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Sample records for exploring strongly correlated

  1. Strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

    2012-09-18

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO₂ and Fe₃O₄, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials.

  2. Strongly correlated electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.; Albers, R.; Balatsky, A.; Bishop, A.; Bonca, J.; Gubernatis, J.; Gulasci, M.; Silver, R.; Trugman, S.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a 3-year project. Novel electronic materials characterized by strong electronic correlations display a number of unexpected, often extraordinary, properties. These are likely to play a major role in purpose-specific high-technology electronic materials of the future developed for electronic, magnetic, and optical applications. This project sought to develop predictive control of the novel properties by formulating, solving and applying many-body models for the underlying microscopic physics. This predictive control required the development of new analytical and numerical many-body techniques and strategies for materials of varying strengths of interactions, dimensionality and geometry. Results are compared with experiment on classes of novel materials, and the robust techniques are used to predict additional properties and motivate key additional experiments.

  3. Disordered strongly correlated electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Mard, Hossein

    Disorder can have a vast variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this dissertation we study the effects of quenched disorder on electronic systmens at zero temperature. First, we perform variational studies of the interaction-localization problem to describe the interaction-induced renormalizations of the effective (screened) random potential seen by quasiparticles. Here we present results of careful finite-size scaling studies for the conductance of disordered Hubbard chains at half-filling and zero temperature. While our results indicate that quasiparticle wave functions remain exponentially localized even in the presence of moderate to strong repulsive interactions, we show that interactions produce a strong decrease of the characteristic conductance scale g* signaling the crossover to strong localization. This effect, which cannot be captured by a simple renormalization of the disorder strength, instead reflects a peculiar non-Gaussian form of the spatial correlations of the screened disordered potential, a hitherto neglected mechanism to dramatically reduce the impact of Anderson localization (interference) effects. Second, we formulate a strong-disorder renormalization-group (SDRG) approach to study the beta function of the tight-binding model in one dimension with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder for states at the band center. We show that the SDRG method, when used to compute transport properties, yields exact results since it is identical to the transfer matrix method. The beta function is shown to be universal when only off-diagonal disorder is present even though single-parameter scaling is known to be violated. A different single-parameter scaling theory is formulated for this particular (particle-hole symmetric) case. Upon breaking particle-hole symmetry (by adding diagonal disorder), the beta function is shown to

  4. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  5. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  6. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-09

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  7. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  8. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines1, 2, 3, 4. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number5. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes6. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  9. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; ...

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes.more » Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.« less

  10. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  11. Strong correlations between incoherent vortices.

    PubMed

    Jesus-Silva, A J; Hickmann, J M; Fonseca, E J S

    2012-08-27

    We establish a correlation rule of which the value of the topological charge obtained in intensity correlation between two coherence vortices is such that this value is bounded by the topological charge of each coherence vortex. The original phase information is scrambled in each speckle pattern and unveiled using numerical intensity correlation. According to this rule, it is also possible to obtain a coherence vortex stable, an integer vortex, even when each incoherent vortex beam is instable, non-integer vortex.

  12. Machine Learning Phases of Strongly Correlated Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch'ng, Kelvin; Carrasquilla, Juan; Melko, Roger G.; Khatami, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    Machine learning offers an unprecedented perspective for the problem of classifying phases in condensed matter physics. We employ neural-network machine learning techniques to distinguish finite-temperature phases of the strongly correlated fermions on cubic lattices. We show that a three-dimensional convolutional network trained on auxiliary field configurations produced by quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the Hubbard model can correctly predict the magnetic phase diagram of the model at the average density of one (half filling). We then use the network, trained at half filling, to explore the trend in the transition temperature as the system is doped away from half filling. This transfer learning approach predicts that the instability to the magnetic phase extends to at least 5% doping in this region. Our results pave the way for other machine learning applications in correlated quantum many-body systems.

  13. Strong correlations in bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilahun, Dagim

    If there is a general theme to this thesis, it is the effects of strong correlations in both bosons and fermions. The bosonic system considered here consists of ultracold alkali atoms trapped by interfering lasers, so called optical lattices. Strong interactions, realized by increasing the depth of the lattice potential, or through the phenomenon of Feshbach resonances induce strong correlations amongst the atoms, rendering attempts to describe the systems in terms of single particle type physics unsuccessful. Of course strong correlations are not the exclusive domain of bosons, and also are not caused only by strong interactions. Other factors such as reduced dimensionality, in one-dimensional electron gases, or strong magnetic fields, in two-dimensional electron gases are known to induce strong correlations. In this thesis, we explore the manifestations of strong correlations in ultracold atoms in optical lattices and interacting electron gases. Optical lattices provide a near-perfect realization of lattice models, such as the bosonic Hubbard model (BHM) that have been formulated to study solid state systems. This follows from the absence of defects or impurities that usually plague real solid state systems. Another novel feature of optical lattices is the unprecedented control experimenters have in tuning the different lattice parameters, such as the lattice spacing and the intensity of the lasers. This control enables one to study the model Hamiltonians over a wide range of variables, such as the interaction strength between the atoms, thereby opening the door towards the observation of diverse and interesting phenomena. The BHM, and also its variants, predict various quantum phases, such as the strongly correlated Mott insulator (MI) phase that appears as a function of the parameter t/U, the ratio of the nearest neighbor hopping amplitude to the on-site interaction, which one varies experimentally over a wide range of values simply by switching the intensity

  14. Effects of strong disorder in strongly correlated superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Ghosal, Amit

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of strong disorder on a system with strong electronic repulsion. In the absence of disorder, the system has a d-wave superconducting ground state with strong non-BCS features due to its proximity to a Mott insulator. We find that while strong correlations make superconductivity in this system immune to weak disorder, superconductivity is destroyed efficiently when disorder strength is comparable to the effective bandwidth. The suppression of charge motion in regions of strong potential fluctuation leads to the formation of Mott insulating patches, which anchor a larger nonsuperconducting region around them. The system thus breaks into islands of Mott insulating and superconducting regions, with Anderson insulating regions occurring along the boundary of these regions. Thus, electronic correlation and disorder, when both are strong, aid each other in destroying superconductivity, in contrast to their competition at weak disorder. Our results shed light on why zinc impurities are efficient in destroying superconductivity in cuprates, even though it is robust to weaker impurities.

  15. Norman Rostoker and strongly correlated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2016-03-01

    If Norman were alive and attended this symposium, he might have quipped: "Setsuo! What are you talking about! A plasma is, after all, a strongly correlated object, and there is nothing so special about it!" "Yes, Norman, you are so correct! A statistical system consisting of mutually non-interacting and thus uncorrelated particles may be an "ideal-gas" system from a physics teacher's pedagogical point of view, but real systems do consist of mutually interacting and thus strongly correlated particles; a plasma is definitely one of them.Here, in the memory of Professor Rostoker's outstanding contributions to strongly correlated plasmas for the past 60 years, we wish to survey on "Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by a Strongly Correlated Plasma" and "Multi-particle Correlation, Equations of State, and Phase Diagrams" in what follows.

  16. Simulating strongly correlated electrons with a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John E.

    2013-05-28

    The quantum many-body physics of strongly-correlated fermions is studied in a degenerate, strongly- interacting atomic Fermi gas, first realized by our group with DOE support in 2002. This system, which exhibits strong spin pairing, is now widely studied and provides an important paradigm for testing predictions based on state-of-the-art many-body theory in fields ranging from nuclear matter to high temperature superfluidity and superconductivity. As the system is strongly interacting, both the superfluid and the normal fluid are nontrivial and of great interest. A central part of our program on Fermi gases is the connection between the study of thermodynamics, supported by DOE and the study of hydrodynamic transport, supported by NSF. This connection is especially interesting in view of a recent conjecture from the string theory community on the concept of nearly perfect normal fluids, which exhibit a minimum ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in strongly-interacting, scale-invariant systems.

  17. Noise Spectroscopy in Strongly Correlated Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaqqa, Ali M.

    Strongly correlated materials are an interesting class of materials, thanks to the novel electronic and magnetic phenomena they exhibit as a result of the interplay of various degrees of freedom. This gives rise to an array of potential applications, from Mott-FET to magnetic storage. Many experimental probes have been used to study phase transitions in strongly correlated oxides. Among these, resistance noise spectroscopy, together with conventional transport measurements, provides a unique viewpoint to understand the microscopic dynamics near the phase transitions in these oxides. In this thesis, utilizing noise spectroscopy and transport measurements, four different strongly correlated materials were studied: (1) neodymium nickel oxide (NdNiO 3) ultrathin films, (2) vanadium dioxide (VO2) microribbons, (3) copper vanadium bronze (CuxV2O 5) microribbons and (4) niobium triselenide (NbSe3) microribbons. Ultra thin films of rare-earth nickelates exhibit several temperature-driven phase transitions. In this thesis, we studied the metal-insulator and Neel transitions in a series of NdNiO3 films with different lattice mismatches. Upon colling down, the metal-insulator phase transition is accompanied by a structural (orthorohombic to monoclinic) and magnetic (paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic) transitions as well, making the problem more interesting and complex at the same time. The noise is of the 1/f type and is Gaussian in the high temperature phase, however deviations are seen in the low temperature phases. Below the metal-insulator transition, noise magnitude increases by orders of magnitude: a sign of inhomogeneous electrical conduction as result of phase separation. This is further assured by the non-Gaussian noise signature. At very low temperatures (T < 50 K), the noise behavior switches between Gaussian and non-Gaussian over several hours, possibly arising from dynamically competing ground states. VO2 is one of the most widely studied strongly correlated

  18. Dynamics of strongly correlated and strongly inhomogeneous plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kählert, Hanno; Kalman, Gabor J; Bonitz, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Kinetic and fluid equations are derived for the dynamics of classical inhomogeneous trapped plasmas in the strong coupling regime. The starting point is an extended Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander (STLS) ansatz for the dynamic correlation function, which is allowed to depend on time and both particle coordinates separately. The time evolution of the correlation function is determined from the second equation of the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. We study the equations in the linear limit and derive a nonlocal equation for the fluid displacement field. Comparisons to first-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal an excellent quality of our approach thereby overcoming the limitations of the broadly used STLS scheme.

  19. Nanostructure studies of strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiang; Natelson, Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Strongly correlated materials exhibit an amazing variety of phenomena, including metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and high temperature superconductivity, as strong electron-electron and electron-phonon couplings lead to competing correlated ground states. Recently, researchers have begun to apply nanostructure-based techniques to this class of materials, examining electronic transport properties on previously inaccessible length scales, and applying perturbations to drive systems out of equilibrium. We review progress in this area, particularly emphasizing work in transition metal oxides (Fe(3)O(4), VO(2)), manganites, and high temperature cuprate superconductors. We conclude that such nanostructure-based studies have strong potential to reveal new information about the rich physics at work in these materials.

  20. Strongly correlated quantum walks in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Philipp M; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Zupancic, Philip; Lahini, Yoav; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2015-03-13

    Full control over the dynamics of interacting, indistinguishable quantum particles is an important prerequisite for the experimental study of strongly correlated quantum matter and the implementation of high-fidelity quantum information processing. We demonstrate such control over the quantum walk-the quantum mechanical analog of the classical random walk-in the regime where dynamics are dominated by interparticle interactions. Using interacting bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, we directly observed fundamental effects such as the emergence of correlations in two-particle quantum walks, as well as strongly correlated Bloch oscillations in tilted optical lattices. Our approach can be scaled to larger systems, greatly extending the class of problems accessible via quantum walks. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Strong correlations in gravity and biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry

    The unifying theme of this dissertation is the use of correlations. In the first part (chapter 2), we investigate correlations in quantum field theories in de Sitter space. In the second part (chapters 3,4,5), we use correlations to investigate a theoretical proposal that real (observed in nature) transcriptional networks of biological organisms are operating at a critical point in their phase diagram. In chapter 2 we study the infrared dependence of correlators in various external backgrounds. Using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism we calculate loop corrections to the correlators in the case of the Poincare patch and the complete de Sitter space. In the case of the Poincare patch, the loop correction modifies the behavior of the correlator at large distances. In the case of the complete de Sitter space, the loop correction has a strong dependence on the infrared cutoff in the past. It grows linearly with time, suggesting that at some point the correlations become strong and break the symmetry of the classical background. In chapter 3 we derive the signatures of critical behavior in a model organism, the embryo of Drosophila melanogaster. They are: strong correlations in the fluctuations of different genes, a slowing of dynamics, long range correlations in space, and departures from a Gaussian distribution of these fluctuations. We argue that these signatures are observed experimentally. In chapter 4 we construct an effective theory for the zero mode in this system. This theory is different from the standard Landau-Ginsburg description. It contains gauge fields (the result of the broken translational symmetry inside the cell), which produce observable contributions to the two-point function of the order parameter. We show that the behavior of the two-point function for the network of N genes is described by the action of a relativistic particle moving on the surface of the N - 1 dimensional sphere. We derive a theoretical bound on the decay of the correlations and

  2. Strong correlation induced charge localization in antiferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Tian, Chushun; Weng, Zheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The fate of a hole injected in an antiferromagnet is an outstanding issue of strongly correlated physics. It provides important insights into doped Mott insulators closely related to high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we report a systematic numerical study of t-J ladder systems based on the density matrix renormalization group. It reveals a surprising result for the single hole's motion in an otherwise well-understood undoped system. Specifically, we find that the common belief of quasiparticle picture is invalidated by the self-localization of the doped hole. In contrast to Anderson localization caused by disorders, the charge localization discovered here is an entirely new phenomenon purely of strong correlation origin. It results from destructive quantum interference of novel signs picked up by the hole, and since the same effect is of a generic feature of doped Mott physics, our findings unveil a new paradigm which may go beyond the single hole doped system. PMID:24002668

  3. Strongly correlated photons on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Andreas; Volz, Thomas; Winger, Martin; Badolato, Antonio; Hennessy, Kevin J.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Imamoğlu, Ataç

    2012-02-01

    Optical nonlinearities at the single-photon level are key ingredients for future photonic quantum technologies. Prime candidates for the realization of the strong photon-photon interactions necessary for implementing quantum information processing tasks, as well as for studying strongly correlated photons in an integrated photonic device setting, are quantum dots embedded in photonic-crystal nanocavities. Here, we report strong quantum correlations between photons on picosecond timescales. We observe (i) photon antibunching upon resonant excitation of the lowest-energy polariton state, proving that the first cavity photon blocks the subsequent injection events, and (ii) photon bunching when the laser field is in two-photon resonance with the polariton eigenstates of the second Jaynes-Cummings manifold, demonstrating that two photons at this colour are more likely to be injected into the cavity jointly than they would otherwise. Together, these results demonstrate unprecedented strong single-photon nonlinearities, paving the way for the realization of a quantum optical Josephson interferometer or a single-photon transistor.

  4. Gutzwiller approximation in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhua

    Gutzwiller wave function is an important theoretical technique for treating local electron-electron correlations nonperturbatively in condensed matter and materials physics. It is concerned with calculating variationally the ground state wave function by projecting out multi-occupation configurations that are energetically costly. The projection can be carried out analytically in the Gutzwiller approximation that offers an approximate way of calculating expectation values in the Gutzwiller projected wave function. This approach has proven to be very successful in strongly correlated systems such as the high temperature cuprate superconductors, the sodium cobaltates, and the heavy fermion compounds. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that strongly correlated systems have a strong propensity towards forming inhomogeneous electronic states with spatially periodic superstrutural modulations. A good example is the commonly observed stripes and checkerboard states in high- Tc superconductors under a variety of conditions where superconductivity is weakened. There exists currently a real challenge and demand for new theoretical ideas and approaches that treats strongly correlated inhomogeneous electronic states, which is the subject matter of this thesis. This thesis contains four parts. In the first part of the thesis, the Gutzwiller approach is formulated in the grand canonical ensemble where, for the first time, a spatially (and spin) unrestricted Gutzwiller approximation (SUGA) is developed for studying inhomogeneous (both ordered and disordered) quantum electronic states in strongly correlated electron systems. The second part of the thesis applies the SUGA to the t-J model for doped Mott insulators which led to the discovery of checkerboard-like inhomogeneous electronic states competing with d-wave superconductivity, consistent with experimental observations made on several families of high-Tc superconductors. In the third part of the thesis, new

  5. Spectroscopic Imaging of Strongly Correlated Electronic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Ali; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-03-01

    The study of correlated electronic systems from high-Tc cuprates to heavy-fermion systems continues to motivate the development of experimental tools to probe electronic phenomena in new ways and with increasing precision. In the past two decades, spectroscopic imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a powerful experimental technique. The combination of high energy and spatial resolutions provided by this technique reveals unprecedented detail of the electronic properties of strongly correlated metals and superconductors. This review examines specific experiments, theoretical concepts, and measurement methods that have established the application of these techniques to correlated materials. A wide range of applications, such as the study of collective responses to single atomic impurities, the characterization of quasiparticle-like excitations through their interference, and the identification of competing electronic phases using spectroscopic imaging, are discussed.

  6. Pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotscheck, E.; Smith, R. A.; Jackson, A. D.

    1981-12-01

    The correlated-basis-function method is extended to deal with pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. With a variational ansatz for the model wave function we derive the "correlated" analog of the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (or Balian-Werthamer), Anderson-Brinkman-Morel theory of pairing. A suitable (and well-controlled) set of approximations brings the theory into a form identical to the conventional theories, but with the bare interaction replaced by a weak effective interaction and the bare single-particle energies replaced by an effective single-particle spectrum. As usual, liquid 3He provides a very stringent test of the theory, as both the interaction and the experimental facts are pretty clear. The variational estimates for the pairing interaction are improved by nonorthogonal perturbation theory. We find the expected enhancement of the attraction in P waves, although the restriction to effective two-body interactions appears to be insufficient to generate P-wave pairing.

  7. Thermoelectric properties of a strongly correlated layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titvinidze, Irakli; Dorda, Antonius; von der Linden, Wolfgang; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of strong electronic interactions on the thermoelectric properties of a simple generic system, consisting of a single correlated layer sandwiched between two metallic leads. Results will be given for the linear response regime as well as beyond, for which a full nonequilibrium many-body calculation is performed, based on nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). As impurity solver we use the auxiliary master equation approach, which addresses the impurity problem within a finite auxiliary system consisting of a correlated impurity, a small number of uncorrelated bath sites, and Markovian environments. For the linear response regime, results will be presented for the Seebeck coefficient, the electrical conductance, and the electronic contribution to the thermal conductance. Beyond linear response, i.e., for finite differences in the temperatures and/or the bias voltages in the leads, we study the dependence of the current on various model parameters, such as gate voltage and Hubbard interaction of the central layer. We will give a detailed parameter study as far as the thermoelectric efficiency is concerned. We find that strong correlations can indeed increase the thermopower of the device. In addition, some general theoretical requirements for an efficient thermoelectric device will be given.

  8. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, S. E.; Marston, J. B.

    2011-02-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  9. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, S E; Marston, J B

    2011-02-14

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  10. Strong spurious phase in teleseismic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Campillo, Michel; Boue, Pierre; Thomas, Christine; Roux, Philippe; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    In the teleseismic correlations of continuous ambient noise data from Fnet array in Japan and Lapnet array in Finland, we observed a clear spurious phase with an apparent slowness of about 4.6 s/deg and an arrival time of about 430 s, far ahead of the P arrival at around 628 s. The spurious signal is rather strong from Fnet to Lapnet, arising from the correlating between the P wave from New Zealand arriving at Fnet and the PKP wave at Lapnet. The spurious phase in the opposite direction is weaker, with the source region locating in the low-latitude Atlantic Ocean near South America. Spurious phases near P and PcP waves are also present.

  11. Nanoscale electrodynamics of strongly correlated quantum materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J; Basov, D N

    2017-01-01

    Electronic, magnetic, and structural phase inhomogeneities are ubiquitous in strongly correlated quantum materials. The characteristic length scales of the phase inhomogeneities can range from atomic to mesoscopic, depending on their microscopic origins as well as various sample dependent factors. Therefore, progress with the understanding of correlated phenomena critically depends on the experimental techniques suitable to provide appropriate spatial resolution. This requirement is difficult to meet for some of the most informative methods in condensed matter physics, including infrared and optical spectroscopy. Yet, recent developments in near-field optics and imaging enabled a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic response with a spatial resolution down to 10 nm. Thus it is now feasible to exploit at the nanoscale well-established capabilities of optical methods for characterization of electronic processes and lattice dynamics in diverse classes of correlated quantum systems. This review offers a concise description of the state-of-the-art near-field techniques applied to prototypical correlated quantum materials. We also discuss complementary microscopic and spectroscopic methods which reveal important mesoscopic dynamics of quantum materials at different energy scales.

  12. Nanoscale electrodynamics of strongly correlated quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Basov, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    Electronic, magnetic, and structural phase inhomogeneities are ubiquitous in strongly correlated quantum materials. The characteristic length scales of the phase inhomogeneities can range from atomic to mesoscopic, depending on their microscopic origins as well as various sample dependent factors. Therefore, progress with the understanding of correlated phenomena critically depends on the experimental techniques suitable to provide appropriate spatial resolution. This requirement is difficult to meet for some of the most informative methods in condensed matter physics, including infrared and optical spectroscopy. Yet, recent developments in near-field optics and imaging enabled a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic response with a spatial resolution down to 10 nm. Thus it is now feasible to exploit at the nanoscale well-established capabilities of optical methods for characterization of electronic processes and lattice dynamics in diverse classes of correlated quantum systems. This review offers a concise description of the state-of-the-art near-field techniques applied to prototypical correlated quantum materials. We also discuss complementary microscopic and spectroscopic methods which reveal important mesoscopic dynamics of quantum materials at different energy scales.

  13. Strong electron correlation and nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Haranath

    2012-07-01

    Based on experimental and theoretical research during the last decade, giant optical nonlinearities found in Mott-Hubbard insulators like Sr2CuO3,Ca2CuO3, Nickel halides ([Ni(chxn)2X]X2 where X = Br, Cl and `chxn' refers to cyclohexanediamine) are presented. These materials are reported to be potential materials for all optical switching devices. The occurrence of nearly degenerate lowest one- and two-photon states, strong Coulomb correlation and strong dipole coupling between the one- and two-photon states are believed to be the reason for such colossal optical nonlinearities in these systems. In some of these materials (at least), the two photon state is below the one-photon state. This leads to the possibility that such material can be excited to the lowest optical state by shinning laser of suitable wavelength, the populations thus generated decays to the two-photon state at ultrafast short time. Thus nonlinear measurements can be made from an excited state (we call as excited state nonlinear optical properties). One dimensional strongly correlated materials are predicted to have several orders-of-magnitude larger excited state optical non-linearities in comparison to that from the ground state, in the wavelength region suitable for terahertz communications. A large number of measurable nonlinear optical properties like Two Photon absorption, Photo induced absorption, Third Harmonic generation, Stimulated Raman Scattering are obtained theoretically and compared with available experimental observations. Then a large number excited state nonlinear optical properties are predicted which are experimentally measurable. We emphasize that the mechanism of nonlinear optics in one dimensional Mott-Hubbard insulators is different from that of the π-conjugated polymers — in the former spin excitation play an important role. We argue from detailed understanding of nonlinear optics of π-conjugated systems that some features in the Third Harmonic Generation

  14. Emergent quasicrystals in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, Eran; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Commensurability is of paramount importance in numerous strongly interacting electronic systems. In the fractional quantum Hall effect, a rich cascade of increasingly narrow plateaux appear at larger denominator filling fractions. Rich commensurate structures also emerge, at certain filling fractions, in high temperature superconductors and other electronic systems. A natural question concerns the character of these and other electronic systems at irrational filling fractions. Here we demonstrate that quasicrystalline structures naturally emerge in these situations, and trigger behaviors not typically expected of periodic systems. We first show that irrationally filled quantum Hall systems cross over into quasiperiodically ordered configuration in the thin-torus limit. Using known properties of quasicrystals, we argue that these states are unstable against the effects of disorder, in agreement with the existence of quantum Hall plateaux. We then study analogous physical situations in a system of cold Rydberg atoms placed on an optical lattice. Such an experimental setup is generally disorder free, and can therefore be used to detect the emergent quasicrystals we predict. We discuss similar situations in the Falicov-Kimball model, where known exact results can be used to establish quasicrystalline structures in one and two dimensions. We briefly speculate on possible relations between our theoretical findings and the existence of glassy dynamics and other features of strongly correlated electronic systems.

  15. Estimating strong correlations in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertis, J.; Friesdorf, M.; Riofrío, C. A.; Eisert, J.

    2016-11-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide one of the most promising platforms for analog quantum simulations of complex quantum many-body systems. Large-size systems can now routinely be reached and are already used to probe a large variety of different physical situations, ranging from quantum phase transitions to artificial gauge theories. At the same time, measurement techniques are still limited and full tomography for these systems seems out of reach. Motivated by this observation, we present a method to directly detect and quantify to what extent a quantum state deviates from a local Gaussian description, based on available noise correlation measurements from in situ and time-of-flight measurements. This is an indicator of the significance of strong correlations in ground and thermal states, as Gaussian states are precisely the ground and thermal states of noninteracting models. We connect our findings, augmented by numerical tensor network simulations, to notions of equilibration, disordered systems, and the suppression of transport in Anderson insulators.

  16. Predictive Capability for Strongly Correlated Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus Umrigar

    2012-05-09

    Diffusion Monte Carlo methods can give highly accurate results for correlated systems, provided that well optimized trial wave functions with accurate nodal surfaces are employed. The Cornell team developed powerful methods for optimizing all the parameters within a multi-determinant Slater-Jastrow form of the wave function. These include the Jastrow parameters within a flexible electron-electron-nucleus form of the Jastrow function, the parameters multiplying the configuration state functions, the orbital parameters and the basis exponents. The method optimizes a linear combination of the energy and the variance of the local energy. The optimal parameters are found iteratively by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in the space spanned by the wave function and its first-order derivatives, making use of a strong zero-variance principle. It is highly robust, has become the method of choice for correlated wave function optimization and has been adopted by other QMC groups. This optimization method was used on the first-row atoms and homonuclear diatomic molecules, demonstrating that molecular well depths can be obtained with near chemical accuracy quite systematically at the diffusion Monte Carlo level for these systems. In addition the complete ground-state potential energy curve of the C{sub 2} molecule up to the dissociation limit was obtained, and, size consistency and broken spin-symmetry issues in quantum Monte Carlo calculations were studied. The method was used with a eight-electrons-in-eight-orbitals complete active space CAS(8,8) wave function to study the relative energies of the monocyclic and bicyclic forms of m-benzyne. The DMC calculations show that the monocyclic structure is lower in energy than the bicyclic structure by 1.92 kcal/ mole, which is in excellent agreement with the best coupled cluster results (CCSD(T)) and in disagreement with the CCSD results. QMC methods have for the most part been used only for ground states of a given symmetry. We

  17. Computational Studies of Strongly Correlated Quantum Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hao

    The study of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems is an outstanding challenge. Highly accurate results are needed for the understanding of practical and fundamental problems in condensed-matter physics, high energy physics, material science, quantum chemistry and so on. Our familiar mean-field or perturbative methods tend to be ineffective. Numerical simulations provide a promising approach for studying such systems. The fundamental difficulty of numerical simulation is that the dimension of the Hilbert space needed to describe interacting systems increases exponentially with the system size. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are one of the best approaches to tackle the problem of enormous Hilbert space. They have been highly successful for boson systems and unfrustrated spin models. For systems with fermions, the exchange symmetry in general causes the infamous sign problem, making the statistical noise in the computed results grow exponentially with the system size. This hinders our understanding of interesting physics such as high-temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator phase transition. In this thesis, we present a variety of new developments in the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods, including the incorporation of symmetry in both the trial wave function and the projector, developing the constraint release method, using the force-bias to drastically improve the efficiency in Metropolis framework, identifying and solving the infinite variance problem, and sampling Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave function. With these developments, some of the most challenging many-electron problems are now under control. We obtain an exact numerical solution of two-dimensional strongly interacting Fermi atomic gas, determine the ground state properties of the 2D Fermi gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, provide benchmark results for the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model, and establish that the Hubbard model has a stripe order in the

  18. Electronic properties of strongly correlated layered oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng

    The two-dimensional electronic systems (2DESs) have kept surprising physicists for the last few decades. Examples include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, cuprate superconductivity, and graphene. This thesis is intended to develop suitable theoretical tools which can be generalized to study new types of 2DESs with strong correlation feature. The first part of this thesis describes the investigation of heterostructures made by Mott insulators. This work is mostly motivated by the significant improvement of techniques for layer-by-layer growth of transition metal oxides in the last few years. We construct a toy model based on generalized Hubbard model complemented with long-ranged Coulomb interaction, and we study it by Hartree-Fock theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and Thomas-Fermi theory. We argue that interesting 2D strongly correlated electronic systems can be created in such heterostructures under several conditions. Since these 2D systems are formed entirely due to the gap generated by electron-electron interaction, they are not addiabatically connected to a noninteracting electron states. This feature makes these 2D systems distinguish from the ones created in semiconductor heterostructures, and they may be potential systems having non-Fermi liquid behaviors. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the study of collective excitations in high-temperature superconductors. One important achievement in this work is to develop a time-dependent mean-field theory for t -- U -- J -- V model, an effective low energy model for cuprates. The time-dependent mean-field theory is proven to be identical to the generalized random-phase approximation (GRPA) which includes both the bubble and ladder diagrams. We propose that the famous 41 meV magnetic resonance mode observed in the inelastic neutron scattering measurements is a collective mode arising from a conjugation relation, which has been overlooked in previous work, between the antiferromagnetic

  19. Emergent behavior in strongly correlated electron systems.

    PubMed

    Pines, David

    2016-09-01

    I describe early work on strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) from the perspective of a theoretical physicist who, while a participant in their reductionist top-down beginnings, is now part of the paradigm change to a bottom-up 'emergent' approach with its focus on using phenomenology to find the organizing principles responsible for their emergent behavior disclosed by experiment-and only then constructing microscopic models that incorporate these. After considering the organizing principles responsible for the emergence of plasmons, quasiparticles, and conventional superconductivity in SCES, I consider their application to three of SCES's sister systems, the helium liquids, nuclei, and the nuclear matter found in neutron stars. I note some recent applications of the random phase approximation and examine briefly the role that paradigm change is playing in two central problems in our field: understanding the emergence and subsequent behavior of heavy electrons in Kondo lattice materials; and finding the mechanism for the unconventional superconductivity found in heavy electron, organic, cuprate, and iron-based materials.

  20. Emergent behavior in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pines, David

    2016-09-01

    I describe early work on strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) from the perspective of a theoretical physicist who, while a participant in their reductionist top-down beginnings, is now part of the paradigm change to a bottom-up ‘emergent’ approach with its focus on using phenomenology to find the organizing principles responsible for their emergent behavior disclosed by experiment—and only then constructing microscopic models that incorporate these. After considering the organizing principles responsible for the emergence of plasmons, quasiparticles, and conventional superconductivity in SCES, I consider their application to three of SCES’s sister systems, the helium liquids, nuclei, and the nuclear matter found in neutron stars. I note some recent applications of the random phase approximation and examine briefly the role that paradigm change is playing in two central problems in our field: understanding the emergence and subsequent behavior of heavy electrons in Kondo lattice materials; and finding the mechanism for the unconventional superconductivity found in heavy electron, organic, cuprate, and iron-based materials.

  1. Charge instabilities in strongly correlated bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, G.

    2003-09-01

    We investigate the charge-instabilities of the Hubbard-Holstein model with two coupled layers. In this system the scattering processes naturally separate into contributions which are either symmetric or antisymmetric combinations with respect to exchange of the layers. It turns out that the short-range strong correlations suppress finite wave-vector nesting instabilities for both symmetries but favor the occurrence of phase separation in the symmetric channel. Inclusion of a sizeable long-range Coulomb (LRC) interaction frustrates the q=0 instabilities and supports the formation of incommensurate charge-density waves (CDW). Upon reducing doping from half-filling and for small electron-phonon coupling g the CDW instability first occurs in the antisymmetric channel but both instability lines merge with increasing g. While LRC forces always suppress the phase separation instability in the symmetric channel, the CDW period in the antisymmetric sector tends to infinity (q_cto 0) for sufficiently small Coulomb interaction. This feature allows for the possibility of singular scattering over the whole Fermi surface. We discuss possible implications of our results for the bilayer high- T c cuprates.

  2. Strongly correlated states in ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.

    This thesis deals with novel phases and dynamical effects in strongly correlated quantum systems and is divided in two main parts. The first part deals with the effects of extended interactions on lattice bosons in one dimension. Using the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) we showed that ultracold atoms or molecules with extended interactions, in a one dimensional optical lattice can form a novel quantum phase characterized by non-local string correlations and no broken symmetry[1]. We termed this phase a Haldane insulator due to an analogy with Haldane gapped Heisenberg spin chains. We derived a field theory description of the phase and the phase transitions from it to the conventional states, a Mott insulator and a density wave. One important outcome from this study was the observation that the topological distinction between the Haldane and Mott insulator is protected by the lattice inversion symmetry[2]. In addition, the field theoretical description allowed us to describe universal features in the dynamic response of the system to time-dependent probes[3]. In the second part, we study the effects of time-dependent noise on quantum phase transitions. We consider one particular type of noise, 1/f noise, omnipresent in low-frequency electric devices. This type of noise is scale invariant, and leads to the formation of novel non-equilibrium quantum critical states[?]. We study the effects of small static perturbations around the critical states, through a real-time renormalization group (RG) approach[4]. At the first order of our expansion (valid for short times), we find that these perturbations can lead to a sharp non-equilibrium quantum phase transition, controlled by the non-equilibrium quantum critical state. However, at the second order (valid for longer times), we actually find that the system develops a finite effective temperature, which destroys the scale invariance and turns the phase transition into a smooth crossover. Using the RG approach

  3. Strong Community, Deep Learning: Exploring the Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Carole; Ramondt, Leonie; Smiley, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    This explores the constructivist understanding that shared practitioner research in collaborative online spaces leads to deeper learning. The research was developed within the context of building the National College of School Leaderships (NCSLs) online learning communities. A community and a learning scale, both emerging through grounded…

  4. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Longhua

    In this thesis, we investigated the strongly correlated phenomena in bilayer quantum Hall effect, inhomogeneous superconductivity and Boson Hubbard model. Bilayer quantum Hall system is studied in chapter 2. By using the Composite Boson (CB) theory developed by J. Ye, we derive the ground state, quasihole and a quasihole-pair wave functions from the CB theory and its dual action. We find that the ground state wave function is the product of two parts, one in the charge sector which is the well known Halperin's (111) wave function and the other in the spin sector which is non-trivial at any finite d due to the gapless mode. So the total groundstate wave function differs from the well known (111) wave function at any finite d. In addition to commonly known multiplicative factors, the quasihole and quasihole-pair wave functions also contain non-trivial normalization factors multiplying the correct ground state wave function. Then we continue to study the quantum phase transition from the excitonic superfluid (ESF) to a possible pseudo-spin density wave (PSDW) at some intermediate distances driven by the magneto-roton minimum collapsing at a finite wavevector. We analyze the properties of the PSDW and explicitly show that a square lattice is the favored lattice. We suggest that correlated hopping of vacancies in the active and passive layers in the PSDW state leads to very large and temperature-dependent drag, consistent with the experimental data. Comparisons with previous microscopic numerical calculations are made. Further experimental implications are given. In chapter 3, we investigate inhomogeneous superconductivity. Starting from the Ginzburg-Landau free energy describing the normal state to Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state transition, we evaluate the free energy of seven most common lattice structures: stripe, square, triangular, Simple Cubic (SC), Face centered Cubic (FCC), Body centered Cubic (BCC) and Quasicrystal (QC). We find that the stripe

  5. Complexity in Strongly Correlated Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dagotto, Elbio R

    2005-01-01

    A wide variety of experimental results and theoretical investigations in recent years have convincingly demonstrated that several transition metal oxides and other materials have dominant states that are not spatially homogeneous. This occurs in cases in which several physical interactions - spin, charge, lattice, and/or orbital - are simultaneously active. This phenomenon causes interesting effects, such as colossal magnetoresistance, and it also appears crucial to understand the high-temperature superconductors. The spontaneous emergence of electronic nanometer-scale structures in transition metal oxides, and the existence of many competing states, are properties often associated with complex matter where nonlinearities dominate, such as soft materials and biological systems. This electronic complexity could have potential consequences for applications of correlated electronic materials, because not only charge (semiconducting electronic), or charge and spin (spintronics) are of relevance, but in addition the lattice and orbital degrees of freedom are active, leading to giant responses to small perturbations. Moreover, several metallic and insulating phases compete, increasing the potential for novel behavior.

  6. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study on Strongly Correlated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang

    Strongly correlated electrons and spin-orbit interaction have been the two major research directions of condensed matter physics in recent years. The discovery of high temperature superconductors in 1986 not only brought excitement into the field but also challenged our theory on quantum materials. After almost three decades of extensive study, the underlying mechanism of high temperature superconductivity is still not fully understood, the reason for which is mainly a poor understanding of strongly correlated systems. The phase diagram of cuprate superconductors has become more complicated throughout the years as multiple novel electronic phases have been discovered, while few of them are fully understood. Topological insulators are a newly discovered family of materials bearing topological non-trivial quantum states as a result of spin-orbit coupling. The theoretically predicted topological Kondo insulators as strongly correlated systems with strong spin-orbital coupling make an ideal playground to test our theory of quantum materials. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a powerful technique to explore new phenomena in materials with exotic electronic states due to its high spacial resolution and high sensitivity to low energy electronic structures. Moreover, as a surface-sensitive technique, STM is an ideal tool to investigate the electronic properties of topological and non-topological surface states. In this thesis, I will describe experiments we performed on high temperature superconductors and topological Kondo insulators using STM. First, I will describe our experiments on a Bi-based high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CuO6+delta. The quasiparticle interference technique uncovers a Fermi surface reconstruction. We also discovered the coexistence of Bogoliubov quasiparticle and pseudogap state at the antinodes. Afterwards, I will discuss our discovery of d-form factor density wave in the same material, showing the omnipresence of d form factor density

  7. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  8. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  9. Strong correlation effects on surfaces of topological insulators via holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yunseok; Song, Geunho; Sin, Sang-Jin

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the effects of strong correlation on the surface state of a topological insulator (TI). We argue that electrons in the regime of crossover from weak antilocalization to weak localization are strongly correlated, and calculate the magnetotransport coefficients of TIs using the gauge-gravity principle. Then, we examine the magnetoconductivity (MC) formula and find excellent agreement with the data of chrome-doped Bi2Te3 in the crossover regime. We also find that the cusplike peak in MC at low doping is absent, which is natural since quasiparticles disappear due to the strong correlation.

  10. Joint statistics of strongly correlated neurons via dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Taşkın; Rotter, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The relative timing of action potentials in neurons recorded from local cortical networks often shows a non-trivial dependence, which is then quantified by cross-correlation functions. Theoretical models emphasize that such spike train correlations are an inevitable consequence of two neurons being part of the same network and sharing some synaptic input. For non-linear neuron models, however, explicit correlation functions are difficult to compute analytically, and perturbative methods work only for weak shared input. In order to treat strong correlations, we suggest here an alternative non-perturbative method. Specifically, we study the case of two leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with strong shared input. Correlation functions derived from simulated spike trains fit our theoretical predictions very accurately. Using our method, we computed the non-linear correlation transfer as well as correlation functions that are asymmetric due to inhomogeneous intrinsic parameters or unequal input.

  11. Transmission of Correlated Messages over Interference Channels with Strong Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhan; Yoon, Eunchul; Moon, Hichan

    Transmission of correlated messages over interference channels with strong interference is considered. As a result, an achievable rate region is presented. It is shown that if the messages are correlated, the achievable rate region can be larger than the capacity region given by Costa and El Gamal. As an example, the Gaussian interference channel is considered.

  12. Strong correlations generically protect d -wave superconductivity against disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shao; Dobrosavljević, V.; Miranda, E.

    2016-05-01

    We address the question of why strongly correlated d -wave superconductors, such as the cuprates, prove to be surprisingly robust against the introduction of nonmagnetic impurities. We show that, very generally, both the pair-breaking and the normal state transport scattering rates are significantly suppressed by strong correlations effects arising in the proximity to a Mott insulating state. We also show that the correlation-renormalized scattering amplitude is generically enhanced in the forward direction, an effect which was previously often ascribed to the specific scattering by charged impurities outside the copper-oxide planes.

  13. Size effects on thermoelectricity in a strongly correlated oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Siemons, Wolter; McGuire, Michael A; Ramesh, R.; Yadav, A.K.; Wu, Vincent; Vailionis, Arturas; Majumdar, Arunava

    2012-01-01

    We investigated size effects on thermoelectricity in thin films of a strongly correlated layered cobaltate. At room temperature, the thermopower is independent of thickness down to 6 nm. This unusual behavior is inconsistent with the Fuchs-Sondheimer theory, which is used to describe conventional metals and semiconductors, and is attributed to the strong electron correlations in this material. On the other hand, the resistivity increases below a critical thickness of {approx}30 nm, as expected. The temperature-dependent thermopower is similar for different thicknesses but the resistivity shows systematic changes with thickness. Our experiments highlight the differences in thermoelectric behavior of strongly correlated and uncorrelated systems when subjected to finite-size effects. We use the atomic-limit Hubbard model at the high-temperature limit to explain our observations. These findings provide new insights into decoupling electrical conductivity and thermopower in correlated systems.

  14. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    2006-09-01

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  15. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  16. Strongly Correlated Transport in the Falicov Kimball Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Greg; Freericks, Jim; Zlatic, Veljko

    2013-03-01

    Many materials like the cuprates, heavy fermions, and strongly correlated oxides, are non-Fermi liquid ``bad metals'', with linear or quasi-linear resistivity as a function of temperature. The low-energy excitations are quasiparticle-like near the Fermi surface, but their lifetimes are short, so they are not coherent or free-particle-like, as in conventional Fermi-liquids (whose quasi-particle lifetimes diverge at the Fermi energy). It turns out that this kind of behavior is ubiquitous in a wide range of different strongly correlated models, as long as the temperature is above the Fermi-liquid scale. To illustrate this, we investigate the strongly correlated transport in the Falicov-Kimball model using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) - which is exactly solvable in the limit of infinite coordination number. We show results for the resistivity as a function of temperature, the quasiparticle lifetime, and the spectral function. These results are quite similar to those recently found for the Hubbard model, illustrating that this high temperature behavior is seen in many different models of strong electron correlations.

