlight the numerous questions that still remain open. PMID:23983694

  7. SHuffle, a novel Escherichia coli protein expression strain capable of correctly folding disulfide bonded proteins in its cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lobstein, Julie; Emrich, Charlie A; Jeans, Chris; Faulkner, Melinda; Riggs, Paul; Berkmen, Mehmet

    2012-05-08

    Production of correctly disulfide bonded proteins to high yields remains a challenge. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli is the popular choice, especially within the research community. While there is an ever growing demand for new expression strains, few strains are dedicated to post-translational modifications, such as disulfide bond formation. Thus, new protein expression strains must be engineered and the parameters involved in producing disulfide bonded proteins must be understood. We have engineered a new E. coli protein expression strain named SHuffle, dedicated to producing correctly disulfide bonded active proteins to high yields within its cytoplasm. This strain is based on the trxB gor suppressor strain SMG96 where its cytoplasmic reductive pathways have been diminished, allowing for the formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. We have further engineered a major improvement by integrating into its chromosome a signal sequenceless disulfide bond isomerase, DsbC. We probed the redox state of DsbC in the oxidizing cytoplasm and evaluated its role in assisting the formation of correctly folded multi-disulfide bonded proteins. We optimized protein expression conditions, varying temperature, induction conditions, strain background and the co-expression of various helper proteins. We found that temperature has the biggest impact on improving yields and that the E. coli B strain background of this strain was superior to the K12 version. We also discovered that auto-expression of substrate target proteins using this strain resulted in higher yields of active pure protein. Finally, we found that co-expression of mutant thioredoxins and PDI homologs improved yields of various substrate proteins. This work is the first extensive characterization of the trxB gor suppressor strain. The results presented should help researchers design the appropriate protein expression conditions using SHuffle strains.

  8. SHuffle, a novel Escherichia coli protein expression strain capable of correctly folding disulfide bonded proteins in its cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Production of correctly disulfide bonded proteins to high yields remains a challenge. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli is the popular choice, especially within the research community. While there is an ever growing demand for new expression strains, few strains are dedicated to post-translational modifications, such as disulfide bond formation. Thus, new protein expression strains must be engineered and the parameters involved in producing disulfide bonded proteins must be understood. Results We have engineered a new E. coli protein expression strain named SHuffle, dedicated to producing correctly disulfide bonded active proteins to high yields within its cytoplasm. This strain is based on the trxB gor suppressor strain SMG96 where its cytoplasmic reductive pathways have been diminished, allowing for the formation of disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. We have further engineered a major improvement by integrating into its chromosome a signal sequenceless disulfide bond isomerase, DsbC. We probed the redox state of DsbC in the oxidizing cytoplasm and evaluated its role in assisting the formation of correctly folded multi-disulfide bonded proteins. We optimized protein expression conditions, varying temperature, induction conditions, strain background and the co-expression of various helper proteins. We found that temperature has the biggest impact on improving yields and that the E. coli B strain background of this strain was superior to the K12 version. We also discovered that auto-expression of substrate target proteins using this strain resulted in higher yields of active pure protein. Finally, we found that co-expression of mutant thioredoxins and PDI homologs improved yields of various substrate proteins. Conclusions This work is the first extensive characterization of the trxB gor suppressor strain. The results presented should help researchers design the appropriate protein expression conditions using SHuffle strains. PMID:22569138

  9. The Exploitation of Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Shirley; Montagne, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drug users have been exploited in research studies and clinical practice. We explore ways in which exploitation has occurred and strategies to help patients, research subjects and communities to prevent or avoid exploitation.

  10. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mAmore » cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.« less

  11. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mA cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.

  12. Role of disulfide bridges in the activity and stability of a cold-active alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Poljak, Anne; Guilhaus, Michael; Feller, Georges; D'Amico, Salvino; Gerday, Charles; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2005-09-01

    The cold-adapted alpha-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis unfolds reversibly and cooperatively according to a two-state mechanism at 30 degrees C and unfolds reversibly and sequentially with two transitions at temperatures below 12 degrees C. To examine the role of the four disulfide bridges in activity and conformational stability of the enzyme, the eight cysteine residues were reduced with beta-mercaptoethanol or chemically modified using iodoacetamide or iodoacetic acid. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that all of the cysteines were modified. The iodoacetamide-modified enzyme reversibly folded/unfolded and retained approximately one-third of its activity. Removal of all disulfide bonds resulted in stabilization of the least stable region of the enzyme (including the active site), with a concomitant decrease in activity (increase in activation enthalpy). Disulfide bond removal had a greater impact on enzyme activity than on stability (particularly the active-site region). The functional role of the disulfide bridges appears to be to prevent the active site from developing ionic interactions. Overall, the study demonstrated that none of the four disulfide bonds are important in stabilizing the native structure of enzyme, and instead, they appear to promote a localized destabilization to preserve activity.

  13. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions. PMID:27385052

  14. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions.

  15. GAMMA-RADIOLYSIS OF DISULFIDES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION. II. D-PENICILLAMINE DISULFIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The gamma-radiolysis of D- penicillamine disulfide (PenSSPen) in an aqueous solution has been studied under aerated and deaerated conditions. G...values were determined for the following products: penicillamine sulfinic acid (PenSO2H), penicillaminic acid (PenSO3H), beta-hydroxyvaline (PenOH), 2...amino-3-methylbut-3-enoic acid (HOOC.CH(NH2).C(CH3)=CH2), penicillamine (PenSH), penicillamine disulfide-S-monoxide (PenS(O)SPen), valine (PenH

  16. Hope and exploitation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adrienne M

    2008-01-01

    How do we encourage patients to be hopeful without exploiting their hope? A medical researcher or a pharmaceutical company can take unfair advantage of someone's hope by much subtler means than simply giving misinformation. Hope shapes deliberation, and therefore can make deliberation better or worse, by the deliberator's own standards of deliberation.

  17. The Dynamic Disulfide Relay of Quiescin Sulfhydryl Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Assaf; Grossman, Iris; Gat, Yair; Kodali, Vamsi K.; DiMaio, Frank; Mehlman, Tevie; Haran, Gilad; Baker, David; Thorpe, Colin; Fass, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Protein stability, assembly, localization, and regulation often depend on formation of disulfide cross-links between cysteine side chains. Enzymes known as sulfhydryl oxidases catalyze de novo disulfide formation and initiate intra- and intermolecular dithiol/disulfide relays to deliver the disulfides to substrate proteins1,2. Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a unique, multi-domain disulfide catalyst that is localized primarily to the Golgi apparatus and secreted fluids3 and has attracted attention due to its over-production in tumors4,5. In addition to its physiological importance, QSOX is a mechanistically intriguing enzyme, encompassing functions typically carried out by a series of proteins in other disulfide formation pathways. How disulfides are relayed through the multiple redox-active sites of QSOX and whether there is a functional benefit to concatenating these sites on a single polypeptide are open questions. We determined the first crystal structure of an intact QSOX enzyme, derived from a trypanosome parasite. Notably, sequential sites in the disulfide relay were found more than 40 Å apart in this structure, too far for direct disulfide transfer. To resolve this puzzle, we trapped and crystallized an intermediate in the disulfide hand-off, which showed a 165° domain rotation relative to the original structure, bringing the two active sites within disulfide bonding distance. The comparable structure of a mammalian QSOX enzyme, also presented herein, reveals additional biochemical features that facilitate disulfide transfer in metazoan orthologs. Finally, we quantified the contribution of concatenation to QSOX activity, providing general lessons for the understanding of multi-domain enzymes and the design of novel catalytic relays. PMID:22801504

  18. Assigning Peptide Disulfide Linkage Pattern Among Regio-Isomers via Methoxy Addition to Disulfide and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Durand, Kirt L; Tan, Lei; Stinson, Craig A; Love-Nkansah, Chasity B; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yu

    2017-02-13

    Pinpointing disulfide linkage pattern is critical in the characterization of proteins and peptides consisting of multiple disulfide bonds. Herein, we report a method based on coupling online disulfide modification and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to distinguish peptide disulfide regio-isomers. Such a method relies on a new disulfide bond cleavage reaction in solution, involving methanol as a reactant and 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This reaction leads to selective cleavage of a disulfide bond and formation of sulfenic methyl ester (-SOCH3) at one cysteine residue and a thiol (-SH) at the other. Under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), cysteine sulfenic methyl ester motif produces a signature methanol loss (-32 Da), allowing its identification from other possible isomeric structures such as S-hydroxylmethyl (-SCH2OH) and methyl sulfoxide (-S(O)-CH3). Since disulfide bond can be selectively cleaved and modified upon methoxy addition, subsequent MS(2) CID of the methoxy addition product provides enhanced sequence coverage as demonstrated by the analysis of bovine insulin. More importantly, this reaction does not induce disulfide scrambling, likely due to the fact that radical intermediates are not involved in the process. An approach based on methoxy addition followed by MS(3) CID has been developed for assigning disulfide linkage patterns in peptide disulfide regio-isomers. This methodology was successfully applied to characterizing peptide systems having two disulfide bonds and three disulfide linkage isomers: side-by-side, overlapped, and looped-within-a-loop configurations. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Converting a Sulfenic Acid Reductase into a Disulfide Bond Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Chatelle, Claire; Kraemer, Stéphanie; Ren, Guoping; Chmura, Hannah; Marechal, Nils; Boyd, Dana; Roggemans, Caroline; Ke, Na; Riggs, Paul; Bardwell, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Posttranslational formation of disulfide bonds is essential for the folding of many secreted proteins. Formation of disulfide bonds in a protein with more than two cysteines is inherently fraught with error and can result in incorrect disulfide bond pairing and, consequently, misfolded protein. Protein disulfide bond isomerases, such as DsbC of Escherichia coli, can recognize mis-oxidized proteins and shuffle the disulfide bonds of the substrate protein into their native folded state. Results: We have developed a simple blue/white screen that can detect disulfide bond isomerization in vivo, using a mutant alkaline phosphatase (PhoA*) in E. coli. We utilized this screen to isolate mutants of the sulfenic acid reductase (DsbG) that allowed this protein to act as a disulfide bond isomerase. Characterization of the isolated mutants in vivo and in vitro allowed us to identify key amino acid residues responsible for oxidoreductase properties of thioredoxin-like proteins such as DsbC or DsbG. Innovation and Conclusions: Using these key residues, we also identified and characterized interesting environmental homologs of DsbG with novel properties, thus demonstrating the capacity of this screen to discover and elucidate mechanistic details of in vivo disulfide bond isomerization. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 945–957. PMID:26191605

  20. Synthesis, structure and stability of novel dimeric peptide-disulfides.

    PubMed

    Leban, J J; Spaltenstein, A; Landavazo, A; Chestnut, W; Aulabaugh, A; Taylor, L C; Daniels, A J

    1996-03-01

    Oxidation of nonapeptide dithiol (2) with K3Fe(CN)6 leads to either monomeric disulfide (4) or antiparallel and parallel dimeric disulfides (3a and 3b) depending upon reaction conditions. When exposed to small amounts of thiols or cyanide in aqueous solution, these three species interconvert to an equilibrium mixture of 2:1:8 (3a:3b:4).

  1. Direct observation of disulfide isomerization in a single protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Kosuri, Pallav; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Fernández, Julio M.

    2011-11-01

    Photochemical uncaging techniques use light to release active molecules from otherwise inert compounds. Here we expand this class of techniques by demonstrating the mechanical uncaging of a reactive species within a single protein. We proved this novel technique by capturing the regiospecific reaction between a thiol and a vicinal disulfide bond. We designed a protein that includes a caged cysteine and a buried disulfide. The mechanical unfolding of this protein in the presence of an external nucleophile frees the single reactive cysteine residue, which now can cleave the target disulfide via a nucleophilic attack on either one of its two sulfur atoms. This produces two different and competing reaction pathways. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to monitor the cleavage of the disulfides, which extends the polypeptide by a magnitude unambiguously associated with each reaction pathway. This allowed us to measure, for the first time, the kinetics of disulfide-bond isomerization in a protein.

  2. Multisensor staring exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Michael L.

    2008-04-01

    The focus of this paper is on the exploitation of new staring sensors to address the urban surveillance challenge and help combat the war on terror. A staring sensor visualization environment, known as the Data Table, will be presented which integrates staring sensors with close-in sensors, such as small UAVs, building mounted sensors, and unattended ground sensors (UGS). There are several staring sensors in development, but two in particular will be highlighted in this paper - NightStare and the Gotcha Radar, both under development by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL).

  3. Early events in the disulfide-coupled folding of BPTI.

    PubMed Central

    Bulaj, G.; Goldenberg, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies of the refolding of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) have shown that a previously unidentified intermediate with a single disulfide is formed much more rapidly than any other one-disulfide species. This intermediate contains a disulfide that is present in the native protein (between Cys14 and 38), but it is thermodynamically less stable than the other two intermediates with single native disulfides. To characterize the role of the [14-38] intermediate and the factors that favor its formation, detailed kinetic and mutational analyses of the early disulfide-formation steps were carried out. The results of these studies indicate that the formation of [14-38] from the fully reduced protein is favored by both local electrostatic effects, which enhance the reactivities of the Cys14 and 38 thiols, and conformational tendencies that are diminished by the addition of urea and are enhanced at lower temperatures. At 25 degrees C and pH 7.3, approximately 35% of the reduced molecules were found to initially form the 14-38 disulfide, but the majority of these molecules then undergo intramolecular rearrangements to generate non-native disulfides, and subsequently the more stable intermediates with native disulfides. Amino acid replacements, other than those involving Cys residues, were generally found to have only small effects on either the rate of forming [14-38] or its thermodynamic stability, even though many of the same substitutions greatly destabilized the native protein and other disulfide-bonded intermediates. In addition, those replacements that did decrease the steady-state concentration of [14-38] did not adversely affect further folding and disulfide formation. These results suggest that the weak and transient interactions that are often detected in unfolded proteins and early folding intermediates may, in some cases, not persist or promote subsequent folding steps. PMID:10493584

  4. Transnational gestational surrogacy: does it have to be exploitative?

    PubMed

    Kirby, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the controversial practice of transnational gestational surrogacy and poses a provocative question: Does it have to be exploitative? Various existing models of exploitation are considered and a novel exploitation-evaluation heuristic is introduced to assist in the analysis of the potentially exploitative dimensions/elements of complex health-related practices. On the basis of application of the heuristic, I conclude that transnational gestational surrogacy, as currently practiced in low-income country settings (such as rural, western India), is exploitative of surrogate women. Arising out of consideration of the heuristic's exploitation conditions, a set of public education and enabled choice, enhanced protections, and empowerment reforms to transnational gestational surrogacy practice is proposed that, if incorporated into a national regulatory framework and actualized within a low income country, could possibly render such practice nonexploitative.

  5. In vitro folding of methionine-arginine human lyspro-proinsulin S-sulfonate-disulfide formation pathways and factors controlling yield.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Adijanto, Lawrence; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro folding of an oxidized proinsulin (methionine-arginine human lyspro-proinsulin S-sulfonate), using cysteine as a reducing agent at 5°C and high pH (10.5-11). Folding intermediates were detected and characterized by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), reversed-phase chromatography (RPC), size-exclusion chromatography, and gel electrophoresis. The folding kinetics and yield depended on the protein and cysteine concentrations. RPC coupled with MALDI-MS analyses indicated a sequential formation of intermediates with one, two, and three disulfide bonds. The MALDI-MS analysis of Glu-C digested, purified intermediates indicated that an intra-A-chain disulfide bond formed first among A6, A7, and A11. Various non-native intra-A (A20 with A6, A7, or A11), intra-B (between B7 and B19), and inter-A-B disulfide bonds were observed in the intermediates with two disulfide bonds. The intermediates with three disulfide bonds had mainly the non-native intra-A and intra-B bonds. At a cysteine-to-proinsulin-SH ratio of 3.5, all intermediates with the non-native disulfide bonds were converted to properly folded proinsulin via disulfide bond reshuffling, which was the slowest step. Aggregation via the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds of early intermediates was the major cause of yield loss. At a higher cysteine-to-proinsulin-SH ratio, some intermediates and folded MR-KPB-hPI were reduced to proteins with thiolate anions, which caused unfolding and even more yield loss than what resulted from aggregation of the early intermediates. Reducing protein concentration, while keeping an optimal cysteine-to-protein ratio, can improve folding yield significantly. © 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  6. Disulfide Linkage Characterization of Disulfide Bond-Containing Proteins and Peptides by Reducing Electrochemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Christian N; Haselmann, Kim F; Olsen, Jesper V; Nielsen, Peter Kresten

    2016-02-02

    Unravelling of disulfide linkage patterns is a crucial part of protein characterization, whether it is for a previously uncharacterized protein in basic research or a recombinant pharmaceutical protein. In the biopharmaceutical industry, elucidation of the cysteine connectivities is a necessity to avoid disulfide scrambled and incorrectly folded forms in the final product. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a highly utilized analytical tool for this due to fast and accurate characterization. However, disulfide bonds being an additional covalent bond in the protein structure represent a challenge in protein sequencing by tandem MS (MS/MS). Electrochemical (EC) reduction of disulfide bonds has recently been demonstrated to provide efficient reduction efficiencies, significantly enhancing sequence coverages in online coupling with MS characterization. In this study, the potential use of EC disulfide reduction in combination with MS characterization for disulfide mapping was assessed. We employed two approaches based on (1) the high flexibility and instant information about the degree of reduction in infusion EC-MS to generate partially reduced species on the intact protein level and (2) the preserved link between parent disulfide-linked fragments and free reduced peptides in an LC-EC-MS platform of nonreduced proteolytic protein digestions. Here we report the successful use of EC as a partial reduction approach in mapping of disulfide bonds of intact human insulin (HI) and lysozyme. In addition, we established a LC-EC-MS platform advantageous in disulfide characterization of complex and highly disulfide-bonded proteins such as human serum albumin (HSA) by online EC reduction of nonreduced proteolytic digestions.

  7. Advances in rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.; Stiles, J. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    The lithium molybdenum disulfide system as demonstrated in a C size cell, offers performance characteristics for applications where light weight and low volume are important. A gravimetric energy density of 90 watt hours per kilogram can be achieved in a C size cell package. The combination of charge retention capabilities, high energy density and a state of charge indicator in a rechargeable cell provides power package for a wide range of devices. The system overcomes the memory effect in Nicads where the full capacity of the battery cannot be utilized unless it was utilized on previous cycles. The development of cells with an advanced electrolyte formulation led to an improved rate capability especially at low temperatures and to a significantly improved life cycle.

  8. Ferromagnetism in exfoliated tungsten disulfide nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional-layered transition metal dichalcogenides nanosheets have attracted tremendous attention for their promising applications in spintronics because the atomic-thick nanosheets can not only enhance the intrinsic properties of their bulk counterparts, but also give birth to new promising properties. In this paper, ultrathin tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets were gotten by liquid exfoliation route from its bulk form using dimethylformamide (DMF). Compared to the antiferromagnetism bulk WS2, ultrathin WS2 nanosheets show intrinsic room-temperature ferromagnetism (FM) with the maximized saturation magnetization of 0.004 emu/g at 10 K, where the appearance of FM in the nanosheets is partly due to the presence of zigzag edges in the magnetic ground state at the grain boundaries. PMID:24134699

  9. Molybdenum disulfide and water interaction parameters.

    PubMed

    Heiranian, Mohammad; Wu, Yanbin; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-09-14

    Understanding the interaction between water and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is of crucial importance to investigate the physics of various applications involving MoS2 and water interfaces. An accurate force field is required to describe water and MoS2 interactions. In this work, water-MoS2 force field parameters are derived using the high-accuracy random phase approximation (RPA) method and validated by comparing to experiments. The parameters obtained from the RPA method result in water-MoS2 interface properties (solid-liquid work of adhesion) in good comparison to the experimental measurements. An accurate description of MoS2-water interaction will facilitate the study of MoS2 in applications such as DNA sequencing, sea water desalination, and power generation.

  10. Molybdenum disulfide and water interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiranian, Mohammad; Wu, Yanbin; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interaction between water and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is of crucial importance to investigate the physics of various applications involving MoS2 and water interfaces. An accurate force field is required to describe water and MoS2 interactions. In this work, water-MoS2 force field parameters are derived using the high-accuracy random phase approximation (RPA) method and validated by comparing to experiments. The parameters obtained from the RPA method result in water-MoS2 interface properties (solid-liquid work of adhesion) in good comparison to the experimental measurements. An accurate description of MoS2-water interaction will facilitate the study of MoS2 in applications such as DNA sequencing, sea water desalination, and power generation.

  11. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  12. Ultrafast response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haining; Zhang, Changjian; Chan, Weimin; Tiwari, Sandip; Rana, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    The strong light emission and absorption exhibited by single atomic layer transitional metal dichalcogenides in the visible to near-infrared wavelength range make them attractive for optoelectronic applications. In this work, using two-pulse photovoltage correlation technique, we show that monolayer molybdenum disulfide photodetector can have intrinsic response times as short as 3 ps implying photodetection bandwidths as wide as 300 GHz. The fast photodetector response is a result of the short electron–hole and exciton lifetimes in this material. Recombination of photoexcited carriers in most two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides is dominated by nonradiative processes, most notable among which is Auger scattering. The fast response time, and the ease of fabrication of these devices, make them interesting for low-cost ultrafast optical communication links. PMID:26572726

  13. Sequential bottom-up and top-down processing for the synthesis of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets: the case of rhenium disulfide (ReS2).

    PubMed

    Al-Dulaimi, Naktal; Lewis, Edward A; Lewis, David J; Howell, Simon K; Haigh, Sarah J; O'Brien, Paul

    2016-06-14

    Bottom-up (aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition, AACVD) and top-down (liquid phase exfoliation, LPE) processing methodologies are used in tandem to produce colloids of few-layer thick rhenium disulfide (ReS2) in N-methyl pyrrolidone. The processing route we use is a potentially robust and scalable pathway to manufacture useful 2D materials.

  14. Mechanism of SN2 disulfide bond cleavage by phosphorus nucleophiles. Implications for biochemical disulfide reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko, Olga; Thorpe, Colin; Bach, Robert D

    2007-10-26

    The B3LYP variant of DFT has been used to study the mechanism of S-S bond scission in dimethyl disulfide by a phosphorus nucleophile, trimethylphospine (TMP). The reaction is highly endothermic in the gas phase and requires significant external stabilization of the charged products. DFT calculations (B3LYP) were performed with explicit (water molecules added) and implicit solvent corrections (COSMO model). The transition structures for this SN2 displacement reaction in a number of model systems have been located and fully characterized. The reaction barriers calculated with different approaches for different systems are quite close (around 11 kcal/mol). Remarkably, the calculations suggest that the reaction is almost barrierless with respect to the preorganized reaction complex and that most of the activation energy is required to rearrange the disulfide and TMP to its most effective orientation for the SMe group transfer way. Different reactivities of different phosphorus nucleophiles were suggested to be the result of steric effects, as manifested largely by varying amounts of hindrance to solvation of the initial product phosphonium ion. These data indicate that the gas-phase addition of a phosphine to the disulfide moiety will most likely form a phosphonium cation-thiolate anion salt, in the presence of four or more water molecules, that provide sufficient H-bonding stabilization to allow displacement of the thiolate anion, a normal uncomplicated SN2 transition state is to be expected.

  15. Enzyme structure captures four cysteines aligned for disulfide relay

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Yair; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Grossman, Iris; Major, Dan Thomas; Fass, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin superfamily proteins introduce disulfide bonds into substrates, catalyze the removal of disulfides, and operate in electron relays. These functions rely on one or more dithiol/disulfide exchange reactions. The flavoenzyme quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX), a catalyst of disulfide bond formation with an interdomain electron transfer step in its catalytic cycle, provides a unique opportunity for exploring the structural environment of enzymatic dithiol/disulfide exchange. Wild-type Rattus norvegicus QSOX1 (RnQSOX1) was crystallized in a conformation that juxtaposes the two redox-active di-cysteine motifs in the enzyme, presenting the entire electron-transfer pathway and proton-transfer participants in their native configurations. As such a state cannot generally be enriched and stabilized for analysis, RnQSOX1 gives unprecedented insight into the functional group environments of the four cysteines involved in dithiol/disulfide exchange and provides the framework for analysis of the energetics of electron transfer in the presence of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) free energy simulations based on the X-ray crystal structure suggest that formation of the interdomain disulfide intermediate is highly favorable and secures the flexible enzyme in a state from which further electron transfer via the flavin can occur. PMID:24888638

  16. The Geohazards Exploitation Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laur, Henri; Casu, Francesco; Bally, Philippe; Caumont, Hervé; Pinto, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    The Geohazards Exploitation Platform, or Geohazards TEP (GEP), is an ESA originated R&D activity of the EO ground segment to demonstrate the benefit of new technologies for large scale processing of EO data. This encompasses on-demand processing for specific user needs, systematic processing to address common information needs of the geohazards community, and integration of newly developed processors for scientists and other expert users. The platform supports the geohazards community's objectives as defined in the context of the International Forum on Satellite EO and Geohazards organised by ESA and GEO in Santorini in 2012. The GEP is a follow on to the Supersites Exploitation Platform (SSEP) an ESA initiative to support the Geohazards Supersites & Natural Laboratories initiative (GSNL). Today the GEP allows to exploit 70+ Terabyte of ERS and ENVISAT archive and the Copernicus Sentinel-1 data available on line. The platform has already engaged 22 European early adopters in a validation activity initiated in March 2015. Since September, this validation has reached 29 single user projects. Each project is concerned with either integrating an application, running on demand processing or systematically generating a product collection using an application available in the platform. The users primarily include 15 geoscience centres and universities based in Europe: British Geological Survey (UK), University of Leeds (UK), University College London (UK), ETH University of Zurich (CH), INGV (IT), CNR-IREA and CNR-IRPI (IT), University of L'Aquila (IT), NOA (GR), Univ. Blaise Pascal & CNRS (FR), Ecole Normale Supérieure (FR), ISTERRE / University of Grenoble-Alpes (FR). In addition, there are users from Africa and North America with the University of Rabat (MA) and the University of Miami (US). Furthermore two space agencies and four private companies are involved: the German Space Research Centre DLR (DE), the European Space Agency (ESA), Altamira Information (ES

  17. Image exploitation for MISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, N.; Edrich, M.; Saur, G.; Krüger, W.

    2007-04-01

    The miniature SAR-system MiSAR has been developed by EADS Germany for lightweight UAVs like the LUNASystem. MiSAR adds to these tactical UAV-systems the all-weather reconnaissance capability, which is missing until now. Unlike other SAR sensors, that produce large strip maps at update rates of several seconds, MiSAR generates sequences of SAR images with approximately 1 Hz frame rate. photo interpreters (PI) of tactical drones, now mainly experienced with visual interpretation, are not used to SARimages, especially not with SAR-image sequence characteristics. So they should be supported to improve their ability to carry out their task with a new, demanding sensor system. We have therefore analyzed and discussed with military PIs in which task MiSAR can be used and how the PIs can be supported by special algorithms. We developed image processing- and exploitation-algorithms for such SAR-image sequences. A main component is the generation of image sequence mosaics to get more oversight. This mosaicing has the advantage that also non straight /linear flight-paths and varying squint angles can be processed. Another component is a screening-component for manmade objects to mark regions of interest in the image sequences. We use a classification based approach, which can be easily adapted to new sensors and scenes. These algorithms are integrated into an image exploitation system to improve the image interpreters ability to get a better oversight, better orientation and helping them to detect relevant objects, especially considering long endurance reconnaissance missions.

  18. Steric effects in peptide and protein exchange with activated disulfides.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jason; Schlosser, Jessica L; Griffin, Donald R; Wong, Darice Y; Kasko, Andrea M

    2013-08-12

    Disulfide exchange is an important bioconjugation tool, enabling chemical modification of peptides and proteins containing free cysteines. We previously reported the synthesis of a macromer bearing an activated disulfide and its incorporation into hydrogels. Despite their ability to diffuse freely into hydrogels, larger proteins were unable to undergo in-gel disulfide exchange. In order to understand this phenomenon, we synthesized four different activated disulfide-bearing model compounds (Mn = 300 Da to 10 kDa) and quantified their rate of disulfide exchange with a small peptide (glutathione), a moderate-sized protein (β-lactoglobulin), and a large protein (bovine serum albumin) in four different pH solutions (6.0, 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0) to mimic biological systems. Rate constants of exchange depend significantly on the size and accessibility of the thiolate. pH also significantly affects the rate of reaction, with the faster reactions occurring at higher pH. Surprisingly, little difference in exchange rates is seen between macromolecular disulfides of varying size (Mn = 2 kDa - 10 kDa), although all undergo exchange more slowly than their small molecule analogue (MW = 300 g/mol). The maximum exchange efficiencies (% disulfides exchanged after 24 h) are not siginificantly affected by thiol size or pH, but somewhat affected by disulfide size. Therefore, while all three factors investigated (pH, disulfide size, and thiolate size) can influence the exchange kinetics and extent of reaction, the size of the thiolate and its accessibility plays the most significant role.

  19. Steric Effects in Peptide and Protein Exchange with Activated Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jason; Schlosser, Jessica L.; Griffin, Donald R.; Wong, Darice Y.; Kasko, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide exchange is an important bioconjugation tool, enabling chemical modification of peptides and proteins containing free cysteines. We previously reported the synthesis of a macromer bearing an activated disulfide and its incorporation into hydrogels. Despite their ability to diffuse freely into hydrogels, larger proteins were unable to undergo in-gel disulfide exchange. In order to understand this phenomenon, we synthesized four different activated disulfide-bearing model compounds (Mn = 300 Da-10 kDa) and quantified their rate of disulfide exchange with a small peptide (glutathione), a moderate-sized protein (β-lactoglobulin), and a large protein (bovine serum albumin) in four different pH solutions (6.0, 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0) to mimic biological systems. Rate constants of exchange depend significantly on the size and accessibility of the thiolate. pH also significantly affects the rate of reaction, with the faster reactions occurring at higher pH. Surprisingly, little difference in exchange rates is seen between macromolecular disulfides of varying size (Mn = 2 kDa – 10kDa), although all undergo exchange more slowly than their small molecule analogue (MW = 300 g/mol). The maximum exchange efficiencies (% disulfides exchanged after 24 h) are not siginificantly affected by thiol size or pH, but somewhat affected by disulfide size. Therefore, while all three factors investigated (pH, disulfide size and thiolate size) can influence the exchange kinetics and extent of reaction, the size of the thiolate and its accessibility plays the most significant role. PMID:23865598

  20. Chemical shift and coupling constant analysis of dibenzyloxy disulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutenburg, Eric G.; Gryn'ova, Ganna; Coote, Michelle L.; Priefer, Ronny

    2015-02-01

    Dialkoxy disulfides have found applications in the realm of organic synthesis as an S2 or alkoxy donor, under thermal and photolytic decompositions conditions, respectively. Spectrally, dibenzyloxy disulfides possess an ABq in the 1H NMR, which can shift by over 1.1 ppm depending on the substituents present on the aromatic ring, as well as the solvent employed. The effect of the said substituents and solvent were analyzed and compared to the center of the ABq, geminal coupling, and the differences in chemical shifts of the individual doublets. Additionally, quantum-chemical calculations demonstrated the intramolecular H-bonding arrangement, found within the dibenzyloxy disulfides.

  1. Protein disulfide isomerase a multifunctional protein with multiple physiological roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Khan, Hyder; Mutus, Bulent

    2014-08-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), is a member of the thioredoxin superfamily of redox proteins. PDI has three catalytic activities including, thiol-disulfide oxireductase, disulfide isomerase and redox-dependent chaperone. Originally, PDI was identified in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequently detected at additional locations, such as cell surfaces and the cytosol. This review will provide an overview of the recent advances in relating the structural features of PDI to its multiple catalytic roles as well as its physiological and pathophysiological functions related to redox regulation and protein folding.

  2. Selective reduction of the disulfide bonds of ovine placental lactogen.

    PubMed

    Caridad, J J; Wolfenstein-Todel, C

    1988-01-01

    Reduction and carbamidomethylation of two of the three disulfide bridges of ovine placental lactogen was accomplished by the use of 20-fold molar excess of dithiothreitol over protein disulfide content. The derivative retained its binding capacity to somatogenic as well as lactogenic rat liver receptors, although the latter was somewhat diminished. The two disulfide bonds exposed to the reducing agent are those located near the carboxy- and amino-terminus, while the larger loop remained intact after reduction. This behaviour is similar to that of bovine growth hormone, where the larger loop was also more resistant to reduction.

  3. Catalysis of Protein Disulfide Bond Isomerization in a Homogeneous Substrate†

    PubMed Central

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A.; Barrows, Seth R.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2008-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a _-hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N-and C-terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N_-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E°_ = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys—Gly—His—Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/KM = 1.7 _ 105 M–1M s–1, which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude that

  4. Radical cations of sulfides and disulfides: An ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazzola, L.; Michaut, J.P.; Roncin, J.

    1985-09-15

    Exposure of dilute solutions of dimethylsulfide, methanethiol, tetrahydrothiophene, terbutyl and diterbutyl-sulfides, dimethyl-disulfide, and diterbutyldisulfide, in freon at 77 K to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays gave the corresponding cations. From the reported ESR spectra, g tensors were obtained. It was found that both sulfide and disulfide cations exhibit the same g tensor: (g/sub max/ = 2.034 +- 0.002, g/sub int/ = 2.017 +- 0.001, g/sub min/ = 2.001 +- 0.005). From this result it has been shown that the disulfide cation is planar. This finding was supported by fully optimized geometry ab initio calculations.

  5. User interface development for semiautomated imagery exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, R. P.; Bohling, Edward H.

    1991-08-01

    Operational reconnaissance technical organizations are burdened by greatly increasing workloads due to expanding capabilities for collection and delivery of large-volume near-real- time multisensor/multispectral softcopy imagery. Related to the tasking of reconnaissance platforms to provide the imagery are more stringent timelines for exploiting the imagery in response to the rapidly changing threat environment being monitored. The development of a semi-automated softcopy multisensor image exploitation capability is a critical step toward integrating existing advanced image processing techniques in conjunction with appropriate intelligence and cartographic data for next-generation image exploitation systems. This paper discusses the results of a recent effort to develop computer-assisted aids for the image analyst (IA) in order to rapidly and accurately exploit multispectral/multisensor imagery in combination with intelligence support data and cartographic information for the purpose of target detection and identification. A key challenge of the effort was to design and implement an effective human-computer interface that would satisfy any generic IA task and readily accommodate the needs of a broad range of IAs.

  6. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  11. A Potent, Versatile Disulfide-Reducing Agent from Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dithiothreitol (DTT) is the standard reagent for reducing disulfide bonds between and within biological molecules. At neutral pH, however, >99% of DTT thiol groups are protonated and thus unreactive. Herein, we report on (2S)-2-amino-1,4-dimercaptobutane (dithiobutylamine or DTBA), a dithiol that can be synthesized from l-aspartic acid in a few high-yielding steps that are amenable to a large-scale process. DTBA has thiol pKa values that are ∼1 unit lower than those of DTT and forms a disulfide with a similar E°′ value. DTBA reduces disulfide bonds in both small molecules and proteins faster than does DTT. The amino group of DTBA enables its isolation by cation-exchange and facilitates its conjugation. These attributes indicate that DTBA is a superior reagent for reducing disulfide bonds in aqueous solution. PMID:22353145

  12. Improved molybdenum disulfide-silver motor brushes have extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, J. C.; King, H. M.

    1964-01-01

    Motor brushes of proper quantities of molybdenum disulfide and copper or silver are manufactured by sintering techniques. Graphite molds are used. These brushes operate satisfactorily for long periods in normal atmosphere or in a high-vacuum environment.

  13. Association of thiol disulfide homeostasis with slow coronary flow.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Harun; Gok, Murat; Cetin, Mustafa; Kiziltunç, Emrullah; Topcuoglu, Canan; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Ozcan; Ulusoy, Feridun Vasfi

    2016-08-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the role of thiol disulfide homeostasis in the presence of slow coronary flow. Material and methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 110 patients who admitted to our hospital between March 2014 and December 2015 were included in the study. There were 65 patients in the slow coronary flow, and 45 patients in the normal flow groups. Results We found significant differences between slow coronary flow and the normal flow groups for thiol disulfide homeostasis, and the results of our study indicated that hsCRP, and thiol disulfide ratio were independently associated with slow coronary flow. Conclusion Our study showed that thiol disulfide homeostasis was significantly and independently related to the presence of slow coronary flow.

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic conversion of dialkyl disulfides into alkanethiols

    SciTech Connect

    Mashkina, A.V.; Borodin, B.P.; Mashkin, V.Y.

    1995-03-01

    The decomposition of dimethyl and diethyl disulfides on solid catalysts at elevated temperatures in a He or H{sub 2}S medium results mainly in the formation of alkanethiols. The reaction is supposed to involve the donor-acceptor interaction of the sulfur atom of the disulfide with the acid center of the catalyst with the subsequent rupture of S-S bonds and the formation of RS groups at the surface, which interact with surface protons.

  15. Regulation of a Phage Endolysin by Disulfide Caging ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuty, Gabriel F.; Xu, Min; Struck, Douglas K.; Summer, Elizabeth J.; Young, Ry

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to canonical phage endolysins, which require holin-mediated disruption of the membrane to gain access to attack the cell wall, signal anchor release (SAR) endolysins are secreted by the host sec system, where they accumulate in an inactive form tethered to the membrane by their N-terminal SAR domains. SAR endolysins become activated by various mechanisms upon release from the membrane. In its inactive form, the prototype SAR endolysin, LyzP1, of coliphage P1, has an active-site Cys covalently blocked by a disulfide bond; activation involves a disulfide bond isomerization driven by a thiol in the newly released SAR domain, unblocking the active-site Cys. Here, we report that Lyz103, the endolysin of Erwinia phage ERA103, is also a SAR endolysin. Although Lyz103 does not have a catalytic Cys, genetic evidence suggests that it also is activated by a thiol-disulfide isomerization triggered by a thiol in the SAR domain. In this case, the inhibitory disulfide in nascent Lyz103 is formed between cysteine residues flanking a catalytic glutamate, caging the active site. Thus, LyzP1 and Lyz103 define subclasses of SAR endolysins that differ in the nature of their inhibitory disulfide, and Lyz103 is the first enzyme found to be regulated by disulfide bond caging of its active site. PMID:20833810

  16. Influence of disulfide density and molecular weight on disulfide cross-linked polyethylenimine as gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qi; Hu, Chu; Cheng, Juan; Zhong, Zhenlin; Zhuo, Renxi

    2009-02-01

    Disulfide cross-linked polyethylenimines (PEI(X)-SS(Y), where X refers to the molecular weight of raw PEI, and Y refers to the thiolation degree) were prepared in two steps: First, thiol groups were introduced on a raw polyethylenimine (PEI) by the amine-induced ring-opening reaction of thiirane. Second, thiol groups were oxidized by DMSO to form the disulfide cross-links. The cross-linked PEI(800)-SS(Y) polymers with a moderate thiolation degree (PEI(800)-SS(2.6,) PEI(800)-SS(3.5), and PEI(800)-SS(4.5)) could form compact polyplexes with a size of 200-300 nm at an adequate N/P ratio. In contrast, those with a too low or too high thiolation degree (Y below 2.6 or above 4.5) formed much looser polyplexes with a size above 600 nm. The polyplexes of PEI(X)-SS(3.0-4.0) series (X = 800, 1800, and 25,000) formed small particles with a size below 400 nm at a wide range of N/P ratios. Efficiency of the cross-linked PEIs as gene vectors was evaluated in vitro by transfection of pGL3 to HeLa, COS7, 293T, and CHO cells. The efficiency is disulfide content and molecular weight dependent. The PEI(800)-SS(Y) series with an adequate thiolation degree between 2.6 and 4.5 have relatively lower cytotoxicity and higher gene transfection efficiency than 25 KDa PEI. The polymers with very low or very high thiolation degrees were unable to form compact polyplexes and had very poor transfection efficiency. A suitable molecular weight of raw PEI is also essential to obtain a highly efficient disulfide cross-linked PEI gene vector. Among the three raw PEIs of different molecular weights tested (800 Da, 1800 Da, and 25 KDa), the cross-linked polymer prepared from 800 Da PEI that has the lowest molecular weight gave the best results.

  17. AMU NEXRAD Exploitation Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Applied Meteorology Unit's NEXRAD Exploitation Task. The objectives of this task are to determine what radar signatures are present prior to and at the time of convection initiation, and to determine radar signatures which will help distinguish whether the ensuing convection will become severe. Radar data from the WSR-88D radar located at NWS Melbourne (WSR-88D/KMLB) were collected between June and September 1995, and 16 convective case studies were analyzed for which the radar was operating during the entire period of interest. All WSR-88D/KMLB products were scrutinized for their utility in detecting convection initiation and severe storm signatures. Through process of elimination, it was found that the 0.5 deg reflectivity product with the lowest reflectivity values displayed is the best product to monitor for convection initiation signatures. Seven meteorological features associated with the initiation of deep convection were identified: the Merritt Island and Indian River convergence zones, interlake convergence, horizontal convective rolls, the sea breeze, storm outflow boundaries, and fires. Their reflectivity values ranged from -5 to 20 dBZ. Of the three severe weather phenomena (winds greater than or equal to 50 kts, tornado, 3/4 inch hail), high wind events due to microbursts were most common in the data set. It was found that the values and trends of composite reflectivity, vertically integrated liquid, and core aspect ratio were key indicators of the potential of a cell to produce a microburst. The data were not analyzed for the other two severe weather phenomena because they rarely occurred during the data collection period. This report also includes suggestions for new WSR-88D products, summaries of ongoing research aimed at creating new products, and explicit recommended procedures for detecting convection initiation and severe storm signatures in the radar data using the currently available technology.

  18. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  19. Penicillamine disulfide (PNS) and alkaline cations.

    PubMed

    Apruzzese, Fabrizio; Bottari, Emilio; Festa, Maria Rosa

    2004-01-01

    D-penicillamine disulfide (PNS) shows protolytic properties and is able to form complexes with cations, because it has two aminic groups and two carboxylic groups. The four protonation constants of its deprotonated species were determined by means of electromotive force (e.m.f.) measurements of a galvanic cell involving a glass electrode at 25 degrees C and in a constant ionic medium constituted by N(CH3)4Cl 3.00 or 1.00 mol dm-3. At 25 degrees C and in 3.00 mol dm-3 N(CH3)4Cl as ionic medium, equilibria taking place between PNS and lithium, sodium and potassium ions were investigated. Experimental data, again obtained from e.m.f. measurements, were explained by assuming the formation of species of the type MH2PNS ed M2H2PNS, where M indicates a cation. Stability constants for each proposed species were calculated. A comparison with cystine is discussed.

  20. Ion mobility mass spectrometry as a potential tool to assign disulfide bonds arrangements in peptides with multiple disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Echterbille, Julien; Quinton, Loïc; Gilles, Nicolas; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-05-07

    Disulfide bridges play a major role in defining the structural properties of peptides and proteins. However, the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging. Peptide sequences are usually achieved using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of the totally reduced unfolded species, but the cysteine pairing information is lost. On the other hand, MS/MS experiments performed on native folded species show complex spectra composed of nonclassical ions. MS/MS alone does not allow either the cysteine pairing or the full sequence of an unknown peptide to be determined. The major goal of this work is to set up a strategy for the full structural characterization of peptides including disulfide bridges annotation in the sequence. This strategy was developed by combining ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). It is assumed that the opening of one S-S bridge in a peptide leads to a structural evolution which results in a modification of IMS drift time. In the presence of multiple S-S bridges, the shift in arrival time will depend on which disulfide(s) has (have) been reduced and on the shape adopted by the generated species. Due to specific fragmentations observed for each species, CID experiments performed after the mobility separation could provide not only information on peptide sequence but also on the localization of the disulfide bridges. To achieve this goal, synthetic peptides containing two disulfides were studied. The openings of the bridges were carried out following different experimental conditions such as reduction, reduction/alkylation, or oxidation. Due to disulfide scrambling highlighted with the reduction approaches, oxidation of S-S bonds into cysteic acids appeared to be the best strategy. Cysteine connectivity was then unambiguously determined for the two peptides, without any disulfide scrambling interference.

  1. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Brain-Targeted Thiamine Disulfide Prodrugs of Ampakine Compound LCX001.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dian; Meng, Fan-Hua; Dai, Wei; Yong, Zheng; Liu, Jin-Qiu; Zhou, Xin-Bo; Li, Song

    2016-04-14

    Ampakine compounds have been shown to reverse opiate-induced respiratory depression by activation of amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors. However, their pharmacological exploitations are hindered by low blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and limited brain distribution. Here, we explored whether thiamine disulfide prodrugs with the ability of "lock-in" can be used to solve these problems. A series of thiamine disulfide prodrugs 7a-7f of ampakine compound LCX001 was synthesized and evaluated. The trials in vitro showed that prodrugs 7e, 7d, 7f possessed a certain stability in plasma and quickly decomposed in brain homogenate by the disulfide reductase. In vivo, prodrug 7e decreased the peripheral distribution of LCX001 and significantly increased brain distribution of LCX001 after i.v. administration. This compound showed 2.23- and 3.29-fold greater increases in the AUC0-t and MRT0-t of LCX001 in brain, respectively, than did LCX001 itself. A preliminary pharmacodynamic study indicated that the required molar dose of prodrug 7e was only one eighth that of LCX001 required to achieve the same effect in mice. These findings provide an important reference to evaluate the clinical outlook of ampakine compounds.

  2. Rhenium Disulfide Depletion-Load Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, Connor; Corbet, Chris; Rai, Amritesh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-03-01

    Many semiconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) materials have been effectively used to create Field-Effect Transistor (FET) devices but have yet to be used in logic designs. We constructed a depletion-load voltage inverter using ultrathin layers of Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2) as the semiconducting channel. This ReS2 inverter was fabricated on a single micromechanically-exfoliated flake of ReS2. Electron beam lithography and physical vapor deposition were used to construct Cr/Au electrical contacts, an Alumina top-gate dielectric, and metal top-gate electrodes. By using both low (Aluminum) and high (Palladium) work-function metals as two separate top-gates on a single ReS2 flake, we create a dual-gated depletion mode (D-mode) and enhancement mode (E-mode) FETs in series. Both FETs displayed current saturation in the output characteristics as a result of the FET ``pinch-off'' mechanism and On/Off current ratios of 105. Field-effect mobilities of 23 and 17 cm2V-1s-1 and subthreshold swings of 97 and 551 mV/decade were calculated for the E-mode and D-mode FETs, respectively. With a supply voltage of 1V, at low/negative input voltages the inverter output was at a high logic state of 900 mV. Conversely with high/positive input voltages, the inverter output was at a low logic state of 500 mV. The inversion of the input signal demonstrates the potential for using ReS2 in future integrated circuit designs and the versatility of depletion-load logic devices for TMD research. NRI SWAN Center and ARL STTR Program.

  3. Copper-doped modified ZnO nanorods to tailor its light assisted charge transfer reactions exploited for photo-electrochemical and photo-catalytic application in environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sonal; Pendurthi, Ravi; Khanuja, Manika; Islam, S. S.; Rajput, Suchitra; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    The amount of dopant concentration, alongwith the choice of dopant, is one of the most conducive factor for the favourable outcome for light driven activities of a material. The present paper reports on the synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods doped with different concentrations of copper (Cu-ZnO) by simple, low-cost mechanical assisted thermal decomposition process. The as synthesized samples were tested for visible light driven photo-electrochemical (PEC) and photocatalytic activities on various hazardous dyes using methylene blue (MB), methyl orange and mixed green dye (methyl thymol blue + methylene blue). The study helped us to reveal that highest degradation efficiency was achieved for Cu concentration of 5% in ZnO on MB (91.1% degradation in 40 min). Compared to pure ZnO, the photoactivity of 5% Cu-ZnO composites shows higher photodegradation of dyes. Moreover, the photocatalytic results were found consistent with PEC studies which showed maximum current generation of +9.4 mA for 5% Cu-ZnO (carried out under dark and illumination condition). The mechanism for this enhanced photoactivity has been proposed based on the relationship established between oxygen vacancies and defects generation in the material due to different doping concentrations that directly influence its photocatalytic efficiency.