  17. Higher order correlation beams in atmosphere under strong turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, H; Monken, C H

    2016-02-08

    Higher order correlation beams, that is, two-photon beams obtained from the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by Hermite-Gauss or Laguerre-Gauss beams of any order, can be used to encode information in many modes, opening the possibility of quantum communication with large alphabets. In this paper we calculate, analytically, the fourth-order correlation function for the Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss coherent and partially coherent correlation beams propagating through a strong turbulent medium. We show that fourth-order correlation functions for correlation beams have, under certain conditions, expressions similar to those of intensities of classical beams and are degraded by turbulence in a similar way as the classical beams. Our results can be useful in establishing limits for the use of two-photon beams in quantum communications with larger alphabets under atmospheric turbulence.

  18. Reexamination of strong subadditivity: A quantum-correlation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2017-03-01

    The strong subadditivity inequality of von Neumann entropy relates the entropy of subsystems of a tripartite state ρA B C to that of the composite system. Here, we define T(a )(ρA B C) as the extent to which ρA B C fails to satisfy the strong subadditivity inequality S (ρB) +S (ρC) ≤S (ρA B) +S (ρA C) with equality and investigate its properties. In particular, by introducing auxiliary subsystem E , we consider any purification | ψA B C E> of ρA B C and formulate T(a )(ρA B C) as the extent to which the bipartite quantum correlations of ρA B and ρA C, measured by entanglement of formation and quantum discord, change under the transformation B →B E and C →C E . Invariance of quantum correlations of ρA B and ρA C under such transformation is shown to be a necessary and sufficient condition for vanishing T(a )(ρA B C) . Our approach allows one to characterize, intuitively, the structure of states for which the strong subadditivity is saturated. Moreover, along with providing a conservation law for quantum correlations of states for which the strong subadditivity inequality is satisfied with equality, we find that such states coincide with those that the Koashi-Winter monogamy relation is saturated.

  19. Thermometry precision in strongly correlated ultracold lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehboudi, M.; Moreno-Cardoner, M.; De Chiara, G.; Sanpera, A.

    2015-05-01

    The precise knowledge of the temperature of an ultracold lattice gas simulating a strongly correlated system is a question of both fundamental and technological importance. Here, we address such question by combining tools from quantum metrology together with the study of the quantum correlations embedded in the system at finite temperatures. Within this frame we examine the spin-1/2 XY chain, first estimating, by means of the quantum Fisher information, the lowest attainable bound on the temperature precision. We then address the estimation of the temperature of the sample from the analysis of correlations using a quantum non demolishing Faraday spectroscopy method. Remarkably, our results show that the collective quantum correlations can become optimal observables to accurately estimate the temperature of our model in a given range of temperatures.

  20. Strongly correlated quasi-two-dimensional dipolar fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Mehrtash; Skinner, Brian; Fogler, Michael; Demler, Eugene

    2013-03-01

    We study the collective oscillations of strongly correlated quasi-two-dimensional dipolar fermions at zero temperature. The correlation energy of the quasi-two-dimensional gas is obtained using a novel variational method based on the fixed-node diffusion Monte-Carlo analysis of strictly two-dimensional dipolar Fermi gas. As an application, we predict the dependence of the Wigner crystal transition point on the thickness of the layer, as well as the shift of the monopole oscillation frequency in harmonic traps.

  1. Size, dimensionality, and strong electron correlation in nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Brus, Louis

    2014-10-21

    In electronic structure theory, electron-electron repulsion is normally considered only in an average (or mean field) sense, for example, in a single Hartree-Fock determinant. This is the simple molecular orbital model, which is often a good approximation for molecules. In infinite systems, this averaging treatment leads to delocalized electronic bands, an excellent description of bulk 3D sp(3) semiconductors. However, in reality electrons try to instantaneously avoid each other; their relative motion is correlated. Strong electron-electron repulsion and correlation create new collective states and cause new femtosecond kinetic processes. This is especially true in 1D and 2D systems. The quantum size effect, a single electron property, is widely known: the band gap increases with decreasing size. This Account focuses on the experimental consequences of strong correlation. We first describe π-π* excited states in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). To obtain the spectra of individual CNTs, we developed a white-light, right-angle resonant Rayleigh scattering method. Discrete exciton transitions dominate the optical absorption spectra of both semiconducting and metallic tubes. Excitons are bound neutral excited states in which the electron and hole tightly orbit each other due to their mutual Coulomb attraction. We then describe more generally the independent roles of size and dimensionality in nanoelectronic structure, using additional examples from graphene, trans-polyacetylene chains, transition metal dichalcogenides, organic/inorganic Pb iodide perovskites, quantum dots, and pentacene van der Waals crystals. In 1D and 2D chemical systems, the electronic band structure diagram can be a poor predictor of properties if explicit correlation is not considered. One- and two-dimensional systems show quantum confinement and especially strong correlation as compared with their 3D parent systems. The Coulomb interaction is enhanced because the electrons are on the surface. One- and

  2. Exact Kohn-Sham potential of strongly correlated finite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Helbig, N.; Rubio, A.

    2009-12-14

    The dissociation of molecules, even the most simple hydrogen molecule, cannot be described accurately within density functional theory because none of the currently available functionals accounts for strong on-site correlation. This problem led to a discussion of properties that the local Kohn-Sham potential has to satisfy in order to correctly describe strongly correlated systems. We derive an analytic expression for the nontrivial form of the Kohn-Sham potential in between the two fragments for the dissociation of a single bond. We show that the numerical calculations for a one-dimensional two-electron model system indeed approach and reach this limit. It is shown that the functional form of the potential is universal, i.e., independent of the details of the two fragments.

  3. Separation of strong (bond-breaking) from weak (dynamical) correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzelnigg, Werner

    2012-06-01

    A CC (coupled-cluster) ansatz based on a GVB (generalized valence bond) or an APSG (antisymmetrized product of strongly orthogonal geminals) reference function arises naturally if one tries to treat strong correlations exactly (to infinite order), and weak correlations by TCC (traditional coupled cluster) theory. This ansatz is proposed as an alternative to MC-CC (multi-configuration coupled cluster) theory. One uses especially that APSG and GVB are of CC type, but allow to combine separability with the variation principle. The energy and the stationarity conditions are formulated in terms of spinfree density cumulants. The replacement operators corresponding to the APSG ansatz generate a Lie algebra which is a subalgebra of that of all replacement operators.

  4. CP 1 | 1 nonlinear sigma model vs strong electron correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, E. A.; Ferraz, A.

    2017-06-01

    The nonlinear sigma model targeted on the coset supermanifold CP 1 | 1 = SU(2 | 1) / U(1 | 1) is derived in an attempt to describe the quasiclassical low-energy effective action for the doped t - J model at the SUSY point, J = 2 t. In spite of the fact that the supermanifold CP 1 | 1 indeed appears as the phase space of the strongly correlated electrons, the canonical CP 1 | 1 nonlinear sigma model (NLSM) is unable to capture the physics of strong correlations displayed by the SUSY t - J model at any finite doping. This is due to the fact that, in this regime, the doping itself cannot be self-consistently incorporated into the CP 1 | 1 NLSM.

  5. Single Spin Asymmetry in Strongly Correlated Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Musulmanbekov, G.

    2007-06-13

    The Single Transverse - Spin Asymmetry (SSA) is analysed in the framework of the Strongly Correlated Quark Model proposed by author, where the proton spin emerges from the orbital momenta of quark and qluon condensates circulating around the valence quarks. It is shown that dominating factors of appearance of SSA are the orbiting around the valence quarks sea quark and qluon condensates and spin dependent quark-quark cross sections.

  6. Connecting strongly correlated superfluids by a quantum point contact.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Dominik; Uchino, Shun; Krinner, Sebastian; Lebrat, Martin; Giamarchi, Thierry; Esslinger, Tilman; Brantut, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-18

    Point contacts provide simple connections between macroscopic particle reservoirs. In electric circuits, strong links between metals, semiconductors, or superconductors have applications for fundamental condensed-matter physics as well as quantum information processing. However, for complex, strongly correlated materials, links have been largely restricted to weak tunnel junctions. We studied resonantly interacting Fermi gases connected by a tunable, ballistic quantum point contact, finding a nonlinear current-bias relation. At low temperature, our observations agree quantitatively with a theoretical model in which the current originates from multiple Andreev reflections. In a wide contact geometry, the competition between superfluidity and thermally activated transport leads to a conductance minimum. Our system offers a controllable platform for the study of mesoscopic devices based on strongly interacting matter.

  7. Theoretical prediction of a strongly correlated Dirac metal.

    PubMed

    Mazin, I I; Jeschke, Harald O; Lechermann, Frank; Lee, Hunpyo; Fink, Mario; Thomale, Ronny; Valentí, Roser

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the most intensely studied objects in the electronic theory of solids have been strongly correlated systems and graphene. However, the fact that the Dirac bands in graphene are made up of sp(2) electrons, which are subject to neither strong Hubbard repulsion U nor strong Hund's rule coupling J, creates certain limitations in terms of novel, interaction-induced physics that could be derived from Dirac points. Here we propose GaCu3(OH)6Cl2 (Ga-substituted herbertsmithite) as a correlated Dirac-Kagome metal combining Dirac electrons, strong interactions and frustrated magnetic interactions. Using density functional theory, we calculate its crystallographic and electronic properties, and observe that it has symmetry-protected Dirac points at the Fermi level. Its many-body physics is diverse, with possible charge, magnetic and superconducting instabilities. Through a combination of various many-body methods we study possible symmetry-lowering phase transitions such as Mott-Hubbard, charge or magnetic ordering, and unconventional superconductivity, which in this compound assumes an f-wave symmetry.

  8. Strong correlations and topological order in one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gottardi, Wade Wells

    This thesis presents theoretical studies of strongly correlated systems as well as topologically ordered systems in 1D. Non-Fermi liquid behavior characteristic of interacting 1D electron systems is investigated with an emphasis on experimentally relevant setups and observables. The existence of end Majorana fermions in a 1D p-wave superconductor subject to periodic, incommensurate and disordered potentials is studied. The Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL), a model of interacting electrons in one spatial dimension, is considered in the context of two systems of experimental interest. First, a study of the electronic properties of single-walled armchair carbon nanotubes in the presence of transverse electric and magnetic fields is presented. As a result of their effect on the band structure and electron wave functions, fields alter the nature of the (effective) Coulomb interaction in tubes. In particular, it is found that fields couple to nanotube bands (or valleys), a quantum degree of freedom inherited from the underlying graphene lattice. As revealed by a detailed TLL calculation, it is predicted that fields induce electrons to disperse into their spin, band, and charge components. Fields also provide a means of tuning the shell-filling behavior associated with short tubes. The phenomenon of charge fractionalization is investigated in a one-dimensional ring. TLL theory predicts that momentum-resolved electrons injected into the ring will fractionalize into clockwise- and counterclockwise-moving quasiparticles. As a complement to transport measurements in quantum wires connected to leads, non-invasive measures involving the magnetic field profiles around the ring are proposed. Topological aspects of 1D p-wave superconductors are explored. The intimate connection between non-trivial topology (fermions) and spontaneous symmetry breaking (spins) in one-dimension is investigated. Building on this connection, a spin ladder system endowed with vortex degrees of freedom is

  9. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Pak, A.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Galtier, E.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; Hastings, J.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Turnbull, D.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Glenzer, S. H.; Döppner, T.

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ~3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4k=4Å-1. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  10. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Pak, A.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Galtier, E.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; Hastings, J.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Turnbull, D.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Glenzer, S. H.; Döppner, T.

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ˜3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k =4Å-1. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  11. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T. Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Turnbull, D.; Döppner, T.; Fletcher, L.; Galtier, E.; Hastings, J.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; White, T. G.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ∼3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4Å{sup −1}. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  12. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    DOE PAGES

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; ...

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour ismore » predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.« less

  13. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.

  14. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E.-G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states. PMID:26640114

  15. Phase transition transistors based on strongly-correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    The field-effect transistor (FET) provides electrical switching functions through linear control of the number of charges at a channel surface by external voltage. Controlling electronic phases of condensed matters in a FET geometry has long been a central issue of physical science. In particular, FET based on a strongly correlated material, namely ``Mott transistor,'' has attracted considerable interest, because it potentially provides gigantic and diverse electronic responses due to a strong interplay between charge, spin, orbital and lattice. We have investigated electric-field effects on such materials aiming at novel physical phenomena and electronic functions originating from strong correlation effects. Here we demonstrate electrical switching of bulk state of matter over the first-order metal-insulator transition. We fabricated FETs based on VO2 with use of a recently developed electric-double-layer transistor technique, and found that the electrostatically induced carriers at a channel surface drive all preexisting localized carriers of 1022 cm-3 even inside a bulk to motion, leading to bulk carrier delocalization beyond the electrostatic screening length. This non-local switching of bulk phases is achieved with just around 1 V, and moreover, a novel non-volatile memory like character emerges in a voltage-sweep measurement. These observations are apparently distinct from those of conventional FETs based on band insulators, capturing the essential feature of collective interactions in strongly correlated materials. This work was done in collaboration with K. Shibuya, D. Okuyama, T. Hatano, S. Ono, M. Kawasaki, Y. Iwasa, and Y. Tokura. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program).''

  16. Impact of crystal chemistry upon the physics of strongly correlated electrons in oxides.

    PubMed

    Raveau, Bernard

    2013-01-02

    Transition-metal oxides have been widely studied for understanding the physics of strongly electron-correlated systems. The crucial role of crystal chemistry for the discovery of three families: the high T(c) superconducting cuprates, the colossal magnetoresistance manganates, the thermoelectric, and multiferroic cobaltates, is explored. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Robust mesoscopic superposition of strongly correlated ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hallwood, David W.; Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-12-15

    We propose a scheme to create coherent superpositions of annular flow of strongly interacting bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional ring trap. The nonrotating ground state is coupled to a vortex state with mesoscopic angular momentum by means of a narrow potential barrier and an applied phase that originates from either rotation or a synthetic magnetic field. We show that superposition states in the Tonks-Girardeau regime are robust against single-particle loss due to the effects of strong correlations. The coupling between the mesoscopically distinct states scales much more favorably with particle number than in schemes relying on weak interactions, thus making particle numbers of hundreds or thousands feasible. Coherent oscillations induced by time variation of parameters may serve as a 'smoking gun' signature for detecting superposition states.

  18. Zero Pearson coefficient for strongly correlated growing trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Ferreira, A. L.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-03-01

    We obtained Pearson’s coefficient of strongly correlated recursive networks growing by preferential attachment of every new vertex by m edges. We found that the Pearson coefficient is exactly zero in the infinite network limit for the recursive trees (m=1) . If the number of connections of new vertices exceeds one (m>1) , then the Pearson coefficient in the infinite networks equals zero only when the degree distribution exponent γ does not exceed 4. We calculated the Pearson coefficient for finite networks and observed a slow power-law-like approach to an infinite network limit. Our findings indicate that Pearson’s coefficient strongly depends on size and details of networks, which makes this characteristic virtually useless for quantitative comparison of different networks.

  19. Zero Pearson coefficient for strongly correlated growing trees.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, S N; Ferreira, A L; Goltsev, A V; Mendes, J F F

    2010-03-01

    We obtained Pearson's coefficient of strongly correlated recursive networks growing by preferential attachment of every new vertex by m edges. We found that the Pearson coefficient is exactly zero in the infinite network limit for the recursive trees (m=1). If the number of connections of new vertices exceeds one (m>1), then the Pearson coefficient in the infinite networks equals zero only when the degree distribution exponent gamma does not exceed 4. We calculated the Pearson coefficient for finite networks and observed a slow power-law-like approach to an infinite network limit. Our findings indicate that Pearson's coefficient strongly depends on size and details of networks, which makes this characteristic virtually useless for quantitative comparison of different networks.

  20. Electron-Spin Dynamics in Strongly Correlated Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dóra, Balázs; Simon, Ferenc

    2009-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron-spin lifetime T1 and the g factor are anomalous in alkali fullerides (K,Rb)3C60, which cannot be explained by the canonical Elliott-Yafet theory. These materials are archetypes of strongly correlated and narrow band metals. We introduce the concept of a “complex electron-spin resonance frequency shift” to treat these measurables in a unified manner within the Kubo formalism. The theory is applicable for metals with nearly degenerate conduction bands and large momentum scattering even with an anomalous temperature dependence and sizable residual value.

  1. Charge density waves in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Choe, Jesse; Morosan, E.

    2016-08-01

    Strong electron correlations are at the heart of many physical phenomena of current interest to the condensed matter community. Here we present a survey of the mechanisms underlying such correlations in charge density wave (CDW) systems, including the current theoretical understanding and experimental evidence for CDW transitions. The focus is on emergent phenomena that result as CDWs interact with other charge or spin states, such as magnetism and superconductivity. In addition to reviewing the CDW mechanisms in 1D, 2D, and 3D systems, we pay particular attention to the prevalence of this state in two particular classes of compounds, the high temperature superconductors (cuprates) and the layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The possibilities for quantum criticality resulting from the competition between magnetic fluctuations and electronic instabilities (CDW, unconventional superconductivity) are also discussed.

  2. Strongly correlated nature of d-wave superconductivity in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, H.; Tamura, S.; Miyagawa, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Ogata, M.

    With the high-Tc cuprates in mind, properties of correlated d-wave superconducting (SC) states are studied for a Hubbard model on square lattices with a diagonal transfer (t-t'-U model), using a variational Monte Carlo method. We employ a simple wave function, which includes crucial parameters, in particular, a doublon-holon (D-H) binding factor important for correlated SC and normal states as doped Mott insulators. We first check that the range of dominant superconductivity is limited to a strongly correlated regime (U>W, U: onsite correlation strength, W: band width), and coincides with the effective range of the D-H binding factors. In this range of U/t and δ (doping rate), holons (in hole-doped cases) are classified into two types: doped holons and ones created as D-H pairs. Only the former holons participate in current, whereas the latter contribute to singlet-pair formation. Next, we show that the SC properties undergo a crossover at U=Uco∼W. For UUco (the regime of cuprates), a new idea is needed to understand the peculiar SC behavior.

  3. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wenlong

    The past decade has seen a substantial rejuvenation of interest in the study of quantum phase transitions (QPTs), driven by experimental advance on the cuprate superconductors, the heavy fermion materials, organic conductors, Quantum Hall effect, Fe-As based superconductors and other related compounds. It is clear that strong electronic interactions play a crucial role in the systems of current interest, and simple paradigms for the behavior of such systems near quantum critical points remain unclear. Furthermore, the rapid progress in Feshbach resonance and optical lattice provides a flexible platform to study QPT. Quantum Phase Transition (QPT) describes the non-analytic behaviors of the ground-state properties in a many-body system by varying a physical parameter at absolute zero temperature - such as magnetic field or pressure, driven by quantum fluctuations. Such quantum phase transitions can be first-order phase transition or continuous. The phase transition is usually accompanied by a qualitative change in the nature of the correlations in the ground state, and describing this change shall clearly be one of our major interests. We address this issue from three prospects in a few strong correlated many-body systems in this thesis, i.e., identifying the ordered phases, studying the properties of different phases, characterizing the QPT points. In chapter 1, we give an introduction to QPT, and take one-dimensional XXZ model as an example to illustrate the QPT therein. Through this simple example, we would show that when the tunable parameter is varied, the system evolves into different phases, across two quantum QPT points. The distinct phases exhibit very different behaviors. Also a schematic phase diagram is appended. In chapter 2, we are engaged in research on ordered phases. Originating in the work of Landau and Ginzburg on second-order phase transition, the spontaneous symmetry breaking induces nonzero expectation of field operator, e.g., magnetization M

  4. Capacitance and compressibility of heterostructures with strong electronic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Kevin; Frésard, Raymond; Kopp, Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Strong electronic correlations related to a repulsive local interaction suppress the electronic compressibility in a single-band model, and the capacitance of a corresponding metallic film is directly related to its electronic compressibility. Both statements may be altered significantly when two extensions to the system are implemented which we investigate here: (i) we introduce an attractive nearest-neighbor interaction V as antagonist to the repulsive onsite repulsion U , and (ii) we consider nanostructured multilayers (heterostructures) assembled from two-dimensional layers of these systems. We determine the respective total compressibility κ and capacitance C of the heterostructures within a strong coupling evaluation, which builds on a Kotliar-Ruckenstein slave-boson technique. Whereas the capacitance C (n ) for electronic densities n close to half-filling is suppressed, illustrated by a correlation induced dip in C (n ) , it may be appreciably enhanced close to a van Hove singularity. Moreover, we show that the capacitance may be a nonmonotonic function of U close to half-filling for both attractive and repulsive V . The compressibility κ can differ from C substantially, as κ is very sensitive to internal electrostatic energies which in turn depend on the specific setup of the heterostructure. In particular, we show that a capacitor with a polar dielectric has a smaller electronic compressibility and is more stable against phase separation than a standard nonpolar capacitor with the same capacitance.

  5. Multitask spectral clustering by exploring intertask correlation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Zhigang; Yang, Yi; Nie, Feiping; Shen, Heng Tao

    2015-05-01

    Clustering, as one of the most classical research problems in pattern recognition and data mining, has been widely explored and applied to various applications. Due to the rapid evolution of data on the Web, more emerging challenges have been posed on traditional clustering techniques: 1) correlations among related clustering tasks and/or within individual task are not well captured; 2) the problem of clustering out-of-sample data is seldom considered; and 3) the discriminative property of cluster label matrix is not well explored. In this paper, we propose a novel clustering model, namely multitask spectral clustering (MTSC), to cope with the above challenges. Specifically, two types of correlations are well considered: 1) intertask clustering correlation, which refers the relations among different clustering tasks and 2) intratask learning correlation, which enables the processes of learning cluster labels and learning mapping function to reinforce each other. We incorporate a novel l2,p -norm regularizer to control the coherence of all the tasks based on an assumption that related tasks should share a common low-dimensional representation. Moreover, for each individual task, an explicit mapping function is simultaneously learnt for predicting cluster labels by mapping features to the cluster label matrix. Meanwhile, we show that the learning process can naturally incorporate discriminative information to further improve clustering performance. We explore and discuss the relationships between our proposed model and several representative clustering techniques, including spectral clustering, k -means and discriminative k -means. Extensive experiments on various real-world datasets illustrate the advantage of the proposed MTSC model compared to state-of-the-art clustering approaches.

  6. Accessibility to air travel correlates strongly with increasing melanoma incidence.

    PubMed

    Agredano, Yolanda Z; Chan, Joanna L; Kimball, Ranch C; Kimball, Alexa B

    2006-02-01

    As the cost of air travel has decreased substantially in the USA and Europe over the past few decades, leisure travel to vacation destinations during the winter months has expanded significantly. This trend has probably increased the incidence of significant ultraviolet radiation exposure and sunburn in a broader population who could not previously afford this kind of travel. The purpose of this study was to analyse the correlation between increasing accessibility to air travel and melanoma incidence. This ecological study surveyed air travel patterns and melanoma incidence over the past three decades. Melanoma age-adjusted incidence was obtained from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 9 Registry Database, 1975-2000, and the Cancer Registry of Norway, 1965-2000. United States mean inflation-adjusted airfare prices for four airports linked to leisure destinations (Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix) were compared with melanoma incidence. Parallel analyses were performed using annual domestic passenger-kilometres and melanoma incidence in Norway. Declining United States leisure-specific airfares corresponded strongly with increasing melanoma incidence (r = 0.96, r = 0.92, P < 0.001). Modelling a 5-year time lag between airfare and melanoma diagnosis strengthened the association (r = 0.98, r = 0.96, P < 0.001). Longer time lags could not be modelled due to data limitations. Data from Norway similarly showed that increasing air passenger mileage corresponded strongly with increasing melanoma incidence. Although correlation does not equate to causality, the very strong relationship between increasing access to air travel and melanoma incidence suggests that changes in recreational patterns may be contributing significantly to the public health problem of melanoma.

  7. Polaronic approach to strongly correlated electron systems with strong electron-phonon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, I. A.; Shneyder, E. I.; Kozlov, P. A.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2015-10-01

    The three-band p -d model of strongly correlated electrons interacting with optical phonons via diagonal and off-diagonal electron-phonon interactions is considered within the cluster perturbation theory. In the beginning, the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian of a CuO4 cluster results in the construction of local polaronic eigenstates |p > with hole numbers nh=0 ,1 ,2 per unit cell. The intercluster hoppings and interactions are exactly written in terms of Hubbard operators Xfp q=|p > at site f . The Fermi-type single-electron quasiparticle dispersion and spectral weight are calculated for the undoped antiferromagnetic parent insulator like La2CuO4 . The quasiparticle dispersion of Hubbard polarons is determined by a hybridization of the Hubbard fermion subbands with local Franck-Condon resonances so the main polaronic effect of the quasiparticle band structure is a splitting of the Hubbard bands on the number of Hubbard polaron subbands. Increasing of the EPI constant results in an increase of splitting, decrease of the subband width, transfer of the spectral weight to high-energy multiphonon excitations, and subsequent localization of the charge carriers. Herewith, the effect of such renormalization for the conduction band and the valence one differs depending on the ratio of the diagonal and off-diagonal EPI. In the framework of the GTB method, the Franck-Condon broadening of the spectral function of polaronic excitations is also reproduced for strongly correlated systems with strong electron-phonon interaction.

  8. Correlated Fluctuations in Strongly Coupled Binary Networks Beyond Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, David; Bos, Hannah; Helias, Moritz

    2016-07-01

    Randomly coupled Ising spins constitute the classical model of collective phenomena in disordered systems, with applications covering glassy magnetism and frustration, combinatorial optimization, protein folding, stock market dynamics, and social dynamics. The phase diagram of these systems is obtained in the thermodynamic limit by averaging over the quenched randomness of the couplings. However, many applications require the statistics of activity for a single realization of the possibly asymmetric couplings in finite-sized networks. Examples include reconstruction of couplings from the observed dynamics, representation of probability distributions for sampling-based inference, and learning in the central nervous system based on the dynamic and correlation-dependent modification of synaptic connections. The systematic cumulant expansion for kinetic binary (Ising) threshold units with strong, random, and asymmetric couplings presented here goes beyond mean-field theory and is applicable outside thermodynamic equilibrium; a system of approximate nonlinear equations predicts average activities and pairwise covariances in quantitative agreement with full simulations down to hundreds of units. The linearized theory yields an expansion of the correlation and response functions in collective eigenmodes, leads to an efficient algorithm solving the inverse problem, and shows that correlations are invariant under scaling of the interaction strengths.

  9. Pair correlation functions of strongly coupled two-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we perform the first direct tests of three proposed models for the pair correlation functions of strongly coupled plasmas with species of unequal temperature. The models are all extensions of the Ornstein-Zernike/hypernetted-chain theory used to good success for equilibrium plasmas. Each theory is evaluated at several coupling strengths, temperature ratios, and mass ratios for a model plasma in which the electrons are positively charged. We show that the model proposed by Seuferling et al. [Phys. Rev. A 40, 323 (1989)] agrees well with molecular dynamics over a wide range of mass and temperature ratios, as well as over a range of coupling strength similar to that of the equilibrium hypernetted-chain (HNC) theory. The SVT model also correctly predicts the strength of interspecies correlations and exhibits physically reasonable long-wavelength limits of the static structure factors. Comparisons of the SVT model with the Yukawa one-component plasma (YOCP) model are used to show that ion-ion pair correlations are well described by the YOCP model up to Γe≈1 , beyond which it rapidly breaks down.

  10. Spike Triggered Covariance in Strongly Correlated Gaussian Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Segev, Ronen; Berry, Michael J.; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological systems perform computations on inputs that have very large dimensionality. Determining the relevant input combinations for a particular computation is often key to understanding its function. A common way to find the relevant input dimensions is to examine the difference in variance between the input distribution and the distribution of inputs associated with certain outputs. In systems neuroscience, the corresponding method is known as spike-triggered covariance (STC). This method has been highly successful in characterizing relevant input dimensions for neurons in a variety of sensory systems. So far, most studies used the STC method with weakly correlated Gaussian inputs. However, it is also important to use this method with inputs that have long range correlations typical of the natural sensory environment. In such cases, the stimulus covariance matrix has one (or more) outstanding eigenvalues that cannot be easily equalized because of sampling variability. Such outstanding modes interfere with analyses of statistical significance of candidate input dimensions that modulate neuronal outputs. In many cases, these modes obscure the significant dimensions. We show that the sensitivity of the STC method in the regime of strongly correlated inputs can be improved by an order of magnitude or more. This can be done by evaluating the significance of dimensions in the subspace orthogonal to the outstanding mode(s). Analyzing the responses of retinal ganglion cells probed with Gaussian noise, we find that taking into account outstanding modes is crucial for recovering relevant input dimensions for these neurons. PMID:24039563

  11. Generalized simulated tempering for exploring strong phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E

    2010-10-21

    An extension of the simulation tempering algorithm is proposed. It is shown to be particularly suited to the exploration of first-order phase transition systems characterized by the backbending or S-loop in the statistical temperature or a microcanonical caloric curve. A guided Markov process in an auxiliary parameter space systematically combines a set of parametrized Tsallis-weight ensemble simulations, which are targeted to transform unstable or metastable energy states of canonical ensembles into stable ones and smoothly join ordered and disordered phases across phase transition regions via a succession of unimodal energy distributions. The inverse mapping between the sampling weight and the effective temperature enables an optimal selection of relevant Tsallis-weight parameters. A semianalytic expression for the biasing weight in parameter space is adaptively updated "on the fly" during the simulation to achieve rapid convergence. Accelerated tunneling transitions with a comprehensive sampling for phase-coexistent states are explicitly demonstrated in systems subject to strong hysteresis including Potts and Ising spin models and a 147 atom Lennard-Jones cluster.

  12. Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L

    2011-11-03

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated systems will enable the predicative design of the next generation of supermaterials. In this program, we are harnessing recent advances in the quantum manipulation of ultracold atomic gases to expand our ability to probe these technologically important materials in heretofore unexplored regions of temperature, resolution, and sensitivity parameter space. We are working to demonstrate the use of atom chips to enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux at the 10^-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology developed here will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques---such as scanning SQUIDs---by a factor of 10--1000. We are testing the utility of this technique by using rubidium BECs to image the magnetic fields emanating from charge transport and magnetic domain percolation in strongly correlated materials as they undergo temperature-tuned metal--to--insulator phase transitions. Cryogenic atom chip microscopy introduces three very important features to the toolbox of high-resolution, strongly correlated material microscopy: simultaneous detection of magnetic and electric fields (down to the sub-single electron charge level); no invasive large magnetic fields or gradients; simultaneous micro- and macroscopic spatial resolution; freedom from 1/f flicker noise at low frequencies; and, perhaps most importantly, the complete decoupling of probe and sample temperatures. The first of these features will play an important role in studying the interplay between magnetic and electric domain structure. The last two are crucial for low frequency magnetic noise detection in, e.g., the cuprate pseudogap region and for precision measurements of transport in the high temperature, technologically relevant regime inaccessible to other techniques

  13. Interface-induced magnetism and strong correlation in oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at interfaces between two insulating oxides have attracted significant attention because they can exhibit unique properties, such as strong electron correlations, superconductivity and magnetism. In this presentation, we will discuss the emergent properties of 2DEGs in SrTiO3 quantum wells that are interfaced with Mott insulating rare earth titanates (RTiO3) . We show that the magnetic properties of the 2DEG can be tuned to be either (incipient) ferromagnetic or (incipient) antiferromagnetic, depending on the specific RTiO3 that interfaces it. The thickness of the quantum well is a critical tuning parameter and determines the onset of magnetism, the proximity to a quantum critical point, and the onset of non-Fermi liquid behavior for those quantum wells that are in proximity to an antiferromagnetic transition. We will also discuss the role of symmetry-lowering structural transitions in the quantum well.

  14. Strongly Correlated States of Ultracold Rotating Dipolar Fermi Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Osterloh, Klaus; Barberan, Nuria; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2007-10-19

    We study strongly correlated ground and excited states of rotating quasi-2D Fermi gases constituted of a small number of dipole-dipole interacting particles with dipole moments polarized perpendicular to the plane of motion. As the number of atoms grows, the system enters an intermediate regime, where ground states are subject to a competition between distinct bulk-edge configurations. This effect obscures their description in terms of composite fermions and leads to the appearance of novel quasihole ground states. In the presence of dipolar interactions, the principal Laughlin state at filling {nu}=1/3 exhibits a substantial energy gap for neutral (total angular momentum conserving) excitations and is well-described as an incompressible Fermi liquid. Instead, at lower fillings, the ground state structure favors crystalline order.

  15. Andreev bound state at a strongly correlated oxide interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Tacla, Alexandre; Daley, Andrew; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Josh; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Pekker, David; Levy, Jeremy

    Strongly correlated electrons at oxide interfaces give rise to a set of novel physics phenomena including superconductivity and magnetism. At the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface, signatures of strong electron pairing persist even for conditions where superconductivity is suppressed. Meanwhile, an Andreev bound state (ABS) is a single quasiparticle excitation that mediates pair transport in confined superconductor-normal systems. Here we report a transition from pair resonant transport to ABS in sketched single electron transistors at the LAO/STO interface. This transition is consistent with a change of electron-electron interaction from attractive to repulsive, occurring at or near the Lifshitz transition. Such new electronically tunable electron-electron interaction may be useful for quantum simulation and engineering of novel quantum states in oxide materials. We gratefully acknowledge support from AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0524 (JL, CBE), AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0057 (JL, CBE, AD), NSF DMR-1104191 (JL), ONR N00014-15-1-2847 (JL).

  16. Stabilizing strongly correlated photon fluids with non-Markovian reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreuilly, José; Biella, Alberto; Storme, Florent; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Ciuti, Cristiano; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a frequency-dependent incoherent pump scheme with a square-shaped spectrum as a way to study strongly correlated photons in arrays of coupled nonlinear resonators. This scheme can be implemented via a reservoir of population-inverted two-level emitters with a broad distribution of transition frequencies. Our proposal is predicted to stabilize a nonequilibrium steady state sharing important features with a zero-temperature equilibrium state with a tunable chemical potential. We confirm the efficiency of our proposal for the Bose-Hubbard model by computing numerically the steady state for finite system sizes: first, we predict the occurrence of a sequence of incompressible Mott-insulator-like states with arbitrary integer densities presenting strong robustness against tunneling and losses. Secondly, for stronger tunneling amplitudes or noninteger densities, the system enters a coherent regime analogous to the superfluid state. In addition to an overall agreement with the zero-temperature equilibrium state, exotic nonequilibrium processes leading to a finite entropy generation are pointed out in specific regions of parameter space. The equilibrium ground state is shown to be recovered by adding frequency-dependent losses. The promise of this improved scheme in view of quantum simulation of the zero-temperature many-body physics is highlighted.

  17. Strong light-field effects in correlated oraganic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yohei; Naitoh, Yota; Itoh, Hirotake; Ishihara, Sumio; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    Optical responses of organic conductors have attracted much attentions, because they exhibit ultrafast solid-state phase transitions in the conducting and/or dielectric natures upon photo-excitations. In this decade, photoinduced melting of correlated insulators with clear charge gap have been extensively investigated. On the other hand, optical rsponses of correlated metal has not been studied well. Here, we describe a charge localization induced by the 9.3 MV/cm instantaneous electric field of a 1.5 cycle (7 fs) infrared pulse in an organic conductor alpha- (bis[ethylenedithio]-tetrathiafulvelene)2I3. A large reflectivity change of 30 percent and a coherent charge oscillation along the time axis reflect the opening of the charge ordering gap in the metallic phase. This optical freezing of charges, which is the reverse of the photoinduced melting of electronic orders, is attributed to the 10 percent reduction of t driven by the strong, high-frequency electric field. Furthermore, the contribution of Coulomb repulsion will be discussed on the basis of the polarization dependence of the pump light and the theory.

  18. Strong correlations and Fickian water diffusion in narrow carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Maiti, Prabal K.; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sood, A. K.

    2007-03-01

    The authors have used atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the structure and dynamics of water molecules inside an open ended carbon nanotube placed in a bath of water molecules. The size of the nanotube allows only a single file of water molecules inside the nanotube. The water molecules inside the nanotube show solidlike ordering at room temperature, which they quantify by calculating the pair correlation function. It is shown that even for the longest observation times, the mode of diffusion of the water molecules inside the nanotube is Fickian and not subdiffusive. They also propose a one-dimensional random walk model for the diffusion of the water molecules inside the nanotube. They find good agreement between the mean-square displacements calculated from the random walk model and from MD simulations, thereby confirming that the water molecules undergo normal mode diffusion inside the nanotube. They attribute this behavior to strong positional correlations that cause all the water molecules inside the nanotube to move collectively as a single object. The average residence time of the water molecules inside the nanotube is shown to scale quadratically with the nanotube length.

  19. 'True' bosonic coupling strength in strongly correlated superconductors.

    PubMed

    Iwasawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Hase, Izumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Aiura, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Clarifying the coupling between electrons and bosonic excitations (phonons or magnetic fluctuations) that mediate the formation of Cooper pairs is pivotal to understand superconductivity. Such coupling effects are contained in the electron self-energy, which is experimentally accessible via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). However, in unconventional superconductors, identifying the nature of the electron-boson coupling remains elusive partly because of the significant band renormalization due to electron correlation. Until now, to quantify the electron-boson coupling, the self-energy is most often determined by assuming a phenomenological 'bare' band. Here, we demonstrate that the conventional procedure underestimates the electron-boson coupling depending on the electron-electron coupling, even if the self-energy appears to be self-consistent via the Kramers-Kronig relation. Our refined method explains well the electron-boson and electron-electron coupling strength in ruthenate superconductor Sr2RuO4, calling for a critical revision of the bosonic coupling strength from ARPES self-energy in strongly correlated electron systems.

  20. Weak-coupling superconductivity in a strongly correlated iron pnictide

    PubMed Central

    Charnukha, A.; Post, K. W.; Thirupathaiah, S.; Pröpper, D.; Wurmehl, S.; Roslova, M.; Morozov, I.; Büchner, B.; Yaresko, A. N.; Boris, A. V.; Borisenko, S. V.; Basov, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-based superconductors have been found to exhibit an intimate interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom, dramatically affecting their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity. Albeit the precise pairing mechanism remains unidentified, several candidate interactions have been suggested to mediate the superconducting pairing, both in the orbital and in the spin channel. Here, we employ optical spectroscopy (OS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), ab initio band-structure, and Eliashberg calculations to show that nearly optimally doped NaFe0.978Co0.022As exhibits some of the strongest orbitally selective electronic correlations in the family of iron pnictides. Unexpectedly, we find that the mass enhancement of itinerant charge carriers in the strongly correlated band is dramatically reduced near the Γ point and attribute this effect to orbital mixing induced by pronounced spin-orbit coupling. Embracing the true band structure allows us to describe all low-energy electronic properties obtained in our experiments with remarkable consistency and demonstrate that superconductivity in this material is rather weak and mediated by spin fluctuations. PMID:26729630

  1. ‘True’ bosonic coupling strength in strongly correlated superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Hase, Izumi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Aiura, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Clarifying the coupling between electrons and bosonic excitations (phonons or magnetic fluctuations) that mediate the formation of Cooper pairs is pivotal to understand superconductivity. Such coupling effects are contained in the electron self-energy, which is experimentally accessible via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). However, in unconventional superconductors, identifying the nature of the electron-boson coupling remains elusive partly because of the significant band renormalization due to electron correlation. Until now, to quantify the electron-boson coupling, the self-energy is most often determined by assuming a phenomenological ‘bare’ band. Here, we demonstrate that the conventional procedure underestimates the electron-boson coupling depending on the electron-electron coupling, even if the self-energy appears to be self-consistent via the Kramers-Kronig relation. Our refined method explains well the electron-boson and electron-electron coupling strength in ruthenate superconductor Sr2RuO4, calling for a critical revision of the bosonic coupling strength from ARPES self-energy in strongly correlated electron systems. PMID:23722675

  2. Weak-coupling superconductivity in a strongly correlated iron pnictide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnukha, Aliaksei

    Iron-based superconductors have been found to exhibit an intimate interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom, dramatically affecting their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity. Albeit the precise pairing mechanism remains unidentified, several candidate interactions have been suggested to mediate the superconducting pairing, both in the orbital and in the spin channel. Here, we employ optical spectroscopy (OS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, ab initio band-structure, and Eliashberg calculations to show that nearly optimally doped NaFe0.978Co0.022As exhibits some of the strongest orbitally selective electronic correlations in the family of iron pnictides. Unexpectedly, we find that the mass enhancement of itinerant charge carriers in the strongly correlated band is dramatically reduced near the Γ point and attribute this effect to orbital mixing induced by pronounced spin-orbit coupling. Embracing the true band structure allows us to describe all low-energy electronic properties obtained in our experiments with remarkable consistency and demonstrate that superconductivity in this material is rather weak and mediated by spin fluctuations. A. Charnukha acknowledges financial support by the Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  3. Weakly parametrized Jastrow ansatz for a strongly correlated Bose system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsyshyn, Yaroslav

    2017-03-01

    We consider the Jastrow pair-product wavefunction for strongly correlated Bose systems, in our case liquid helium-4. An ansatz is proposed for the pair factors which consist of a numeric solution to a modified and parametrized pair scattering equation. We consider a number of such simple one-variable parametrizations. Additionally, we allow for a parametrizeable cutoff of the pair factors and for the addition of a long-range phonon tail. This approach results in many-body wavefunctions that have between just one and three variational parameters. Calculation of observables is carried with the variational Monte Carlo method. We find that such a simple parametrization is sufficient to produce results that are comparable in quality to the best available two-body factors for helium. For the two-parameter wavefunction, we find variational energies of -6.04 K per particle for a system of one thousand particles. It is also shown that short-range two-body correlations are reproduced in good detail by the two- and three-parameter functions.