  4. Assessment of disulfide and hinge modifications in monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Bernd; Stracke, Jan Olaf

    2016-12-16

    During the last years there was a substantial increase in the use of antibodies and related proteins as therapeutics. The emphasis of the pharmaceutical industry is on IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 antibodies, which are therefore in the focus of this article. In order to ensure appropriate quality control of such biopharmaceuticals, deep understanding of their chemical degradation pathways and the resulting impact on potency, pharmacokinetics, and safety is required. Criticality of modifications may be specific for individual antibodies and has to be assessed for each molecule. However, some modifications of conserved structure elements occur in all or at least most IgGs. In these cases, criticality assessment may be applicable to related molecules or molecule formats. The relatively low dissociation energy of disulfide bonds and the high flexibility of the hinge region frequently lead to modifications and cleavages. Therefore, the hinge region and disulfide bonds require specific consideration during quality assessment of mAbs. In this review, available literature knowledge on underlying chemical reaction pathways of modifications, analytical methods for quantification and criticality are discussed. The hinge region is prone to cleavage and is involved in pathways that lead to thioether bond formation, cysteine racemization, and iso-Asp (Asp, aspartic acid) formation. Disulfide or sulfhydryl groups were found to be prone to reductive cleavage, trisulfide formation, cysteinylation, glutathionylation, disulfide bridging to further light chains, and disulfide scrambling. With regard to potency, disulfide cleavage, hinge cleavage, disulfide bridging to further light chains, and cysteinylation were found to influence antigen binding and fragment crystallizable (Fc) effector functionalities. Renal clearance of small fragments may be faster, whereas clearance of larger fragments appears to depend on their neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) functionality, which in turn may be impeded by

  5. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  6. Disulfide Bridges: Bringing Together Frustrated Structure in a Bioactive Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin; Bansal, Paramjit S; Wilson, David; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-04-26

    Disulfide bridges are commonly found covalent bonds that are usually believed to maintain structural stability of proteins. Here, we investigate the influence of disulfide bridges on protein dynamics through molecular dynamics simulations on the cysteine-rich trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II with three disulfide bridges. Correlation analysis of the reduced cyclic peptide shows that two of the three disulfide distances (Cys(11)-Cys(23) and Cys(17)-Cys(29)) are anticorrelated within ∼1 μs of bridge formation or dissolution: when the peptide is in nativelike structures and one of the distances shortens to allow bond formation, the other tends to lengthen. Simulations over longer timescales, when the denatured state is less structured, do not show the anticorrelation. We propose that the native state contains structural elements that frustrate one another's folding, and that the two bridges are critical for snapping the frustrated native structure into place. In contrast, the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge is predicted to form together with either of the other two bridges. Indeed, experimental chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance data show that an engineered peptide with the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge deleted can still fold into its near-native structure even in its noncyclic form, confirming the lesser role of the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge. The results highlight the importance of disulfide bridges in a small bioactive peptide to bring together frustrated structure in addition to maintaining protein structural stability. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Semienzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides using Sortase A.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xinying; Kwon, Soohyun; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Huang, Yen-Hua; Chan, Lai Y; Tan, Chia Chia; Rosengren, K Johan; Mulvenna, Jason P; Schroeder, Christina I; Craik, David J

    2014-03-07

    Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides have generated great interest in the development of peptide-based therapeutics due to their exceptional stability toward chemical, enzymatic, or thermal attack. In particular, they have been used as scaffolds onto which bioactive epitopes can be grafted to take advantage of the favorable biophysical properties of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides. To date, the most commonly used method for the head-to-tail cyclization of peptides has been native chemical ligation. In recent years, however, enzyme-mediated cyclization has become a promising new technology due to its efficiency, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Sortase A (SrtA) is a bacterial enzyme with transpeptidase activity. It recognizes a C-terminal penta-amino acid motif, LPXTG, and cleaves the amide bond between Thr and Gly to form a thioacyl-linked intermediate. This intermediate undergoes nucleophilic attack by an N-terminal poly-Gly sequence to form an amide bond between the Thr and N-terminal Gly. Here, we demonstrate that sortase A can successfully be used to cyclize a variety of small disulfide-rich peptides, including the cyclotide kalata B1, α-conotoxin Vc1.1, and sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1. These peptides range in size from 14 to 29 amino acids and contain three, two, or one disulfide bond, respectively, within their head-to-tail cyclic backbones. Our findings provide proof of concept for the potential broad applicability of enzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides with therapeutic potential.

  8. Converting disulfide bridges in native peptides to stable methylene thioacetals.

    PubMed

    Kourra, C M B K; Cramer, N

    2016-12-01

    Disulfide bridges play a crucial role in defining and rigidifying the three-dimensional structure of peptides. However, disulfides are inherently unstable in reducing environments. Consequently, the development of strategies aiming to circumvent these deficiencies - ideally with little structural disturbance - are highly sought after. Herein, we report a simple protocol converting the disulfide bond of peptides into highly stable methylene thioacetal. The transformation occurs under mild, biocompatible conditions, enabling the conversion of unprotected native peptides into analogues with enhanced stability. The developed protocol is applicable to a range of peptides and selective in the presence of a multitude of potentially reactive functional groups. The thioacetal modification annihilates the reductive lability and increases the serum, pH and temperature stability of the important peptide hormone oxytocin. Moreover, it is shown that the biological activities for oxytocin are retained.

  9. Disulfide Bond Formation in Prokaryotes: History, Diversity and Design

    PubMed Central

    Hatahet, Feras; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The formation of structural disulfide bonds is essential for the function and stability of a great number of proteins, particularly those that are secreted. There exists a variety of dedicated cellular catalysts and pathways from Archaea to humans that ensure the formation of native disulfide bonds. In this review we describe the initial discoveries of these pathways and report progress in recent years in our understanding of the diversity of these pathways in prokaryotes, including those newly discovered in some Archaea. We will also discuss the various successful efforts to achieve laboratory-based evolution and design of synthetic disulfide bond formation machineries in the bacterium E. coli. These latter studies have also led to new more general insights into the redox environment of the cytoplasm and bacterial cell envelope. PMID:24576574

  10. Structural basis of protein disulfide bond generation in the cell.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kenji

    2010-09-01

    The formation of protein disulfide bonds is an oxidative reaction that is crucial for the folding and maturation of many secreted and membrane proteins. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells possess various disulfide oxidoreductases and redox-active cofactors to accelerate this oxidative reaction in a correct manner. Crystal or solution structures have been solved for some of the oxidoreductases in the past 10 years, leading to remarkable progress in the field of thiol-based redox cell biology. Consequently, structural and mechanistic similarities in the disulfide bond formation pathways have been uncovered. This review highlights the molecular basis of the elaborate oxidative systems operating in the Escherichia coli periplasm, the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. The accumulated knowledge provides important insights into how protein and redox homeostasis are maintained in the cell.

  11. A molybdenum disulfide/carbon nanotube heterogeneous complementary inverter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2012-08-24

    We report a simple, bottom-up/top-down approach for integrating drastically different nanoscale building blocks to form a heterogeneous complementary inverter circuit based on layered molybdenum disulfide and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. The fabricated CNT/MoS(2) inverter is composed of n-type molybdenum disulfide (MOS(2)) and p-type CNT transistors, with a high voltage gain of 1.3. The CNT channels are fabricated using directed assembly while the layered molybdenum disulfide channels are fabricated by mechanical exfoliation. This bottom-up fabrication approach for integrating various nanoscale elements with unique characteristics provides an alternative cost-effective methodology to complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors, laying the foundation for the realization of high performance logic circuits.

  12. Assignment of the disulfide bonds in the sweet protein brazzein.

    PubMed

    Kohmura, M; Ota, M; Izawa, H; Ming, D; Hellekant, G; Ariyoshi, Y

    1996-04-01

    The thermostable sweet protein brazzein consists of 54 amino acid residues and has four intramolecular disulfide bonds, the location of which is unknown. We found that brazzein resists enzymatic hydrolysis at enzyme/substrate ratios (w/w) of 1:100-1:10 at 35-40 degrees C for 24-48 h. Brazzein was hydrolyzed using thermolysin at an enzyme/substrate ratio of 1:1 (w/w) in water, pH 5.5, for 6 h and at 50 degrees C. The disulfide bonds were determined, by a combination of mass spectrometric analysis and amino acid sequencing of cystine-containing peptides, to be between Cys4-Cys52, Cys16-Cys37, Cys22-Cys47, and Cys26-Cys49. These disulfide bonds contribute to its thermostability.

  13. Control of blood proteins by functional disulfide bonds

    PubMed Central

    Butera, Diego; Cook, Kristina M.; Chiu, Joyce; Wong, Jason W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Most proteins in nature are chemically modified after they are made to control how, when, and where they function. The 3 core features of proteins are posttranslationally modified: amino acid side chains can be modified, peptide bonds can be cleaved or isomerized, and disulfide bonds can be cleaved. Cleavage of peptide bonds is a major mechanism of protein control in the circulation, as exemplified by activation of the blood coagulation and complement zymogens. Cleavage of disulfide bonds is emerging as another important mechanism of protein control in the circulation. Recent advances in our understanding of control of soluble blood proteins and blood cell receptors by functional disulfide bonds is discussed as is how these bonds are being identified and studied. PMID:24523239

  14. From structure to redox: the diverse functional roles of disulfides and implications in disease

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Tyler J.; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2017-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the functional roles of disulfide bonds and their relevance to human disease. The critical roles of disulfide bonds in protein structure stabilization and redox regulation of protein activity are addressed. Disulfide bonds are essential to the structural stability of many proteins within the secretory pathway and can exist as intramolecular or inter-domain disulfides. The proper formation of these bonds often relies on folding chaperones and oxidases such as members of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family. Many of the PDI family members catalyze disulfide-bond formation, reduction and isomerization through redox-active disulfides and perturbed PDI activity is characteristic of carcinomas and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to catalytic function in oxidoreductases, redox-active disulfides are also found on a diverse array of cellular proteins and act to regulate protein activity and localization in response to oxidative changes in the local environment. These redox-active disulfides are either dynamic intramolecular protein disulfides or mixed disulfides with small-molecule thiols generating glutathionylation and cysteinylation adducts. The oxidation and reduction of redox-active disulfides are mediated by cellular reactive oxygen species and activity of reductases, such as glutaredoxin and thioredoxin. Dysregulation of cellular redox conditions and resulting changes in mixed disulfide formation are directly linked to diseases such as cardiovascular disease and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28044432

  15. Role of the Conserved Disulfide Bridge in Class A Carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clyde A; Nossoni, Zahra; Toth, Marta; Stewart, Nichole K; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2016-10-14

    Some members of the class A β-lactamase family are capable of conferring resistance to the last resort antibiotics, carbapenems. A unique structural feature of these clinically important enzymes, collectively referred to as class A carbapenemases, is a disulfide bridge between invariant Cys(69) and Cys(238) residues. It was proposed that this conserved disulfide bridge is responsible for their carbapenemase activity, but this has not yet been validated. Here we show that disruption of the disulfide bridge in the GES-5 carbapenemase by the C69G substitution results in only minor decreases in the conferred levels of resistance to the carbapenem imipenem and other β-lactams. Kinetic and circular dichroism experiments with C69G-GES-5 demonstrate that this small drop in antibiotic resistance is due to a decline in the enzyme activity caused by a marginal loss of its thermal stability. The atomic resolution crystal structure of C69G-GES-5 shows that two domains of this disulfide bridge-deficient enzyme are held together by an intensive hydrogen-bonding network. As a result, the protein architecture and imipenem binding mode remain unchanged. In contrast, the corresponding hydrogen-bonding networks in NMCA, SFC-1, and SME-1 carbapenemases are less intensive, and as a consequence, disruption of the disulfide bridge in these enzymes destabilizes them, which causes arrest of bacterial growth. Our results demonstrate that the disulfide bridge is essential for stability but does not play a direct role in the carbapenemase activity of the GES family of β-lactamases. This would likely apply to all other class A carbapenemases given the high degree of their structural similarity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Dynamic thiol-disulfide homeostasis in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Hesna; Vural, Gonul; Gumusyayla, Sadiye; Deniz, Orhan; Alisik, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic thiol-disulfide homeostasis plays a critical role in the cellular protection provided by antioxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a change in thiol-disulfide homeostasis in acute ischemic stroke patients. Patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke that had undergone magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging within the first 24 h were prospectively included in this study. The thiol, disulfide, and total thiol levels were measured during the first 24 and 72 h, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and Barthel Index (BI) of the patients were recorded. Overall, the relationships between the thiol-disulfide levels of the patients and the infarct volumes, NIHSS, mRS, and BI scores were investigated. In this study, 54 patients and 53 healthy controls were included. The mean of the native thiol levels in the stroke group was 356.572 ± 61.659 μmol/L (min/max 228.00/546.40), while it was 415.453 ± 39.436 μmol/L (min/max 323.50/488.70) in the control group (p < 0.001). A negative, significant correlation was observed between the infarct volumes and native thiol levels (ρ = -0.378; p = 0.005), and the disulfide levels were similar between the groups (Z = 0.774; p = 0.439). Significant difference was found between the thiol levels of the mild and moderate-severe NIHSS groups (p = 0.026). The changes in the thiol levels under oxidative stress may be associated with the severity of the stroke. Substitution of thiol deficiency and correction of thiol-disulfide imbalance may be beneficial in ischemic stroke.

  17. Structures and related properties of helical, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, Mark D.

    1993-11-01

    The three dimensional structure of several peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations. Each peptide formed a predictable, rigid structure, consisting of an α-helix, a "scaffold" region which packed along one face of the helix, and two disulfide bridges which covalently connect the helix and scaffold regions. The peptide Apa-M5 was designed to constrain the M5 peptide from MLCK in a helical geometry using the apamin disulfide scaffold. This scaffold constrains the N- terminal end of the helix with two disulfide bridges and a reverse turn. Like the M5 peptide, Apa-M5 was found to bind calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent 1:1 stoichiometry. However, the dissociation constant of the (Apa-M5)-calmodulin complex, 107 nM, was 100-fold higher than the dissociation constant of the M5-calmodulin complex. This difference was due to a putative steric overlap between the Apa-M5 scaffold and calmodulin. The peptide Apa-Cro was designed to replace the large structural protein matrix of λ Cro with the apamin disulfide scaffold. However, Apa-Cro did not bind the consensus DNA operator half-site of λ Cro, probably due to a steric overlap between the Apa-Cro disulfide framework and the DNA. The amino acid sequence of the scaffold-disulfide bridge arrangement of the peptide Max was derived from the core sequence of scyllatoxin, which contains an α-helix constrained at the C-terminal end by two disulfide bridges and a two-stranded βsheet scaffold. Max was shown to fold with >84% yield to form a predictable, stable structure that is similar to scyllatoxin. The folding and stability properties of Max make this scaffold and disulfide bridge arrangement an ideal candidate for the development of hybrid sequence peptides. The dynamics of a fraying C-terminal end of the helix of the peptide Apa-AlaN was determined by analysis of 15N NMR relaxation properties.

  18. Synthesis of Neoglycoconjugates by the Desulfurative Rearrangement of Allylic Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Crich, David; Yang, Fan

    2009-01-01

    Two series of neoglucosyl donors are prepared based on connection of the allylic disulfide motif to the anomeric center via either a simple O-glycosyl linkage or N-glycosyl amide unit. Conjugation of both sets of donors to cysteine in peptides is demonstrated through classical disulfide exchange followed by the phosphine-mediated desulfurative allylic rearrangement resulting in neoglycopeptides characterized by a simple thioether spacer. The conjugation reaction functions in the absence of protecting groups on both the neoglycosyl donor and peptide in aqueous media at room temperature. PMID:18729514

  19. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange in Gram-Positive Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Davey, Lauren; Halperin, Scott A; Lee, Song F

    2016-11-01

    Extracytoplasmic thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (TDORs) catalyze the oxidation, reduction, and isomerization of protein disulfide bonds. Although these processes have been characterized in Gram-negative bacteria, the majority of Gram-positive TDORs have only recently been discovered. Results from recent studies have revealed distinct trends in the types of TDOR used by different groups of Gram-positive bacteria, and in their biological functions. Actinobacteria TDORs can be essential for viability, while Firmicute TDORs influence various physiological processes, including protein stability, oxidative stress resistance, bacteriocin production, and virulence. In this review we discuss the diverse extracytoplasmic TDORs used by Gram-positive bacteria, with a focus on Gram-positive Firmicutes.

  20. Disulfide-rich macrocyclic peptides as templates in drug design.

    PubMed

    Northfield, Susan E; Wang, Conan K; Schroeder, Christina I; Durek, Thomas; Kan, Meng-Wei; Swedberg, Joakim E; Craik, David J

    2014-04-22

    Recently disulfide-rich head-to-tail cyclic peptides have attracted the interest of medicinal chemists owing to their exceptional thermal, chemical and enzymatic stability brought about by their constrained structures. Here we review current trends in the field of peptide-based pharmaceuticals and describe naturally occurring cyclic disulfide-rich peptide scaffolds, discussing their pharmaceutically attractive properties and benefits. We describe how we can utilise these stable frameworks to graft and/or engineer pharmaceutically interesting epitopes to increase their selectivity and bioactivity, opening up new possibilities for addressing 'difficult' pharmaceutical targets.

  1. Fusion expression and purification of four disulfide-rich peptides reveals enterokinase secondary cleavage sites in animal toxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyun; Han, Song; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Wenxin

    2013-01-01

    Animal toxins are powerful tools for testing the pharmacological, physiological, and structural characteristics of ion channels, proteases, and other receptors. However, most animal toxins are disulfide-rich peptides that are difficult to produce functionally. Here, a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion expression strategy was used to produce four recombinant animal toxin peptides, ChTX, StKTx23, BmP01, and ImKTx1, with different isoelectric points from 4.7 to 9.2. GST tags were removed by enterokinase, a widely used and effective commercial protease that cleaves after lysine at the cleavage site DDDDK. Using this strategy, two disulfide-rich animal toxins ChTX and StKTx23 were obtained successfully with a yield of approximately 1-2 mg/l culture. Electrophysiological experiments further showed that these two recombinant toxins showed good bioactivities, indicating that our method was effective in producing large amounts of functional disulfide-rich animal toxins. Interestingly, by analyzing the separated fractions of BmP01, StKTx23, and ImKTx1 using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, four new enterokinase secondary cleavage sites were found, consisting of the sequences "WEYR," "EDK," "QNAR," and "DNDK." To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of secondary cleavage sites for commercial enterokinase in animal toxins. These findings will help us use commercial enterokinase appropriately as a cleavage tool in the production of animal toxins.

  2. Synergistic toughening of graphene oxide-molybdenum disulfide-thermoplastic polyurethane ternary artificial nacre.

    PubMed

    Wan, Sijie; Li, Yuchen; Peng, Jingsong; Hu, Han; Cheng, Qunfeng; Jiang, Lei

    2015-01-27

    Inspired by the ternary structure of natural nacre, robust ternary artificial nacre is constructed through synergistic toughening of graphene oxide (GO) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets via a vacuum-assisted filtration self-assembly process. The synergistic toughening effect from high mechanical properties of GO and lubrication of MoS2 nanosheets is successfully demonstrated. Meanwhile, the artificial nacre shows high electrical conductivity. This approach for constructing robust artificial nacre by synergistic effect from GO and MoS2 provides a creative opportunity for designing and fabricating integrated artificial nacre in the near future, and this kind of ternary artificial nacre has great potential applications in aerospace, flexible supercapacitor electrodes, artificial muscle, and tissue engineering.

  3. Acid-denatured Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Mares, Rosa E; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Ramos, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been widely used in several molecular and cellular biology applications, since it is remarkably stable in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, native GFP is resistant to the most common chemical denaturants; however, a low fluorescence signal has been observed after acid-induced denaturation. Furthermore, this acid-denatured GFP has been used as substrate in studies of the folding activity of some bacterial chaperones and other chaperone-like molecules. Protein disulfide isomerase enzymes, a family of eukaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds in nascent polypeptides, play a key role in protein folding and it could display chaperone activity. However, contrasting results have been reported using different proteins as model substrates. Here, we report the further application of GFP as a model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) enzymes. Since refolding of acid-denatured GFP can be easily and directly monitored, a simple micro-assay was used to study the effect of the molecular participants in protein refolding assisted by PDI. Additionally, the effect of a well-known inhibitor of PDI chaperone activity was also analyzed. Because of the diversity their functional activities, PDI enzymes are potentially interesting drug targets. Since PDI may be implicated in the protection of cells against ER stress, including cancer cells, inhibitors of PDI might be able to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy; furthermore, it has been demonstrated that blocking the reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds of proteins associated with the cell surface markedly reduces the infectivity of the human immunodeficiency virus. Although several high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to test PDI reductase activity have been described, we report here a novel and simple micro-assay to test the chaperone activity of PDI enzymes, which is amenable for HTS of PDI

  4. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1802c - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with... ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1802c Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce contains 5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex and 0.83 gram...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1802c - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with... ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1802c Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce contains 5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex and 0.83 gram...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1802c - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with... ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1802c Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce contains 5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex and 0.83 gram...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1802c - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with... ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1802c Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce contains 5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex and 0.83 gram...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. 520....1802b Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses. (a) Specifications. Each bolus contains 20 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. (b) Sponsor. See 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1802c - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with... ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1802c Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex with phenothiazine suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce contains 5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex and 0.83 gram...

  14. Comparison of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Gold: Coadsorption of Thiols and Disulfides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-15

    self-assembled monolayers of thiols and disulfides. Previous studies by Dubois et alt t of the adsorption of dimethyl disulfide and methanethiol on...with an activation energy of desorption of 28 kcal/mol of disulfide, but the methanethiol was only physisorbed on the gold surface and desorbed intact

  15. Synthesis of unsymmetric disulfides as potential antiradiation drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    This research involved the synthesis of unsymmetric disulfides which contain the radioprotective compound cysteamine attached to a biologically active molecule via a disulfide linkage. This study involved the synthesis of unsymmetric disulfides of cysteamine with amino acids, amino acid esters, steroidal thiols, glutathione, and other known radio-protective compounds which were submitted for biological evaluation. It is hoped that by attaching a known radioprotective compound to a molecule such as an amino acid or steroid we may obtain an enhanced concentration of the radioprotective substance in the target areas within the cell. The use of steroidal thiols coupled to cysteamine may result in the protection of the central nervous system for which there is no known radioprotective agent available. In the second part of this work a synthesis of a thiol containing polymer was developed which would give a highly functionalized product. This thiol containing polymer can be utilized in a solid phase synthesis scheme for the preparation of unsymmetric disulfides free of side products.

  16. Echistatin disulfide bridges: selective reduction and linkage assignment.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Echistatin is the smallest member of the disintegrin family of snake venom proteins, containing four disulfides in a peptide chain of 49 residues. Partial assignment of disulfides has been made previously by NMR and chemical approaches. A full assignment was made by a newly developed chemical approach, using partial reduction with tris-(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine at acid pH. Reduction proceeded in a stepwise manner at pH 3, and the intermediates were isolated by high performance liquid chromatography. Alkylation of free thiols, followed by sequencer analysis, enabled all four bridges to be identified: (1) at 20 degrees C a single bridge linking Cys 2-Cys 11 was broken, giving a relatively stable intermediate; (2) with further treatment at 41 degrees C the bridges Cys 7-Cys 32 and Cys 8-Cys 37 became accessible to the reagent and were reduced at approx. equal rates; (3) the two bicyclic peptides produced in this manner were less stable and could be reduced at 20 degrees C to a peptide that retains a single bridge linking Cys 20-Cys 39; and (4) the monocyclic peptide can be reduced to the linear molecule at 20 degrees C. Some disulfide exchange occurred during alkylation of the bicyclic intermediates, but results unambiguously show the pattern to be [2-11; 7-32; 8-37; 20-39]. A comparison is made with kistrin, a longer disintegrin whose disulfide structure has been proposed from NMR analysis. PMID:8251946

  17. Response of soil organisms to dimethyl disulfide fumigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    After the commonly used soil fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr) was phased out in the United States, alternatives to MeBr such as dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) which is known to have broad pest control spectrum, is increasingly used. However, effectiveness of DMDS has been mainly investigated to study targe...

  18. Topology of the disulfide bonds in the antiviral lectin scytovirin

    PubMed Central

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Stuchlik, Olga; Reed, Matthew; Yuan, Weirong; Pohl, Jan; Lu, Wuyuan; Haugh-Krumpe, Lauren; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) contains a total of five disulfide bonds in two structurally similar domains. Previous reports provided contradictory results on the disulfide pairing in each individual domain, and we have now re-examined the disulfide topology. N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry were used to analyze proteolytic fragments of native SVN obtained at acidic pH, yielding the assignment as Cys7–Cys55, Cys20–Cys32, Cys26–Cys38, Cys68–Cys80, and Cys74–Cys86. We also analyzed the N-terminal domain of SVN (SD1, residues 1–48) prepared by expression/oxidative folding of the recombinant protein and by chemical synthesis. The disulfide pairing in the chemically synthesized SD1 was forced into predetermined topologies: SD1A (Cys20–Cys26, Cys32–Cys38) or SD1B (Cys20–Cys32, Cys26–Cys38). The topology of native SVN was found to be in agreement with the SD1B and the one determined for the recombinant SD1 domain. Although the two synthetic forms of SD1 were distinct when subjected to chromatography, their antiviral properties were indistinguishable, having low nM activity against HIV. Tryptic fragments, the “cystine clusters” [Cys20–Cys32/Cys26–Cys38; SD1] and [Cys68–Cys80/Cys74–C-86; SD2], were found to undergo rapid disulfide interchange at pH 8. This interchange resulted in accumulation of artifactual fragments in alkaline pH digests that are structurally unrelated to the original topology, providing a rational explanation for the differences between the topology reported herein and the one reported earlier (Bokesh et al., Biochemistry 2003;42:2578–2584). Our observations emphasize the fact that proteins such as SVN, with disulfide bonds in close proximity, require considerable precautions when being fragmented for the purpose of disulfide assignment. PMID:20572021

  19. Sensory exploitation and sexual conflict

    PubMed Central

    Arnqvist, Göran

    2006-01-01

    Much of the literature on male–female coevolution concerns the processes by which male traits and female preferences for these can coevolve and be maintained by selection. There has been less explicit focus on the origin of male traits and female preferences. Here, I argue that it is important to distinguish origin from subsequent coevolution and that insights into the origin can help us appreciate the relative roles of various coevolutionary processes for the evolution of diversity in sexual dimorphism. I delineate four distinct scenarios for the origin of male traits and female preferences that build on past contributions, two of which are based on pre-existing variation in quality indicators among males and two on exploitation of pre-existing sensory biases among females. Recent empirical research, and theoretical models, suggest that origin by sensory exploitation has been widespread. I argue that this points to a key, but perhaps transient, role for sexually antagonistic coevolution (SAC) in the subsequent evolutionary elaboration of sexual traits, because (i) sensory exploitation is often likely to be initially costly for individuals of the exploited sex and (ii) the subsequent evolution of resistance to sensory exploitation should often be associated with costs due to selective constraints. A review of a few case studies is used to illustrate these points. Empirical data directly relevant to the costs of being sensory exploited and the costs of evolving resistance is largely lacking, and I stress that such data would help determining the general importance of sexual conflict and SAC for the evolution of sexual dimorphism. PMID:16612895

  20. Peptide-drug conjugate linked via a disulfide bond for kidney targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Qian; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-Rong

    2012-06-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, and unfortunately, the therapeutic index of clinically available drugs is limited. Thus, there is a great need to exploit effective treatment strategies, and the carrier-drug approach is an attractive method to improve the kidney specificity of the therapeutic agents. The aim of this present study is to develop a peptide-drug conjugate for the kidney targeted delivery of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril (CAP), since G3-C12 peptide (ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR) could specifically accumulate in the kidney after intravenous injection. Therefore, FITC labeled G3-C12 peptide (G3-C12-FITC) and peptide-drug conjugate (G3-C12-CAP) with a disulfide bond which can be cleaved by reduced glutathione in the kidney were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The fluorescence imaging of G3-C12-FITC revealed that the labeled peptide specifically accumulated in the kidney soon after i.v. injection to mice, and the accumulation is due largely to the reabsorption of the peptide by the proximal renal tubule cells. Furthermore, in comparison with the corresponding nonconjugated form, a 2.7-fold increase in renal area under concentration-time curve produced by the conjugate was observed in mice. Interestingly, the CAP entirely released in the kidney even at 0.05 h postinjection through disulfide reduction. As a consequence, the in vivo renal ACE inhibition was significantly increased. In conclusion, these findings suggest the potential of G3-C12 peptide serving as a suitable candidate carrier for kidney-targeted drug delivery.

  1. Intermolecular disulfide bond influences unphosphorylated STAT3 dimerization and function.

    PubMed

    Butturini, Elena; Gotte, Giovanni; Dell'Orco, Daniele; Chiavegato, Giulia; Marino, Valerio; Canetti, Diana; Cozzolino, Flora; Monti, Maria; Pucci, Piero; Mariotto, Sofia

    2016-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor activated by the phosphorylation of tyrosine 705 in response to many cytokines and growth factors. Recently, the roles for unphosphorylated STAT3 (U-STAT3) have been described in response to cytokine stimulation, in cancers, and in the maintenance of heterochromatin stability. It has been reported that U-STAT3 dimerizes, shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus, and binds to DNA, thereby driving genes transcription. Although many reports describe the active role of U-STAT3 in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3, the U-STAT3 functional pathway remains elusive.In this report, we describe the molecular mechanism of U-STAT3 dimerization, and we identify the presence of two intermolecular disulfide bridges between Cys367 and Cys542 and Cys418 and Cys426, respectively. Recently, we reported that the same cysteines contribute to the redox regulation of STAT3 signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo The presence of these disulfides is here demonstrated to largely contribute to the structure and the stability of U-STAT3 dimer as the dimeric form rapidly dissociates upon reduction in the S-S bonds. In particular, the Cys367-Cys542 disulfide bridge is shown to be critical for U-STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Mutation of the two Cys residues completely abolishes the DNA-binding capability of U-STAT3. Spectroscopic investigations confirm that the noncovalent interactions are sufficient for proper folding and dimer formation, but that the interchain disulfide bonds are crucial to preserve the functional dimer. Finally, we propose a reaction scheme of U-STAT3 dimerization with a first common step followed by stabilization through the formation of interchain disulfide bonds. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Semienzymatic Cyclization of Disulfide-rich Peptides Using Sortase A*

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinying; Kwon, Soohyun; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Huang, Yen-Hua; Chan, Lai Y.; Tan, Chia Chia; Rosengren, K. Johan; Mulvenna, Jason P.; Schroeder, Christina I.; Craik, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides have generated great interest in the development of peptide-based therapeutics due to their exceptional stability toward chemical, enzymatic, or thermal attack. In particular, they have been used as scaffolds onto which bioactive epitopes can be grafted to take advantage of the favorable biophysical properties of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides. To date, the most commonly used method for the head-to-tail cyclization of peptides has been native chemical ligation. In recent years, however, enzyme-mediated cyclization has become a promising new technology due to its efficiency, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Sortase A (SrtA) is a bacterial enzyme with transpeptidase activity. It recognizes a C-terminal penta-amino acid motif, LPXTG, and cleaves the amide bond between Thr and Gly to form a thioacyl-linked intermediate. This intermediate undergoes nucleophilic attack by an N-terminal poly-Gly sequence to form an amide bond between the Thr and N-terminal Gly. Here, we demonstrate that sortase A can successfully be used to cyclize a variety of small disulfide-rich peptides, including the cyclotide kalata B1, α-conotoxin Vc1.1, and sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1. These peptides range in size from 14 to 29 amino acids and contain three, two, or one disulfide bond, respectively, within their head-to-tail cyclic backbones. Our findings provide proof of concept for the potential broad applicability of enzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides with therapeutic potential. PMID:24425873

  3. Exploring synonymous codon usage preferences of disulfide-bonded and non-disulfide bonded cysteines in the E. coli genome.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangning; Wang, Minglei; Burrage, Kevin

    2006-07-21

    High-quality data about protein structures and their gene sequences are essential to the understanding of the relationship between protein folding and protein coding sequences. Firstly we constructed the EcoPDB database, which is a high-quality database of Escherichia coli genes and their corresponding PDB structures. Based on EcoPDB, we presented a novel approach based on information theory to investigate the correlation between cysteine synonymous codon usages and local amino acids flanking cysteines, the correlation between cysteine synonymous codon usages and synonymous codon usages of local amino acids flanking cysteines, as well as the correlation between cysteine synonymous codon usages and the disulfide bonding states of cysteines in the E. coli genome. The results indicate that the nearest neighboring residues and their synonymous codons of the C-terminus have the greatest influence on the usages of the synonymous codons of cysteines and the usage of the synonymous codons has a specific correlation with the disulfide bond formation of cysteines in proteins. The correlations may result from the regulation mechanism of protein structures at gene sequence level and reflect the biological function restriction that cysteines pair to form disulfide bonds. The results may also be helpful in identifying residues that are important for synonymous codon selection of cysteines to introduce disulfide bridges in protein engineering and molecular biology. The approach presented in this paper can also be utilized as a complementary computational method and be applicable to analyse the synonymous codon usages in other model organisms.

  4. Examination of the effect of increasing the number of intra-disulfide amino functional groups on the performance of small molecule cyclic polyamine disulfide vectors.

    PubMed

    Drake, Christopher R; Aissaoui, Abderrahim; Argyros, Orestis; Thanou, Maya; Steinke, Joachim H G; Miller, Andrew D

    2013-10-10

    Establishing structure-activity relationships is vital if the efficacy of non-viral vectors is to match that of their viral counter-parts. Recently, we reported on the ability of a series of small molecule, cyclic polyamine disulfides to condense and cage plasmid DNA (pDNA) by a process of thermodynamically controlled templated polymerization, leading to a series of corresponding pDNA-polyplex nanoparticles able to mediate high levels of transfection with no associated cytotoxicities. The leading cyclic polyamine disulfide was shown to be the spermine tetra-amine disulfide (TetraN-3,4,3). Herein we report on the significantly more challenging syntheses of cyclic disulfides with longer polyamine motifs. Two new cyclic polyamine disulfides, based on hexa- and octa-amine inserts, were prepared and their transfection efficacies and cytotoxicities compared with our previously reported cyclic tri- and tetra-amine disulfides. The new cyclic hexa- and octa-amine disulfides prove more effective at transfection in vitro, especially of lung epithelial A549 cell line. By contrast, our original cyclic tetra-amine disulfide remains the most efficient agent for the transfection of lung epithelial cells in vivo following intra-nasal administration. Hypothetical mechanistic reasons are presented to explain this outcome. Our data in toto support the concept of shorter cyclic polyamine disulfides as preferred agents for polycation-mediated controlled condensation and functional delivery of pDNA to lung epithelial cells in vivo.

  5. First examples of oxidizing secondary alcohols to ketones in the presence of the disulfide functional group: synthesis of novel diketone disulfides.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Bandarage, U K; Wang, T; Schroeder, J D; Garvey, D S

    2001-06-01

    The disulfide functionality is present in a number of organic compounds of interest in the fields of both chemistry and biology. Because the disulfide group is known to be highly susceptible to further oxidation by a wide range of agents, performing a chemoselective oxidation without further oxidizing the disulfide moiety poses a synthetic challenge. Reported herein are the first examples of such a chemoselective oxidation in which a series of novel secondary alcohol disulfides 2a-f have been converted to the corresponding symmetrical diketones 3a-f utilizing a modified Swern oxidation.

  6. Mitochondrial Ccs1 contains a structural disulfide bond crucial for the import of this unconventional substrate by the disulfide relay system

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Dominik P.; Burgard, Caroline A.; Reddehase, Silvia; Leitch, Jeffry M.; Culotta, Valeria C.; Hell, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase 1 (Ccs1) provides an important cellular function against oxidative stress. Ccs1 is present in the cytosol and in the intermembrane space (IMS) of mitochondria. Its import into the IMS depends on the Mia40/Erv1 disulfide relay system, although Ccs1 is, in contrast to typical substrates, a multidomain protein and lacks twin CxnC motifs. We report on the molecular mechanism of the mitochondrial import of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ccs1 as the first member of a novel class of unconventional substrates of the disulfide relay system. We show that the mitochondrial form of Ccs1 contains a stable disulfide bond between cysteine residues C27 and C64. In the absence of these cysteines, the levels of Ccs1 and Sod1 in mitochondria are strongly reduced. Furthermore, C64 of Ccs1 is required for formation of a Ccs1 disulfide intermediate with Mia40. We conclude that the Mia40/Erv1 disulfide relay system introduces a structural disulfide bond in Ccs1 between the cysteine residues C27 and C64, thereby promoting mitochondrial import of this unconventional substrate. Thus the disulfide relay system is able to form, in addition to double disulfide bonds in twin CxnC motifs, single structural disulfide bonds in complex protein domains. PMID:21865601

  7. The Exploitation of Black Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry

    1983-01-01

    Colleges and universities have not up held their end of the bargain with athletes, exploiting a disproportionate number of talented Black athletes by not providing the kind of education the students sought or needed and by applying rigid academic standards for eligibility. (MSE)

  8. Nonnative Disulfide Bond Formation Activates the σ32-Dependent Heat Shock Response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alexandra; Hoffmann, Jörg H.; Meyer, Helmut E.; Narberhaus, Franz; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Formation of nonnative disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm, so-called disulfide stress, is an integral component of oxidative stress. Quantification of the extent of disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli revealed that disulfide stress is associated with oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and cadmium. To separate the impact of disulfide bond formation from unrelated effects of these oxidative stressors in subsequent experiments, we worked with two complementary approaches. We triggered disulfide stress either chemically by diamide treatment of cells or genetically in a mutant strain lacking the major disulfide-reducing systems TrxB and Gor. Studying the proteomic response of E. coli exposed to disulfide stress, we found that intracellular disulfide bond formation is a particularly strong inducer of the heat shock response. Real-time quantitative PCR experiments showed that disulfide stress induces the heat shock response in E. coli σ32 dependently. However, unlike heat shock treatment, which induces these genes transiently, transcripts of σ32-dependent genes accumulated over time in disulfide stress-treated cells. Analyzing the stability of σ32, we found that this constant induction can be attributed to an increase of the half-life of σ32 upon disulfide stress. This is concomitant with aggregation of E. coli proteins treated with diamide. We conclude that oxidative stress triggers the heat shock response in E. coli σ32 dependently. The component of oxidative stress responsible for the induction of heat shock genes is disulfide stress. Nonnative disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm causes protein unfolding. This stabilizes σ32 by preventing its DnaK- and FtsH-dependent degradation. PMID:23585533

  9. Putative disulfide-forming pathway of porcine insulin precursor during its refolding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Z S; Guo, Z Y; Feng, Y M

    2001-03-06

    Although the structure of insulin has been well studied, the formation pathway of the three disulfide bridges during the refolding of insulin precursor is ambiguous. Here, we reported the in vitro disulfide-forming pathway of a recombinant porcine insulin precursor (PIP). In redox buffer containing L-arginine, the yield of native PIP from fully reduced/denatured PIP can reach 85%. The refolding process was quenched at different time points, and three distinct intermediates, including one with one disulfide linkage and two with two disulfide bridges, have been captured and characterized. An intra-A disulfide bridge was found in the former but not in the latter. The two intermediates with two disulfide bridges contain the common A20-B19 disulfide linkage and another inter-AB one. Based on the time-dependent formation and distribution of disulfide pairs in the trapped intermediates, two different forming pathways of disulfide bonds in the refolding process of PIP in vitro have been proposed. The first one involves the rapid formation of the intra-A disulfide bond, followed by the slower formation of one of the inter-AB disulfide bonds and then the pairing of the remaining cysteines to complete the refolding of PIP. The second pathway begins first with the formation of the A20-B19 disulfide bridge, followed immediately by another inter-AB one, possibly nonnative. The nonnative two-disulfide intermediates may then slowly rearrange between CysA6, CysA7, CysA11, and CysB7, until the native disulfide bond A6-A11 or A7-B7 is formed to complete the refolding of PIP. The proposed refolding behavior of PIP is compared with that of IGF-I and discussed.

  10. Dark matters: exploitation as cooperation.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Partha

    2012-04-21

    The empirical literature on human cooperation contains studies of communitarian institutions that govern the provision of public goods and management of common property resources in poor countries. Scholars studying those institutions have frequently used the Prisoners' Dilemma game as their theoretical tool-kit. But neither the provision of local public goods nor the management of local common property resources involves the Prisoners' Dilemma. That has implications for our reading of communitarian institutions. By applying a fundamental result in the theory of repeated games to a model of local common property resources, it is shown that communitarian institutions can harbour exploitation of fellow members, something that would not be possible in societies where cooperation amounts to overcoming the Prisoners' Dilemma. The conclusion we should draw is that exploitation can masquerade as cooperation.

  11. Teotihuacan, tepeapulco, and obsidian exploitation.

    PubMed

    Charlton, T H

    1978-06-16

    Current cultural ecological models of the development of civilization in central Mexico emphasize the role of subsistence production techniques and organization. The recent use of established and productive archeological surface survey techniques along natural corridors of communication between favorable niches for cultural development within the Central Mexican symbiotic region resulted in the location of sites that indicate an early development of a decentralized resource exploitation, manufacturing, and exchange network. The association of the development of this system with Teotihuacán indicates the importance such nonsubsistence production and exchange had in the evolution of this first central Mexican civilization. The later expansion of Teotihuacán into more distant areas of Mesoamerica was based on this resource exploitation model. Later civilizations centered at Tula and Tenochtitlán also used such a model in their expansion.

  12. Scorpion venom peptides with no disulfide bridges: a review.

    PubMed

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Albalas, Qosay

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venoms are rich sources of biologically active peptides that are classified into disulfide-bridged peptides (DBPs) and non-disulfide-bridged peptides (NDBPs). DBPs are the main scorpion venom components responsible for the neurotoxic effects observed during scorpion envenomation as they usually target membrane bound ion channels of excitable and non-excitable cells. Several hundred DBPs have been identified and functionally characterized in the past two decades. The NDBPs represent a novel group of molecules that have gained great interest only recently due to their high diversity both in their primary structures and bioactivities. This review provides an overview of scorpion NDBPs focusing on their therapeutic applications, modes of discovery, mechanisms of NDBPs genetic diversity and structural properties. It also provides a simple classification for NDBPs that could be adopted and applied to other NDBPs identified in future studies.

  13. Disulfide isoforms of recombinant glia maturation factor beta.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, A; Lim, R

    1990-09-14

    Recombinant human glia maturation factor beta (r-hGMF-beta) is a single-chain polypeptide (141 amino acid residues) containing three cysteines, at positions 7, 86 and 95. Nascent r-hGMF-beta exists in the reduced state and has no biological activity. The protein can be activated through oxidative refolding by incubation with a mixture of reduced and oxidized glutathione. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of the refolded r-hGMF-beta shows the presence of four peaks, corresponding to the reduced form plus three newly generated intrachain disulfide-containing isoforms predicted from the number of cysteine residues. Only one isoform shows biological activity when tested for growth suppression on C6 glioma cells. We infer from the HPLC elution pattern that the active form contains the disulfide bridge Cys86-Cys95.

  14. A degradable polydopamine coating based on disulfide-exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hojae; Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Choi, Ji Yu; Park, Matthew; Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Yang, Sung Ho; Jung, Sun Ho; Ko, Sung-Bo; Choi, Insung S

    2015-12-21

    Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies.

  15. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  16. Pressure-time profile of multiply shocked carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, G. T.; Gupta, Y. M.; Bellamy, P. M.

    1986-02-01

    An experimental method was developed to measure the pressure-time profile of a liquid in a reverberation of multiple-shock experiment. Profiles, with peak pressures to 30 kbars, were measured for carbon disulfide using shorted quartz gauges (25.4 mm diameter by 3.15 mm thick); these gauges formed the back surfaces of cells which contained the carbon disulfide. Sapphire plates were used both as impactors and as the front surfaces of the cell. Up to six pressure steps were clearly observed in the quartz-gauge output. Measured pressure-time profiles were compared to profiles calculated with available equations of state. The experiments agreed well with profiles predicted with an equation of state proposed by Sheffield (1983). Calibration experiments were performed to characterize both the initial current response and the subsequent current ramping of the shorted quartz gauges used in this study.

  17. High hemoglobin mixed disulfide content in hemolysates from stressed shark.

    PubMed

    Dafré, A L; Reischl, E

    1990-01-01

    1. Hemolysate from heavily stressed smooth hammerhead shark, Sphyrna zygaena, shows three electrophoretic components, SZ I, SZ II and SZ III, whose relative concentrations are 36.4 +/- 6.8, 36.4 +/- 5.0 and 20.8 +/- 5.7%, respectively. After reduction with DTE only SZ I remained. 2. SZ I reacted with glutathione disulfide reconstitute SZ II and SZ III. 3. Non-reduced, DTE-reduced, and denatured hemoglobin were found to have 2.0 +/- 0.4, 3.7 +/- 0.6, and 9.4 +/- 0.7-SH groups, respectively. 4. Erythrocyte non-protein--SH (NPSH), including glutathione present as mixed disulfide with SZ II and SZ III, is 1.7 NPSH/Hb.

  18. Polarization-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy of Rhenium Disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenet, Daniel; Aslan, Ozgur; Heinz, Tony; van der Zande, Arend; Hone, James

    2015-03-01

    Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2) is a layered semiconductor with each layer exhibiting a distorted 1T crystal structure. The reduced symmetry of the distorted 1T structure creates anisotropic optical and electrical properties that have been previously studied in bulk films. Herein, we demonstrate anisotropic behavior in its Raman spectra. We then correlate these vibrational modes with polarized absorption measurements in thin films in order to develop a versatile technique for determining the crystal orientation of anisotropic semiconducting thin films.

  19. Vanadium nitride functionalization and denitrogenation by carbon disulfide and dioxide.

    PubMed

    Brask, Justin K; Durà-Vilà, Víctor; Diaconescu, Paula L; Cummins, Christopher C

    2002-04-21

    A dramatic difference in behavior is observed for the dithiocarbamate and carbamate complexes [Ar(But)N]3V(NCE2)Na(THF)2(E = S or O, respectively), prepared from the corresponding nitride species ([Ar(But)N]3V identical to NNa)2 by way of a nucleophilic addition reaction involving carbon disulfide or dioxide, and is rationalized with the aid of DFT calculations.

  20. Oxidation of kinetically trapped thiols by protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Walker, K W; Gilbert, H F

    1995-10-17

    The formation of a stabilized structure during oxidative protein folding can severely retard disulfide formation if the structure must be disrupted to gain access to buried cysteines. These kinetic traps can slow protein folding and disulfide bond formation to the extent that unassisted folding is too slow to be kinetically competent in the cell. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) facilitates the oxidation of a kinetically trapped state of RTEM-1 beta-lactamase in which two cysteines that form the single disulfide bond in the native protein are buried and approximately 500-fold less reactive than exposed cysteines. Under second-order conditions, PDI-dependent oxidation of reduced, folded beta-lactamase is 500-fold faster than GSSG-dependent oxidation. The rate difference observed between PDI and GSSG can be accounted for by the 520-fold higher kinetic reactivity of PDI as an oxidant. Noncovalent interactions between PDI (35 microM) and beta-lactamase increase the reactivity or unfolding of beta-lactamase in the steady-state by less than 3-fold. At high concentrations of PDI or alkylating agents, the reaction of beta-lactamase cysteines approaches a constant rate, limited by the spontaneous unfolding of the protein (kunfold = 0.024 +/- 0.005 min-1). PDI does not substantially increase the rate of beta-lactamase unfolding; however, once beta-lactamase spontaneously unfolds, PDI at concentrations greater than 44 +/- 4 microM, oxidizes the unfolded substrate before it can refold (kfold = 1.5 +/- 0.2 min-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Performance and Safety Characteristics of Lithium-molybdenum Disulfide Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The lithium-molybdenum disulfide system offers attractive characteristics including high rate capability, successful operation up to 75 C, a very low self-discharge rate, a good cycle life and safety characteristics which compare favorably to those of other lithium cells. Moreover, the materials and manufacturing costs for the system is effectively controlled, so the cells should ultimately be competitive with currently marketed rechargeable cells.

  2. A degradable polydopamine coating based on disulfide-exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hojae; Kim, Beom Jin; Park, Taegyun; Choi, Ji Yu; Park, Matthew; Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Hong, Seok-Pyo; Yang, Sung Ho; Jung, Sun Ho; Ko, Sung-Bo; Choi, Insung S.

    2015-11-01

    Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies.Although the programmed degradation of biocompatible films finds applications in various fields including biomedical and bionanotechnological areas, coating methods have generally been limited to be substrate-specific, not applicable to any kinds of substrates. In this paper, we report a dopamine derivative, which allows for both universal coating of various substrates and stimuli-responsive film degradation, inspired by mussel-adhesive proteins. Two dopamine moieties are linked together by the disulfide bond, the cleavage of which enables the programmed film degradation. Mechanistic analysis of the degradable films indicates that the initial cleavage of the disulfide linkage causes rapid uptake of water molecules, hydrating the films, which leads to rapid degradation. Our substrate-independent coating of degradable films provides an advanced tool for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and anti-fouling strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis, characterization, and other additional details. See DOI: 10

  3. Prediction of reversible disulfide based on features from local structural signatures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-An; Wang, Yejun; Zhang, Qing; Xia, Yiji; Ge, Wei; Guo, Dianjing

    2017-04-04

    Disulfide bonds are traditionally considered to play only structural roles. In recent years, increasing evidence suggests that the disulfide proteome is made up of structural disulfides and reversible disulfides. Unlike structural disulfides, reversible disulfides are usually of important functional roles and may serve as redox switches. Interestingly, only specific disulfide bonds are reversible while others are not. However, whether reversible disulfides can be predicted based on structural information remains largely unknown. In this study, two datasets with both types of disulfides were compiled using independent approaches. By comparison of various features extracted from the local structural signatures, we identified several features that differ significantly between reversible and structural disulfides, including disulfide bond length, along with the number, amino acid composition, secondary structure and physical-chemical properties of surrounding amino acids. A SVM-based classifier was developed for predicting reversible disulfides. RESULTS: By 10-fold cross-validation, the model achieved accuracy of 0.750, sensitivity of 0.352, specificity of 0.953, MCC of 0.405 and AUC of 0.751 using the RevSS_PDB dataset. The robustness was further validated by using RevSS_RedoxDB as independent testing dataset. This model was applied to proteins with known structures in the PDB database. The results show that one third of the predicted reversible disulfide containing proteins are well-known redox enzymes, while the remaining are non-enzyme proteins. Given that reversible disulfides are frequently reported from functionally important non-enzyme proteins such as transcription factors, the predictions may provide valuable candidates of novel reversible disulfides for further experimental investigation. This study provides the first comparative analysis between the reversible and the structural disulfides. Distinct features remarkably different between these two

  4. Selective Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions: Enabling Disulfide Mapping via Oxidation and Cleavage of Disulfide Bonds in Intermolecularly-Linked Polypeptide Ions.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-20

    The selective gas-phase oxidation of disulfide bonds to their thiosulfinate form using ion/ion reactions and subsequent cleavage is demonstrated here. Oxidizing reagent anions are observed to attach to all polypeptides, regardless of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide is also frequently observed. Activation of the ion/ion complex between an oxidizing reagent anion and a disulfide-containing peptide cation results in oxygen transfer from the reagent anion to the peptide cation to form the [M+H+O](+) species. This thiosulfinate derivative can undergo one of several rearrangements that result in cleavage of the disulfide bond. Species containing an intermolecular disulfide bond undergo separation of the two chains upon activation. Further activation can be used to generate more sequence information from each chain. These oxidation ion/ion reactions have been used to illustrate the identification of S-glutathionylated and S-cysteinylated peptides, in which low molecular weight thiols are attached to cysteine residues in peptides via disulfide bonds. The oxidation chemistry effectively labels peptide ions with readily oxidized groups, such as disulfide bonds. This enables a screening approach for the identification of disulfide-linked peptides in a disulfide mapping application involving enzymatic digestion. The mixtures of ions generated by tryptic and peptic digestions of lysozyme and insulin, respectively, without prior separation or isolation were subjected both to oxidation and proton transfer ion/ion chemistry to illustrate the identification of peptides in the mixtures with readily oxidized groups.

  5. Disulfide bridge reorganization induced by proline mutations in maurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Carlier, E; Fajloun, Z; Mansuelle, P; Fathallah, M; Mosbah, A; Oughideni, R; Sandoz, G; Di Luccio, E; Geib, S; Regaya, I; Brocard, J; Rochat, H; Darbon, H; Devaux, C; Sabatier, J M; de Waard, M

    2001-02-02

    Maurotoxin (MTX) is a 34-residue toxin that has been isolated from the venom of the chactidae scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus, and characterized. Together with Pi1 and HsTx1, MTX belongs to a family of short-chain four-disulfide-bridged scorpion toxins acting on potassium channels. However, contrary to other members of this family, MTX exhibits an uncommon disulfide bridge organization of the type C1-C5, C2-C6, C3-C4 and C7-C8, versus C1-C5, C2-C6, C3-C7 and C4-C8 for both Pi1 and HsTx1. Here, we report that the substitution of MTX proline residues located at positions 12 and/or 20, adjacent to C3 (Cys(13)) and C4 (Cys(19)), results in conventional Pi1- and HsTx1-like arrangement of the half-cystine pairings. In this case, this novel disulfide bridge arrangement is without obvious incidence on the overall three-dimensional structure of the toxin. Pharmacological assays of this structural analog, [A(12),A(20)]MTX, reveal that the blocking activities on Shaker B and rat Kv1.2 channels remain potent whereas the peptide becomes inactive on rat Kv1.3. These data indicate, for the first time, that discrete point mutations in MTX can result in a marked reorganization of the half-cystine pairings, accompanied with a novel pharmacological profile for the analog.

  6. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  7. Ion beam-induced hydroxylation controls molybdenum disulfide growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, Stephen F.; Kaplan, Daniel; Maurer, Joshua A.

    2017-06-01

    2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, are a promising class of nanomaterials for next generation electronics, photovoltaics, electrocatalysts, sensors, and optoelectronic devices. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is of particular interest due to its direct bandgap in the visible spectrum, high electron mobility, and chemical stability. Here, we demonstrate that alterations in the density of surface hydroxyl groups on silicon dioxide substrates can control nucleation and growth in molybdenum disulfide thin films produced by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The extent of MoS2 nucleation is linearly correlated to the density of surface hydroxyl groups. Controlling the density of surface hydroxyl groups on the initial substrate provides a method of growing patterned molybdenum disulfide. Furthermore, we establish that the surface density of hydroxyl groups on silicon dioxide (SiO2) is altered using conventional gallium focused ion beam (FIB) patterning. Upon gallium-ion beam exposure, the number of hydroxyl groups generated on the surface is directly proportional to the ion dosage. This work establishes a means of patterning large-area monolayer MoS2 on silicon dioxide substrates, which is a critical step for realizing applications in imaging, catalysis, biosensing, chemical detection, electronics and optoelectronics.

  8. Photodegradable, Photoadaptable Hydrogels via Radical-Mediated Disulfide Fragmentation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Various techniques have been adopted to impart a biological responsiveness to synthetic hydrogels for the delivery of therapeutic agents as well as the study and manipulation of biological processes and tissue development. Such techniques and materials include polyelectrolyte gels that swell and deswell with changes in pH, thermosensitive gels that contract at physiological temperatures, and peptide cross-linked hydrogels that degrade upon peptidolysis by cell-secreted enzymes. Herein we report a unique approach to photochemically deform and degrade disulfide cross-linked hydrogels, mitigating the challenges of light attenuation and low quantum yield, permitting the degradation of hydrogels up to 2 mm thick within 120 s at low light intensities (10 mW/cm2 at 365 nm). Hydrogels were formed by the oxidation of thiol-functionalized 4-armed poly(ethylene glycol) macromolecules. These disulfide cross-linked hydrogels were then swollen in a lithium acylphosphinate photoinitiator solution. Upon exposure to light, photogenerated radicals initiate multiple fragmentation and disulfide exchange reactions, permitting and promoting photodeformation, photowelding, and photodegradation. This novel, but simple, approach to generate photoadaptable hydrogels portends the study of cellular response to mechanically and topographically dynamic substrates as well as novel encapsulations by the welding of solid substrates. The principles and techniques described herein hold implications for more than hydrogel materials but also for photoadaptable polymers more generally. PMID:21512614

  9. Inhibition of botulinum neurotoxins interchain disulfide bond reduction prevents the peripheral neuroparalysis of botulism.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Giulia; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Pirazzini, Marcon; Binz, Thomas; Shone, Clifford C; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) form a growing family of metalloproteases with a unique specificity either for VAMP, SNAP25 or syntaxin. The BoNTs are grouped in seven different serotypes indicated by letters from A to G. These neurotoxins enter the cytosol of nerve terminals via a 100 kDa chain which binds to the presynaptic membrane and assists the translocation of a 50 kDa metalloprotease chain. These two chains are linked by a single disulfide bridge which plays an essential role during the entry of the metalloprotease chain in the cytosol, but thereafter it has to be reduced to free the proteolytic activity. Its reduction is mediated by thioredoxin which is continuously regenerated by its reductase. Here we show that inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase or of thioredoxin prevent the specific proteolysis of VAMP by the four VAMP-specific BoNTs: type B, D, F and G. These compounds are effective not only in primary cultures of neurons, but also in preventing the in vivo mouse limb neuroparalysis. In addition, one of these inhibitors, Ebselen, largely protects mice from the death caused by a systemic injection. Together with recent results obtained with BoNTs specific for SNAP25 and syntaxin, the present data demonstrate the essential role of the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system in reducing the interchain disulfide during the nerve intoxication mechanism of all serotypes. Therefore its inhibitors should be considered for a possible use to prevent botulism and for treating infant botulism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The influence of zinc(II) on thioredoxin/glutathione disulfide exchange: QM/MM studies to explore how zinc(II) accelerates exchange in higher dielectric environments.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Roby; Bruce, Mitchell R M; Bruce, Alice E; Amar, François G

    2015-08-01

    QM/MM studies were performed to explore the energetics of exchange reactions of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and the active site of thioredoxin [Cys32-Gly33-Pro34-Cys35] with and without zinc(II), in vacuum and solvated models. The activation energy for exchange, in the absence of zinc, is 29.7 kcal mol(-1) for the solvated model. This is 3.3 kcal mol(-1) higher than the activation energy for exchange in the gas phase, due to ground state stabilization of the active site Cys-32 thiolate in a polar environment. In the presence of zinc, the activation energy for exchange is 4.9 kcal mol(-1) lower than in the absence of zinc (solvated models). The decrease in activation energy is attributed to stabilization of the charge-separated transition state, which has a 4-centered, cyclic arrangement of Zn-S-S-S with an estimated dipole moment of 4.2 D. A difference of 4.9 kcal mol(-1) in activation energy would translate to an increase in rate by a factor of about 4000 for zinc-assisted thiol-disulfide exchange. The calculations are consistent with previously reported experimental results, which indicate that metal-thiolate, disulfide exchange rates increase as a function of solvent dielectric. This trend is opposite to that observed for the influence of the dielectric environment on the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange in the absence of metal. The results suggest a dynamic role for zinc in thiol-disulfide exchange reactions, involving accessible cysteine sites on proteins, which may contribute to redox regulation and mechanistic pathways during oxidative stress.

  11. Dissecting the Machinery That Introduces Disulfide Bonds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Ball, Geneviève; Leverrier, Pauline; Garvis, Steven; Nicolaes, Valérie; Vertommen, Didier; Ize, Bérengère; Tamu Dufe, Veronica; Messens, Joris; Voulhoux, Romé; Collet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disulfide bond formation is required for the folding of many bacterial virulence factors. However, whereas the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is well characterized, not much is known on the pathways that oxidatively fold proteins in pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report the detailed unraveling of the pathway that introduces disulfide bonds in the periplasm of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome of P. aeruginosa uniquely encodes two DsbA proteins (P. aeruginosa DsbA1 [PaDsbA1] and PaDsbA2) and two DsbB proteins (PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2). We found that PaDsbA1, the primary donor of disulfide bonds to secreted proteins, is maintained oxidized in vivo by both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2. In vitro reconstitution of the pathway confirms that both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2 shuttle electrons from PaDsbA1 to membrane-bound quinones. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa dsbB1 (PadsbB1) and PadsbB2 is required to prevent the folding of several P. aeruginosa virulence factors and to lead to a significant decrease in pathogenicity. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, we also analyzed the impact of PadsbA1 deletion on the global periplasmic proteome of P. aeruginosa, which allowed us to identify more than 20 new potential substrates of this major oxidoreductase. Finally, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of PaDsbA2, a highly oxidizing oxidoreductase, which seems to be expressed under specific conditions. By fully dissecting the machinery that introduces disulfide bonds in P. aeruginosa, our work opens the way to the design of novel antibacterial molecules able to disarm this pathogen by preventing the proper assembly of its arsenal of virulence factors. PMID:24327342

  12. Routing Algorithm Exploits Spatial Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Jennings, Esther

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed routing algorithm for broadcasting in an ad hoc wireless communication network takes account of, and exploits, the spatial relationships among the locations of nodes, in addition to transmission power levels and distances between the nodes. In contrast, most prior algorithms for discovering routes through ad hoc networks rely heavily on transmission power levels and utilize limited graph-topology techniques that do not involve consideration of the aforesaid spatial relationships. The present algorithm extracts the relevant spatial-relationship information by use of a construct denoted the relative-neighborhood graph (RNG).

  13. Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage within peptides via ultraviolet irradiation of an electrospray plume.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2013-05-21

    Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage in peptides was demonstrated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the electrospray ionization (ESI) plume using a low pressure mercury (LP-Hg) lamp. Tandem mass spectrometry and accurate mass measurements confirmed that the primary reaction products were due to disulfide bond cleavage to form thiol (-SH) and sulfinyl radical (-SO˙). Mechanistic studies showed that the 185 nm emission from a LP-Hg lamp was responsible for UV photolysis of atmospheric O2, which further initiated secondary radical formation and subsequent disulfide bond cleavage by radical attack. The radical induced disulfide bond cleavage was found to be analytically useful in providing rich sequence information for naturally occurring peptides containing intrachain disulfide bonds. The utility of this method was also demonstrated for facile disulfide peptide identification and characterization from protein digests.

  14. Do Vicinal Disulfide Bridges Mediate Functionally Important Redox Transformations in Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Aline Dantas; Herzig, Volker; Windley, Monique J.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Mobli, Mehdi; Nicholson, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Vicinal disulfide bridges, in which a disulfide bond is formed between adjacent cysteine residues, constitute an unusual but expanding class of potential allosteric disulfides. Although vicinal disulfide rings (VDRs) are relatively uncommon, they have proven to be functionally critical in almost all proteins in which they have been discovered. However, it has proved difficult to test whether these sterically constrained disulfides participate in functionally important redox transformations. We demonstrate that chemical replacement of VDRs with dicarba or diselenide bridges can be used to assess whether VDRs function as allosteric disulfides. Our approach leads to the hypothesis that not all VDRs participate in functionally important redox reactions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1976–1980. PMID:23646911

  15. Cathode Based on Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoflakes for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Mohammad; Kumar, Bijandra; Liu, Cong; Phillips, Patrick; Yasaei, Poya; Behranginia, Amirhossein; Zapol, Peter; Klie, Robert F; Curtiss, Larry A; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2016-02-23

    Lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries have been recognized as an emerging technology for energy storage systems owing to their high theoretical specific energy. One challenge is to find an electrolyte/cathode system that is efficient, stable, and cost-effective. We present such a system based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes combined with an ionic liquid (IL) that work together as an effective cocatalyst for discharge and charge in a Li-O2 battery. Cyclic voltammetry results show superior catalytic performance for this cocatalyst for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions compared to Au and Pt catalysts. It also performs remarkably well in the Li-O2 battery system with 85% round-trip efficiency and reversibility up to 50 cycles. Density functional calculations provide a mechanistic understanding of the MoS2 nanoflakes/IL system. The cocatalyst reported in this work could open the way for exploiting the unique properties of ionic liquids in Li-air batteries in combination with nanostructured MoS2 as a cathode material.

  16. Nonlinear optical response and applications of tin disulfide in the near- and mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. R.; Liu, X. M.

    2017-04-01

    Layered metal dichalcogenides (LMDs) have received considerable attention in optoelectronics and photonics. Tin disulfide (SnS2) as a member of the LMDs has been employed for transistors, energy storage, and photocatalysts. The optical properties of SnS2 in the ultraviolet and visible regions have been widely investigated, while the applications of SnS2 in the near- and mid-infrared regions are still rare. Here, we demonstrate the nonlinear optical response of layered SnS2 that is exploited as a saturable absorber in the near- and mid-infrared regions. The saturable absorption of SnS2 is measured at 1.06 and 1.55 μm, which illustrates a low saturable intensity. SnS2 covered on a D-shaped fiber is used to initiate the mode-locking operations in erbium-, ytterbium-, and thulium-doped fiber lasers and ultrafast pulses are achieved at 1.03, 1.56, and 1.91 μm. These results make SnS2 an appealing candidate for broadband applications across the near- and mid-infrared regions.

  17. Cathode based on molybdenum disulfide nanoflakes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Asadi, Mohammad; Kumar, Bijandra; Liu, Cong; Phillips, Patrick; Yasaei, Poya; Behranginia, Amirhossein; Zapol, Peter; Klie, Robert F.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2016-02-01

    Lithium-oxygen (Li-O-2) batteries have been recognized as an emerging technology for energy storage systems owing to their high theoretical specific energy. One challenge is to find an electrolyte/cathode system that is efficient, stable, and cost-effective. We present such a system based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoflakes combined with an ionic liquid (IL) that work together as an effective cocatalyst for discharge and charge in a Li-O-2 battery. Cyclic voltammetry results show superior catalytic performance for this cocatalyst for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions compared to Au and Pt catalysts. It also performs remarkably well in the Li-O-2 battery system with 85% round-trip efficiency and reversibility up to 50 cycles. Density functional calculations provide a mechanistic understanding of the MoS2 nanoflakes/IL system. cocatalyst reported in this work could open the way for exploiting the unique properties of ionic liquids in Li-air batteries in combination with nanostructured MoS2 as a cathode material.

  18. Synthesis of symmetric disulfides as potential alternative substrates for trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Jaouhari, R; Besheya, T; McKie, J H; Douglas, K T

    1995-12-01

    The synthesis of a series of symmetrical disulfides as potential substrates of trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase was described. The key intermediate in the synthetic approach was the choice of S-(t)butylmercapto-L-cysteine (1). The spermidine ring in the native substrate, trypanothione disulfide (TSST), was replaced with 3-dimethyl-aminopropylamine (DMAPA), while theγ-Glu moiety was replaced by phenylalanyl or tryptophanyl residues. The same modifications in theγ-Glu moiety of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) were applied.

  19. Disulfides as cyanide antidotes: evidence for a new in vivo oxidative pathway for cyanide detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zottola, Mark A; Beigel, Keith; Soni, Sunil-Datta; Lawrence, Richard

    2009-12-01

    It is known that cyanide is converted to thiocyanate in the presence of the enzyme rhodanese. The enzyme is activated by sulfur transfer from an appropriate sulfur donor. The activated enzyme then binds cyanide and transfers the sulfur atom to cyanide to form thiocyanate. This project began as an exploration of the ability of disulfides to act as sulfur donors in the rhodanese-mediated detoxification of cyanide. To our surprise, and contrary to expectations based on efficacy studies in vivo, our in vitro results showed that disulfides are rather poor sulfur donors. The transfer of a sulfur atom from a disulfide to the enzyme must occur via cleavage of a carbon-sulfur bond either of the original disulfide or in a mixed disulfide arising from the reaction of rhodanese with the original disulfide. Extending the reaction time and addition of chloride anion (a nucleophile) did not significantly change the results of the experiment. Using ultrasound as a means of accelerating bond cleavage also had a minimal effect. Those results ruled out cleavage of the carbon-sulfur bond in the original disulfide but did not preclude formation of a mixed disulfide. S-Methyl methylthiosulfonate (MTSO) was used to determine whether a mixed disulfide, if formed, would result in transfer of a sulfur atom to rhodanese. While no thiocyanate was formed in the reaction between cyanide and rhodanese exposed to MTSO, NMR analysis revealed that MTSO reacted directly with cyanide anion to form methyl thiocyanate. This result reveals the body's possible use of oxidized disulfides as a first line of defense against cyanide intoxication. The oxidation of disulfides to the corresponding thiosulfinate or thiosulfonate will result in facilitating their reaction with other nucleophiles. The reaction of an oxidized disulfide with a sulfur nucleophile from glutathione could be a plausible origin for the cyanide metabolite 2-aminothiazoline-4-carboxylic acid.

  20. Steps in reductive activation of the disulfide-generating enzyme Ero1p

    PubMed Central

    Heldman, Nimrod; Vonshak, Ohad; Sevier, Carolyn S; Vitu, Elvira; Mehlman, Tevie; Fass, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Ero1p is the primary catalyst of disulfide bond formation in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Ero1p contains a pair of essential disulfide bonds that participate directly in the electron transfer pathway from substrate thiol groups to oxygen. Remarkably, elimination of certain other Ero1p disulfides by mutation enhances enzyme activity. In particular, the C150A/C295A Ero1p mutant exhibits increased thiol oxidation in vitro and in vivo and interferes with redox homeostasis in yeast cells by hyperoxidizing the ER. Inhibitory disulfides of Ero1p are thus important for enzyme regulation. To visualize the differences between de-regulated and wild-type Ero1p, we determined the crystal structure of Ero1p C150A/C295A. The structure revealed local changes compared to the wild-type enzyme around the sites of mutation, but no conformational transitions within 25 Å of the active site were observed. To determine how the C150—C295 disulfide nonetheless participates in redox regulation of Ero1p, we analyzed using mass spectrometry the changes in Ero1p disulfide connectivity as a function of time after encounter with reducing substrates. We found that the C150—C295 disulfide sets a physiologically appropriate threshold for enzyme activation by guarding a key neighboring disulfide from reduction. This study illustrates the diverse and interconnected roles that disulfides can play in redox regulation of protein activity. PMID:20669236

  1. Method for removal of asphaltene depositions with amine-activated disulfide oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, S.P.

    1983-04-12

    A method for treating and removing unwanted asphaltene deposits from oil and gas wells, surface equipment, flow lines, and pore spaces of oil-baring formations comprises treatment with an amine -activated aliphatic disulfide oil as an asphaltene solvent. In a preferred aspect, the aliphatic disulfide oil is a dialkyl disulfide oil and is activated by the addition of 10 weight percent of diethylamine. In a specific use, the activated disulfide oil is used to remove asphaltene deposits from an oilbearing formation and a producing well penetrating the formation.

  2. Imaging disulfide dinitroxides at 250 MHz to monitor thiol redox status.

    PubMed

    Elajaili, Hanan; Biller, Joshua R; Rosen, Gerald M; Kao, Joseph P Y; Tseytlin, Mark; Buchanan, Laura A; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; McPeak, Joseph; Shi, Yilin; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of thiol-disulfide redox status is crucial for characterization of tumor physiology. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of disulfide-linked dinitroxides are readily distinguished from those of the corresponding monoradicals that are formed by cleavage of the disulfide linkage by free thiols. EPR spectra can thus be used to monitor the rate of cleavage and the thiol redox status. EPR spectra of (1)H,(14)N- and (2)H,(15)N-disulfide dinitroxides and the corresponding monoradicals resulting from cleavage by glutathione have been characterized at 250 MHz, 1.04 GHz, and 9 GHz and imaged by rapid-scan EPR at 250 MHz.

  3. Increasing Fragmentation of Disulfide-Bonded Proteins for Top-Down Mass Spectrometry by Supercharging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiang; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The disulfide bond is an important post-translational modification to form and maintain the native structure and biological functions of proteins. Characterization of disulfide bond linkages is therefore of essential interest in the structural elucidation of proteins. Top-down mass spectrometry (MS) of disulfide-bonded proteins has been hindered by relatively low sequence coverage due to disulfide cross-linking. In this study, we employed top-down ESI-MS with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) MS with electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) to study the fragmentation of supercharged proteins with multiple intramolecular disulfide bonds. With charge enhancement upon the addition of sulfolane to the analyte solution, improved protein fragmentation and disulfide bond cleavage efficiency was observed for proteins including bovine β-lactoglobulin, soybean trypsin inhibitor, human proinsulin, and chicken lysozyme. Both the number and relative abundances of product ions representing disulfide cleavage increase with increasing charge states for the proteins studied. Our studies suggest supercharging ESI-MS is a promising tool to aid in the top-down MS analysis of disulfide-bonded proteins, providing potentially useful information for the determination of disulfide bond linkages. PMID:26028988

  4. Imaging disulfide dinitroxides at 250 MHz to monitor thiol redox status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elajaili, Hanan; Biller, Joshua R.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Tseytlin, Mark; Buchanan, Laura A.; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; McPeak, Joseph; Shi, Yilin; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of thiol-disulfide redox status is crucial for characterization of tumor physiology. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of disulfide-linked dinitroxides are readily distinguished from those of the corresponding monoradicals that are formed by cleavage of the disulfide linkage by free thiols. EPR spectra can thus be used to monitor the rate of cleavage and the thiol redox status. EPR spectra of 1H,14N- and 2H,15N-disulfide dinitroxides and the corresponding monoradicals resulting from cleavage by glutathione have been characterized at 250 MHz, 1.04 GHz, and 9 GHz and imaged by rapid-scan EPR at 250 MHz.

  5. Synthesis of asymmetric disulfides as potential alternative substrates for trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Jaouhari, R; Besheya, T; McKie, J H; Douglas, K T

    1995-12-01

    The synthesis of asymmetrical disulfides, based on Zervas' inter-mediate, monocarbobenzoxy-L-cystine, has been developed. A series of substrate analogues of trypanothione disulfide (TSST) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) are described, where the spermidine ring of (TSST) has been replaced by 3-dimethylaminopropylamine (DMAPA). The free amino group in Zervas' product was condensed with phenylalanyl, tryptophanyl or glutamyl residues, while the carbobenzoxy group was unaffected under the reaction conditions employed. The same synthetic approach was applied in the design of analogues of glutathione disulfide (GSSG).

  6. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange.

  7. Radiation inactivation of ricin occurs with transfer of destructive energy across a disulfide bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Haigler, H.T.; Woodbury, D.J.; Kempner, E.S.

    1985-08-01

    The ionizing radiation sensitivity of ricin, a disulfide-linked heterodimeric protein, was studied as a model to determine the ability of disulfide bonds to transmit destructive energy. The radiation-dependent loss of A chain enzymatic activity after irradiation of either intact ricin or ricin in which the interchain disulfide bond was disrupted gave target sizes corresponding to the molecular size of dimeric ricin or monomeric A chain, respectively. These results clearly show that a disulfide bond can transmit destructive energy between protein subunits.

  8. Theoretical study of the thermal decomposition of dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Aäron G; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Marin, Guy B

    2010-10-07

    Despite its use in a wide variety of industrially important thermochemical processes, little is known about the thermal decomposition mechanism of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). To obtain more insight, the radical decomposition mechanism of DMDS is studied theoretically and a kinetic model is developed accounting for the formation of all the decomposition products observed in the experimental studies available in literature. Thermochemical data and rate coefficients are obtained using the high-level CBS-QB3 composite method. Among five methods tested (BMK/6-311G(2d,d,p), MPW1PW91/6-311G(2d,d,p), G3, G3B3, and CBS-QB3), the CBS-QB3 method was found to reproduce most accurately the experimental standard enthalpies of formation for a set of 17 small organosulfur compounds and the bond dissociation energies for a set of 10 sulfur bonds. Enthalpies of formation were predicted within 4 kJ mol(-1) while the mean absolute deviation on the bond dissociation enthalpies amounts to 7 kJ mol(-1). From the theoretical study, a new reaction path is identified for the formation of carbon disulfide via dithiirane (CH(2)S(2)). A reaction mechanism was constructed containing 36 reactions among 25 species accounting for the formation of all the decomposition products reported in literature. High-pressure limit rate coefficients for the 36 reactions in the reaction mechanism are presented. The kinetic model is able to grasp the experimental observations. With the recombination of thiyl radicals treated as being in the low-pressure limit, the experimentally reported first-order rate coefficients for the decomposition of DMDS are reproduced within 1 order of magnitude, while the observed product selectivities of most compounds are reproduced satisfactory. Simulations indicate that at high conversions most of the carbon disulfide forms according to the newly identified reaction path involving the formation of dithiirane.

  9. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Tobias; Blees, Johanna S.; Bajer, Magdalena M.; Wild, Janine; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Scipione, Luigi; Costi, Roberta; Henrich, Curtis J.; Brüne, Bernhard; Colburn, Nancy H.; Di Santo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)disulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2–4) or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6). We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted. PMID:26982744

  10. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D.; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2016-01-01

    We have performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. The ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems. PMID:26876194

  11. A 65 Ah rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.

    1986-01-01

    A rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery which has a number of superior performance characteristics which includes a high energy density, a high power density, and a long charge retention time was developed. The first cell sizes developed included a C size cell and an AA size cell. Over the last two years, a project to demonstrate the feasibility of the scale up to this technology to a BC size cell with 65 Ah capacity was undertaken. The objective was to develop, build, and test a .6 kWh storage battery consisting of 6 BC cells in series.

  12. Ultrafast Optical Microscopy of Single Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Minah; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Mohite, Aditya D.; Boubanga-Tombet, Stephane; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Prasankumar, Rohit P.

    2016-02-15

    We performed ultrafast optical microscopy on single flakes of atomically thin CVD-grown molybdenum disulfide, using non-degenerate femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to excite and probe carriers above and below the indirect and direct band gaps. These measurements reveal the influence of layer thickness on carrier dynamics when probing near the band gap. Furthermore, fluence-dependent measurements indicate that carrier relaxation is primarily influenced by surface-related defect and trap states after above-bandgap photoexcitation. Furthermore, the ability to probe femtosecond carrier dynamics in individual flakes can thus give much insight into light-matter interactions in these two-dimensional nanosystems.

  13. Geosynchronous Performance of a Lithium-titanium Disulfide Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otzinger, B.

    1985-01-01

    An ambient temperature rechargeable Lithium-Titanium disulfide (Li-TiS2) five cell battery has completed the first orbital year of accelerated synchronous orbit testing. A novel charge/discharge, state of charge (SOC) control scheme is utilized, together with taper current charge backup to overcome deleterious effects associated with high end of charge and low end of discharge voltages. It is indicated that 10 orbital years of simulated synchronous operation may be achieved. Preliminary findings associated with cell matching and battery performance are identified.

  14. Exploiting social evolution in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kerry E; Heilmann, Silja; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Xavier, Joao B

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria are highly social organisms that communicate via signaling molecules, move collectively over surfaces and make biofilm communities. Nonetheless, our main line of defense against pathogenic bacteria consists of antibiotics-drugs that target individual-level traits of bacterial cells and thus, regrettably, select for resistance against their own action. A possible solution lies in targeting the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other within biofilms. The emerging field of microbial social evolution combines molecular microbiology with evolutionary theory to dissect the molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary pressures underpinning bacterial sociality. This exciting new research can ultimately lead to new therapies against biofilm infections that exploit evolutionary cheating or the trade-off between biofilm formation and dispersal.

  15. Energy for lunar resource exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1992-02-01

    Humanity stands at the threshold of exploiting the known lunar resources that have opened up with the access to space. America's role in the future exploitation of space, and specifically of lunar resources, may well determine the level of achievement in technology development and global economic competition. Space activities during the coming decades will significantly influence the events on Earth. The 'shifting of history's tectonic plates' is a process that will be hastened by the increasingly insistent demands for higher living standards of the exponentially growing global population. Key to the achievement of a peaceful world in the 21st century, will be the development of a mix of energy resources at a societally acceptable and affordable cost within a realistic planning horizon. This must be the theme for the globally applicable energy sources that are compatible with the Earth's ecology. It is in this context that lunar resources development should be a primary goal for science missions to the Moon, and for establishing an expanding human presence. The economic viability and commercial business potential of mining, extracting, manufacturing, and transporting lunar resource based materials to Earth, Earth orbits, and to undertake macroengineering projects on the Moon remains to be demonstrated. These extensive activities will be supportive of the realization of the potential of space energy sources for use on Earth. These may include generating electricity for use on Earth based on beaming power from Earth orbits and from the Moon to the Earth, and for the production of helium 3 as a fuel for advanced fusion reactors.

  16. Energy for lunar resource exploitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Humanity stands at the threshold of exploiting the known lunar resources that have opened up with the access to space. America's role in the future exploitation of space, and specifically of lunar resources, may well determine the level of achievement in technology development and global economic competition. Space activities during the coming decades will significantly influence the events on Earth. The 'shifting of history's tectonic plates' is a process that will be hastened by the increasingly insistent demands for higher living standards of the exponentially growing global population. Key to the achievement of a peaceful world in the 21st century, will be the development of a mix of energy resources at a societally acceptable and affordable cost within a realistic planning horizon. This must be the theme for the globally applicable energy sources that are compatible with the Earth's ecology. It is in this context that lunar resources development should be a primary goal for science missions to the Moon, and for establishing an expanding human presence. The economic viability and commercial business potential of mining, extracting, manufacturing, and transporting lunar resource based materials to Earth, Earth orbits, and to undertake macroengineering projects on the Moon remains to be demonstrated. These extensive activities will be supportive of the realization of the potential of space energy sources for use on Earth. These may include generating electricity for use on Earth based on beaming power from Earth orbits and from the Moon to the Earth, and for the production of helium 3 as a fuel for advanced fusion reactors.

  17. The Effect of Tensile Stress on the Conformational Free Energy Landscape of Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Anjukandi, Padmesh; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Ribas–Arino, Jordi; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C–C–S–S dihedrals, and . Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force–clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The and angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so–called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C–C–S–S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two –carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides. PMID:25286308

  18. The effect of tensile stress on the conformational free energy landscape of disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Anjukandi, Padmesh; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Ribas-Arino, Jordi; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C-C-S-S dihedrals, χ2 and χ'2. Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force-clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The χ2 and χ'2 angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so-called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C-C-S-S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two a-carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox S(N)2 reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides.

  19. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a single-player disulfide-bond oxidoreductase system to manage disulfide bond formation and isomerization.

    PubMed

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z; Day, Shandra R; Mills, Brandy W; Hoffman, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared with E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2.

  20. Opportunistic exploitation: an overlooked pathway to extinction.

    PubMed

    Branch, Trevor A; Lobo, Aaron S; Purcell, Steven W

    2013-07-01

    How can species be exploited economically to extinction? Past single-species hypotheses examining the economic plausibility of exploiting rare species have argued that the escalating value of rarity allows extinction to be profitable. We describe an alternative pathway toward extinction in multispecies exploitation systems, termed 'opportunistic exploitation'. In this mode, highly valued species that are targeted first by fishing, hunting, and logging become rare, but their populations can decline further through opportunistic exploitation while more common but less desirable species are targeted. Effectively, expanding exploitation to more species subsidizes the eventual extinction of valuable species at low densities. Managers need to recognize conditions that permit opportunistic depletion and pass regulations to protect highly desirable species when exploitation can expand to other species.

  1. Assisting the Assistant Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James

    2008-01-01

    Retaining quality staff members is a hot topic in the public school arena. Although teachers are often the focus of concern, hiring and retaining quality assistant principals must be addressed as well. Interviewing and hiring the right assistant principal--and then ensuring that he or she remains on in a campus for several years--can do a great…

  2. Arabidopsis protein disulfide isomerase-8 is a type I endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein with thiol-disulfide oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Christen Y L; Shek, Roger; Kang, Byung-Ho; Matsumoto, Kristie; Cho, Eun Ju; Christopher, David A

    2016-08-22

    In eukaryotes, classical protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) facilitate the oxidative folding of nascent secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum by catalyzing the formation, breakage, and rearrangement of disulfide bonds. Terrestrial plants encode six structurally distinct subfamilies of PDIs. The novel PDI-B subfamily is unique to terrestrial plants, and in Arabidopsis is represented by a single member, PDI8. Unlike classical PDIs, which lack transmembrane domains (TMDs), PDI8 is unique in that it has a C-terminal TMD and a single N-terminal thioredoxin domain (instead of two). No PDI8 isoforms have been experimentally characterized to date. Here we describe the characterization of the membrane orientation, expression, sub-cellular localization, and biochemical function of this novel member of the PDI family. Histochemical staining of plants harboring a PDI8 promoter:β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion revealed that the PDI8 promoter is highly active in young, expanding leaves, the guard cells of cotyledons, and in the vasculature of several organs, including roots, leaves, cotyledons, and flowers. Immunoelectron microscopy studies using a PDI8-specific antibody on root and shoot apical cells revealed that PDI8 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transient expression of two PDI8 fusions to green fluorescent protein (spGFP-PDI8 and PDI8-GFP-KKED) in leaf mesophyll protoplasts also resulted in labeling of the ER. Protease-protection immunoblot analysis indicated that PDI8 is a type I membrane protein, with its catalytic domain facing the ER lumen. The lumenal portion of PDI8 was able to functionally complement the loss of the prokaryotic protein foldase, disulfide oxidase (DsbA), as demonstrated by the reconstitution of periplasmic alkaline phosphatase in Escherichia coli. The results indicate that PDI8 is a type I transmembrane protein with its catalytic domain facing the lumen of the ER and functions in the oxidation of cysteines to produce disulfide

  3. Methods of measuring Protein Disulfide Isomerase activity: a critical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Monica; Laurindo, Francisco; Fernandes, Denise

    2014-09-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase is an essential redox chaperone from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is responsible for correct disulfide bond formation in nascent proteins. PDI is also found in other cellular locations in the cell, particularly the cell surface. Overall, PDI contributes to ER and global cell redox homeostasis and signaling. The knowledge about PDI structure and function progressed substantially based on in vitro studies using recombinant PDI and chimeric proteins. In these experimental scenarios, PDI reductase and chaperone activities are readily approachable. In contrast, assays to measure PDI isomerase activity, the hallmark of PDI family, are more complex. Assessment of PDI roles in cells and tissues mainly relies on gain- or loss-of-function studies. However, there is limited information regarding correlation of experimental readouts with the distinct types of PDI activities. In this mini-review, we evaluate the main methods described for measuring the different kinds of PDI activity: thiol reductase, thiol oxidase, thiol isomerase and chaperone. We emphasize the need to use appropriate controls and the role of critical interferents (e.g., detergent, presence of reducing agents). We also discuss the translation of results from in vitro studies with purified recombinant PDI to cellular and tissue samples, with critical comments on the interpretation of results.

  4. Engineered disulfides improve mechanical properties of recombinant spider silk.

    PubMed

    Grip, S; Johansson, J; Hedhammar, M

    2009-05-01

    Nature's high-performance polymer, spider silk, is composed of specific proteins, spidroins, which form solid fibers. So far, fibers made from recombinant spidroins have failed in replicating the extraordinary mechanical properties of the native material. A recombinant miniature spidroin consisting of four poly-Ala/Gly-rich tandem repeats and a nonrepetitive C-terminal domain (4RepCT) can be isolated in physiological buffers and undergoes self assembly into macrofibers. Herein, we have made a first attempt to improve the mechanical properties of 4RepCT fibers by selective introduction of AA --> CC mutations and by letting the fibers form under physiologically relevant redox conditions. Introduction of AA --> CC mutations in the first poly-Ala block in the miniature spidroin increases the stiffness and tensile strength without changes in ability to form fibers, or in fiber morphology. These improved mechanical properties correlate with degree of disulfide formation. AA --> CC mutations in the forth poly-Ala block, however, lead to premature aggregation of the protein, possibly due to disulfide bonding with a conserved Cys in the C-terminal domain. Replacement of this Cys with a Ser, lowers thermal stability but does not interfere with dimerization, fiber morphology or tensile strength. These results show that mutagenesis of 4RepCT can reveal spidroin structure-activity relationships and generate recombinant fibers with improved mechanical properties.

  5. Diversity of the Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb (disulfide bond) systems.

    PubMed

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J; Dziewit, Lukasz; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial proteins of the Dsb family-important components of the post-translational protein modification system-catalyze the formation of disulfide bridges, a process that is crucial for protein structure stabilization and activity. Dsb systems play an essential role in the assembly of many virulence factors. Recent rapid advances in global analysis of bacteria have thrown light on the enormous diversity among bacterial Dsb systems. While the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is quite well understood, the mechanisms of action of Dsb systems in other bacteria, including members of class Epsilonproteobacteria that contain pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria colonizing extremely diverse ecological niches, are poorly characterized. Here we present a review of current knowledge on Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb systems. We have focused on the Dsb systems of Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. because our knowledge about Dsb proteins of Wolinella and Arcobacter spp. is still scarce and comes mainly from bioinformatic studies. Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen that colonizes the gastric epithelium of humans with severe consequences. Campylobacter spp. is a leading cause of zoonotic enteric bacterial infections in most developed and developing nations. We focus on various aspects of the diversity of the Dsb systems and their influence on pathogenicity, particularly because Dsb proteins are considered as potential targets for a new class of anti-virulence drugs to treat human infections by Campylobacter or Helicobacter spp.

  6. A laboratory and theoretical study of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS+.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M C; Thaddeus, P; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-06-21

    The rotational spectrum of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS(+), has been detected in the centimeter-wave band in a molecular beam by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Rotational and centrifugal distortion constants have been determined from ten transitions in the K(a)=0 ladder of the normal isotopic species, HS(13)CS(+), and DSCS(+). The present assignment agrees well with high-level coupled cluster calculations of the HSCS(+) structure, which, like earlier work, predict this isomer to be the ground state on the HCS(2) (+) potential energy surface; HCSS(+), an isomer with C(2v) symmetry, is predicted to lie more than 20 kcal/mol higher in energy. Other properties of HSCS(+) including its dipole moment, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities have also been computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with large basis sets. Because carbon disulfide possesses a fairly large proton affinity, and because this nonpolar molecule may plausibly exist in astronomical sources, HSCS(+) is a good candidate for detection with radio telescopes in the submillimeter band where the stronger b-type transitions of this protonated cation are predicted to lie.

  7. Regulation of interleukin-4 signaling by extracellular reduction of intramolecular disulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Curbo, Sophie; Gaudin, Raphael; Carlsten, Mattias; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Ahlborg, Niklas; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Magnus; Lundberg, Mathias

    2009-12-25

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) contains three structurally important intramolecular disulfides that are required for the bioactivity of the cytokine. We show that the cell surface of HeLa cells and endotoxin-activated monocytes can reduce IL-4 intramolecular disulfides in the extracellular space and inhibit binding of IL-4 to the IL-4R{alpha} receptor. IL-4 disulfides were in vitro reduced by thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Reduction of IL-4 disulfides by the cell surface of HeLa cells was inhibited by auranofin, an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase that is an electron donor to both Trx1 and PDI. Both Trx1 and PDI have been shown to be located at the cell surface and our data suggests that these enzymes are involved in catalyzing reduction of IL-4 disulfides. The pro-drug N-acetylcysteine (NAC) that promotes T-helper type 1 responses was also shown to mediate the reduction of IL-4 disulfides. Our data provides evidence for a novel redox dependent pathway for regulation of cytokine activity by extracellular reduction of intramolecular disulfides at the cell surface by members of the thioredoxin enzyme family.

  8. Gamma-Radiolysis of Cysteine-Cysteamine Disulfide in Aqueous Solution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Gamma-radiolysis of a mixed disulfide, cysteine- cysteamine disulfide, in unbuffered aqueous solution (0.3 mM) was investigated in the presence and...absence of oxygen. The principal products were the thiols (cysteine and cysteamine ), the corresponding sulfinic and sulfonic acids, the symmetrical

  9. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  15. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon... Special Requirements § 151.50-40 Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl... waterways at the loading and unloading points. (f) The special requirements of § 151.50-41 for...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms....

  19. Role of disulfide bonds in the structure and activity of human insulin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seung-Gu; Choi, Ki-Doo; Jang, Seung-Hwan; Shin, Hang-Cheol

    2003-12-31

    Insulin contains two inter-chain disulfide bonds between the A and B chains (A7-B7 and A20-B19), and one intra-chain linkage in the A chain (A6-A11). To investigate the role of each disulfide bond in the structure, function and stability of the molecule, three des mutants of human insulin, each lacking one of the three disulfide bonds, were prepared by enzymatic conversion of refolded mini-proinsulins. Structural and biological studies of the three des mutants revealed that all three disulfide bonds are essential for the receptor binding activity of insulin, whereas the different disulfide bonds make different contributions to the overall structure of insulin. Deletion of the A20-B19 disulfide bond had the most substantial influence on the structure as indicated by loss of ordered secondary structure, increased susceptibility to proteolysis, and markedly reduced compactness. Deletion of the A6-A11 disulfide bond caused the least perturbation to the structure. In addition, different refolding efficiencies between the three des mutants suggest that the disulfide bonds are formed sequentially in the order A20-B19, A7-B7 and A6-A11 in the folding pathway of proinsulin.

  20. Biscysteine-Bearing Peptide Probes To Reveal Extracellular Thiol-Disulfide Exchange Reactions Promoting Cellular Uptake.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Gao, Wei; Liang, Jingjing; Zha, Mirao; Chen, Yaqi; Zhao, Yibing; Wu, Chuanliu

    2017-08-15

    In recent years, delivery systems based on the incorporation of thiols/disulfides have been extensively explored to promote the intracellular delivery of biological cargoes. However, it remains unclear about the detailed processes of thiol-disulfide exchanges taking place on the cell surface and how the exchange reactions promote the cellular uptake of cargoes bearing thiols or disulfide bonds. In this work, we report the rational design of biscysteine motif-containing peptide probes with substantially different ring-closing property and how these peptide probes were employed to explore the thiol-disulfide exchanges on the cell surface. Our results show that extensive thiol-disulfide exchanges between peptides and exofacial protein thiols/disulfides are involved in the cellular uptake of these peptide probes, and importantly glutathione (GSH) exported from the cytosols participates extensively in the exchange reactions. Cysteine-glycine-cysteine (CGC)-containing peptide probes can be more efficiently taken up by cells compared to other probes, and we suggested that the driving force for the superior cellular uptake arises from very likely the unique propensity of the CGC motif in forming doubly bridged disulfide bonds with exofacial proteins. Our probe-based strategy provides firsthand information on the detailed processes of the exchange reactions, which would be of great benefit to the development of delivery systems based on the extracellular thiol-disulfide exchanges for intracellular delivery of biologics.