  4. Strong electron correlations in biomimetic transition metal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labute, Montiago Xavier

    The first-row transition metals (Fe, Co, V,...) are key players in the active sites of proteins and enzymes responsible for diverse biological processes such as NO regulation and photosynthesis. Many small transition metal complexes possess chemical coordination environments in the vicinity of the metal atom that are reminiscent of these active sites. We have studied the electronic structure of these molecules and discussed the relevance for their biological analogues. The specific question on which we wish to focus is: Do strong correlations (resulting from the localized character of the TM 3d-orbitals) contribute significantly to the reaction energetics of these molecules and, if so, can these effects be observed by experiment? To accomplish these ends we focus on the cobalt valence tautomer molecules and the phenomenon of electron transfer in aqueous hexaammine cobalt ions. We utilize theoretical methods in order to study the cobalt valence tautomer molecules which undergo an interconversion with temperature that is reminiscent of the changes in structure and spin that the heme group experiences as the result of Fe-ligand interactions. We perform fully ab initio calculations using the GGA implementation of density functional theory with the computer code SIESTA. In addition, a simple Anderson Impurity Model has been employed that more properly accounts for the Coulomb interaction among the 3d electrons on the cobalt atom. The calculated Co K x-ray absorption near-edge spectra XANES agrees well with experimental data and a prediction for the Co L-edge XAS that could be tested in future experiments is also presented. We believe that there are structures in both spectra that may only be explained by a strong admixture of configurations. It is conjectured that strong electron correlations help explain the non-Arrhenius rate behavior observed in the high-spin to low-spin relaxation rate at low temperatures. Work on electron-transfer in CoNH32 +/3+6aq using these

  5. PREFACE: Introduction to Strongly Correlated Electrons in New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2003-09-01

    The discovery of new natural and artificial materials has revolutionized condensed matter physics and our views on the role of correlations between electrons. Novel properties such as high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance discovered in these materials have overturned our conventional representations of condensed matter physics and pushed us to reconsider many well-established concepts. For example, we must treat the Coulomb interaction between electrons far beyond perturbation theory; we must recall long-forgotten ideas of electronic phase separation introduced originally by Nagaev in the 1960s; we must reconsider the role of electron--phonon and electron--magnon interactions, orbital degrees of freedom, the Rashba effect and many other aspects of condensed matter physics that are becoming increasingly important. In many novel materials, such as the two-dimensional electron gas, the energy associated with the Coulomb interaction is typically of the order of (or even larger than) the kinetic energy of electrons or the Fermi energy. Therefore perturbation theory and associated renormalization group methods are not applicable to these situations and we may expect to find a novel state of matter associated with correlation effects. It is worth mentioning the known examples of these states proposed recently, such as marginal Fermi liquids, novel metal--insulator phase transitions in the two-dimensional electron gas associated with new metallic and insulating states, structured liquids, microscopic electronic phase separations, stripes, strings, polarons and others. The discussion of these states is now on the frontier of modern condensed matter physics and is partially covered in this special issue. The demand to treat the Coulomb interaction properly has stimulated a development of many-body theory, which considers correlations as fully as possible. Strong correlations may play an important role in the dynamics of the electronic system. In a

  6. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Saxena, S. S.; Sutherland, M. L.; Sebastian, S. E.; Artacho, E.; Grosche, F. M.; Hadzibabic, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 was dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covered a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The meeting welcomed to Cambridge 657 participants from 23 countries, who presented 127 talks (including 16 plenary, 57 invited, and 54 contributed) and 736 posters in 40 sessions over five full days of meetings. This proceedings volume contains papers reporting on the science presented at the meeting. This work deepens our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. Strongly correlated systems are known for their remarkable array of emergent phenomena: the traditional subjects of superconductivity, magnetism and metal-insulator transitions have been joined by non-Fermi liquid phenomena, topologically protected quantum states, atomic and photonic gases, and quantum phase transitions. These are some of the most challenging and interesting phenomena in science. As well as the science driver, there is underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion

  7. Virial Expansion for a Strongly Correlated Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui

    2011-03-01

    Few-body physics can give considerable insight into the challenging many-body problem. A concrete example is the exact Tan relations linking the ``hard'' (few-body) physics at short distance, large-momentum and high frequency to the ``soft'' physics of the equation of state via a contact parameter. This has been demonstrated clearly using the operator product expansion (OPE) method which separates in a natural way few-body from many-body physics. In this talk, we present another example: the quantum virial expansion that bridges few-body and many-body physics. At large temperatures, the properties of a strongly correlated Fermi gas, either static or dynamic, can be expanded in terms of virial coefficients or expansion functions, calculable from the few-fermion solutions. For the equation of state in the resonant unitarity limit, we obtain for the first time an accurate third order virial coefficient. This has been experimentally verified in a measurement at ENS (Paris). For the single-particle spectral function, we demonstrate that an expansion up to second order is able to explain the main features of momentum-resolved RF spectroscopy in a resonantly interacting Fermi gas, as recently reported by JILA. We also obtain a virial expansion of the dynamic structure function, as measured at Swinburne University (Melbourne), and check that the second order expansion functions give the correct OPE coefficients in the limit of large momentum and frequency. The important feature of this expansion is the existence of a small parameter, the fugacity, even for strong interactions. In the future, we anticipate that higher-order virial expansions of dynamic properties such as the single-particle spectral function may provide useful insights into clarifying the debate on the pseudo-gap issue in resonantly interacting Fermi gases.

  8. Non-equilibrium magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Secchi, A.; Brener, S.; Lichtenstein, A.I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2013-06-15

    We formulate a low-energy theory for the magnetic interactions between electrons in the multi-band Hubbard model under non-equilibrium conditions determined by an external time-dependent electric field which simulates laser-induced spin dynamics. We derive expressions for dynamical exchange parameters in terms of non-equilibrium electronic Green functions and self-energies, which can be computed, e.g., with the methods of time-dependent dynamical mean-field theory. Moreover, we find that a correct description of the system requires, in addition to exchange, a new kind of magnetic interaction, that we name twist exchange, which formally resembles Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya coupling, but is not due to spin–orbit, and is actually due to an effective three-spin interaction. Our theory allows the evaluation of the related time-dependent parameters as well. -- Highlights: •We develop a theory for magnetism of strongly correlated systems out of equilibrium. •Our theory is suitable for laser-induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics. •We write time-dependent exchange parameters in terms of electronic Green functions. •We find a new magnetic interaction, a “twist exchange”. •We give general expressions for magnetic noise in itinerant-electron systems.

  9. Strongly correlated Fermi systems as a new state of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Msezane, A. Z.; Japaridze, G. S.; Popov, K. G.; Khodel, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this review paper is to expose a new state of matter exhibited by strongly correlated Fermi systems represented by various heavy-fermion (HF) metals, two-dimensional liquids like 3He, compounds with quantum spin liquids, quasicrystals, and systems with one-dimensional quantum spin liquid. We name these various systems HF compounds, since they exhibit the behavior typical of HF metals. In HF compounds at zero temperature the unique phase transition, dubbed throughout as the fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT) can occur; this FCQPT creates flat bands which in turn lead to the specific state, known as the fermion condensate. Unlimited increase of the effective mass of quasiparticles signifies FCQPT; these quasiparticles determine the thermodynamic, transport and relaxation properties of HF compounds. Our discussion of numerous salient experimental data within the framework of FCQPT resolves the mystery of the new state of matter. Thus, FCQPT and the fermion condensation can be considered as the universal reason for the non-Fermi liquid behavior observed in various HF compounds. We show analytically and using arguments based completely on the experimental grounds that these systems exhibit universal scaling behavior of their thermodynamic, transport and relaxation properties. Therefore, the quantum physics of different HF compounds is universal, and emerges regardless of the microscopic structure of the compounds. This uniform behavior allows us to view it as the main characteristic of a new state of matter exhibited by HF compounds.

  10. Strongly correlated quantum transport out-of-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Prasenjit

    The revolutionary advances in nanotechnology and nanofabrication have facilitated the precise control and manipulation of mesoscopic systems where quantum effects are pronounced. Quantum devices with tunable gates have made it possible to access regimes far beyond the purview of linear response theory. In particular, the influence of strong voltage and thermal biases has led to the observation of novel phenomena where the non-equilibrium characteristics of the system are of paramount importance. We study transport through quantum-impurity systems in the regime of strong correlations and determine the effects of large temperature and potential gradients on its many-body physics. In Part I of this thesis we focus on the steady-state dynamics of the system, a commonly encountered experimental scenario. For a system consisting of several leads composed of non-interacting electrons, each individually coupled to a quantum impurity with interactions and maintained at different chemical potentials, we reformulate the system in terms of an effective-equilibrium density matrix. This density matrix has a simple Boltzmann-like form in terms of the system's Lippmann-Schwinger (scattering) operators. We elaborate the conditions for this description to be valid based on the microscopic Hamiltonian of the system. We then prove the equivalence of physical observables computed using this formulation with corresponding expressions in the Schwinger-Keldysh approach and provide a dictionary between Green's functions in either scheme. An imaginary-time functional integral framework to compute finite temperature Green's functions is proposed and used to develop a novel perturbative expansion in the interaction strength which is exact in all other system parameters. We use these tools to study the fate of the Abrikosov-Suhl regime on the Kondo-correlated quantum dot due to the effects of bias and external magnetic fields. Next, we expand the domain of this formalism to additionally

  11. Low-energy Model for Strongly Correlated Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shiu

    We provide a detailed derivation of the low-energy model for site-diluted strongly correlated oxides, an example being Zn-diluted La2CuO 4, in the limit of low doping together with a study of the ground-state properties of that model. The generally complicated Hamiltonian on the energy scale of the most relevant atomic orbitals is systematically downfolded to an effective model containing only spin-spin interactions using several techniques. In our study, beginning with the site-diluted three-band Hubbard model for La2ZnxCu(1- x)O4, we first determine the hybridized electronic states of CuO4 and ZnO4 plaquettes within the CuO2 planes utilizing Wannier-orthogonalization of oxygen orbitals and cell-perturbation of the Hamiltonian of each plaquett. Qualitatively, we find that the hybridization of zinc and oxygen orbitals can result in an impurity state with the energy epsilon, which is lower than the effective Hubbard gap U. Then we apply canonical transformation in the limit of the effective hopping integral t << epsilon, U, to obtain the low-energy, spin-only Hamiltonian, which includes terms of the order t2/U, t4/epsilon3, and t 4/Uepsilon2. In other words, besides the usual diluted nearest-neighbor superexchange J-terms of order t2/U, the low-energy model contains impurity-mediated, further-neighbor frustrating interactions among the Cu spins surrounding Zn-sites in an otherwise unfrustrated antiferromagnetic background. These terms, denoted as J'Zn and J''Zn , are of order t4/epsilon3 and can be substantial when epsilon ˜ U/2, the latter value corresponding to the realistic CuO2 parameters. The other further-neighbor Cu spin interactions are of order t 4/U3, which are neglected in both pure and diluted systems, because they are much lesser than J'Zn and J''Zn and independent of impurity concentration. In order to verify this spin-only model, we subsequently apply the T-matrix approach to study the effect of impurities on the antiferromagnetic order parameter

  12. Mortality of Septic Mice Strongly Correlates With Adrenal Gland Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, Carla; Tran, Nguyen; Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Heerdegen, Lars; Kantharajah, Ajith; Dröse, Stefan; Bornstein, Stefan; Scheller, Bertram; Zacharowski, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are commonly present in the ICU and accompanied by significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. The frequency of secondary adrenal insufficiency in sepsis remains open to debate and a challenge to identify and treat appropriately. Animal models of sepsis using genetic or surgical initiation of adrenal insufficiency resulted in increased mortality, but the mechanisms are still unclear. The present study investigates the impact of adrenal inflammation in septic mice challenged with cecal ligation and puncture. Prospective experimental study. University laboratory. C57BL/6N wild-type mice. Sepsis, induced by cecal ligation and puncture for 24 and 48 hours. Both septic and control mice were carefully monitored (every 30 min) for up to 48 hours and divided into survivors and nonsurvivors. We observed a significant and massive increase of interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in adrenal protein extracts of nonsurvivors compared with sham animals and survivors. This pattern was partly reflected in liver and lung but not in plasma samples. Notably, a significant increase in nonsurvivors compared with survivors was only found for lung interleukin-6. In line with these findings, we detected a higher degree of leukocyte infiltration and hemorrhage in the adrenal glands of deceased mice. Evaluation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response in these animals revealed an increase of adrenocorticotropic hormone, which was only partly reflected in the corticosterone level. Notably, using the adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test, we found an impaired adrenocorticotropic hormone response, particularly in nonsurvivors, which significantly correlated with the number of infiltrated leukocytes. Cecal ligation and puncture-induced murine sepsis induces a strong inflammatory response in the adrenal glands, which is accompanied by cell death and hemorrhage. Our data suggest that mortality and adrenal incapacitation are

  13. Far East: Offshore exploration and development continues strong

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    New fields are being added even while recent finds are brought on using floating production systems and gas pipelines. Intensive workover/redrilling continues in older onshore provinces. The paper discusses exploration, development, drilling and production in China, Indonesia, India, Malaysia, Thailand, Viet Nam, Pakistan, Myanmar, Brunei, and the Philippines, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Japan, Mongolia, and Taiwan are briefly mentioned.

  14. The shell model for the exchange-correlation hole in the strong-correlation limit.

    PubMed

    Bahmann, Hilke; Zhou, Yongxi; Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2016-09-28

    We present a model for the exchange-correlation hole and the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation (SC) limit of density functional theory. The SC limit is useful in the construction of exchange-correlation functionals through interpolation of the adiabatic connection. The new approximation (referred to as shell model) is an improvement of the non-local radius (NLR) model recently proposed by Wagner and Gori-Giorgi [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052512 (2014)]. The NLR model does not correctly reproduce the limit of the strongly correlated homogeneous electron gas and this shortcoming is remedied by the shell model. As in the case of the NLR model, the spherically averaged electron density ρ(r,u)=∫dΩu4πρ(r+u) is the starting point for the construction of the shell model and it is also its computational bottleneck. We show how ρ(r, u), the NLR, and the shell model can be implemented efficiently. For this purpose, analytical integrals for the normalization and the energy density of the underlying holes are provided. Employing the shell model, we illustrate how improved adiabatic connection interpolations can be constructed.

  15. Computational studies of model disordered and strongly correlated electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Sonika

    The theory of non-interacting electrons in perfect crystals was completed soon after the advent of quantum mechanics. Though capable of describing electron behaviour in most simple solid state physics systems, this approach falls woefully short of describing condensed matter systems of interest today, and designing the quantum devices of the future. The reason is that nature is never free of disorder, and emergent properties arising from interactions can be clearly seen in the pure, low-dimensional materials that can be engineered today. In this thesis, I address some salient problems in disordered and correlated electronic systems using modern numerical techniques like sparse matrix diagonalization, density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), and large disorder renormalization group (LDRG) methods. The pioneering work of P. W. Anderson, in 1958, led to an understanding of how an electron can stop diffusing and become localized in a region of space when a crystal is sufficiently disordered. Thus disorder can lead to metal-insulator transitions, for instance, in doped semiconductors. Theoretical research on the Anderson disorder model since then has mostly focused on the localization-delocalization phase transition. The localized phase in itself was not thought to exhibit any interesting physics. Our work has uncovered a new singularity in the disorder-averaged inverse participation ratio of wavefunctions within the localized phase, arising from resonant states. The effects of system size, dimension and disorder distribution on the singularity have been studied. A novel wavefunction-based LDRG technique has been designed for the Anderson model which captures the singular behaviour. While localization is well established for a single electron in a disordered potential, the situation is less clear in the case of many interacting particles. Most studies of a many-body localized phase are restricted to a system which is isolated from its environment. Such a condition

  16. Aspects of Strongly Correlated Many-Body Fermi Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, William J., III

    A, by now, well-known signal-to-noise problem plagues Monte Carlo calculations of quantum-information-theoretic observables in systems of interacting fermions, particularly the Renyi entanglement entropies Sn, even in many cases where the infamous sign problem does not appear. Several methods have been put forward to circumvent this affliction including ensemble-switching techniques using auxiliary partition-function ratios. This dissertation presents an algorithm that modifies the recently proposed free-fermion decomposition in an essential way: we incorporate the entanglement-sensitive correlations directly into the probability measure in a natural way. Implementing this algorithm, we demonstrate that it is compatible with the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm, the workhorse of the lattice quantum chromodynamics community and an essential tool for studying gauge theories that contain dynamical fermions. By studying a simple one-dimensional Hubbard model, we demonstrate that our method does not exhibit the same debilitating numerical difficulties that naive attempts to study entanglement often encounter. Following that, we illustrate some key probabilistic insights, using intuition derived from the previous method and its successes to construct a simpler, better behaved, and more elegant algorithm. Using this method, in combination with new identities which allow us to avoid seemingly necessary numerical difficulties, the inversion of the restricted one-body density matrices, we compute high order Renyi entropies and perform a thorough comparison to this new algorithm's predecessor using the Hubbard model mentioned before. Finally, we characterize non-perturbatively the Renyi entropies of degree n = 2,3,4, and 5 of three-dimensional, strongly coupled many-fermion systems in the scale-invariant regime of short interaction range and large scattering length, i.e. in the unitary limit using the algorithms detailed herein. We also detail an exact, few-body projective method

  17. The Event Horizon Telescope: exploring strong gravity and accretion physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Angelo; Dexter, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global sub-millimetre wavelength very long baseline interferometry array, is now resolving the innermost regions around the supermassive black holes Sgr A* and M87. Using black hole images from both simple geometric models and relativistic magnetohydrodynamical accretion flow simulations, we perform a variety of experiments to assess the promise of the EHT for studying strong gravity and accretion physics during the stages of its development. We find that (1) the addition of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array along with upgraded instrumentation in the `Complete' stage of the EHT allow detection of the photon ring, a signature of Kerr strong gravity, for predicted values of its total flux; (2) the inclusion of coherently averaged closure phases in our analysis dramatically improves the precision of even the current array, allowing (3) significantly tighter constraints on plausible accretion models and (4) detections of structural variability at the levels predicted by the models. While observations at 345 GHz circumvent problems due to interstellar electron scattering in line of sight to the galactic centre, short baselines provided by CARMA (Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy) and/or the LMT could be required in order to constrain the overall shape of the accretion flow. Given the systematic uncertainties in the underlying models, using the full complement of two observing frequencies (230 and 345 GHz) and sources (Sgr A* and M87) may be critical for achieving transformative science with the EHT experiment.

  18. Hybrid exchange-correlation energy functionals for strongly correlated electrons: Applications to transition-metal monoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Fabien; Blaha, Peter; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Novák, Pavel

    2006-10-01

    For the treatment of strongly correlated electrons, the corresponding Hartree-Fock exchange energy is used instead of the local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functional, as suggested recently [P. Novák , Phys. Status Solidi B 243, 563 (2006)]. If this is done only inside the atomic spheres, using an augmented plane wave scheme, a significant simplification and reduction of computational cost is achieved with respect to the usual but costly implementation of the Hartree-Fock formalism in solids. Starting from this, we construct exchange-correlation energy functionals of the hybrid form like B3PW91, PBE0, etc. These functionals are tested on the transition-metal monoxides MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO, and the results are compared with the LDA, GGA, LDA+U , and experimental ones. The results show that the proposed method, which does not contain any system-dependent input parameter, gives results comparable or superior to the ones obtained with LDA+U which is designed to improve significantly over the LDA and GGA results for systems containing strongly correlated electrons. The computational efficiency, similar to the LDA+U one, and accuracy of the proposed method show that it represents a very good alternative to LDA+U .

  19. Rapid independent trait evolution despite a strong pleiotropic genetic correlation.

    PubMed

    Conner, Jeffrey K; Karoly, Keith; Stewart, Christy; Koelling, Vanessa A; Sahli, Heather F; Shaw, Frank H

    2011-10-01

    Genetic correlations are the most commonly studied of all potential constraints on adaptive evolution. We present a comprehensive test of constraints caused by genetic correlation, comparing empirical results to predictions from theory. The additive genetic correlation between the filament and the corolla tube in wild radish flowers is very high in magnitude, is estimated with good precision (0.85 ± 0.06), and is caused by pleiotropy. Thus, evolutionary changes in the relative lengths of these two traits should be constrained. Still, artificial selection produced rapid evolution of these traits in opposite directions, so that in one replicate relative to controls, the difference between them increased by six standard deviations in only nine generations. This would result in a 54% increase in relative fitness on the basis of a previous estimate of natural selection in this population, and it would produce the phenotypes found in the most extreme species in the family Brassicaceae in less than 100 generations. These responses were within theoretical expectations and were much slower than if the genetic correlation was zero; thus, there was evidence for constraint. These results, coupled with comparable results from other species, show that evolution can be rapid despite the constraints caused by genetic correlations.

  20. Fate of disorder-induced inhomogeneities in strongly correlated d-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Ghosal, Amit

    2014-10-01

    We analyze the complex interplay of the strong correlations and impurities in a high temperature superconductor and show that both the nature and degree of the inhomogeneities at zero temperature in the local-order parameters change drastically from those obtained in a simple Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Although both the strong electronic repulsions and disorder contribute to the nanoscale inhomogeneity in the population of charge-carriers, we find they compete with each other, leading to a relatively smooth variation of the local density. Our self-consistent calculations modify the spatial fluctuations in the pairing amplitude by suppressing all the double occupancy within a Gutzwiller formalism and prohibit the formation of distinct superconducting ‘islands’. In contrast, presence of such ‘islands’ controls the outcome if strong correlations are neglected. The reorganization of the spatial structures in the Gutzwiller method makes these superconductors surprisingly insensitive to the impurities. This is illustrated by a very weak decay of superfluid stiffness, off-diagonal long-range order and local density of states up to a large disorder strength. Exploring the origin of such a robustness, we conclude that the underlying one-particle normal states reshape in a rich manner, such that the superconductor formed by pairing these states experiences a weaker but spatially correlated effective disorder. Such a route to superconductivity is evocative of Anderson's theorem. Our results capture the key experimental trends in the cuprates.

  1. Strong correlations between text quality and complex networks features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiqueira, L.; Nunes, M. G. V.; Oliveira, O. N., Jr.; F. Costa, L. da

    2007-01-01

    Concepts of complex networks have been used to obtain metrics that were correlated to text quality established by scores assigned by human judges. Texts produced by high-school students in Portuguese were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and shortest path were obtained. Another metric was derived from the dynamics of the network growth, based on the variation of the number of connected components. The scores assigned by the human judges according to three text quality criteria (coherence and cohesion, adherence to standard writing conventions and theme adequacy/development) were correlated with the network measurements. Text quality for all three criteria was found to decrease with increasing average values of outdegrees, clustering coefficient and deviation from the dynamics of network growth. Among the criteria employed, cohesion and coherence showed the strongest correlation, which probably indicates that the network measurements are able to capture how the text is developed in terms of the concepts represented by the nodes in the networks. Though based on a particular set of texts and specific language, the results presented here point to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  2. Signals of strong electronic correlation in ion scattering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Gonzalez, C.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Previous measurements of neutral atom fractions for S r+ scattered by gold polycrystalline surfaces show a singular dependence with the target temperature. There is still not a theoretical model that can properly describe the magnitude and the temperature dependence of the neutralization probabilities found. Here, we applied a first-principles quantum-mechanical theoretical formalism to describe the time-dependent scattering process. Three different electronic correlation approaches consistent with the system analyzed are used: (i) the spinless approach, where two charge channels are considered (S r0 and S r+ ) and the spin degeneration is neglected; (ii) the infinite-U approach, with the same charge channels (S r0 and S r+ ) but considering the spin degeneration; and (iii) the finite-U approach, where the first ionization and second ionization energy levels are considered very, but finitely, separated. Neutral fraction magnitudes and temperature dependence are better described by the finite-U approach, indicating that e -correlation plays a significant role in charge-transfer processes. However, none of them is able to explain the nonmonotonous temperature dependence experimentally obtained. Here, we suggest that small changes in the surface work function introduced by the target heating, and possibly not detected by experimental standard methods, could be responsible for that singular behavior. Additionally, we apply the same theoretical model using the infinite-U approximation for the Mg-Au system, obtaining an excellent description of the experimental neutral fractions measured.

  3. An organizing principle for two-dimensional strongly correlated superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratino, L.; Sémon, P.; Sordi, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Superconductivity in the cuprates exhibits many unusual features. We study the two-dimensional Hubbard model with plaquette dynamical mean-field theory to address these unusual features and relate them to other normal-state phenomena, such as the pseudogap. Previous studies with this method found that upon doping the Mott insulator at low temperature a pseudogap phase appears. The low-temperature transition between that phase and the correlated metal at higher doping is first-order. A series of crossovers emerge along the Widom line extension of that first-order transition in the supercritical region. Here we show that the highly asymmetric dome of the dynamical mean-field superconducting transition temperature , the maximum of the condensation energy as a function of doping, the correlation between maximum and normal-state scattering rate, the change from potential-energy driven to kinetic-energy driven pairing mechanisms can all be understood as remnants of the normal state first-order transition and its associated crossovers that also act as an organizing principle for the superconducting state.

  4. An organizing principle for two-dimensional strongly correlated superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Fratino, L.; Sémon, P.; Sordi, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Superconductivity in the cuprates exhibits many unusual features. We study the two-dimensional Hubbard model with plaquette dynamical mean-field theory to address these unusual features and relate them to other normal-state phenomena, such as the pseudogap. Previous studies with this method found that upon doping the Mott insulator at low temperature a pseudogap phase appears. The low-temperature transition between that phase and the correlated metal at higher doping is first-order. A series of crossovers emerge along the Widom line extension of that first-order transition in the supercritical region. Here we show that the highly asymmetric dome of the dynamical mean-field superconducting transition temperature , the maximum of the condensation energy as a function of doping, the correlation between maximum and normal-state scattering rate, the change from potential-energy driven to kinetic-energy driven pairing mechanisms can all be understood as remnants of the normal state first-order transition and its associated crossovers that also act as an organizing principle for the superconducting state. PMID:26964524

  5. Excitonic condensation in systems of strongly correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneš, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The idea of exciton condensation in solids was introduced in the 1960s with the analogy of superconductivity in mind. While exciton supercurrents have been realised only in artificial quantum-well structures so far, the application of the concept of excitonic condensation to bulk solids leads to a rich spectrum of thermodynamic phases with diverse physical properties. In this review we discuss recent developments in the theory of exciton condensation in systems described by Hubbard-type models. In particular, we focus on the connections to their various strong-coupling limits that have been studied in other contexts, e.g. cold atoms physics. One of our goals is to provide a ‘dictionary’ that would allow the reader to efficiently combine results obtained in these different fields.

  6. Strongly correlated electron materials. I. Theory of the quasiparticle structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J.; Puig-Puig, L. )

    1993-07-01

    In this paper we give a method for analyzing the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of effective interactions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and from an extended RPA (ERPA) that introduces vertex effects within the bubble polarization. The second step is the determination of the density of states deduced from the spectral functions. Its analysis leads us to conclude that these systems can exhibit three types of resonances in their electronic structures: the lower-, middle-, and upper-energy resonances. Furthermore, we analyze the conditions for which there is only one type of resonance and the causes that lead to the disappearance of the heavy-fermion state. We finally introduce the RPA and ERPA effective interactions within the strong-coupling theory and we give the conditions for obtaining coupling and superconductivity.

  7. Phase diagram of incoherently driven strongly correlated photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biella, Alberto; Storme, Florent; Lebreuilly, José; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Carusotto, Iacopo; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2017-08-01

    We explore theoretically the nonequilibrium photonic phases of an array of coupled cavities in presence of incoherent driving and dissipation. In particular, we consider a Hubbard model system where each site is a Kerr nonlinear resonator coupled to a two-level emitter, which is pumped incoherently. Within a Gutzwiller mean-field approach, we determine the steady-state phase diagram of such a system. We find that, at a critical value of the intercavity photon hopping rate, a second-order nonequilibrium phase transition associated with the spontaneous breaking of the U(1 ) symmetry occurs. The transition from an incompressible Mott-like photon fluid to a coherent delocalized phase is driven by commensurability effects and not by the competition between photon hopping and optical nonlinearity. The essence of the mean-field predictions is corroborated by finite-size simulations obtained with matrix product operators and corner-space renormalization methods.

  8. Residues of correlators in the strongly coupled N=4 plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Amado, Irene; Landsteiner, Karl; Montero, Sergio; Hoyos, Carlos

    2008-03-15

    Quasinormal modes of asymptotically AdS black holes can be interpreted as poles of retarded correlators in the dual gauge theory. To determine the response of the system to small external perturbations it is not enough to know the location of the poles: one also needs to know the residues. We compute them for R-charge currents and find that they are complex except for the hydrodynamic mode, whose residue is purely imaginary. For different quasinormal modes the residue grows with momentum q, whereas for the hydrodynamic mode it behaves as a damped oscillation with distinct zeroes at finite q. Similar to collective excitations at weak coupling the hydrodynamic mode decouples at short wavelengths. Knowledge of the residues allows as well to define the time scale {tau}{sub H} from when on the system enters the hydrodynamic regime, restricting the validity of hydrodynamic simulations to times t>{tau}{sub H}.

  9. Exploring Correlation Coefficients with Golf Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the relationships between several pairs of statistics kept on professional golfers on the PGA tour. Specifically, two measures related to the player's ability to drive the ball are compared as are two measures related to the player's ability to putt. An additional analysis is made between one statistic related to putting and…

  10. Strong correlation effects in a two-dimensional Bose gas with quartic dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radić, Juraj; Natu, Stefan S.; Galitski, Victor

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by the fundamental question of the fate of interacting bosons in flat bands, we consider a two-dimensional Bose gas at zero temperature with an underlying quartic single-particle dispersion in one spatial direction. This type of band structure can be realized using the NIST scheme of spin-orbit coupling [Y.-J. Lin, K. Jiménez-Garcia, and I. B. Spielman, Nature (London) 471, 83 (2011), 10.1038/nature09887], in the regime where the lower-band dispersion has the form ɛk˜kx4/4 +ky2+... , or using the shaken lattice scheme of Parker et al. [C. V. Parker, L.-C. Ha, and C. Chin, Nat. Phys. 9, 769 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2789]. We numerically compare the ground-state energies of the mean-field Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and various trial wave functions, where bosons avoid each other at short distances. We discover that, at low densities, several types of strongly correlated states have an energy per particle (ɛ ), which scales with density (n ) as ɛ ˜n4 /3 , in contrast to ɛ ˜n for the weakly interacting Bose gas. These competing states include a Wigner crystal, quasicondensates described in terms of properly symmetrized fermionic states, and variational wave functions of Jastrow type. We find that one of the latter has the lowest energy among the states we consider. This Jastrow-type state has a strongly reduced, but finite, condensate fraction, and true off-diagonal long-range order, which suggests that the ground state of interacting bosons with quartic dispersion is a strongly correlated condensate reminiscent of superfluid helium-4. Our results show that even for weakly interacting bosons in higher dimensions, one can explore the crossover from a weakly coupled BEC to a strongly correlated condensate by simply tuning the single-particle dispersion or density.

  11. Construction of exchange-correlation functionals through interpolation between the non-interacting and the strong-correlation limit

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yongxi; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Bahmann, Hilke

    2015-09-28

    Drawing on the adiabatic connection of density functional theory, exchange-correlation functionals of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are constructed which interpolate between the extreme limits of the electron-electron interaction strength. The first limit is the non-interacting one, where there is only exchange. The second limit is the strong correlated one, characterized as the minimum of the electron-electron repulsion energy. The exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit is approximated through a model for the exchange-correlation hole that is referred to as nonlocal-radius model [L. O. Wagner and P. Gori-Giorgi, Phys. Rev. A 90, 052512 (2014)]. Using the non-interacting and strong-correlated extremes, various interpolation schemes are presented that yield new approximations to the adiabatic connection and thus to the exchange-correlation energy. Some of them rely on empiricism while others do not. Several of the proposed approximations yield the exact exchange-correlation energy for one-electron systems where local and semi-local approximations often fail badly. Other proposed approximations generalize existing global hybrids by using a fraction of the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit to replace an equal fraction of the semi-local approximation to the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit. The performance of the proposed approximations is evaluated for molecular atomization energies, total atomic energies, and ionization potentials.

  12. Exploring the neural correlates of social stereotyping.

    PubMed

    Quadflieg, Susanne; Turk, David J; Waiter, Gordon D; Mitchell, Jason P; Jenkins, Adrianna C; Macrae, C Neil

    2009-08-01

    Judging people on the basis of cultural stereotypes is a ubiquitous facet of daily life, yet little is known about how this fundamental inferential strategy is implemented in the brain. Using fMRI, we measured neural activity while participants made judgments about the likely actor (i.e., person-focus) and location (i.e., place-focus) of a series of activities, some of which were associated with prevailing gender stereotypes. Results revealed that stereotyping was underpinned by activity in areas associated with evaluative processing (e.g., ventral medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala) and the representation of action knowledge (e.g., supramarginal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus). In addition, activity accompanying stereotypic judgments was correlated with the strength of participants' explicit and implicit gender stereotypes. These findings elucidate how stereotyping fits within the neuroscience of person understanding.

  13. Exploring the neural correlates of visual creativity

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Dandekar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Although creativity has been called the most important of all human resources, its neural basis is still unclear. In the current study, we used fMRI to measure neural activity in participants solving a visuospatial creativity problem that involves divergent thinking and has been considered a canonical right hemisphere task. As hypothesized, both the visual creativity task and the control task as compared to rest activated a variety of areas including the posterior parietal cortex bilaterally and motor regions, which are known to be involved in visuospatial rotation of objects. However, directly comparing the two tasks indicated that the creative task more strongly activated left hemisphere regions including the posterior parietal cortex, the premotor cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the medial PFC. These results demonstrate that even in a task that is specialized to the right hemisphere, robust parallel activity in the left hemisphere supports creative processing. Furthermore, the results support the notion that higher motor planning may be a general component of creative improvisation and that such goal-directed planning of novel solutions may be organized top-down by the left DLPFC and by working memory processing in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:22349801

  14. Self-consistent field model for strong electrostatic correlations and inhomogeneous dielectric media

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Manman Xu, Zhenli

    2014-12-28

    Electrostatic correlations and variable permittivity of electrolytes are essential for exploring many chemical and physical properties of interfaces in aqueous solutions. We propose a continuum electrostatic model for the treatment of these effects in the framework of the self-consistent field theory. The model incorporates a space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity and an excluded ion-size effect for the correlation energy. This results in a self-energy modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck or Poisson-Boltzmann equation together with state equations for the self energy and the dielectric function. We show that the ionic size is of significant importance in predicting a finite self energy for an ion in an inhomogeneous medium. Asymptotic approximation is proposed for the solution of a generalized Debye-Hückel equation, which has been shown to capture the ionic correlation and dielectric self energy. Through simulating ionic distribution surrounding a macroion, the modified self-consistent field model is shown to agree with particle-based Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical results for symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes demonstrate that the model is able to predict the charge inversion at high correlation regime in the presence of multivalent interfacial ions which is beyond the mean-field theory and also show strong effect to double layer structure due to the space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity.

  15. Self-consistent field model for strong electrostatic correlations and inhomogeneous dielectric media.

    PubMed

    Ma, Manman; Xu, Zhenli

    2014-12-28

    Electrostatic correlations and variable permittivity of electrolytes are essential for exploring many chemical and physical properties of interfaces in aqueous solutions. We propose a continuum electrostatic model for the treatment of these effects in the framework of the self-consistent field theory. The model incorporates a space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity and an excluded ion-size effect for the correlation energy. This results in a self-energy modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck or Poisson-Boltzmann equation together with state equations for the self energy and the dielectric function. We show that the ionic size is of significant importance in predicting a finite self energy for an ion in an inhomogeneous medium. Asymptotic approximation is proposed for the solution of a generalized Debye-Hückel equation, which has been shown to capture the ionic correlation and dielectric self energy. Through simulating ionic distribution surrounding a macroion, the modified self-consistent field model is shown to agree with particle-based Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical results for symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes demonstrate that the model is able to predict the charge inversion at high correlation regime in the presence of multivalent interfacial ions which is beyond the mean-field theory and also show strong effect to double layer structure due to the space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity.

  16. Self-consistent field model for strong electrostatic correlations and inhomogeneous dielectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Manman; Xu, Zhenli

    2014-12-01

    Electrostatic correlations and variable permittivity of electrolytes are essential for exploring many chemical and physical properties of interfaces in aqueous solutions. We propose a continuum electrostatic model for the treatment of these effects in the framework of the self-consistent field theory. The model incorporates a space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity and an excluded ion-size effect for the correlation energy. This results in a self-energy modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck or Poisson-Boltzmann equation together with state equations for the self energy and the dielectric function. We show that the ionic size is of significant importance in predicting a finite self energy for an ion in an inhomogeneous medium. Asymptotic approximation is proposed for the solution of a generalized Debye-Hückel equation, which has been shown to capture the ionic correlation and dielectric self energy. Through simulating ionic distribution surrounding a macroion, the modified self-consistent field model is shown to agree with particle-based Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical results for symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes demonstrate that the model is able to predict the charge inversion at high correlation regime in the presence of multivalent interfacial ions which is beyond the mean-field theory and also show strong effect to double layer structure due to the space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity.

  17. Exploring Words with Semantic Correlations from Chinese Wikipedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Huang, Kaiyan; Tsuchiya, Seiji; Ren, Fuji; Zhong, Yixin

    In this paper, we work on semantic correlation between Chinese words based on Wikipedia documents. A corpus with about 50,000 structured documents is generated from Wikipedia pages. Then considering of hyper-links, text overlaps and word frequency, about 300,000 word pairs with semantic correlations are explored from these documents. We roughly measure the degree of semantic correlations and find groups with tight semantic correlations by self clustering.

  18. Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Allan; Carr, Lincoln D.; Schaefer, Thomas; Steinberg, Peter; Thomas, John E.

    2013-04-01

    off a flurry of interest in holography as a toolkit for studying strongly-correlated many-body systems more generally. Holography also allows us to use results from quantum fluids to study classical and quantum gravity; for example, the phase structure of a quantum many-body system translates into a rich classification of black holes in the dual space-time. Given both the rapid progress in applied holography and the exciting developments in ultracold quantum gases and QCD plasmas discussed above, the time is ripe for new collaborations across traditional lines of specialization. This focus issue explores the convergence between three heretofore separate areas of physics. Over forty research groups have contributed original work, and there will be a review article which complements these advances, overviewing them and presenting them in the context of all three fields and their interconnections. The review concludes with a list of open questions. This sets the tone for the present focus issue; namely, interdisciplinary dialog, openness, innovation, and possibility, an emphasis for which New Journal of Physics, an open-access journal of the highest quality, is especially fitted.

  19. Illusory Correlation: A Further Exploration of Chapman's Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Richard M.; Garfield, Sol L.

    1978-01-01

    Explores whether training can affect the illusory correlation. Materials used by Chapman and Chapman (1969) were used. Attempts were made to influence the illusory correlation by providing a simulated training session. Training was no more effective than nontraining in reducing this phenomenon. This is consistent with Chapman and Chapman (1969).…

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the itinerant-localized model of strongly correlated electrons: Spin-spin correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsov, Ilya; Ferraz, Alvaro; Kochetov, Evgenii

    2016-12-01

    We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the itinerant-localized periodic Kondo-Heisenberg model for the underdoped cuprates to calculate the associated spin correlation functions. The strong electron correlations are shown to play a key role in the abrupt destruction of the quasi-long-range antiferromagnetic order in the lightly doped regime.

  1. Relaxation of a Classical Spin Coupled to a Strongly Correlated Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayad, Mohammad; Rausch, Roman; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    A classical spin which is antiferromagnetically coupled to a system of strongly correlated conduction electrons is shown to exhibit unconventional real-time dynamics which cannot be described by Gilbert damping. Depending on the strength of the local Coulomb interaction U , the two main electronic dissipation channels, namely transport of excitations via correlated hopping and via excitations of correlation-induced magnetic moments, become active on largely different time scales. We demonstrate that correlations can lead to a strongly suppressed relaxation which so far has been observed in purely electronic systems only and which is governed here by proximity to the divergent magnetic time scale in the infinite-U limit.

  2. Correlated multielectron systems in strong laser fields: A multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Koch, O.; Kreuzer, W.

    2005-01-01

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach for the description of correlated few-electron dynamics in the presence of strong laser fields is introduced and a comprehensive description of the method is given. Total ionization and electron spectra for the ground and first excited ionic channels are calculated for one-dimensional model systems with up to six active electrons. Strong correlation effects are found in the shape of photoelectron peaks and the dependence of ionization on molecule size.

  3. Communication: DFT treatment of strong correlation in 3d transition-metal diatomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erin R.; Becke, Axel D.

    2017-06-01

    Bonds between, and to, transition-metal atoms often involve strong electron correlation which cannot be handled by conventional density-functional-theory approximations. The recent "B13" functional of Becke [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 074109 (2013) and J. Chem. Phys. 138, 161101 (2013)] models dynamic, static, and strong correlation in an exact-exchange-based framework. We test B13 on bond energies of transition-metal diatomics in this work, with promising results.

  4. Strong correlations, strong coupling, and s -wave superconductivity in hole-doped BaFe2As2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, F.; Böhmer, A. E.; de'Medici, L.; Capone, M.; Giovannetti, G.; Eder, R.; Wang, L.; He, M.; Wolf, T.; Schweiss, P.; Heid, R.; Herbig, A.; Adelmann, P.; Fisher, R. A.; Meingast, C.

    2016-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the low-temperature heat capacity and thermal expansion of single crystals of the hole-doped Ba1 -xKxFe2As2 series (0 strong enhancement of electron correlations and the possible proximity of these materials to a Mott insulator. This trend is well reproduced theoretically by our density functional theory + slave-spin (DFT+SS) calculations, confirming that 122-iron pnictides are effectively Hund metals, in which sizable Hund's coupling and orbital selectivity are the key ingredients for tuning correlations. We also find direct evidence for the existence of a coherence-incoherence crossover between a low-temperature heavy Fermi liquid and a highly incoherent high-temperature regime similar to heavy fermion systems. In the superconducting state, clear signatures of multiband superconductivity are observed with no evidence for nodes in the energy gaps, ruling out the existence of a doping-induced change of symmetry (from s to d wave). We argue that the disappearance of the electron band in the range 0.4 strong-to-weak coupling crossover and that this shallow band remains involved in the superconducting pairing, although its contribution to the normal state fades away. Differences between hole- and electron-doped BaFe2As2 series are emphasized and discussed in terms of strong pair breaking by potential scatterers beyond the Born limit.

  5. The Sum-Rate Capacity of Strong Interference Channels with Correlated Messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhan

    The transmission of correlated messages over strong interference channels is examined. The result is the proposal of a single-letter characterization of the sum-rate capacity of strong interference channels with correlated messages. It is shown that if the messages are independent, the sum-rate capacity is equal to that of [1] obtained by Costa and El Gamal. However, it can be larger than that of [1] if the messages are correlated. It is also shown that, in terms of the sum-rate, the achievable rate region in [2] is indeed the sum-rate capacity.