  1. Copper-mediated stereospecific C-H oxidative sulfenylation of terminal alkenes with disulfides.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hai-Yong; Hu, Bo-Lun; Deng, Chen-Liang; Zhang, Xing-Guo

    2015-11-04

    A copper and iodine-mediated C-H oxidative sulfenylation of olefins with diaryl disulfides has been developed for the stereospecific synthesis of vinyl thioether. With the combination of Cu(OTf)2 and I2, a variety of terminal alkenes underwent oxidative coupling reaction with various diaryl disulfides successfully to afford the corresponding E-vinyl sulfides in moderate to good yields.

  2. Differential involvement of disulfide bridges on the folding of a scorpion toxin.

    PubMed

    Calabro, V; Sabatier, J M; Blanc, E; Lecomte, C; Van Rietschoten, V; Darbon, H

    1997-07-01

    Leiurotoxin I is a neurotoxin, blocker of Ca(2+)-activated apamin-sensitive K+ channel, purified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus. It is a 31-residue polypeptide reticulated by three disulfide bridges, i.e. Cys3-Cys21, Cys8-Cys26 and Cys12-Cys28. To investigate the role of these disulfide bridges in the folding of this toxin, analogs lacking one disulfide bridge were synthesized. The structures of two analogs in which two half-cystines were placed by alpha-aminobutyrate residues to suppress one disulfide bridge, were analyzed by 1H NMR. The NMR studies reveal a three-dimensional structure identical with the native toxin for the analog lacking disulfide bridge Cys3-Cys21 and a loss of organized structure for another analog lacking disulfide bridge Cys12-Cys28. These analogs are, respectively, fully active and weakly active (2% of the residual activity) when tested in vitro for their ability to interact with their receptor channel and in vivo for their neurotoxic activity in mice. This suggest that disulfide bridge Cys12-Cys28 is essential for the folding process. In contrast, the lack of disulfide bridge Cys3-Cys21 does not affect the folding and the maintenance of bioactive conformation of Leiurotoxin I.

  3. The Gaia scientific exploitation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, F.; Jordi, C.

    2015-05-01

    On July 2014 the Gaia satellite, placed at L2 since January 2014, finished their commissioning phase and started collecting high accurate scientific data. New and more realistic estimations of the astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic accuracy expected after five years mission operation (2014-2019) have been recently published in the Gaia Science Performance Web page. Here we present the coordination efforts and the activities being conducted through the two GREAT (Gaia Research for European Astronomy Training) European Networks, the GREAT-ESF, a programme supported by the European Science Foundation (2010-2015), and the GREAT-ITN network, from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (2011-2015). The main research theme of these networks is to unravel the origin and history of our home galaxy. Emphasis is placed on the research projects being conducted by the Spanish Researchers through these networks, well coordinated by the Red Española de Explotación Científica de Gaia (REG network, with more than 140 participants). Members of the REG play an important role on the collection of complementary spectroscopic data from ground based telescopes, on the development of new tools for an optimal scientific exploitation of Gaia data and on the preparation task to create the Gaia archive.

  4. Exploiting dual otoacoustic emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina; Kalluri, Radha

    2015-12-01

    Two distinct processes generate otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Reflection-source emissions, here recorded as stimulus frequency OAEs, are optimally informative at low sound levels and are more sensitive to slight hearing loss; they have been linked to cochlear amplifier gain and tuning. Distortion-source emissions are strongest at moderate-high sound levels and persist despite mild hearing loss; they likely originate in the nonlinear process of hair cell transduction. In this preliminary study, we exploit the unique features of each by generating a combined reflection-distortion OAE profile in normal hearing and hearing-impaired ears. Distortion-product (DP) and stimulus-frequency (SF) OAEs were recorded over a broad range of stimulus levels and frequencies. Individual I/O and transfer functions were generated for both emission types in each ear, and OAE peak strength, compression threshold, and rate of compression were calculated. These combined SFOAE and DPOAE features in normal and hearing-impaired ears may provide a potentially informative and novel index of hearing loss. This is an initial step toward utilizing OAE source in characterizing cochlear function and dysfunction.

  5. Design study for asteroidal exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Carl; Blissit, Jim; Jarrett, Dave; Sanner, Rob; Yanagawa, Koji

    1985-08-01

    A systematic approach to asteroidal exploitation for the 1990 to 2010 time frame is presented as an initial step toward expanding the use of space beyond the space station by providing a source of lower cost materials. With only a limited amount of information known about the asteroids, reconnaissance and exploration phases to determine the exact locations and compositions of several earth-approaching asteroids are required. Earth-based telescopes are used to locate and study the asteroids, while unmanned probes will return samples of asteroidal material to earth for analysis. After these phases are completed, the retrieval of a 35,000 metric ton piece of the asteroid Anteros is undertaken. A cargo transporter uses magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjets outbound and a mass-driver using asteroidal material inbound. A crew ship uses ion engines. Low thrust trajectories are used for both spacecraft. A materials processing facility will manufacture propellant pellets and retrieve non-propellant materials for spacecraft use. The cost is 1/10th that to transport the same materials from earth to high earth orbit. The project will cost 25 percent less if done in conjunction with a lunar and Martian base.

  6. The reduction potential of the active site disulfides of human protein disulfide isomerase limits oxidation of the enzyme by Ero1α.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Joseph E; Tavender, Timothy J; Oka, Ojore B V; Warwood, Stacey; Knight, David; Bulleid, Neil J

    2010-09-17

    Disulfide formation in newly synthesized proteins entering the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), which is itself thought to be directly oxidized by Ero1α. The activity of Ero1α is tightly regulated by the formation of noncatalytic disulfides, which need to be broken to activate the enzyme. Here, we have developed a novel PDI oxidation assay, which is able to simultaneously determine the redox status of the individual active sites of PDI. We have used this assay to confirm that when PDI is incubated with Ero1α, only one of the active sites of PDI becomes directly oxidized with a slow turnover rate. In contrast, a deregulated mutant of Ero1α was able to oxidize both PDI active sites at an equivalent rate to the wild type enzyme. When the active sites of PDI were mutated to decrease their reduction potential, both were now oxidized by wild type Ero1α with a 12-fold increase in activity. These results demonstrate that the specificity of Ero1α toward the active sites of PDI requires the presence of the regulatory disulfides. In addition, the rate of PDI oxidation is limited by the reduction potential of the PDI active site disulfide. The inability of Ero1α to oxidize PDI efficiently likely reflects the requirement for PDI to act as both an oxidase and an isomerase during the formation of native disulfides in proteins entering the secretory pathway.

  7. Overview of the regulation of disulfide bond formation in Peptide and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the maintenance of the native conformation of proteins under thermodynamic control. In general, disulfide bond formation is associated with protein folding, and this restricts the formation of folding intermediates such as misbridged disulfide isomers or kinetically trapped conformations, which provide important information related to how proteins fold into their native conformation. Therefore, numerous studies have focused on the structural analysis of folding intermediates in vitro. However, isolating or trapping folding intermediates, as well as the entire proteins, including mutant proteins, is not an easy task. Several chemical methods have recently been developed for examining peptide and protein folding and for producing, e.g., intact, post-translationally modified, or kinetically trapped proteins, or proteins with misbridged disulfide bonds. This overview introduces chemical methods for regulating the formation of disulfide bonds of peptides and proteins in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding.

  8. Air oxidation method employed for the disulfide bond formation of natural and synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Calce, Enrica; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Amodeo, Pietro; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-08-01

    Among the available protocols, chemically driven approaches to oxidize cysteine may not be required for molecules that, under the native-like conditions, naturally fold in conformations ensuring an effective pairing of the right disulfide bridge pattern. In this contest, we successfully prepared the distinctin, a natural heterodimeric peptide, and some synthetic cyclic peptides that are inhibitors of the CXCR4 receptor. In the first case, the air oxidation reaction allowed to connect two peptide chains via disulfide bridge, while in the second case allowed the cyclization of rationally designed peptides by an intramolecular disulfide bridge. Computational approaches helped to either drive de-novo design or suggest structural modifications and optimal oxidization protocols for disulfide-containing molecules. They are able to both predict and to rationalize the propensity of molecules to spontaneously fold in suitable conformations to achieve the right disulfide bridges.

  9. Chemical methods and approaches to the regioselective formation of multiple disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Shigeru; Katayama, Hidekazu; Okumura, Masaki; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide-bond formation plays an important role in the stabilization of the native conformation of peptides and proteins. In the case of multidisulfide-containing peptides and proteins, numerous folding intermediates are produced, including molecules that contain non-native and native disulfide bonds during in vitro folding. These intermediates can frequently be trapped covalently during folding and subsequently analyzed. The structural characterization of these kinetically trapped disulfide intermediates provides a clue to understanding the oxidative folding pathway. To investigate the folding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, in this unit, chemical methods are described for regulating regioselective disulfide formation (1) by using a combination of several types of thiol protecting groups, (2) by incorporating unique SeCys residues into a protein or peptide molecule, and (3) by combining with post-translational modification.

  10. Molecular Bases of Cyclic and Specific Disulfide Interchange between Human ERO1α Protein and Protein-disulfide Isomerase (PDI)*

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Shoji; Vavassori, Stefano; Fagioli, Claudio; Sitia, Roberto; Inaba, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human cells, ERO1α and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) constitute one of the major electron flow pathways that catalyze oxidative folding of secretory proteins. Specific and limited PDI oxidation by ERO1α is essential to avoid ER hyperoxidation. To investigate how ERO1α oxidizes PDI selectively among more than 20 ER-resident PDI family member proteins, we performed docking simulations and systematic biochemical analyses. Our findings reveal that a protruding β-hairpin of ERO1α specifically interacts with the hydrophobic pocket present in the redox-inactive PDI b′-domain through the stacks between their aromatic residues, leading to preferred oxidation of the C-terminal PDI a′-domain. ERO1α associated preferentially with reduced PDI, explaining the stepwise disulfide shuttle mechanism, first from ERO1α to PDI and then from oxidized PDI to an unfolded polypeptide bound to its hydrophobic pocket. The interaction of ERO1α with ERp44, another PDI family member protein, was also analyzed. Notably, ERO1α-dependent PDI oxidation was inhibited by a hyperactive ERp44 mutant that lacks the C-terminal tail concealing the substrate-binding hydrophobic regions. The potential ability of ERp44 to inhibit ERO1α activity may suggest its physiological role in ER redox and protein homeostasis. PMID:21398518

  11. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Edges of a Few Layer Molybdenum Disulfide Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Li, Meixian; Wang, Shuangbao; Wang, Peng; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2015-07-01

    The design and development of inexpensive highly efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen production underpins several emerging clean-energy technologies. In this work, for the first time, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanodots have been synthesized by ionic liquid assisted grinding exfoliation of bulk platelets and isolated by sequential centrifugation. The nanodots have a thickness of up to 7 layers (∼4 nm) and an average lateral size smaller than 20 nm. Detailed structural characterization established that the nanodots retained the crystalline quality and low oxidation states of the bulk material. The small lateral size and reduced number of layers provided these nanodots with an easier path for the electron transport and plentiful active sites for the catalysis of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic electrolyte. The MoS2 nanodots exhibited good durability and a Tafel slope of 61 mV dec(-1) with an estimated onset potential of -0.09 V vs RHE, which are considered among the best values achieved for 2H phase. It is envisaged that this work may provide a simplistic route to synthesize a wide range of 2D layered nanodots that have applications in water splitting and other energy related technologies.

  12. Macromolecule functionalization of disulfide-bonded polymer hydrogel capsules and cancer cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Olga; Postma, Almar; Yan, Yan; Scott, Andrew M; Heath, Joan K; Nice, Edouard C; Zelikin, Alexander N; Caruso, Frank

    2012-02-28

    We present a generic and versatile method for functionalization of disulfide-stabilized PMA hydrogel capsules (HCs) with macromolecules, including a number of specific antibodies to cancer cells. Functionalization was achieved by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVPON), which introduced biorelevant heterotelechelic end groups (thiol and amine) to the polymer chain. The PVPON with heterotelechelic end groups was conjugated to the outermost layer of PMA HCs through the thiol groups and reacted with biotin via the amine groups to generate PMA/PVPON(biotin) HCs. On the basis of the high specific interaction and high affinity between biotin and avidin, and its derivates, such as NeutrAvidin (NAv), we functionalized the PMA HCs with biotinylated antibodies. We demonstrate significantly enhanced cellular binding and internalization of the antibody (Ab)-functionalized capsules compared with control human immunoglobulin (IgG)-functionalized capsules, suggesting these capsules can specifically interact with cells through antibody/antigen recognition. We anticipate that the versatility of the functionalization approach reported in this study will assist in targeted therapeutic delivery applications.

  13. The optical response of monolayer, few-layer and bulk tungsten disulfide.

    PubMed

    Molas, Maciej R; Nogajewski, Karol; Slobodeniuk, Artur O; Binder, Johannes; Bartos, Miroslav; Potemski, Marek

    2017-09-14

    We present a comprehensive optical study of thin flakes of tungsten disulfide (WS2) with thickness ranging from mono- to octalayer and in the bulk limit. It is shown that the optical band-gap absorption of monolayer WS2 is governed by competing resonances arising from one neutral and two distinct negatively charged excitons whose contributions to the overall absorption of light vary as a function of temperature and carrier concentration. The photoluminescence response of monolayer WS2 is found to be largely dominated by disorder/impurity- and/or phonon-assisted recombination processes. The indirect band-gap luminescence in multilayer WS2 turns out to be a phonon-mediated process whose energy evolution with the number of layers surprisingly follows a simple model of a two-dimensional confinement. The energy position of the direct band-gap response (A and B resonances) is only weakly dependent on the layer thickness, which underlines an approximate compensation of the effect of the reduction of the exciton binding energy by the shrinkage of the apparent band gap. The A-exciton absorption-type spectra in multilayer WS2 display a non-trivial fine structure which results from the specific hybridization of the electronic states in the vicinity of the K-point of the Brillouin zone. The effects of temperature on the absorption-like and photoluminescence spectra of various WS2 layers are also quantified.

  14. Tunable Fabrication of Molybdenum Disulfide Quantum Dots for Intracellular MicroRNA Detection and Multiphoton Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenhao; Dong, Haifeng; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Cao, Yu; Lu, Huiting; Ma, Xinlei; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-09-02

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) quantum dots (QDs) (size <10 nm) possess attractive new properties due to the quantum confinement and edge effects as graphene QDs. However, the synthesis and application of MoS2 QDs has not been investigated in great detail. Here, a facile and efficient approach for synthesis of controllable-size MoS2 QDs with excellent photoluminescence (PL) by using a sulfuric acid-assisted ultrasonic route is developed for this investigation. Various MoS2 structures including monolayer MoS2 flake, nanoporous MoS2 , and MoS2 QDs can be yielded by simply controlling the ultrasonic durations. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic tools demonstrate that the MoS2 QDs have uniform lateral size and possess excellent excitation-independent blue PL. The as-generated MoS2 QDs show high quantum yield of 9.65%, long fluorescence lifetime of 4.66 ns, and good fluorescent stability over broad pH values from 4 to 10. Given the good intrinsic optical properties and large surface area combined with excellent physiological stability and biocompatibility, a MoS2 QDs-based intracellular microRNA imaging analysis system is successfully constructed. Importantly, the MoS2 QDs show good performance as multiphoton bioimaging labeling. The proposed synthesis strategy paves a new way for facile and efficient preparing MoS2 QDs with tunable-size for biomedical imaging and optoelectronic devices application.

  15. The moral basis of animal-assisted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Tzachi

    2006-01-01

    Is nonhuman animal-assisted therapy (AAT) a form of exploitation? After exploring possible moral vindications of AAT and after establishing a distinction between "use" and "exploitation," the essay distinguishes between forms of animal-assisted therapy that are morally unobjectionable and those modes of it that ought to be abolished.

  16. Human CD4 Metastability Is a Function of the Allosteric Disulfide Bond in Domain 2.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gavin R; Channell, Jennifer A; Forsyth, V Trevor; Haertlein, Michael; Mitchell, Edward P; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria; Cerutti, Nichole M

    2016-04-19

    CD4 is expressed on the surface of specific leukocytes where it plays a key role in the activation of immunostimulatory T-cells and acts as a primary receptor for HIV-1 entry. CD4 has four ecto-domains (D1-D4) of which D1, D2, and D4 contain disulfide bonds. Although disulfide bonds commonly serve structural or catalytic functions, a rare class of disulfide bonds possessing unusually high dihedral strain energy and a relative ease of reduction can impact protein function by shuffling their redox state. D2 of CD4 possesses one such "allosteric" disulfide. While it is becoming accepted that redox exchange of the D2 allosteric disulfide plays an essential role in regulating CD4 activity, the biophysical consequences of its reduction remain incompletely understood. By analyzing the hydrodynamic volume, secondary structure, and thermal stability of the reduced and nonreduced forms of the single D1 and D2 domains, as well as the various redox isomers of two domain CD4, we have shown that ablation of the allosteric disulfide bond in domain 2 results in both a favorable structural collapse and an increase in the stability of CD4. Conversely, ablating the structural disulfide of D1 results in destabilizing structural rearrangements in CD4. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which oxidoreduction of the D2 allosteric disulfide regulates CD4 function; they reveal the intrinsic disulfide-dependent metastability of D2 and illustrate that redox shuffling of the allosteric disulfide results in previously undescribed conformational changes in CD4 that are likely important for its interaction with its protein partners.

  17. Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Satoru; Kigawa, Takanori

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins is proposed. ► Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. ► DsbC catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds. ► Milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled BPTI and lysozyme C were obtained. ► Synthesized proteins were both catalytically functional and properly folded. -- Abstract: Many important therapeutic targets are secreted proteins with multiple disulfide bonds, such as antibodies, cytokines, hormones, and proteases. The preparation of these proteins for structural and functional analyses using cell-based expression systems still suffers from several issues, such as inefficiency, low yield, and difficulty in stable-isotope labeling. The cell-free (or in vitro) protein synthesis system has become a useful protein production method. The openness of the cell-free system allows direct control of the reaction environment to promote protein folding, making it well suited for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins. In this study, we developed the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate-based cell-free synthesis system for disulfide-containing proteins, which can produce sufficient amounts of functional proteins for NMR analyses. Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. In addition, disulfide isomerase, DsbC, catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds during the protein synthesis reaction. We successfully synthesized milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled higher eukaryotic proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and human lysozyme C (LYZ). The NMR spectra and functional analyses indicated that the synthesized proteins are both catalytically functional and properly folded. Thus, the cell-free system is useful for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins for structural and functional analyses.

  18. Peptide Bond Formation in Water Mediated by Carbon Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Leman, Luke J; Huang, Zheng-Zheng; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2015-09-01

    Demonstrating plausible nonenzymatic polymerization mechanisms for prebiotic monomers represents a fundamental goal in prebiotic chemistry. While a great deal is now known about the potentially prebiotic synthesis of amino acids, our understanding of abiogenic polymerization processes to form polypeptides is less well developed. Here, we show that carbon disulfide (CS2), a component of volcanic emission and sulfide mineral weathering, and a widely used synthetic reagent and solvent, promotes peptide bond formation in modest yields (up to ∼20%) from α-amino acids under mild aqueous conditions. Exposure of a variety of α-amino acids to CS2 initially yields aminoacyl dithiocarbamates, which in turn generate reactive 2-thiono-5-oxazolidone intermediates, the thio analogues of N-carboxyanhydrides. Along with peptides, thiourea and thiohydantoin species are produced. Amino acid stereochemistry was preserved in the formation of peptides. Our findings reveal that CS2 could contribute to peptide bond formation, and possibly other condensation reactions, in abiogenic settings.

  19. ALS-linked protein disulfide isomerase variants cause motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woehlbier, Ute; Colombo, Alicia; Saaranen, Mirva J; Pérez, Viviana; Ojeda, Jorge; Bustos, Fernando J; Andreu, Catherine I; Torres, Mauricio; Valenzuela, Vicente; Medinas, Danilo B; Rozas, Pablo; Vidal, Rene L; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Salameh, Johnny; Fernandez-Collemann, Sara; Muñoz, Natalia; Matus, Soledad; Armisen, Ricardo; Sagredo, Alfredo; Palma, Karina; Irrazabal, Thergiory; Almeida, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Paloma; Campero, Mario; Gao, Fen-Biao; Henny, Pablo; van Zundert, Brigitte; Ruddock, Lloyd W; Concha, Miguel L; Henriquez, Juan P; Brown, Robert H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-04-15

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis is a common feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) areERfoldases identified as possibleALSbiomarkers, as well as neuroprotective factors. However, no functional studies have addressed their impact on the disease process. Here, we functionally characterized fourALS-linked mutations recently identified in two majorPDIgenes,PDIA1 andPDIA3/ERp57. Phenotypic screening in zebrafish revealed that the expression of thesePDIvariants induce motor defects associated with a disruption of motoneuron connectivity. Similarly, the expression of mutantPDIs impaired dendritic outgrowth in motoneuron cell culture models. Cellular and biochemical studies identified distinct molecular defects underlying the pathogenicity of thesePDImutants. Finally, targetingERp57 in the nervous system led to severe motor dysfunction in mice associated with a loss of neuromuscular synapses. This study identifiesERproteostasis imbalance as a risk factor forALS, driving initial stages of the disease.

  20. Intercalation Pseudocapacitance of Exfoliated Molybdenum Disulfide for Ultrafast Energy Storage

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Hyun Deog; Li, Yifei; Liang, Yanliang; ...

    2016-05-23

    In this study, we report intercalation pseudocapacitance of 250 F g-1 for exfoliated molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in non-aqueous electrolytes that contain lithium ions. The exfoliated MoS2 shows surface-limited reaction kinetics with high rate capability up to 3 min of charge or discharge. The intercalation pseudocapacitance originates from the extremely fast kinetics due to the enhanced ionic and electronic transport enabled by the slightly expanded layer structure as well as the metallic 1T-phase. The exfoliated MoS2 could be also used in a Li-Mg-ion hybrid capacitor, which shows full cell specific capacitance of 240 F g-1.

  1. Annealing and transport studies of suspended molybdenum disulfide devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fenglin; Stepanov, Petr; Gray, Mason; Lau, Chun Ning

    2015-03-01

    We fabricate suspended molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field effect transistor devices and develop an effective gas annealing technique that significantly improves device quality and increases conductance by 3-4 orders of magnitude. Mobility of the suspended devices ranges from 0.01 to 46 cm2 V-1 s-1 before annealing, and from 0.5 to 105 cm2 V-1 s-1 after annealing. Temperature dependence measurements reveal two transport mechanisms: electron-phonon scattering at high temperatures and thermal activation over a gate-tunable barrier height at low temperatures. Our results suggest that transport in these devices is not limited by the substrates, but likely by defects, charge impurities and/or Schottky barriers at the metal-MoS2 interfaces. Finally, this suspended MoS2 device structure provides a versatile platform for other research areas, such as thermal, optical and mechanical studies.

  2. Intercalation Pseudocapacitance of Exfoliated Molybdenum Disulfide for Ultrafast Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun Deog; Li, Yifei; Liang, Yanliang; Lan, Yucheng; Wang, Feng; Yao, Yan

    2016-05-23

    In this study, we report intercalation pseudocapacitance of 250 F g-1 for exfoliated molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in non-aqueous electrolytes that contain lithium ions. The exfoliated MoS2 shows surface-limited reaction kinetics with high rate capability up to 3 min of charge or discharge. The intercalation pseudocapacitance originates from the extremely fast kinetics due to the enhanced ionic and electronic transport enabled by the slightly expanded layer structure as well as the metallic 1T-phase. The exfoliated MoS2 could be also used in a Li-Mg-ion hybrid capacitor, which shows full cell specific capacitance of 240 F g-1.

  3. Diameter-dependent wetting of tungsten disulfide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Goldbart, Ohad; Cohen, Sidney R; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Glazyrina, Polina; Wagner, H Daniel; Enyashin, Andrey; Tenne, Reshef

    2016-11-29

    The simple process of a liquid wetting a solid surface is controlled by a plethora of factors-surface texture, liquid droplet size and shape, energetics of both liquid and solid surfaces, as well as their interface. Studying these events at the nanoscale provides insights into the molecular basis of wetting. Nanotube wetting studies are particularly challenging due to their unique shape and small size. Nonetheless, the success of nanotubes, particularly inorganic ones, as fillers in composite materials makes it essential to understand how common liquids wet them. Here, we present a comprehensive wetting study of individual tungsten disulfide nanotubes by water. We reveal the nature of interaction at the inert outer wall and show that remarkably high wetting forces are attained on small, open-ended nanotubes due to capillary aspiration into the hollow core. This study provides a theoretical and experimental paradigm for this intricate problem.

  4. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G

    2016-10-21

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials.

  5. Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide composite for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyitanga, Theophile; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2017-10-01

    Graphite oxide and molybdenum disulfide (GO-MoS2) composite is prepared through a wet process by using hydrolysis of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and it exhibits excellent catalytic activity of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with a low overpotential of -0.47 V, which is almost two and three times lower than those of precursor MoS2 and GO. The high performance of HER of the composite attributes to the reduced GO supporting MoS2, providing a conducting network for fast electron transport from MoS2 to electrodes. The composite also shows high stability after 500 cycles, demonstrating a synergistic effect of MoS2 and GO for efficient HER.

  6. High Performance Molybdenum Disulfide Amorphous Silicon Heterojunction Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili-Rad, Mohammad R.; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2013-01-01

    One important use of layered semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could be in making novel heterojunction devices leading to functionalities unachievable using conventional semiconductors. Here we demonstrate a metal-semiconductor-metal heterojunction photodetector, made of MoS2 and amorphous silicon (a-Si), with rise and fall times of about 0.3 ms. The transient response does not show persistent (residual) photoconductivity, unlike conventional a-Si devices where it may last 3–5 ms, thus making this heterojunction roughly 10X faster. A photoresponsivity of 210 mA/W is measured at green light, the wavelength used in commercial imaging systems, which is 2−4X larger than that of a-Si and best reported MoS2 devices. The device could find applications in large area electronics, such as biomedical imaging, where a fast response is critical. PMID:23907598

  7. Temperature effect on optical spectra of monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Soklaski, Ryan; Liang, Yufeng; Yang, Li

    2014-05-12

    Recently, measured optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra reveal substantial frequency shifts of both exciton and trion peaks as monolayer molybdenum disulfide, MoS{sub 2}, is cooled from 363 K to 4 K. First-principles simulations using the GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation approach satisfactorily reproduce these frequency shifts by incorporating the thermal expansion effect. Studying these temperature effects in monolayer MoS{sub 2} is crucial for rectifying the results of available experiments with the previous predictions of zero-temperature-limit simulations. Moreover, our estimated thermal expansion coefficient of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is less than that of bulk counterpart by tracking the frequency shifts of the exciton peaks in optical spectra. This may serve as a convenient way to estimate thermal expansion coefficients of general two-dimensional chalcogenides.

  8. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials. PMID:27767030

  9. Intercalation Pseudocapacitance of Exfoliated Molybdenum Disulfide for Ultrafast Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun Deog; Li, Yifei; Liang, Yanliang; Lan, Yucheng; Wang, Feng; Yao, Yan

    2016-05-23

    In this study, we report intercalation pseudocapacitance of 250 F g-1 for exfoliated molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in non-aqueous electrolytes that contain lithium ions. The exfoliated MoS2 shows surface-limited reaction kinetics with high rate capability up to 3 min of charge or discharge. The intercalation pseudocapacitance originates from the extremely fast kinetics due to the enhanced ionic and electronic transport enabled by the slightly expanded layer structure as well as the metallic 1T-phase. The exfoliated MoS2 could be also used in a Li-Mg-ion hybrid capacitor, which shows full cell specific capacitance of 240 F g-1.

  10. Wet chemical thinning of molybdenum disulfide down to its monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Amara, Kiran Kumar; Chu, Leiqiang; Kumar, Rajeev; Toh, Minglin; Eda, Goki

    2014-09-01

    We report on the preparation of mono- and bi-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) from a bulk crystal by facile wet chemical etching. We show that concentrated nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) effectively etches thin MoS{sub 2} crystals from their edges via formation of MoO{sub 3}. Interestingly, etching of thin crystals on a substrate leaves behind unreacted mono- and bilayer sheets. The flakes obtained by chemical etching exhibit electronic quality comparable to that of mechanically exfoliated counterparts. Our findings indicate that the self-limiting chemical etching is a promising top-down route to preparing atomically thin crystals from bulk layer compounds.

  11. Insulator-metal transition of highly compressed carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Ranga P.; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Kim, Minseob; Tse, John S.

    2011-10-01

    We present integrated spectral, structural, resistance, and theoretical evidences for simple molecular CS2 transformations to an insulating black polymer with threefold carbon atoms at 9 GPa, then to a semiconducting polymer above 30 GPa, and finally to a metallic solid above 50 GPa. The metallic phase is a highly disordered three-dimensional network structure with fourfold carbon atoms at the carbon-sulfur distance of ˜1.70 Å. Based on first-principles calculations, we present two plausible structures for the metallic phase: α-chalcopyrite and tridymite, both of which exhibit metallic ground states and disordered diffraction features similar to that measured. We also present the phase and chemical transformation diagram for carbon disulfide, showing a large stability field of the metallic phase to 100 GPa and 800 K.

  12. Diameter-dependent wetting of tungsten disulfide nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Goldbart, Ohad; Cohen, Sidney R.; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Glazyrina, Polina; Wagner, H. Daniel; Enyashin, Andrey; Tenne, Reshef

    2016-01-01

    The simple process of a liquid wetting a solid surface is controlled by a plethora of factors—surface texture, liquid droplet size and shape, energetics of both liquid and solid surfaces, as well as their interface. Studying these events at the nanoscale provides insights into the molecular basis of wetting. Nanotube wetting studies are particularly challenging due to their unique shape and small size. Nonetheless, the success of nanotubes, particularly inorganic ones, as fillers in composite materials makes it essential to understand how common liquids wet them. Here, we present a comprehensive wetting study of individual tungsten disulfide nanotubes by water. We reveal the nature of interaction at the inert outer wall and show that remarkably high wetting forces are attained on small, open-ended nanotubes due to capillary aspiration into the hollow core. This study provides a theoretical and experimental paradigm for this intricate problem. PMID:27856759

  13. On the Formation of Cometary Carbon Disulfide (CS2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, M. H.; Ferrante, R. F.

    2009-09-01

    The formation of cometary CS molecules from carbon disulfide, CS2, was proposed about 20 years before the latter's detection in comet 122P/de Vico by Jackson et al. (2002). However, the origin of CS2 has received little attention from either experimentalists or theorists. As part of our on-going laboratory program to investigate cometary molecules we have examined chemical reactions that lead to CS2 in the solid state. Icy mixtures of known cometary molecules were proton irradiated near 10 K to doses of several eV per molecule. Mid-IR spectroscopy was used as an in situ probe to record both CS2 formation in the ices and the destruction of precursors. We find that the most likely route to cometary CS2 is through OCS by way of the S + CO reaction. - This work was funded by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics and Planetary Atmospheres programs.

  14. On the Formation of Cometary Carbon Disulfide (CS2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie; Moore, marla; Ferrante, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    The formation of cometary CS molecules from carbon disulfide, CS2 , was proposed about 20 years before the latter's detection in comet 122P/de Vico by Jackson et al. (2002). However, the origin of CS2 has received little attention from either experimentalists or theorists. As part of our on-going laboratory program to investigate cometary molecules we have examined chemical reactions that lead to CS2 in the solid state. Icy mixtures of known cometary molecules were proton irradiated near 10 K to doses of several eV per molecule. Mid-IR spectroscopy was used as an in situ probe to record both CS2 formation in the ices and the destruction of precursors. We find that the most likely route to cometary CS2 is through OCS by way of the S + CO reaction.

  15. Charge carrier transfer in tungsten disulfide - black phosphorus heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siqi; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xinwu; He, Jiaqi

    2017-09-27

    Photocarrier dynamics in tungsten disulfide - black phosphorus heterostructures were studied by time-resolved differential reflection measurements. The heterostructures were fabricated by stacking together monolayer WS2 and black phosphorus flakes that are both fabricated by mechanical exfoliation. Efficient and ultrafast transfer of photocarriers from WS2 to BP flakes was observed. This confirms the type-I band alignment of WS2/BP heterostructures that was predicted by theory. Accompanied with the photocarrier interlayer transfer process from WS2 to BP flakes, the change of the absorption of WS2 persists for several nanoseconds. These results promote the consciousness about the carrier dynamics of interlayer transfer process in van der Waals heterostructures and its application in optoelectronic devices. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Friction behavior of pulsed laser deposited tungsten disulfide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S. V.; Zabinski, J. S.; McDevitt, N. T.

    1995-01-01

    This reseach describes the friction behavior of pulsed laser-deposited tungsten disulfide films. A ball-on-flat apparatus, in which a 440C stainless steel ball was held on rotating disk coated with a WS2 film, was used as the test configuration. Friction measurements were made in dry nitrogen and in laboratory air. Wear surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The friction coefficient of the film in dry nitrogen was 0.04, and in laboratory air it rose to between 0.10 and 0.15. In the dry nitrogen case, friction induced some degree of crystallinity into the otherwise amorphous film, while rubbing in air mostly resulted in oxidation of the film. Transfer films formed in a dry environment were smooth, tenacious and formed in air were patchy and powdery in nature.

  17. Temperature-dependent morphology of chemical vapor grown molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yantao; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Monolayered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a 2D direct band gap semiconductor with promising potential applications. In this work, we observed the temperature dependency of the morphologies of MoS2 monolayers from chemical vapor deposition. At a low growing temperature below 850 °C, MoS2 flakes tend to be trianglular in shape. At 850–950 °C, hexagonal MoS2 flakes can be observed. While at a temperature over 950 °C, MoS2 flakes can form rectangular shapes. Complementary characterizations have been made to these samples. We also proposed a mechanism for such temperature-dependent shape evolution based on thermodynamic simulation.

  18. A frame shifted disulfide bridged analogue of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Boris; Kühn, Christian; Ehlert, Dennis K; Lindeberg, Gunnar; Lindman, Susanna; Karlén, Anders; Hallberg, Anders

    2003-03-20

    N-(2-Mercaptoethyl)glycine [NMGly] was incorporated into the 3 and 5 positions of angiotensin II and oxidized to give the corresponding cyclized disulfide c[NMGly(3,5)]Ang II. The binding affinity to the angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)) of this conformationally constrained analogue, which is related to the potent Ang II agonist c[Hcy(3,5)]Ang II, was examined. The analogue had no affinity to the AT(1) receptor. Theoretical conformational analysis was performed to compare the conformational characteristics of model compounds of c[Hcy(3,5)]Ang II and the frame shifted analogue c[NMGly(3,5)]Ang II in an attempt to explain the lack of affinity.

  19. Protein disulfide isomerase as a regulator of chloroplast translational activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungmook; Mayfield, S.P.

    1997-12-12

    Light-regulated translation of chloroplast messenger RNAs (mRNAs) requires transacting factors that interact with the 5{prime} untranslated region (UTR) of these mRNAs. Chloroplast polyadenylate-binding protein (cPABP) specifically binds to the 5{prime}-UTR of the psbA mRNA and is essential for translation of this mRNA. A protein disulfide isomeriase that is localized to the chloroplast and copurifies with cPABP was shown to modulate the binding of cPABP to the 5{prime}-UTR of the psbA mRNA by reversibly changing the redox status of cPaBP through redox potential or adenosine 5{prime}-diphosphate-dependent phosphorylation. This mechanism allows for a simple reversible switch regulating gene expression in the chloroplast. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Protein disulfide isomerase is essential for viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, R; Honey, N; Murant, S J; Bossier, P; Schultz, L; Montgomery, D; Ellis, R W; Freedman, R B; Tuite, M F

    1991-12-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is an enzyme involved in the catalysis of disulfide bond formation in secretory and cell-surface proteins. Using an oligodeoxyribonucleotide designed to detect the conserved 'thioredoxin-like' active site of vertebrate PDIs, we have isolated a gene encoding PDI from the lower eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The nucleotide sequence and deduced open reading frame of the cloned gene predict a 530-amino-acid (aa) protein of Mr 59,082 and a pI of 4.1, physical properties characteristic of mammalian PDIs. Furthermore, the aa sequence shows 30-32% identity with mammalian and avian PDI sequences and has a very similar overall organisation, namely the presence of two approx. 100-aa segments, each of which is repeated, with the most significant homologies to mammalian and avian PDIs being in the regions (a, a') that contain the conserved 'thioredoxin-like' active site. The N-terminal region has the characteristics of a cleavable secretory signal sequence and the C-terminal four aa (-His-Asp-Glu-Leu) are consistent with the protein being a component of the S. cerevisiae endoplasmic reticulum. Transformants carrying multiple copies of this gene (designated PDI1) have tenfold higher levels of PDI activity and overproduce a protein of the predicted Mr. The PDI1 gene is unique in the yeast genome and encodes a single 1.8-kb transcript that is not found in stationary phase cells. Disruption of the PDI1 gene is haplo-lethal indicating that the product of this gene is essential for viability.

  1. Impairment of thiol-disulfide homeostasis in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Vakkas; Kurdoglu, Zehra; Alisik, Murat; Cetin, Orkun; Korkmaz, Hilal; Surer, Hatice; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of severity of preeclampsia on thiol-disulfide homeostasis (TDH). A total of 108 participants were divided into three groups: Group 1 was composed of pregnant women with no obstetric complications, Group 2 included pregnant women with mild preeclampsia, and Group 3 consisted of pregnant women with severe preeclampsia. TDH parameters were determined, and comparisons of clinical and routine laboratory test findings were made in all groups. The serum native thiol level was 347.9 ± 27.4 in the control group, 237.2 ± 44.2 in the mild preeclampsia group, and 227.9 ± 53.1 in the severe preeclampsia group (p < 0.001). The serum total thiol level was 376.1 ± 31.9 in the control group, 261.8 ± 49.4 in the mild preeclampsia group, and 248.3 ± 57.4 in the severe preeclampsia group (p < 0.001). The disulfide level was 14.1 ± 5.6 in the control group, 12.3 ± 5.1 in the mild preeclampsia group, and 10.2 ± 4.8 in the severe preeclampsia group (p = 0.001). A significant correlation between impairment in degree of TDH and severity of preeclampsia was observed. TDH was impaired in women with preeclampsia, and this impairment increased with disease severity. Therefore, impaired TDH may have a role in the etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  2. Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Satoru; Kigawa, Takanori

    2013-02-08

    Many important therapeutic targets are secreted proteins with multiple disulfide bonds, such as antibodies, cytokines, hormones, and proteases. The preparation of these proteins for structural and functional analyses using cell-based expression systems still suffers from several issues, such as inefficiency, low yield, and difficulty in stable-isotope labeling. The cell-free (or in vitro) protein synthesis system has become a useful protein production method. The openness of the cell-free system allows direct control of the reaction environment to promote protein folding, making it well suited for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins. In this study, we developed the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate-based cell-free synthesis system for disulfide-containing proteins, which can produce sufficient amounts of functional proteins for NMR analyses. Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. In addition, disulfide isomerase, DsbC, catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds during the protein synthesis reaction. We successfully synthesized milligram quantities of functional (15)N-labeled higher eukaryotic proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and human lysozyme C (LYZ). The NMR spectra and functional analyses indicated that the synthesized proteins are both catalytically functional and properly folded. Thus, the cell-free system is useful for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins for structural and functional analyses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of protein disulfide conversion in vitro using a continuous flow dialysis system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Wang, Tian; Kaltenbrunner, Oliver; Chen, Kenneth; Flynn, Gregory C; Huang, Gang

    2013-01-15

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins are heterogeneous due to chemical and physical modifications. Understanding the impact of these modifications on drug safety and efficacy is critical for optimal process development and for setting reasonable specification limits. In this study, we describe the development of an in vitro continuous flow dialysis system to evaluate potential in vivo behavior of thiol adducted species and incorrectly disulfide bonded species of therapeutic proteins. The system is capable of maintaining the low-level cysteine concentrations found in human blood. Liabilities of cysteamine adducted species, incorrectly disulfide bonded species, and the correctly disulfide bonded form of an Fc-fusion protein were studied using this system. Results showed that 90% of the cysteamine adduct converted into the correctly disulfide bonded form and incorrectly disulfide bonded species in approximately 4 h under physiological conditions. Approximately 50% of incorrectly disulfide bonded species converted into the correctly bonded form in 2 days. These results provide valuable information on potential in vivo stability of the cysteamine adduct, incorrectly disulfide bonded species, and the correctly bonded form of the Fc-fusion protein. These are important considerations when evaluating the criticality of product quality attributes.

  4. Implication of disulfide bridge induced thermal reversibility, structural and functional stability for luciferase.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Mina; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Bohlooli, Mousa; Hong, Jun; Hadi-Alijanvand, Hamid; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Firefly luciferase is a relatively unstable protein and commonly loses its activity at room temperature because of structural changes. The structural and functional stability of this protein is critical for its enzymatic applications. Different approaches are applied to increase the stability of this enzyme such as designing of covalent cross-links (disulfide bonds). In this study, luciferase mutants containing one or two disulfide bonds were compared to the native protein for their for their structural, thermodynamic, and functional properties. Mutant forms of P. Pyralis luciferase A²⁹⁶C-A³²⁶C and A²⁹⁶C-A³²⁶C/P⁴⁵¹C-V⁴⁶⁹C were used. Thermodynamic and biophysical studies were carried out using UV-Vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism, luminescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). We observed that both mutant forms of the protein were more stable than the wild-type enzyme. However, the single disulfide bond containing mutant was structurally and functionally more stable than the mutant protein containing two disulfide bonds. Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of the single disulfide bond containing mutant protein was 7-folds greater than the wild type and the double disulfide bond proteins. The A²⁹⁶C-A³²⁶C mutation also increased the reversibility and disaggregation of the protein. The enhanced activity of the single disulfide bond mutant protein was contributed to the expansion of its active site cleft, which was confirmed by bioinformatics tools.

  5. Human β-defensin 4 with non-native disulfide bridges exhibit antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Human defensins play multiple roles in innate immunity including direct antimicrobial killing and immunomodulatory activity. They have three disulfide bridges which contribute to the stability of three anti-parallel β-strands. The exact role of disulfide bridges and canonical β-structure in the antimicrobial action is not yet fully understood. In this study, we have explored the antimicrobial activity of human β-defensin 4 (HBD4) analogs that differ in the number and connectivity of disulfide bridges. The cysteine framework was similar to the disulfide bridges present in μ-conotoxins, an unrelated class of peptide toxins. All the analogs possessed enhanced antimicrobial potency as compared to native HBD4. Among the analogs, the single disulfide bridged peptide showed maximum potency. However, there were no marked differences in the secondary structure of the analogs. Subtle variations were observed in the localization and membrane interaction of the analogs with bacteria and Candida albicans, suggesting a role for disulfide bridges in modulating their antimicrobial action. All analogs accumulated in the cytosol where they can bind to anionic molecules such as nucleic acids which would affect several cellular processes leading to cell death. Our study strongly suggests that native disulfide bridges or the canonical β-strands in defensins have not evolved for maximal activity but they play important roles in determining their antimicrobial potency.

  6. Redox potentials of protein disulfide bonds from free-energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjin; Baldus, Ilona B; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-04-30

    Thiol/disulfide exchange in proteins is a vital process in all organisms. To ensure specificity, the involved thermodynamics and kinetics are believed to be tailored by the structure and dynamics of the protein hosting the thiol/disulfide pair. We here aim at predicting the thermodynamics of thiol/disulfide pairs in proteins. We devise a free-energy calculation scheme, which makes use of the Crooks Gaussian intersection method to estimate the redox potential of thiol/disulfide pairs in 12 proteins belonging to the thioredoxin superfamily, namely, thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases in disulfide bond formation systems. We obtained a satisfying correlation of computed with experimental redox potentials (varying by 160 mV), with a residual error of ∼40 mV (8 kJ/mol), which drastically reduces when considering a less diverse set of only thioredoxins. Our simple and transferrable approach provides a route toward estimating redox potentials of any disulfide-containing protein given that its (reduced or oxidized) structure is known and thereby represents a step toward a rational design of redox proteins.

  7. Broad control of disulfide stability through microenvironmental effects and analysis in complex redox environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanliu; Wang, Shuo; Brülisauer, Lorine; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Gauthier, Marc A

    2013-07-08

    Disulfide bonds stabilize the tertiary- and quaternary structure of proteins. In addition, they can be used to engineer redox-sensitive (bio)materials and drug-delivery systems. Many of these applications require control of the stability of the disulfide bond. It has recently been shown that the charged microenvironment of the disulfide can be used to alter their stability by ∼3 orders of magnitude in a predictable and finely tunable manner at acidic pH. The aim of this work is to extend these findings to physiological pH and to demonstrate the validity of this approach in complex redox milieu. Disulfide microenvironments were manipulated synergistically with steric hindrance herein to control disulfide bond stability over ∼3 orders of magnitude at neutral pH. Control of disulfide stability through microenvironmental effects could also be observed in complex redox buffers (including serum) and in the presence of cells. Such fine and predictable control of disulfide properties is not achievable using other existing approaches. These findings provide easily implementable and general tools for controlling the responsiveness of biomaterials and drug delivery systems toward various local endogenous redox environments.

  8. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Vijay Kumar; Goel, Mohit; Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti; Swaminathan, Rajaram

    2014-01-01

    Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL) at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control) and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL) on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  9. Diallyl disulfide ameliorates gentamicin-induced oxidative stress and nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; González-Orozco, Ana E; Maldonado, Perla D; Barrera, Diana; Medina-Campos, Omar N; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2003-07-18

    Experimental evidences suggest a role of reactive oxygen species in gentamicin-induced nephropathy in rats. Therefore, we investigated if diallyl disulfide, a garlic-derived compound with antioxidant properties, has a renoprotective effect in this experimental model. Four groups of rats were studied: (1) control, (2) gentamicin treated subcutaneously with gentamicin (70 mg/kg/12 h/4 days), (3) diallyl disulfide treated intragastrically with diallyl disulfide (50 mg/kg/24 h/4 days), and (4) gentamicin + diallyl disulfide treated with gentamicin + diallyl disulfide. Gentamicin induced (a) nephrotoxicity, (b) increase in renal oxidative stress, and (c) decrease in the activity of manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. Diallyl disulfide ameliorated these changes induced by gentamicin. The mechanism by which diallyl disulfide has a renoprotective effect in gentamicin-induced acute renal failure in rats may be related, at least in part, to the amelioration in the oxidative stress and the preservation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes in kidney.

  10. Simple plate-based, parallel synthesis of disulfide fragments using the CuAAC click reaction.

    PubMed

    Turner, David M; Tom, Christopher T M B; Renslo, Adam R

    2014-12-08

    Disulfide exchange screening is a site-directed approach to fragment-based lead discovery that requires a bespoke library of disulfide-containing fragments. Previously, we described a simple one-pot, two-step synthesis of disulfide fragments from amine- or acid-bearing starting materials. Here, we describe the synthesis of disulfide fragments that bear a 1,4-substituted-1,2,3-triazole linkage between disulfide and molecular diversity element. This work establishes the compatibility of copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) chemistry with a one-pot, two-step reaction sequence that can be readily parallelized. We performed 96 reactions in a single deep-well microtiter plate, employing 48 alkynes and two different azide linker reagents. From this effort, a total of 81 triazole-containing disulfide fragments were obtained in useful isolated yields. Thus, CuAAC chemistry offers an experimentally convenient method to rapidly prepare disulfide fragments that are structurally distinct from fragments accessed via amide, sulfonamide, or isocyanate chemistries.

  11. An in vivo pathway for disulfide bond isomerization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rietsch, A; Belin, D; Martin, N; Beckwith, J

    1996-11-12

    Biochemical studies have shown that the periplasmic protein disulfide oxidoreductase DsbC can isomerize aberrant disulfide bonds. Here we present the first evidence for an in vivo role of DsbC in disulfide bond isomerization. Furthermore, our data suggest that the enzymes DsbA and DsbC play distinct roles in the cell in disulfide bond formation and isomerization, respectively. We have shown that mutants in dsbC display a defect in disulfide bond formation specific for proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. The defect can be complemented by the addition of reduced dithiothreitol to the medium, suggesting that absence of DsbC results in accumulation of misoxidized proteins. Mutations in the dipZ and trxA genes have similar phenotypes. We propose that DipZ, a cytoplasmic membrane protein with a thioredoxin-like domain, and thioredoxin, the product of the trxA gene, are components of a pathway for maintaining DsbC active as a protein disulfide bond isomerase.

  12. Thermodynamic and mechanical effects of disulfide bonds in CXCLl7 chemokine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Christopher

    Chemokines are a family of signaling proteins mainly responsible for the chemotaxis of leukocytes, where their biological activity is modulated by their oligomerization state. Here, the dynamics and thermodynamic stability are characterized in monomer and homodimer structures of CXCL7, one of the most abundant platelet chemokines. The effects of dimerization and disulfide bond formation are investigated using computational methods that include molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the Distance Constraint Model (DCM). A consistent picture emerges for the effect of dimerization and role of the Cys5-Cys31 and Cys7- Cys47 disulfide bonds. Surprisingly, neither disulfide bond is critical for maintaining structural stability in the monomer or dimer, although the monomer is destabilized more than the dimer upon removal of disulfide bonds. Instead, it is found that disulfide bonds influence the native state dynamics as well as modulates the relative stability between monomer and dimer. The combined analysis elucidates how CXCL7 is mechanically stable as a monomer, and how upon dimerization flexibly correlated motions are induced between the 30s and 50s loop within each monomer and across the dimer interface. Interestingly, the greatest gain in flexibility upon dimerization occurs when both disulfide bonds are present in each domain, and the homodimer is least stable relative to its two monomers. These results suggest the highly conserved disulfide bonds in chemokines facilitate a structural mechanism for distinguishing functional characteristics between monomer and dimer.

  13. The exploitation of Gestalt principles by magicians.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Anthony S

    2010-01-01

    Magicians exploit a host of psychological principles in deceiving their audiences. Psychologists have recently attempted to pinpoint the most common psychological tendencies exploited by magicians. This paper highlights two co-occurring principles that appear to be the basis for many popular magic tricks: accidental alignment and good continuation.

  14. Transitioning from AOP to IATA - Exploiting mechanistic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. . Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. .

  15. Characterization of disulfide bonds by planned digestion and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Na, Seungjin; Paek, Eunok; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Duwoon; Lee, Seung Jae; Kwon, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    The identification of disulfide bonds provides critical information regarding the structure and function of a protein and is a key aspect in understanding signaling cascades in biological systems. Recent proteomic approaches using digestion enzymes have facilitated the characterization of disulfide-bonds and/or oxidized products from cysteine residues, although these methods have limitations in the application of MS/MS. For example, protein digestion to obtain the native form of disulfide bonds results in short lengths of amino acids, which can cause ambiguous MS/MS analysis due to false positive identifications. In this study we propose a new approach, termed planned digestion, to obtain sufficient amino acid lengths after cleavage for proteomic approaches. Application of the DBond software to planned digestion of specific proteins accurately identified disulfide-linked peptides. RNase A was used as a model protein in this study because the disulfide bonds of this protein have been well characterized. Application of this approach to peptides digested with Asp-N/C (chemical digestion) and trypsin under acid hydrolysis conditions identified the four native disulfide bonds of RNase A. Missed cleavages introduced by trypsin treatment for only 3 hours generated sufficient lengths of amino acids for identification of the disulfide bonds. Analysis using MS/MS successfully showed additional fragmentation patterns that are cleavage products of S-S and C-S bonds of disulfide-linkage peptides. These fragmentation patterns generate thioaldehydes, persulfide, and dehydroalanine. This approach of planned digestion with missed cleavages using the DBond algorithm could be applied to other proteins to determine their disulfide linkage and the oxidation patterns of cysteine residues.

  16. Light-induced disulfide dimerization of recoverin under ex vivo and in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Nazipova, Aliya A; Gancharova, Olga S; Kazakov, Alexey S; Serebryakova, Marina V; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Tikhomirova, Natalya K; Senin, Ivan I; Philippov, Pavel P; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2015-06-01

    Despite vast knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying photochemical damage of photoreceptors, linked to progression of age-related macular degeneration, information on specific protein targets of the light-induced oxidative stress is scarce. Here, we demonstrate that prolonged intense illumination (halogen bulb, 1500 lx, 1-5 h) of mammalian eyes under ex vivo (cow) or in vivo (rabbit) conditions induces disulfide dimerization of recoverin, a Ca(2+)-dependent inhibitor of rhodopsin kinase. Western blotting and mass spectrometry analysis of retinal extracts reveals illumination time-dependent accumulation of disulfide homodimers of recoverin and its higher order disulfide cross-linked species, including a minor fraction of mixed disulfides with intracellular proteins (tubulins, etc.). Meanwhile, monomeric bovine recoverin remains mostly reduced. These effects are accompanied by accumulation of disulfide homodimers of visual arrestin. Histological studies demonstrate that the light-induced oxidation of recoverin and arrestin occurs in intact retina (illumination for 2 h), while illumination for 5 h is associated with damage of the photoreceptor layer. A comparison of ex vivo levels of disulfide homodimers of bovine recoverin with redox dependence of its in vitro thiol-disulfide equilibrium (glutathione redox pair) gives the lowest estimate of redox potential in rod outer segments under illumination from -160 to -155 mV. Chemical crosslinking and dynamic light scattering data demonstrate an increased propensity of disulfide dimer of bovine recoverin to multimerization/aggregation. Overall, the oxidative stress caused by the prolonged intense illumination of retina might affect rhodopsin desensitization via concerted disulfide dimerization of recoverin and arrestin. The developed herein models of eye illumination are useful for studies of the light-induced thiol oxidation of visual proteins.

  17. The influence of disulfide bonds on the mechanical stability of proteins is context dependent.

    PubMed

    Manteca, Aitor; Alonso-Caballero, Álvaro; Fertin, Marie; Poly, Simon; De Sancho, David; Perez-Jimenez, Raul

    2017-08-11

    Disulfide bonds play a crucial role in proteins, modulating their stability and constraining their conformational dynamics. A particularly important case is that of proteins that need to withstand forces arising from their normal biological function and that are often disulfide bonded. However, the influence of disulfides on the overall mechanical stability of proteins is poorly understood. Here, we used single-molecule force spectroscopy (smFS) to study the role of disulfide bonds in different mechanical proteins in terms of their unfolding forces. For this purpose, we chose the pilus protein FimG from Gram-negative bacteria and a disulfide-bonded variant of the I91 human cardiac titin polyprotein. Our results show that disulfide bonds can alter the mechanical stability of proteins in different ways depending on the properties of the system. Specifically, disulfide-bonded FimG undergoes a 30% increase in its mechanical stability compared with its reduced counterpart, whereas the unfolding force of I91 domains experiences a decrease of 15% relative to the WT form. Using a coarse-grained simulation model, we rationalized that the increase in mechanical stability of FimG is due to a shift in the mechanical unfolding pathway. The simple topology-based explanation suggests a neutral effect in the case of titin. In summary, our results indicate that disulfide bonds in proteins act in a context-dependent manner rather than simply as mechanical lockers, underscoring the importance of considering disulfide bonds both computationally and experimentally when studying the mechanical properties of proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. A New Measure of Interpersonal Exploitativeness

    PubMed Central

    Brunell, Amy B.; Davis, Mark S.; Schley, Dan R.; Eng, Abbey L.; van Dulmen, Manfred H.M.; Wester, Kelly L.; Flannery, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Measures of exploitativeness evidence problems with validity and reliability. The present set of studies assessed a new measure [the Interpersonal Exploitativeness Scale (IES)] that defines exploitativeness in terms of reciprocity. In Studies 1 and 2, 33 items were administered to participants. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that a single factor consisting of six items adequately assess interpersonal exploitativeness. Study 3 results revealed that the IES was positively associated with “normal” narcissism, pathological narcissism, psychological entitlement, and negative reciprocity and negatively correlated with positive reciprocity. In Study 4, participants competed in a commons dilemma. Those who scored higher on the IES were more likely to harvest a greater share of resources over time, even while controlling for other relevant variables, such as entitlement. Together, these studies show the IES to be a valid and reliable measure of interpersonal exploitativeness. The authors discuss the implications of these studies. PMID:23755031

  19. Processes of carbon disulfide degradation under the action of a pulsed corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, D. L.; Filatov, I. E.; Uvarin, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on decomposition of carbon disulfide CS2 in air under the action of a pulsed nanosecond corona discharge have been carried out. The energetic efficiency of the degradation amounted to 290-340 g (kW h)-1, which is significantly higher than with the use of a corona discharge at a constant voltage. The main degradation products are sulfur dioxide SO2, carbonyl sulfide COS, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. Processes occurring in pulsed corona discharge plasma and leading to carbon disulfide degradation are considered. Different methods of air purification from carbon disulfide are compared.

  20. Native Conformation and Canonical Disulfide Bond Formation Are Interlinked Properties of HIV-1 Env Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Go, Eden P.; Cupo, Albert; Ringe, Rajesh; Pugach, Pavel; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated whether there is any association between a native-like conformation and the presence of only the canonical (i.e., native) disulfide bonds in the gp120 subunits of a soluble recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein. We used a mass spectrometry (MS)-based method to map the disulfide bonds present in nonnative uncleaved gp140 proteins and native-like SOSIP.664 trimers based on the BG505 env gene. Our results show that uncleaved gp140 proteins were not homogeneous, in that substantial subpopulations (20 to 80%) contained aberrant disulfide bonds. In contrast, the gp120 subunits of the native-like SOSIP.664 trimer almost exclusively retained the canonical disulfide bond pattern. We also observed that the purification method could influence the proportion of an Env protein population that contained aberrant disulfide bonds. We infer that gp140 proteins may always contain a variable but substantial proportion of aberrant disulfide bonds but that the impact of this problem can be minimized via design and/or purification strategies that yield native-like trimers. The same factors may also be relevant to the production and purification of monomeric gp120 proteins that are free of aberrant disulfide bonds. IMPORTANCE It is widely thought that a successful HIV-1 vaccine will include a recombinant form of the Env protein, a trimer located on the virion surface. To increase yield and simplify purification, Env proteins are often made in truncated, soluble forms. A consequence, however, can be the loss of the native conformation concomitant with the virion-associated trimer. Moreover, some soluble recombinant Env proteins contain aberrant disulfide bonds that are not expected to be present in the native trimer. To assess whether these observations are linked, to determine the extent of disulfide bond scrambling, and to understand why scrambling occurs, we determined the disulfide bond profiles of two soluble Env

  1. Site-Selective Disulfide Modification of Proteins: Expanding Diversity beyond the Proteome.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Seah Ling; Wang, Tao; Weil, Tanja

    2016-11-21

    The synthetic transformation of polypeptides with molecular accuracy holds great promise for providing functional and structural diversity beyond the proteome. Consequently, the last decade has seen an exponential growth of site-directed chemistry to install additional features into peptides and proteins even inside living cells. The disulfide rebridging strategy has emerged as a powerful tool for site-selective modifications since most proteins contain disulfide bonds. In this Review, we present the chemical design, advantages and limitations of the disulfide rebridging reagents, while summarizing their relevance for synthetic customization of functional protein bioconjugates, as well as the resultant impact and advancement for biomedical applications.

  2. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2016-12-12

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 10(4) in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  3. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T.; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K.; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H.; Pattison, David I.; Davies, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 104 in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  4. Kinetics and intracellular location of intramolecular disulfide bond formation mediated by the cytoplasmic redox system encoded by vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bisht, Himani; Brown, Erica; Moss, Bernard

    2010-03-15

    Poxviruses encode a redox system for intramolecular disulfide bond formation in cytoplasmic domains of viral proteins. Our objectives were to determine the kinetics and intracellular location of disulfide bond formation. The vaccinia virus L1 myristoylated membrane protein, used as an example, has three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Reduced and disulfide-bonded forms of L1 were distinguished by electrophoretic mobility and reactivity with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Because disulfide bonds formed during 5 min pulse labeling with radioactive amino acids, a protocol was devised in which dithiothreitol was present at this step. Disulfide bond formation was detected by 2 min after removal of reducing agent and was nearly complete in 10 min. When the penultimate glycine residue was mutated to prevent myristoylation, L1 was mistargeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and disulfide bond formation failed to occur. These data suggested that viral membrane association was required for oxidation of L1, providing specificity for the process.

  5. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T.; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K.; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H.; Pattison, David I.; Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 104 in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins. PMID:27941824

  6. Identifying the presence of a disulfide linkage in peptides by the selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide from collisionally activated alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Beauchamp, J L

    2008-01-30

    We report a new method for identifying disulfide linkages in peptides using mass spectrometry. This is accomplished by collisional activation of singly charged cationic alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes, which results in the highly selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide (H2S2). Complexes of peptides possessing disulfide bonds with sodium and alkaline earth metal are generated using electrospray ionization (ESI). Isolation followed by collision induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged peptide complexes results in selective elimination of H2S2 to leave newly formed dehydroalanine residues in the peptide. Further activation of the product yields sequence information in the region previously short circuited by the disulfide bond. For example, singly charged magnesium and calcium ion bound complexes of [Lys8]-vasopressin exhibit selective elimination of H2S2 via low-energy CID. Further isolation of the product followed by CID yields major b- and z-type fragments revealing the peptide sequence in the region between the newly formed dehydroalanine residues. Numerous model peptides provide mechanistic details for the selective elimination of H2S2. The process is initiated starting with a metal stabilized enolate anion at Cys, followed by cleavage of the S-C bond. An examination of the peptic digest of insulin provides an example of the application of the selective elimination of H2S2 for the identification of peptides with disulfide linkages. The energetics and mechanisms of H2S2 elimination from model compounds are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  7. Combined use of ion mobility and collision-induced dissociation to investigate the opening of disulfide bridges by electron-transfer dissociation in peptides bearing two disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Massonnet, Philippe; Upert, Gregory; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications (PTMs) often found in peptides and proteins. They increase their stability toward enzymatic degradations and provide the structure and (consequently) the activity of such folded proteins. The characterization of disulfide patterns, i.e., the cysteine connectivity, is crucial to achieve a global picture of the active conformation of the protein of interest. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) constitutes a valuable tool to cleave the disulfide bonds in the gas phase, avoiding chemical reduction/alkylation in solution. To characterize the cysteine pairing, the present work proposes (i) to reduce by ETD one of the two disulfide bridges of model peptides, resulting in the opening of the cyclic structures, (ii) to separate the generated species by ion mobility, and (iii) to characterize the species using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Results of this strategy applied to several peptides show different behaviors depending on the connectivity. The loss of SH· radical species, observed for all the peptides, confirms the cleavage of the disulfides during the ETD process.

  8. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a novel indicator of oxidative stress in children with simple febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Bahri; Erel, Özcan; Ersavaş, Dilek; Yürümez, Yusuf

    2017-08-14

    Simple febrile seizures are generally benign, but during the seizure, elevated levels of glutamate and high levels of oxygen use due to the high metabolic brain activity result in oxidative stress. However, the relationship between febrile seizures and oxidative stress remains unclear. In this study, we investigated thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a new oxidative stress parameter in patients with simple febrile seizures. This study was performed between February 2016 and May 2016 at the Pediatric Emergency Unit. The study population consisted of 40 patients with a diagnosis of simple febrile seizure and 30 control participants aged 8-59 months. Total thiol, native thiol and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, disulfide/total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratios were used as thiol/disulfide homeostasis parameters and were quantified in patient and control groups. Furthermore, correlations with seizure duration were investigated. In the patient group, native and total thiol levels and native thiol/total thiol ratios were low, and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, and disulfide/total thiol ratios were significantly higher than in the control group. Negative correlations were observed between seizure duration, total and native thiol levels, and native thiol/total thiol ratio, whereas positive correlations were observed between seizure duration and disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratio. The sensitivities of both disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratios were high for simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures may cause impairment in favor of disulfide bonds in thiol/disulfide homeostasis. Overall, these changes may contribute to neuronal cell damage after simple febrile seizures.

  9. Herbivory eliminates fitness costs of mutualism exploiters.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Anna K; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-04-01

    A common empirical observation in mutualistic interactions is the persistence of variation in partner quality and, in particular, the persistence of exploitative phenotypes. For mutualisms between hosts and symbionts, most mutualism theory assumes that exploiters always impose fitness costs on their host. We exposed legume hosts to mutualistic (nitrogen-fixing) and exploitative (non-nitrogen-fixing) symbiotic rhizobia in field conditions, and manipulated the presence or absence of insect herbivory to determine if the costly fitness effects of exploitative rhizobia are context-dependent. Exploitative rhizobia predictably reduced host fitness when herbivores were excluded. However, insects caused greater damage on hosts associating with mutualistic rhizobia, as a consequence of feeding preferences related to leaf nitrogen content, resulting in the elimination of fitness costs imposed on hosts by exploitative rhizobia. Our experiment shows that herbivory is potentially an important factor in influencing the evolutionary dynamic between legumes and rhizobia. Partner choice and host sanctioning are theoretically predicted to stabilize mutualisms by reducing the frequency of exploitative symbionts. We argue that herbivore pressure may actually weaken selection on choice and sanction mechanisms, thus providing one explanation of why host-based discrimination mechanisms may not be completely effective in eliminating nonbeneficial partners.

  10. Global Climate Responses to Anthropogenic Groundwater Exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.; Xie, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a groundwater exploitation scheme is incorporated into the earth system model, Community Earth System Model 1.2.0 (CESM1.2.0), which is called CESM1.2_GW, and the climatic responses to anthropogenic groundwater withdrawal are then investigated on global scale. The scheme models anthropogenic groundwater exploitation and consumption, which are then divided into agricultural irrigation, industrial use and domestic use. A group of 41-year ensemble groundwater exploitation simulations with six different initial conditions, and a group of ensemble control simulations without exploitation are conducted using the developed model CESM1.2_GW with water supplies and demands estimated. The results reveal that the groundwater exploitation and water consumption cause drying effects on soil moisture in deep layers and wetting effects in upper layers, along with a rapidly declining groundwater table in Central US, Haihe River Basin in China and Northern India and Pakistan where groundwater extraction are most severe in the world. The atmosphere also responds to anthropogenic groundwater exploitation. Cooling effects on lower troposphere appear in large areas of North China Plain and of Northern India and Pakistan. Increased precipitation occurs in Haihe River Basin due to increased evapotranspiration from irrigation. Decreased precipitation occurs in Northern India because water vapor here is taken away by monsoon anomalies induced by anthropogenic alteration of groundwater. The local reducing effects of anthropogenic groundwater exploitation on total terrestrial water storage evinces that water resource is unsustainable with the current high exploitation rate. Therefore, a balance between slow groundwater withdrawal and rapid human economic development must be achieved to maintain a sustainable water resource, especially in over-exploitation regions such as Central US, Northern China, India and Pakistan.

  11. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding.

    PubMed

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael; Pihl, Heidi; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Johnsen, Anders H; Frimurer, Thomas M; Karlshøj, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-07-29

    Chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune system and are linked to several human diseases. The initial contact of chemokines with their receptors depends on highly specified extracellular receptor features. Here we investigate the importance of conserved extracellular disulfide bridges and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action in CCR8. We find that the seven-transmembrane (TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix III (TMIII) and ECL-2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only for chemokines. Furthermore, we find that two distinct aromatic residues in ECL-2, Tyr(184) (Cys + 1) and Tyr(187) (Cys + 4), are crucial for binding of the CC chemokines CCL1 (agonist) and MC148 (antagonist), respectively, but not for small molecule binding. Finally, using in silico modeling, we predict an aromatic cluster of interaction partners for Tyr(187) in TMIV (Phe(171)) and TMV (Trp(194)). We show in vitro that these residues are crucial for the binding and action of MC148, thus supporting their participation in an aromatic cluster with Tyr(187) This aromatic cluster appears to be present in a large number of CC chemokine receptors and thereby could play a more general role to be exploited in future drug development targeting these receptors. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C.; Lückmann, Michael; Pihl, Heidi; Larsen, Olav; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Johnsen, Anders H.; Frimurer, Thomas M.; Karlshøj, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune system and are linked to several human diseases. The initial contact of chemokines with their receptors depends on highly specified extracellular receptor features. Here we investigate the importance of conserved extracellular disulfide bridges and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL-2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action in CCR8. We find that the seven-transmembrane (TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix III (TMIII) and ECL-2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only for chemokines. Furthermore, we find that two distinct aromatic residues in ECL-2, Tyr184 (Cys + 1) and Tyr187 (Cys + 4), are crucial for binding of the CC chemokines CCL1 (agonist) and MC148 (antagonist), respectively, but not for small molecule binding. Finally, using in silico modeling, we predict an aromatic cluster of interaction partners for Tyr187 in TMIV (Phe171) and TMV (Trp194). We show in vitro that these residues are crucial for the binding and action of MC148, thus supporting their participation in an aromatic cluster with Tyr187. This aromatic cluster appears to be present in a large number of CC chemokine receptors and thereby could play a more general role to be exploited in future drug development targeting these receptors. PMID:27226537

  13. Effects of adding low levels of a disulfide reducing agent on the disulfide interactions of β-lactoglobulin and κ-casein in skim milk.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen H A; Wong, Marie; Anema, Skelte G; Havea, Palatasa; Guyomarc'h, Fanny

    2012-03-07

    Low concentrations of a disulfide reducing agent were added to unheated and heated (80 °C for 30 min) skim milk, with and without added whey protein. The reduction of the β-lactoglobulin and κ-casein disulfide bonds was monitored over time using electrophoresis. The distribution of the proteins between the colloidal and serum phases was also investigated. κ-Casein disulfide bonds were reduced in preference to those of β-lactoglobulin in both unheated and heated skim milk (with or without added whey protein). In addition, in heated skim milk, while the serum κ-casein was reduced more readily than the colloidal κ-casein, the distribution of κ-casein between the two phases was not affected.

  14. Heterologous expression of five disulfide-bonded insecticidal spider peptides.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Georgina; Silva, Anita O; Villegas, Elba; Ortiz, Ernesto; Beirão, Paulo S L; Corzo, Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    The genes of the five disulfide-bonded peptide toxins 1 and 2 (named Oxytoxins or Oxotoxins) from the spider Oxyopes lineatus were cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage region. These two recombinant vectors were transfected into Escherichia coli BL21 cells and expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). The product of each gene was named HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2, and the protein expression was ca 14 and 6 mg/L of culture medium, respectively. Either recombinant toxin HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 were found exclusively in inclusion bodies, which were solubilized using a chaotropic agent, and then, purified using affinity chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). The HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 products, obtained from the affinity chromatographic step, showed several peptide fractions having the same molecular mass of 9913.1 and 8030.1 Da, respectively, indicating that both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 were oxidized forming several distinct disulfide bridge arrangements. The isoforms of both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 after DTT reduction eluted from the column as a single protein component of 9923 and 8040 Da, respectively. In vitro folding of either HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 yielded single oxidized components, which were cleaved independently by the proteolytic enzyme Factor Xa to give the recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2. The experimental molecular masses of rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 were 8059.0 and 6176.4 Da, respectively, which agree with their expected theoretical masses. The recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 showed lower but comparable toxicity to the native toxins when injected into lepidopteran larvae; furthermore, rOxyTx1 was able to inhibit calcium ion currents on dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons from Periplaneta americana.

  15. The interdomain disulfide bond of a homogeneous rabbit pneumococcal antibody light chain.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, A D; Margolies, M N; Haber, E

    1975-11-01

    Rabbit light chain 3315, prepared from a homogeneous antipneumococcal antibody, was subjected to hydrolysis by pepsin without prior reduction and alkylation of the intrachain disulfide bonds. Gel filtration of the hydrolysate on Sephadex G-10, G-15, and G-25 and ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sephadex yielded several disulfide bridge peptides. These were fully reduced and alkulated and sequenced by Edman degradation. The peptides were located in the light chain sequence determined in independent studies from our laboratory. The half-cystine residues in this KB rabbit chain are located at positions 23, 80, 88, 134, 171, 194, and 214. The extra disulfide bridge extends between residues 80 and 171, thus joining the variable and constant domains. This is consistent with x-ray diffraction crystallographic studies showing that the corresponding residues in human light chains are separated by a distance compatible with disulfide bond formation.

  16. Diaminodiacid Bridges to Improve Folding and Tune the Bioactivity of Disulfide-Rich Peptides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ye; Sun, De-Meng; Wang, Feng-Liang; He, Yao; Liu, Lei; Tian, Chang-Lin

    2015-11-23

    Disulfide-rich peptides containing three or more disulfide bonds are promising therapeutic and diagnostic agents, but their preparation is often limited by the tedious and low-yielding folding process. We found that a single cystine-to-diaminodiacid replacement could significantly increase the folding efficiency of disulfide-rich peptides and thus improve their production yields. The practicality of this strategy was demonstrated by the synthesis and folding of derivatives of the μ-conotoxin SIIIA, the preclinical hormone hepcidin, and the trypsin inhibitor EETI-II. NMR and X-ray crystallography studies confirmed that these derivatives of disulfide-rich peptide retained the correct three-dimensional conformations. Moreover, the cystine-to-diaminodiacid replacement enabled structural tuning, thereby leading to an EETI-II derivative with higher bioactivity than the native peptide. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The Mitochondrial Disulfide Relay System: Roles in Oxidative Protein Folding and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation drives protein import of most proteins of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). The main components of this disulfide relay machinery are the oxidoreductase Mia40 and the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1/ALR. Their precise functions have been elucidated in molecular detail for the yeast and human enzymes in vitro and in intact cells. However, we still lack knowledge on how Mia40 and Erv1/ALR impact cellular and organism physiology and whether they have functions beyond their role in disulfide bond formation. Here we summarize the principles of oxidation-dependent protein import mediated by the mitochondrial disulfide relay. We proceed by discussing recently described functions of Mia40 in the hypoxia response and of ALR in influencing mitochondrial morphology and its importance for tissue development and embryogenesis. We also include a discussion of the still mysterious function of Erv1/ALR in liver regeneration. PMID:24348563

  18. Direct palladium-mediated on-resin disulfide formation from Allocam protected peptides.

    PubMed

    Kondasinghe, Thilini D; Saraha, Hasina Y; Odeesho, Samantha B; Stockdill, Jennifer L

    2017-04-05

    The synthesis of disulfide-containing polypeptides represents a long-standing challenge in peptide chemistry, and broadly applicable methods for the construction of disulfides are in constant demand. Few strategies exist for on-resin formation of disulfides directly from their protected counterparts. We present herein a novel strategy for the on-resin construction of disulfides directly from Allocam-protected cysteines. Our palladium-mediated approach is mild and uses readily available reagents, requiring no special equipment. No reduced peptide intermediates or S-allylated products are observed, and no residual palladium can be detected in the final products. The utility of this method is demonstrated through the synthesis of the C-carboxy analog of oxytocin.

  19. Evaluation of disulfide reduction during receptor-mediated endocytosis by using FRET imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Chen, Hongtao; Vlahov, Iontcho R; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Low, Philip S

    2006-09-12

    Despite functional evidence for disulfide bond-reducing activity in endosomal compartments, the mechanistic details pertaining to such process (e.g., kinetics and sites of disulfide reduction) remain largely controversial. To address these questions directly, we have synthesized a previously uncharacterized fluorescent folate conjugate, folate-(BODIPY FL)-SS-rhodamine (folate-FRET), that changes fluorescence from red to green upon disulfide bond reduction. Using this construct, we have observed that disulfide reduction: (i) occurs with a half-time of 6 h after folate-FRET endocytosis, (ii) begins in endosomes and does not depend significantly on redox machinery located on the cell surface or within the lysosome or the Golgi apparatus, (iii) occurs independently of endocytic vesicle trafficking along microtubules, and (iv) yields products that are subsequently sorted into distinct endosomes and trafficked in different directions. Finally, colocalization of folate and transferrin receptors suggest that conclusions derived from this study may apply to other endocytic pathways.

  20. Intense-Field Photoionization of Molecules using Ultrashort Radiation Pulses: Carbon Disulfide and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Joshua; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the photoionization and photofragmentation of molecules using intense fields from an 800 nm, femtosecond laser source and an experimental method that eliminates the focal volume effect without the need for data deconvolution. Targets include carbon disulfide and carbon dioxide. We show that ionization is insignificant for intensities that maximize alignment of carbon disulfide, which validates ultrafast electron diffraction experiments from aligned carbon disulfide. For comparison, we also investigate the analogous molecule carbon dioxide. In this molecule the molecular bonding orbitals include the n = 2 atomic orbitals of the oxygen atom, while in carbon disulfide the n = 3 orbitals of the sulfur atom contribute to the bonding. Recent work will be presented. This work supported by U.S. Dept. of Education GAANN Grants Nos. P200A090156 and P200A120188 and National Science Foundation EPSCoR RII Track-2 CA Award No. IIA-1430519 (Cooperative Nebraska-Kansas Grant).

  1. Rapid expansion of the protein disulfide isomerase gene family facilitates the folding of venom peptides

    PubMed Central

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Li, Qing; Jackson, Ronneshia L.; Song, Albert S.; Boomsma, Wouter; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Gruber, Christian W.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of correct disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum is a crucial step for folding proteins destined for secretion. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) play a central role in this process. We report a previously unidentified, hypervariable family of PDIs that represents the most diverse gene family of oxidoreductases described in a single genus to date. These enzymes are highly expressed specifically in the venom glands of predatory cone snails, animals that synthesize a remarkably diverse set of cysteine-rich peptide toxins (conotoxins). Enzymes in this PDI family, termed conotoxin-specific PDIs, significantly and differentially accelerate the kinetics of disulfide-bond formation of several conotoxins. Our results are consistent with a unique biological scenario associated with protein folding: The diversification of a family of foldases can be correlated with the rapid evolution of an unprecedented diversity of disulfide-rich structural domains expressed by venomous marine snails in the superfamily Conoidea. PMID:26957604

  2. Catalysis of Protein Folding by Protein Disulfide Isomerase and Small-Molecule Mimics

    PubMed Central

    KERSTEEN, ELIZABETH A.; RAINES, RONALD T.

    2010-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the formation of native disulfide pairings in secretory proteins. The ability of PDI to act as a disulfide isomerase makes it an essential enzyme in eukaryotes. PDI also fulfills other important roles. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of PDI as an oxidant in the endoplasmic reticulum. Intriguing questions remain regarding how PDI is able to catalyze both isomerization and oxidation in vivo. Studies of PDI and its homologs have led to the development of small-molecule folding catalysts that are able to accelerate disulfide isomerization in vitro and in vivo. PDI will continue to provide both an inspiration for the design of such artificial foldases and a benchmark with which to gauge the success of those designs. Here, we review current understanding of the chemistry and biology of PDI, its homologs, and small molecules that mimic its catalytic activity. PMID:13678529

  3. Generation of a Multicomponent Library of Disulfide Donor-Acceptor Architectures Using Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Kołodziejski, Michał; Markiewicz, Grzegorz; Jenczak, Anna; Stefankiewicz, Artur R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the generation of new donor-acceptor disulfide architectures obtained in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The application of a dynamic combinatorial chemistry approach allowed us to generate a large number of new disulfide macrocyclic architectures together with a new type of [2]catenanes consisting of four distinct components. Up to fifteen types of structurally-distinct dynamic architectures have been generated through one-pot disulfide exchange reactions between four thiol-functionalized aqueous components. The distribution of disulfide products formed was found to be strongly dependent on the structural features of the thiol components employed. This work not only constitutes a success in the synthesis of topologically- and morphologically-complex targets, but it may also open new horizons for the use of this methodology in the construction of molecular machines. PMID:26193265

  4. Conferring specificity in redox pathways by enzymatic thiol/disulfide exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Netto, Luis Eduardo S; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Tairum, Carlos A; da Silva Neto, José Freire

    2016-01-01

    Thiol-disulfide exchange reactions are highly reversible, displaying nucleophilic substitutions mechanism (S(N)2 type). For aliphatic, low molecular thiols, these reactions are slow, but can attain million times faster rates in enzymatic processes. Thioredoxin (Trx) proteins were the first enzymes described to accelerate thiol-disulfide exchange reactions and their high reactivity is related to the high nucleophilicity of the attacking thiol. Substrate specificity in Trx is achieved by several factors, including polar, hydrophobic, and topological interactions through a groove in the active site. Glutaredoxin (Grx) enzymes also contain the Trx fold, but they do not share amino acid sequence similarity with Trx. A conserved glutathione binding site is a typical feature of Grx that can reduce substrates by two mechanisms (mono and dithiol). The high reactivity of Grx enzymes is related to the very acid pK(a) values of reactive Cys that plays roles as good leaving groups. Therefore, although distinct oxidoreductases catalyze similar thiol–disulfide exchange reactions, their enzymatic mechanisms vary. PDI and DsbA are two other oxidoreductases, but they are involved in disulfide bond formation, instead of disulfide reduction, which is related to the oxidative environment where they are found. PDI enzymes and DsbC are endowed with disulfide isomerase activity, which is related with their tetra-domain architecture. As illustrative description of specificity in thiol-disulfide exchange, redox aspects of transcription activation in bacteria, yeast, and mammals are presented in an evolutionary perspective. Therefore, thiol-disulfide exchange reactions play important roles in conferring specificity to pathways, a required feature for signaling.

  5. Structure-based approach to the prediction of disulfide bonds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Salam, Noeris K; Adzhigirey, Matvey; Sherman, Woody; Pearlman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Protein engineering remains an area of growing importance in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research. Stabilization of a folded protein conformation is a frequent goal in projects that deal with affinity optimization, enzyme design, protein construct design, and reducing the size of functional proteins. Indeed, it can be desirable to assess and improve protein stability in order to avoid liabilities such as aggregation, degradation, and immunogenic response that may arise during development. One way to stabilize a protein is through the introduction of disulfide bonds. Here, we describe a method to predict pairs of protein residues that can be mutated to form a disulfide bond. We combine a physics-based approach that incorporates implicit solvent molecular mechanics with a knowledge-based approach. We first assign relative weights to the terms that comprise our scoring function using a genetic algorithm applied to a set of 75 wild-type structures that each contains a disulfide bond. The method is then tested on a separate set of 13 engineered proteins comprising 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides introduced via site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the native disulfide in the wild-type proteins is scored well, on average (within the top 6% of the reasonable pairs of residues that could form a disulfide bond) while 6 out of the 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides scored within the top 13% of ranked predictions. Overall, this suggests that the physics-based approach presented here can be useful for triaging possible pairs of mutations for disulfide bond formation to improve protein stability.

  6. Effect of the Metal on Disulfide/Thiolate Interconversion: Manganese versus Cobalt.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Marcello; Brazzolotto, Deborah; Yu, Shengying; Pécaut, Jacques; Philouze, Christian; Rouzières, Mathieu; Clérac, Rodolphe; Orio, Maylis; Duboc, Carole

    2015-12-14

    It has recently been proposed that disulfide/thiolate interconversion supported by transition-metal ions is involved in several relevant biological processes. In this context, the present contribution represents a unique investigation of the effect of the coordinated metal (M) on the M(n+)-disulfide/M((n+1)+)-thiolate switch properties. Like its isostructural Co(II)-based parent compound, Co(II)2SS (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.- 2014, 53, 5318), the new dinuclear disulfide-bridged Mn(II) complex Mn(II)2SS can undergo an M(II)-disulfide/M(III)-thiolate interconversion, which leads to the first disulfide/thiolate switch based on Mn. The coordination of iodide to the metal ion stabilizes the oxidized form, as the disulfide is reduced to the thiolate. The reverse process, which involves the reduction of M(III) to M(II) with the concomitant oxidation of the thiolates, requires the release of iodide. The Mn(II)2SS complex slowly reacts with Bu4NI in CH2Cl2 to afford the mononuclear Mn(III)-thiolate complex Mn(III)I. The process is much slower (ca. 16 h) and much less efficient (ca. 30% yield) with respect to the instantaneous and quantitative conversion of Co(II)2SS into Co(III)I under similar conditions. This distinctive behavior can be rationalized by considering the different electrochemical properties of the involved Co and Mn complexes and the DFT-calculated driving force of the disulfide/thiolate conversion. For both Mn and Co systems, M(II)-disulfide/M(III)-thiolate interconversion is reversible. However, when the iodide is removed with Ag(+), the M(II)2SS complexes are regenerated, albeit much slower for Mn than for Co systems.

  7. Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

    1998-12-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

  8. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide from the eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, R A; Khalil, M A; Dalluge, R W; Penkett, S A; Jones, B

    1982-02-05

    Ash from the massive 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens readily gave off large amounts of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide gases at room temperature. These findings suggest that the sulfur that enhances the Junge sulfate layer in the stratosphere after volcanic eruptions could be carried directly to the upper atmosphere as carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide adsorbed on ash particles from major volcanic eruptions.

  9. Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide from the eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, R.A.; Khalil, M.A.K.; Dalluge, R.W.; Penkett, S.A.; Jones, B.

    1982-01-01

    Ash from the massive 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens readily gave off large amounts of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide gases at room temperature. These findings suggest that the sulfur that enhances the Junge sulfate layer in the stratosphere after volcanic eruptions could be carried directly to the upper atmosphere as carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide adsorbed on ash particles from major volcanic eruptions.

  10. The effects of carbon disulfide and ethanol on the circulatory system of rats.

    PubMed

    Morvai, Veronika; Szakmáry, Eva; Ungváry, György

    2005-05-28

    Carbon disulfide exerted adverse effects on the structure or hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system, and whether ethanol exposure modifies the cardiovascular effect of carbon disulfide, was examined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. Animals in the control and ethanol groups drank water containing 5% sugar, or 10% ethanol in addition to 5% sugar, respectively, for 14 wk. Sepatare animals inhaled 700 mg/m3 of carbon disulfide for 6 h daily. Carbon disulfide treatment did not affect the food and fluid consumption of the animals, while this gas decreased body mass gain. CS2 increased arterial blood pressure and cardiac index, decreased their cardiac output, the fraction of the cardiac output, and blood flow for the kidneys and the lungs, and increased the relative heart, liver, and kidneys mass and the vascular resistance of the brain, lungs, and kidneys. Ethanol decreased the food and fluid consumption and body mass gain of the animals, the fraction of the cardiac output for the kidneys, and the vascular resistance of the liver, while it increased the blood flow of the brain and liver. Simultaneous administration of carbon disulfide and ethanol decreased the heart rate and increased the QRS duration. Significant interaction was found between the effect in case of heart rate, PQ distance, and QRS duration; carbon disulfide significantly increased the minimal-moderate effect of ethanol on all three parameters. With histological examinations no pathologic alterations were found in the organs studied. It was concluded that the early hemodynamic changes produced by carbon disulfide may play a significant role in the pathomechanism of the effects of the substance (hypertension, damage to the myocardium and kidneys). On the other hand, a potentiating interaction of carbon disulfide was expected with the effects of ethanol, at the administered concentration and dose in the study.

  11. Disulfide bond formation in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm: an in vivo role reversal for the thioredoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, E J; Aslund, F; Beckwith, J

    1998-01-01

    Cytoplasmic proteins do not generally contain structural disulfide bonds, although certain cytoplasmic enzymes form such bonds as part of their catalytic cycles. The disulfide bonds in these latter enzymes are reduced in Escherichia coli by two systems; the thioredoxin pathway and the glutathione/glutaredoxin pathway. However, structural disulfide bonds can form in proteins in the cytoplasm when the gene (trxB) for the enzyme thioredoxin reductase is inactivated by mutation. This disulfide bond formation can be detected by assessing the state of the normally periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP) when it is localized to the cytoplasm. Here we show that the formation of disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic AP in the trxB mutant is dependent on the presence of two thioredoxins in the cell, thioredoxins 1 and 2, the products of the genes trxA and trxC, respectively. Our evidence supports a model in which the oxidized forms of these thioredoxins directly catalyze disulfide bond formation in cytoplasmic AP, a reversal of their normal role. In addition, we show that the recently discovered thioredoxin 2 can perform many of the roles of thioredoxin 1 in vivo, and thus is able to reduce certain essential cytoplasmic enzymes. Our results suggest that the three most effective cytoplasmic disulfide-reducing proteins are thioredoxin 1, thioredoxin 2 and glutaredoxin 1; expression of any one of these is sufficient to support aerobic growth. Our results help to explain how the reducing environment in the cytoplasm is maintained so that disulfide bonds do not normally occur. PMID:9755155

  12. Impaired color discrimination among viscose rayon workers exposed to carbon disulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Raitta, C.; Teir, H.; Tolonen, M.; Nurminen, M.; Helpioe, E.M.; Malmstroem, S.

    1981-03-01

    A possible effect of chronic carbon disulfide exposure on the optic nerve was studied by giving the Farnsworth Munsell 100-Hue Test for color discrimination to 62 exposed and 40 nonexposed men. Carbon disulfide exposure did not relate to specific pattern defects in color discrimination, but impaired color discrimination occurred significantly more often in the exposed group than among the referents. The abnormal findings suggest an impairment in the receptiveness of the ganglion cells or demyelination of the optic nerve fibers.

  13. Evaluation of centrifugal barrel tumbling process for impregnation of molybdenum disulfide powder lubricant: topical report

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.D.

    1987-02-01

    Molybdenum disulfide lubricant, applied by the moly-harperizing process, was evaluated in terms of film thickness, effects of cleaning operations, effects on the weldability of stainless steel, and determination of the optimum application variables. The results of this evaluation show molybdenum disulfide to be a film of measurable thickness having a very low coefficient of friction which is affected by substrate finish and cleaning operations.

  14. Microwave-assisted functionalization of carbon nanohorns via [2+1] nitrenes cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Karousis, Nikolaos; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2011-02-07

    The microwave-assisted functionalization of carbon nanohorns (CNHs) via [2+1] nitrenes cycloaddition, providing well dispersible hybrid materials possessing aziridino-rings covalently grafted onto the graphitic network of CNHs, was accomplished, while condensation of hydroxy-functionalized CNHs with thioctic acid, furnishing an endocyclic disulfide bond extended from the aziridino-rings, allowed the stabilization of Au nanoparticles.

  15. National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team HOPE provides peer and emotional support to families. Contact Us Legal Information DONATE Careers Site Index Copyright © 2016 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. All rights reserved. This Web site ...

  16. Oxidation of Disulfides to Thiolsulfinates with Hydrogen Peroxide and a Cyclic Seleninate Ester Catalyst.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Nicole M R; McDonnell, Ciara; Hambrook, Miranda; Back, Thomas G

    2015-06-11

    Cyclic seleninate esters function as mimetics of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase. They catalyze the reduction of harmful peroxides with thiols, which are converted to disulfides in the process. The possibility that the seleninate esters could also catalyze the further oxidation of disulfides to thiolsulfinates and other overoxidation products under these conditions was investigated. This has ramifications in potential medicinal applications of seleninate esters because of the possibility of catalyzing the unwanted oxidation of disulfide-containing spectator peptides and proteins. A variety of aryl and alkyl disulfides underwent facile oxidation with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of catalytic benzo-1,2-oxaselenolane Se-oxide affording the corresponding thiolsulfinates as the principal products. Unsymmetrical disulfides typically afforded mixtures of regioisomers. Lipoic acid and N,N'-dibenzoylcystine dimethyl ester were oxidized readily under similar conditions. Although isolated yields of the product thiolsulfinates were generally modest, these experiments demonstrate that the method nevertheless has preparative value because of its mild conditions. The results also confirm the possibility that cyclic seleninate esters could catalyze the further undesired oxidation of disulfides in vivo.

  17. Role of disulfide bridges in archaeal family-B DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Killelea, Tom; Connolly, Bernard A

    2011-06-14

    The family-B DNA polymerases obtained from the order Thermococcales, for example, Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu-Pol) are commonly used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because of their high thermostability and low error rates. Most of these polymerases contain four cysteines, arranged as two disulfide bridges. With Pfu-Pol C429-C443 forms one of the disulfides (DB1) and C507-C510 (DB2) the other. Although the disulfides are well conserved in the enzymes from the hyperthermophilic Thermococcales, they are less prevalent in euryarchaeal polymerases from other orders, and tend to be only found in other hyperthermophiles. Here, we report on the effects of deleting the disulfide bridges by mutating the relevant cysteines to serines. A variety of techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, have shown that both disulfides make a contribution to thermostability, with DB1 being more important than DB2. However, even when both disulfides are removed, sufficient thermostability remains for normal (identical to the wild type) performance in PCR and quantitative (real-time) PCR. Therefore, polymerases totally lacking cysteine are fully compatible with most PCR-based applications. This observation opens the way to further engineering of polymerases by introduction of a single cysteine followed by appropriate chemical modification. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Disulfide-Linked Dinitroxides for Monitoring Cellular Thiol Redox Status through Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Legenzov, Eric A; Sims, Stephen J; Dirda, Nathaniel D A; Rosen, Gerald M; Kao, Joseph P Y

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular thiol-disulfide redox balance is crucial to cell health, and may be a key determinant of a cancer's response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The ability to assess intracellular thiol-disulfide balance may thus be useful not only in predicting responsiveness of cancers to therapy, but in assessing predisposition to disease. Assays of thiols in biology have relied on colorimetry or fluorimetry, both of which require UV-visible photons, which do not penetrate the body. Low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is an emerging magnetic imaging technique that uses radio waves, which penetrate the body well. Therefore, in combination with tailored imaging agents, EPRI affords the opportunity to image physiology within the body. In this study, we have prepared water-soluble and membrane-permeant disulfide-linked dinitroxides, at natural isotopic abundance, and with D,(15)N-substitution. Thiols such as glutathione cleave the disulfides, with simple bimolecular kinetics, to yield the monomeric nitroxide species, with distinctive changes in the EPR spectrum. Using the D,(15)N-substituted disulfide-dinitroxide and EPR spectroscopy, we have obtained quantitative estimates of accessible intracellular thiol in cultured human lymphocytes. Our estimates are in good agreement with published measurements. This suggests that in vivo EPRI of thiol-disulfide balance is feasible. Finally, we discuss the constraints on the design of probe molecules that would be useful for in vivo EPRI of thiol redox status.

  19. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Hugo L.; Wijma, Hein J.; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C–A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature. PMID:24649397

  20. The presence of disulfide bonds reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism involved in mitochondrial protein translocase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lidia; Sokol, Anna M.; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is crucial for the biogenesis and structure of many proteins that are localized in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The importance of disulfide bond formation within mitochondrial proteins was extended beyond soluble intermembrane space proteins. Tim22, a membrane protein and core component of the mitochondrial translocase TIM22, forms an intramolecular disulfide bond in yeast. Tim22 belongs to the Tim17/Tim22/Tim23 family of protein translocases. Here, we present evidence of the high evolutionary conservation of disulfide bond formation in Tim17 and Tim22 among fungi and metazoa. Topological models are proposed that include the location of disulfide bonds relative to the predicted transmembrane regions. Yeast and human Tim22 variants that are not oxidized do not properly integrate into the membrane complex. Moreover, the lack of Tim17 oxidation disrupts the TIM23 translocase complex. This underlines the importance of disulfide bond formation for mature translocase assembly through membrane stabilization of weak transmembrane domains. PMID:27265872

  1. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Hugo L; Wijma, Hein J; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C-A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature.