  6. CeRu4Sn6: a strongly correlated material with nontrivial topology

    PubMed Central

    Sundermann, Martin; Strigari, Fabio; Willers, Thomas; Winkler, Hannes; Prokofiev, Andrey; Ablett, James M.; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Schmitz, Detlef; Weschke, Eugen; Sala, Marco Moretti; Al-Zein, Ali; Tanaka, Arata; Haverkort, Maurits W.; Kasinathan, Deepa; Tjeng, Liu Hao; Paschen, Silke; Severing, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators form a novel state of matter that provides new opportunities to create unique quantum phenomena. While the materials used so far are based on semiconductors, recent theoretical studies predict that also strongly correlated systems can show non-trivial topological properties, thereby allowing even the emergence of surface phenomena that are not possible with topological band insulators. From a practical point of view, it is also expected that strong correlations will reduce the disturbing impact of defects or impurities, and at the same increase the Fermi velocities of the topological surface states. The challenge is now to discover such correlated materials. Here, using advanced x-ray spectroscopies in combination with band structure calculations, we infer that CeRu4Sn6 is a strongly correlated material with non-trivial topology. PMID:26658647

  7. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, Arun

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  8. Competing ground states of strongly correlated bosons in the Harper-Hofstadter-Mott model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natu, Stefan S.; Mueller, Erich J.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-06-01

    Using an efficient cluster approach, we study the physics of two-dimensional lattice bosons in a strong magnetic field in the regime where the tunneling is much weaker than the on-site interaction strength. We study both the dilute, hard-core bosons at filling factors much smaller than unity occupation per site and the physics in the vicinity of the superfluid-Mott lobes as the density is tuned away from unity. For hard-core bosons, we carry out extensive numerics for a fixed flux per plaquette ϕ =1 /5 and ϕ =1 /3 . At large flux, the lowest-energy state is a strongly correlated superfluid, analogous to He-4, in which the order parameter is dramatically suppressed, but nonzero. At filling factors ν =1 /2 ,1 , we find competing incompressible states which are metastable. These appear to be commensurate density wave states. For small flux, the situation is reversed and the ground state at ν =1 /2 is an incompressible density wave solid. Here, we find a metastable lattice supersolid phase, where superfluidity and density wave order coexist. We then perform careful numerical studies of the physics near the vicinity of the Mott lobes for ϕ =1 /2 and ϕ =1 /4 . At ϕ =1 /2 , the superfluid ground state has commensurate density wave order. At ϕ =1 /4 , incompressible phases appear outside the Mott lobes at densities n =1.125 and n =1.25 , corresponding to filling fractions ν =1 /2 and 1, respectively. These phases, which are absent in single-site mean-field theory, are metastable and have slightly higher energy than the superfluid, but the energy difference between them shrinks rapidly with increasing cluster size, suggestive of an incompressible ground state. We thus explore the interplay between Mott physics, magnetic Landau levels, and superfluidity, finding a rich phase diagram of competing compressible and incompressible states.

  9. Serum BDNF Concentrations Show Strong Seasonal Variation and Correlations with the Amount of Ambient Sunlight

    PubMed Central

    Molendijk, Marc L.; Haffmans, Judith P. M.; Bus, Boudewijn A. A.; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Prickaerts, Jos; Voshaar, Richard C. Oude; Elzinga, Bernet M.

    2012-01-01

    Earlier findings show seasonality in processes and behaviors such as brain plasticity and depression that in part are regulated by Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). Based on this we investigated seasonal variation in serum BDNF concentrations in 2,851 persons who took part in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Analyses by month of sampling (monthly n’s >196) showed pronounced seasonal variation in serum BDNF concentrations (P<.0001) with increasing concentrations in the spring-summer period (standardized regression weight (ß) = 0.19, P<.0001) and decreasing concentrations in the autumn-winter period (ß = −0.17, P<.0001). Effect sizes [Cohen’s d] ranged from 0.27 to 0.66 for monthly significant differences. We found similar seasonal variation for both sexes and for persons with a DSM-IV depression diagnosis and healthy control subjects. In explorative analyses we found that the number of sunshine hours (a major trigger to entrain seasonality) in the week of blood withdrawal and the 10 weeks prior to this event positively correlated with serum BDNF concentrations (Pearson’s correlation coefficients ranged: 0.05 – 0.18) and this could partly explain the observed monthly variation. These results provide strong evidence that serum BDNF concentrations systematically vary over the year. This finding is important for our understanding of those factors that regulate BDNF expression and may provide novel avenues to understand seasonal dependent changes in behavior and illness such as depression. Finally, the findings reported here should be taken into account when designing and interpreting studies on BDNF. PMID:23133609

  10. Semiclassical solitons in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Demler, Eugene; Maltsev, Andrei

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Dynamics of their formation in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices. > Regime of very strong interactions between atoms, the so-called hard core bosons regime. > Character of soliton excitations is dramatically different from the usual Gross-Pitaevskii regime. - Abstract: We investigate theoretically soliton excitations and dynamics of their formation in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in two and three dimensional optical lattices. We derive equations of nonlinear hydrodynamics in the regime of strong interactions and incommensurate fillings, when atoms can be treated as hard core bosons. When parameters change in one direction only we obtain Korteweg-de Vries type equation away from half-filling and modified KdV equation at half-filling. We apply this general analysis to a problem of the decay of the density step. We consider stability of one dimensional solutions to transverse fluctuations. Our results are also relevant for understanding nonequilibrium dynamics of lattice spin models.

  11. Collective modes in strongly correlated yukawa liquids: waves in dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kalman, G; Rosenberg, M; DeWitt, H E

    2000-06-26

    We determine the collective mode structure of a strongly correlated Yukawa fluid, with the purpose of analyzing wave propagation in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. We identify a longitudinal plasmon and a transverse shear mode. The dispersion is characterized by a low- k acoustic behavior, a frequency maximum well below the plasma frequency, and a high- k merging of the two modes around the Einstein frequency of localized oscillations. The damping effect of collisions between neutrals and dust grains is estimated.

  12. Strong anticipation and long-range cross-correlation: Application of detrended cross-correlation analysis to human behavioral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delignières, Didier; Marmelat, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze empirical data, accounting for coordination processes between complex systems (bimanual coordination, interpersonal coordination, and synchronization with a fractal metronome), by using a recently proposed method: detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA). This work is motivated by the strong anticipation hypothesis, which supposes that coordination between complex systems is not achieved on the basis of local adaptations (i.e., correction, predictions), but results from a more global matching of complexity properties. Indeed, recent experiments have evidenced a very close correlation between the scaling properties of the series produced by two coordinated systems, despite a quite weak local synchronization. We hypothesized that strong anticipation should result in the presence of long-range cross-correlations between the series produced by the two systems. Results allow a detailed analysis of the effects of coordination on the fluctuations of the series produced by the two systems. In the long term, series tend to present similar scaling properties, with clear evidence of long-range cross-correlation. Short-term results strongly depend on the nature of the task. Simulation studies allow disentangling the respective effects of noise and short-term coupling processes on DCCA results, and suggest that the matching of long-term fluctuations could be the result of short-term coupling processes.

  13. Exploring Tripartite Quantum Correlations: Entanglement Witness and Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Karimi, N.; Heshmati, A.; Amidi, D.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we explore the tripartite quantum correlations by employing the quantum relative entropy as a distance measure. First, we evaluate the explicit expression for nonlinear entanglement witness (EW) of tripartite systems in the four dimensional space that lends itself to a straightforward algorithm for finding closest separable state (CSS) to the generic state. Then using nonlinear EW with specific feasible regions (FRs), quantum discord is derived analytically for the three-qubit and tripartite systems in the four dimensional space. Furthermore, we explicitly figure out the additivity relation of quantum correlations in tripartite systems.

  14. Exploring Tripartite Quantum Correlations: Entanglement Witness and Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Karimi, N.; Heshmati, A.; Amidi, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we explore the tripartite quantum correlations by employing the quantum relative entropy as a distance measure. First, we evaluate the explicit expression for nonlinear entanglement witness (EW) of tripartite systems in the four dimensional space that lends itself to a straightforward algorithm for finding closest separable state (CSS) to the generic state. Then using nonlinear EW with specific feasible regions (FRs), quantum discord is derived analytically for the three-qubit and tripartite systems in the four dimensional space. Furthermore, we explicitly figure out the additivity relation of quantum correlations in tripartite systems.

  15. Solving the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation for strongly correlated neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Taşkın; Rotter, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Pairs of neurons in brain networks often share much of the input they receive from other neurons. Due to essential nonlinearities of the neuronal dynamics, the consequences for the correlation of the output spike trains are generally not well understood. Here we analyze the case of two leaky integrate-and-fire neurons using an approach which is nonperturbative with respect to the degree of input correlation. Our treatment covers both weakly and strongly correlated dynamics, generalizing previous results based on linear response theory.

  16. Photoresponse of a strongly correlated material determined by scanning photocurrent microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kasırga, T Serkan; Sun, Dong; Park, Jae H; Coy, Jim M; Fei, Zaiyao; Xu, Xiaodong; Cobden, David H

    2012-11-01

    The generation of a current by light is a key process in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. In band semiconductors, depletion fields associated with interfaces separate long-lived photo-induced carriers. However, in systems with strong electron-electron and electron-phonon correlations it is unclear what physics will dominate the photoresponse. Here, we investigate photocurrent in VO(2), an exemplary strongly correlated material known for its dramatic metal-insulator transition at T(c) ≈ 68 °C, which could be useful for optoelectronic detection and switching up to ultraviolet wavelengths. Using scanning photocurrent microscopy on individual suspended VO(2) nanobeams we observe a photoresponse peaked at the metal-insulator boundary but extending throughout both insulating and metallic phases. We determine that the response is photothermal, implying efficient carrier relaxation to a local equilibrium in a manner consistent with strong correlations. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal subtle phase changes within the insulating state. We further demonstrate switching of the photocurrent by optical control of the metal-insulator boundary arrangement. Our work shows the value of applying scanning photocurrent microscopy to nanoscale crystals in the investigation of strongly correlated materials, and the results are relevant for designing and controlling optoelectronic devices employing such materials.

  17. Photoresponse of a strongly correlated material determined by scanning photocurrent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasırga, T. Serkan; Sun, Dong; Park, Jae H.; Coy, Jim M.; Fei, Zaiyao; Xu, Xiaodong; Cobden, David H.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of a current by light is a key process in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. In band semiconductors, depletion fields associated with interfaces separate long-lived photo-induced carriers. However, in systems with strong electron-electron and electron-phonon correlations it is unclear what physics will dominate the photoresponse. Here, we investigate photocurrent in VO2, an exemplary strongly correlated material known for its dramatic metal-insulator transition at Tc ~ 68 °C, which could be useful for optoelectronic detection and switching up to ultraviolet wavelengths. Using scanning photocurrent microscopy on individual suspended VO2 nanobeams we observe a photoresponse peaked at the metal-insulator boundary but extending throughout both insulating and metallic phases. We determine that the response is photothermal, implying efficient carrier relaxation to a local equilibrium in a manner consistent with strong correlations. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal subtle phase changes within the insulating state. We further demonstrate switching of the photocurrent by optical control of the metal-insulator boundary arrangement. Our work shows the value of applying scanning photocurrent microscopy to nanoscale crystals in the investigation of strongly correlated materials, and the results are relevant for designing and controlling optoelectronic devices employing such materials.

  18. Effect of strong electron correlation on the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Mazziotti, David A.

    2012-08-21

    Research into the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting has focused on two factors: (1) entanglement of chromophores, and (2) environmental noise. While chromophores are conjugated {pi}-bonding molecules with strongly correlated electrons, previous models have treated this correlation implicitly without a mathematical variable to gauge correlation-enhanced efficiency. Here we generalize the single-electron/exciton models to a multi-electron/exciton model that explicitly shows the effects of enhanced electron correlation within chromophores on the efficiency of energy transfer. The model provides more detailed insight into the interplay of electron correlation within chromophores and electron entanglement between chromophores. Exploiting this interplay is assisting in the design of new energy-efficient materials, which are just beginning to emerge.

  19. Realistic many-body approaches to materials with strong nonlocal correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechermann, F.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Potthoff, M.

    2017-07-01

    Many of the fascinating and unconventional properties of several transition-metal compounds with partially filled d-shells are due to strong electronic correlations. While local correlations are in principle treated exactly within the frame of the dynamical mean-field theory, there are two major and interlinked routes for important further methodical advances: On the one hand, there is a strong need for methods being able to describe material-specific aspects, i.e., methods combining the DMFT with modern band-structure theory, and, on the other hand, nonlocal correlations beyond the mean-field paradigm must be accounted for. Referring to several concrete example systems, we argue why these two routes are worth pursuing and how they can be combined, we describe several related methodical developments and present respective results, and we discuss possible ways to overcome remaining obstacles.

  20. Strongly correlated photons generated by coupling a three- or four-level system to a waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2012-04-01

    We study the generation of strongly correlated photons by coupling an atom to photonic quantum fields in a one-dimensional waveguide. Specifically, we consider a three-level or four-level system for the atom. Photon-photon bound states emerge as a manifestation of the strong photon-photon correlation mediated by the atom. Effective repulsive or attractive interaction between photons can be produced, causing either suppressed multiphoton transmission (photon blockade) or enhanced multiphoton transmission (photon-induced tunneling). As a result, nonclassical light sources can be generated on demand by sending coherent states into the proposed system. We calculate the second-order correlation function of the transmitted field and observe bunching and antibunching caused by the bound states. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed system can produce photon pairs with a high degree of spectral entanglement, which have a large capacity for carrying information and are important for large-alphabet quantum communication.

  1. Aperture averaging and correlation function measurements in strong atmospheric turbulence for optical wireless applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Heba; Harris, Joseph; Tang, Yunxin; Gammon, Robert; Davis, Christopher

    2008-08-01

    The performance of free space optical (FSO) links in a clear atmosphere is affected by the non-ideal characteristics of the communication channel. Atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in the received signal level, which increase the bit errors in a digital communication link. In order to quantify performance limitations, a better understanding of the effect of the intensity fluctuations on the received signal at all turbulence levels is needed. Theory reliably describes the behavior in the weak turbulence regime, but theoretical descriptions in the intermediate and strong turbulence regimes are less well developed. We have developed a flexible empirical approach for characterizing link performance in strong turbulence conditions through image analysis of intensity scintillation patterns coupled with frame aperture averaging on an FSO communication link. These measurements are complemented with direct measurements of temporal and spatial correlation functions. A He-Ne laser beam propagates 106 meters in free-space over flat terrain about a meter above the ground to provide strong atmospheric turbulence conditions. A high performance digital camera with a frame-grabbing computer interface is used to capture received laser intensity distributions at rates up to 30 frames per second and various short shutter speeds, down to 1/16,000s per frame. A scintillometer is used for accurate measurements of the turbulence parameter Cn2. Laboratory measurements use a local strong turbulence generator, which mimics a strong phase screen. Spatial correlation functions are measured using laterally separated point detectors placed in the receiver plane. Correlations and captured image frames are analyzed in Labview to evaluate correlation functions, Cn2, and the aperture averaging factor. The aperture averaging results demonstrate the expected reduction in intensity fluctuations with increasing aperture diameter, and show quantitatively the differences in behavior between

  2. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; Chu, J. -H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z. Q.; Chu, C. W.; Fisher, I. R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z. -X.; Lu, D. H.

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  3. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; ...

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phasemore » where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.« less

  4. Self-consistent slave rotor mean-field theory for strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, E.; Paramekanti, A.

    2007-11-01

    Building on the work by Florens and Georges [Phys. Rev. B 70, 035114 (2004)], we formulate and study a self-consistent slave rotor mean-field theory for strongly correlated systems. This approach views the electron, in the strong correlation regime, as a composite of a neutral spinon and a charged rotor field. We solve the coupled spinon-rotor model self-consistently using a cluster mean-field theory for the rotors and various Ansätze for the spinon ground state. We illustrate this approach with a number of examples relevant to ongoing experiments in strongly correlated electronic systems such as (i) the phase diagram of the isotropic triangular lattice organic Mott insulators, (ii) quasiparticle excitations and tunneling asymmetry in the weakly doped cuprate superconductors, and (iii) the cyclotron mass of carriers in commensurate spin-density wave and U(1) staggered flux (or d -density wave) normal states of the underdoped cuprates. We compare the estimated cyclotron mass with results from recent quantum oscillation experiments on ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.5 by Doiron-Leyraud [Nature (London) 447, 565 (2007)] which appear to find Fermi pockets in the magnetic field induced normal state. We comment on the relation of this normal ground state to Fermi arcs seen in photoemission experiments above Tc . This slave rotor mean-field theory can be generalized to study inhomogeneous states and strongly interacting models relevant to ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  5. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z-K; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J.-X.; Lee, J.J.; Moore, R.G.; Schmitt, F.T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S.C.; Chu, J.-H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S.-K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z.Q.; Chu, C.W.; Fisher, I.R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z.-X.; Lu, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. These observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors. PMID:26204461

  6. Universal linear-temperature resistivity: possible quantum diffusion transport in strongly correlated superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Yinshang; Xiao, Hong; Mu, Gang; Yang, Yi-Feng

    2017-08-25

    The strongly correlated electron fluids in high temperature cuprate superconductors demonstrate an anomalous linear temperature (T) dependent resistivity behavior, which persists to a wide temperature range without exhibiting saturation. As cooling down, those electron fluids lose the resistivity and condense into the superfluid. However, the origin of the linear-T resistivity behavior and its relationship to the strongly correlated superconductivity remain a mystery. Here we report a universal relation [Formula: see text], which bridges the slope of the linear-T-dependent resistivity (dρ/dT) to the London penetration depth λ L at zero temperature among cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and heavy fermion superconductors CeCoIn5, where μ 0 is vacuum permeability, k B is the Boltzmann constant and ħ is the reduced Planck constant. We extend this scaling relation to different systems and found that it holds for other cuprate, pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors as well, regardless of the significant differences in the strength of electronic correlations, transport directions, and doping levels. Our analysis suggests that the scaling relation in strongly correlated superconductors could be described as a hydrodynamic diffusive transport, with the diffusion coefficient (D) approaching the quantum limit D ~ ħ/m*, where m* is the quasi-particle effective mass.

  7. ARPES Study on the Strongly Correlated Iron Chalcogenides Fe1+ySexTe1-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongkai

    2014-03-01

    The level of electronic correlation has been one of the key questions in understanding the nature of iron-based superconductivity. Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES), we systematically investigated the correlation level in the iron chalcogenide family Fe1+ySexTe1-x. For the parent compound Fe1.02Te, we discovered ``peak-dip-hump'' spectra with heavily renormalized quasiparticles in the low temperature antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, characteristic of coherent polarons seen in other correlated materials with complex electronic and lattice interactions. As the temperature (or Se ratio x) increases and Fe1.02SexTe1-x is in the paramagnetic (PM) phase, we observed dissociation behavior of polarons, suggestive of connection between the weakening electron-phonon coupling and AFM. Further increase of x leads to an incoherent to coherent crossover in the electronic structure, indicating a reduction in the electronic correlation as the superconductivity emerges. Furthermore, the reduction of the electronic correlation in Fe1+ySexTe1-x evolves in an orbital-dependent way, where the dxy orbital is influenced most significantly. At the other end of the phase diagram (FeSe) where the single crystal is not stable, we have studied the MBE-grown thin film which also reveals orbital-dependent strong correlation in the electronic structure. Our findings provide a quantitative comprehension on the correlation level and its evolution on the phase diagram of Fe1+ySexTe1-x. We discuss the physical scenarios leading to strong correlations and its connection to superconductivity.

  8. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  9. Principle of Maximum Entanglement Entropy and Local Physics of Strongly Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lanatà, Nicola; Strand, Hugo U. R.; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    We argue that, because of quantum entanglement, the local physics of strongly correlated materials at zero temperature is described in a very good approximation by a simple generalized Gibbs distribution, which depends on a relatively small number of local quantum thermodynamical potentials. We demonstrate that our statement is exact in certain limits and present numerical calculations of the iron compounds FeSe and FeTe and of the elemental cerium by employing the Gutzwiller approximation that strongly support our theory in general.

  10. Strongly correlated states of a small cold-atom cloud from geometric gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Dagnino, D.; Barberan, N.; Guenter, K. J.; Dalibard, J.; Grass, T.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-11-15

    Using exact diagonalization for a small system of cold bosonic atoms, we analyze the emergence of strongly correlated states in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. This gauge field is generated by a laser beam that couples two internal atomic states, and it is related to Berry's geometrical phase that emerges when an atom follows adiabatically one of the two eigenstates of the atom-laser coupling. Our approach allows us to go beyond the adiabatic approximation, and to characterize the generalized Laughlin wave functions that appear in the strong magnetic-field limit.

  11. Quantum correlations responsible for remote state creation: strong and weak control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, S. I.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We study the quantum correlations between the two remote qubits (sender and receiver) connected by the transmission line (homogeneous spin-1/2 chain) depending on the parameters of the sender's and receiver's initial states (control parameters). We consider two different measures of quantum correlations: the entanglement (a traditional measure) and the informational correlation (based on the parameter exchange between the sender and receiver). We find the domain in the control parameter space yielding (i) zero entanglement between the sender and receiver during the whole evolution period and (ii) non-vanishing informational correlation between the sender and receiver, thus showing that the informational correlation is responsible for the remote state creation. Among the control parameters, there are the strong parameters (which strongly effect the values of studied measures) and the weak ones (whose effect is negligible), therewith the eigenvalues of the initial state are given a privileged role. We also show that the problem of small entanglement (concurrence) in quantum information processing is similar (in certain sense) to the problem of small determinants in linear algebra. A particular model of 40-node spin-1/2 communication line is presented.

  12. Exploring the photometric signatures of magnetospheres around helium-strong stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, R. H. D.

    2008-09-01

    Photometric variations due to magnetically confined material around helium-strong stars are investigated within the framework of the rigidly rotating magnetosphere model. For dipole field topologies, the model is used to explore how the morphology of light curves evolves in response to changes to the observer inclination, magnetic obliquity, rotation rate and optical depth. The general result is that double-minimum light curves arise when the obliquity and/or inclination are close to 90° no light variations are seen in the opposite limit. For intermediate cases, single-minimum light curves occur. These findings are interpreted with the aid of a simple, analytical torus model, paving the way for the development of new photometric-based constraints on the fundamental parameters of helium-strong stars. Illustrative applications to five stars in the class are presented.

  13. Block product density matrix embedding theory for strongly correlated spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Klaas; Wouters, Sebastian; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2017-05-01

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) is a relatively new technique for the calculation of strongly correlated systems. Recently, block product DMET (BPDMET) was introduced for the study of spin systems such as the antiferromagnetic J1-J2 model on the square lattice. In this paper, we extend the variational Ansatz of BPDMET using spin-state optimization, yielding improved results. We apply the same techniques to the Kitaev-Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, comparing the results when using several types of clusters. Energy profiles and correlation functions are investigated. A diagonalization in the tangent space of the variational approach yields information on the excited states and the corresponding spectral functions.

  14. Comparison between theory and experiment for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D.

    2011-06-15

    We compare the theoretical predictions for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas with the latest experimental measurements reported by the ENS group [S. Nascimbene et al., Nature (London) 463, 1057 (2010)] and the Tokyo group [M. Horikoshi et al., Science 327, 442 (2010)]. The theoretical results are obtained using two diagrammatic theories, together with a virial expansion theory combined with a Pade approximation. We find good agreement between theory and experiment. In particular, the virial expansion, using a Pade approximation up to third order, describes the experimental results extremely well down to the superfluid transition temperature, T{sub c{approx}}0.16T{sub F}, where T{sub F} is the Fermi temperature. The comparison in this work complements our previous comparative study on the universal thermodynamics of a strongly correlated but trapped Fermi gas. The comparison also raises interesting issues about the unitary entropy and the applicability of the Pade approximation.

  15. Correlation-based virtual source imaging in strongly scattering random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Josselin; Papanicolaou, George

    2012-07-01

    Array imaging in a strongly scattering medium is limited because coherent signals recorded at the array and coming from a reflector to be imaged are weak and dominated by incoherent signals coming from multiple scattering by the medium. If, however, an auxiliary passive array can be placed between the reflector to be imaged and the scattering medium then the cross correlations of the incoherent signals on this array can also be used to image the reflector. In this paper, we show both in the weakly scattering paraxial regime and in strongly scattering layered media that this cross-correlation approach produces images as if the medium between the sources and the passive array was homogeneous and the auxiliary passive array was an active one made up of both sources and receivers.

  16. Two-dimensional nanoscale correlations in the strong negative thermal expansion material ScF3

    SciTech Connect

    Handunkanda, Sahan Uddika; Said, Ayman H.; Occhialini, Connor A.; Hancock, Jason N.

    2016-12-07

    We present diffuse x-ray scattering data on the strong negative thermal expansion (NTE) material ScF3 and find that two-dimensional nanoscale correlations exist at momentum-space regions associated with possibly rigid rotations of the perovskite octahedra. We address the extent to which rigid octahedral motion describes the dynamical fluctuations behind NTE by generalizing a simple model supporting a single floppy mode that is often used to heuristically describe instances of NTE. We find this model has tendencies toward dynamic inhomogeneities and its application to recent and existing experimental data suggest an intricate link between the nanometer correlation length scale, the energy scale for octahedral tilt fluctuations, and the coefficient of thermal expansion in ScF3. We then investigate the breakdown of the rigid limit and propose a resolution to an outstanding debate concerning the role of molecular rigidity in strong NTE materials.

  17. Many-body Tunneling and Nonequilibrium Dynamics of Doublons in Strongly Correlated Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Hou, WenJie; Wang, YuanDong; Wei, JianHua; Zhu, ZhenGang; Yan, YiJing

    2017-05-30

    Quantum tunneling dominates coherent transport at low temperatures in many systems of great interest. In this work we report a many-body tunneling (MBT), by nonperturbatively solving the Anderson multi-impurity model, and identify it a fundamental tunneling process on top of the well-acknowledged sequential tunneling and cotunneling. We show that the MBT involves the dynamics of doublons in strongly correlated systems. Proportional to the numbers of dynamical doublons, the MBT can dominate the off-resonant transport in the strongly correlated regime. A T (3/2)-dependence of the MBT current on temperature is uncovered and can be identified as a fingerprint of the MBT in experiments. We also prove that the MBT can support the coherent long-range tunneling of doublons, which is well consistent with recent experiments on ultracold atoms. As a fundamental physical process, the MBT is expected to play important roles in general quantum systems.

  18. Itinerant-localized dual character of a strongly correlated superfluid Bose gas in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Y.; Kitaura, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    2006-03-15

    We investigate a strongly correlated Bose gas in an optical lattice. Extending the standard-basis operator method developed by Haley and Erdoes to a boson Hubbard model, we calculate excitation spectra in the superfluid phase, as well as in the Mott insulating phase, at T=0. In the Mott phase, the excitation spectrum has a finite energy gap, reflecting the localized character of atoms. In the superfluid phase, the excitation spectrum is shown to have an itinerant-localized dual structure, where the gapless Bogoliubov mode (which describes the itinerant character of superfluid atoms) and a band with a finite energy gap coexist. We also show that the rf-tunneling current measurement would give useful information about the duality of a strongly correlated superfluid Bose gas near the superfluid-insulator transition.

  19. When strong correlations become weak: Consistent merging of G W and DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, L.; Nilsson, F.; Aryasetiawan, F.; Werner, P.

    2016-11-01

    The cubic perovskite SrVO3 is generally considered to be a prototype strongly correlated metal with a characteristic three-peak structure of the d -electron spectral function, featuring a renormalized quasiparticle band in between pronounced Hubbard sidebands. Here we show that this interpretation, which has been supported by numerous "ab initio" simulations, has to be reconsidered. Using a fully self-consistent G W + extended dynamical mean-field theory calculation we find that the screening from nonlocal Coulomb interactions substantially reduces the effective local Coulomb repulsion, and at the same time leads to strong plasmonic effects. The resulting effective local interactions are too weak to produce pronounced Hubbard bands in the local spectral function, while prominent plasmon satellites appear at energies which agree with those of the experimentally observed sidebands. Our results demonstrate the important role of nonlocal interactions and dynamical screening in determining the effective interaction strength of correlated compounds.

  20. Correlated electron and nuclear dynamics in strong field photoionization of H(2)(+).

    PubMed

    Silva, R E F; Catoire, F; Rivière, P; Bachau, H; Martín, F

    2013-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of H(2)(+) ionization under strong IR femtosecond pulses by using a method designed to extract correlated (2D) photoelectron and proton kinetic energy spectra. The results show two distinct ionization mechanisms-tunnel and multiphoton ionization-in which electrons and nuclei do not share the energy from the field in the same way. Electrons produced in multiphoton ionization share part of their energy with the nuclei, an effect that shows up in the 2D spectra in the form of energy-conservation fringes similar to those observed in weak-field ionization of diatomic molecules. In contrast, tunneling electrons lead to fringes whose position does not depend on the proton kinetic energy. At high intensity, the two processes coexist and the 2D plots show a very rich behavior, suggesting that the correlation between electron and nuclear dynamics in strong field ionization is more complex than one would have anticipated.

  1. Two-dimensional nanoscale correlations in the strong negative thermal expansion material ScF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handunkanda, Sahan U.; Occhialini, Connor A.; Said, Ayman H.; Hancock, Jason N.

    2016-12-01

    We present diffuse x-ray scattering data on the strong negative thermal expansion (NTE) material ScF3 and find that two-dimensional nanoscale correlations exist at momentum-space regions associated with possibly rigid rotations of the perovskite octahedra. We address the extent to which rigid octahedral motion describes the dynamical fluctuations behind NTE by generalizing a simple model supporting a single floppy mode that is often used to heuristically describe instances of NTE. We find this model has tendencies toward dynamic inhomogeneities and its application to recent and existing experimental data suggest an intricate link between the nanometer correlation length scale, the energy scale for octahedral tilt fluctuations, and the coefficient of thermal expansion in ScF3. We then investigate the breakdown of the rigid limit and propose a resolution to an outstanding debate concerning the role of molecular rigidity in strong NTE materials.

  2. Coupled Cluster Valence Bond Method: Efficient Computer Implementation and Application to Multiple Bond Dissociations and Strong Correlations in the Acenes.

    PubMed

    Small, David W; Lawler, Keith V; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-05-13

    We describe an efficient implementation of the coupled cluster valence bond (CCVB) model. CCVB captures a certain essential part of the description of molecules with strong correlations (SC), which allows it to achieve correct energy profiles when covalent bonds are broken, while maintaining proper spin symmetry and size extensivity. To illustrate treatment of SC in bond breaking, we examine the symmetric dissociation of the sulfur allotropes S6 and S8 into triplet S atoms. To show applicability to larger systems and to explore whether CCVB can capture aspects of SC that arise in extended π systems, we report results for a series of acenes up to 12 fused benzene rings, with active spaces of up to 228 correlated electrons. The lowest-energy CCVB solutions found for two of the largest acenes show signatures consistent with multi-electron SC and partial delocalization.

  3. Transitions between strongly correlated and random steady-states for catalytic CO-oxidation on surfaces at high-pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da -Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2015-04-02

    We explore simple lattice-gas reaction models for CO-oxidation on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of surface adsorption sites. The models are motivated by studies of CO-oxidation on RuO2(110) at high-pressures. Although adspecies interactions are neglected, the effective absence of adspecies diffusion results in kinetically-induced spatial correlations. A transition occurs from a random mainly CO-populated steady-state at high CO-partial pressure pCO, to a strongly-correlated near-O-covered steady-state for low pCO as noted. In addition, we identify a second transition to a random near-O-covered steady-state at very low pCO.

  4. Transitions between strongly correlated and random steady-states for catalytic CO-oxidation on surfaces at high-pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Da -Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2015-04-02

    We explore simple lattice-gas reaction models for CO-oxidation on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of surface adsorption sites. The models are motivated by studies of CO-oxidation on RuO2(110) at high-pressures. Although adspecies interactions are neglected, the effective absence of adspecies diffusion results in kinetically-induced spatial correlations. A transition occurs from a random mainly CO-populated steady-state at high CO-partial pressure pCO, to a strongly-correlated near-O-covered steady-state for low pCO as noted. In addition, we identify a second transition to a random near-O-covered steady-state at very low pCO.

  5. SISGR: Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    2014-05-31

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating the order manifest in condensed matter materials. Up until now, however, no attempts have been made to use modern techniques of ultracold atomic physics to directly explore properties of strongly correlated or topologically protected materials. Our current program is focused on introducing a novel magnetic field microscopy technique into the toolbox of imaging probes. Our prior DOE ESPM program funded the development of a novel instrument using a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a scanning probe capable of measuring tiny magnetic (and electric) DC and AC fields above materials. We successfully built the world's first “scanning cryogenic atom chip microscope” [1], and we now are in the process of characterizing its performance before using the instrument to take the first wide-area images of transport flow within unconventional superconductors, pnictides and oxide interfaces (LAO/STO), topological insulators, and colossal magnetoresistive manganites. We will do so at temperatures outside the capability of scanning SQUIDs, with ~10x better resolution and without 1/f-noise. A notable goal will be to measure the surface-to-bulk conductivity ratio in topological insulators in a relatively model-independent fashion [2]. We have completed the construction of this magnetic microscope, shown in Figure 1. The instrument uses atom chips—substrates supporting micron-sized current-carrying wires that create magnetic microtraps near surfaces for ultracold thermal gases and BECs—to enable single-shot and raster-scanned large-field-of-view detection of magnetic fields. The fields emanating from electronic transport may be detected at the 10-7 flux quantum (Φ0) level and below (see Fig. 2); that is, few to sub-micron resolution of sub-nanotesla fields over single-shot, millimeter-long detection lengths. By harnessing the extreme

  6. Compositional phase stability of strongly correlated electron materials within DFT+U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, Eric B.; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the compositional phase stability of strongly correlated electron materials is an outstanding challenge in condensed matter physics. In this work, we employ the density functional theory plus U (DFT +U ) formalism to address the effects of local correlations due to transition metal d electrons on compositional phase stability in the prototype phase stable and separating materials LixCoO2 and olivine LixFePO4 , respectively. We introduce a spectral decomposition of the DFT +U total energy, revealing the distinct roles of the filling and ordering of the d orbital correlated subspace. The on-site interaction U drives both of these very different materials systems towards phase separation, stemming from enhanced ordering of the d orbital occupancies in the x =0 and x =1 species, whereas changes in the overall filling of the d shell contribute negligibly. We show that DFT +U formation energies are qualitatively consistent with experiments for phase stable LixCoO2 , phase separating LixFePO4 , and phase stable LixCoPO4 . However, we find that charge ordering plays a critical role in the energetics at intermediate x , strongly dampening the tendency for the Hubbard U to drive phase separation. Most relevantly, the phase stability of Li1 /2CoO2 within DFT +U is qualitatively incorrect without allowing charge ordering, which is problematic given that neither charge ordering nor the band gap that it induces are observed in experiment. We demonstrate that charge ordering arises from the correlated subspace interaction energy as opposed to the double counting. Additionally, we predict the Li order-disorder transition temperature for Li1 /2CoO2 , demonstrating that the unphysical charge ordering within DFT +U renders the method problematic, often producing unrealistically large results. Our findings motivate the need for other advanced techniques, such as DFT plus dynamical mean-field theory, for total energies in strongly correlated materials.

  7. Strongly correlated classical plasmas under external forcing and dissipation - an example using Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charan, Harish; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2016-10-01

    Systems with excess of average potential energy per particle than its kinetic energy develop strong correlations. It is well known that such systems are not amenable to standard procedures of BBGKY hierarchy. This results in failure of both kinetic and fluid models. Phenomenology is the normal way out. If such a strongly correlated system is further subjected to strong drive and/or dissipation, “near first principles” computational methods such as Molecular Dynamics become necessary. Formation of Rayleigh-Bénnard convection cells (RBCC), where a liquid is under the action of external gravity and external temperature gradient, is one such phenomena. We report here, the formation of RBCC in 2-dimensional strongly coupled Yukawa liquids, characterized by coupling strength Γ (ratio of average potential energy to kinetic energy per particle) and screening parameter κ (ratio of average inter particle distance to Debye length). We observe the existence of a critical external temperature difference, beyond which RBCC are seen to emerge. Beyond this critical external temperature difference, the strength of the maximum convective flow velocity is shown to exhibit a new, linear relationship with external temperature difference and with a slope independent of (Γ, κ). The time taken for the transients to settle down (ts ) is found to be 10,000 to 20,000 ωpd -1, where ωpd is dust plasma frequency. At very high values of Γ and/or low values of κ, RBCC are seen to get suppressed.

  8. Oxide Thermoelectrics: The Role of Crystal Structure on Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Taylor David

    This dissertation reports on the synthesis, structural and thermal characterization and electrical and thermal transport properties of a variety of strongly correlated spinels. General structure property relationships for electrical and thermal transport are discussed. However, the relationship between thermopower and features of the crystal structure such as spin, crystal field, anti-site disorder, and structural distortions are explored in depth. The experimental findings are reported in the context of improving existing oxide thermoelectric materials, screening for new materials or using thermopower as a unique characterization tool to determine the cation distribution in spinels. The need for improved n-type oxide thermoelectric materials has led researchers to consider mixed valence (+3/+4) manganese oxides. Contrary to previous findings we report herein that the LiMn2O4 compound reaches the relatively large n-type thermopower of -73 microV/K which is three times larger than the value observed in other manganese oxides, -25 microV/K. The cause of this increase in thermopower is shown to be the absence of a Jahn-Teller distortion on the Mn3+ ions in LiMn2 O4. By avoiding this structural distortion the orbital degeneracy is doubled and the Koshibae et al.'s modified Heikes formula predicts a thermopower of -79 muV/K in good agreement with the experiment. Altering the Mn 3+/4+ ratio via aliovalent doping did not affect the thermopower and is a second evidence of universal charge transport first reported by Kobayashi et al. The role of anti-site disorder was further examined in FexMn 1-xNiCrO4 x=0, ½, ¾, 1 spinels but the effect on thermopower was inconclusive due to the presence of impurity phases. Next, the thermopower as a function of temperature in Co3O 4 was investigated as a means whereby the Wu and Mason's 30 year old model for using thermopower to calculate cation distribution in spinels could be revisited. We report evidence that Wu and Mason's original

  9. Spin-Projected Matrix Product States: Versatile Tool for Strongly Correlated Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-06-13

    are simple to implement with MPS. To illustrate the versatility of SP-MPS, we formulate algorithms for the optimization of ground and excited states, develop perturbation theory based on SP-MPS, and describe how to evaluate spin-independent and spin-dependent properties such as the reduced density matrices. We demonstrate the numerical performance of SP-MPS with applications to several models typical of strong correlation, including the Hubbard model, and [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] model complexes.

  10. Strong correlations and the search for high-Tc superconductivity in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, J. M.; Calderón, M. J.; Liu, J.; Muñoz, M. C.; Bascones, E.

    2017-02-01

    Undoped iron superconductors accommodate n =6 electrons in five d orbitals. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that the strength of correlations increases with hole doping, as the electronic filling approaches half filling with n =5 electrons. This evidence delineates a scenario in which the parent compound of iron superconductors is the half-filled system, in analogy to cuprate superconductors. In cuprates the superconductivity can be induced upon electron or hole doping. In this work we propose to search for high-Tc superconductivity and strong correlations in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides with n <5 electrons. By means of ab initio slave-spin and multiorbital random-phase-approximation calculations we analyze the strength of the correlations and the superconducting and magnetic instabilities in these systems with the main focus on LaCrAsO. We find that electron-doped LaCrAsO is a strongly correlated system with competing magnetic interactions, with (π ,π ) antiferromagnetism and nodal d -wave pairing being the most plausible magnetic and superconducting instabilities, respectively.

  11. Exact results in a slave boson saddle point approach for a strongly correlated electron model

    SciTech Connect

    Fresard, Raymond; Kopp, Thilo

    2008-08-15

    We revisit the Kotliar-Ruckenstein (KR) slave boson saddle point evaluation for a two-site correlated electron model. As the model can be solved analytically, it is possible to compare the KR saddle point results with the exact many-particle levels. The considered two-site cluster mimics an infinite-U single-impurity Anderson model with a nearest-neighbor Coulomb interaction: one site is strongly correlated with an infinite local Coulomb repulsion, which hybridizes with the second site, on which the local Coulomb repulsion vanishes. Making use of the flexibility of the representation, we introduce appropriate weight factors in the KR saddle point scheme. Ground-state and all excitation levels agree with the exact diagonalization results. Thermodynamics and correlation functions may be recovered in a suitably renormalized saddle point evaluation.

  12. Patient-specific Immune States before Surgery are Strong Correlates of Surgical Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Gaudillière, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Aghaeepour, Nima; Tingle, Martha; Nolan, Garry P.; Angst, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recovery after surgery is highly variable. Risk-stratifying patients based on their predicted recovery profile will afford individualized perioperative management strategies. Recently, application of mass cytometry in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty revealed strong immune correlates of surgical recovery in blood samples collected shortly after surgery. However, the ability to interrogate a patient’s immune state before surgery and predict recovery is highly desirable in perioperative medicine. Methods To evaluate a patient’s pre-surgical immune state, cell-type specific intracellular signaling responses to ex-vivo ligands (LPS, IL-6, IL-10, IL-2/GM-CSF) were quantified by mass cytometry in pre-surgical blood samples. Selected ligands modulate signaling processes perturbed by surgery. Twenty-three cell surface and 11 intracellular markers were used for the phenotypic and functional characterization of major immune cell subsets. Evoked immune responses were regressed against patient-centered outcomes contributing to protracted recovery including functional impairment, postoperative pain, and fatigue. Results Evoked signaling responses varied significantly and defined patient-specific pre-surgical immune states. Eighteen signaling responses correlated significantly with surgical recovery parameters (|R|=0.37–0.70; FDR<0.01). Signaling responses downstream of the TLR4 receptor in CD14+ monocytes were particularly strong correlates, accounting for 50% of observed variance. Pre-surgical immune correlates mirrored correlates previously described in post-surgical samples. Conclusion Convergent findings in pre- and post-surgical analyses provide validation of reported immune correlates and suggest a critical role of the TLR4 signaling pathway in monocytes for the clinical recovery process. The comprehensive assessment of patients’ preoperative immune state is promising for predicting important recovery parameters and may lead to clinical tests using

  13. Correlation exploration of metabolic and genomic diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Keiichi; Furuta, Taku; Ebana, Kaworu; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Jun

    2009-12-01

    of 3 adjacent markers along each chromosome), generated clear correlations (r(s) > 0.4, p < 0.001) at 34 RFLP markers. This combinatorial approach will be valuable for exploring the correlative relationships between metabolic and genomic diversity. It will facilitate the elucidation of complex regulatory networks and those of evolutionary significance in plant metabolic systems.

  14. Effects of strong and electromagnetic correlations on neutrino interactions in dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.; Prakash, M.; Lattimer, J.M.; Reddy, S.; Pons, J.A.