  2. Evidence for thiol/disulfide exchange reactions between tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Hagedorn, Tara D; Kennett, Kelly L

    2014-12-01

    While thiol redox reactions are a common mechanism to regulate protein structure and function, protein disulfide bond formation is a marker of oxidative stress that has been linked to neurodegeneration. Both tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) contain multiple cysteines that have been identified as targets for oxidation to disulfides, S-nitrosation and S-glutathionylation. We show that GAPDH is one of three prominent brain microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), in addition to MAP-2 and tau, with reactive cysteines. We detected a threefold to fourfold increase in tubulin cysteine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of rabbit muscle GAPDH by 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein labeling and by Western blot detection of higher molecular weight inter-chain tubulin disulfides. In thiol/disulfide exchange experiments, tubulin restored ∼50% of oxidized GAPDH cysteines and the equilibrium favored reduced GAPDH. Further, we report that oxidized GAPDH is repaired by the thioredoxin reductase system (TRS). Restoration of GAPDH activity after reduction by both tubulin and the TRS was time-dependent suggesting conformational changes near the active site cysteine149. The addition of brain MAPs to oxidized tubulin reduced tubulin disulfides and labeling of MAP-2 and of GAPDH decreased. Because the extent of tubulin repair of oxidized GAPDH was dependent on buffer strength, we conclude that electrostatics influence thiol/disulfide exchange between the two proteins. The novel interactions presented herein may protect GAPDH from inhibition under oxidative stress conditions.

  3. The Erv1-Mia40 disulfide relay system in the intermembrane space of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hell, Kai

    2008-04-01

    The compartment between the outer and the inner membranes of mitochondria, the intermembrane space (IMS), harbours a variety of proteins that contain disulfide bonds. Many of these proteins possess a conserved twin Cx(3)C motif or twin Cx(9)C motif. Recently, a disulfide relay system in the IMS has been identified which consists of two essential components, the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 and the redox-regulated import receptor Mia40/Tim40. The disulfide relay system drives the import of these cysteine-rich proteins into the IMS of mitochondria by an oxidative folding mechanism. In order to enable Mia40 to perform the oxidation of substrate proteins, the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 mediates the oxidation of Mia40 in a disulfide transfer reaction. To recycle Erv1 into its oxidized form, electrons are transferred to cytochrome c connecting the disulfide relay system to the electron transport chain of mitochondria. Despite the lack of homology of the components, the disulfide relay system in the IMS resembles the oxidation system in the periplasm of bacteria presumably reflecting the evolutionary origin of the IMS from the bacterial periplasm.

  4. Metallic molybdenum disulfide nanosheet-based electrochemical actuators.

    PubMed

    Acerce, Muharrem; Akdoğan, E Koray; Chhowalla, Manish

    2017-09-21

    Actuators that convert electrical energy to mechanical energy are useful in a wide variety of electromechanical systems and in robotics, with applications such as steerable catheters, adaptive wings for aircraft and drag-reducing wind turbines. Actuation systems can be based on various stimuli, such as heat, solvent adsorption/desorption, or electrochemical action (in systems such as carbon nanotube electrodes, graphite electrodes, polymer electrodes and metals). Here we demonstrate that the dynamic expansion and contraction of electrode films formed by restacking chemically exfoliated nanosheets of two-dimensional metallic molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) on thin plastic substrates can generate substantial mechanical forces. These films are capable of lifting masses that are more than 150 times that of the electrode over several millimetres and for hundreds of cycles. Specifically, the MoS2 films are able to generate mechanical stresses of about 17 megapascals-higher than mammalian muscle (about 0.3 megapascals) and comparable to ceramic piezoelectric actuators (about 40 megapascals)-and strains of about 0.6 per cent, operating at frequencies up to 1 hertz. The actuation performance is attributed to the high electrical conductivity of the metallic 1T phase of MoS2 nanosheets, the elastic modulus of restacked MoS2 layers (2 to 4 gigapascals) and fast proton diffusion between the nanosheets. These results could lead to new electrochemical actuators for high-strain and high-frequency applications.

  5. Oxidation Effect in Octahedral Hafnium Disulfide Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Tae Soo; Chung, Dong Seob; Na, Hyunyeong; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Hyun; Perello, David J; Jeong, Hye Yun; Ly, Thuc Hue; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-26

    Atomically smooth van der Waals materials are structurally stable in a monolayer and a few layers but are susceptible to oxygen-rich environments. In particular, recently emerging materials such as black phosphorus and perovskite have revealed stronger environmental sensitivity than other two-dimensional layered materials, often obscuring the interesting intrinsic electronic and optical properties. Unleashing the true potential of these materials requires oxidation-free sample preparation that protects thin flakes from air exposure. Here, we fabricated few-layer hafnium disulfide (HfS2) field effect transistors (FETs) using an integrated vacuum cluster system and study their electronic properties and stability under ambient conditions. By performing all the device fabrication and characterization procedure under an oxygen- and moisture-free environment, we found that few-layer AA-stacking HfS2-FETs display excellent field effect responses (Ion/Ioff ≈ 10(7)) with reduced hysteresis compared to the FETs prepared under ambient conditions. Oxidation of HfS2 occurs uniformly over the entire area, increasing the film thickness by 250% at a prolonged oxidation time of >120 h, while defects on the surface are the preferential initial oxidation sites. We further demonstrated that the stability of the device in air is significantly improved by passivating FETs with BN in a vacuum cluster.

  6. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis.

  7. Biotechnology for removal of carbon disulfide emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    Biological removal in a ``biofilter`` plant of carbon disulfide and hydrogen sulfide from the air effluent of a viscose plant at Teepak, Inc., is analyzed from process and economic standpoints by use of the Aspen Plus simulation program. The metabolic product from the biofilter, 3% sulfuric acid, must be transformed at the source into either a marketable or recyclable commodity (such as 95% sulfuric acid, high-quality sulfur, or high-quality gypsum) or a material with reasonable landfill costs (such as sulfur or gypsum). The simulations indicate that the total capital requirement for production of concentrated sulfuric acid is $48.9 million; for high-quality gypsum, $40.4 million; and for high-quality sulfur, $29.4 million. Production of concentrated sulfur for landfill is not economically practical. The process to neutralize the 3% acid effluent with limestone and landfill the resulting low-quality gypsum requires the lowest total investment of the processes simulated, $8.7 million, including the biofilter plant.

  8. Electrical spin injection and detection in molybdenum disulfide multilayer channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shiheng; Yang, Huaiwen; Renucci, Pierre; Tao, Bingshan; Laczkowski, Piotr; Mc-Murtry, Stefan; Wang, Gang; Marie, Xavier; George, Jean-Marie; Petit-Watelot, Sébastien; Djeffal, Abdelhak; Mangin, Stéphane; Jaffrès, Henri; Lu, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has recently emerged as a promising two-dimensional semiconducting material for nano-electronic, opto-electronic and spintronic applications. However, the demonstration of an electron spin transport through a semiconducting MoS2 channel remains challenging. Here we show the evidence of the electrical spin injection and detection in the conduction band of a multilayer MoS2 semiconducting channel using a two-terminal spin-valve configuration geometry. A magnetoresistance around 1% has been observed through a 450 nm long, 6 monolayer thick MoS2 channel with a Co/MgO tunnelling spin injector and detector. It is found that keeping a good balance between the interface resistance and channel resistance is mandatory for the observation of the two-terminal magnetoresistance. Moreover, the electron spin-relaxation is found to be greatly suppressed in the multilayer MoS2 channel with an in-plane spin polarization. The long spin diffusion length (approximately ~235 nm) could open a new avenue for spintronic applications using multilayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

  9. Exciton-plasmon coupling in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Jed; Newaz, A. K. M.; Bolotin, Kirill; Haglund, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials such as monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) represent a unique platform for investigating the dynamics of exciton-plasmon coupling. We report on the generation and modulation of coherent and incoherent coupled states between excitons in monolayer MoS2 and plasmons in an array of gold nanoparticle deposited onto the surface of MoS2. We study the behavior of these coherent states, termed plexcitons using a combination of photoluminescence, extinction and ultrafast spectroscopies. The close proximity of the two characteristic exciton bands of MoS2 presents multiple coherent coupling configurations, including A-or-B exciton-plasmon, and A-and-B exciton-plasmon interactions. These configurations of plexciton formation that are shown to modulate both the extinction and photoluminescence spectra of the hybrid system. This includes broadband photoluminescence and Fano-type resonances. This behavior is distinct from the spectral response of the MoS2 and plasmonic components of the system. Incoherent exciton-plasmon coupling, achieved by detuning from the plasmon extinction peaks, enhances the interaction of MoS2 with light by focusing the plasmon energy. Depending on which coupling configuration is chosen, our results show that the MoS2/plasmon hybrid systems can act as high efficiency light harvesters, broadband emitters and as tunable visible and NIR photodetectors. Support by Defense Threat Reduction Agency (HDTRA1-1-10-1-0047) and NSF DMR-1056859

  10. Plasmon modes of bilayer molybdenum disulfide: A density functional study.

    PubMed

    Torbatian, Zahra; Asgari, Reza

    2017-08-17

    We explore the collective electronic excitations of bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) using the density functional theory together with the random phase approximation. The many-body dielectric function and electron energy-loss spectra are calculated using an ab initio based model involving material-realistic physical properties. The electron energy-loss function of bilayer MoS2 system is found to be sensitive to either electron or hole doping and it is owing to the fact that the Kohn-Sham band dispersions are not symmetric for energies above and below the zero Fermi level. Three plasmon modes are predicted. A damped high- energy mode, one optical mode (in-phase mode) for which the plasmon dispersion exhibits √q in the long wavelength limit originating from low-energy electron scattering and finally a highly damped acoustic mode (out-of-phase mode). . © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Electrical spin injection and detection in molybdenum disulfide multilayer channel

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shiheng; Yang, Huaiwen; Renucci, Pierre; Tao, Bingshan; Laczkowski, Piotr; Mc-Murtry, Stefan; Wang, Gang; Marie, Xavier; George, Jean-Marie; Petit-Watelot, Sébastien; Djeffal, Abdelhak; Mangin, Stéphane; Jaffrès, Henri; Lu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has recently emerged as a promising two-dimensional semiconducting material for nano-electronic, opto-electronic and spintronic applications. However, the demonstration of an electron spin transport through a semiconducting MoS2 channel remains challenging. Here we show the evidence of the electrical spin injection and detection in the conduction band of a multilayer MoS2 semiconducting channel using a two-terminal spin-valve configuration geometry. A magnetoresistance around 1% has been observed through a 450 nm long, 6 monolayer thick MoS2 channel with a Co/MgO tunnelling spin injector and detector. It is found that keeping a good balance between the interface resistance and channel resistance is mandatory for the observation of the two-terminal magnetoresistance. Moreover, the electron spin-relaxation is found to be greatly suppressed in the multilayer MoS2 channel with an in-plane spin polarization. The long spin diffusion length (approximately ∼235 nm) could open a new avenue for spintronic applications using multilayer transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:28387252

  12. Diallyl disulfide attenuates acetaminophen-induced renal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Young; Han, Ji-Hee; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, Na-Rae; Jung, Tae-Yang; Kim, Hyun-A; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Shin, In-Sik; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS) against acetaminophen (AAP)-induced acute renal injury in male rats. We also investigated the effects of DADS on kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), which are novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in renal tissues, in response to AAP treatment. The following four experimental groups were evaluated: (1) vehicle control, (2) AAP (1,000 mg/kg), (3) AAP&DADS, and (4) DADS (50 mg/kg/day). AAP treatment caused acute kidney injury evidenced by increased serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histopathological alterations. Additionally, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed increased expression of KIM-1 and NGAL proteins in renal tissues of AAP-treated rats. In contrast, DADS pretreatment significantly attenuated the AAP-induced nephrotoxic effects, including serum BUN level and expression of KIM-1 and NGAL proteins. Histopathological studies confirmed the renoprotective effect of DADS. The results suggest that DADS prevents AAP-induced acute nephrotoxicity, and that KIM-1 and NGAL may be useful biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of acute kidney injury associated with AAP exposure.

  13. Template synthesis and characterization of molybdenum disulfide nanotubules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dongbo; Feng, Yi; Zhu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xuebin; Li, Bin; Liu, Huiqiang

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The image is a SEM image of branched MoS{sub 2} nanotubes, which are prepared in AAO templates. It is obvious to observe the branch of MoS{sub 2} nanotubes (labeled by arrows), and it reflects the microcosmic morphologies of pores in templates. Highlights: {yields} Large quantities of hollow MoS2 tubules. {yields} Explanation for the formation of branched shape. {yields} Explanation for the morphology of bamboo-like structure. -- Abstract: Molybdenum disulfide nanotubules were prepared by thermal decomposition of ammonium thiomolybdate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}MoS{sub 4}) precursors on anodized aluminum oxide template. Large quantities of hollow MoS{sub 2} nanotubules with the bamboo-like structure were obtained. The morphology and structures of MoS{sub 2} tubules were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron diffraction and optical absorption spectroscopy. MoS{sub 2} nanotubules completely reflected the three-dimensional structure of nanopores in template. The properties of Mo-S chemical bonds in lattice structure and the wetting state between porous surface and precursor have a great effect on the formation of sections in nanotubules, the ridges in the nanopores also play a very special role of this formation.

  14. Diallyl disulfide attenuates acetaminophen-induced renal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin-Young; Han, Ji-Hee; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, Na-Rae; Jung, Tae-Yang; Kim, Hyun-A; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Shin, In-Sik

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS) against acetaminophen (AAP)-induced acute renal injury in male rats. We also investigated the effects of DADS on kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), which are novel biomarkers of nephrotoxicity in renal tissues, in response to AAP treatment. The following four experimental groups were evaluated: (1) vehicle control, (2) AAP (1,000 mg/kg), (3) AAP&DADS, and (4) DADS (50 mg/kg/day). AAP treatment caused acute kidney injury evidenced by increased serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histopathological alterations. Additionally, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed increased expression of KIM-1 and NGAL proteins in renal tissues of AAP-treated rats. In contrast, DADS pretreatment significantly attenuated the AAP-induced nephrotoxic effects, including serum BUN level and expression of KIM-1 and NGAL proteins. Histopathological studies confirmed the renoprotective effect of DADS. The results suggest that DADS prevents AAP-induced acute nephrotoxicity, and that KIM-1 and NGAL may be useful biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of acute kidney injury associated with AAP exposure. PMID:28053613

  15. Optical absorption and transmission in a molybdenum disulfide monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukelj, Zoran; Štrkalj, Antonio; Despoja, Vito

    2016-09-01

    Our recently proposed theoretical formulation [presented in D. Novko et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 125413 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.125413] is used to study optical absorption and transmission in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer as a function of incident photon energy and angle. The investigation is not focused on exploration of well-documented spin-orbit split excitons around optical absorption onset, but rather on the most intensive features in absorption spectrum in the visible and near-ultraviolet photon energy range (1.7 -4 eV ). It is shown that three most intensive peaks, at 2.7, 3.1, and 3.7 eV, result from transitions between Mo(d ) and S(p ) valence and conduction bands and that the character of their charge/current density fluctuations is intrinsically in plane, located in the molybdenum plane. This also implies that MoS2 monolayer is completely transparent when illuminated by grazing incidence p -polarized light. The validity of the presented results is supported by our effective two-band tight-binding model and finally by good agreement with some recent experimental results.

  16. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis.

  17. Diallyl disulfide impairs hippocampal neurogenesis in the young adult brain.

    PubMed

    Ji, Seung Taek; Kim, Min-Sun; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Eunjin; Lee, Yujeong; Jang, Young Jung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jaewon

    2013-07-31

    Garlic and garlic extracts are used as seasonings and are generally considered beneficial to human health, which include antioxidant and neuroprotective properties in neurological disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of garlic sulfur components on the proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and hippocampal neurogenesis. Of the sulfur compounds extracted, diallyl disulfide (DADS) significantly suppressed the proliferation of NPCs, whereas other sulfur containing components had no effect. In order to investigate the effect of DADS on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, DADS was administered orally to young (6 week-old) male C57BL/6 mice for 2 weeks. It was found that 10 mg/kg of DADS significantly decreased the proliferation of NPCs in the dentate gyrus without affecting the survival of newly generated cells. Furthermore, DADS decreased levels of hippocampal BDNF, phosphorylated CREB signaling, and phosphorylated ERKs, which are known to be related to hippocampal neurogenesis and NPCs proliferation. In addition, DADS induced significant memory defects as compared with controls. We report that DADS may have adverse effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and neurocognitive functions by modulating ERK and BDNF-CREB signaling, and suggest that the advisability of consuming large amounts of garlic products should be considered, particularly during the period of neural growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of dimensionality on thermoelectric powerfactor of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, H. K.; Chi, D.; Hippalgaonkar, K.

    2017-05-01

    We present that two-dimensional (2D) bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) exhibits an enhanced Seebeck coefficient over its three-dimensional (3D) counterpart arising from dimensionality confinement. It has been predicted that quantum confinement enhances thermoelectric performance but no studies have focused on a single material to present a theoretical and experimental comparison, which would illustrate the enhancement of thermoelectric performance. Layered MoS2 provides an opportunity to verify this hypothesis and in this work, we extensively study the Seebeck coefficient, S, the electrical conductivity, σ, and the thermoelectric powerfactor, S2σ of 2D monolayer and bilayer MoS2 using theoretical Boltzmann Transport Equation calculations and compare the results to well-characterized experimental data. We conclude that dimensional confinement indeed enhances the Seebeck coefficient by up to ˜50% in 2D bilayer MoS2 over 3D MoS2 under similar doping concentrations because of the discretization of density of states. We also consider electrical conductivity with various energy-dependent scattering rates considering charged-impurities and acoustic phonon mediated scattering, and comment on a theoretical comparison of the powerfactor to the best-case scenario for 3D MoS2.

  19. Preclinical pharmacokinetic analysis of NOV-002, a glutathione disulfide mimetic.

    PubMed

    Uys, J D; Manevich, Y; Devane, L C; He, L; Garret, T E; Pazoles, C J; Tew, K D; Townsend, D M

    2010-09-01

    NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is the subject of clinical investigation in oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Non-linear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of approximately 13 min with an AUC of 1.18 μgh/mL, a C(max) of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis.

  20. Cardiovascular effects in viscose rayon workers exposed to carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Kotseva, K; Braeckman, L; De Bacquer, D; Bulat, P; Vanhoorne, M

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the cardiovascular effects in workers currently exposed to carbon disulfide (CS2) below the threshold limit value (TLV) of 31 mg/m3 and to determine the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) after long-term exposure. 172 men (91 workers exposed to CS2 in a viscose rayon factory and 81 referent workers) were examined using a medical and job history questionnaire, Rose's questionnaire, and electrocardiography at rest, and by measuring blood pressure and serum lipids and lipoproteins. Personal exposures were monitored simultaneously with active sampling and findings were analyzed according to the NIOSH 1600 method. As a result of technical and organizational improvements, personal CS2 exposures were well below the TLV (5.4-13.02 mg/m3). No significant effect of CS2 on blood pressure or lipids (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoproteins AI and B) was found, even after allowance for confounding factors. The prevalence of CHD (ECG abnormalities and chest pain) was higher in the viscose rayon workers than in the workers with no exposure but reached statistical significance for men with exposure histories often years and more only (cumulative CS9 index > or = 150 mg/m3, the most highly exposed group). The findings suggest that the coronary risk is increased in workers previously exposed to high CS2 concentrations but not in those exposed to CS2 levels below the current TLV.

  1. Expression and Localization of Plant Protein Disulfide Isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B. S.; Subramaniam, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Dixon, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a putative protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and an antiserum was raised against the expressed PDI-active protein. The antiserum recognized a protein of approximately 60 kD in extracts from alfalfa, soybean, and tobacco roots and stems. Levels of this protein remained relatively constant on exposure of alfalfa cell suspension cultures to the protein glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, whereas a slightly lower molecular mass form, also detected by the antiserum, was induced by this treatment. A lower molecular mass form of PDI was also observed in roots of alfalfa seedlings during the first 5 weeks after germination. PDI levels increased in developing soybean seeds up to 17 d after fertilization and then declined. Tissue print immunoblots revealed highest levels of PDI protein in the cambial tissues of soybean stems and petioles and in epidermal, subepidermal, cortical, and pith tissues of stems of alfalfa and tobacco. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the localization of PDI to the endoplasmic reticulum in soybean root nodules. PMID:12231974

  2. The flexibility and dynamics of protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Stephen A.; Emilio Jimenez‐Roldan, J.; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Vishweshwara, Saraswathi; Freedman, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have studied the mobility of the multidomain folding catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), by a coarse‐graining approach based on flexibility. We analyze our simulations of yeast PDI (yPDI) using measures of backbone movement, relative positions and orientations of domains, and distances between functional sites. We find that there is interdomain flexibility at every interdomain junction but these show very different characteristics. The extent of interdomain flexibility is such that yPDI's two active sites can approach much more closely than is found in crystal structures—and indeed hinge motion to bring these sites into proximity is the lowest energy normal mode of motion of the protein. The flexibility predicted for yPDI (based on one structure) includes the other known conformation of yPDI and is consistent with (i) the mobility observed experimentally for mammalian PDI and (ii) molecular dynamics. We also observe intradomain flexibility and clear differences between the domains in their propensity for internal motion. Our results suggest that PDI flexibility enables it to interact with many different partner molecules of widely different sizes and shapes, and highlights considerable similarities of yPDI and mammalian PDI. Proteins 2016; 84:1776–1785. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27616289

  3. 9-Fluorenylmethyl (Fm) Disulfides: Biomimetic Precursors for Persulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chung-Min; Johnson, Brett A.; Duan, Jicheng; Park, Jeong-Jin; Day, Jacob J.; Gang, David; Qian, Wei-Jun; Xian, Ming

    2016-03-04

    Protein S-sulfhydration has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that regulates H2S signals. However, the reactivity and biological implications of the products of S-sulfhydration, i.e. persulfides, are still unclear. This is mainly due to the instability of persulfides and difficulty to access these molecules. Under physiological conditions persulfides mainly exist in anionic forms because of their low pKa values. However, current methods do not allow for the direct generation of persulfide anions under biomimetic and non-H2S conditions. Herein we report the development of a functional disulfide, FmSSPy-A (Fm =9-fluorenylmethyl; Py = pyridinyl). This reagent can effectively convert both small molecule and protein thiols (-SH) to form –S-SFm adducts under mild conditions. It allows for a H2S-free and biomimetic protocol to generate highly reactive persulfides (in their anionic forms). We also demonstrated the high nucleophilicity of persulfides toward a number of thiol-blocking reagents. This method holds promise for further understanding the chemical biology of persulfides and S-sulfhydration.

  4. Formation and stability of point defects in monolayer rhenium disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horzum, S.; ćakır, D.; Suh, J.; Tongay, S.; Huang, Y.-S.; Ho, C.-H.; Wu, J.; Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-04-01

    Recently, rhenium disulfide (ReS2) monolayers were experimentally extracted by conventional mechanical exfoliation technique from as-grown ReS2 crystals. Unlike the well-known members of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), ReS2 crystallizes in a stable distorted-1T structure and lacks an indirect to direct gap crossover. Here we present an experimental and theoretical study of the formation, energetics, and stability of the most prominent lattice defects in monolayer ReS2. Experimentally, irradiation with 3-MeV He+2 ions was used to break the strong covalent bonds in ReS2 flakes. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the luminescence from monolayers is mostly unchanged after highly energetic α particle irradiation. In order to understand the energetics of possible vacancies in ReS2 we performed systematic first-principles calculations. Our calculations revealed that the formation of a single sulfur vacancy has the lowest formation energy in both Re and S rich conditions and a random distribution of such defects are energetically more preferable. Sulfur point defects do not result in any spin polarization whereas the creation of Re-containing point defects induce magnetization with a net magnetic moment of 1-3μB. Experimentally observed easy formation of sulfur vacancies is in good agreement with first-principles calculations.

  5. The role of intra-domain disulfide bonds in heat-induced irreversible denaturation of camelid single domain VHH antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Camelid-derived single domain VHH antibodies are highly heat resistant, and the mechanism of heat-induced VHH denaturation predominantly relies on the chemical modification of amino acids. Although chemical modification of disulfide bonds has been recognized as a cause for heat-induced denaturation of many proteins, there have been no mutagenesis studies, in which the number of disulfide bonds was controlled. In this article, we examined a series of mutants of two different VHHs with single, double or no disulfide bonds, and scrutinized the effects of these disulfide bond modifications on VHH denaturation. With the exception of one mutant, the heat resistance of VHHs decreased when the number of disulfide bonds increased. The effect of disulfide bonds on heat denaturation was more striking if the VHH had a second disulfide bond, suggesting that the contribution of disulfide shuffling is significant in proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. Furthermore, our results directly indicate that removal of a disulfide bond can indeed increase the heat resistance of a protein, irrespective of the negative impact on equilibrium thermodynamic stability.

  6. The role of intra-domain disulfide bonds in heat-induced irreversible denaturation of camelid single domain VHH antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Camelid-derived single domain VHH antibodies are highly heat resistant, and the mechanism of heat-induced VHH denaturation predominantly relies on the chemical modification of amino acids. Although chemical modification of disulfide bonds has been recognized as a cause for heat-induced denaturation of many proteins, there have been no mutagenesis studies, in which the number of disulfide bonds was controlled. In this article, we examined a series of mutants of two different VHHs with single, double or no disulfide bonds, and scrutinized the effects of these disulfide bond modifications on VHH denaturation. With the exception of one mutant, the heat resistance of VHHs decreased when the number of disulfide bonds increased. The effect of disulfide bonds on heat denaturation was more striking if the VHH had a second disulfide bond, suggesting that the contribution of disulfide shuffling is significant in proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. Furthermore, our results directly indicate that removal of a disulfide bond can indeed increase the heat resistance of a protein, irrespective of the negative impact on equilibrium thermodynamic stability. PMID:26289739

  7. Exploitations and their complications: the necessity of identifying the multiple forms of exploitation in pharmaceutical trials.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jeremy

    2012-06-01

    Human subject trials of pharmaceuticals in low and middle income countries (LMICs) have been associated with the moral wrong of exploitation on two grounds. First, these trials may include a placebo control arm even when proven treatments for a condition are in use in other (usually wealthier) parts of the world. Second, the trial researchers or sponsors may fail to make a successful treatment developed through the trial available to either the trial participants or the host community following the trial. Many commentators have argued that a single form of exploitation takes place during human subject research in LMICs. These commentators do not, however, agree as to what kind of moral wrong exploitation is or when exploitation is morally impermissible. In this paper, I have two primary goals. First, I will argue for a taxonomy of exploitation that identifies three distinct forms of exploitation. While each of these forms of exploitation has its critics, I will argue that they can each be developed into plausible accounts of exploitation tied to different vulnerabilities and different forms of wrongdoing. Second, I will argue that each of these forms of exploitation can coexist in single situations, including human subject trials of pharmaceuticals. This lesson is important, since different forms of exploitation in a single relationship can influence, among other things, whether the relationship is morally permissible. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Disulfide bond structure of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2.

    PubMed Central

    Long, D; Wilcox, W C; Abrams, W R; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1992-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) is a structural component of the herpes simplex virus envelope which is essential for virus penetration. The function of this protein is highly dependent on its structure, and its structure is dependent on maintenance of three intact disulfide bonds. gD contains six cysteines in its ectodomain whose spacing is conserved among all its homologs in other alphaherpesviruses as well as Marek's disease virus. For other proteins, conservation of cysteine spacing correlates with conservation of disulfide bond structure. We have now solved the disulfide bond structure of gD-1 and gD-2 of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, respectively. Two approaches were used. First, we constructed 15 double-Cys mutants of gD-1, representing all possible disulfide pairs. In each case, codons for cysteines were changed to serine. We reasoned that if two cysteines normally form a disulfide bond, double mutations which eliminate one proper bond should be less harmful to gD structure than double mutations which eliminate two disulfide bonds. The mutated genes were cloned into a eucaryotic expression vector, and the proteins were expressed in transiently transfected cells. Three double mutations, Cys-1,5, Cys-2,6, and Cys-3,4 permitted gD-1 folding, processing, transport to the cell surface, and function in virus infection, whereas 12 other double mutations each produced a malfolded and nonfunctional protein. Thus, the three functional double-Cys mutants may represent the actual partners in disulfide bond linkages. The second approach was to define the actual disulfide bond structure of gD by biochemical means. Purified native gD-2 was cleaved by CNBr and proteases, and the peptides were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Disulfide-linked peptides were subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The results show that cysteine 1 (amino acid [aa] 66) is bonded to cysteine 5 (aa 189), cysteine 2 (aa 106) is bonded to cysteine 6 (aa 202), and cysteine 3 (aa

  9. The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin C, a disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich protein isolated from Crotalus atrox venom.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J. J.; Moreno-Murciano, M. P.; Sanz, L.; Jürgens, M.; Schrader, M.; Raida, M.; Benjamin, D. C.; Fox, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    The disulfide bond pattern of catrocollastatin-C was determined by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The N-terminal disintegrin-like domain is a compact structure including eight disulfide bonds, seven of them in the same pattern as the disintegrin bitistatin. The protein has two extra cysteine residues (XIII and XVI) that form an additional disulfide bond that is characteristically found in the disintegrin-like domains of cellular metalloproteinases (ADAMs) and PIII snake venom Zn-metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The C-terminal cysteine-rich domain of catrocollastatin-C contains five disulfide bonds between nearest-neighbor cysteines and a long range disulfide bridge between CysV and CysX. These results provide structural evidence for a redefinition of the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain boundaries. An evolutionary pathway for ADAMs, PIII, and PII SVMPs based on disulfide bond engineering is also proposed. PMID:10933502

  10. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    DOE PAGES

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; ...

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates throughmore » a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using λpump < 2.4 eV forms only trion T1, which implies that the electron that remains from the dissociation of exciton XA is involved in the creation of this trion with a binding energy ~ 10 meV with respect to XA. The absorption peak that corresponds to trion T2 appears when λpump > 2.4 eV, which is just

  11. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; Lin, Ming-Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates through a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using λpump < 2.4 eV forms only trion T1, which implies that the electron that remains

  12. Computer-assisted threat evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, Jatin S.; Davies, Livingston

    2006-05-01

    The use of a CATE (Computer Assisted Threat Evaluation) System in the Maritime Domain lends itself technically and operationally to data exploitation thru the use of domain forensics and link analysis of fragmented information utilizing data prioritization and suspicion indicators for an aggressor's method of operation. The timely availability of threat mitigating actionable information is one of the key tools for success in the Global War On Terror (GWOT). The global supply chain is vulnerable to exploitation by nefarious individuals, governments, and terrorist organizations. For example, Figure 1 illustrates one of many potential methods that could be used to circumvent regulations limiting proliferation of WMDs.

  13. Carbon disulfide exposure and neurotoxic sequelae among viscose rayon workers

    SciTech Connect

    Aaserud, O.; Hommeren, O.J.; Tvedt, B.; Nakstad, P.; Mowe, G.; Efskind, J.; Russell, D.; Joergensen, E.B.N.; Nyberg-Hansen, R.; Rootwelt, K. )

    1990-01-01

    In Norway's only viscose rayon plant, carbon disulfide (CS2) concentrations in ambient air usually were between 30 and 50 mg/m3 during the first 23 years of production. From 1970/1971 until the factory was closed in 1982, corresponding values were 10-25 mg/m3. Through all of these years, high peak exposures of CS2 and H2S occurred. In 1986, 16 of the 24 men still at work in 1982 and with at least 10 years' experience in the spinning room agreed to participate in this study. Clinical neurological examination demonstrated abnormalities in 15; neuropsychological tests showed impairments of probable organic origin in 14. Thirteen had cerebral atrophy demonstrated by cerebral computed tomography (CT). Electromyography (EMG) was abnormal in six, neurography in 11. Regional cerebral blood flow measurements indicated flow asymmetries in eight, whereas Doppler investigation of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries, electroencephalography (EEG), and evoked response investigations were mostly normal. Based on these results and the exposure data, a diagnosis of CS2-induced encephalopathy was reached in eight workers; another six had an encephalopathy in which CS2 exposure was regarded as a partial cause. Correspondingly, seven had a neuropathy probably caused by CS2 exposure alone; in three others, CS2 was found to be the partial cause of a neuropathy. This indicates that long-term, relatively moderate exposure to CS2 in association with high peak exposures to CS2 and H2S involves a substantial risk of developing neurotoxic disease.

  14. Unprecedented formation of novel phosphonodithioate ligands from diferrocenyldithiadiphosphetane disulfide.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Eva M; Crespo, Olga; Gimeno, M Concepción; Jones, Peter G; Laguna, Antonio

    2008-08-04

    The reaction of the phosphetane disulfide, FcP(S)S 2P(S)Fc ( 1) (Fc = (eta (5)-C 5H 5)Fe(eta (5)-C 5H 4)), the ferrocenyl analogue of the Lawesson reagent, with gold and palladium complexes leads to the unprecedented formation of phosphonodithioate ligands upon coordination to the metal centers. The reaction of 1 with gold complexes such as [AuCl(PR 3)] affords the species [Au{S 2P(OH)Fc}(PR 3)] (PR 3 = PPh 3 ( 2), PPh 2Me ( 3)), in which the phosphonodithioate ligand Fc(OH)PS 2 (-) has been formed. The same ligand is present in the compound [Au 2{S 2P(OH)Fc} 2].[N(PPh 3) 2]Cl ( 4), obtained by reaction of 1 with [N(PPh 3) 2][AuCl 2]. It crystallizes with one molecule of [N(PPh 3) 2]Cl, whereby complex 4 acts as an anion receptor and forms strong hydrogen bonds between the chloro and the hydroxyl groups. The reaction with palladium derivatives is different; two complexes, [Pd 2(S 4OP 2Fc 2) 2] ( 5) and [Pd 4Cl 4(S 4OP 2Fc 2) 2] ( 6), are obtained in molar ratio 2:1 and 1:1, respectively. In these complexes a new phosphonodithioate ligand is present and probably arises from the condensation of two molecules of Fc(OH)PS 2 (-). Complex 5 has also been characterized by X-ray methods.

  15. Tungsten disulfide nanotubes reinforced biodegradable polymers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M; Farshid, Behzad; Parmar, Priyanka; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the efficacy of inorganic nanotubes as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites as a function of nanomaterial loading concentration (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Tungsten disulfide nanotubes (WSNTs) were used as reinforcing agents in the experimental group. Single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) were used as positive controls, and crosslinked PPF composites were used as the baseline control. Mechanical testing (compression and three-point bending) shows a significant enhancement (up to 28-190%) in the mechanical properties (compressive modulus, compressive yield strength, flexural modulus and flexural yield strength) of WSNT-reinforced PPF nanocomposites compared to the baseline control. In comparison to the positive controls, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of WSNT nanocomposites were also observed at various concentrations. In general, the inorganic nanotubes (WSNTs) showed mechanical reinforcement better than (up to 127%) or equivalent to that of carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Sol fraction analysis showed significant increases in the crosslinking density of PPF in the presence of WSNTs (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis on thin sections of crosslinked nanocomposites showed the presence of WSNTs as individual nanotubes in the PPF matrix, whereas SWCNTs and MWCNTs existed as micron-sized aggregates. The trend in the surface area of nanostructures obtained by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis was SWCNTs>MWCNTs>WSNTs. The BET surface area analysis, TEM analysis and sol fraction analysis results taken together suggest that chemical composition (inorganic vs. carbon nanomaterials), the presence of functional groups (such as sulfide and oxysulfide) and individual dispersion of the nanomaterials in the polymer matrix (absence of aggregation of the reinforcing agent) are the key parameters

  16. Nanoparticles synthesis of tungsten disulfide via AOT-based microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoreishi, S.M.; Meshkat, S.S.; Ghiaci, M.; Dadkhah, A.A.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A controlled synthesis of WS2 nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) via microemulsion was applied for the first time to prepare WS2 (7–12 nm) by acidification of the water cores of the AOT reverse microemulsion. Highlights: ► An innovative reverse microemulsion technique was developed for WS{sub 2} synthesis. ► WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution in range of 7–12 nm. ► Operating cost of microemulsion was lower in contrast to quartz reactor method. ► WS{sub 2} morphology could be controlled to obtain highly active and selective catalysts. ► Lower size of WS{sub 2} in this study overcomes the shortcoming of quartz reactor method. -- Abstract: The tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) with a narrow size distribution were synthesized by a reverse micelle technique for the first time. The particle size was controlled by varying water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub 0}), aging time and reagent concentration. The synthesized WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by zetasizer, UV–visible spectrophotometers and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The WS{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle diameter size of 7–12 nm were obtained via 24 h aging time. The particle size was controlled by changing the aging time and molar ratio of water/surfactant. Doubling W{sub 0} increased the amount and particle size of WS{sub 2} by 22 and 26%, respectively. The effect of aging time in the range of 6–24 h was investigated and the complete disappearance of yellowish color at 24 h resulted in an optically clear solution, which was the indication of WS{sub 2} formation with 100% conversion of reactant ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}) in the batch reactor.

  17. Carbon Disulfide Mediates Socially-Acquired Nicotine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tengfei; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The social environment plays a critical role in smoking initiation as well as relapse. We previously reported that rats acquired nicotine self-administration with an olfactogustatory cue only when another rat consuming the same cue was present during self-administration. Because carbon disulfide (CS2) mediates social learning of food preference in rodents, we hypothesized that socially acquired nicotine self-administration is also mediated by CS2. We tested this hypothesis by placing female adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats in operant chambers equipped with two lickometers. Licking on the active spout meeting a fixed-ratio 10 schedule triggered the concurrent delivery of an i.v. infusion (saline, or 30 µg/kg nicotine, free base) and an appetitive olfactogustatory cue containing CS2 (0–500 ppm). Rats that self-administered nicotine with the olfactogustatory cue alone licked less on the active spout than on the inactive spout. Adding CS2 to the olfactogustatory cue reversed the preference for the spouts. The group that received 500 ppm CS2 and the olfactogustatory cue obtained a significantly greater number of nicotine infusions than other groups. After extinction training, the original self-administration context reinstated nicotine-seeking behavior in all nicotine groups. In addition, in rats that received the olfactogustatory cue and 500 ppm CS2 during SA, a social environment where the nicotine-associated olfactory cue is present, induced much stronger drug-seeking behavior compared to a social environment lacking the olfactogustatory cue. These data established that CS2 is a critical signal that mediates social learning of nicotine self-administration with olfactogustatory cues in rodents. Additionally, these data showed that the social context can further enhance the drug-seeking behavior induced by the drug-taking environment. PMID:25532105

  18. First principles investigation of copper and silver intercalated molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, D. M.; Onofrio, N.; Strachan, A.

    2017-02-01

    We characterize the energetics and atomic structures involved in the intercalation of copper and silver into the van der Waals gap of molybdenum disulfide as well as the resulting ionic and electronic transport properties using first-principles density functional theory. The intercalation energy of systems with formula (Cu,Ag)xMoS2 decreases with ion concentration and ranges from 1.2 to 0.8 eV for Cu; Ag exhibits a stronger concentration dependence from 2.2 eV for x = 0.014 to 0.75 eV for x = 1 (using the fcc metal as a reference). Partial atomic charge analysis indicates that approximately half an electron is transferred per metallic ion in the case of Cu at low concentrations and the ionicity decreases only slightly with concentration. In contrast, while Ag is only slightly less ionic than Cu for low concentrations, charge transfer reduces significantly to approximately 0.1 e for x = 1. This difference in ionicity between Cu and Ag correlates with their intercalation energies. Importantly, the predicted values indicate the possibility of electrochemical intercalation of both Cu and Ag into MoS2 and the calculated activation energies associated with ionic transport within the gaps, 0.32 eV for Cu and 0.38 eV for Ag, indicate these materials to be good ionic conductors. Analysis of the electronic structure shows that charge transfer leads to a shift of the Fermi energy into the conduction band resulting in a semiconductor-to-metal transition. Electron transport calculations based on non-equilibrium Green's function show that the low-bias conductance increases with metal concentration and is comparable in the horizontal and vertical transport directions. These properties make metal intercalated transition metal di-chalcogenides potential candidates for several applications including electrochemical metallization cells and contacts in electronics based on 2D materials.

  19. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Analysis of NOV-002, a Glutathione Disulfide Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D.; Manevich, Yefim; DeVane, Lindsay C.; He, Lin; Garret, Tracy E.; Pazoles, Christopher J.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is in Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer and other oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of ~13 mins with an AUC of 1.18 μg.h/ml, a Cmax of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis. PMID:20359856

  20. Fate and Transport of Molybdenum Disulfide Nanomaterials in Sand Columns

    PubMed Central

    Lanphere, Jacob D.; Luth, Corey J.; Guiney, Linda M.; Mansukhani, Nikhita D.; Hersam, Mark C.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Research and development of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) (e.g., molybdenum disulfide [MoS2]) in electronic, optical, and catalytic applications has been growing rapidly. However, there is little known regarding the behavior of these particles once released into aquatic environments. Therefore, an in-depth study regarding the fate and transport of two popular types of MoS2 nanomaterials, lithiated (MoS2-Li) and Pluronic PF-87 dispersed (MoS2-PL), was conducted in saturated porous media (quartz sand) to identify which form would be least mobile in aquatic environments. The electrokinetic properties and hydrodynamic diameters of MoS2 as a function of ionic strength and pH were determined using a zeta potential analyzer and dynamic light scattering techniques. Results suggest that the stability is significantly decreased beginning at 10 and 31.6 mM KCl, for MoS2-PL and MoS2-Li, respectively. Transport study results from breakthrough curves, column dissections, and release experiments suggest that MoS2-PL exhibits a greater affinity to be irreversibly bound to quartz surfaces as compared with the MoS2-Li at a similar ionic strength. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory was used to help explain the unique interactions between the MoS2-PL and MoS2-Li surfaces between particles and with the quartz collectors. Overall, the results suggest that the fate and transport of MoS2 is dependent on the type of MoS2 that enters the environment, where MoS2-PL will be least mobile and more likely be deposited in porous media from pluronic–quartz interactions, whereas MoS2-Li will travel greater distances and have a greater tendency to be remobilized in sand columns. PMID:25741176

  1. Tissue factor de-encryption, thrombus formation, and thiol-disulfide exchange.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vivien M Y

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) by forming a complex with factor VIIa (FVIIa) initiates blood coagulation. It was traditionally believed that the separation of FVIIa in circulation from subendothelial TF was the main control that was preventing spontaneous initiation of thrombosis and that circulating cells and endothelium did not express TF protein at rest in healthy individuals. However, TF has been detected in healthy human plasma and animal models of thrombosis, which indicate that TF in circulation can contribute to thrombin generation and fibrin formation after an activation event. Circulating TF-and indeed, most of the TF on the cell surface-is "encrypted" or coagulation inactive. The de-encryption step involves exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), but PS exposure alone is insufficient for full TF activity. Allosteric disulfide bonds control protein function by mediating conformal change through the formation and breaking of disulfide bonds. TF contains a typical surface exposed allosteric bond in the membrane proximal fibronectin type III domain. Thiol-disulfide exchange involving this disulfide is implicated in TF activation with the formation of the disulfide bond corresponding with the active conformation of TF and free thiol or thiol-modified forms corresponding with encryption. Although the exact mechanism by which TF de-encryption occurs remains a subject of debate, thiol blockade and inhibition of oxidoreductases show an important role for thiol-disulfide reactions in platelet-independent pathways of coagulation in vitro and in vivo. In particular, redox active extracellular protein disulfide isomerase is involved in the earliest stages of thrombus initiation and has proven to be a potential target for antithrombotic drug development.

  2. The Disulfide Bond Formation Pathway Is Essential for Anaerobic Growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Brian M; Landeta, Cristina; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jonathan

    2017-08-15

    Disulfide bonds are critical to the stability and function of many bacterial proteins. In the periplasm of Escherichia coli, intramolecular disulfide bond formation is catalyzed by the two-component disulfide bond forming (DSB) system. Inactivation of the DSB pathway has been shown to lead to a number of pleotropic effects, although cells remain viable under standard laboratory conditions. However, we show here that dsb strains of E. coli reversibly filament under aerobic conditions and fail to grow anaerobically unless a strong oxidant is provided in the growth medium. These findings demonstrate that the background disulfide bond formation necessary to maintain the viability of dsb strains is oxygen dependent. LptD, a key component of the lipopolysaccharide transport system, fails to fold properly in dsb strains exposed to anaerobic conditions, suggesting that these mutants may have defects in outer membrane assembly. We also show that anaerobic growth of dsb mutants can be restored by suppressor mutations in the disulfide bond isomerization system. Overall, our results underscore the importance of proper disulfide bond formation to pathways critical to E. coli viability under conditions where oxygen is limited.IMPORTANCE While the disulfide bond formation (DSB) system of E. coli has been studied for decades and has been shown to play an important role in the proper folding of many proteins, including some associated with virulence, it was considered dispensable for growth under most laboratory conditions. This work represents the first attempt to study the effects of the DSB system under strictly anaerobic conditions, simulating the environment encountered by pathogenic E. coli strains in the human intestinal tract. By demonstrating that the DSB system is essential for growth under such conditions, this work suggests that compounds inhibiting Dsb enzymes might act not only as antivirulents but also as true antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  3. Structure of Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase from Staphylococcus aureus at 1.54 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett,T.; Wallen, J.; Karplus, P.; Sakai, H.; Tsukihara, T.; Claiborne, A.

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) replaces glutathione as the major low molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus; it is maintained in the reduced state by coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), a homodimeric enzyme similar to NADH peroxidase but containing a novel Cys43-SSCoA redox center. The crystal structure of S. aureus CoADR has been solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 1.54 {angstrom}. The resulting electron density maps define the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide conformation, with Cys43-S{gamma} located at the flavin si face, 3.2 {angstrom} from FAD-C4aF, and the CoAS- moiety lying in an extended conformation within a cleft at the dimer interface. A well-ordered chloride ion is positioned adjacent to the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide and receives a hydrogen bond from Tyr361'-OH of the complementary subunit, suggesting a role for Tyr361' as an acid-base catalyst during the reduction of CoAS-disulfide. Tyr419'-OH is located 3.2 {angstrom} from Tyr361'-OH as well and, based on its conservation in known functional CoADRs, also appears to be important for activity. Identification of residues involved in recognition of the CoAS-disulfide substrate and in formation and stabilization of the Cys43-SSCoA redox center has allowed development of a CoAS-binding motif. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that CoADR enzymes are broadly distributed in both bacterial and archaeal kingdoms, suggesting an even broader significance for the CoASH/CoAS-disulfide redox system in prokaryotic thiol/disulfide homeostasis.

  4. Exploitation in International Paid Surrogacy Arrangements

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many critics have suggested that international paid surrogacy is exploitative. Taking such concerns as its starting point, this article asks: (1) how defensible is the claim that international paid surrogacy is exploitative and what could be done to make it less exploitative? (2) In the light of the answer to (1), how strong is the case for prohibiting it? Exploitation could in principle be dealt with by improving surrogates' pay and conditions. However, doing so may exacerbate problems with consent. Foremost amongst these is the argument that surrogates from economically disadvantaged countries cannot validly consent because their background circumstances are coercive. Several versions of this argument are examined and I conclude that at least one has some merit. The article's overall conclusion is that while ethically there is something to be concerned about, paid surrogacy is in no worse a position than many other exploitative commercial transactions which take place against a backdrop of global inequality and constrained options, such as poorly‐paid and dangerous construction work. Hence, there is little reason to single surrogacy out for special condemnation. On a policy level, the case for prohibiting international commercial surrogacy is weak, despite legitimate concerns about consent and background poverty. PMID:27471338

  5. Exploitation in International Paid Surrogacy Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Many critics have suggested that international paid surrogacy is exploitative. Taking such concerns as its starting point, this article asks: (1) how defensible is the claim that international paid surrogacy is exploitative and what could be done to make it less exploitative? (2) In the light of the answer to (1), how strong is the case for prohibiting it? Exploitation could in principle be dealt with by improving surrogates' pay and conditions. However, doing so may exacerbate problems with consent. Foremost amongst these is the argument that surrogates from economically disadvantaged countries cannot validly consent because their background circumstances are coercive. Several versions of this argument are examined and I conclude that at least one has some merit. The article's overall conclusion is that while ethically there is something to be concerned about, paid surrogacy is in no worse a position than many other exploitative commercial transactions which take place against a backdrop of global inequality and constrained options, such as poorly-paid and dangerous construction work. Hence, there is little reason to single surrogacy out for special condemnation. On a policy level, the case for prohibiting international commercial surrogacy is weak, despite legitimate concerns about consent and background poverty.

  6. Social class and mental health: testing exploitation as a relational determinant of depression.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Prins, Seth J; Bones-Rocha, Katia; Espelt, Albert; Chung, Haejoo

    2015-01-01

    This study tests whether social class exploitation operates as a relational mechanism that generates mental health inequalities in the nursing home industry. We ask, does social class exploitation (i.e., the acquisition of economic benefits from the labor of those who are dominated) have a systematic and predictable impact on depression among nursing assistants? Using cross-sectional data from 868 nursing assistants employed in 50 nursing homes in three U.S. states, we measure social class exploitation as "ownership type" (private for-profit, private not-for-profit, and public) and "managerial domination" (labor relations violations, perceptions of labor-management conflict). Depression is assessed using the original and revised versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and CESD-R). Using two-level logistic regressions, we find that private for-profit ownership and higher managerial domination are predictive of depression among nursing assistants even after adjustment for potential confounders and mediators. Our findings confirm the theoretical and empirical value of applying a social class approach to understanding how mental health inequalities are generated through exploitative mechanisms. Ownership type and managerial domination appear to affect depression through social relations that generate mental health inequalities through the process of acquiring profits, controlling production, supervising and monitoring labor, and enforcing disciplinary sanctions. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Social Class and Mental Health: Testing Exploitation as a Relational Determinant of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Prins, Seth J.; Bones-Rocha, Katia; Espelt, Albert; Chung, Haejoo

    2016-01-01

    This study tests whether social class exploitation operates as a relational mechanism that generates mental health inequalities in the nursing home industry. We ask, does social class exploitation (i.e., the acquisition of economic benefits from the labor of those who are dominated) have a systematic and predictable impact on depression among nursing assistants? Using cross-sectional data from 868 nursing assistants employed in 50 nursing homes in three U.S. states, we measure social class exploitation as “ownership type” (private for-profit, private not-for-profit, and public) and “managerial domination” (labor relations violations, perceptions of labor-management conflict). Depression is assessed using the original and revised versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and CESD-R). Using two-level logistic regressions, we find that private for-profit ownership and higher managerial domination are predictive of depression among nursing assistants even after adjustment for potential confounders and mediators. Our findings confirm the theoretical and empirical value of applying a social class approach to understanding how mental health inequalities are generated through exploitative mechanisms. Ownership type and managerial domination appear to affect depression through social relations that generate mental health inequalities through the process of acquiring profits, controlling production, supervising and monitoring labor, and enforcing disciplinary sanctions. PMID:25813501

  8. Collision-activated cleavage of a peptide/antibiotic disulfide linkage: possible evidence for intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement upon collisional activation.

    PubMed

    Fagerquist, Clifton K

    2004-01-01

    Ceftiofur is an important veterinary beta-lactam antibiotic whose bioactive metabolite, desfuroylceftiofur, has a free thiol group. Desfuroylceftiofur (DFC) was reacted with two peptides, [Arg8]-vasopressin and reduced glutathione, both of which have cysteine residues to form disulfide-linked peptide/antibiotic complexes. The products of the reaction, [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, [(vasopressin+H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ and [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, were analyzed using collision-activated dissociation (CAD) with a quadrupole ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. MS/MS of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in facile dissociative loss of one and two covalently bound DFC moieties. Loss of one DFC resulted from either homolytic or heterolytic dissociation of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond with equal or unequal partitioning of the two sulfur atoms between the fragment ion and neutral loss. Hydrogen migration preceded heterolytic dissociation. Loss of two DFC moieties from [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ appears to result from collision-activated intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement (IDBR) to produce cyclic [vasopressin + H]+ (at m/z 1084) as well as other cyclic fragment ions at m/z 1084 +/- 32 and +64. The cyclic structure of these ions could only be inferred as MS/MS may result in rearrangement to non-cyclic structures prior to dissociative loss. IDBR was also detected from MS(3) experiments of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ fragment ions. MS/MS of [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in cleavage of the peptide backbone with retention of the DFC moiety as well as heterolytic cleavage of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond to produce the fragment ion: [(DFC-2H) + H]+. These results demonstrate the facile dissociative loss by CAD of DFC moieties covalently attached to peptides through disulfide bonds. Published in 2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... but they don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement ... change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people or ...

  10. Assistive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... at3center.net/home . Some Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) have programs or link to services that assist ... obtain low-cost assistive technology. To locate your AAA, call the Eldercare Locator at 1-800-677- ...

  11. Anesthesiologist Assistant

    MedlinePlus

    ... QUIZ Anesthesiologist Assistant Occupational description The Anesthesiologist Assistant (AA) is a skilled person qualified by advanced academic ... anesthesiologist. The anesthesiologist who is responsible for the AA is available to prescribe and direct particular therapeutic ...

  12. DBCP: a web server for disulfide bonding connectivity pattern prediction without the prior knowledge of the bonding state of cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsuan-Hung; Tseng, Lin-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The proper prediction of the location of disulfide bridges is efficient in helping to solve the protein folding problem. Most of the previous works on the prediction of disulfide connectivity pattern use the prior knowledge of the bonding state of cysteines. The DBCP web server provides prediction of disulfide bonding connectivity pattern without the prior knowledge of the bonding state of cysteines. The method used in this server improves the accuracy of disulfide connectivity pattern prediction (Qp) over the previous studies reported in the literature. This DBCP server can be accessed at http://120.107.8.16/dbcp or http://140.120.14.136/dbcp. PMID:20530534

  13. General Approach To Determine Disulfide Connectivity in Cysteine-Rich Peptides by Sequential Alkylation on Solid Phase and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anastasia; Eksteen, J Johannes; Isaksson, Johan; Sengee, Myagmarsuren; Hansen, Terkel; Vasskog, Terje

    2016-10-04

    Within the field of bioprospecting, disulfide-rich peptides are a promising group of compounds that has the potential to produce important leads for new pharmaceuticals. The disulfide bridges stabilize the tertiary structure of the peptides and often make them superior drug candidates to linear peptides. However, determination of disulfide connectivity in peptides with many disulfide bridges has proven to be laborious and general methods are lacking. This study presents a general approach for structure elucidation of disulfide-rich peptides. The method features sequential reduction and alkylation of a peptide on solid phase combined with sequencing of the fully alkylated peptide by tandem mass spectrometry. Subsequently, the disulfide connectivity is assigned on the basis of the determined alkylation pattern. The presented method is especially suitable for peptides that are prone to disulfide scrambling or are unstable in solution with partly reduced bridges. Additionally, the use of small amounts of peptide in the lowest nmol range makes the method ideal for structure elucidation of unknown peptides from the bioprospecting process. This study successfully demonstrates the new method for seven different peptides with two to four disulfide bridges. Two peptides with previous contradicting publications, μ-conotoxin KIIA and hepcidin-25, are included, and their disulfide connectivity is confirmed in accordance with the latest published results.

  14. Rethinking exploitation: a process-centered account.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn A; Wall, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Exploitation has become an important topic in recent discussions of biomedical and research ethics. This is due in no small measure to the influence of Alan Wertheimer's path-breaking work on the subject. This paper presents some objections to Wertheimer's account of the concept. The objections attempt to show that his account places too much emphasis on outcome-based considerations and too little on process-based considerations. Building on these objections, the paper develops an alternative process-centered account of the concept. This alternative account of exploitation takes as its point of departure the broadly Kantian notion that it is wrong to use another as an instrument for the advancement of one's own ends. It sharpens this slippery notion and adds a number of refinements to it. The paper concludes by arguing that process-centered accounts of exploitation better illuminate the ethical challenges posed by research on human subjects than outcome-centered accounts.

  15. Green polymer chemistry: Synthesis of poly(disulfide) polymers and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal-Kim, Emily Quinn

    The disulfide group is unique in that it presents a covalent bond that is easily formed and cleaved under certain biological conditions. While the ease of disulfide bond cleavage is often harnessed as a method of biodegradation, the ease of disulfide bond formation as a synthetic strategy is often overlooked. The objective this research was to synthesize poly(disulfide) polymers and disulfide crosslinked networks from a green chemistry approach. The intent of the green chemistry approach was to take advantage of the mild conditions applicable to disulfide bond synthesis from thiols. With anticipated use as biomaterials, it was also desired that the polymer materials could be degraded under biological conditions. Here, a new method of poly(disulfide) polymer synthesis is introduced which was inspired by the reaction conditions and reagents found in Nature. Ambient temperatures and aqueous mixtures were used in the new method. Hydrogen peroxide, one of the Nature's most powerful oxidizing species was used as the oxidant in the new polymerization reaction. The dithiol monomer, 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol was first solubilized in triethylamine, which activated the thiol groups and made the monomer water soluble. At room temperature, the organic dithiol/amine solution was then mixed with dilute aqueous hydrogen peroxide (3% by weight) to make the poly(disulfide) polymers. The presence of a two phase system (organic and aqueous phases) was critical to the polymerization reaction. As the reaction progresses, a third, polymer phase appeared. At ambient temperatures and above, this phase separated from the reaction mixture and the polymer product was easily removed from the reaction solution. These polymers reach Mn > 250,000 g/mol in under two hours. Molecular weight distributions were between 1.5 and 2.0. Reactions performed in an ice bath which remain below room temperature contain high molecular weight polymers with Mn ≈ 120,000 g/mol and have a molecular weight

  16. Assistive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book offers the reader new achievements within the Assistive Technology field made by worldwide experts, covering aspects such as assistive technology focused on teaching and education, mobility, communication and social interactivity, among others. Each chapter included in this book covers one particular aspect of Assistive Technology that…

  17. Assistive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book offers the reader new achievements within the Assistive Technology field made by worldwide experts, covering aspects such as assistive technology focused on teaching and education, mobility, communication and social interactivity, among others. Each chapter included in this book covers one particular aspect of Assistive Technology that…

  18. Mining and Exploitation of Rare Earth Elements in Africa as an Engagement Strategy in US Africa Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-17

    WARFIGHTING SCHOOL MINING AND EXPLOITATION OF RARE EARTH ELEMENTS IN AFRICA AS AN ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY IN US AFRICA COMMAND By Eugene...earth mining and exploitation until the late 1990s when China gained monopoly status. They now supply over 95% of rare earths to the world...government approach including United States Africa Command, can achieve several national objectives by assisting African nations in mining and

  19. Assignment of disulfide-linked peptides using automatic a1 ion recognition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng Yu; Wen, Chien Hsien; Li, Ding Tzai; Hsu, Jue Liang; Chen, Chinpan; Shi, Fong Ku; Lin, Yueh Yi

    2008-12-01

    We present a novel approach for the assignment of peptides containing disulfide linkages. Dimethyl labeling is introduced to generate labeled peptides which exhibit enhanced a1 ion signals during MS/MS fragmentation. For disulfide-linked peptides, multiple a1 ions can be observed due to multiple N-termini. This distinct feature allows sieving out the disulfide-linked peptides; meanwhile, the N-terminal amino acids can be identified. With such information, the number of possible peptide combinations involved in a disulfide bond dramatically narrows down. Furthermore, we developed a computational algorithm to perform target a1 ion screening followed by molecular weight matching of cysteine-containing peptides with specific amino acids at the N-termini. Once the protein sequence and the peak list from a LC-MS/MS survey scan of labeled peptides are imported, the identities of disulfide-linked peptides can be readily obtained. The presented approach is simple and straightforward, offering a valuable tool for protein structural characterization.

  20. On the photostability of the disulfide bond: An electronic or a structural property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephansen, Anne B.; Larsen, Martin A. B.; Klein, Liv. B.; Sølling, Theis I.

    2014-10-01

    Photostability is an essential property of molecular building blocks of nature. Disulfides are central in the structure determination of proteins, which is in striking contradiction to the result that the S-S bond is a photochemically labile structural entity that cleaves to form free radicals upon light exposure. In an earlier contribution we hypothesized that the key to the photostability of some disulfides may be found in a cyclic structural arrangement. Here we provide further evidence to support this hypothesis by showing that straight chain disulfides undergo ultrafast S-S dissociation on a sub 50 fs timescale without further ado. In a cyclic motif resembling the cysteine-disulfide bond in proteins, light can perturb the S-S bond to generate short-lived diradicaloid species, but the sulfur atoms are conformationally restricted by the ring that prevents the sulfur atoms from flying apart. Conversely, in a straight chain conformation, light perturbation results in two separated RS · radicals because there is no restoring force to counteract the repulsive motion of the sulfur atoms. For the cyclic conformation this restoring force is provided by the cyclic framework, and thus the photostability of disulfide-bonds must be ascribed a cyclic structural arrangement.

  1. The significance of disulfide bonding in biological activity of HB-EGF, a mutagenesis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, J.T.; Zhou, Z.; Harding, P.A.

    2008-10-31

    A site-directed mutagenesis approach was taken to disrupt each of 3 disulfide bonds within human HB-EGF by substituting serine for both cysteine residues that contribute to disulfide bonding. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue (HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121}, HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132}, and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143}) was cloned under the regulation of the mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter and stably expressed in mouse fibroblasts. HB-EGF immunoreactive proteins with M{sub r} of 6.5, 21 and 24 kDa were observed from lysates of HB-EGF and each HB-EGF disulfide analogue. HB-EGF immunohistochemical analyses of each HB-EGF stable cell line demonstrated ubiquitous protein expression except HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} stable cell lines which exhibited accumulated expression immediately outside the nucleus. rHB-EGF, HB-EGF, and HB-EGF{sub 134/143} proteins competed with {sup 125}I-EGF in an A431 competitive binding assay, whereas HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} failed to compete. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue lacked the ability to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the 170 kDa EGFR. These results suggest that HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143} antagonizes EGFRs.

  2. Eight at one stroke - a synthetic tetra-disulfide peptide epitope.

    PubMed

    Schrimpf, Andreas; Linne, Uwe; Geyer, Armin

    2017-02-13

    We have designed a cysteine-rich β-hairpin peptide which dimerises spontaneously to the antiparallel double β-hairpin motif C1-C12', C1'-C12, C5-C8, C5'-C8'-tricyclo-(CHWECCitGCRLVC)2. The highly regioselective oxidation of eight cysteines yields an intermolecular bi-disulfide 24mer hinge peptide from two individual 12mer β-hairpins, each rigidified by an additional intramolecular disulfide bond - all in all a tetra-disulfide. The reaction kinetics of air-oxidation were followed by HPLC and the constitutional isomer was identified by mass spectrometry. The hairpin conformation was characterised in detail by NMR spectroscopy and the opening angle of the antiparallel hinge was estimated from drift times obtained by ion-mobility spectrometry. Based on a set of investigated disulfide motifs, we are able to rationalise how the unbalanced number of bonded and non-bonded hydrogen pairs in a 12 mer hairpin causes their dimerisation. The unique dimeric bi-/tetra-disulfides provide systematic insights into β-hairpin formation. They can serve as a standalone structural element for the oligomerisation of peptide epitopes where structural diversity is generated from a minimal number of amino acids.

  3. Functional Analysis of Paralogous Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases in Streptococcus gordonii*

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Ng, Crystal K. W.; Halperin, Scott A.; Lee, Song F.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are important for the stability of many extracellular proteins, including bacterial virulence factors. Formation of these bonds is catalyzed by thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (TDORs). Little is known about their formation in Gram-positive bacteria, particularly among facultative anaerobic Firmicutes, such as streptococci. To investigate disulfide bond formation in Streptococcus gordonii, we identified five putative TDORs from the sequenced genome. Each of the putative TDOR genes was insertionally inactivated with an erythromycin resistance cassette, and the mutants were analyzed for autolysis, extracellular DNA release, biofilm formation, bacteriocin production, and genetic competence. This analysis revealed a single TDOR, SdbA, which exhibited a pleiotropic mutant phenotype. Using an in silico analysis approach, we identified the major autolysin AtlS as a natural substrate of SdbA and showed that SdbA is critical to the formation of a disulfide bond that is required for autolytic activity. Analysis by BLAST search revealed homologs to SdbA in other Gram-positive species. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of an oxidoreductase, SdbA, that affects multiple phenotypes in a Gram-positive bacterium. SdbA shows low sequence homology to previously identified oxidoreductases, suggesting that it may belong to a different class of enzymes. Our results demonstrate that SdbA is required for disulfide bond formation in S. gordonii and indicate that this enzyme may represent a novel type of oxidoreductase in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23615907

  4. An intramolecular disulfide bond designed in myoglobin fine-tunes both protein structure and peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei-Bin; Yuan, Hong; Zhou, Hu; Gao, Shu-Qin; Nie, Chang-Ming; Tan, Xiangshi; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-06-15

    Disulfide bond plays crucial roles in stabilization of protein structure and in fine-tuning protein functions. To explore an approach for rational heme protein design, we herein rationally introduced a pair of cysteines (F46C/M55C) into the scaffold of myoglobin (Mb), mimicking those in native neuroglobin. Molecular modeling suggested that it is possible for Cys46 and Cys55 to form an intramolecular disulfide bond, which was confirmed experimentally by ESI-MS analysis, DTNB reaction and CD spectrum. Moreover, it was shown that the spontaneously formed disulfide bond of Cys46-Cys55 fine-tunes not only the heme active site structure, but also the protein functions. The substitution of Phe46 with Ser46 in F46S Mb destabilizes the protein while facilitates H2O2 activation. Remarkably, the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond of Cys46-Cys55 in F46C/M55C Mb improves the protein stability and regulates the heme site to be more favorable for substrate binding, resulting in enhanced peroxidase activity. This study provides valuable information of structure-function relationship for heme proteins regulated by an intramolecular disulfide bond, and also suggests that construction of such a covalent bond is useful for design of functional heme proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CHANGES IN DISULFIDE BOND CONTENT OF PROTEINS IN A YEAST STRAIN LACKING MAJOR SOURCES OF NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Karyl I.; Carroll, Christopher A.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Mc-Alister-Henn, Lee

    2006-01-01

    A yeast mutant lacking the two major cytosolic sources of NADPH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1p) and NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idp2p), has been demonstrated to lose viability when shifted to medium with acetate or oleate as the carbon source. This loss in viability was found to correlate with an accumulation of endogenous oxidative byproducts of respiration and peroxisomal β-oxidation. To assess effects on cellular protein of endogenous versus exogenous oxidative stress, a proteomics approach was used to compare disulfide bond-containing proteins in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain following shifts to acetate and oleate media with those in the parental strain following similar shifts to media containing hydrogen peroxide. Among prominent disulfide bond-containing proteins were several with known antioxidant functions. These and several other proteins were detected as multiple electrophoretic isoforms, with some isoforms containing disulfide bonds under all conditions and other isoforms exhibiting a redox-sensitive content of disulfide bonds, i.e., in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain and in the hydrogen peroxide-challenged parental strain. The disulfide bond content of some isoforms of these proteins was also elevated in the parental strain grown on glucose, possibly suggesting a redirection of NADPH reducing equivalents to support rapid growth. Further examination of protein carbonylation in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain shifted to oleate medium also led to identification of common and unique protein targets of endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:17157197

  6. Size and conformation limits to secretion of disulfide-bonded loops in autotransporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Denisse L; Sevastsyanovich, Yanina R; Browning, Douglas F; Rossiter, Amanda E; Wells, Timothy J; Fitzpatrick, Rebecca E; Overduin, Michael; Cunningham, Adam F; Henderson, Ian R

    2011-12-09

    Autotransporters are a superfamily of virulence factors typified by a channel-forming C terminus that facilitates translocation of the functional N-terminal passenger domain across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This final step in the secretion of autotransporters requires a translocation-competent conformation for the passenger domain that differs markedly from the structure of the fully folded secreted protein. The nature of the translocation-competent conformation remains controversial, in particular whether the passenger domain can adopt secondary structural motifs, such as disulfide-bonded segments, while maintaining a secretion-competent state. Here, we used the endogenous and closely spaced cysteine residues of the plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to investigate the effect of disulfide bond-induced folding on translocation of an autotransporter passenger domain. We reveal that rigid structural elements within disulfide-bonded segments are resistant to autotransporter-mediated secretion. We define the size limit of disulfide-bonded segments tolerated by the autotransporter system demonstrating that, when present, cysteine pairs are intrinsically closely spaced to prevent congestion of the translocator pore by large disulfide-bonded regions. These latter data strongly support the hairpin mode of autotransporter biogenesis.

  7. Thiol-disulfide interchange in the tocinoic acid/glutathione system during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Thing, Mette; Zhang, Jun; Laurence, Jennifer; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2010-12-01

    Thiol-disulfide interchange ("disulfide scrambling") is a common mechanism of covalent aggregation for protein drugs. Using tocinoic acid (cyclo-S-Cys-Tyr-Ile-Gln-Asn-Cys-(S); TA(ox)) and glutathione (γGlu-Cys-Gly; GSH), our previous work demonstrated that thiol/disulfide interchange is affected by lyophilization in a manner consistent with irreversible and regioselective loss of TA(ox) (Zhang et al., 2009, J Pharm Sci 98/9: 3312-3318). Here, we explore the contributions of stages of the lyophilization cycle to perturbations in thiol/disulfide interchange in the TA/GSH system. TA(ox) and GSH were co-lyophilized from phosphate buffer in the presence or absence of various excipients, then analyzed for TA(ox) and mixed disulfide products by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (rp-HPLC). Perturbations were found to occur primarily during freezing, before significant amounts of ice were removed by sublimation. Addition of a lyoprotectant (sucrose), a cryoprotectant (Tween-20) and flash-freezing influenced the product distribution only while ice was still present. Decreasing the redox potential by the addition of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) affected the product distribution differently in lyophilized samples and solution controls, but in neither case led to increased conservation of TA(ox). © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  8. Multiblock Copolymer-Based Dual Dynamic Disulfide and Supramolecular Crosslinked Self-Healing Networks.

    PubMed

    An, So Young; Noh, Seung Man; Oh, Jung Kwon

    2017-04-01

    A new multiblock copolymer self-healing strategy is reported that centers on the synthesis of block copolymers designed with different self-healing motifs incorporated into individual blocks. As a proof of concept, a novel pentablock copolymer (ABCBA) consisting of a poly(ethylene glycol) middle block and self-healable symmetric blocks of a polymethacrylate with pendant disulfide linkages and carboxylic acids is synthesized by a combination of consecutive controlled radical polymerization with hydrolytic cleavage. Disulfide exchange reactions of pendant disulfide linkages and metal-ligand interactions of pendant carboxylic acids with ferric ions allow for the formation of dual crosslinked networks with dynamic disulfide and supramolecular crosslinkages. The resultant networks possessing self-healing viscoelasticity enable self-healing on macroscale damages through supramolecular metal-ligand interactions and disulfide exchange reactions at room or moderate temperatures. These preliminary results suggest that the strategy can offer the versatility in the development of multifunctional self-healable materials in dual or multiple self-healable mechanisms. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Bioengineering of coagulation factor VIII for efficient expression through elimination of a dispensable disulfide loop

    PubMed Central

    SELVARAJ, SUNDAR R; SCHELLER, ARNO N; MIAO, HONGZHI Z; KAUFMAN, RANDAL J; PIPE, STEVEN W

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Heterologous expression of Factor VIII (FVIII) is about 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than similarly sized proteins. Bioengineering strategies aimed at different structural and biochemical attributes of FVIII have been successful in enhancing its expression levels. Objective Disulfide bonds are vital to the proper folding, secretion and stability of most secretory proteins. In an effort to explore additional targeted bioengineering approaches, the role of disulfide bonds in FVIII secretion and function was probed in this study. Methods and Results Single and paired cysteine mutants were generated by substituting with serine or glycine residues and analyzed by transient transfection into COS-1 and CHO cells. Seven of the eight disulfide bonds in FVIII were found to be indispensable for proper secretion and function. However, elimination of the disulfide bond formed by C1899 and C1903 within the conserved A3 domain improved the secretion of FVIII. The addition of the C1899G/C1903G mutations to a previously described FVIII variant, 226/N6, with high secretion efficiency increased its secretion by 2.2-fold. Finally, the addition of the A1-domain mutation, F309S in conjunction with the disulfide mutation had an additive effect resulting in a net improvement in secretion of between 35–45 fold higher than wild type FVIII in CHO cells. Conclusion Such combined targeted bioengineering strategies may facilitate more efficient production of recombinant FVIII toward low cost factor replacement therapy for hemophilia A. PMID:22044596

  10. Delicate balance of electrostatic interactions and disulfide bridges in thermostability of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Somayeh; Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2012-12-01

    The wild type Photinus pyralis luciferase does not have any disulfide bridge. Disulfide bridges are determinant in inherent stability of protein at moderate temperatures. Meanwhile, arginin is responsible for thermostability at higher temperatures. In this study, by concomitant introduction of disulfide bridge and a surface arginin in a mutant (A296C-A326C/I232R), the contribution of disulfide bridge introduction and surface hydrophilic residue on activity and global stability of P. pyralis luciferase is investigated. In addition to the mentioned mutant; I232R, A296C-A326C and wild type luciferases are characterized. Though addition of Arg caused stability against proteolysis but in combination with disulfide bridge resulted in decreased thermal stability compared to A296C-A326C mutant. In spite of long distance of two different mutations (A296C-A326C and I232R) from each other in the three-dimensional structure, combination of their effects on the stability of luciferase was not cumulative.

  11. Dual Beneficial Effect of Interloop Disulfide Bond for Single Domain Antibody Fragments*

    PubMed Central

    Govaert, Jochen; Pellis, Mireille; Deschacht, Nick; Vincke, Cécile; Conrath, Katja; Muyldermans, Serge; Saerens, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The antigen-binding fragment of functional heavy chain antibodies (HCAbs) in camelids comprises a single domain, named the variable domain of heavy chain of HCAbs (VHH). The VHH harbors remarkable amino acid substitutions in the framework region-2 to generate an antigen-binding domain that functions in the absence of a light chain partner. The substitutions provide a more hydrophilic, hence more soluble, character to the VHH but decrease the intrinsic stability of the domain. Here we investigate the functional role of an additional hallmark of dromedary VHHs, i.e. the extra disulfide bond between the first and third antigen-binding loops. After substituting the cysteines forming this interloop cystine by all 20 amino acids, we selected and characterized several VHHs that retain antigen binding capacity. Although VHH domains can function in the absence of an interloop disulfide bond, we demonstrate that its presence constitutes a net advantage. First, the disulfide bond stabilizes the domain and counteracts the destabilization by the framework region-2 hallmark amino acids. Second, the disulfide bond rigidifies the long third antigen-binding loop, leading to a stronger antigen interaction. This dual beneficial effect explains the in vivo antibody maturation process favoring VHH domains with an interloop disulfide bond. PMID:22128183

  12. Disulfide Connectivity Prediction Based on Modelled Protein 3D Structural Information and Random Forest Regression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong-Jun; Li, Yang; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xibei; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Disulfide connectivity is an important protein structural characteristic. Accurately predicting disulfide connectivity solely from protein sequence helps to improve the intrinsic understanding of protein structure and function, especially in the post-genome era where large volume of sequenced proteins without being functional annotated is quickly accumulated. In this study, a new feature extracted from the predicted protein 3D structural information is proposed and integrated with traditional features to form discriminative features. Based on the extracted features, a random forest regression model is performed to predict protein disulfide connectivity. We compare the proposed method with popular existing predictors by performing both cross-validation and independent validation tests on benchmark datasets. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over existing predictors. We believe the superiority of the proposed method benefits from both the good discriminative capability of the newly developed features and the powerful modelling capability of the random forest. The web server implementation, called TargetDisulfide, and the benchmark datasets are freely available at: http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetDisulfide for academic use.

  13. Pressure Induced Resonance Raman Effects in Shocked Carbon Disulfide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    currently underway. The assistance of Paul Bellamy and Jerry Thompson with the experimental work is acknowledged. This work was supported by ONR contract...Renlund, S.A. Sheffiel, and W.M. Trott , ’Time Resolved Infrared Spec- tral Photograph Studies of Shock Induced Chemistry in CS2 ’ pp 237 in Ref. 1 14. N.C

  14. Child Exploitation: Some Pieces of the Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohlader, Dorothy

    The report addresses the status in North Carolina and in the nation of child exploitation. Legislative and judicial backgrounds of child pornography and child prostitution are reviewed, and difficulties in obtaining statistical data are noted. Law enforcement issues in pornography are cited, and suggestions for further legislation regarding child…

  15. Exploiting a natural auxotrophy for genetic selection.

    PubMed

    Ramage, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Larry; Manoil, Colin

    2012-08-01

    We exploited the natural histidine auxotrophy of Francisella species to develop hisD (encodes histidinol dehydrogenase) as a positive selection marker. A shuttle plasmid (pBR103) carrying Escherichia coli hisD and designed for cloning of PCR fragments replicated in both attenuated and highly virulent Francisella strains. During this work, we formulated a simplified defined growth medium for Francisella novicida.

  16. Child Exploitation: Some Pieces of the Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohlader, Dorothy

    The report addresses the status in North Carolina and in the nation of child exploitation. Legislative and judicial backgrounds of child pornography and child prostitution are reviewed, and difficulties in obtaining statistical data are noted. Law enforcement issues in pornography are cited, and suggestions for further legislation regarding child…

  17. Geothermal energy exploitation in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The essential factors, human and technical, which control the operation of geothermal systems, particularly those which allow prediction of behavior during and after exploitation, are sketched. The strategy and co-ordination involved in using New Zealand's geothermal resources for power production are considered. The broader aspects of the technical matters involved in the design of the parasitic plant reservoir system are described. (MHR)

  18. Drug interactions with potential rubber closure extractables. Identification of thiol-disulfide exchange reaction products of captopril and thiurams.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Claudia; Tomasella, Frank P; Young, Joel

    2009-01-02

    Mixtures of thiuram disulfides are frequently used as accelerators in rubber stoppers for injectables and sterilized powders for injection. Rapid reactions of thiuram disulfides between themselves and with thiols yield mixed disulfides due to thiol-disulfide exchange. The possibility of exchange reactions of thiuram disulfides extracted from rubber stoppers and drug products containing pendant thiol groups have not been reported in the analysis of potential stopper extractables. In this paper we report the formation and identification of mixed thiuram disulfides of N,N,N',N'-dimethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD), N,N,N',N'-dibutylthiuram disulfide (TBTD), and captopril (a thiol-containing drug). A reversed-phase HPLC method was developed for the determination of TMTD, TBTD, captopril and their disulfides in aqueous vehicles, using a YMC ODS AQ column at 35 degrees C and mobile phases A and B consisting of acetonitrile:water:trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (20:80:0.1) and acetonitrile:TFA (100:0.1), respectively. The captopril-TBTD and captopril-TMTD disulfides were identified by MS, with molecular ions at m/z 420.9 and m/z of 337.1, respectively. Possible structures for the fragment ions in the spectra are provided. Mixed captopril-thiuram formation was studied as a function of pH. Captopril-TMTD formation was enhanced at pH 6.0, reaching a maximum of 31.3% in 4.1h. At pH 4.0 and 2.2, the mixed captopril adduct product was still detected in solution after 20h. The impact of the formation of mixed disulfide products of thiol-containing drugs with thiurams in the HPLC profile of extractables and leachables studies is discussed.

  19. Distinct folding pathways of two homologous disulfide proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2011-01-01

    The folding pathways of disulfide proteins vary substantially (Arolas et al., Trends Biochem Sci 31: 292-301, 2006). The diversity is mainly manifested by (a) the extent of heterogeneity of folding intermediates, (b) the extent of presence of native-like intermediates, and (c) the variation of folding kinetics. Even among structurally similar proteins, the difference can be enormous. This is demonstrated in this concise review with two structurally homologous kunitz-type protease inhibitors, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide, as well as a group of cystine knot proteins. The diversity of their folding mechanisms is illustrated with two different folding techniques: (a) the conventional method of disulfide oxidation (oxidative folding), and (b) the novel method of disulfide scrambling (Chang, J Biol Chem 277: 120-126, 2002). This review also highlights the convergence of folding models concluded form the conventional conformational folding and those obtained by oxidative folding.

  20. All intermediates of the arsenate reductase mechanism, including an intramolecular dynamic disulfide cascade

    PubMed Central

    Messens, Joris; Martins, José C.; Van Belle, Karolien; Brosens, Elke; Desmyter, Aline; De Gieter, Marjan; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Willem, Rudolph; Wyns, Lode; Zegers, Ingrid

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of pI258 arsenate reductase (ArsC) catalyzed arsenate reduction, involving its P-loop structural motif and three redox active cysteines, has been unraveled. All essential intermediates are visualized with x-ray crystallography, and NMR is used to map dynamic regions in a key disulfide intermediate. Steady-state kinetics of ArsC mutants gives a view of the crucial residues for catalysis. ArsC combines a phosphatase-like nucleophilic displacement reaction with a unique intramolecular disulfide bond cascade. Within this cascade, the formation of a disulfide bond triggers a reversible “conformational switch” that transfers the oxidative equivalents to the surface of the protein, while releasing the reduced substrate. PMID:12072565

  1. Electron transfer and coupling in graphene-tungsten disulfide van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaqi; Kumar, Nardeep; Bellus, Matthew Z; Chiu, Hsin-Ying; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Hui

    2014-11-25

    The newly discovered two-dimensional materials can be used to form atomically thin and sharp van der Waals heterostructures with nearly perfect interface qualities, which can transform the science and technology of semiconductor heterostructures. Owing to the weak van der Waals interlayer coupling, the electronic states of participating materials remain largely unchanged. Hence, emergent properties of these structures rely on two key elements: electron transfer across the interface and interlayer coupling. Here we show, using graphene-tungsten disulfide heterostructures as an example, evidence of ultrafast and highly efficient interlayer electron transfer and strong interlayer coupling and control. We find that photocarriers injected in tungsten disulfide transfer to graphene in 1 ps and with near-unity efficiency. We also demonstrate that optical properties of tungsten disulfide can be effectively tuned by carriers in graphene. These findings illustrate basic processes required for using van der Waals heterostructures in electronics and photonics.

  2. Disulfide Bond Formation and Activation of Escherichia coli β-Galactosidase under Oxidizing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Affentranger, Roman; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Daura, Xavier; Villaverde, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli β-galactosidase is probably the most widely used reporter enzyme in molecular biology, cell biology, and biotechnology because of the easy detection of its activity. Its large size and tetrameric structure make this bacterial protein an interesting model for crystallographic studies and atomic mapping. In the present study, we investigate a version of Escherichia coli β-galactosidase produced under oxidizing conditions, in the cytoplasm of an Origami strain. Our data prove the activation of this microbial enzyme under oxidizing conditions and clearly show the occurrence of a disulfide bond in the β-galactosidase structure. Additionally, the formation of this disulfide bond is supported by the analysis of a homology model of the protein that indicates that two cysteines located in the vicinity of the catalytic center are sufficiently close for disulfide bond formation. PMID:22286993

  3. Molecular Simulations of Disulfide-Rich Venom Peptides with Ion Channels and Membranes.

    PubMed

    Deplazes, Evelyne

    2017-02-27

    Disulfide-rich peptides isolated from the venom of arthropods and marine animals are a rich source of potent and selective modulators of ion channels. This makes these peptides valuable lead molecules for the development of new drugs to treat neurological disorders. Consequently, much effort goes into understanding their mechanism of action. This paper presents an overview of how molecular simulations have been used to study the interactions of disulfide-rich venom peptides with ion channels and membranes. The review is focused on the use of docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and free energy calculations to (i) predict the structure of peptide-channel complexes; (ii) calculate binding free energies including the effect of peptide modifications; and (iii) study the membrane-binding properties of disulfide-rich venom peptides. The review concludes with a summary and outlook.

  4. TXNDC5, a newly discovered disulfide isomerase with a key role in cell physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Horna-Terrón, Elena; Pradilla-Dieste, Alberto; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Osada, Jesús

    2014-12-17

    Thioredoxin domain-containing 5 (TXNDC5) is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, acting as a chaperone of endoplasmic reticulum under not fully characterized conditions As a result, TXNDC5 interacts with many cell proteins, contributing to their proper folding and correct formation of disulfide bonds through its thioredoxin domains. Moreover, it can also work as an electron transfer reaction, recovering the functional isoform of other protein disulfide isomerases, replacing reduced glutathione in its role. Finally, it also acts as a cellular adapter, interacting with the N-terminal domain of adiponectin receptor. As can be inferred from all these functions, TXNDC5 plays an important role in cell physiology; therefore, dysregulation of its expression is associated with oxidative stress, cell ageing and a large range of pathologies such as arthritis, cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, vitiligo and virus infections. Its implication in all these important diseases has made TXNDC5 a susceptible biomarker or even a potential pharmacological target.

  5. Cytosolic disulfide bond formation in cells infected with large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Motti; Fass, Deborah

    2010-10-01

    Proteins that have evolved to contain stabilizing disulfide bonds generally fold in a membrane-delimited compartment in the cell [i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS)]. These compartments contain sulfhydryl oxidase enzymes that catalyze the pairing and oxidation of cysteine residues. In contrast, most proteins in a healthy cytosol are maintained in reduced form through surveillance by NADPH-dependent reductases and the lack of sulfhydryl oxidases. Nevertheless, one of the core functionalities that unify the broad and diverse set of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) is the ability to catalyze disulfide formation in the cytosol. The substrates of this activity are proteins that contribute to the assembly, structure, and infectivity of the virions. If the last common ancestor of NCLDVs was present during eukaryogenesis as has been proposed, it is interesting to speculate that viral disulfide bond formation pathways may have predated oxidative protein folding in intracellular organelles.

  6. Failure life determination of oilfield elastomer seals in sour gas/dimethyl disulfide environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kennelley, K.J.; Abrams, P.I. ); Vicic, J.C. ); Cain, D. )

    1989-01-01

    Previous screening tests of various oilfield elastomers in sour gas/dimethyl disulfide environments indicated that hydrogenated nitrile (HNBR), tetrafluoroethylene-propylene (TFE/P), ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM), and perfluorinated rubber (FFKM) elastomers may perform satisfactorily in these environments. This paper describes subsequent failure life tests conducted with the subject elastomers in the sour gas/dimethyl disulfide test environment at several elevated temperatures (> 135{degrees}C). The materials were tested in the form of O-rings (size 214), which were used to seal an autoclave containing the test environment at 14 MPa gas pressure. The results were used to extrapolate time to failure at a common reference temperature of 135{degrees}C. The performance of EPDM and HNBR in the sour gas/dimethyl disulfide mixture substantially exceeded a projected 20-year service life at 135{degrees}C, while FFKM and TFE/P did not.

  7. Lid mobility in lipase SMG1 validated using a thiol/disulfide redox potential probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaohua; Popowicz, Grzegorz Maria; Li, Daoming; Yuan, Dongjuan; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-05-01

    Most lipases possess a lid domain above the catalytic site that is responsible for their activation. Lipase SMG1 from Malassezia globose CBS 7966 (Malassezia globosa LIP1), is a mono- and diacylglycerol lipase with an atypical loop-like lid domain. Activation of SMG1 was proposed to be solely through a gating mechanism involving two residues (F278 and N102). However, through disulfide bond cross-linking of the lid, this study shows that full activation also requires mobility of the lid domain, contrary to a previous proposal. The newly introduced disulfide bond makes lipase SMG1 eligible as a ratiometric thiol/disulfide redox potential probe, when it is coupled with chromogenic substrates. This redox-switch lipase could also be of potential use in cascade biocatalysis.

  8. Trolling may intensify exploitation in crappie fisheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meals, K. O.; Dunn, A. W.; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2012-01-01

    In some parts of the USA, anglers targeting crappies Pomoxis spp. are transitioning from mostly stationary angling with a single pole around submerged structures to using multiple poles while drifting with the wind or under power. This shift in fishing methods could result in a change in catch efficiency, possibly increasing exploitation rates to levels that would be of concern to managers. We studied the catch statistics of anglers fishing while trolling with multiple poles (trollers) and those fishing with single poles (polers) in Mississippi reservoirs. Specifically, we tested whether (1) various catch statistics differed between trollers and polers, (2) catch rates of trollers were related to the number of poles fished, and (3) trollers could raise exploitation rates to potentially unsustainable levels. Results showed that participation in the crappie fisheries was about equally split between polers and trollers. In spring, 90% of crappie anglers were polers; in summer, 85% of crappie anglers were trollers. The size of harvested crappies was similar for the two angler groups, but the catch per hour was almost three times higher for trollers than for polers. Catch rates by trollers were directly correlated to the number of poles fished, although the relationship flattened as the number of poles increased. The average harvest rate for one troller fishing with three poles was similar to the harvest rate obtained by one poler. Simulations predicted that at the existing mix of about 50% polers and 50% trollers and with no restrictions on the number of poles used by trollers, exploitation of crappies is about 1.3 times higher than that in a polers-only fishery; under a scenario in which 100% of crappie anglers were trollers, exploitation was forecasted to increase to about 1.7 times the polers-only rate. The efficiency of trolling for crappies should be of concern to fishery managers because crappie fisheries are mostly consumptive and may increase exploitation

  9. Dissemination and Exploitation: Project Goals beyond Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Kristin; Reitz, Anja

    2017-04-01

    Dissemination and Exploitation are essential parts of public funded projects. In Horizon 2020 a plan for the exploitation and dissemination of results (PEDR) is a requirement. The plan should contain a clear vision on the objectives of the project in relation to actions for dissemination and potential exploitation of the project results. The actions follow the basic idea to spread the knowledge and results gathered within the project and face the challenge of how to bring the results into potentially relevant policy circle and how they impact the market. The plan follows the purpose to assess the impact of the project and to address various target groups who are interested in the project results. Simply put, dissemination concentrates on the transfer of knowledge and exploitation on the commercialization of the project. Beyond the question of the measurability of project`s impact, strategies within science marketing can serve purposes beyond internal and external communication. Accordingly, project managers are facing the challenge to implement a dissemination and exploitation strategy that ideally supports the identification of all partners with the project and matches the current discourse of the project`s content within the society, politics and economy. A consolidated plan might unite all projects partners under a central idea and supports the identification with the project beyond the individual research questions. Which applications, strategies and methods can be used to bring forward a PEDR that accompanies a project successfully and allows a comprehensive assessment of the project afterwards? Which hurdles might project managers experience in the dissemination process and which tasks should be fulfilled by the project manager?

  10. Disulfide stress: a novel type of oxidative stress in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Mari-Luz; Escobar, Javier; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Alicia; Gil, Anabel; Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Zapico, Inés; Vento, Máximo; Sabater, Luis; Marina, Anabel; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Sastre, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Glutathione oxidation and protein glutathionylation are considered hallmarks of oxidative stress in cells because they reflect thiol redox status in proteins. Our aims were to analyze the redox status of thiols and to identify mixed disulfides and targets of redox signaling in pancreas in experimental acute pancreatitis as a model of acute inflammation associated with glutathione depletion. Glutathione depletion in pancreas in acute pancreatitis is not associated with any increase in oxidized glutathione levels or protein glutathionylation. Cystine and homocystine levels as well as protein cysteinylation and γ-glutamyl cysteinylation markedly rose in pancreas after induction of pancreatitis. Protein cysteinylation was undetectable in pancreas under basal conditions. Targets of disulfide stress were identified by Western blotting, diagonal electrophoresis, and proteomic methods. Cysteinylated albumin was detected. Redox-sensitive PP2A and tyrosine protein phosphatase activities diminished in pancreatitis and this loss was abrogated by N-acetylcysteine. According to our findings, disulfide stress may be considered a specific type of oxidative stress in acute inflammation associated with protein cysteinylation and γ-glutamylcysteinylation and oxidation of the pair cysteine/cystine, but without glutathione oxidation or changes in protein glutathionylation. Two types of targets of disulfide stress were identified: redox buffers, such as ribonuclease inhibitor or albumin, and redox-signaling thiols, which include thioredoxin 1, APE1/Ref1, Keap1, tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphatases, and protein disulfide isomerase. These targets exhibit great relevance in DNA repair, cell proliferation, apoptosis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and inflammatory response. Disulfide stress would be a specific mechanism of redox signaling independent of glutathione redox status involved in inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Insulin analog with additional disulfide bond has increased stability and preserved activity

    PubMed Central

    Vinther, Tine N; Norrman, Mathias; Ribel, Ulla; Huus, Kasper; Schlein, Morten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Pettersson, Ingrid; Ludvigsen, Svend; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Jensen, Knud J; Hubálek, František

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone controlling glucose homeostasis. All known vertebrate insulin analogs have a classical structure with three 100% conserved disulfide bonds that are essential for structural stability and thus the function of insulin. It might be hypothesized that an additional disulfide bond may enhance insulin structural stability which would be highly desirable in a pharmaceutical use. To address this hypothesis, we designed insulin with an additional interchain disulfide bond in positions A10/B4 based on Cα-Cα distances, solvent exposure, and side-chain orientation in human insulin (HI) structure. This insulin analog had increased affinity for the insulin receptor and apparently augmented glucodynamic potency in a normal rat model compared with HI. Addition of the disulfide bond also resulted in a 34.6°C increase in melting temperature and prevented insulin fibril formation under high physical stress even though the C-terminus of the B-chain thought to be directly involved in fibril formation was not modified. Importantly, this analog was capable of forming hexamer upon Zn addition as typical for wild-type insulin and its crystal structure showed only minor deviations from the classical insulin structure. Furthermore, the additional disulfide bond prevented this insulin analog from adopting the R-state conformation and thus showing that the R-state conformation is not a prerequisite for binding to insulin receptor as previously suggested. In summary, this is the first example of an insulin analog featuring a fourth disulfide bond with increased structural stability and retained function. PMID:23281053

  12. New analogs of the CART peptide with anorexigenic potency: the importance of individual disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Blechová, Miroslava; Nagelová, Veronika; Záková, Lenka; Demianová, Zuzana; Zelezná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide is an anorexigenic neuropeptide that acts in the hypothalamus. The receptor and the mechanism of action of this peptide are still unknown. In our previous study, we showed that the CART peptide binds specifically to PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells in both the native and differentiated into neuronal phenotype. Two biologically active forms, CART(55-102) and CART(61-102), with equal biological activity, contain three disulfide bridges. To clarify the importance of each of these disulfide bridges in maintaining the biological activity of CART(61-102), an Ala scan at particular S-S bridges forming cysteines was performed, and analogs with only one or two disulfide bridges were synthesized. In this study, a stabilized CART(61-102) analog with norleucine instead of methionine at position 67 was also prepared and was found to bind to PC12 cells with an anorexigenic potency similar to that of CART(61-102). The binding study revealed that out of all analogs tested, [Ala(68,86)]CART(61-102), which contains two disulfide bridges (positions 74-94 and 88-101), preserved a high affinity to both native PC12 cells and those that had been differentiated into neurons. In food intake and behavioral tests with mice after intracerebroventricular administration, this analog showed strong and long-lasting anorexigenic potency. Therefore, the disulfide bridge between cysteines 68 and 86 in CART(61-102) can be omitted without a loss of biological activity, but the preservation of two other disulfide bridges and the full-length peptide are essential for biological activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stabilization of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 Receptor Complex through Targeted Interchain Disulfide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Nichole; Mendelow, Barry V.; Napier, Grant B.; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Killick, Mark; Khati, Makobetsa; Stevens, Wendy; Capovilla, Alexio

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 enters cells via interaction between the trimeric envelope (Env) glycoprotein gp120/gp41 and the host cell surface receptor molecule CD4. The requirement of CD4 for viral entry has rationalized the development of recombinant CD4-based proteins as competitive viral attachment inhibitors and immunotherapeutic agents. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant CD4 protein designed to bind gp120 through a targeted disulfide-exchange mechanism. According to structural models of the gp120-CD4 receptor complex, substitution of Ser60 on the CD4 domain 1 α-helix with Cys positions a thiol in proximity of the gp120 V1/V2 loop disulfide (Cys126–Cys196), satisfying the stereochemical and geometric conditions for redox exchange between CD4 Cys60 and gp120 Cys126, and the consequent formation of an interchain disulfide bond. In this study, we provide experimental evidence for this effect by describing the expression, purification, refolding, receptor binding and antiviral activity analysis of a recombinant two-domain CD4 variant containing the S60C mutation (2dCD4-S60C). We show that 2dCD4-S60C binds HIV-1 gp120 with a significantly higher affinity than wild-type protein under conditions that facilitate disulfide exchange and that this translates into a corresponding increase in the efficacy of CD4-mediated viral entry inhibition. We propose that targeted redox exchange between conserved gp120 disulfides and nucleophilic moieties positioned strategically on CD4 (or CD4-like scaffolds) conceptualizes a new strategy in the development of high affinity HIV-1 Env ligands, with important implications for therapy and vaccine development. More generally, this chalcogen substitution approach provides a general means of stabilizing receptor-ligand complexes where the structural and biophysical conditions for disulfide exchange are satisfied. PMID:20538591

  14. Stabilization of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 receptor complex through targeted interchain disulfide exchange.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Nichole; Mendelow, Barry V; Napier, Grant B; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A; Killick, Mark; Khati, Makobetsa; Stevens, Wendy; Capovilla, Alexio

    2010-08-13

    HIV-1 enters cells via interaction between the trimeric envelope (Env) glycoprotein gp120/gp41 and the host cell surface receptor molecule CD4. The requirement of CD4 for viral entry has rationalized the development of recombinant CD4-based proteins as competitive viral attachment inhibitors and immunotherapeutic agents. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant CD4 protein designed to bind gp120 through a targeted disulfide-exchange mechanism. According to structural models of the gp120-CD4 receptor complex, substitution of Ser(60) on the CD4 domain 1 alpha-helix with Cys positions a thiol in proximity of the gp120 V1/V2 loop disulfide (Cys(126)-Cys(196)), satisfying the stereochemical and geometric conditions for redox exchange between CD4 Cys(60) and gp120 Cys(126), and the consequent formation of an interchain disulfide bond. In this study, we provide experimental evidence for this effect by describing the expression, purification, refolding, receptor binding and antiviral activity analysis of a recombinant two-domain CD4 variant containing the S60C mutation (2dCD4-S60C). We show that 2dCD4-S60C binds HIV-1 gp120 with a significantly higher affinity than wild-type protein under conditions that facilitate disulfide exchange and that this translates into a corresponding increase in the efficacy of CD4-mediated viral entry inhibition. We propose that targeted redox exchange between conserved gp120 disulfides and nucleophilic moieties positioned strategically on CD4 (or CD4-like scaffolds) conceptualizes a new strategy in the development of high affinity HIV-1 Env ligands, with important implications for therapy and vaccine development. More generally, this chalcogen substitution approach provides a general means of stabilizing receptor-ligand complexes where the structural and biophysical conditions for disulfide exchange are satisfied.