    1999-05-01

    An extensive study of the effects of correlations on both charged and neutral current weak interaction rates in dense matter is performed. Both strong and electromagnetic correlations are considered. The propagation of particle-hole interactions in the medium plays an important role in determining the neutrino mean free paths. The effects due to Pauli blocking and density, spin, and isospin correlations in the medium significantly reduce the neutrino cross sections. As a result of the lack of experimental information at high density, these correlations are necessarily model dependent. For example, spin correlations in nonrelativistic models are found to lead to larger suppressions of neutrino cross sections compared to those of relativistic models. This is due to the tendency of the nonrelativistic models to develop spin instabilities. Notwithstanding the above caveats, and the differences between nonrelativistic and relativistic approaches such as the spin- and isospin-dependent interactions and the nucleon effective masses, suppressions of order 2{endash}3, relative to the case in which correlations are ignored, are obtained. Neutrino interactions in dense matter are especially important for supernova and early neutron star evolution calculations. The effects of correlations for protoneutron star evolution are calculated. Large effects on the internal thermodynamic properties of protoneutron stars, such as the temperature, are found. These translate into significant early enhancements in the emitted neutrino energies and fluxes, especially after a few seconds. At late times, beyond about 10 s, the emitted neutrino fluxes decrease more rapidly compared to simulations without the effects of correlations, due to the more rapid onset of neutrino transparency in the protoneutron star. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. A Statistical Correlation Between Low L-shell Electrons Measured by NOAA Satellites and Strong Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidani, C.

    2015-12-01

    More than 11 years of the Medium Energy Protons Electrons Detector data from the NOAA polar orbiting satellites were analyzed. Significant electron counting rate fluctuations were evidenced during geomagnetic quiet periods by using a set of adiabatic coordinates. Electron counting rates were compared to earthquakes by defining a seismic event L-shell obtained radially projecting the epicenter geographical positions to a given altitude. Counting rate fluctuations were grouped in every satellite semi-orbit together with strong seismic events and these were chosen with the L-shell coordinates close to each other. Electron data from July 1998 to December 2011 were compared for nearly 1,800 earthquakes with magnitudes larger than or equal to 6, occurring worldwide. When considering 30 - 100 keV energy channels by the vertical NOAA telescopes and earthquake epicenter projections at altitudes greater that 1,300 km, a 4 sigma correlation appeared where time of particle precipitations Tpp occurred 2 - 3 hour prior time of large seismic events Teq. This was in physical agreement with different correlation times obtained from past studies that considered particles with greater energies. The correlation suggested a 4-8 hour advance in preparedness of strong earthquakes influencing the ionosphere. Considering this strong correlation between earthquakes and electron rate fluctuations, and the hypothesis that such fluctuations originated with magnetic disturbances generated underground, a small scale experiment with low cost at ground level is advisable. Plans exists to perform one or more unconventional experiments around an earthquake affected area by private investor in Italy.

  16. Selective Mottness as a key to iron superconductors: weak and strong correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medici, Luca

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the strength of electronic correlations in the normal phase of Fe-superconductors and trace a comparison with cuprates. The phase diagram of the high-Tc cuprates is dominated by the Mott insulating phase of the parent compounds. Approaching it from large doping, a standard Fermi-liquid is seen to gradually turn into a bad non-Fermi liquid metal in which quasiparticles have heavily differentiated coherence depending on momentum, a process which culminates in the pseudogap regime, in which the antinodal region in momentum space acquires a gap before the material reaches a fully gapped Mott state. I will show that experiments for electron- and hole-doped BaFe2As2 support an analogous scenario. The doping evolution is dominated by the influence of a Mott insulator that would be realized for half-filled conduction bands, while the stoichiometric compound does not play a special role. Weakly and strongly correlated conduction electrons coexist in much of the phase diagram, a differentiation that increases with hole-doping. We identify the reason for this ``selective Mottness'' in a simple emergent mechanism, an ``orbital decoupling,'' triggered by the strong Hund's coupling. When this mechanism is active charge excitations in the different orbitals are decoupled and each orbital behaves as a single band Hubbard model, where the correlation degree almost only depends on how doped is each orbital from half-filling. This scenario reconciles contrasting evidences on the electronic correlation strength, implies a strong asymmetry between hole- and electron-doping and establishes a deep connection with the cuprates. L. de' Medici, G. Giovannetti and M. Capone, ArXiv:1212.3966 Work supported by CNRS - ESPCI ParisTech, France

  17. Recent progress on correlated electron systems with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, Robert; Kin-Ho Lee, Eric; Yang, Bohm-Jung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of novel quantum ground states in correlated electron systems with strong spin-orbit coupling has been a recent subject of intensive studies. While it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling can provide non-trivial band topology in weakly interacting electron systems, as in topological insulators and semi-metals, the role of electron-electron interaction in strongly spin-orbit coupled systems has not been fully understood. The availability of new materials with significant electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling now makes such investigations possible. Many of these materials contain 5d or 4d transition metal elements; the prominent examples are iridium oxides or iridates. In this review, we succinctly discuss recent theoretical and experimental progress on this subject. After providing a brief overview, we focus on pyrochlore iridates and three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. In pyrochlore iridates, we discuss the quantum criticality of the bulk and surface states, and the relevance of the surface/boundary states in a number of topological and magnetic ground states, both in the bulk and thin film configurations. Experimental signatures of these boundary and bulk states are discussed. Domain wall formation and strongly-direction-dependent magneto-transport are also discussed. In regard to the three-dimensional honeycomb iridates, we consider possible quantum spin liquid phases and unusual magnetic orders in theoretical models with strongly bond-dependent interactions. These theoretical ideas and results are discussed in light of recent resonant x-ray scattering experiments on three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. We also contrast these results with the situation in two-dimensional honeycomb iridates. We conclude with the outlook on other related systems.

  18. Critical Exponents of Strongly Correlated Fermion Systems from Diagrammatic Multi-Scale Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, Andrey; Kirchner, Stefan; Gull, Emanuel

    2014-03-01

    The dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) has become the standard tool in describing strongly correlated electron materials. While it captures the quantum dynamics of local fields, it neglects spatial correlations. To describe e.g. anti-ferromagnetism, unconventional superconductivity or frustration a proper treatment of non-local correlations is necessary. Diagrammatic multi-scale approaches offer an elegant option to accomplish this: the difficult correlated part of the system is solved using a non-perturbative many-body method, whereas 'easier', 'weakly correlated' parts of the problem are tackled using a secondary perturbative scheme. Here we employ such a method, the dual fermion approach, to problems of charge ordering in Falicov-Kimball model by constructing a systematic diagrammatic extension on top of DMFT. Near the critical point of the Falicov-Kimball model we study the interplay between charge excitations and long-range fluctuations. We show that such multi-scale approach is indeed capable of capturing the non mean-field nature of the critical point of the lattice model and correctly describes the transition to mean-field like behavior as the number of spatial dimensions increases.

  19. Methodological study of computational approaches to address the problem of strong correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juho

    The main focus of this thesis is the detailed investigation of computational methods to tackle strongly correlated materials in which a rich variety of exotic phenomena are found. A many-body problem with sizable electronic correlations can no longer be explained by independent-particle approximations such as density functional theory (DFT) or tight-binding approaches. The influence of an electron to the others is too strong for each electron to be treated as an independent quasiparticle and consequently those standard band-structure methods fail even at a qualitative level. One of the most powerful approaches for strong correlations is the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), which has enlightened the understanding of the Mott transition based on the Hubbard model. For realistic applications, the dynamical mean-field theory is combined with various independent-particles approaches. The most widely used one is the DMFT combined with the DFT in the local density approximation (LDA), so-called LDA+DMFT. In this approach, the electrons in the weakly correlated orbitals are calculated by LDA while others in the strongly correlated orbitals are treated by DMFT. Recently, the method combining DMFT with Hedin's GW approximation was also developed, in which the momentum-dependent self-energy is also added. In this thesis, we discuss the application of those methodologies based on DMFT. First, we apply the dynamical mean-field theory to solve the 3-dimensional Hubbard model in Chap. 3. In this application, we model the interface between the thermodynamically coexisting metal and Mott insulator. We show how to model the required slab geometry and extract the electronic spectra. We construct an effective Landau free energy and compute the variation of its parameters across the phase diagram. Finally, using a linear mixture of the density and double-occupancy, we identify a natural Ising order parameter which unifies the treatment of the bandwidth and filling controlled Mott

  20. Quasiparticles of strongly correlated Fermi liquids at high temperatures and in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaginyan, V. R.

    2011-08-01

    Strongly correlated Fermi systems are among the most intriguing, best experimentally studied and fundamental systems in physics. There is, however, lack of theoretical understanding in this field of physics. The ideas based on the concepts like Kondo lattice and involving quantum and thermal fluctuations at a quantum critical point have been used to explain the unusual physics. Alas, being suggested to describe one property, these approaches fail to explain the others. This means a real crisis in theory suggesting that there is a hidden fundamental law of nature. It turns out that the hidden fundamental law is well forgotten old one directly related to the Landau-Migdal quasiparticles, while the basic properties and the scaling behavior of the strongly correlated systems can be described within the framework of the fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT). The phase transition comprises the extended quasiparticle paradigm that allows us to explain the non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behavior observed in these systems. In contrast to the Landau paradigm stating that the quasiparticle effective mass is a constant, the effective mass of new quasiparticles strongly depends on temperature, magnetic field, pressure, and other parameters. Our observations are in good agreement with experimental facts and show that FCQPT is responsible for the observed NFL behavior and quasiparticles survive both high temperatures and high magnetic fields.

  1. Quasiparticles of strongly correlated Fermi liquids at high temperatures and in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shaginyan, V. R.

    2011-08-15

    Strongly correlated Fermi systems are among the most intriguing, best experimentally studied and fundamental systems in physics. There is, however, lack of theoretical understanding in this field of physics. The ideas based on the concepts like Kondo lattice and involving quantum and thermal fluctuations at a quantum critical point have been used to explain the unusual physics. Alas, being suggested to describe one property, these approaches fail to explain the others. This means a real crisis in theory suggesting that there is a hidden fundamental law of nature. It turns out that the hidden fundamental law is well forgotten old one directly related to the Landau-Migdal quasiparticles, while the basic properties and the scaling behavior of the strongly correlated systems can be described within the framework of the fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT). The phase transition comprises the extended quasiparticle paradigm that allows us to explain the non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behavior observed in these systems. In contrast to the Landau paradigm stating that the quasiparticle effective mass is a constant, the effective mass of new quasiparticles strongly depends on temperature, magnetic field, pressure, and other parameters. Our observations are in good agreement with experimental facts and show that FCQPT is responsible for the observed NFL behavior and quasiparticles survive both high temperatures and high magnetic fields.

  2. Integrability of the hyperbolic reduced Maxwell-Bloch equations for strongly correlated Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaudon, Alexis; Gibbon, John D.

    2017-07-01

    We derive and study the hyperbolic reduced Maxwell-Bloch (HRMB) equations, a simplified model for the dynamics of strongly correlated Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), and in particular for the interaction between the BEC atoms and its evaporated atoms under the strong interactions. This equation is one among four, which are proven to be integrable via the existence of a Lax pair, and thus the method of inverse scattering transform. Another equation is the reduced Maxwell-Bloch equation of quantum optics and the two others do not have physical applications yet. By studying the linear stability of the constant solutions of these four equations we observe various regimes, from stable, to modulational unstable, and unstable at all frequencies. The finite-dimensional reduction of the RMB equations is also used to give more insight into the constant solutions of these equations. From this study, we find that the HRMB equation arising from strongly correlated BECs is stable under the particular condition that the transition rate of evaporation is not too large compared to the number of evaporated atoms. We then derive explicit soliton solutions of the RMB equations and use numerical simulations to show collisions of solitons and kink solitons.

  3. Unphysical and physical solutions in many-body theories: from weak to strong correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Adrian; Romaniello, Pina; Rigamonti, Santiago; Reining, Lucia; Berger, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Many-body theory is largely based on self-consistent equations that are constructed in terms of the physical quantity of interest itself, for example the density. Therefore, the calculation of important properties such as total energies or photoemission spectra requires the solution of nonlinear equations that have unphysical and physical solutions. In this work we show in which circumstances one runs into an unphysical solution, and we indicate how one can overcome this problem. Moreover, we solve the puzzle of when and why the interacting Green’s function does not unambiguously determine the underlying system, given in terms of its potential, or non-interacting Green’s function. Our results are general since they originate from the fundamental structure of the equations. The absorption spectrum of lithium fluoride is shown as one illustration, and observations in the literature for some widely used models are explained by our approach. Our findings apply to both the weak and strong-correlation regimes. For the strong-correlation regime we show that one cannot use the expressions that are obtained from standard perturbation theory, and we suggest a different approach that is exact in the limit of strong interaction.

  4. Normalized Movement Quality Measures for Therapeutic Robots Strongly Correlate With Clinical Motor Impairment Measures

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Ozkan; O’Malley, Marcia K.; Boake, Corwin; Levin, Harvey S.; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Reistetter, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the correlations between four clinical measures (Fugl–Meyer upper extremity scale, Motor Activity Log, Action Research Arm Test, and Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test) and four robotic measures (smoothness of movement, trajectory error, average number of target hits per minute, and mean tangential speed), used to assess motor recovery. Data were gathered as part of a hybrid robotic and traditional upper extremity rehabilitation program for nine stroke patients. Smoothness of movement and trajectory error, temporally and spatially normalized measures of movement quality defined for point-to-point movements, were found to have significant moderate to strong correlations with all four of the clinical measures. The strong correlations suggest that smoothness of movement and trajectory error may be used to compare outcomes of different rehabilitation protocols and devices effectively, provide improved resolution for tracking patient progress compared to only pre-and post-treatment measurements, enable accurate adaptation of therapy based on patient progress, and deliver immediate and useful feedback to the patient and therapist. PMID:20388607

  5. Normalized movement quality measures for therapeutic robots strongly correlate with clinical motor impairment measures.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ozkan; O'Malley, Marcia K; Boake, Corwin; Levin, Harvey S; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Reistetter, Timothy A

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we analyze the correlations between four clinical measures (Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale, Motor Activity Log, Action Research Arm Test, and Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test) and four robotic measures (smoothness of movement, trajectory error, average number of target hits per minute, and mean tangential speed), used to assess motor recovery. Data were gathered as part of a hybrid robotic and traditional upper extremity rehabilitation program for nine stroke patients. Smoothness of movement and trajectory error, temporally and spatially normalized measures of movement quality defined for point-to-point movements, were found to have significant moderate to strong correlations with all four of the clinical measures. The strong correlations suggest that smoothness of movement and trajectory error may be used to compare outcomes of different rehabilitation protocols and devices effectively, provide improved resolution for tracking patient progress compared to only pre- and post-treatment measurements, enable accurate adaptation of therapy based on patient progress, and deliver immediate and useful feedback to the patient and therapist.

  6. The quest for stiff, strong and tough hybrid materials: an exhaustive exploration

    PubMed Central

    Barthelat, F.; Mirkhalaf, M.

    2013-01-01

    How to arrange soft materials with strong but brittle reinforcements to achieve attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness is an ongoing and fascinating question in engineering and biological materials science. Recent advances in topology optimization and bioinspiration have brought interesting answers to this question, but they provide only small windows into the vast design space associated with this problem. Here, we take a more global approach in which we assess the mechanical performance of thousands of possible microstructures. This exhaustive exploration gives a global picture of structure–property relationships and guarantees that global optima can be found. Landscapes of optimum solutions for different combinations of desired properties can also be created, revealing the robustness of each of the solutions. Interestingly, while some of the major hybrid designs used in engineering are absent from the set of solutions, the microstructures emerging from this process are reminiscent of materials, such as bone, nacre or spider silk. PMID:24068176

  7. Strong Correlation among Three Biodosimetry Techniques Following Exposures to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-Mo; Yun, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hanna; Kim, Cha Soon

    2016-01-01

    Three in vitro dose calibration curves for biodosimetry such as dicentric chromosome assay, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay for translocation, and micronuclei (MNs) in binucleated cell assay were established after exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocyte samples obtained from healthy donors were irradiated with 60Co source at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min to doses of 0.1–6 Gy. The results from three in vitro dose calibration curves for biodosimetry were analyzed to understand the relationship among biodosimetry assay techniques. Our comparison demonstrates that there is a very strong positive correlation among the dicentric assay, FISH, and MNs analysis, and these three biodosimetry assays strongly support the in vitro dose reconstruction and the emergency preparedness of public or occupational radiation overexposure. PMID:28217287

  8. Propagation of a Laguerre-Gaussian correlated Schell-model beam in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yunli; Chen, Zhaoxi; He, Yingji

    2017-04-01

    Analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density function and the second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function of a Laguerre-Gaussian correlated Schell-model (LGCSM) beam propagating in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media are derived. The propagation properties, such as beam irradiance, beam width, the spectral degree of coherence and the propagation factor of a LGCSM beam inside the media are investigated in detail. The effect of the beam parameters and the input power on the evolution properties of a LGCSM is illustrated numerically. It is found that the beam width varies periodically or keeps invariant for a certain proper input power. And both the beam irradiance and the spectral degree of coherence of the LGCSM beam change periodically with the propagation distance for the arbitrary input power which however has no influence on the propagation factor. The coherent length and the mode order mainly affect the evolution speed of the LGCSM beam in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  9. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  10. Density of hole-doped states in strongly correlated electron systems of copper oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, S.G. )

    1994-04-01

    A generalized tight-binding method to calculate quasiparticle band structure and density of states in strongly correlated systems is presented. The band structures of undoped and weakly hole-doped CuO[sub 2] layer are calculated. The insulator gap has a charge transfer nature with a minor contribution from a Cu-O Coulomb interaction. Doping results in the appearance of an in-gap state with a simultaneous decrease of the density of states at the band edges in agreement with small cluster results and experimental data.

  11. Effect of correlations on heat transport in a magnetized strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, T.; Bonitz, M.; Donkó, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In a classical ideal plasma, a magnetic field is known to reduce the heat conductivity perpendicular to the field, whereas it does not alter the one along the field. Here we show that, in strongly correlated plasmas that are observed at high pressure and/or low temperature, a magnetic field reduces the perpendicular heat transport much less and even enhances the parallel transport. These surprising observations are explained by the competition of kinetic, potential, and collisional contributions to the heat conductivity. Our results are based on first-principle molecular dynamics simulations of a one-component plasma.

  12. Few-particle systems: An analysis of some strongly correlated states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberán, N.; Taron, J.

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of the quantum Hall response of a small system of interacting ultracold bosonic atoms through the variation of its Hall resistivity against the applied gauge magnetic field provides a powerful method to unmask its strongly correlated states in a quite exhaustive way. Within a fixed range of values of the magnetic field in the lowest Landau-level regime, where the resistivity displays two successive plateaux, we identify the implied states as the Pfaffian and the state with filling factor ν =2 /3 in the thermodynamic limit. We fix the conditions to have good observability.

  13. Feshbach Prize: New Phenomena and New Physics from Strongly-Correlated Quantum Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Strongly correlated quantum matter is ubiquitous in physics from cold atoms to nuclei to the cold dense matter found in neutron stars. Experiments from table-top to the extremely large scale experiments including FRIB and LIGO will help determine the properties of matter across an incredible scale of distances and energies. Questions to be addressed include the existence of exotic states of matter in cold atoms and nuclei, the response of this correlated matter to external probes, and the behavior of matter in extreme astrophysical environments. A more complete understanding is required, both to understand these diverse phenomena and to employ this understanding to probe for new underlying physics in experiments including neutrinoless double beta decay and accelerator neutrino experiments. I will summarize some aspects of our present understanding and highlight several important prospects for the future.

  14. Understanding Strongly Correlated Materials thru Theory Algorithms and High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotliar, Gabriel

    A long standing challenge in condensed matter physics is the prediction of physical properties of materials starting from first principles. In the past two decades, substantial advances have taken place in this area. The combination of modern implementations of electronic structure methods in conjunction with Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT), in combination with advanced impurity solvers, modern computer codes and massively parallel computers, are giving new system specific insights into the properties of strongly correlated electron systems enable the calculations of experimentally measurable correlation functions. The predictions of this ''theoretical spectroscopy'' can be directly compared with experimental results. In this talk I will briefly outline the state of the art of the methodology, and illustrate it with an example the origin of the solid state anomalies of elemental Plutonium.

  15. Application of strong zerotrees to compression of correlated MRI image sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloveyko, Olexandr M.; Musatenko, Yurij S.; Kurashov, Vitalij N.; Dubikovskiy, Vladislav A.

    2001-08-01

    It is known that gainful interframe compression of magnetic resonance(MR) image set is quite difficult problem. Only few authors reported gain in performance of compressors like that comparing to separate compression of every MR image from the set (intraframe compression). Known reasons of such a situation are significant noise in MR images and presence of only low frequency correlations in images of the set. Recently we suggested new method of correlated image set compression based on Karhunen-Loeve(KL) transform and special EZW compression scheme with strong zerotrees(KLSEZW). KLSEZW algorithm showed good results in compression of video sequences with low and middle motion even without motion compensation. The paper presents successful application of the basic method and its modification to interframe MR image compression problem.

  16. Theoretical development and first-principles analysis of strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen

    A variety of quantum many-body methods have been developed for studying the strongly correlated electron systems. We have also proposed a computationally efficient and accurate approach, named the correlation matrix renormalization (CMR) method to address the challenges. The theoretic development and benchmark tests of the CMR method are included in this thesis. Meanwhile, ground state total energy is the most important property of electronic calculations. We also investigated an alternative approach to calculate the total energy, and extended this method for magnetic anisotropy energy of ferromagnetic materials. In addition, another theoretical tool, dynamical mean-field theory on top of the density functional theory, has also been used in electronic structure calculations for an Iridium oxide to study the phase transition, which results from an interplay of the d electrons' internal degrees of freedom.

  17. Strong correlation between early stage atherosclerosis and electromechanical coupling of aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Yan, F.; Niu, L. L.; Chen, Q. N.; Zheng, H. R.; Li, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases that are responsible for many deaths in the world, and the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is highly desirable. The existing imaging methods, however, are not capable of detecting the early stage of atherosclerosis development due to their limited spatial resolution. Using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), we show that the piezoelectric response of an aortic wall increases as atherosclerosis advances, while the stiffness of the aorta shows a less evident correlation with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we show that there is strong correlation between the coercive electric field necessary to switch the polarity of the artery and the development of atherosclerosis. Thus by measuring the electromechanical coupling of the aortic wall, it is possible to probe atherosclerosis at the early stage of its development, not only improving the spatial resolution by orders of magnitude, but also providing comprehensive quantitative information on the biomechanical properties of the artery.

  18. Electronic structure of strongly correlated materials: from one-particle to many-body theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, F.; Aryasetiawan, F.

    2017-03-01

    One of the great challenges of modern condensed matter theory is to develop reliable and practical methods for describing the electronic structure of strongly correlated materials fully from first principles. It has been known for a long time that the widely used Kohn–Sham density functional theory within the local density approximation (LDA) often fails for these systems. This paper describes the theoretical development of including electron correlations beyond the LDA with emphasis on ab initio methods, starting from the highly successful LDA+U and the many-body Green’s function-based GW method to the state-of-the-art combination of dynamical mean-field theory and GW. Apart from reviewing the development so far we also present some previously unpublished results.

  19. Metallic quantum well states in artificial structures of strongly correlated oxide.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, K; Horiba, K; Kumigashira, H; Yoshida, T; Fujimori, A; Oshima, M

    2011-07-15

    The quantum confinement of strongly correlated electrons in artificial structures provides a platform for studying the behavior of correlated Fermi-liquid states in reduced dimensions. We report the creation and control of two-dimensional electron-liquid states in ultrathin films of SrVO(3) grown on Nb:SrTiO(3) substrates, which are artificial oxide structures that can be varied in thickness by single monolayers. Angle-resolved photoemission from the SrVO(3)/Nb:SrTiO(3) samples shows metallic quantum well states that are adequately described by the well-known phase-shift quantization rule. The observed quantum well states in SrVO(3) ultrathin films exhibit distinctive features--such as orbital-selective quantization originating from the anisotropic orbital character of the V 3d states and unusual band renormalization of the subbands near the Fermi level--that reflect complex interactions in the quantum well.

  20. Measuring time-dependent Greens Functions of strongly correlated gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwöck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in single-site addressing in optical-lattice confined strongly correlated ultracold gases promise to deliver entirely new capabilities for these systems to serve as quantum simulators. We show how these advances may be employed to design in-situ measurements of both local and nonlocal time-dependent Greens functions as well as higher-order correlators. Using analytics side-by-side with time-dependent DMRG we quantify the practically available resolutions of these schemes - which can be applied for practically any 1D and 2D system of lattice-confined ultracold atoms - for several examples of interest, such as the mobile impurity problem and the superfluid-Mott insulator transition. This work was supported in part by the Swiss NSF under Division II.

  1. Critical exponents of strongly correlated fermion systems from diagrammatic multiscale methods.

    PubMed

    Antipov, Andrey E; Gull, Emanuel; Kirchner, Stefan

    2014-06-06

    Self-consistent dynamical approximations for strongly correlated fermion systems are particularly successful in capturing the dynamical competition of local correlations. In these, the effect of spatially extended degrees of freedom is usually only taken into account in a mean field fashion or as a secondary effect. As a result, critical exponents associated with phase transitions have a mean field character. Here we demonstrate that diagrammatic multiscale methods anchored around local approximations are indeed capable of capturing the non-mean-field nature of the critical point of the lattice model encoded in a nonvanishing anomalous dimension and of correctly describing the transition to mean-field-like behavior as the number of spatial dimensions increases.

  2. Evidence for a Strong Correlation Between Transcription Factor Protein Disorder and Organismic Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Christopher J.; Niklas, Karl J.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2017-01-01

    Studies of diverse phylogenetic lineages reveal that protein disorder increases in concert with organismic complexity but that differences nevertheless exist among lineages. To gain insight into this phenomenology, we analyzed all of the transcription factor (TF) families for which sequences are known for 17 species spanning bacteria, yeast, algae, land plants, and animals and for which the number of different cell types has been reported in the primary literature. Although the fraction of disordered residues in TF sequences is often moderately or poorly correlated with organismic complexity as gauged by cell-type number (r2 < 0.5), an unbiased and phylogenetically broad analysis shows that organismic complexity is positively and strongly correlated with the total number of TFs, the number of their spliced variants and their total disordered residues content (r2 > 0.8). Furthermore, the correlation between the fraction of disordered residues and cell-type number becomes stronger when confined to the TF families participating in cell cycle, cell size, cell division, cell differentiation, or cell proliferation, and other important developmental processes. The data also indicate that evolutionarily simpler organisms allow for the detection of subtle differences in the conserved IDRs of TFs as well as changes in variable IDRs, which can influence the DNA recognition and multifunctionality of TFs through direct or indirect mechanisms. Although strong correlations cannot be taken as evidence for cause-and-effect relationships, we interpret our data to indicate that increasing TF disorder likely was an important factor contributing to the evolution of organismic complexity and not merely a concurrent unrelated effect of increasing organismic complexity. PMID:28430951

  3. Strongdeco: Expansion of analytical, strongly correlated quantum states into a many-body basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Graß, Tobias

    2012-03-01

    We provide a Mathematica code for decomposing strongly correlated quantum states described by a first-quantized, analytical wave function into many-body Fock states. Within them, the single-particle occupations refer to the subset of Fock-Darwin functions with no nodes. Such states, commonly appearing in two-dimensional systems subjected to gauge fields, were first discussed in the context of quantum Hall physics and are nowadays very relevant in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As important examples, we explicitly apply our decomposition scheme to the prominent Laughlin and Pfaffian states. This allows for easily calculating the overlap between arbitrary states with these highly correlated test states, and thus provides a useful tool to classify correlated quantum systems. Furthermore, we can directly read off the angular momentum distribution of a state from its decomposition. Finally we make use of our code to calculate the normalization factors for Laughlin's famous quasi-particle/quasi-hole excitations, from which we gain insight into the intriguing fractional behavior of these excitations. Program summaryProgram title: Strongdeco Catalogue identifier: AELA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5475 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 071 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which Mathematica can be installed Operating system: Linux, Windows, Mac Classification: 2.9 Nature of problem: Analysis of strongly correlated quantum states. Solution method: The program makes use of the tools developed in Mathematica to deal with multivariate polynomials to decompose analytical strongly correlated states of bosons

  4. Spectral functions of strongly correlated extended systems via an exact quantum embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, George H.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2015-04-01

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 186404 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.186404], introduced an approach to quantum cluster embedding methods whereby the mapping of strongly correlated bulk problems to an impurity with finite set of bath states was rigorously formulated to exactly reproduce the entanglement of the ground state. The formalism provided similar physics to dynamical mean-field theory at a tiny fraction of the cost but was inherently limited by the construction of a bath designed to reproduce ground-state, static properties. Here, we generalize the concept of quantum embedding to dynamic properties and demonstrate accurate bulk spectral functions at similarly small computational cost. The proposed spectral DMET utilizes the Schmidt decomposition of a response vector, mapping the bulk dynamic correlation functions to that of a quantum impurity cluster coupled to a set of frequency-dependent bath states. The resultant spectral functions are obtained on the real-frequency axis, without bath discretization error, and allows for the construction of arbitrary dynamic correlation functions. We demonstrate the method on the one- (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model, where we obtain zero temperature and thermodynamic limit spectral functions, and show the trivial extension to two-particle Green's functions. This advance therefore extends the scope and applicability of DMET in condensed-matter problems as a computationally tractable route to correlated spectral functions of extended systems and provides a competitive alternative to dynamical mean-field theory for dynamic quantities.

  5. Origin of kinks in the energy dispersion of strongly correlated matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Kazue; Perepelitsky, Edward; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the origin of ubiquitous low-energy kinks found in angle-resolved photoemission experiments in a variety of correlated matter. Such kinks are unexpected from weakly interacting electrons and hence identifying their origin should lead to fundamental insights in strongly correlated matter. We devise a protocol for extracting the kink momentum and energy from the experimental data which relies solely on the two asymptotic tangents of each dispersion curve, away from the feature itself. It is thereby insensitive to the different shapes of the kinks as seen in experiments. The body of available data are then analyzed using this method. We proceed to discuss two alternate theoretical explanations of the origin of the kinks. Some theoretical proposals invoke local bosonic excitations (Einstein phonons or other modes with spin or charge character), located exactly at the energy of observed kinks, leading to a momentum-independent self-energy of the electrons. A recent alternate is the theory of extremely correlated Fermi liquids (ECFL). This theory predicts kinks in the dispersion arising from a momentum-dependent self-energy of correlated electrons. We present the essential results from both classes of theories, and identify experimental features that can help distinguish between the two mechanisms. The ECFL theory is found to be consistent with currently available data on kinks in the nodal direction of cuprate superconductors, but conclusive tests require higher-resolution energy distribution curve data.

  6. Effects of the orbital self-interaction in both strongly and weakly correlated systems.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2009-02-07

    The orbital occupation, which is the centerpiece of both self-interaction and several metal-insulator transition analyses, as well as of the local density or generalized gradient approximation with a Hubbard term, is not well defined, in the sense that it is partially ambiguous. A general treatment can be applied to both strongly and weakly correlated systems. When it is applied to an intermediate- and partially filled band within of the host semiconductor gap whose width is less than the semiconductor gap, the original single band can either split as in a Mott transition or not. The former situation is usual and almost always generalized. However the latter also takes place and results from a dilution effect of the self-interaction where a large orbital correlation is reduced if there are other orbital contributions with lower self-interaction in the band. The key is in the choice of the subspace of correlated orbitals. This effect can neither be ignored nor discarded for those systems where there is a substantial mix of states. Examples of these behaviors will be presented and compared to other results. Moreover, the combination of different Hubbard terms acting on different atomic state subspaces can also be used to correct the spurious self-interaction of the bands and the gap underestimation. The relationship between these terms applied to different subspaces of correlated electrons will be presented.

  7. Structure-processing-property relationships and thermoelectricity in strongly correlated cerium-tri(palladium) and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boona, Stephen Richard

    The discovery of high performance thermoelectric materials would enable the development of a wide range of new thermal and electrical energy management technologies, including the possibility of solid state cryogenic coolers. Such discoveries have been sharply inhibited to date, however, by the contraindicated nature of the material properties that comprise the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. Enhancement of ZT generally requires overcoming significant materials science and engineering challenges that become even more restrictive at low temperatures. One possible approach for overcoming these challenges is to shift away from conventional semiconductors and toward strongly correlated electron materials, as these systems often display unusual combinations of electronic and thermal properties that may be exploited to achieve high ZT in the cryogenic temperature regime. This perspective has motivated the current work, in which the thermoelectric properties of strongly correlated CePd3 and related compounds are explored. This work presents a comprehensive and systematic study of the ways in which composition and processing modifications affect the electronic, thermal, magnetic, and structural properties of these materials. The insights gained from this study have led to the highest ZT value reported to date of all p-type bulk polycrystalline materials at low temperatures. A detailed review of these developments is provided along with a discussion of how they may be applied to achieve further enhancements in ZT.

  8. Ensemble DFT Approach to Excited States of Strongly Correlated Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (DFT) is a novel time-independent formalism for obtaining excitation energies of many-body fermionic systems. A considerable advantage of ensemble DFT over the more common Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT and time-dependent DFT formalisms is that it enables one to account for strong non-dynamic electron correlation in the ground and excited states of molecular systems in a transparent and accurate fashion. Despite its positive aspects, ensemble DFT has not so far found its way into the repertoire of methods of modern computational chemistry, probably because of the perceived lack of practically affordable implementations of the theory. The spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method is perhaps the first computationally feasible implementation of the ideas behind ensemble DFT which enables one to describe accurately electronic transitions in a wide class of molecular systems, including strongly correlated molecules (biradicals, molecules undergoing bond breaking/formation), extended π-conjugated systems, donor-acceptor charge transfer adducts, etc.

  9. Unstable shear flows in two dimensional strongly correlated liquids - a hydrodynamic and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2016-11-01

    In Navier-Stokes fluids, shear flows are known to become unstable leading to instability and eventually to turbulence. A class of flow namely, Kolmogorov Flows (K-Flows) exhibit such transition at low Reynolds number. Using fluid and molecular dynamics, we address the physics of transition from laminar to turbulent regime in strongly correlated-liquids such as in multi-species plasmas and also in naturally occurring plasmas with K-Flows as initial condition. A 2D phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic model is invoked wherein the effect of strong correlations is incorporated via a viscoelastic memory. To study the stability of K-Flows or in general any shear flow, a generalized eigenvalue solver has been developed along with a spectral solver for the full nonlinear set of fluid equations. A study of the linear and nonlinear features of K-Flow in incompressible and compressible limit exhibits cyclicity and nonlinear pattern formation in vorticity. A first principles based molecular dynamics simulation of particles interacting via Yukawa potential is performed with features such as configurational and kinetic thermostats for K-Flows. This work reveals several interesting similarities and differences between hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics studies.

  10. Nutritional status is strongly correlated with grip strength and depression in community-living elderly Japanese.

    PubMed

    Kaburagi, Tomoko; Hirasawa, Reiko; Yoshino, Haruka; Odaka, Yukino; Satomi, Mariko; Nakano, Mana; Fujimoto, Eka; Kabasawa, Kazuyuki; Sato, Kazuto

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the utility of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) in assessing nutritional, physical and psychosocial functions in community-living elderly individuals. A cross-sectional study of elderly individuals investigated in August 2007 and August-September 2008. Nutritional status was assessed using serum biomarkers, anthropometric measurements and the MNA. Physical function was assessed by measuring grip strength and both usual and maximum walking speeds. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was used to measure the individual's depressive state. Elder-care facilities in Tokyo, Japan. Community-living elderly individuals aged ≥65 years (n 130). The MNA evaluation classified twenty-seven (20·8 %) individuals as being at risk for malnutrition (MNA score ≤23·5); these at-risk individuals included a high proportion of the elderly aged ≥75 years. MNA scores correlated with nutritional biomarkers (total protein, albumin, cholinesterase, Hb) and anthropometric measurements (triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, mid-arm muscle area) and exhibited a strong correlation with grip strength and GDS score. Multivariate analysis revealed that grip strength, GDS score, marital status and maximum walking speed are strong predictors of MNA score. The MNA is considerably useful in providing a comprehensive assessment of nutritional status in elderly, community-living Japanese. However, larger-scale epidemiological studies are needed to determine the utility and the appropriate cut-off point of the MNA as a screen for risk of malnutrition.

  11. Quasi-Localized Charge Approximation for Strongly Correlated Plasmas in Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kählert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael; Kalman, Gabor

    2012-10-01

    Over the last two decades, the Quasi-Localized Charge Approximation (QLCA) has been successfully applied to investigate the dielectric properties of various strongly coupled systems [1]. While these earlier studies focused on bulk properties, we are concerned with the application of the QLCA to finite inhomogeneous systems. These situations are commonly encountered in ion trap plasmas, ultra-cold neutral plasmas, or dusty plasmas. Starting from the microscopic Lagrangian, we derive an equation for the fluid displacement field and compare our results with previous calculations [2] and a theory for strongly correlated ion plasmas [3]. Since the QLCA accounts for correlation effects, it improves upon so-called ``cold-fluid'' theories and should allow to reduce the discrepancies between the latter and molecular dynamics simulations in a confined Yukawa plasma [4]. Here, we present our first results.[3pt] [1] K. I. Golden and G. J. Kalman, Phys. Plasmas 7, 14 (2000)[0pt] [2] C.-J. Lee and G. J. Kalman, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 58, 448 (2011)[0pt] [3] D. H. E. Dubin and J. P. Schiffer, Phys. Rev. E 53, 5249 (1996), D. H. E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. E 53, 5268 (1996)[0pt] [4] H. K"ahlert and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. E 83, 056401 (2011)

  12. Femtosecond switching of magnetism via strongly correlated spin-charge quantum excitations.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianqi; Patz, Aaron; Mouchliadis, Leonidas; Yan, Jiaqiang; Lograsso, Thomas A; Perakis, Ilias E; Wang, Jigang

    2013-04-04

    The technological demand to push the gigahertz (10(9) hertz) switching speed limit of today's magnetic memory and logic devices into the terahertz (10(12) hertz) regime underlies the entire field of spin-electronics and integrated multi-functional devices. This challenge is met by all-optical magnetic switching based on coherent spin manipulation. By analogy to femtosecond chemistry and photosynthetic dynamics--in which photoproducts of chemical and biochemical reactions can be influenced by creating suitable superpositions of molecular states--femtosecond-laser-excited coherence between electronic states can switch magnetic order by 'suddenly' breaking the delicate balance between competing phases of correlated materials: for example, manganites exhibiting colossal magneto-resistance suitable for applications. Here we show femtosecond (10(-15) seconds) photo-induced switching from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, by observing the establishment (within about 120 femtoseconds) of a huge temperature-dependent magnetization with photo-excitation threshold behaviour absent in the optical reflectivity. The development of ferromagnetic correlations during the femtosecond laser pulse reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, distinguished from the picosecond (10(-12) seconds) lattice-heating regime characterized by phase separation without threshold behaviour. Our simulations reproduce the nonlinear femtosecond spin generation and underpin fast quantum spin-flip fluctuations correlated with coherent superpositions of electronic states to initiate local ferromagnetic correlations. These results merge two fields, femtosecond magnetism in metals and band insulators, and non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons, in which local interactions exceeding the kinetic energy produce a complex balance of competing orders.

  13. Incoherent Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Recurrences and Unconstrained Thermalization Mediated by Strong Phase Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasoni, M.; Garnier, J.; Rumpf, B.; Sugny, D.; Fatome, J.; Amrani, F.; Millot, G.; Picozzi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The long-standing and controversial Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem addresses fundamental issues of statistical physics, and the attempt to resolve the mystery of the recurrences has led to many great discoveries, such as chaos, integrable systems, and soliton theory. From a general perspective, the recurrence is commonly considered as a coherent phase-sensitive effect that originates in the property of integrability of the system. In contrast to this interpretation, we show that convection among a pair of waves is responsible for a new recurrence phenomenon that takes place for strongly incoherent waves far from integrability. We explain the incoherent recurrence by developing a nonequilibrium spatiotemporal kinetic formulation that accounts for the existence of phase correlations among incoherent waves. The theory reveals that the recurrence originates in a novel form of modulational instability, which shows that strongly correlated fluctuations are spontaneously created among the random waves. Contrary to conventional incoherent modulational instabilities, we find that Landau damping can be completely suppressed, which unexpectedly removes the threshold of the instability. Consequently, the recurrence can take place for strongly incoherent waves and is thus characterized by a reduction of nonequilibrium entropy that violates the H theorem of entropy growth. In its long-term evolution, the system enters a secondary turbulent regime characterized by an irreversible process of relaxation to equilibrium. At variance with the expected thermalization described by standard Gibbsian statistical mechanics, our thermalization process is not dictated by the usual constraints of energy and momentum conservation: The inverse temperatures associated with energy and momentum are zero. This unveils a previously unrecognized scenario of unconstrained thermalization, which is relevant to a variety of weakly dispersive wave systems. Our work should stimulate the development of new

  14. Construction of Exchange-Correlation Potentials for Strongly Interacting One-Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. Wildon O.; Vieira, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) systems are useful laboratories aiming further improvement of electronic structure calculations. In order to simulate electron-electron interactions, two types of expressions are commonly considered: soft-Coulomb and exponential. For both cases, in the context of density-functional theory (DFT), 1D systems can be employed to gain insight into the ingredients accurate exchange-correlation (XC) density functionals must incorporate. A question of major interest is the treatment of strongly interacting situations, one of the main modern challenges for DFT. In this manuscript, we propose a generalization of preexisting XC potentials which can be applied to investigate the transition from weak to strong interactions. Specifically, we employ the intriguing behavior of electrons confined in one dimension: the spin-charge separation, for which spin and charge are decoupled to form two independent quasiparticles, spinons, and chargons. By means of Friedel oscillations, our results indicate it is possible to reproduce the weak-strong interaction transition by using a simple strategy we name, from previous works, spin-charge separation correction (SCSC). In addition, SCSC also yields good results in reproducing the constancy of the highest occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues upon fractional electron charges.

  15. SO(8) fermion dynamical symmetry and strongly correlated quantum Hall states in monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Murphy, Matthew; Guidry, Mike

    2017-03-01

    A formalism is presented for treating strongly correlated graphene quantum Hall states in terms of an SO(8) fermion dynamical symmetry that includes pairing as well as particle-hole generators. The graphene SO(8) algebra is isomorphic to an SO(8) algebra that has found broad application in nuclear physics, albeit with physically very different generators, and exhibits a strong formal similarity to SU(4) symmetries that have been proposed to describe high-temperature superconductors. The well-known SU(4) symmetry of quantum Hall ferromagnetism for single-layer graphene is recovered as one subgroup of SO(8), but the dynamical symmetry structure associated with the full set of SO(8) subgroup chains extends quantum Hall ferromagnetism and allows analytical many-body solutions for a rich set of collective states exhibiting spontaneously broken symmetry that may be important for the low-energy physics of graphene in strong magnetic fields. The SO(8) symmetry permits a natural definition of generalized coherent states that correspond to symmetry-constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solutions, or equivalently a microscopically derived Ginzburg-Landau formalism, exhibiting the interplay between competing spontaneously broken symmetries in determining the ground state.