  15. On the relevance of sophisticated structural annotations for disulfide connectivity pattern prediction.

    PubMed

    Becker, Julien; Maes, Francis; Wehenkel, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bridges strongly constrain the native structure of many proteins and predicting their formation is therefore a key sub-problem of protein structure and function inference. Most recently proposed approaches for this prediction problem adopt the following pipeline: first they enrich the primary sequence with structural annotations, second they apply a binary classifier to each candidate pair of cysteines to predict disulfide bonding probabilities and finally, they use a maximum weight graph matching algorithm to derive the predicted disulfide connectivity pattern of a protein. In this paper, we adopt this three step pipeline and propose an extensive study of the relevance of various structural annotations and feature encodings. In particular, we consider five kinds of structural annotations, among which three are novel in the context of disulfide bridge prediction. So as to be usable by machine learning algorithms, these annotations must be encoded into features. For this purpose, we propose four different feature encodings based on local windows and on different kinds of histograms. The combination of structural annotations with these possible encodings leads to a large number of possible feature functions. In order to identify a minimal subset of relevant feature functions among those, we propose an efficient and interpretable feature function selection scheme, designed so as to avoid any form of overfitting. We apply this scheme on top of three supervised learning algorithms: k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines and extremely randomized trees. Our results indicate that the use of only the PSSM (position-specific scoring matrix) together with the CSP (cysteine separation profile) are sufficient to construct a high performance disulfide pattern predictor and that extremely randomized trees reach a disulfide pattern prediction accuracy of [Formula: see text] on the benchmark dataset SPX[Formula: see text], which corresponds to [Formula: see text

  16. Mitochondrial Disulfide Relay: Redox-regulated Protein Import into the Intermembrane Space*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Johannes M.; Riemer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    99% of all mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytosol, from where they are imported into mitochondria. In contrast to matrix proteins, many proteins of the intermembrane space (IMS) lack presequences and are imported in an oxidation-driven reaction by the mitochondrial disulfide relay. Incoming polypeptides are recognized and oxidized by the IMS-located receptor Mia40. Reoxidation of Mia40 is facilitated by the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 and the respiratory chain. Although structurally unrelated, the mitochondrial disulfide relay functionally resembles the Dsb (disufide bond) system of the bacterial periplasm, the compartment from which the IMS was derived 2 billion years ago. PMID:22157015

  17. Identification of disulfide bond formation between MitoNEET and glutamate dehydrogenase 1.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Morgan E; Crail, Jacquelyn P; Laffoon, Megan M; Fernandez, William G; Menze, Michael A; Konkle, Mary E

    2013-12-17

    MitoNEET is a protein that was identified as a drug target for diabetes, but its cellular function as well as its role in diabetes remains elusive. Protein pull-down experiments identified glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) as a potential binding partner. GDH1 is a key metabolic enzyme with emerging roles in insulin regulation. MitoNEET forms a covalent complex with GDH1 through disulfide bond formation and acts as an activator. Proteomic analysis identified the specific cysteine residues that participate in the disulfide bond. This is the first report that effectively links mitoNEET to activation of the insulin regulator GDH1.

  18. Minor element distribution in iron disulfides in coal: a geochemical review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam microanalysis of coal samples in U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) labs confirms that As is the most abundant minor constituent in Fe disulfides in coal and that Se, Ni, and other minor constituents are present less commonly and at lower concentrations than those for As. In nearly all cases, Hg occurs in Fe disulfides in coal at concentrations below detection by electron beam instruments. Its presence is shown by laser ablation ICP-MS, by selective leaching studies of bulk coal, and by correlation with Fe disulfide proxies such as total Fe and pyritic sulfur. Multiple generations of Fe disulfides are present in coal. These commonly show grain-to-grain and within-grain minor- or trace element compositional variation that is a function of the early diagenetic, coalification, and post-coalification history of the coal. Framboidal pyrite is almost always the earliest Fe disulfide generation, as shown by overgrowths of later Fe disulfides which may include pyrite or marcasite. Cleat- (or vein) pyrite (or marcasite) is typically the latest Fe disulfide generation, as shown by cross-cutting relations. Cleat pyrite forms by fluid migration within a coal basin and consequently may be enriched in elements such as As by deposition from compaction-driven fluids, metal enriched basinal brines or hydrothermal fluids. In some cases, framboidal pyrite shows preferential Ni enrichment with respect to co-occurring pyrite forms. This is consistent with bacterial complexing of metals in anoxic sediments and derivation of framboidal pyrite from greigite (Fe3S4), an Fe monosulfide precursor to framboidal pyrite having the thio-spinel structure which accommodates transition metals. Elements such as As, Se, and Sb substitute for S in the pyrite structure whereas metals, including transition metals, Hg and Pb, are thought to substitute for Fe. Understanding the distribution of minor and trace elements in Fe disulfides in coal has important implications for their availability to

  19. Effects of Growth Conditions on the Measured Electrical Properties of Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a 2-D material that shows promise for flexible electronics, low-power...investigation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 2-D materials , molybdenum disulfide, MoS2, field-effect transistor, electron mobility, powder vaporization 16. SECURITY...Setup 2 2.1.3 Growth Conditions 3 2.2 Device Fabrication 4 2.2.1 Process Flow 5 2.2.2 MoS2 Material Transfer 8 2.3 Electrical Characterization 9

  20. A disulfide intercalator toolbox for the site-directed modification of polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Yuzhou; Kuan, Seah Ling; Dumele, Oliver; Lamla, Markus; Ng, David Y W; Arzt, Matthias; Thomas, Jessica; Mueller, Jan O; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Weil, Tanja

    2015-01-02

    A disulfide intercalator toolbox was developed for site-specific attachment of a broad variety of functional groups to proteins or peptides under mild, physiological conditions. The peptide hormone somatostatin (SST) served as model compound for intercalation into the available disulfide functionalization schemes starting from the intercalator or the reactive SST precursor before or after bioconjugation. A tetrazole-SST derivative was obtained that undergoes photoinduced cycloaddition in mammalian cells, which was monitored by live-cell imaging. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Changes in serum angiotensin I converting enzyme activity due to carbon disulfide exposure.

    PubMed

    Filipović, N; Bilalbegović, Z; Sefić, M; Djurić, D

    1984-01-01

    The activity of serum angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) was determined in 50 workers from a viscose factory in Banja Luka, Yugoslavia, and in 50 control subjects. Activity of serum ACE was significantly lower in workers exposed to carbon disulfide than in the control group. No correlation was found between a decrease of serum ACE in exposed workers and duration of exposure. These findings indicate that the serum ACE may be influenced by carbon disulfide, but the mechanism of these changes remains to be elucidated in this case.

  2. A Primary Role for Disulfide Formation in the Productive Folding of Prokaryotic Cu,Zn-superoxide Dismutase*

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Yasuyuki; Anzai, Itsuki; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic activation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) requires not only binding of a catalytic copper ion but also formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond. Indeed, the disulfide bond is completely conserved among all species possessing SOD1; however, it remains obscure how disulfide formation controls the enzymatic activity of SOD1. Here, we show that disulfide formation is a primary event in the folding process of prokaryotic SOD1 (SodC) localized to the periplasmic space. Escherichia coli SodC was found to attain β-sheet structure upon formation of the disulfide bond, whereas disulfide-reduced SodC assumed little secondary structure even in the presence of copper and zinc ions. Moreover, reduction of the disulfide bond made SodC highly susceptible to proteolytic degradation. We thus propose that the thiol-disulfide status in SodC controls the intracellular stability of this antioxidant enzyme and that the oxidizing environment of the periplasm is required for the enzymatic activation of SodC. PMID:24917671

  3. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry: Correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfides (PSSG) are commonly quantified by the reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This met...

  4. Identification of Reduction-Susceptible Disulfide Bonds in Transferrin by Differential Alkylation Using O16/O18 Labeled Iodoacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunhai; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2015-05-01

    Stabilization of native three-dimensional structure has been considered for decades to be the main function of disulfide bonds in proteins. More recently, it was becoming increasingly clear that in addition to this static role, disulfide bonds are also important for many other aspects of protein behavior, such as regulating protein function in a redox-sensitive fashion. Dynamic disulfide bonds can be taken advantage of as candidate anchor sites for site-specific modification (such as PEGylation of conjugation to a drug molecule), but are also frequently implicated in protein aggregation (through disulfide bond scrambling leading to formation of intermolecular covalent linkages). A common feature of all these labile disulfide bonds is their high susceptibility to reduction, as they need to be selectively regulated by either specific local redox conditions in vivo or well-controlled experimental conditions in vitro. The ability to identify labile disulfide bonds in a cysteine-rich protein can be extremely beneficial for a variety of tasks ranging from understanding the mechanistic aspects of protein function to identification of troublesome "hot spots" in biopharmaceutical products. Herein, we describe a mass spectrometry (MS)-based method for reliable identification of labile disulfide bonds, which consists of limited reduction, differential alkylation with an O18-labeled reagent, and LC-MS/MS analysis. Application of this method to a cysteine-rich protein transferrin allows the majority of its native disulfide bonds to be measured for their reduction susceptibility, which appears to reflect both solvent accessibility and bond strain energy.

  5. Identification of reduction-susceptible disulfide bonds in transferrin by differential alkylation using O16/O18 labeled iodoacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunhai; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of native three-dimensional structure has been considered for decades the main function of disulfide bonds in proteins. More recently, it was becoming increasingly clear that in addition to this static role, disulfide bonds are also important for many other aspects of protein behavior, such as regulating protein function in a redox-sensitive fashion. Dynamic disulfide bonds can be taken advantage of as candidate anchor sites for site-specific modification (such as PEGylation of conjugation to a drug molecule), but are also frequently implicated in protein aggregation (through disulfide bond scrambling leading to formation of intermolecular covalent linkages). A common feature of all these labile disulfide bonds is their high susceptibility to reduction, as they need to be selectively regulated by either specific local redox conditions in vivo or well-controlled experimental conditions in vitro. The ability to identify labile disulfide bonds in a cysteine-rich protein can be extremely beneficial for a variety of tasks ranging from understanding the mechanistic aspects of protein function to identification of troublesome “hot spots” in biopharmaceutical products. Herein, we describe a mass spectrometry-based method for reliable identification of labile disulfide bonds, which consists of limited reduction, differential alkylation with an O18-labeled reagent, and LC-MS/MS analysis. Application of this method to a cysteine-rich protein transferrin allows the majority of its native disulfide bonds to be measured for their reduction susceptibility, which appears to reflect both solvent accessibility and bond strain energy. PMID:25716754

  6. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. 63.500 Section 63.500 Protection... Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.500 Back-end process provisions—carbon disulfide...

  7. Intelligence, mapping, and geospatial exploitation system (IMAGES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moellman, Dennis E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1998-08-01

    This paper provides further detail to one facet of the battlespace visualization concept described in last year's paper Battlespace Situation Awareness for Force XXI. It focuses on the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) goal to 'provide customers seamless access to tailorable imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information.' This paper describes Intelligence, Mapping, and Geospatial Exploitation System (IMAGES), an exploitation element capable of CONUS baseplant operations or field deployment to provide NIMA geospatial information collaboratively into a reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition (RSTA) environment through the United States Imagery and Geospatial Information System (USIGS). In a baseplant CONUS setting IMAGES could be used to produce foundation data to support mission planning. In the field it could be directly associated with a tactical sensor receiver or ground station (e.g. UAV or UGV) to provide near real-time and mission specific RSTA to support mission execution. This paper provides IMAGES functional level design; describes the technologies, their interactions and interdependencies; and presents a notional operational scenario to illustrate the system flexibility. Using as a system backbone an intelligent software agent technology, called Open Agent ArchitectureTM (OAATM), IMAGES combines multimodal data entry, natural language understanding, and perceptual and evidential reasoning for system management. Configured to be DII COE compliant, it would utilize, to the extent possible, COTS applications software for data management, processing, fusion, exploitation, and reporting. It would also be modular, scaleable, and reconfigurable. This paper describes how the OAATM achieves data synchronization and enables the necessary level of information to be rapidly available to various command echelons for making informed decisions. The reasoning component will provide for the best information to be developed in the timeline

  8. Disulfide-Dependent Self-Assembly of Adiponectin Octadecamers from Trimers and Presence of Stable Octadecameric Adiponectin Lacking Disulfide Bonds In Vitro†

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, David B.; Jones, Christopher M.; Mashalidis, Ellene H.; Nuñez, Martha; Hausrath, Andrew C.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin is a circulating insulin-sensitizing hormone that homo-oligomerizes into trimers, hexamers, and higher molecular weight (HMW) species. Low levels of circulating HMW adiponectin appear to increase the risk for insulin resistance. Currently, assembly of adiponectin oligomers, and consequently mechanisms responsible for decreased HMW adiponectin in insulin resistance, are not well understood. In the work reported here, we analyzed the re-assembly of the most abundant HMW adiponectin species, the octadecamer, following its collapse to smaller oligomers in vitro. Purified bovine serum adiponectin octadecamer was treated with reducing agents at pH 5 to obtain trimers. These reduced trimers partially and spontaneously reassembled into octadecamers upon oxidative formation of disulfide bonds. Disulfide bonds appear to occupy a greater role in the process of oligomerization than in the structural stabilization of mature octadecamer. Stable octadecamers lacking virtually all disulfide bonds could be observed in abundance using native gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and collision-induced dissociation nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These findings indicate that while disulfide bonds help to maintain the mature octadecameric adiponectin structure, their more important function is to stabilize intermediates during the assembly of octadecamer. Adiponectin oligomerization must proceed through intermediates that are at least partially reduced. Accordingly, fully oxidized adiponectin hexamers failed to reassemble into octadecamers at a rate comparable to that of reduced trimers. As the findings from the present study are based on in vitro experiments, their in vivo relevance remains unclear. Nevertheless, they describe a redox environment-dependent model of adiponectin oligomerization that can be tested using cell-based approaches. PMID:19943704

  9. Gravitational Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, R.

    1995-01-01

    Deep-space missions some times use close gravity-assist 'swingbys' of planets and moons to gain or lose velocity. These maneuvers increase the amount of mass that can be delivered and/or decrease mission flight times. The two Voyager spacecraft used gravity assists to leave the solar system. The Galileo spacecraft is using gravity assists to move among the various moons of Jupiter and the Cassini spacecraft will do similar maneuvers around Saturn.

  10. Modulating Therapeutic Activity and Toxicity of Pyrrolobenzodiazepine Antibody-Drug Conjugates with Self-Immolative Disulfide Linkers.

    PubMed

    Pillow, Thomas H; Schutten, Melissa; Yu, Shang-Fan; Ohri, Rachana; Sadowsky, Jack; Poon, Kirsten Achilles; Solis, Willy; Zhong, Fiona; Del Rosario, Geoffrey; Go, Mary Ann T; Lau, Jeffery; Yee, Sharon; He, Jintang; Liu, Luna; Ng, Carl; Xu, Keyang; Leipold, Douglas D; Kamath, Amrita V; Zhang, Donglu; Masterson, Luke; Gregson, Stephen J; Howard, Philip W; Fang, Fan; Chen, Jinhua; Gunzner-Toste, Janet; Kozak, Katherine K; Spencer, Susan; Polakis, Paul; Polson, Andrew G; Flygare, John A; Junutula, Jagath R

    2017-02-21

    A novel disulfide linker was designed to enable a direct connection between cytotoxic pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) drugs and the cysteine on a targeting antibody for use in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). ADCs composed of a cysteine-engineered antibody were armed with a PBD using a self-immolative disulfide linker. Both the chemical linker and the antibody site were optimized for this new bioconjugation strategy to provide a highly stable and efficacious ADC. This novel disulfide ADC was compared to a conjugate containing the same PBD drug, but attached to the antibody via a peptide linker. Both ADCs had similar efficacy in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Safety studies in rats revealed that the disulfide-linked ADC had a higher maximum tolerated dose (MTD) than the peptide-linked ADC. Overall, these data suggest that the novel self-immolative disulfide linker represents a valuable way to construct ADCs with equivalent efficacy and improved safety.

  11. Disulfide bonds in a recombinant protein modeled after a core repeat in an aquatic insect's silk protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, S V; Correia, J J; Case, S T

    1995-05-01

    We constructed a gene encoding rCAS, recombinant constant and subrepeat protein, modeled after tandem repeats found in the major silk proteins synthesized by aquatic larvae of the midge, Chironomus tentans. Bacterially synthesized rCAS was purified to near homogeneity and characterized by several biochemical and biophysical methods including amino-terminal sequencing, amino acid compositional analysis, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and mass spectrometry. Complementing these techniques with quantitative sulfhydryl assays, we discovered that the four cysteines present in rCAS form two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Mapping studies revealed that the disulfide bonds are heterogeneous. When reduced and denatured rCAS was allowed to refold and its disulfide bonding state monitored, it again adopted a conformation with two intramolecular disulfide bonds. The inherent ability of rCAS to quantitatively form two intramolecular disulfide bonds may reflect a previously unknown feature of the in vivo silk proteins from which it is derived.

  12. Structure and function in rhodopsin: Mass spectrometric identification of the abnormal intradiscal disulfide bond in misfolded retinitis pigmentosa mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hwa, John; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Khorana, H. Gobind

    2001-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) point mutations in both the intradiscal (ID) and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin cause partial or complete misfolding of rhodopsin, resulting in loss of 11-cis-retinal binding. Previous work has shown that misfolding is caused by the formation of a disulfide bond in the ID domain different from the native Cys-110–Cys-187 disulfide bond in native rhodopsin. Here we report on direct identification of the abnormal disulfide bond in misfolded RP mutants in the transmembrane domain by mass spectrometric analysis. This disulfide bond is between Cys-185 and Cys-187, the same as previously identified in misfolded RP mutations in the ID domain. The strategy described here should be generally applicable to identification of disulfide bonds in other integral membrane proteins. PMID:11320236

  13. Exploiting host immunity: the Salmonella paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Behnsen, Judith; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved clever strategies to evade and in some cases exploit the attacks of an activated immune system. Salmonella enterica is one such pathogen, exploiting multiple aspects of host defense to promote its replication in the host. Here we review recent findings on the mechanisms by which Salmonella establishes systemic and chronic infection, including strategies involving manipulation of innate immune signaling and inflammatory forms of cell death, as well as immune evasion by establishing residency in M2 macrophages. We also examine recent evidence showing that the oxidative environment and the high levels of antimicrobial proteins produced in response to localized Salmonella gastrointestinal infection enable the pathogen to successfully outcompete the resident gut microbiota. PMID:25582038

  14. Exploiting Non-Markovianity for Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel M.; Katz, Nadav; Koch, Christiane P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum technology, exploiting entanglement and the wave nature of matter, relies on the ability to accurately control quantum systems. Quantum control is often compromised by the interaction of the system with its environment since this causes loss of amplitude and phase. However, when the dynamics of the open quantum system is non-Markovian, amplitude and phase flow not only from the system into the environment but also back. Interaction with the environment is then not necessarily detrimental. We show that the back-flow of amplitude and phase can be exploited to carry out quantum control tasks that could not be realized if the system was isolated. The control is facilitated by a few strongly coupled, sufficiently isolated environmental modes. Our paradigmatic example considers a weakly anharmonic ladder with resonant amplitude control only, restricting realizable operations to SO(N). The coupling to the environment, when harnessed with optimization techniques, allows for full SU(N) controllability.

  15. Exploiting Quantum Resonance to Solve Combinatorial Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Fijany, Amir

    2006-01-01

    Quantum resonance would be exploited in a proposed quantum-computing approach to the solution of combinatorial optimization problems. In quantum computing in general, one takes advantage of the fact that an algorithm cannot be decoupled from the physical effects available to implement it. Prior approaches to quantum computing have involved exploitation of only a subset of known quantum physical effects, notably including parallelism and entanglement, but not including resonance. In the proposed approach, one would utilize the combinatorial properties of tensor-product decomposability of unitary evolution of many-particle quantum systems for physically simulating solutions to NP-complete problems (a class of problems that are intractable with respect to classical methods of computation). In this approach, reinforcement and selection of a desired solution would be executed by means of quantum resonance. Classes of NP-complete problems that are important in practice and could be solved by the proposed approach include planning, scheduling, search, and optimal design.

  16. Tribal children are most exploited - UNICEF.

    PubMed

    A workshop sponsored by the UN Children's Fund in the Philippines examined the status of the children of indigenous people and found that exploitation of the assets of indigenous people in the name of development has resulted in social inequalities that have damaged the indigenous children. As examples of the disregard for the human rights of the children, participants cited projects in Davao, Boracay, and Benguet that have displaced native children. These include mining schemes that have "raped" ancestral lands, large-scale agricultural enterprises, promotion of tourism, and creation of hydroelectric dams. The children rarely benefit at all from any of these projects as their families are moved from a position of isolated independence to one of exploited dependence. Social changes accompanying development ruin traditional culture without providing a better or even similar basis of existence.

  17. Exploiting Virtual Synchrony in Distributed Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    state, by having each current member reply with a data structure encoding this information. In a virtually syn- chronous sense , the new member joins...Exlitn Virua Sychon inf :en.et P. Birma ThmbA.Jsp TECHNICAL REPORTF Department of Computer Science Cornell University Ithaca, New York Exploiting...1 Department of Computer Science Justifi: i ____ Cornell University Ithaca, New York 14853-7501 Distrit ui. _w/ - Avail * t ] ’ - Dist S;. This work

  18. Macropinocytosis Exploitation by Cancers and Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kevin D.; Bidlingmaier, Scott M.; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis has long been known as a primary method for cellular intake of fluid-phase and membrane-bound bulk cargo. This review seeks to re-examine the latest studies to emphasize how cancers exploit macropinocytosis to further their tumorigenesis, including details in how macropinocytosis can be adapted to serve diverse functions. Furthermore, this review will also cover the latest endeavors in targeting macropinocytosis as an avenue for novel therapeutics. PMID:27672367

  19. DANDRUFF: THE MOST COMMERCIALLY EXPLOITED SKIN DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S; Mukhopadhyay, T

    2010-01-01

    The article discuss in detail about the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations of dandruff including the etio-pathology. The article also discusses in detail about various treatment methods available for dandruff. The status of dandruff being amphibious – a disease/disorder, and relatively less medical intervention is sought after for the treatment, dandruff is the most commercially exploited skin and scalp disorder/disease by personal care industries. PMID:20606879

  20. Different dynamics and pathway of disulfide bonds reduction of two human defensins, a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun

    2017-04-01

    Human defensins are a class of antimicrobial peptides that are crucial components of the innate immune system. Both human α defensin type 5 (HD5) and human β defensin type 3 (hBD-3) have 6 cysteine residues which form 3 pairs of disulfide bonds in oxidizing condition. Disulfide bond linking is important to the protein structure stabilization, and the disulfide bond linking and breaking order have been shown to influence protein function. In this project, microsecond long molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the structure and dynamics of HD5 and hBD-3 wildtype and analogs which have all 3 disulfide bonds released in reducing condition. The structure of hBD-3 was found to be more dynamic and flexible than HD5, based on RMSD, RMSF, and radius of gyration calculations. The disulfide bridge breaking order of HD5 and hBD-3 in reducing condition was predicted by two kinds of methods, which gave consistent results. It was found that the disulfide bonds breaking pathways for HD5 and hBD-3 are very different. The breaking of disulfide bonds can influence the dimer interface by making the dimer structure less stable for both kinds of defensin. In order to understand the difference in dynamics and disulfide bond breaking pathway, hydrophilic and hydrophobic accessible surface areas (ASA), buried surface area between cysteine pairs, entropy of cysteine pairs, and internal energy were calculated. Comparing to the wildtype, hBD-3 analog is more hydrophobic, while HD5 is more hydrophilic. For hBD-3, the disulfide breaking is mainly entropy driven, while other factors such as the solvation effects may take the major role in controlling HD5 disulfide breaking pathway. Proteins 2017; 85:665-681. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. SAIM: a mobile multisensor image exploitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devambez, Francois

    2000-11-01

    The control of information is an essential part of operations. Technology allows today a near real time surveillance capacity, over wide areas, due to sensor performances, communication networks. The system presented herein has been developed by Thomson-Csf, under contract with the French MOD to give to the decision makers the right information, in a very short delay, and prepare support information, to help for decision. The SAIM, Mobile Multisensor Image Exploitation Ground System, uses near real time acquisition units, very large data base management, data processing, including fusion and decision aiding tools, and communication networks. It then helps for all the steps of exploitation of data incoming from image sensors, form preparation of the reconnaissance mission to the dissemination of intelligence. The SAIM system is in operations in the French Air Force, and soon in the French Navy and the French Army. Initially defined for the specific use of French Recce sensors, the SAIM is now intended to be widely used for the exploitation of UAV and battle field MTI and SAR surveillance systems.

  2. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... the direction of a dentist . They may prepare materials for dental impressions or to create temporary crowns. All dental ... Nursing assistants, sometimes called nursing aides , help provide basic care for patients in hospitals and residents of ... more information about becoming a dental assistant and for a list of accredited dental ...

  3. Solvation agent for disulfide precipitates from inhibited glycol-water solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.

    1971-01-01

    Small additions /0.01 percent or less/ of triethanoloamine sodium sulfite adduct to mercapto benzothiazole inhibited glycol water heat transfer solutions containing disulfide precipitate produce marked reduction in amount of precipitate. Adduct is useful as additive in glycol base antifreezes and coolants.

  4. Impact of SCILL catalysts for the S-S coupling of thiols to disulfides.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Octavian D; Podolean, Iunia; Parvulescu, Vasile I; Taylor, S F Rebecca; Manyar, Haresh G; Ralphs, Kathryn; Goodrich, Peter; Hardacre, Christopher

    2017-09-20

    This study reports the behaviour of SCILL based catalysts in the oxidative S-S coupling of aliphatic and aromatic thiols, namely 1-butanethiol and thiophenol, to dibutyl disulfide and diphenyl disulfide. A range of ionic liquids (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) and metal supported catalysts (5% Pt/SiO2; 5% Ru/SiO2; 5% Ru/C; 5% Pt/OMS-2) were used to prepare the SCILL catalysts and all were found to be active for the reaction following the trend 5% Pt-OMS-2 > 5% Pt/SiO2 > 5% Ru/C > 5% Ru/SiO2. The presence of SCILL catalysts afforded high selectivity to the disulfide, and the activity of the SCILL catalyst was dependent on the ionic liquid used. A significant increase in the stability of all the supported metal catalysts was found in the presence of the ionic liquid, and there was no change in the selectivity towards disulfides. This demonstrated that the ionic liquids protect the active sites of the catalyst against sulfation, thus providing more stable and active catalysts.

  5. Multiple disulfide bridges modulate conformational stability and flexibility in hyperthermophilic archaeal purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bagarolo, Maria Libera; Porcelli, Marina; Martino, Elisa; Feller, Georges; Cacciapuoti, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    5'-Deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is a hexameric hyperthermophilic protein containing in each subunit two pairs of disulfide bridges, a CXC motif, and one free cysteine. The contribution of each disulfide bridge to the protein conformational stability and flexibility has been assessed by comparing the thermal unfolding and the limited proteolysis of the wild-type enzyme and its variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the seven cysteine residues. All variants catalyzed efficiently MTA cleavage with specific activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. The elimination of all cysteine residues caused a substantial decrease of ΔHcal (850 kcal/mol) and Tmax (39°C) with respect to the wild-type indicating that all cysteine pairs and especially the CXC motif significantly contribute to the enzyme thermal stability. Disulfide bond Cys200-Cys262 and the CXC motif weakly affected protein flexibility while the elimination of the disulfide bond Cys138-Cys205 lead to an increased protease susceptibility. Experimental evidence from limited proteolysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions also allowed to propose a stabilizing role for the free Cys164. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tau Protein Assembles into Isoform- and Disulfide-dependent Polymorphic Fibrils with Distinct Structural Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kumi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases in which insoluble fibrillar aggregates of a microtubule-binding protein, Tau, are abnormally accumulated. Pathological Tau fibrils often exhibit structural polymorphisms that differ among phenotypically distinct tauopathies; however, a molecular mechanism to generate polymorphic Tau fibrils remains obscure. Here, we note the formation of a disulfide bond in isoforms of full-length Tau and show that the thiol-disulfide status as well as the isoform composition determines structural and morphological properties of Tau fibrils in vitro. Mainly two regions in a Tau primary sequence are found to act as structural blocks for building a protease-resistant core of Tau fibrils. Interactions among those two blocks for building a core structure depend upon the thiol-disulfide status in each isoform of Tau, which results in the formation of polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties. Furthermore, we have found that more diverse structures of Tau fibrils emerge through a cross-seeded fibrillation between heterologous pairs of Tau isoforms. We thus propose that isoform- and disulfide-dependent combinatorial interactions among multiple regions in a Tau sequence endow Tau fibrils with various structures, i.e. polymorphism. PMID:21659525

  7. Tau protein assembles into isoform- and disulfide-dependent polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kumi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2011-08-05

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases in which insoluble fibrillar aggregates of a microtubule-binding protein, Tau, are abnormally accumulated. Pathological Tau fibrils often exhibit structural polymorphisms that differ among phenotypically distinct tauopathies; however, a molecular mechanism to generate polymorphic Tau fibrils remains obscure. Here, we note the formation of a disulfide bond in isoforms of full-length Tau and show that the thiol-disulfide status as well as the isoform composition determines structural and morphological properties of Tau fibrils in vitro. Mainly two regions in a Tau primary sequence are found to act as structural blocks for building a protease-resistant core of Tau fibrils. Interactions among those two blocks for building a core structure depend upon the thiol-disulfide status in each isoform of Tau, which results in the formation of polymorphic fibrils with distinct structural properties. Furthermore, we have found that more diverse structures of Tau fibrils emerge through a cross-seeded fibrillation between heterologous pairs of Tau isoforms. We thus propose that isoform- and disulfide-dependent combinatorial interactions among multiple regions in a Tau sequence endow Tau fibrils with various structures, i.e. polymorphism.

  8. Disulfide-modified antigen for detection of celiac disease-associated anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Rivera, Luis Carlos; Dulay, Samuel; Lozano-Sánchez, Pablo; Katakis, Ioanis; Acero-Sánchez, Josep Lluís; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2017-03-29

    A simple and rapid immunosensor for the determination of the celiac disease-related antibody, anti-tissue transglutaminase, was investigated. The antigenic protein tissue transglutaminase was chemically modified, introducing disulfide groups through different moieties of the molecule (amine, carboxylic, and hydroxyl groups), self-assembled on gold surfaces, and used for the detection of IgA and IgG autoantibodies. The modified proteins were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance, which showed that only introduction of the disulfide groups through amine moieties in the tissue transglutaminase preserved its antigenic properties. The disulfide-modified antigen was co-immobilized via chemisorption with a poly(ethylene glycol) alkanethiol on gold electrodes. The modified electrodes were then exposed to IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and subsequently to horseradish peroxidase-labeled anti-idiotypic antibodies, achieving a detection limit of 260 ng ml(-1). Immunosensor performance in the presence of complex matrixes, including clinically relevant serum reference solutions and real patient samples, was evaluated. The introduction of disulfides in the antigenic protein enabled a simple and convenient one-step surface immobilization procedure involving only spontaneous gold-thiol covalent binding. Complete amperometric assay time was 30 min.

  9. Differential expression of disulfide reductase enzymes in a free-living platyhelminth (Dugesia dorotocephala)

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Juárez, Álvaro Miguel; Martínez-González, José de Jesús; del Arenal Mena, Irene Patricia; Flores-Herrera, Óscar

    2017-01-01

    A search of the disulfide reductase activities expressed in the adult stage of the free-living platyhelminth Dugesia dorotocephala was carried out. Using GSSG or DTNB as substrates, it was possible to obtain a purified fraction containing both GSSG and DTNB reductase activities. Through the purification procedure, both disulfide reductase activities were obtained in the same chromatographic peak. By mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments obtained after tryptic digestion of the purified fraction, the presence of glutathione reductase (GR), thioredoxin-glutathione reductase (TGR), and a putative thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) was detected. Using the gold compound auranofin to selectively inhibit the GSSG reductase activity of TGR, it was found that barely 5% of the total GR activity in the D. dorotocephala extract can be assigned to GR. Such strategy did allow us to determine the kinetic parameters for both GR and TGR. Although It was not possible to discriminate DTNB reductase activity due to TrxR from that of TGR, a chromatofocusing experiment with a D. dorotocephala extract resulted in the obtention of a minor protein fraction enriched in TrxR, strongly suggesting its presence as a functional protein. Thus, unlike its parasitic counterparts, in the free-living platyhelminth lineage the three disulfide reductases are present as functional proteins, albeit TGR is still the major disulfide reductase involved in the reduction of both Trx and GSSG. This fact suggests the development of TGR in parasitic flatworms was not linked to a parasitic mode of life. PMID:28787021

  10. Negative Ion Drift Velocity and Longitudinal Diffusion in Mixtures of Carbon Disulfide and Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dion, Michael P.; Son, S.; Hunter, S. D.; deNolfo, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Negative ion drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion has been measured for gas mixtures of carbon disulfide (CS2) and methane (CH4)' Measurements were made as a function of total pressure, CS2 partial pressure and electric field. Constant mobility and thermal-limit longitudinal diffusion is observed for all gas mixtures tested. Gas gain for some of the mixtures is also included.

  11. Direct evidence that two cysteines in the dopamine transporter form a disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Wei, Hua; Hill, Erik R; Chen, Lucy; Jiang, Liying; Han, Dawn D; Gu, Howard H

    2007-04-01

    We have generated a fully functional dopamine transporter (DAT) mutant (dmDATx7) with all cysteines removed except the two cysteines in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Random mutagenesis at either or both EL2 cysteines did not produce any functional transporter mutants, suggesting that the two cysteines cannot be replaced by any other amino acids. The cysteine-specific reagent MTSEA-biotin labeled dmDATx7 only after a DTT treatment which reduces disulfide bond. Since there are no other cysteines in dmDATx7, the MTSEA-biotin labeling must be on the EL2 cysteines made available by the DTT treatment. This result provides the first direct evidence that the EL2 cysteines form a disulfide bond. Interestingly, the DTT treatment had little effect on transport activity suggesting that the disulfide bond is not necessary for the uptake function of DAT. Our results and previous results are consistent with the notion that the disulfide bond between EL2 cysteines is required for DAT biosynthesis and/or its delivery to the cell surface.

  12. An efficient molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Rui; Liang, Jin-Xia; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Qiang; Li, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-01-14

    The electroreduction of water for sustainable hydrogen production is a critical component of several developing clean-energy technologies, such as water splitting and fuel cells. However, finding a cheap and efficient alternative catalyst to replace currently used platinum-based catalysts is still a prerequisite for the commercialization of these technologies. Here we report a robust and highly active catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction that is constructed by in situ growth of molybdenum disulfide on the surface of cobalt diselenide. In acidic media, the molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide catalyst exhibits fast hydrogen evolution kinetics with onset potential of -11 mV and Tafel slope of 36 mV per decade, which is the best among the non-noble metal hydrogen evolution catalysts and even approaches to the commercial platinum/carbon catalyst. The high hydrogen evolution activity of molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid is likely due to the electrocatalytic synergistic effects between hydrogen evolution-active molybdenum disulfide and cobalt diselenide materials and the much increased catalytic sites.

  13. Multiscale structural and electronic control of molybdenum disulfide foam for highly efficient hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiao; Li, Haobo; Wang, Suheng; Ding, Ding; Chen, Mingshu; Liu, Chuan; Tian, Zhongqun; Novoselov, K. S.; Ma, Chao; Deng, Dehui; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen production through water splitting has been considered as a green, pure and high-efficient technique. As an important half-reaction involved, hydrogen evolution reaction is a complex electrochemical process involving liquid-solid-gas three-phase interface behaviour. Therefore, new concepts and strategies of material design are needed to smooth each pivotal step. Here we report a multiscale structural and electronic control of molybdenum disulfide foam to synergistically promote the hydrogen evolution process. The optimized three-dimensional molybdenum disulfide foam with uniform mesopores, vertically aligned two-dimensional layers and cobalt atoms doping demonstrated a high hydrogen evolution activity and stability. In addition, density functional theory calculations indicate that molybdenum disulfide with moderate cobalt doping content possesses the optimal activity. This study demonstrates the validity of multiscale control in molybdenum disulfide via overall consideration of the mass transport, and the accessibility, quantity and capability of active sites towards electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution, which may also be extended to other energy-related processes. PMID:28401882

  14. Protein disulfide isomerase homolog TrPDI2 contributing to cellobiohydrolase production in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Lv, Pin; He, Ronglin; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the cysteine residues in the secreted proteins form disulfide bonds via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated catalysis, stabilizing the enzyme activity. The role of PDI in cellulase production is speculative, as well as the possibility of PDI as a target for improving enzyme production efficiency of Trichoderma reesei, a widely used producer of enzyme for the production of lignocellulose-based biofuels and biochemicals. Here, we report that a PDI homolog, TrPDI2 in T. reesei exhibited a 36.94% and an 11.81% similarity to Aspergillus niger TIGA and T. reesei PDI1, respectively. The capability of TrPDI2 to recover the activity of reduced and denatured RNase by promoting refolding verified its protein disulfide isomerase activity. The overexpression of Trpdi2 increased the secretion and the activity of CBH1 at the early stage of cellulase induction. In addition, both the expression level and redox state of TrPDI2 responded to cellulase induction in T. reesei, providing sustainable oxidative power to ensure cellobiohydrolase maturation and production. The results suggest that TrPDI2 may contribute to cellobiohydrolase secretion by enhancing the capability of disulfide bond formation, which is essential for protein folding and maturation.

  15. Multiscale structural and electronic control of molybdenum disulfide foam for highly efficient hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiao; Li, Haobo; Wang, Suheng; Ding, Ding; Chen, Mingshu; Liu, Chuan; Tian, Zhongqun; Novoselov, K. S.; Ma, Chao; Deng, Dehui; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen production through water splitting has been considered as a green, pure and high-efficient technique. As an important half-reaction involved, hydrogen evolution reaction is a complex electrochemical process involving liquid-solid-gas three-phase interface behaviour. Therefore, new concepts and strategies of material design are needed to smooth each pivotal step. Here we report a multiscale structural and electronic control of molybdenum disulfide foam to synergistically promote the hydrogen evolution process. The optimized three-dimensional molybdenum disulfide foam with uniform mesopores, vertically aligned two-dimensional layers and cobalt atoms doping demonstrated a high hydrogen evolution activity and stability. In addition, density functional theory calculations indicate that molybdenum disulfide with moderate cobalt doping content possesses the optimal activity. This study demonstrates the validity of multiscale control in molybdenum disulfide via overall consideration of the mass transport, and the accessibility, quantity and capability of active sites towards electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution, which may also be extended to other energy-related processes.

  16. Intracellular disulfide reduction by phosphine-borane complexes: Mechanism of action for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Niemuth, Nicholas J; Thompson, Alex F; Crowe, Megan E; Lieven, Christopher J; Levin, Leonard A

    2016-10-01

    Phosphine-borane complexes are novel cell-permeable drugs that protect neurons from axonal injury in vitro and in vivo. These drugs activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) cell survival pathway and are therefore neuroprotective, but do not scavenge superoxide. In order to understand the interaction between superoxide signaling of neuronal death and the action of phosphine-borane complexes, their biochemical activity in cell-free and in vitro assays was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry and using an intracellular dithiol reporter that becomes fluorescent when its disulfide bond is cleaved. These studies demonstrated that bis(3-propionic acid methyl ester) phenylphosphine-borane complex (PB1) and (3-propionic acid methyl ester) diphenylphosphine-borane complex (PB2) are potent intracellular disulfide reducing agents which are cell permeable. EPR and pharmacological studies demonstrated reducing activity but not scavenging of superoxide. Given that phosphine-borane complexes reduce cell injury from mitochondrial superoxide generation but do not scavenge superoxide, this implies a mechanism where an intracellular superoxide burst induces downstream formation of protein disulfides. The redox-dependent cleavage of the disulfides is therefore a novel mechanism of neuroprotection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An efficient molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min-Rui; Liang, Jin-Xia; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Qiang; Li, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The electroreduction of water for sustainable hydrogen production is a critical component of several developing clean-energy technologies, such as water splitting and fuel cells. However, finding a cheap and efficient alternative catalyst to replace currently used platinum-based catalysts is still a prerequisite for the commercialization of these technologies. Here we report a robust and highly active catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction that is constructed by in situ growth of molybdenum disulfide on the surface of cobalt diselenide. In acidic media, the molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide catalyst exhibits fast hydrogen evolution kinetics with onset potential of -11 mV and Tafel slope of 36 mV per decade, which is the best among the non-noble metal hydrogen evolution catalysts and even approaches to the commercial platinum/carbon catalyst. The high hydrogen evolution activity of molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid is likely due to the electrocatalytic synergistic effects between hydrogen evolution-active molybdenum disulfide and cobalt diselenide materials and the much increased catalytic sites.

  18. Structures and functions of protein disulfide isomerase family members involved in proteostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Inaba, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential cellular compartment in which an enormous number of secretory and cell surface membrane proteins are synthesized and subjected to cotranslational or posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and disulfide bond formation. Proper maintenance of ER protein homeostasis (sometimes termed proteostasis) is essential to avoid cellular stresses and diseases caused by abnormal proteins. Accumulating knowledge of cysteine-based redox reactions catalyzed by members of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family has revealed that these enzymes play pivotal roles in productive protein folding accompanied by disulfide formation, as well as efficient ER-associated degradation accompanied by disulfide reduction. Each of PDI family members forms a protein-protein interaction with a preferential partner to fulfill a distinct function. Multiple redox pathways that utilize PDIs appear to function synergistically to attain the highest quality and productivity of the ER, even under various stress conditions. This review describes the structures, physiological functions, and cooperative actions of several essential PDIs, and provides important insights into the elaborate proteostatic mechanisms that have evolved in the extremely active and stress-sensitive ER. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Linker Immolation Determines Cell Killing Activity of Disulfide-Linked Pyrrolobenzodiazepine Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Donglu; Pillow, Thomas H; Ma, Yong; Cruz-Chuh, Josefa Dela; Kozak, Katherine R; Sadowsky, Jack D; Lewis Phillips, Gail D; Guo, Jun; Darwish, Martine; Fan, Peter; Chen, Jingtian; He, Changrong; Wang, Tao; Yao, Hui; Xu, Zijin; Chen, Jinhua; Wai, John; Pei, Zhonghua; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Dragovich, Peter S

    2016-11-10

    Disulfide bonds could be valuable linkers for a variety of therapeutic applications requiring tunable cleavage between two parts of a molecule (e.g., antibody-drug conjugates). The in vitro linker immolation of β-mercaptoethyl-carbamate disulfides and DNA alkylation properties of associated payloads were investigated to understand the determinant of cell killing potency of anti-CD22 linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD-dimer) conjugates. Efficient immolation and release of a PBD-dimer with strong DNA alkylation properties were observed following disulfide cleavage of methyl- and cyclobutyl-substituted disulfide linkers. However, the analogous cyclopropyl-containing linker did not immolate, and the associated thiol-containing product was a poor DNA alkylator. As predicted from these in vitro assessments, the related anti-CD22 ADCs showed different target-dependent cell killing activities in WSU-DLCL2 and BJAB cell lines. These results demonstrate how the in vitro immolation models can be used to help design efficacious ADCs.

  20. Degradation and adsorption of carbonated dimethyl disulfide in soils with grape production in california

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The common method to apply pre-plant soil fumigants is through pressurizing the pesticides with compressed nitrogen gas. However, it is believed that fumigants with relatively low vapor pressure, such as dimethyl disulfide or DMDS, can be better dispersed in soil when applied using CO2 gas. A labor...