  16. Strong correlation between the 6-minute walk test and accelerometry functional outcomes in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Zoe E; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J; Walker, Karen Z; Truby, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Accelerometry provides information on habitual physical capability that may be of value in the assessment of function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This preliminary investigation describes the relationship between community ambulation measured by the StepWatch activity monitor and the current standard of functional assessment, the 6-minute walk test, in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 13). All participants completed a 6-minute walk test and wore the StepWatch™ monitor for 5 consecutive days. Both the 6-minute walk test and StepWatch accelerometry identified a decreased capacity for ambulation in boys with Duchenne compared to healthy controls. There were strong, significant correlations between 6-minute walk distance and all StepWatch parameters in affected boys only (r = 0.701-0.804). These data proffer intriguing observations that warrant further exploration. Specifically, accelerometry outcomes may compliment the 6-minute walk test in assessment of therapeutic interventions for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  17. Effect of charge on the ferroelectric field effect in strongly correlated oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuegang; Xiao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Zhang, Le; Zhao, Weiwei; Xu, Xiaoshan; Hong, Xia

    We present a systematic study of the effect of charge on the ferroelectric field effect modulation of various strongly correlated oxide materials. We have fabricated high quality epitaxial heterostructures composed of a ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) gate and a correlated oxide channel, including Sm0.5Nd0.5NiO3 (SNNO), La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO), SNNO/LSMO bilayers, and NiCo2O4 (NCO). The Hall effect measurements reveal a carrier density of ~4 holes/u.c. (0.4 cm2V-1s-1) for SNNO to ~2 holes/u.c. (27 cm2V-1s-1) for NCO. We find the magnitude of the field effect is closely related to both the intrinsic carrier density and carrier mobility of the channel material. For devices employing the SNNO/LSMO bilayer channel, we believe the charge transfer between the two correlated oxides play an important role in the observed resistance modulation. The screening capacitor of the channel materials and the interfacial defect states also have significant impact on the retention characteristics of the field effect. Our study reveals the critical role of charge in determining the interfacial coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic oxides, and has important implications in developing ferroelectric-controlled Mott memory devices.

  18. Violence, homicide and suicide: strong correlation and wide variation across districts.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, H G; Iveson, R C; Hill, O

    1999-11-01

    The clinical assessment and management of the risk of violence and suicide by people with mental illness may have to focus on environmental as well as individual factors. To investigate possible associations between violence, homicide and suicide rates, population density and indices of deprivation, with particular reference to inner-city boroughs. Coroners' statistics in London for homicide and suicide were obtained, with police-reported homicide and violence rates as a validity check. Correlations were made between these data and population density, the Jarman under-privileged areas score, and the Mental Illness Needs Index for each of the 32 London boroughs. Homicide rates had a 14.3-fold range, suicide a 4.4-fold range and interpersonal violence a 6.6-fold range. The variables under study were strongly correlated with each other. Rates were highest in boroughs with high population density and deprivation scores. The associations persisted when covarying for deprivation, age structure or population density. Because violence, homicide and suicide are so closely correlated, they are likely to be valid indices of the differences between adjacent boroughs; this has implications for the delivery of preventive and mental health services and for clinical management of risk.

  19. Density-functional theory of strongly correlated Fermi gases in elongated harmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianlong, Gao; Polini, Marco; Asgari, Reza; Tosi, M. P.

    2006-03-01

    Two-component Fermi gases with tunable repulsive or attractive interactions inside quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) harmonic wells may soon become the cleanest laboratory realizations of strongly correlated Luttiger and Luther-Emery liquids under confinement. We present a microscopic Kohn-Sham density-functional theory of these systems, with specific attention to a gas on the approach to a confinement-induced Feshbach resonance. The theory employs the one-dimensional Gaudin-Yang model as the reference system and transfers the appropriate Q1D ground-state correlations to the confined inhomogeneous gas via a suitable local-density approximation to the exchange and correlation energy functional. Quantitative understanding of the role of the interactions in the bulk shell structure of the axial density profile is thereby achieved. While repulsive intercomponent interactions depress the amplitude of the shell structure of the noninteracting gas, attractive interactions stabilize atomic-density waves through spin pairing. These should be clearly observable in atomic clouds containing of the order of up to 100 atoms.

  20. Parallel Large-scale Semidefinite Programming for Strong Electron Correlation: Using Correlation and Entanglement in the Design of Efficient Energy-Transfer Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    which nature uses strong electron correlation for efficient energy transfer, particularly in photosynthesis and bioluminescence, (ii) providing an...strong electron correlation for efficient energy transfer, particularly in photosynthesis and bioluminescence, (ii) providing an innovative paradigm...efficient energy transfer, particularly in photosynthesis and bioluminescence, (ii) providing an innovative paradigm for energy transfer in photovoltaic

  1. Exploring Jet-Hadron correlations at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Joel

    2016-08-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the conditions are met to produce the hot and dense, strongly interacting medium known as the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The QGP, a state of matter created shortly after the Big Bang, is a phase where the deconfinement of quarks and gluons is hypothesized. Jets, the collimated sprays of hadrons from fragmenting partons, are a key probe of the medium. The experimental methods used for jet measurements at ALICE to remove, reduce, and correct for the underlying background event will be presented. In pp collisions, jet production is well understood within the framework of perturbative QCD and acts as a rigorous baseline measurement for jet quenching measurements. By comparing to heavy ion collision systems, we can study the suppression of the number of jets seen and study the modification of the pT or angular distributions of jet fragments. Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a full (charged + neutral) reconstructed (trigger) jet in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in ALICE will be presented here. Newly developed combinatoric background subtraction methods and their improvement compared to prior techniques will be discussed.

  2. Image denoising by exploring external and internal correlations.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huanjing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Single image denoising suffers from limited data collection within a noisy image. In this paper, we propose a novel image denoising scheme, which explores both internal and external correlations with the help of web images. For each noisy patch, we build internal and external data cubes by finding similar patches from the noisy and web images, respectively. We then propose reducing noise by a two-stage strategy using different filtering approaches. In the first stage, since the noisy patch may lead to inaccurate patch selection, we propose a graph based optimization method to improve patch matching accuracy in external denoising. The internal denoising is frequency truncation on internal cubes. By combining the internal and external denoising patches, we obtain a preliminary denoising result. In the second stage, we propose reducing noise by filtering of external and internal cubes, respectively, on transform domain. In this stage, the preliminary denoising result not only enhances the patch matching accuracy but also provides reliable estimates of filtering parameters. The final denoising image is obtained by fusing the external and internal filtering results. Experimental results show that our method constantly outperforms state-of-the-art denoising schemes in both subjective and objective quality measurements, e.g., it achieves >2 dB gain compared with BM3D at a wide range of noise levels.

  3. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  4. Dramatic reduction of dimensionality in large biochemical networks owing to strong pair correlations

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Michael; Mukherjee, Sayak; Jayaprakash, Ciriyam; Das, Jayajit

    2012-01-01

    Large multi-dimensionality of high-throughput datasets pertaining to cell signalling and gene regulation renders it difficult to extract mechanisms underlying the complex kinetics involving various biochemical compounds (e.g. proteins and lipids). Data-driven models often circumvent this difficulty by using pair correlations of the protein expression levels to produce a small number (fewer than 10) of principal components, each a linear combination of the concentrations, to successfully model how cells respond to different stimuli. However, it is not understood if this reduction is specific to a particular biological system or to nature of the stimuli used in these experiments. We study temporal changes in pair correlations, described by the covariance matrix, between concentrations of different molecular species that evolve following deterministic mass-action kinetics in large biologically relevant reaction networks and show that this dramatic reduction of dimensions (from hundreds to less than five) arises from the strong correlations between different species at any time and is insensitive to the form of the nonlinear interactions, network architecture, and to a wide range of values of rate constants and concentrations. We relate temporal changes in the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix to low-dimensional, local changes in directions of the system trajectory embedded in much larger dimensions using elementary differential geometry. We illustrate how to extract biologically relevant insights such as identifying significant timescales and groups of correlated chemical species from our analysis. Our work provides for the first time, to our knowledge, a theoretical underpinning for the successful experimental analysis and points to a way to extract mechanisms from large-scale high-throughput datasets. PMID:22378749

  5. Weak and strong publics: drawing on Nancy Fraser to explore parental participation in neonatal networks.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Andrew J; Lewando-Hundt, Gillian; Blaxter, Loraine

    2014-02-01

    We draw on the work of Nancy Fraser, and in particular her concepts of weak and strong publics, to analyze the process of parental involvement in managed neonatal network boards. Public involvement has moved beyond the individual level to include greater involvement of both patients and the public in governance. However, there is relatively little literature that explores the nature and outcomes of long-term patient involvement initiatives or has attempted to theorize, particularly at the level of corporate decision making, the process of patient and public involvement. A repeated survey of all neonatal network managers in England was carried out in 2006-07 to capture developments and changes in parental representation over this time period. This elicited information about the current status of parent representation on neonatal network boards. Four networks were also selected as case studies. This involved interviews with key members of each network board, interviews with parent representatives, observation of meetings and access to board minutes. Data collected show that a wide range of approaches to involving parents has been adopted. These range from decisions not to involve parents at this level to relatively well-developed systems designed to link parent representatives on network boards to parents in neonatal units. Despite these variations, we suggest that parental participation within neonatal services remains an example of a weak public because the parent representatives had limited participation with little influence on decision making. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Weak and strong publics: drawing on Nancy Fraser to explore parental participation in neonatal networks

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Andrew J.; Lewando‐Hundt, Gillian; Blaxter, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims  We draw on the work of Nancy Fraser, and in particular her concepts of weak and strong publics, to analyze the process of parental involvement in managed neonatal network boards. Background  Public involvement has moved beyond the individual level to include greater involvement of both patients and the public in governance. However, there is relatively little literature that explores the nature and outcomes of long‐term patient involvement initiatives or has attempted to theorize, particularly at the level of corporate decision making, the process of patient and public involvement. Methods  A repeated survey of all neonatal network managers in England was carried out in 2006–07 to capture developments and changes in parental representation over this time period. This elicited information about the current status of parent representation on neonatal network boards. Four networks were also selected as case studies. This involved interviews with key members of each network board, interviews with parent representatives, observation of meetings and access to board minutes. Results  Data collected show that a wide range of approaches to involving parents has been adopted. These range from decisions not to involve parents at this level to relatively well‐developed systems designed to link parent representatives on network boards to parents in neonatal units. Conclusion  Despite these variations, we suggest that parental participation within neonatal services remains an example of a weak public because the parent representatives had limited participation with little influence on decision making. PMID:22040481

  7. Reconstructions at the Interface in Complex Oxide Heterostructures with Strongly Correlated Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Benjamin

    Strongly correlated oxides exhibit a rich spectrum of closely competing orders near the localized-itinerant Mott insulator transition leaving their ground states ripe with instabilities susceptible to small perturbations such as lattice distortions, variation in stoichiometry, magnetic and electric fields, etc. As the field of interfacial engineering has matured, these underlying instabilities in the electronic structure of correlated oxides continue to be leveraged to manipulate existing phases or search for emergent ones. The central theme is matching materials across the interface with disparate physical, chemical, electronic, or magnetic structure to harness interfacial reconstructions in the strongly coupled charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. In this dissertation, we apply the above paradigm to cuprate-manganite and cuprate-titanate interfaces. We examine ultrathin YBa2Cu3O7/La 2/3Ca1/3MnO3 multilayers, where interfacial charge reconstruction modulates the distribution of charge carriers within the superconducting planes and thereby act as dials to tune through the cuprate doping phase diagram. The ultrathin nature of the cuprate layers allows the reconstructed states to be resolved free of a bulk admixture. The depleted carriers are observed to directly enter the CuO2 planes. With increasing LCMO thickness, magnetic correlations are introduced, and coupling between interfacial Cu and Mn develops. The reconstructions in spin and electronic degrees of freedom found in cuprate-manganite heterostructures are expected to completely mask all other competing interactions. To this end, SrTiO3 is incorporated as a spacer material in cuprate-titanate multilayers to reveal the role of dimensionality, interlayer coupling, and broken translational symmetry. At the unit cell limit, a decrease in carrier concentration is found that directly correlates with underdoping from lost charge reservoir layers at the interface, while increased STO layer thickness

  8. Nonadiabatic creation of macroscopic superpositions with strongly correlated one-dimensional bosons in a ring trap

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, C.; Minguzzi, A.; Hekking, F. W. J.

    2011-11-15

    We consider a strongly interacting quasi-one-dimensional Bose gas on a tight ring trap subjected to a localized barrier potential. We explore the possibility of forming a macroscopic superposition of a rotating and a nonrotating state under nonequilibrium conditions, achieved by a sudden quench of the barrier velocity. Using an exact solution for the dynamical evolution in the impenetrable-boson (Tonks-Girardeau) limit, we find an expression for the many-body wave function corresponding to a superposition state. The superposition is formed when the barrier velocity is tuned close to multiples of an integer or half-integer number of Coriolis flux quanta. As a consequence of the strong interactions, we find that (i) the state of the system can be mapped onto a macroscopic superposition of two Fermi spheres rather than two macroscopically occupied single-particle states as in a weakly interacting gas, and (ii) the barrier velocity should be larger than the sound velocity to better discriminate the two components of the superposition.

  9. Infrared and Terahertz Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated Electron Systems under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Okamura, Hidekazu

    2013-02-01

    Owing to its high brilliance, infrared and terahertz synchrotron radiation (IR/THz-SR) has emerged as a powerful tool for spectroscopy under extreme (i.e., technically more difficult) experimental conditions such as high pressure, high magnetic field, high spatial resolution, and a combination of these. The methodologies for pressure- and magnetic-field-dependent spectroscopy and microscopy using IR/THz-SR have advanced rapidly worldwide. By applying them to strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs), many experimental studies have been performed on their electronic structures and phonon/molecular vibration modes under extreme conditions. Here, we review the recent progress of methodologies of IR/THz-SR spectroscopy and microscopy, and the experimental results on SCESs and other systems obtained under extreme conditions.

  10. Virial expansion for a strongly correlated Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2010-10-01

    Quantum virial expansion provides an ideal tool to investigate the high-temperature properties of a strongly correlated Fermi gas. Here, we construct the virial expansion in the presence of spin-population imbalance. Up to the third order, we calculate the high-temperature free energy of a unitary Fermi gas as a function of spin imbalance, with infinitely large attractive or repulsive interactions. In the latter repulsive case, we show that there is no itinerant ferromagnetism when quantum virial expansion is applicable. We therefore estimate an upper bound for the ferromagnetic transition temperature Tc. For a harmonically trapped Fermi gas at unitarity, we find that (Tc)upper

  11. Hot electron transport in a strongly correlated transition-metal oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kumari Gaurav; Yajima, Takeaki; Parui, Subir; Kemper, Alexander F.; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Banerjee, Tamalika

    2013-01-01

    Oxide heterointerfaces are ideal for investigating strong correlation effects to electron transport, relevant for oxide-electronics. Using hot-electrons, we probe electron transport perpendicular to the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO)- Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) interface and find the characteristic hot-electron attenuation length in LSMO to be 1.48 ± 0.10 unit cells (u.c.) at −1.9 V, increasing to 2.02 ± 0.16 u.c. at −1.3 V at room temperature. Theoretical analysis of this energy dispersion reveals the dominance of electron-electron and polaron scattering. Direct visualization of the local electron transport shows different transmission at the terraces and at the step-edges. PMID:23429420

  12. Pseudogap formation and quantum phase transition in strongly-correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Chyh-Hong

    2014-11-15

    Pseudogap formation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in strongly-correlated superconductors, for example cuprates, heavy-fermion superconductors, and iron pnictides. As the system is cooled, an energy gap opens in the excitation spectrum before entering the superconducting phase. The origin of formation and the relevancy to the superconductivity remain unclear, which is the most challenging problem in condensed matter physics. Here, using the cuprate as a model, we demonstrate that the formation of pseudogap is due to a massive gauge interaction between electrons, where the mass of the gauge boson, determining the interaction length scale, is the consequence of the remnant antiferromagnetic fluctuation inherited from the parent compounds. Extracting from experimental data, we predict that there is a quantum phase transition belonging to the 2D XY universality class at the critical doping where pseudogap transition vanishes.

  13. Local structural evidence for strong electronic correlations in spinel LiRh2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, K. R.; Abeykoon, A. M. M.; Zheng, H.; Yin, W.-G.; Tsvelik, A. M.; Mitchell, J. F.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Bozin, E. S.

    2013-11-01

    The local structure of the spinel LiRh2O4 has been studied using atomic-pair distribution function analysis of powder x-ray diffraction data. This measurement is sensitive to the presence of short Rh-Rh bonds that form due to dimerization of Rh4+ ions on the pyrochlore sublattice, independent of the existence of long-range order. We show that structural dimers exist in the low-temperature phase, as previously supposed, with a bond shortening of Δr˜0.15 Å. The dimers persist up to 350 K, well above the insulator-metal transition, with Δr decreasing in magnitude on warming. Such behavior is inconsistent with the Fermi-surface nesting-driven Peierls transition model. Instead, we argue that LiRh2O4 should properly be described as a strongly correlated system.

  14. Pure density functional for strong correlation and the thermodynamic limit from machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Baker, Thomas E.; White, Steven R.; Burke, Kieron

    2016-12-01

    We use the density-matrix renormalization group, applied to a one-dimensional model of continuum Hamiltonians, to accurately solve chains of hydrogen atoms of various separations and numbers of atoms. We train and test a machine-learned approximation to F [n ] , the universal part of the electronic density functional, to within quantum chemical accuracy. We also develop a data-driven, atom-centered basis set for densities which greatly reduces the computational cost and accurately represents the physical information in the machine-learning calculation. Our calculation (a) bypasses the standard Kohn-Sham approach, avoiding the need to find orbitals, (b) includes the strong correlation of highly stretched bonds without any specific difficulty (unlike all standard DFT approximations), and (c) is so accurate that it can be used to find the energy in the thermodynamic limit to quantum chemical accuracy.

  15. Strong correlation in 1D oxygen-ion conduction of apatite-type lanthanum silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, Kouta; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Atsutomo; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Oxygen-ion conduction in apatite-type lanthanum silicate, La9.33+0.67x (SiO4)6O2+x (x = 1), has theoretically been analyzed in a first-principles manner followed by the nudged elastic band method and the kinetic Monte Carlo method. Unlike the conventional cooperative interstitialcy mechanism along the single O4 columns, diffusing interstitial oxygen ions are frequently blocked by adjacent interstitial oxygen ions (Oint ions), leading to the strongly-correlated diffusivity and conductivity of oxygen ions in the case of chemical compositions with large x values. The getting-out mechanism from the O4 column is of importance in the long-range conduction, which temporarily transfers a part of Oint ions out of the columns to relax the blocking effect. The getting-out mechanism plays a key role also in the conduction perpendicular to the c axis (in the ab plane).

  16. Nonperturbative emergence of the Dirac fermion in a strongly correlated composite Fermi liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yibin; Luo, Xi; Yu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    The classic composite fermion field theory [B. I. Halperin, P. A. Lee, and N. Read, Phys. Rev. B 47, 7312 (1993)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.47.7312 builds up an excellent framework to uniformly study important physical objects and globally explain anomalous experimental phenomena in fractional quantum Hall physics while there are also inherent weaknesses. We present a nonperturbative emergent Dirac fermion theory from this strongly correlated composite fermion field theory, which overcomes these serious long-standing shortcomings. The particle-hole symmetry of the Dirac equation resolves this particle-hole symmetry enigma in the composite fermion field theory. With the help of presented numerical data, we show that for main Jain's sequences of fractional quantum Hall effects, this emergent Dirac fermion theory in mean field approximation is most likely stable.

  17. Application of the linear principle for the strongly-correlated variables: Calculations of differences between spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatullin, R. R.; Popov, I. I.; Baleanu, D.; Dinç, E.; Solak, A. O.; Ekşi, H.; Güzel, R.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper the authors suggest a new method of detection of possible differences between similar near infrared (NIR) spectra based on the self-similar (fractal) property. This property is a general characteristic that belongs to a wide class of the strongly-correlated systems. As an example we take a set of NIR spectra measured for three systems: (1) glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, (2) GC electrodes affected by azobenzene (AB) substance and finally (3) films (AB-FILM). Besides the physical model that should describe the intrinsic properties of these substances we found the fitting function that follow from the linear principle for the strongly-correlated variables. This function expressed in the form of linear combination of 4 power-law functions describes with the high accuracy the integrated curves that were obtained from the averaged values of the initially measured spectra. The nine fitting parameters can be considered as the quantitative "finger prints" for detection of the differences between similar spectra. Besides this result we established the self-similar behavior of the remnant functions. In other words, the difference between the initially integrated function and its fitting function can be expressed in the form of linear combinations of periodical functions having a set of frequencies following to relationship ω( k) = ω0ξk, where the initial frequency ω0 and scaling factor ξ are determined by the eigen-coordinates method. This behavior in the NIR spectra was discovered in the first time and physical reasons of such behavior merit an additional research.

  18. Condensation to a strongly correlated dark fluid of two dimensional dipolar excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuz-Harpaz, Yotam; Cohen, Kobi; Rapaport, Ronen

    2017-08-01

    Recently we reported on the condensation of cold, electrostatically trapped dipolar excitons in GaAs bilayer heterostructure into a new, dense and dark collective phase. Here we analyze and discuss in detail the experimental findings and the emerging evident properties of this collective liquid-like phase. We show that the phase transition is characterized by a sharp increase of the number of non-emitting dipoles, by a clear contraction of the fluid spatial extent into the bottom of the parabolic-like trap, and by spectral narrowing. We extract the total density of the condensed phase which we find to be consistent with the expected density regime of a quantum liquid. We show that there are clear critical temperature and excitation power onsets for the phase transition and that as the power further increases above the critical power, the strong darkening is reduced down until no clear darkening is observed. At this point another transition appears which we interpret as a transition to a strongly repulsive yet correlated e-h plasma. Based on the experimental findings, we suggest that the physical mechanism that may be responsible for the transition is a dynamical final-state stimulation of the dipolar excitons to their dark spin states, which have a long lifetime and thus support the observed sharp increase in density. Further experiments and modeling will hopefully be able to unambiguously identify the physical mechanism behind these recent observations.

  19. Signatures of strong correlation effects in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies on cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wan-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Ju; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, spin excitations in doped cuprates have been measured using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The paramagnon dispersions show the large hardening effect in the electron-doped systems and seemingly doping independence in the hole-doped systems, with the energy scales comparable to that of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) magnons. This anomalous hardening effect and the lack of softening were partially explained by using the strong-coupling t -J model but with a three-site term [Nat. Commun. 5, 3314 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms4314], although the hardening effect is already present even without the latter. By considering the t -t'-t''-J model and using the slave-boson mean-field theory, we obtain, via the spin-spin susceptibility, the spin excitations in qualitative agreement with the experiments. The doping-dependent bandwidth due to the strong correlation physics is the origin of the hardening effect. We also show that dispersions in the AFM regime, different from those in the paramagnetic (PM) regime, hardly vary with dopant density. These excitations are mainly collective in nature instead of particle-hole-like. We further discuss the interplay and different contributions of these two kinds of excitations in the PM phase and show that the dominance of the collective excitation increases with decreasing dopant concentrations.

  20. Dynamic equilibrium of collective degrees of freedom in strongly correlated quantum matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfle, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Strongly correlated quantum systems may assume states stabilized by dynamic equilibrium of competing collective degrees of freedom. As a first example we consider the Kondo effect, which may be viewed as governed by a subtle balance of an infinite growth of the exchange coupling constant controled by an increasing local spin relaxation rate, leading to a Fermi liquid stable fixed point at low temperatures. As a second example the quantum critical behavior in antiferromagnetic metals will be considered. It is often found experimentally that the quasiparticle effective mass appears to diverge at the quantum critical point in spite of the fact that the critical spin fluctuations seem to be in the weak coupling domain - a contradiction. It will be shown that the feedback of the diverging mass into the spin fluctuation spectrum allows to establish a balance of the fermionic and bosonic singular degrees of freedom, leading to strong-coupling type quantum critical behavior. The resulting self-consistent theory obeys hyper-scaling of the dominant fermionic degrees of freedom, while the bosonic interaction is still in the weak coupling domain. Excellent agreement is found with experiment for the two candidate cases CeCu6-xAux and YbRh2Si2.

  1. Feature Article: Understanding strongly correlated many-body systems with quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, Catia; Rigol, Marcos; Muramatsu, Alejandro

    2005-08-01

    The cover picture of the current issue, taken from the Feature Article [1], depicts the evolution of local density (a) and its quantum fluctuations (b) in trapped fermions on one-dimensional optical lattices. As the number of fermions in the trap is increased, figure (a) shows the formation of a Mott-insulating plateau (local density equal to one) whereas the quantum fluctuations - see figure (b) - are strongly suppressed, but nonzero. For a larger number of fermions new insulating plateaus appear (this time with local density equal to two), but no density fluctuations. Regions with non-constant density are metallic and exhibit large quantum fluctuations of the density.The first author Catia Lavalle is a Postdoc at the University of Stuttgart. She works in the field of strongly correlated quantum systems by means of Quantum Monte Carlo methods (QMC). While working on her PhD thesis at the University of Stuttgart, she developed a new QMC technique that allows to study dynamical properties of the t-J model.

  2. Strongly Correlated Superconductivity close to a Mott transition in orbitally degenerate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Massimo; Fabrizio, Michele; Castellani, Claudio; Tosatti, Erio

    2004-03-01

    Recently a novel strongly correlated superconductivity (SCS) scenario has been proposed [1] which deals with the question whether and under which conditions Cooper-pairing may get enhanced by strong electron repulsion close to a Mott transition. The core of the SCS proposal is that the effective repulsion between quasiparticles vanishes close to the Mott transition, whereas any pairing attraction will remain unrenormalized if it acts inside the spin channel. This scenario was originally demonstrated through a Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) solution of a model for doped fullerenes, but it is believed to be far more general. Very recently, a twofold orbitally degenerate model with inverted Hund rule exchange has been proposed as a new candidate for SCS [2]. We report fresh DMFT work that fully confirms this expectation, and provides an extremely appealing phase diagram, where superconductivity arises by doping the Mott insulator, out of an unstable a pseudogapped metal, very much as it happens in cuprates. [1] M. Capone, M. Fabrizio, C. Castellani, and E. Tosatti, Science 296, 2364 (2002). [2] M. Fabrizio, A.F. Ho, L. De Leo, and G. Santoro, Phys. Rev. Lett., to appear; L. De Leo and M. Fabrizio, unpublished.

  3. Correlation between abnormal trends in the spontaneous fields of tectonic plates and strong seismicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Da-Cheng; Xin, Jian-Cun

    2017-06-01

    Tectonic activities, electrical structures, and electromagnetic environments are major factors that affect the stability of spontaneous fields. The method of correlating regional synchronization contrasts (CRSC) can determine the reliability of multi-site data trends or short-impending anomalies. From 2008 to 2013, there were three strong earthquake cluster periods in the North-South seismic belt that lasted for 8-12 months. By applying the CRSC method to analyze the spontaneous field E SP at 25 sites of the region in the past 6 years, it was discovered that for each strong earthquake cluster period, the E SP strength of credible anomalous trends was present at minimum 30% of the stations. In the southern section of the Tan-Lu fault zone, the E SP at four main geoelectric field stations showed significant anomalous trends after June 2015, which could be associated with the major earthquakes of the East China Sea waters (M S 7.2) in November 2015 and Japan's Kyushu island (M S 7.3) in April 2016.

  4. Record statistics of a strongly correlated time series: random walks and Lévy flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, Claude; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-08-01

    We review recent advances on the record statistics of strongly correlated time series, whose entries denote the positions of a random walk or a Lévy flight on a line. After a brief survey of the theory of records for independent and identically distributed random variables, we focus on random walks. During the last few years, it was indeed realized that random walks are a very useful ‘laboratory’ to test the effects of correlations on the record statistics. We start with the simple one-dimensional random walk with symmetric jumps (both continuous and discrete) and discuss in detail the statistics of the number of records, as well as of the ages of the records, i.e. the lapses of time between two successive record breaking events. Then we review the results that were obtained for a wide variety of random walk models, including random walks with a linear drift, continuous time random walks, constrained random walks (like the random walk bridge) and the case of multiple independent random walkers. Finally, we discuss further observables related to records, like the record increments, as well as some questions raised by physical applications of record statistics, like the effects of measurement error and noise.

  5. Dynamical mean-field theory of strongly correlated fermion systems and the limit of infinite dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, A.; Kotliar, G.; Krauth, W.; Rozenberg, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    We review the dynamical mean-field theory of strongly correlated electron systems which is based on a mapping of lattice models onto quantum impurity models subject to a self-consistency condition. This mapping is exact for models of correlated electrons in the limit of large lattice coordination (or infinite spatial dimensions). It extends the standard mean-field construction from classical statistical mechanics to quantum problems. We discuss the physical ideas underlying this theory and its mathematical derivation. Various analytic and numerical techniques that have been developed recently in order to analyze and solve the dynamical mean-field equations are reviewed and compared to each other. The method can be used for the determination of phase diagrams (by comparing the stability of various types of long-range order), and the calculation of thermodynamic properties, one-particle Green{close_quote}s functions, and response functions. We review in detail the recent progress in understanding the Hubbard model and the Mott metal-insulator transition within this approach, including some comparison to experiments on three-dimensional transition-metal oxides. We present an overview of the rapidly developing field of applications of this method to other systems. The present limitations of the approach, and possible extensions of the formalism are finally discussed. Computer programs for the numerical implementation of this method are also provided with this article. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Tree Tensor Network State with Variable Tensor Order: An Efficient Multireference Method for Strongly Correlated Systems.

    PubMed

    Murg, V; Verstraete, F; Schneider, R; Nagy, P R; Legeza, Ö

    2015-03-10

    We study the tree-tensor-network-state (TTNS) method with variable tensor orders for quantum chemistry. TTNS is a variational method to efficiently approximate complete active space (CAS) configuration interaction (CI) wave functions in a tensor product form. TTNS can be considered as a higher order generalization of the matrix product state (MPS) method. The MPS wave function is formulated as products of matrices in a multiparticle basis spanning a truncated Hilbert space of the original CAS-CI problem. These matrices belong to active orbitals organized in a one-dimensional array, while tensors in TTNS are defined upon a tree-like arrangement of the same orbitals. The tree-structure is advantageous since the distance between two arbitrary orbitals in the tree scales only logarithmically with the number of orbitals N, whereas the scaling is linear in the MPS array. It is found to be beneficial from the computational costs point of view to keep strongly correlated orbitals in close vicinity in both arrangements; therefore, the TTNS ansatz is better suited for multireference problems with numerous highly correlated orbitals. To exploit the advantages of TTNS a novel algorithm is designed to optimize the tree tensor network topology based on quantum information theory and entanglement. The superior performance of the TTNS method is illustrated on the ionic-neutral avoided crossing of LiF. It is also shown that the avoided crossing of LiF can be localized using only ground state properties, namely one-orbital entanglement.

  7. Concepts relating magnetic interactions, intertwined electronic orders, and strongly correlated superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. C. Séamus; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional superconductivity (SC) is said to occur when Cooper pair formation is dominated by repulsive electron–electron interactions, so that the symmetry of the pair wave function is other than an isotropic s-wave. The strong, on-site, repulsive electron–electron interactions that are the proximate cause of such SC are more typically drivers of commensurate magnetism. Indeed, it is the suppression of commensurate antiferromagnetism (AF) that usually allows this type of unconventional superconductivity to emerge. Importantly, however, intervening between these AF and SC phases, intertwined electronic ordered phases (IP) of an unexpected nature are frequently discovered. For this reason, it has been extremely difficult to distinguish the microscopic essence of the correlated superconductivity from the often spectacular phenomenology of the IPs. Here we introduce a model conceptual framework within which to understand the relationship between AF electron–electron interactions, IPs, and correlated SC. We demonstrate its effectiveness in simultaneously explaining the consequences of AF interactions for the copper-based, iron-based, and heavy-fermion superconductors, as well as for their quite distinct IPs. PMID:24114268

  8. Concepts relating magnetic interactions, intertwined electronic orders, and strongly correlated superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Davis, J C Séamus; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2013-10-29

    Unconventional superconductivity (SC) is said to occur when Cooper pair formation is dominated by repulsive electron-electron interactions, so that the symmetry of the pair wave function is other than an isotropic s-wave. The strong, on-site, repulsive electron-electron interactions that are the proximate cause of such SC are more typically drivers of commensurate magnetism. Indeed, it is the suppression of commensurate antiferromagnetism (AF) that usually allows this type of unconventional superconductivity to emerge. Importantly, however, intervening between these AF and SC phases, intertwined electronic ordered phases (IP) of an unexpected nature are frequently discovered. For this reason, it has been extremely difficult to distinguish the microscopic essence of the correlated superconductivity from the often spectacular phenomenology of the IPs. Here we introduce a model conceptual framework within which to understand the relationship between AF electron-electron interactions, IPs, and correlated SC. We demonstrate its effectiveness in simultaneously explaining the consequences of AF interactions for the copper-based, iron-based, and heavy-fermion superconductors, as well as for their quite distinct IPs.

  9. Strain-Controlled Transport Mechanism in Strongly Correlated LaNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, D.; Kundu, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    A density functional theory + Hubbard U (DFT + U) method is employed to investigate the effect of strain on the electronic and transport properties of the correlated metal LaNiO3. LaNiO3 without strain is characterized by a low temperature Fermi liquid behaviour of resistivity, a negative Seebeck coefficient and a positive Hall coefficient. Density of states, resistivity, thermopower and Hall coefficient obtained within the DFT + U approach reveal that LaNiO3 under both compressive and tensile strain is more metallic compared to the unstrained system. However, LaNiO3 under tensile strain is found to be more strongly correlated than that under compressive strain. Electron localization function calculation shows that there is a substantial increase in the covalent part of the chemical bonding, which corroborates an increase in the resistivity for LaNiO3 under tensile strain. Our first-principle-based calculation clearly demonstrates that the transport properties of LaNiO3 can be tuned by applying suitable strain.

  10. Tree Tensor Network State with Variable Tensor Order: An Efficient Multireference Method for Strongly Correlated Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree-tensor-network-state (TTNS) method with variable tensor orders for quantum chemistry. TTNS is a variational method to efficiently approximate complete active space (CAS) configuration interaction (CI) wave functions in a tensor product form. TTNS can be considered as a higher order generalization of the matrix product state (MPS) method. The MPS wave function is formulated as products of matrices in a multiparticle basis spanning a truncated Hilbert space of the original CAS-CI problem. These matrices belong to active orbitals organized in a one-dimensional array, while tensors in TTNS are defined upon a tree-like arrangement of the same orbitals. The tree-structure is advantageous since the distance between two arbitrary orbitals in the tree scales only logarithmically with the number of orbitals N, whereas the scaling is linear in the MPS array. It is found to be beneficial from the computational costs point of view to keep strongly correlated orbitals in close vicinity in both arrangements; therefore, the TTNS ansatz is better suited for multireference problems with numerous highly correlated orbitals. To exploit the advantages of TTNS a novel algorithm is designed to optimize the tree tensor network topology based on quantum information theory and entanglement. The superior performance of the TTNS method is illustrated on the ionic-neutral avoided crossing of LiF. It is also shown that the avoided crossing of LiF can be localized using only ground state properties, namely one-orbital entanglement. PMID:25844072

  11. Variation in Rural African Gut Microbiota Is Strongly Correlated with Colonization by Entamoeba and Subsistence

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Elise R.; Lynch, Joshua; Froment, Alain; Lafosse, Sophie; Heyer, Evelyne; Przeworski, Molly; Blekhman, Ran; Ségurel, Laure

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is impacted by host nutrition and health status and therefore represents a potentially adaptive phenotype influenced by metabolic and immune constraints. Previous studies contrasting rural populations in developing countries to urban industrialized ones have shown that industrialization is strongly correlated with patterns in human gut microbiota; however, we know little about the relative contribution of factors such as climate, diet, medicine, hygiene practices, host genetics, and parasitism. Here, we focus on fine-scale comparisons of African rural populations in order to (i) contrast the gut microbiota of populations inhabiting similar environments but having different traditional subsistence modes and either shared or distinct genetic ancestry, and (ii) examine the relationship between gut parasites and bacterial communities. Characterizing the fecal microbiota of Pygmy hunter-gatherers as well as Bantu individuals from both farming and fishing populations in Southwest Cameroon, we found that the gut parasite Entamoeba is significantly correlated with microbiome composition and diversity. We show that across populations, colonization by this protozoa can be predicted with 79% accuracy based on the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, and that several of the taxa most important for distinguishing Entamoeba absence or presence are signature taxa for autoimmune disorders. We also found gut communities to vary significantly with subsistence mode, notably with some taxa previously shown to be enriched in other hunter-gatherers groups (in Tanzania and Peru) also discriminating hunter-gatherers from neighboring farming or fishing populations in Cameroon. PMID:26619199

  12. Information geometry with correlated data: Bayesian explorations of cosmological predictions for the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine; de Bernardis, Francesco; Niemack, Michael; Sethna, James

    We developed a new, generalized fitting algorithm for miltiparameter models which incorporates varying and correlated errors. This was combined with geometrical methods of sampling to explore model prediction space, notably to plot geodesics and determine the size and edges of the model manifold. We illustrate this using the microwave background spectra for all possible universes, as described by the standard Λ-cold dark matter (Λ-CDM) cosmological model. In this case, the predicted data are fluctuations and highly correlated with varying errors, resulting in a manifold with a varying metric (as the natural metric to use is given by the Fisher information matrix). Furthermore, the model manifold shares the hyperribbon structure seen in other models, with the edges forming a strongly distorted image of a hypercube. Practical applications of such an analysis include optimizing experimental instrumentation designed to test more detailed cosmological theories. Funding supported in part by NSERC.

  13. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory: A New Way To Treat Strongly Correlated Systems.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G; Li Manni, Giovanni; Carlson, Rebecca K; Hoyer, Chad E; Bao, Junwei Lucas

    2017-01-17

    The electronic energy of a system provides the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy for internuclear motion and thus determines molecular structure and spectra, bond energies, conformational energies, reaction barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. The development of more efficient and more accurate ways to calculate the electronic energy of systems with inherently multiconfigurational electronic structure is essential for many applications, including transition metal and actinide chemistry, systems with partially broken bonds, many transition states, and most electronically excited states. Inherently multiconfigurational systems are called strongly correlated systems or multireference systems, where the latter name refers to the need for using more than one ("multiple") configuration state function to provide a good zero-order reference wave function. This Account describes multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which was developed as a way to combine the advantages of wave function theory (WFT) and density functional theory (DFT) to provide a better treatment of strongly correlated systems. First we review background material: the widely used Kohn-Sham DFT (which uses only a single Slater determinant as reference wave function), multiconfiguration WFT methods that treat inherently multiconfigurational systems based on an active space, and previous attempts to combine multiconfiguration WFT with DFT. Then we review the formulation of MC-PDFT. It is a generalization of Kohn-Sham DFT in that the electron kinetic energy and classical electrostatic energy are calculated from a reference wave function, while the rest of the energy is obtained from a density functional. However, there are two main differences with respent to Kohn-Sham DFT: (i) The reference wave function is multiconfigurational rather than being a single Slater determinant. (ii) The density functional is a function of the total density and the on-top pair density rather than

  14. Entropy excess in strongly correlated Fermi systems near a quantum critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.W.; Zverev, M.V.; Khodel, V.A.

    2012-12-15

    A system of interacting, identical fermions described by standard Landau Fermi-liquid (FL) theory can experience a rearrangement of its Fermi surface if the correlations grow sufficiently strong, as occurs at a quantum critical point where the effective mass diverges. As yet, this phenomenon defies full understanding, but salient aspects of the non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior observed beyond the quantum critical point are still accessible within the general framework of the Landau quasiparticle picture. Self-consistent solutions of the coupled Landau equations for the quasiparticle momentum distribution n(p) and quasiparticle energy spectrum {epsilon}(p) are shown to exist in two distinct classes, depending on coupling strength and on whether the quasiparticle interaction is regular or singular at zero momentum transfer. One class of solutions maintains the idempotency condition n{sup 2}(p)=n(p) of standard FL theory at zero temperature T while adding pockets to the Fermi surface. The other solutions are characterized by a swelling of the Fermi surface and a flattening of the spectrum {epsilon}(p) over a range of momenta in which the quasiparticle occupancies lie between 0 and 1 even at T=0. The latter, non-idempotent solution is revealed by analysis of a Poincare mapping associated with the fundamental Landau equation connecting n(p) and {epsilon}(p) and validated by solution of a variational condition that yields the symmetry-preserving ground state. Significantly, this extraordinary solution carries the burden of a large temperature-dependent excess entropy down to very low temperatures, threatening violation of the Nernst Theorem. It is argued that certain low-temperature phase transitions, notably those involving Cooper-pair formation, offer effective mechanisms for shedding the entropy excess. Available measurements in heavy-fermion compounds provide concrete support for such a scenario. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of Landau

  15. The density matrix renormalization group for strongly correlated electron systems: A generic implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, G.

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is (i) to present a generic and fully functional implementation of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm, and (ii) to describe how to write additional strongly-correlated electron models and geometries by using templated classes. Besides considering general models and geometries, the code implements Hamiltonian symmetries in a generic way and parallelization over symmetry-related matrix blocks. Program summaryProgram title: DMRG++ Catalogue identifier: AEDJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: See file LICENSE No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 15 795 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 83 454 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, MPI Computer: PC, HP cluster Operating system: Any, tested on Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GB (256 MB is enough to run included test) Classification: 23 External routines: BLAS and LAPACK Nature of problem: Strongly correlated electrons systems, display a broad range of important phenomena, and their study is a major area of research in condensed matter physics. In this context, model Hamiltonians are used to simulate the relevant interactions of a given compound, and the relevant degrees of freedom. These studies rely on the use of tight-binding lattice models that consider electron localization, where states on one site can be labeled by spin and orbital degrees of freedom. The calculation of properties from these Hamiltonians is a computational intensive problem, since the Hilbert space over which these Hamiltonians act grows exponentially with the number of sites on the lattice. Solution method: The DMRG is a numerical variational technique to study quantum many body Hamiltonians. For one-dimensional and quasi one-dimensional systems, the

  16. Tiny Stars, Strong Fields: Exploring the Origin of Intense Magnetism in M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomre, Juri

    . We bring to this our prior experience with studying dynamo processes in the outer convective envelopes of G- (the Sun) and Ftype stars, briefly of M dwarfs, and in full convective cores within more massive A- and B-type stars. Our previous work suggests that M dwarfs could display a broad range of dynamo behavior, from cyclic reversals to more chaotic variations, and further to both weak and strong dynamo states. We will focus on the latter, exploring how superequipartition magnetic fields could be achieved by dynamo action in M dwarfs, as are likely needed to energize super-flares and huge active regions, and what limits the peak field strengths. M-type stars are distinctive in becoming fully convective with decreasing mass at about M3.5 in spectral type (or about 0.35 solar masses). At this transition, a steep rise in the fraction of magnetically active stars is observed that is accompanied by an increasing rotational velocity. Clearly how mass-loss and spin-down can lead to this is of interest in itself. However, here we propose to study the manner in which dynamos operating in fully convective M dwarf interiors beyond the transition may be able to achieve very strong magnetic fields, and how field strengths and apparent magnetic activity increases with rotation rate as suggested by observations. We believe that global connectivity of flows and fields across the core center will admit new classes of strong behavior, as revealed by our B star core dynamos, not realized when a convective envelope is bounded below by a tachocline. These ideas need to be tested in a self-consistent manner with global ASH simulations to gain theoretical insights into what is the origin of the fierce magnetic activity in some of M dwarfs that may be potential hosts to Earth-like planets. Such 3-D MHD simulations, though challenging, are now feasible and would complement the intensive observational searches under way.

  17. Interpolated energy densities, correlation indicators and lower bounds from approximations to the strong coupling limit of DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Irons, Tom J. P.; Wagner, Lucas O.; Teale, Andrew M.; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    We investigate the construction of approximated exchange-correlation functionals by interpolating locally along the adiabatic connection between the weak- and the strong-coupling regimes, focussing on the effect of using approximate functionals for the strong-coupling energy densities. The gauge problem is avoided by dealing with quantities that are all locally defined in the same way. Using exact ingredients at weak coupling we are able to isolate the error coming from the approximations at strong coupling only. We find that the nonlocal radius model, which retains some of the non-locality of the exact strong-coupling regime, yields very satisfactory results. We also use interpolation models and quantities from the weak- and strong-coupling regimes to define a correlation-type indicator and a lower bound to the exact exchange-correlation energy. Open problems, related to the nature of the local and global slope of the adiabatic connection at weak coupling, are also discussed.

  18. Cancer of unknown primary originating from oropharyngeal carcinomas are strongly correlated to HPV positivity.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Pamela; Assmann, Gerald; Mollenhauer, Martin; Jung, Andreas; Sotlar, Karl; Kirchner, Thomas; Ihrler, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been identified as a distinct entity within squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. It is associated with special characteristics and is preponderantly restricted to palatial tonsils and base of tongue. These primary locations have for long been associated with the clinical situation of cancer of unknown primary (CUP). In order to investigate the putative relationship between CUP and HPV, we investigated 26 patients who initially presented as CUP and were finally diagnosed with carcinomas of these two locations. Twenty-one cases proved to be positive for high-risk HPV. Primary carcinomas were small and frequently presented in a submucosal location. HPV-positive carcinomas, presented more often in women, showed atypical basaloid differentiation and correlated to cystic lymph node metastases. This study demonstrates an over-representation of HPV-associated OSCC in patients who were initially diagnosed with CUP. This finding indicates a strong relationship between HPV-association and CUP in OSCC. The frequent manifestation as CUP is presumably caused by the unusual predisposition for small size and submucosal location combined with early lymphatic metastization. In order not to miss clinically occult carcinomas, consequent interdisciplinary cooperation in combination with meticulous histological workup is mandatory.

  19. Multireference linearized coupled cluster theory for strongly correlated systems using matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Alavi, Ali

    2015-09-01

    We propose a multireference linearized coupled cluster theory using matrix product states (MPSs-LCC) which provides remarkably accurate ground-state energies, at a computational cost that has the same scaling as multireference configuration interaction singles and doubles, for a wide variety of electronic Hamiltonians. These range from first-row dimers at equilibrium and stretched geometries to highly multireference systems such as the chromium dimer and lattice models such as periodic two-dimensional 1-band and 3-band Hubbard models. The MPS-LCC theory shows a speed up of several orders of magnitude over the usual Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm while delivering energies in excellent agreement with converged DMRG calculations. Also, in all the benchmark calculations presented here, MPS-LCC outperformed the commonly used multi-reference quantum chemistry methods in some cases giving energies in excess of an order of magnitude more accurate. As a size-extensive method that can treat large active spaces, MPS-LCC opens up the use of multireference quantum chemical techniques in strongly correlated ab initio Hamiltonians, including two- and three-dimensional solids.

  20. Strong correlation and multi-phase solution in nonequilibrium lattice systems coupled to dissipation medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jong; Li, Jiajun; Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    How does a strongly correlated electronic solid evolve continuously out of equilibrium when an electric field is applied? While this question may seem deceptively simple, it requires rigorous understanding of dissipation. We formulate the nonequilibrium steady-state lattice coupled to fermion baths in the Coulomb gauge. We demonstrate that the Hubbard model solved using the iterative perturbation theory within the dynamical mean-field approximation recovers the DC conductivity independent of the Coulomb interaction in a very narrow linear response regime. Due to the singular dependence of the effective temperature on the damping in the steady-state [2], systems with damping have dramatic field-dependent effect, very different from dissipationless systems. We conclude that the dominant physics in lattice nonequilibrium is not the field vs quasi-particle energy, but rather the Joule heat vs the quasi-particle energy. Furthermore, we show that, in the vicinity of the Mott-insulator transition, the solution supports mixed-phase state scenario which indicates that the electron transport in solids under high-field can be spatially inhomogeneous leading to filamentary conducting paths, as suggested by experiments. Supported by NSF DMR-0907150, NSF DMR-1308141

  1. Spin-orbit coupling and strong electronic correlations in cyclic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, A. L.; Jacko, A. C.; Merino, J.; Powell, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    In atoms spin-orbit coupling (SOC) cannot raise the angular momentum above a maximum value or lower it below a minimum. Here we show that this need not be the case in materials built from nanoscale structures including multinuclear coordination complexes, materials with decorated lattices, or atoms on surfaces. In such cyclic molecules the electronic spin couples to currents running around the molecule. For odd-fold symmetric molecules (e.g., odd-membered rings) the SOC is highly analogous to the atomic case; but for even-fold symmetric molecules every angular momentum state can be both raised and lowered. These differences arise because for odd-fold symmetric molecules the maximum and minimum molecular orbital angular momentum states are time-reversal conjugates, whereas for even-fold symmetric molecules they are aliases of the same single state. We show, from first-principles calculations, that in suitable molecules this molecular SOC is large, compared to the energy differences between frontier molecular orbitals. Finally, we show that, when electronic correlations are strong, molecular SOC can cause highly anisotropic exchange interactions and discuss how this can lead to effective spin models with compass Hamiltonians.

  2. How important are vertex corrections in the longitudinal dc transport through multilayers of strongly correlated materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Simon; Freericks, Jim

    2010-03-01

    In the bulk, dynamical mean-field theory has no vertex corrections to dc transport, as proved by Khurana in 1990. The proof does not hold for inhomogeneous systems like multilayers with current flow perpendicular to the layers. We examine the effect of vertex corrections on the transport for multilayered inhomogeneous devices composed of semi-infinite metallic leads coupled via a strongly correlated material barrier region. The barrier region can be adjusted from a metallic regime to a Mott insulator through adjusting the interaction strength. We use the Falicov-Kimball model because the exact expression for the vertex corrections is known and it displays a Mott like metal to insulator transition. The resistance is calculated and we find the effects of the vertex correction are relatively small manifesting in a small reduction in the resistance-area product. This as expected this reduction saturates as the barrier layer grows towards the bulk limit. Overall, the effect of vertex corrections is smaller than about 5% of the total resistance and relatively decreases.

  3. Evidence for a New Intermediate Phase in a Strongly Correlated 2D System near Wigner Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan; Qiu, Richard; Goble, Nicholas; Serafin, Alex; Yin, Liang; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Sullivan, Neil; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    How the two dimensional (2D) quantum Wigner crystal (WC) transforms into the metallic liquid phase remains an outstanding problem in physics. In theories considering the 2D WC to liquid transition in the clean limit, it was suggested that a number of intermediate phases might exist. We have studied the transformation between the metallic fluid phase and the low magnetic field reentrant insulating phase (RIP) which was interpreted as due to the WC [Qiu et al., PRL 108, 106404 (2012)], in a strongly correlated 2D hole system in GaAs quantum well with large interaction parameter rs (~20-30) and high mobility. Instead of a sharp transition, we found that increasing density (or lowering rs) drives the RIP into a state where the incipient RIP coexists with Fermi liquid. This apparent mixture phase intermediate between Fermi liquid and WC also exhibits a non-trivial temperature dependent resistivity behavior which can be qualitatively understood by the reversed melting of WC in the mixture, in analogy to the Pomeranchuk effect in the solid-liquid mixture of Helium-3. X.G. thanks NSF (DMR-0906415) for supporting work at CWRU. Experiments at the NHMFL High B/T Facility were supported by NSF Grant 0654118 and the State of Florida. L.P. thanks the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and NSF MRSEC (DMR-0819860) for support.

  4. Nonlinear entangled quantum dynamics in many-body systems with strong electron correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jongbae

    2017-04-01

    A quantum impurity system out of equilibrium comprises two metallic reservoirs with different chemical potentials and one mediating spin impurity between them. We study the highly nonlinear tunneling conductance of this system, and clarify that three coherent peaks, one zero-bias peak and two side peaks, naturally appear in the tunneling conductance. We use the Liouvillian approach, in which a complete set of basis operators is available, and construct a Liouville matrix to obtain Green’s function at the mediating site. We show that the two coherent side peaks are the outcome of steady-state nonequilibrium combined with strong electron correlation at the mediating site. Tunneling in the quantum impurity system out of equilibrium is performed by an entangled state which is a linear combination of two Kondo singlets formed by the spin at the mediating site and the coherent spins in each reservoir. The fluctuation by incoherent spins is also included. The spectral weights and positions of the three coherent peaks are analytically discussed via atomic limit analysis. Our theoretical results well fit experimental data obtained for quantum point contacts with symmetric and asymmetric Kondo couplings.

  5. Anomalous fluctuations of currents in Sinai-type random chains with strongly correlated disorder.

    PubMed

    Oshanin, Gleb; Rosso, Alberto; Schehr, Grégory

    2013-03-08

    We study properties of a random walk in a generalized Sinai model, in which a quenched random potential is a trajectory of a fractional Brownian motion with arbitrary Hurst parameter H, 0strong spatial correlations. In this case, the disorder-average mean-square displacement grows in proportion to log(2/H)(n), n being time. We prove that moments of arbitrary order k of the steady-state current J(L) through a finite segment of length L of such a chain decay as L(-(1-H)), independently of k, which suggests that despite a logarithmic confinement the average current is much higher than its Fickian counterpart in homogeneous systems. Our results reveal a paradoxical behavior such that, for fixed n and L, the mean-square displacement decreases when one varies H from 0 to 1, while the average current increases. This counterintuitive behavior is explained via an analysis of representative realizations of disorder.

  6. Strong electron correlation on the Fe3O4(0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Henry; Elliott, Simon D.; Foster, Adam; Nieminen, R. M.

    2007-03-01

    Magnetite Fe3O4 is a fascinating material that still is not well understood and presents challenges for the state-of-the-art computational methods. This transition metal oxide undergoes a first-order metal-insulator transition at TV=120 K. The ferrimagnetic properties of Fe3O4 makes it a promising material for spintronic applications. We use a plane wave density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation adding a Hubbard-U parameter to describe properly the strongly correlated Fe--3d electrons. Based on previous results, we compute the surface structure, magnetic properties and electronic structure of several Fe3O4(0 0 1) surfaces with (√2x√2)R45^o reconstruction. The simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images of these surfaces are compared and discussed in the light of available experimental data. Finally, we analyze the possible existence of charge ordering on the Fe3O4(0 0 1) surface and the effect on the surface electronic structure with changing the value of the Hubbard-U parameter on the superficial Fe sites. H. Pinto, S. Elliott, J.Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 10427 (2006)

  7. Multireference linearized coupled cluster theory for strongly correlated systems using matrix product states

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep; Alavi, Ali

    2015-09-14

    We propose a multireference linearized coupled cluster theory using matrix product states (MPSs-LCC) which provides remarkably accurate ground-state energies, at a computational cost that has the same scaling as multireference configuration interaction singles and doubles, for a wide variety of electronic Hamiltonians. These range from first-row dimers at equilibrium and stretched geometries to highly multireference systems such as the chromium dimer and lattice models such as periodic two-dimensional 1-band and 3-band Hubbard models. The MPS-LCC theory shows a speed up of several orders of magnitude over the usual Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm while delivering energies in excellent agreement with converged DMRG calculations. Also, in all the benchmark calculations presented here, MPS-LCC outperformed the commonly used multi-reference quantum chemistry methods in some cases giving energies in excess of an order of magnitude more accurate. As a size-extensive method that can treat large active spaces, MPS-LCC opens up the use of multireference quantum chemical techniques in strongly correlated ab initio Hamiltonians, including two- and three-dimensional solids.

  8. Spin Correlations of Strongly Interacting Massive Fermion Pairs as a Test of Bell's Inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.; Saito, T.; Kuboki, H.; Sasano, M.; Yako, K.; Ikeda, T.; Itoh, K.; Kawabata, T.; Maeda, Y.; Suda, K.; Uesaka, T.; Matsui, N.; Satou, Y.; Rangacharyulu, C.; Sekiguchi, K.; Tamii, A.

    2006-10-13

    We report the results of the first-time test of the local hidden variable theories (Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt) involving strongly interacting pairs of massive spin 1/2 hadrons from the decay of short-lived ({tau}<10{sup -21}sec) {sup 2}He spin-singlet state, populated in the nuclear reaction {sup 2}H+{sup 1}H{yields}{sup 2}He+n. The novel features of this experiment are (a) the use of an 'event body' detector of nearly 100% efficiency to prepare an unbiased sample and (b) a focal-plane polarimeter of full 2{pi} sr acceptance with a random 'post selection' of the reference axes. The spin-correlation function is deduced to be S{sub exp}({pi}/4)=2.83{+-}0.24{sub stat}{+-}0.07{sub sys}. This result is in agreement with nonlocal quantum mechanical prediction and it violates the Bell-CHSH inequality of vertical bar S vertical bar{<=}2 at a confidence level of 99.3%.

  9. Correlated electron-nuclear kinetic energy distribution following strong-field ionization of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Anis, F.; Madsen, L. B.; Esry, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Being the simplest molecule, understanding the behavior of H2^+ in a strong laser field helps to understand more complex molecules. Theoretically, however, it is challenging to account for both electronic and nuclear motion in the ionization of even this simple molecule. Accordingly, calculating correlated electron-nuclear physical observables --- such as energy or momentum distributions --- has rarely been accomplished. Such calculations are needed to interpret recent measurements of coincidence momentum distributions of electrons and ions following the ionization of molecules by short intense laser pulses. We study how the energy absorbed from an intense laser pulse (400--800 nm, ˜10^14 W/cm^2, >=10 cycles) is shared among the nuclei and the electron of H2^+ by calculating the 2D electron-nuclei momentum distribution for a 1D model with soft-core Coulomb interactions. These 2D momentum plots reveal multiphoton structure with the energy shared between the nuclei and electron. This structure survives integrating out the nuclear energy, but not integrating out the electronic energy. ^*Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. DoE.

  10. Two-site fluctuations and multipolar intersite exchange interactions in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourovskii, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    An approach is proposed for evaluating dipolar and multipolar intersite interactions in strongly correlated materials. This approach is based on the single-site dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) in conjunction with the atomic approximation for the local self-energy. Starting from the local-moment paramagnetic state described by DMFT, we derive intersite interactions by considering the response of the DMFT grand potential to small fluctuations of atomic configurations on two neighboring sites. The present method is validated by applying it to one-band and two-band eg Hubbard models on the simple-cubic 3 d lattice. It is also applied to study the spin-orbital order in the parent cubic structure of ternary chromium fluoride KCrF3. We obtain the onset of a G-type antiferro-orbital order at a significantly lower temperature compared to that in real distorted KCrF3. In contrast, its layered A-type antiferromagnetic order and Néel temperature are rather well reproduced. The calculated full Kugel-Khomskii Hamiltonian contains spin-orbital coupling terms inducing a misalignment in the antiferro-orbital order upon the onset of antiferromagnetism.

  11. 11-Beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression in white adipose tissue is strongly correlated with adiposity.

    PubMed

    Milagro, Fermin I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2007-04-01

    Glucocorticoid action within the cells is regulated by the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and two enzymes, 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1), which converts inactive to active glucocorticoids, and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2), which regulates the access of active glucocorticoids to the receptor by converting cortisol/corticosterone to the glucocorticoid-inactive form cortisone/dehydrocorticosterone. Male Wistar rats developed obesity by being fed a high-fat diet for 56 days, and GR, 11betaHSD1 and 11betaHSD2 gene expression were compared with control-diet fed animals. Gene expression analysis of 11betaHSD1, 11betaHSD2 and GR were performed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. High-fat fed animals overexpressed 11betaHSD2 in subcutaneous but not in retroperitoneal fat. Interestingly, mRNA levels strongly correlated in both tissues with different parameters related to obesity, such as body weight, adiposity and insulin resistance, suggesting that this gene is a reliable marker of adiposity in this rat model of obesity. Thus, 11betaHSD2 is expressed in adipose tissue by both adipocytes and stromal-vascular cells, which suggests that this enzyme may play an important role in preventing fat accumulation in adipose tissue.

  12. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of C-QED Arrays in Strong Correlation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Li, Zhi-Hang; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Recently increasing interests are attracted in the physics of controlled arrays of nonlinear cavity resonators because of the rapid experimental progress achieved in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a driven-dissipative two-dimentional planar C-QED array, standard Markov master equation is generally used to study the dynamics of this system. However, when in the case that the on-site photon-photon interaction enters strong correlation regime, standard Markov master equation may lead to incorrect results. In this paper we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a two-dimentional C-QED array, which is homogeneously pumped by an external pulse, at the same time dissipation exits. We study the evolution of the average photon number of a single cavity by deriving a modified master equation to. In comparison with the standard master equation, the numerical result obtained by our newly derived master equation shows significant difference for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system.

  13. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems 2014 (SCES2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES) was held in Grenoble from the 7th to 11th of July on the campus of the University of Grenoble. It was a great privilege to have the conference in Grenoble after the series of meetings in Sendai (1992), San Diego (1993), Amsterdam (1994), Goa (1995), Zürich (1996), Paris (1998), Nagano (1999), Ann Arbor (2001), Krakow (2002), Karlsruhe (2004), Vienna (2005), Houston (2007), Buzios (2008), Santa Fe (2010), Cambridge (2011) and Tokyo (2013). Every three years, SCES joins the triennial conference on magnetism ICM. In 2015, ICM will take place in Barcelona. The meeting gathered an audience of 875 participants who actively interacted inside and outside of conference rooms. A large number of posters (530) was balanced with four parallel oral sessions which included 86 invited speakers and 141 short oral contributions. A useful arrangement was the possibility to put poster presentations on the website so participants could see them all through the conference week. Each morning two plenary sessions were held, ending on Friday with experimental and theoretical summaries delivered by Philipp Gegenwart (Augsburg) and Andrew Millis (Columbia). The plenary sessions were given by Gabriel Kotliar (Rutgers), Masashi Kawasaki (Tokyo), Jennifer Hoffman (Harvard), Mathias Vojta (Dresden), Ashvin Vishwanath (Berkeley), Andrea Cavalleri (Hamburg), Marc-Henri Julien (Grenoble), Neil Mathur (Cambridge), Giniyat Khaliullin (Stuttgart), and Toshiro Sakakibara (Tokyo). The parallel oral sessions were prepared by 40 symposium organizers selected by the chairman (Antoine Georges) and co-chairman (Kamran Behnia) of the Program Committee with the supplementary rule that speakers had not delivered an invited talk at the previous SCES conference held in 2013 in Tokyo. Special attention was given to help young researchers via grants to 40 overseas students. Perhaps due to the additional possibility of cheap

  14. Strong correlation of major earthquakes with solid-earth tides in part of the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, R.E.; Perry, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    East of the eastern American continental divide and south of lat. 42.5??N, moderate to large historic earthquakes correlate strongly with times of high and low solid-earth tides. This effect is most pronounced when solar declination lies between 17??N and 17??S. Significant correlation also exist between major earthquakes, time of day, lunar declinations, and lunar phase. -Authors

  15. L233P mutation of the Tax protein strongly correlated with leukemogenicity of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Emi; Matsumura, Keiko; Soma, Norihiko; Hirasawa, Shintaro; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Arakaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-27

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) Tax protein is believed to play a crucial role in leukemogenesis by the virus. BLV usually causes asymptomatic infections in cattle, but only one-third develop persistent lymphocytosis that rarely progress after a long incubation period to lymphoid tumors, namely enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL). In the present study, we demonstrated that the BLV tax genes could be divided into two alleles and developed multiplex PCR detecting an L233P mutation of the Tax protein. Then, in order to define the relationship between the Tax protein and leukemogenicity, we examined 360 tumor samples randomly collected from dairy or breeding cattle in Japan, of which Tax proteins were categorized, for age at the time of diagnosis of EBL. The ages of 288 animals (80.0%) associated with L233-Tax and those of 70 animals (19.4%) with P233-Tax individually followed log-normal distributions. Only the two earliest cases (0.6%) with L233-Tax disobeyed the log-normal distribution. These findings suggest that the animals affected by EBL were infected with the virus at a particular point in life, probably less than a few months after birth. Median age of those with P233-Tax was 22 months older than that with L233-Tax and geometric means exhibited a significant difference (P<0.01). It is also quite unlikely that viruses carrying the particular Tax protein infect older cattle. Here, we conclude that BLV could be divided into two categories on the basis of amino acid at position 233 of the Tax protein, which strongly correlated with leukemogenicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Entropy excess in strongly correlated Fermi systems near a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. W.; Zverev, M. V.; Khodel, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    A system of interacting, identical fermions described by standard Landau Fermi-liquid (FL) theory can experience a rearrangement of its Fermi surface if the correlations grow sufficiently strong, as occurs at a quantum critical point where the effective mass diverges. As yet, this phenomenon defies full understanding, but salient aspects of the non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior observed beyond the quantum critical point are still accessible within the general framework of the Landau quasiparticle picture. Self-consistent solutions of the coupled Landau equations for the quasiparticle momentum distribution n(p) and quasiparticle energy spectrum ɛ(p) are shown to exist in two distinct classes, depending on coupling strength and on whether the quasiparticle interaction is regular or singular at zero momentum transfer. One class of solutions maintains the idempotency condition n2(p)=n(p) of standard FL theory at zero temperature T while adding pockets to the Fermi surface. The other solutions are characterized by a swelling of the Fermi surface and a flattening of the spectrum ɛ(p) over a range of momenta in which the quasiparticle occupancies lie between 0 and 1 even at T=0. The latter, non-idempotent solution is revealed by analysis of a Poincaré mapping associated with the fundamental Landau equation connecting n(p) and ɛ(p) and validated by solution of a variational condition that yields the symmetry-preserving ground state. Significantly, this extraordinary solution carries the burden of a large temperature-dependent excess entropy down to very low temperatures, threatening violation of the Nernst Theorem. It is argued that certain low-temperature phase transitions, notably those involving Cooper-pair formation, offer effective mechanisms for shedding the entropy excess. Available measurements in heavy-fermion compounds provide concrete support for such a scenario.

  17. New developments in the theoretical treatment of low dimensional strongly correlated systems.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew J A; Konik, Robert M; Lecheminant, Philippe; Robinson, Neil; Tsvelik, Alexei M

    2017-10-09

    We review two important non-perturbative approaches for extracting the physics of low- dimensional strongly correlated quantum systems. Firstly, we start by providing a comprehensive review of non-Abelian bosonization. This includes an introduction to the basic elements of confor- mal field theory as applied to systems with a current algebra, and we orient the reader by presenting a number of applications of non-Abelian bosonization to models with large symmetries. We then tie this technique into recent advances in the ability of cold atomic systems to realize complex symme- tries. Secondly, we discuss truncated spectrum methods for the numerical study of systems in one and two dimensions. For one-dimensional systems we provide the reader with considerable insight into the methodology by reviewing canonical applications of the technique to the Ising model (and its variants) and the sine-Gordon model. Following this we review recent work on the development of renormalization groups, both numerical and analytical, that alleviate the effects of truncating the spectrum. Using these technologies, we consider a number of applications to one-dimensional systems: properties of carbon nanotubes, quenches in the Lieb-Liniger model, 1+1D quantum chro- modynamics, as well as Landau-Ginzburg theories. In the final part we move our attention to consider truncated spectrum methods applied to two-dimensional systems. This involves combining truncated spectrum methods with matrix product state algorithms. We describe applications of this method to two-dimensional systems of free fermions and the quantum Ising model, including their non-equilibrium dynamics. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. Origin of the photoinduced current of strongly correlated YMnO3 ferroelectric epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kohei; Zhang, Lejun; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ashida, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Fujimura, Norifumi

    2017-10-01

    We have studied the photoinduced carrier generation and the carrier emission resulting in a photoinduced current using strongly correlated YMnO3 ferroelectric thin films. The unipolar material YMnO3 is suitable for studying the effect of the ferroelectric polarization on the photoinduced current. A clear relationship between the direction of the polarization and the photoinduced current was recognized using (0001)YMnO3 epitaxial films. The current switching corresponding to the polarization switching is also observed under white light illumination. To study the origin of the photoinduced current that originated from the photoinduced carrier generation, the light energy dependence of the photoinduced current was investigated. A small peak at 1.75 eV and a broad peak at around 2.5 eV are observed at room temperature. The peak at 1.75 eV corresponds to the optical absorption at 1.7 eV generated by the electron transition between the Mn 3d (xy,x2 - y2) (e2g state)/O 2p hybridized band and upper Mn 3d (3z 2 ‑ r 2) (a1g state) orbital. The broad peak of the photoinduced current corresponds to the broad photoluminescence excitation spectrum at around 2.5 eV, which is never observed in absorption measurement but reported as the hidden optical channel. The origin of the photoinduced current of YMnO3 is discussed in relation to the carrier generation and the emission processes.

  19. Islet Autoantibody Measurements from Dried Blood Spots on Filter Paper Strongly Correlate to Serum Levels

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Kimber M.; Alkanani, Aimon K.; McDaniel, Kristen A.; Goyne, Christopher; Miao, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Yu, Liping; Michels, Aaron W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasing in incidence and predictable with measurement of serum islet autoantibodies (iAb) years prior to clinical disease onset. Identifying iAb positive individuals reduces diabetic ketoacidosis and identifies individuals for T1D prevention trials. However, large scale screening for iAb remains challenging as assays have varying sensitivities and specificities, insulin autoantibodies remain difficult to measure and venipuncture is generally required to obtain serum. We developed an approach to reliably measure all four major iAb, including insulin autoantibodies, from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter-paper. By spiking iAb positive serum into iAb negative whole blood in a dose titration, we optimized the conditions for autoantibody elution from filter paper as measured by fluid phase radioimmunoassays. After assessing stability of measuring iAb from DBS over time, we then screened iAb from DBS and the corresponding serum in new-onset T1D (n = 52), and controls (n = 72) which included first-degree relatives of T1D patients. iAb measured from eluted DBS in new-onset T1D strongly correlated with serum measurements (R2 = 0.96 for mIAA, GADA = 0.94, IA-2A = 0.85, ZnT8A = 0.82, p<0.01 for each autoantibody). There were no false positives in control subjects, and 5/6 with previously unknown iAb positivity in sera were detected using DBS. With further validation, measuring iAb from DBS can be a reliable method to screen for T1D risk. PMID:27846247

  20. Virion half-life in chronic hepatitis B infection is strongly correlated with levels of viremia.

    PubMed

    Dandri, Maura; Murray, John M; Lutgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; Lohse, Ansgar W; Petersen, Joerg

    2008-10-01

    Analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) kinetics with mathematical models may disclose new aspects of HBV infection and host response mechanisms. To determine the kinetics of virion decay from the blood of patients in different phases of chronic infection, we applied mathematical modeling to real-time polymerase chain reaction assays, which enable quantification of viremia and intrahepatic HBV productivity by measuring both copy number and activity of covalently closed circular DNA (relaxed circular DNA/covalently closed circular DNA) in the liver of 80 untreated chronically active HBV carriers (38 hepatitis B e antigen [HBeAg]-positive and 42 HBeAg-negative individuals). We found that the half-life of circulating virions is very fast (median 46 and 2.5 minutes in HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative individuals, respectively) and strongly related to viremia, with clearance rates significantly accelerating as viral loads decrease. To investigate whether immune components can influence the kinetics of virion decay, we analyzed viral dynamics in immunodeficient urokinase-type plasminogen activator chimera mice. Virion half-life in mice (range, 44 minutes to >4 hours) was comparable to estimates determined in high viremic carriers, implying that clearance rates in these patients are mostly determined by common nonspecific mechanisms. Notably, the lack of correlation between virion half-life and viremia in mice indicated that immune components significantly accelerate virion clearance rates in individuals with low titers. Our analyses suggest that both host defense mechanisms and levels of circulating virions affect the kinetics of HBV decay assessed in the serum of chronic carriers. Identification of the factors affecting clearance rates will be important for future antiviral drug developments and it may give insights into the mechanisms involved in clearance of other chronic infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus.

  1. Emergent high-Tc ferroelectric ordering of strongly correlated and frustrated protons in a heteroepitaxial ice film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Toshiki; Aiga, Norihiro; Otsuki, Yuji; Watanabe, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu

    2016-11-01

    Materials containing strong correlation and frustration have the potential to respond to external perturbations in an unusual way. In the case of common water ice, protons in the hydrogen-bond network are strongly correlated and highly frustrated under Pauling's ice rules. At low temperature, the strongly correlated protons lose ergodicity, and little is understood about the cooperative thermodynamic and electric response to external stimuli. Here, using a model platinum substrate, we demonstrate emergent high-Tc ferroelectric proton ordering in a heteroepitaxial ice film. Such proton ordering is thermodynamically stable and has an extremely high critical temperature of ~175 K. We found that anisotropy and protolysis driven by the electrostatistics at the heterointerface are key factors in stimulating this novel exotic ordering in the many-body correlated proton system. The significant increase in Tc due to the heterointerface suggests the ubiquity of ferroelectric ice in nature--specifically, in space and the polar stratosphere.

  2. Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, M; Delrot, P; Leonard, I; Alfalou, A; Brosseau, C; Dogariu, A

    2013-02-10

    Underwater target detection is investigated by combining active polarization imaging and optical correlation-based approaches. Experiments were conducted in a glass tank filled with tap water with diluted milk or seawater and containing targets of arbitrary polarimetric responses. We found that target estimation obtained by imaging with two orthogonal polarization states always improves detection performances when correlation is used as detection criterion. This experimental study illustrates the potential of polarization imaging for underwater target detection and opens interesting perspectives for the development of underwater imaging systems.

  3. Exploring Emotional Intelligence Correlates in Selected Populations of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, D.; Torrie, J.; Prindle, L.

    This study examined the role played by emotional intelligence on occupational success, seeking to correlate college grades with measures of emotional intelligence. The study, conducted at a Canadian community college, involved two student populations: an adult education group and a group of automotive service technicians in a pre-employment…

  4. Ab initio optimization principle for the ground states of translationally invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models.

    PubMed

    Ran, Shi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and fundamental numeric scheme dubbed as ab initio optimization principle (AOP) is proposed for the ground states of translational invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models. The idea is to transform a nondeterministic-polynomial-hard ground-state simulation with infinite degrees of freedom into a single optimization problem of a local function with finite number of physical and ancillary degrees of freedom. This work contributes mainly in the following aspects: (1) AOP provides a simple and efficient scheme to simulate the ground state by solving a local optimization problem. Its solution contains two kinds of boundary states, one of which play the role of the entanglement bath that mimics the interactions between a supercell and the infinite environment, and the other gives the ground state in a tensor network (TN) form. (2) In the sense of TN, a novel decomposition named as tensor ring decomposition (TRD) is proposed to implement AOP. Instead of following the contraction-truncation scheme used by many existing TN-based algorithms, TRD solves the contraction of a uniform TN in an opposite way by encoding the contraction in a set of self-consistent equations that automatically reconstruct the whole TN, making the simulation simple and unified; (3) AOP inherits and develops the ideas of different well-established methods, including the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD), network contractor dynamics, density matrix embedding theory, etc., providing a unified perspective that is previously missing in this fields. (4) AOP as well as TRD give novel implications to existing TN-based algorithms: A modified iTEBD is suggested and the two-dimensional (2D) AOP is argued to be an intrinsic 2D extension of DMRG that is based on infinite projected entangled pair state. This paper is focused on one-dimensional quantum models to present AOP. The benchmark is given on a transverse Ising

  5. Ab initio optimization principle for the ground states of translationally invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and fundamental numeric scheme dubbed as ab initio optimization principle (AOP) is proposed for the ground states of translational invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models. The idea is to transform a nondeterministic-polynomial-hard ground-state simulation with infinite degrees of freedom into a single optimization problem of a local function with finite number of physical and ancillary degrees of freedom. This work contributes mainly in the following aspects: (1) AOP provides a simple and efficient scheme to simulate the ground state by solving a local optimization problem. Its solution contains two kinds of boundary states, one of which play the role of the entanglement bath that mimics the interactions between a supercell and the infinite environment, and the other gives the ground state in a tensor network (TN) form. (2) In the sense of TN, a novel decomposition named as tensor ring decomposition (TRD) is proposed to implement AOP. Instead of following the contraction-truncation scheme used by many existing TN-based algorithms, TRD solves the contraction of a uniform TN in an opposite way by encoding the contraction in a set of self-consistent equations that automatically reconstruct the whole TN, making the simulation simple and unified; (3) AOP inherits and develops the ideas of different well-established methods, including the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD), network contractor dynamics, density matrix embedding theory, etc., providing a unified perspective that is previously missing in this fields. (4) AOP as well as TRD give novel implications to existing TN-based algorithms: A modified iTEBD is suggested and the two-dimensional (2D) AOP is argued to be an intrinsic 2D extension of DMRG that is based on infinite projected entangled pair state. This paper is focused on one-dimensional quantum models to present AOP. The benchmark is given on a transverse Ising

  6. Exploring individual differences in children's mathematical skills: a correlational and dimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsson, H; Polman, R C J; Lorås, H

    2013-08-01

    Individual differences in mathematical skills are typically explained by an innate capability to solve mathematical tasks. At the behavioural level this implies a consistent level of mathematical achievement that can be captured by strong relationships between tasks, as well as by a single statistical dimension that underlies performance on all mathematical tasks. To investigate this general assumption, the present study explored interrelations and dimensions of mathematical skills. For this purpose, 68 ten-year-old children from two schools were tested using nine mathematics tasks from the Basic Knowledge in Mathematics Test. Relatively low-to-moderate correlations between the mathematics tasks indicated most tasks shared less than 25% of their variance. There were four principal components, accounting for 70% of the variance in mathematical skill across tasks and participants. The high specificity in mathematical skills was discussed in relation to the principle of task specificity of learning.

  7. Strong scintillations in astrophysics. 4. Cross-correlation between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The cross correlation of the intensity fluctuations between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects on the intensity correlations based on the Markov approximation were calculated. Results may be applied to quite general turbulence spectra for an extended turbulent medium. Calculations of the cross-correlation function and of finite bandwidth effects are explicitly carried out for both Gaussian and Kolmogorov turbulence spectra. The increases of the correlation scale of intensity fluctuations are different for these two spectra and the difference can be used to determine whether the interstellar turbulent medium has a Gaussian or a Kolmogorov spectrum.

  8. Electron correlation explored through electron spectrometry using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.; Whitfield, S.B.; Flemming, M.G. . Dept. of Physics); Krause, M.O. )

    1991-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation facilities as a research tool has made possible experiments which provide new insights into the role which correlation plays in electron dynamics and atomic and molecular structure. Features such as autoionizing resonances, normal and resonant Auger decay modes, and ionization threshold structure have become visible in a wealth of new detail. Some aspects of this information drawn from recent experiments on the alkaline earth metals and the rare gases are presented. The potential for increased flux and resolution inherent in insertion device-based facilities like the Advanced Light Source should advance this understanding even further, and some future directions are suggested. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Protein domains correlate strongly with exons in multiple eukaryotic genomes--evidence of exon shuffling?

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyi; Grigoriev, Andrei

    2004-09-01

    We conducted a multi-genome analysis correlating protein domain organization with the exon-intron structure of genes in nine eukaryotic genomes. We observed a significant correlation between the borders of exons and domains on a genomic scale for both invertebrates and vertebrates. In addition, we found that the more complex organisms displayed consistently stronger exon-domain correlation, with substantially more significant correlations detected in vertebrates compared with invertebrates. Our observations concur with the principles of exon shuffling theory, including the prediction of predominantly symmetric phase of introns flanking the borders of correlating exons. These results suggest that extensive exon shuffling events during evolution significantly contributed to the shaping of eukaryotic proteomes.

  10. Two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour field in pp, pA and AA collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye-Yin; Xu, Ming-Mei; Zhang, Heng-Ying; Wu, Yuan-Fang

    2016-11-01

    Using the CGC formalism, we calculate the two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour fields in pp, pA and AA collisions, respectively. If one trigger gluon is fixed at central rapidity, a ridge-like correlation pattern is obtained in symmetry pp and AA collisions, and a huge bump-like correlation pattern is presented in asymmetry pA collisions. It is demonstrated that long-range ridge-like rapidity correlations are caused by the stronger correlation with the gluon of colour source. These features are independent of the azimuthal angular of two selected gluon. They are qualitatively consistent with current observed data at LHC. The transverse momentum and incident energy dependence of the ridge and bump-like correlations are also systematically studied. The ridge is more likely observed at higher incident energy and lower transverse momentum of trigger gluon.

  11. Exploring socioecological correlates of active living in retirement village residents.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Andrea; Wood, Lisa; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2014-01-01

    This study explored individual, social, and built environmental attributes in and outside of the retirement village setting and associations with various active living outcomes including objectively measured physical activity, specific walking behaviors, and social participation. Residents in Perth, Australia (N = 323), were surveyed on environmental perceptions of the village and surrounding neighborhood, self-reported physical activity, and demographic characteristics and wore accelerometers. Managers (N = 32) were surveyed on village characteristics, and objective neighborhood measures were generated in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results indicated that built- and social-environmental attributes within and outside of retirement villages were associated with active living among residents; however, salient attributes varied depending on the specific outcome considered. Findings suggest that locating villages close to destinations is important for walking and that locating them close to previous and familiar neighborhoods is important for social participation. Further understanding and consideration into retirement village designs that promote both walking and social participation are needed.

  12. Exploring correlations in the CGC wave function: Odd azimuthal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael; Skokov, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    We extend the color glass condensate (CGC) approach to a calculation of the double inclusive gluon production by including the high density effect in the CGC wave function of the projectile (proton). Our main result is that these effects lead to the appearance of odd harmonics in the two particle correlation C (k ,p ) . We find that in the high momentum limit, |k |,|p |≫Qs , this results in a positive c1{2 }. Additionally when the magnitudes of the two momenta are approximately equal, |k |/|p |≈1 , the density effects also generate a positive third harmonic c3{2 }, which translates into a nonvanishing v3 when the momenta of the trigger and an associated particle are in the same momentum bin. The sign of c3{2 } becomes negative when |k |/|p |>1.1 suggesting an interesting experimental signature.

  13. Exploring correlations in the CGC wave function: Odd azimuthal anisotropy

    DOE PAGES

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael; Skokov, Vladimir

    2017-07-17

    In this paper, we extend the color glass condensate (CGC) approach to a calculation of the double inclusive gluon production by including the high density effect in the CGC wave function of the projectile (proton). Our main result is that these effects lead to the appearance of odd harmonics in the two particle correlation C(k,p). We find that in the high momentum limit, |k|, |p| >> Qs, this results in a positive c1{2}. Additionally when the magnitudes of the two momenta are approximately equal, |k|/|p| ≈ 1, the density effects also generate a positive third harmonic c3{2}, which translates intomore » a nonvanishing v3 when the momenta of the trigger and an associated particle are in the same momentum bin. Finally, the sign of c3{2} becomes negative when |k|/|p| > 1.1 suggesting an interesting experimental signature.« less

  14. Regional Mapping of the Lunar Crustal Magnetic Field: Correlation of Strong Anomalies with Curvilinear Albedo Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Yingst, A.; Zakharian, A.; Lin, R. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    Using high-resolution regional Lunar Prospector magnetometer magnetic field maps, we report here a close correlation of the strongest individual crustal anomalies with unusual curvilinear albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class.

  15. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems. Progress report, 1 August 1980-31 July 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.D.

    1981-03-01

    Studies of electron correlations of doubly-excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in fast ion-atom collisions are reported. (GHT)

  16. Increasing Specificity of Correlate Research: Exploring Correlates of Children’s Lunchtime and After-School Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rebecca M.; Ridley, Kate; Olds, Timothy S.; Dollman, James

    2014-01-01

    Background The lunchtime and after-school contexts are critical windows in a school day for children to be physically active. While numerous studies have investigated correlates of children’s habitual physical activity, few have explored correlates of physical activity occurring at lunchtime and after-school from a social-ecological perspective. Exploring correlates that influence physical activity occurring in specific contexts can potentially improve the prediction and understanding of physical activity. Using a context-specific approach, this study investigated correlates of children’s lunchtime and after-school physical activity. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected from 423 South Australian children aged 10.0–13.9 years (200 boys; 223 girls) attending 10 different schools. Lunchtime and after-school physical activity was assessed using accelerometers. Correlates were assessed using purposely developed context-specific questionnaires. Correlated Component Regression analysis was conducted to derive correlates of context-specific physical activity and determine the variance explained by prediction equations. Results The model of boys’ lunchtime physical activity contained 6 correlates and explained 25% of the variance. For girls, the model explained 17% variance from 9 correlates. Enjoyment of walking during lunchtime was the strongest correlate for both boys and girls. Boys’ and girls’ after-school physical activity models explained 20% variance from 14 correlates and 7% variance from the single item correlate, “I do an organised sport or activity after-school because it gets you fit”, respectively. Conclusions Increasing specificity of correlate research has enabled the identification of unique features of, and a more in-depth interpretation of, lunchtime and after-school physical activity behaviour and is a potential strategy for advancing the physical activity correlate research field. The findings of this study could be used to inform

  17. Thermomagnetic correlation lengths of strongly interacting matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hernández, L. A.; Loewe, M.; Raya, Alfredo; Rojas, J. C.; Zamora, R.

    2017-08-01

    We study the correlation length between test quarks with the same electric and color charges in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, considering thermal and magnetic effects. We extract the correlation length from the quark correlation function. The latter is constructed from the probability amplitude to bring a given quark into the plasma once a previous one with the same quantum numbers is placed at a given distance apart. For temperatures below the transition temperature, the correlation length starts growing as the field strength increases to then decrease for large magnetic fields. For temperatures above the pseudocritical temperature, the correlation length continues increasing as the field strength increases. We found that such behavior can be understood as a competition between the tightening induced by the classical magnetic force versus the random thermal motion. For large enough temperatures, the increase of the occupation number contributes to the screening of the interaction between the test particles. The growth of the correlation distance with the magnetic field can be understood as due to the closer proximity between one of the test quarks and the ones popped up from the vacuum, which in turn appear due to the increase of the occupation number with the temperature.

  18. Zeros of the dispersion relation of the elementary excitation and the correlation length of strongly correlated quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuichi

    2007-03-01

    We argue that the imaginary part of a zero of the dispersion relation of the elementary excitation of quantum systems is equal to the inverse correlation length. We confirm the relation for the Hubbard model[1] in the half-filled case; it has been confirmed only for the S=1/2 antiferromagnetic XXZ chain[2]. In order to search zeros of the dispersion relation in the complex momentum space efficiently, we introduce a non-Hermitian generalization of quantum systems by adding an imaginary vector potential ig to the momentum operator[3]. We also show for the half-filled Hubbard model the reason why the non-Hermitian critical point[4] is equal to the inverse correlation length[5] by noting the dispersion relation of the charge excitation. [1] Y. Nakamura and N. Hatano, in preparation. [2] K. Okunishi, Y. Akutsu, N. Akutsu and T. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. B 64 (2001) 104432. [3] Y. Nakamura and N. Hatano, Physica B 378-380 (2006) 292; J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 75 (2006) 114001. [4] T. Fukui and N. Kawakami, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 16051. [5] C. A. Stafford and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. B 48 (1993) 1409.

  19. Algorithmic implementation of particle-particle ladder diagram approximation to study strongly-correlated metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayogi, A.; Majidi, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    In condensed-matter physics, strongly-correlated systems refer to materials that exhibit variety of fascinating properties and ordered phases, depending on temperature, doping, and other factors. Such unique properties most notably arise due to strong electron-electron interactions, and in some cases due to interactions involving other quasiparticles as well. Electronic correlation effects are non-trivial that one may need a sufficiently accurate approximation technique with quite heavy computation, such as Quantum Monte-Carlo, in order to capture particular material properties arising from such effects. Meanwhile, less accurate techniques may come with lower numerical cost, but the ability to capture particular properties may highly depend on the choice of approximation. Among the many-body techniques derivable from Feynman diagrams, we aim to formulate algorithmic implementation of the Ladder Diagram approximation to capture the effects of electron-electron interactions. We wish to investigate how these correlation effects influence the temperature-dependent properties of strongly-correlated metals and semiconductors. As we are interested to study the temperature-dependent properties of the system, the Ladder diagram method needs to be applied in Matsubara frequency domain to obtain the self-consistent self-energy. However, at the end we would also need to compute the dynamical properties like density of states (DOS) and optical conductivity that are defined in the real frequency domain. For this purpose, we need to perform the analytic continuation procedure. At the end of this study, we will test the technique by observing the occurrence of metal-insulator transition in strongly-correlated metals, and renormalization of the band gap in strongly-correlated semiconductors.

  20. Strong polygamy of quantum correlations in multi-party quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new type of polygamy inequality for multi-party quantum entanglement. We first consider the possible amount of bipartite entanglement distributed between a fixed party and any subset of the rest parties in a multi-party quantum system. By using the summation of these distributed entanglements, we provide an upper bound of the distributed entanglement between a party and the rest in multi-party quantum systems. We then show that this upper bound also plays as a lower bound of the usual polygamy inequality, therefore the strong polygamy of multi-party quantum entanglement. For the case of multi-party pure states, we further show that the strong polygamy of entanglement implies the strong polygamy of quantum discord.

  1. Exploring Strong Interactions in Proteins with Quantum Chemistry and Examples of Their Applications in Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Xie, Neng-Zhong; Du, Qi-Shi; Li, Jian-Xiu; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Three strong interactions between amino acid side chains (salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge) are studied that are stronger than (or comparable to) the common hydrogen bond interactions, and play important roles in protein-protein interactions. Quantum chemical methods MP2 and CCSD(T) are used in calculations of interaction energies and structural optimizations. The energies of three types of amino acid side chain interactions in gaseous phase and in aqueous solutions are calculated using high level quantum chemical methods and basis sets. Typical examples of amino acid salt bridge, cation-π, and amide bridge interactions are analyzed, including the inhibitor design targeting neuraminidase (NA) enzyme of influenza A virus, and the ligand binding interactions in the HCV p7 ion channel. The inhibition mechanism of the M2 proton channel in the influenza A virus is analyzed based on strong amino acid interactions. (1) The salt bridge interactions between acidic amino acids (Glu- and Asp-) and alkaline amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+) are the strongest residue-residue interactions. However, this type of interaction may be weakened by solvation effects and broken by lower pH conditions. (2) The cation- interactions between protonated amino acids (Arg+, Lys+ and His+) and aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, Trp and His) are 2.5 to 5-fold stronger than common hydrogen bond interactions and are less affected by the solvation environment. (3) The amide bridge interactions between the two amide-containing amino acids (Asn and Gln) are three times stronger than hydrogen bond interactions, which are less influenced by the pH of the solution. (4) Ten of the twenty natural amino acids are involved in salt bridge, or cation-, or amide bridge interactions that often play important roles in protein-protein, protein-peptide, protein-ligand, and protein-DNA interactions.

  2. Strong correlations between circulating chemerin levels and lipoprotein subfractions in nondiabetic obese and nonobese subjects.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Hajnalka; Katkó, Mónika; Harangi, Mariann; Somodi, Sándor; Gaál, Krisztina; Fülöp, Péter; Paragh, György; Seres, Ildikó

    2014-09-01

    Chemerin is a recently described adipokine expressed primarily in the white adipose tissue. Compared with lean subjects, circulating chemerin levels are significantly elevated in obese individuals and correlate positively with the prevalence of various cardiovascular risk factors including altered lipoprotein levels. To date, the impact of chemerin on lipoprotein subfractions and its role in atherosclerotic processes are still unclear. Fifty nondiabetic obese (NDO) patients and 38 lean controls matched in age and gender were enrolled. Chemerin level was measured by ELISA. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions were detected by nongradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Lipoprint). We detected significantly higher serum chemerin levels in NDO patients compared with healthy controls (590·1 ± 190·3 ng/ml vs 405 ± 127·1 ng/ml, P < 0·001). A significant positive correlation was found between chemerin and LDL cholesterol levels, while chemerin showed a significant negative correlation with the level of HDL cholesterol. Significant positive correlation was detected between chemerin and the ratio of small dense LDL, while chemerin correlated negatively with the mean LDL size. Also, a significant negative correlation was found between serum chemerin and the ratio of large HDL subfraction, while there were significant positive correlations between chemerin levels and intermediate and small HDL subfraction ratios, respectively. Chemerin may be involved in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism in obese patients who do not show apparent abnormalities of glucose metabolism. Early changes in the distribution of the lipoprotein subfractions may contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis, leading to increased cardiovascular risk. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Strong correlation of atomic thermal motion in the first coordination shell of a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Mattern, N.; Eckert, J.

    2013-02-25

    We demonstrate a strong correlation of atomic thermal motions in the first coordination shell of Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} metallic glass using molecular dynamics simulations, which explains directly the small thermal expansion coefficient calculated by the first maxima of pair correlation functions. The vibrational anisotropy in the glass is found to be even higher than in crystalline copper. The parallel-perpendicular anisotropy gradually decreases upon heating. The anisotropy in Zr-Zr is the strongest bonds among all the interatomic bonds, which is also very stable near the glass transition at 700 K. Structurally, the anisotropy can be correlated to Cu-centered (0 2 8 1) clusters.

  4. Strong electronic correlations in iron pnictides: Comparison of the optical spectra for BaFe2As2-related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    The role of electronic correlations in iron pnictides is one of the hottest issues in research of iron-based superconductors. Utilizing optical spectroscopy, we quantified the strength of electronic correlations in BaFe2As2-related compounds. For the parent compound BaFe2As2, the fraction of the coherent spectral weight in the low-energy optical conductivity spectrum is distinctly small. Such a spectral feature is also observed in KFe2As2, indicating that the charge dynamics is highly incoherent in iron arsenides. It is found that the strength of electronic correlations significantly changes by chemical substitution, either through changing the electron filling and/or the As-Fe-As bond angle. The present result indicates that superconductivity of the iron pnictides emerges when the materials possess adequate amount of electronic correlations, and that either too weak or too strong correlations are not favorable for high-Tc superconductivity. The degree of electronic correlations in iron arsenides turns out to be comparable to that in the hole-underdoped cuprate superconductors. In this sense, the iron arsenides are classified into strongly correlated systems, probably arising from the Hund's rule coupling. This work was done in collaboration with S. Ishida, K. Kihou, Y. Tomioka, C. H. Lee, A. Iyo, T. Ito, H. Eisaki (AIST), T. Tanaka, T. Kakeshita, S. Uchida (University of Tokyo), T. Saito, H. Fukazawa, and Y. Kohori (Chiba University).

  5. Strong correlations between the exponent α and the particle number for a Renyi monoatomic gas in Gibbs' statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastino, A.; Rocca, M. C.

    2017-06-01

    Appealing to the 1902 Gibbs formalism for classical statistical mechanics (SM)—the first SM axiomatic theory ever that successfully explained equilibrium thermodynamics—we show that already at the classical level there is a strong correlation between Renyi's exponent α and the number of particles for very simple systems. No reference to heat baths is needed for such a purpose.

  6. Strong correlations between the exponent α and the particle number for a Renyi monoatomic gas in Gibbs' statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Plastino, A; Rocca, M C

    2017-06-01

    Appealing to the 1902 Gibbs formalism for classical statistical mechanics (SM)-the first SM axiomatic theory ever that successfully explained equilibrium thermodynamics-we show that already at the classical level there is a strong correlation between Renyi's exponent α and the number of particles for very simple systems. No reference to heat baths is needed for such a purpose.

  7. Particle correlations in the strongly coupled two-dimensional one-component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, P.; Calinon, R.; Golden, K.I.; Kalman, G.; Merlini, D.

    1981-04-01

    The equilibrium pair-correlation function and static dielectric response function are calculated for the one-component two-dimensional plasma in the convolution (Totsuji-Ichimaru) approximation. The long-wavelength (k ..-->.. 0) compressibility sum rule is exactly satisfied for arbitrary values of the plasma parameter ..gamma... For ..gamma.. < 2 the approximation scheme accurately describes the short-range (r ..-->.. 0) behavior of the pair-correlation function g(r) while for ..gamma.. > or = 2, it does not. As ..gamma.. ..-->.. 4 the isothermal compressibility tends to zero as it should. The correlation energy is also calculated for this model and compared with the results for other approximation schemes and the Monte Carlo results.

  8. Communication: Configuration interaction combined with spin-projection for strongly correlated molecular electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2016-01-07

    We present single and double particle-hole excitations in the recently revived spin-projected Hartree-Fock. Our motivation is to treat static correlation with spin-projection and recover the residual correlation, mostly dynamic in nature, with simple configuration interaction (CI). To this end, we introduce the Wick theorem for nonorthogonal determinants, which enables an efficient implementation in conjunction with the direct CI scheme. The proposed approach, termed spin-extended CI with singles and doubles, achieves a balanced treatment between dynamic and static correlations. To approximately account for the quadruple excitations, we also modify the well-known Davidson correction. We report that our approaches yield surprisingly accurate potential curves for HF, H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}, and a hydrogen lattice, compared to traditional single reference wave function methods at the same computational scaling as regular CI.

  9. What Gives a Wine Its Strong Red Color? Main Correlations Affecting Copigmentation.

    PubMed

    Heras-Roger, Jesus; Díaz-Romero, Carlos; Darias-Martín, Jacinto

    2016-08-31

    Copigmentation and enological parameters were studied in a collection of 250 red wines. Although several copigmentation studies have been performed with model solutions, little is known about the actual consequences directly in wine of anthocyanin interactions. To date, some studies have considered relationships between copigmentation and natural wine constituents, but none correlates copigmentation measurements with the real wide concentration in wine. In this work, published hypotheses based on model solutions such as phenolic acid copigmentation ability or the influence of copigmentation factors such as flavonols are empirically evaluated in a large sample of wines for the first time. The study confirms previous results obtained from solutions, whereas other factors suggested as being relevant seem to be unrelated to the studied effect at the concentration range naturally occurring in the wines studied. For instance, the important role of flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids has been ratified, whereas ethanol, gallic acid, and some metals show significant inverse correlations with copigmentation. Unexpectedly, magnesium content in wine correlates with color, whereas the concentration of traditional copigments, such as quercetin, does not show any correlation with copigmentation.

  10. Z2 slave-spin theory of a strongly correlated Chern insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prychynenko, Diana; Huber, Sebastian D.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the phase diagram of the topological honeycomb model in the presence of strong interactions. We concentrate on half filling and employ a Z2 slave-spin method to find a band insulator with staggered density, a spin-density-wave and a Mott insulating phase. Both the band insulator and the spin-density wave come in various topological varieties. Finally, we calculate the response function relevant for lattice modulation spectroscopy with cold atomic gases in optical lattices.

  11. Exploring the optical contrast effect in strong atomic lines for exoplanets transiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, Paul W.; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy is a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing planetary atmospheres. Non-photospheric features on the stellar disk, however, can contaminate the planetary signal: during transit the observed spectrum is weighted towards the features not currently being occulted by the planet. This contrast effect can mimic absorption in the planetary atmosphere for strong atomic lines such as Na I, Ca II, and the hydrogen Balmer lines. While the contrast effect is negligible for quiet stars, contributions to the transmission signal from active stellar surfaces can produce ~1% changes in the line core. It is therefore critical that these contrast signals be differentiated from true absorption features in the planetary atmosphere. Here we present our work on simulating the contrast effect for an active stellar surface. We discuss the particular case of HD 189733 b, a well-studied hot Jupiter orbiting an active K-dwarf, due to the plethora of atomic absorption signals reported in its atmosphere.Specifically, we focus on Hα to address recent suggestions that the measured in-transit signals are a result of stellar activity. In the contrast model we include center-to-limb variations and calculate limb darkening parameters as a function of wavelength across the line of interest. The model includes contributions to the spectrum from spots, faculae and plages, filaments, and the bare stellar photosphere. Stellar rotation is also included. We find that it is very difficult to reproduce the measured in-transit Hα signals for reasonable active region parameters. In addition, it is difficult to create an in-transit contrast signature that lasts for the duration of the transit unless the planet is crossing an active latitudinal belt and is always obscuring active regions. This suggests that the Hα measurements arise predominantly in the planetary atmosphere. However, the contrast effect likely contributes to these signals. Furthermore, our results could be

  12. Massively parallel simulations of strong electronic correlations: Realistic Coulomb vertex and multiplet effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgärtel, M.; Ghanem, K.; Kiani, A.; Koch, E.; Pavarini, E.; Sims, H.; Zhang, G.

    2017-07-01

    We discuss the efficient implementation of general impurity solvers for dynamical mean-field theory. We show that both Lanczos and quantum Monte Carlo in different flavors (Hirsch-Fye, continuous-time hybridization- and interaction-expansion) exhibit excellent scaling on massively parallel supercomputers. We apply these algorithms to simulate realistic model Hamiltonians including the full Coulomb vertex, crystal-field splitting, and spin-orbit interaction. We discuss how to remove the sign problem in the presence of non-diagonal crystal-field and hybridization matrices. We show how to extract the physically observable quantities from imaginary time data, in particular correlation functions and susceptibilities. Finally, we present benchmarks and applications for representative correlated systems.

  13. Exact spectra of strong coulomb correlations of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Shivalika; Kaur, Harsimran; Singh, Sunny; Hazra, Ram Kuntal

    2017-01-01

    Applications of 3-D 2-e systems have proliferated very fast due to technological advancements in wide range of phenomena from atomic landscape to mesoscopic scale. The unusual properties of atomic/mesoscopic systems are the results of interplaying charge interactions among different bound states. The non-trivial e-e correlations in electrically and/or magnetically confined systems improvise wealth of intriguing challenges at fundamental level due to lack of exact solution of Schrödinger equations. For the first time, a novel methodology of exactly finite summed coulomb correlations invented by us is so handy that even usual programmable calculator can be used to examine the electronic structures of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in perpendicular magnetic field (symmetric gauge). Statistics of electronic levels, heat capacity measurements and magnetization (T∼1 K) are also investigated in brief to probe the degree of disorderedness.

  14. Ubiquity of Linear Resistivity at Intermediate Temperature in Strongly Correlated Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Greg; Zlatic, V.; Freericks, Jim

    2014-03-01

    Correlated metals display transport behavior that differs from what is commonly seen in ordinary metals (Fermi-liquids). One of the most salient features is a resistivity that is linear in temperature over decades in temperature and rises to well above the Ioffe-Regel limit (where the mean-free path is less than a lattice spacing). Using an exact representation of the Kubo linear response, we show that a linear resistivity naturally occurs in a minimal model that includes only hopping and correlation. We expect this to be common to many systems at an incoherent intermediate-temperature state, above the Fermi coherence scale. We verify the analytic arguments with exact calculations for Falicov-Kimball model which is solved with dynamical mean-field theory. Similar features have also been seen in Hubbard models, which can be approximated by the Falicov-Kimball model.

  15. Strongly Correlated Quantum Fluids: Ultracold Quantum Gases, Quantum Chromodynamic Plasmas and Holographic Duality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-19

    temperature superconductors to the hydrodynamics of QGPs. These gases are mainly made of alkali metal New Journal of Physics 14 (2012) 115009 (http...condensed matter systems, this means that theories constructed from single-particle properties , such as the Hartree–Fock approximation, cannot describe a...correlated quantum fluids. Transport properties of the fluid can be 7 Fluids are materials that obey the equations of hydrodynamics. The word liquid

  16. Strong Solar Control of Infrared Aurora on Jupiter: Correlation Since the Last Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.

    2009-01-01

    Polar aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere radiate throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X ray through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 5 - 20 micron wavelength). Voyager IRIS data and ground-based spectroscopic measurements of Jupiter's northern mid-IR aurora, acquired since 1982, reveal a correlation between auroral brightness and solar activity that has not been observed in Jovian aurora at other wavelengths. Over nearly three solar cycles, Jupiter auroral ethane emission brightness and solar 10.7 cm radio flux and sunspot number are positively correlated with high confidence. Ethane line emission intensity varies over tenfold between low and high solar activity periods. Detailed measurements have been made using the GSFC HIPWAC spectrometer at the NASA IRTF since the last solar maximum, following the mid-IR emission through the declining phase toward solar minimum. An even more convincing correlation with solar activity is evident in these data. Current analyses of these results will be described, including planned measurements on polar ethane line emission scheduled through the rise of the next solar maximum beginning in 2009, with a steep gradient to a maximum in 2012. This work is relevant to the Juno mission and to the development of the Europa Jupiter System Mission. Results of observations at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program.

  17. The correlation between the Nernst effect and fluctuation diamagnetism in strongly fluctuating superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kingshuk; Banerjee, Sumilan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2017-07-01

    We study the Nernst effect in fluctuating superconductors by calculating the transport coefficient {α }{xy} in a phenomenological model where the relative importance of phase and amplitude fluctuations of the order parameter is tuned continuously to smoothly evolve from an effective XY model to the more conventional Ginzburg-Landau description. To connect with a concrete experimental realization we choose the model parameters appropriate for cuprate superconductors and calculate {α }{xy} and the magnetization {M} over the entire range of experimentally accessible values of field, temperature and doping. We argue that {α }{xy} and {M} are both determined by the equilibrium properties of the superconducting fluctuations (and not their dynamics) despite the former being a transport quantity. Thus, the experimentally observed correlation between the Nernst signal and the magnetization arises primarily from the correlation between {α }{xy} and {M}. Further, there exists a dimensionless ratio {M}/(T{α }{xy}) that quantifies this correlation. We calculate, for the first time, this ratio over the entire phase diagram of the cuprates and find it agrees with previous results obtained in specific parts of the phase diagram. We conclude that there appears to be no sharp distinction between the regimes dominated by phase fluctuations and Gaussian fluctuations for this ratio in contrast to {α }{xy} and {M} individually. The utility of this ratio is that it can be used to determine the extent to which superconducting fluctuations contribute to the Nernst effect in different parts of the phase diagram given the measured values of magnetization.

  18. Pairwise Correlations of Eight Strong DIBs and N(H), N(H2), and EB-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Scott D.; York, D. G.; McCall, B. J.; Dahlstrom, J.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Welty, D. E.; Drosback, M. M.; Hobbs, L. M.; Rachford, B. L.; Snow, T. P.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the correlations between equivalent widths of eight diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), and examine their correlations with the column densities of atomic hydrogen (N(H)) and molecular hydrogen (N(H2)), and EB-V. The DIBs are centered at λ 5780.5, 6204.5, 6283.8, 6196.0, 6613.6, 5705.1, 5797.1, and 5487.7, in decreasing order of Pearson's correlation coefficient with N(H), which ranges from 0.94 to 0.78. The equivalent width of 5780.5 is better correlated with column density of H than with EB-V or H2, and the same is true for six of the seven other DIBs presented here. Hence, they are not preferentially located in the densest, most UV shielded parts of interstellar clouds. These eight strong DIBs are not correlated well enough with each other to suggest they come from the same carrier. However, the correlations may be useful in deriving interstellar parameters, such as N(H) from W(5780.5), when more direct methods are not available. Our future plans include mapping the distribution of DIBs in interstellar clouds, closer examination of the excellent correlation between 5705.1 and 5780.5 (almost as good as the near perfect correlation of 6613.6 with 6196.0), and precise measurements of broad DIBs.

  19. Probing strong correlations with light scattering: Example of the quantum Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Babujian, H. M.; Karowski, M.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this article we calculate the nonlinear susceptibility and the resonant Raman cross section for the paramagnetic phase of the ferromagnetic quantum Ising model in one dimension. In this region the spectrum of the Ising model has a gap m. The Raman cross section has a strong singularity when the energy of the outgoing photon is at the spectral gap ωf ≈ m and a square root threshold when the frequency difference between the incident and outgoing photons ωi₋ωf≈2m. Finally, the latter feature reflects the fermionic nature of the Ising model excitations.

  20. Probing strong correlations with light scattering: Example of the quantum Ising model

    DOE PAGES

    Babujian, H. M.; Karowski, M.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this article we calculate the nonlinear susceptibility and the resonant Raman cross section for the paramagnetic phase of the ferromagnetic quantum Ising model in one dimension. In this region the spectrum of the Ising model has a gap m. The Raman cross section has a strong singularity when the energy of the outgoing photon is at the spectral gap ωf ≈ m and a square root threshold when the frequency difference between the incident and outgoing photons ωi₋ωf≈2m. Finally, the latter feature reflects the fermionic nature of the Ising model excitations.

  1. Probing strong correlations with light scattering: Example of the quantum Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Babujian, H. M.; Karowski, M.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this article we calculate the nonlinear susceptibility and the resonant Raman cross section for the paramagnetic phase of the ferromagnetic quantum Ising model in one dimension. In this region the spectrum of the Ising model has a gap m. The Raman cross section has a strong singularity when the energy of the outgoing photon is at the spectral gap ωf ≈ m and a square root threshold when the frequency difference between the incident and outgoing photons ωi₋ωf≈2m. Finally, the latter feature reflects the fermionic nature of the Ising model excitations.

  2. Distinct Topological Crystalline Phases in Models for the Strongly Correlated Topological Insulator SmB_{6}.

    PubMed

    Baruselli, Pier Paolo; Vojta, Matthias

    2015-10-09

    SmB_{6} was recently proposed to be both a strong topological insulator and a topological crystalline insulator. For this and related cubic topological Kondo insulators, we prove the existence of four different topological phases, distinguished by the sign of mirror Chern numbers. We characterize these phases in terms of simple observables, and we provide concrete tight-binding models for each phase. Based on theoretical and experimental results for SmB_{6} we conclude that it realizes the phase with C_{k_{z}=0}^{+}=+2, C_{k_{z}=π}^{+}=+1, C_{k_{x}=k_{y}}^{+}=-1, and we propose a corresponding minimal model.

  3. Tunable moiré bands and strong correlations in small-twist-angle bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyounghwan; DaSilva, Ashley; Huang, Shengqiang; Fallahazad, Babak; Larentis, Stefano; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; LeRoy, Brian J.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2017-03-01

    According to electronic structure theory, bilayer graphene is expected to have anomalous electronic properties when it has long-period moiré patterns produced by small misalignments between its individual layer honeycomb lattices. We have realized bilayer graphene moiré crystals with accurately controlled twist angles smaller than 1° and studied their properties using scanning probe microscopy and electron transport. We observe conductivity minima at charge neutrality, satellite gaps that appear at anomalous carrier densities for twist angles smaller than 1°, and tunneling densities-of-states that are strongly dependent on carrier density. These features are robust up to large transverse electric fields. In perpendicular magnetic fields, we observe the emergence of a Hofstadter butterfly in the energy spectrum, with fourfold degenerate Landau levels, and broken symmetry quantum Hall states at filling factors ±1, 2, 3. These observations demonstrate that at small twist angles, the electronic properties of bilayer graphene moiré crystals are strongly altered by electron-electron interactions.

  4. Edge state reconstruction from strong correlations in quantum spin Hall insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaricci, A.; Privitera, L.; Petocchi, F.; Capone, M.; Sangiovanni, G.; Trauzettel, B.

    2017-05-01

    We study the fate of helical edge states in a quantum spin Hall insulators when the whole system is exposed to strong Coulomb interactions. Using dynamical mean-field theory, we show that the dispersion relation of the edge states is strongly affected by Coulomb interactions. In fact, the formerly gapless edge modes become gapped at a critical interaction strength. Interestingly, this critical interaction strength is significantly smaller at the edge than its counterpart in the bulk. Thus, the bulk remains in a topologically nontrivial state at intermediate interaction strengths where the edge states are already gapped out. This peculiar scenario leads to the reconstruction of gapless helical states at the new boundary between the topological bulk and the trivial (Mott insulating) edge. Further increasing the interaction strength triggers the progressive localization on the new boundary, the shrinking of the quantum spin Hall region, and the migration of the helical edge states towards the center of the system. The edge state reconstruction process is eventually interrupted by the Mott localization of the whole sample. Finally, we characterize the topological properties of the system by means of a local Chern marker.

  5. Phosphatidylethanol Levels Are Elevated and Correlate Strongly with AUDIT Scores in Young Adult Binge Drinkers.

    PubMed

    Piano, Mariann R; Tiwari, Stephanie; Nevoral, Lauren; Phillips, Shane A

    2015-09-01

    To compare levels of phosphatidylethanol (PEth) to self-reported alcohol intake among young adult binge drinkers (18-30 years). Abstainers (n = 23), moderate (n = 22), and binge drinkers (n = 58) completed an alcohol consumption questionnaire and the AUDIT. PEth was measured in whole blood and dried blood spots via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Also measured was mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). Most subjects were female (65%) and Caucasian (73%). Among binge drinkers, past-month average number of binge episodes was 7.2 ± 4; average duration of binge drinking behavior was 4.3 ± 3 years. AUDIT scores and PEth levels (ng/ml) in whole blood or dried blood spots were significantly (P < 0.001) greater in binge drinkers (13 ± 4, 186 ± 170, and 65 ± 53, respectively) compared to moderate drinkers (6 ± 3, 24 ± 29, and 11 ± 13, respectively) and abstainers (0.6 ± 0.89, 0, and 0, respectively). No differences were found in MCV and GGT among groups. There were significant correlations between whole blood and dried blood spot PEth levels and AUDIT scores (Spearman's r = 0.745 and 0.738, P < 0.0001, respectively), and whole blood and dried blood spot PEth levels were significantly correlated (0.899, P < 0.0001). PEth levels measured in whole blood and dried blood spots were significantly greater in binge drinkers compared to abstainers and moderate drinkers, and these levels were positively correlated with AUDIT scores. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  6. Communication: An adaptive configuration interaction approach for strongly correlated electrons with tunable accuracy.

    PubMed

    Schriber, Jeffrey B; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2016-04-28

    We introduce a new procedure for iterative selection of determinant spaces capable of describing highly correlated systems. This adaptive configuration interaction (ACI) determines an optimal basis by an iterative procedure in which the determinant space is expanded and coarse grained until self-consistency. Two importance criteria control the selection process and tune the ACI to a user-defined level of accuracy. The ACI is shown to yield potential energy curves of N2 with nearly constant errors, and it predicts singlet-triplet splittings of acenes up to decacene that are in good agreement with the density matrix renormalization group.

  7. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) Strongly Correlates with Increasing HIV-1 Viremia and Markers of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Sanjay; Qiu, Ju; Rupert, Adam W.; Hu, Zonghui; Higgins, Jeanette; Dewar, Robin L.; Stevens, Randy; Rehm, Catherine A.; Metcalf, Julia A.; Sherman, Brad T.; Baseler, Michael W.; Lane, H. Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2016-01-01

    Objective IL-15 has been postulated to play an important role in HIV-1 infection, yet there are conflicting reports regarding its expression levels in these patients. We sought to measure the level of IL-15 in a large, well characterised cohort of HIV-1 infected patients and correlate this with well known markers of inflammation, including CRP, D-dimer, sCD163 and sCD14. Design and Methods IL-15 levels were measured in 501 people (460 patients with HIV-1 infection and 41 uninfected controls). The HIV-1 infected patients were divided into 4 groups based on viral load: <50 copies/ml, 51–10,000 copies/ml, 10,001–100,000 copies/ml and >100,000 copies/ml. The Mann Whitney test (non-parametric) was used to identify significant relationships between different patient groups. Results IL-15 levels were significantly higher in patients with viral loads >100,000 copies/ml (3.02 ± 1.53 pg/ml) compared to both uninfected controls (1.69 ± 0.37 pg/ml, p<0.001) or patients with a viral load <50 copies/ml (1.59 ± 0.40 pg/ml (p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between HIV-1 viremia and IL-15 levels (Spearman r = 0.54, p<0.001) and between CD4+ T cell counts and IL-15 levels (Spearman r = -0.56, p<0.001). Conclusions IL-15 levels are significantly elevated in HIV-1 infected patients with viral loads >100,000 copies/ml compared to uninfected controls, with a significant direct correlation noted between IL-15 and HIV-1 viremia and an inverse correlation between IL-15 levels and CD4+ T cell counts. These data support a potential role for IL-15 in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated immune activation. PMID:27880829

  8. Communication: An adaptive configuration interaction approach for strongly correlated electrons with tunable accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriber, Jeffrey B.; Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a new procedure for iterative selection of determinant spaces capable of describing highly correlated systems. This adaptive configuration interaction (ACI) determines an optimal basis by an iterative procedure in which the determinant space is expanded and coarse grained until self-consistency. Two importance criteria control the selection process and tune the ACI to a user-defined level of accuracy. The ACI is shown to yield potential energy curves of N2 with nearly constant errors, and it predicts singlet-triplet splittings of acenes up to decacene that are in good agreement with the density matrix renormalization group.

  9. Quantum distillation: Dynamical generation of low-entropy states of strongly correlated fermions in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heidrich-Meisner, F.; Manmana, S. R.; Rigol, M.; Muramatsu, A.; Feiguin, A. E.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between particles can lead to subtle and sometimes counterintuitive phenomena. We analyze one such case, occurring during the sudden expansion of fermions in a lattice when the initial state has a strong admixture of double occupancies. We promote the notion of quantum distillation: during the expansion and in the case of strongly repulsive interactions, doublons group together, forming a nearly ideal band insulator, which is metastable with low entropy. We propose that this effect could be used for cooling purposes in experiments with two-component Fermi gases.

  10. Generalized-active-space pair-density functional theory: an efficient method to study large, strongly correlated, conjugated systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumen; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Predicting ground- and excited-state properties of open-shell organic molecules by electronic structure theory can be challenging because an accurate treatment has to correctly describe both static and dynamic electron correlation. Strongly correlated systems, i.e., systems with near-degeneracy correlation effects, are particularly troublesome. Multiconfigurational wave function methods based on an active space are adequate in principle, but it is impractical to capture most of the dynamic correlation in these methods for systems characterized by many active electrons. We recently developed a new method called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), that combines the advantages of wave function theory and density functional theory to provide a more practical treatment of strongly correlated systems. Here we present calculations of the singlet-triplet gaps in oligoacenes ranging from naphthalene to dodecacene. Calculations were performed for unprecedently large orbitally optimized active spaces of 50 electrons in 50 orbitals, and we test a range of active spaces and active space partitions, including four kinds of frontier orbital partitions. We show that MC-PDFT can predict the singlet-triplet splittings for oligoacenes consistent with the best available and much more expensive methods, and indeed MC-PDFT may constitute the benchmark against which those other models should be compared, given the absence of experimental data.

  11. Quiescence Correlates Strongly with Directly Measured Black Hole Mass in Central Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas, Bryan A.; Bell, Eric F.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.; White, Simon D. M.; Cattaneo, Andrea; Woo, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Roughly half of all stars reside in galaxies without significant ongoing star formation. However, galaxy formation models indicate that it is energetically challenging to suppress the cooling of gas and the formation of stars in galaxies that lie at the centers of their dark matter halos. In this Letter, we show that the dependence of quiescence on black hole and stellar mass is a powerful discriminant between differing models for the mechanisms that suppress star formation. Using observations of 91 star-forming and quiescent central galaxies with directly measured black hole masses, we find that quiescent galaxies host more massive black holes than star-forming galaxies with similar stellar masses. This observational result is in qualitative agreement with models that assume that effective, more-or-less continuous active galactic nucleus feedback suppresses star formation, strongly suggesting the importance of the black hole in producing quiescence in central galaxies.

  12. Point-contact transport properties of strongly correlated electrons on liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Rees, D G; Kuroda, I; Marrache-Kikuchi, C A; Höfer, M; Leiderer, P; Kono, K

    2011-01-14

    We present transport measurements of a nondegenerate two-dimensional electron system on the surface of liquid helium at a point constriction. The constriction is formed in a microchannel by a split gate beneath the helium surface. The electrostatic energy of the electron system, which depends in part on the electron density, determines the split-gate voltage threshold of current flow through the constriction. Steplike increases in conductance are observed as the confinement strength is reduced. As the Coulomb interaction between electrons is strong, we attribute this effect to the increase in the number of electrons that can pass simultaneously through the constriction. Close to the threshold, single-electron transport is observed.

  13. Momentum distribution functions of strongly correlated systems of particles: Wigner approach and path integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, A. S.; Filinov, V. S.; Fortov, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    The new numerical version of the Wigner approach to quantum mechanics for treatment thermodynamic properties of the strongly interacting systems of particles has been developed for extreme conditions, when there are no small physical parameters and analytical approximations used in different kind of perturbation theories can not be applied. The new path integral representation of the quantum Wigner function in the phase space has been developed for canonical ensemble. Explicit analytical expression of the Wigner function has been obtained in linear and harmonic approximations. The new quantum Monte-Carlo method for calculations of average values of arbitrary quantum operators has been proposed. Preliminary calculations of the momentum distribution function of the Coulomb systems of particles have been carried out. Comparison with classical Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution shows the significant influence of quantum effects on the high energy asymptotics (“tails’) of the calculated momentum distribution functions, which resulted in appearance of sharp oscillations.

  14. Probing Phase Coherence Via Density of States for Strongly Correlated Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apinyan, V.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2015-03-01

    We present the calculation of the coherent spectral functions and density of states (DOS) for excitonic systems in the frame of the three-dimensional extended Falicov-Kimball model. Using gage-invariant U(1) transformation to the usual fermions, we represent the electron operator as a fermion attached to the U(1) phase-flux tube. The emergent bosonic gage field, related to the phase variables, is crucial for the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of excitons. Employing the path-integral formalism, we manipulate the bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom to obtain the effective actions related to fermionic and bosonic sectors. Considering the normal and anomalous excitonic Green functions, we calculate the spectral functions, which have the forms of convolutions in the reciprocal space between bosonic and fermionic counterparts. For the fermionic incoherent part of the DOS, we have found the strong evidence of the hybridization gap in DOS spectra. Furthermore, considering Bogoliubov coherence mechanism, we calculate the coherent DOS spectra. For the coherent normal fermionic DOS, there is no hybridization gap found in the system due to strong coherence effects and phase stiffness. The similar behavior is observed also for the condensate part of the anomalous excitonic DOS spectra. We show that for small values of the Coulomb interaction the fermionic DOS exhibits a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-like double-peak structure. In the BEC region of the BCS-BEC crossover, the double-peak structure disappears totally for both: coherent and incoherent DOS spectra. We discuss also the temperature dependence of DOS functions.

  15. Bold-line Monte Carlo and the nonequilibrium physics of strongly correlated many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Guy

    2015-03-01

    This talk summarizes real time bold-line diagrammatic Monte-Carlo approaches to quantum impurity models, which make significant headway against the sign problem by summing over corrections to self-consistent diagrammatic expansions rather than a bare diagrammatic series. When the bold-line method is combined with reduced dynamics techniques both local single-time properties and two time correlators such as Green functions can be computed at very long timescales, enabling studies of nonequilibrium steady state behavior of quantum impurity models and creating new solvers for nonequilibrium dynamical mean field theory. This work is supported by NSF DMR 1006282, NSF CHE-1213247, DOE ER 46932, TG-DMR120085 and TG-DMR130036, and the Yad Hanadiv-Rothschild Foundation.

  16. Computation of electronic structure and magnetic properties of strongly correlated materials with LDA+DMFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, S. L.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2015-04-01

    In this review, we describe general ideas of the LDA+DMFT method which merges dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) and density functional theory (in particular the local density approximation (LDA)). Nowadays, the LDA+DMFT computational scheme is the most powerful numerical tool for studying physical properties of real materials and chemical compounds. It incorporates the advantage of DMFT to treat the full range of local dynamical Coulomb correlations and the ability of band methods to describe material-specific band dispersion caused by the lattice periodicity. We briefly discuss underlying physical ideas of LDA+DMFT and its mathematical implementation. Then different algorithms applied to solution of the DMFT impurity problem are briefly described. We then give examples of successful applications of the LDA+DMFT method to study spectral and magnetic properties of recently synthesized compounds like pnictide superconductors as well as classic charge-transfer systems NiO and MnO.

  17. Binding of holes to magnetic impurities in a strongly correlated system

    SciTech Connect

    Poilblanc, D.; Scalapino, D.J.; Hanke, W. )

    1994-11-01

    The effect of a magnetic ([ital S]=1/2) impurity coupled to a two-dimensional system of correlated electrons (described by the [ital t]-[ital J] model) is studied by exact diagonalizations. It is found that, if the exchange coupling of the impurity with the neighboring spins is ferromagnetic or weakly antiferromagnetic, an extra hole can form bound states of different spatial symmetries with the impurity extending to a few lattice spacings. The binding energy is maximum when the impurity is completely decoupled (vacancy) and vanishes for an antiferromagnetic coupling exceeding [similar to]0.3[ital J]. Several peaks appear in the single-hole spectral function below the lower edge of the quasiparticle band as signatures of the [ital d]-, [ital s]-, and [ital p]-wave bound states.

  18. Azimuthal charged-particle correlations and possible local strong parity violation.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bnzarov, I; Bonner, B E; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Silva, L C; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E J; Geromitsos, A; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jena, C; Jin, F; Jones, C L; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Konzer, J; Kopytine, M; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, N; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakai, S; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Semertzidis, Y; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xie, W; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2009-12-18

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to nontrivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three-particle azimuthal correlator which is a P even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at square root of s(NN) = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  19. Quasiparticles in transition metals with strong local correlations: band formation and collective effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, N.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]We address the question, whether low lying one-particle excitations in the Fermi-liquid phase of highly correlated electron systems can form well defined bands of nearly stable quasiparticles, and comment on features of a universal band picture for these systems. We outline how to derive a description of instabilities to magnetic, charged ordered or superconducting phases, which bears a close analogy to Stoner theory and lends itself to an interpretation in terms of quasiparticle bands and residual interactions at low temperatures. Concepts and problems are illustrated via calculations for some standard models of solid-state theory using modern many-body techniques like NRG, NCA and DMFT. Differences to conventional band structure theory are pointed out. We shortly comment on the relevance of these questions to the physics of inhomogeneous systems and small particles.

  20. Self-consistent implementation of ensemble density functional theory method for multiple strongly correlated electron pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Liu, Fang; Kim, Kwang S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-12-22

    Here, the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method is based on an ensemble representation of the density and is capable of correctly describing the non-dynamic electron correlation stemming from (near-)degeneracy of several electronic configurations. The existing REKS methodology describes systems with two electrons in two fractionally occupied orbitals. In this work, the REKS methodology is extended to treat systems with four fractionally occupied orbitals accommodating four electrons and self-consistent implementation of the REKS(4,4) method with simultaneous optimization of the orbitals and their fractional occupation numbers is reported. The new method is applied to a number of molecular systems where simultaneous dissociation of several chemical bonds takes place, as well as to the singlet ground states of organic tetraradicals 2,4-didehydrometaxylylene and 1,4,6,9-spiro[4.4]nonatetrayl.

  1. Self-consistent implementation of ensemble density functional theory method for multiple strongly correlated electron pairs

    DOE PAGES

    Filatov, Michael; Liu, Fang; Kim, Kwang S.; ...

    2016-12-22

    Here, the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method is based on an ensemble representation of the density and is capable of correctly describing the non-dynamic electron correlation stemming from (near-)degeneracy of several electronic configurations. The existing REKS methodology describes systems with two electrons in two fractionally occupied orbitals. In this work, the REKS methodology is extended to treat systems with four fractionally occupied orbitals accommodating four electrons and self-consistent implementation of the REKS(4,4) method with simultaneous optimization of the orbitals and their fractional occupation numbers is reported. The new method is applied to a number of molecular systems where simultaneous dissociationmore » of several chemical bonds takes place, as well as to the singlet ground states of organic tetraradicals 2,4-didehydrometaxylylene and 1,4,6,9-spiro[4.4]nonatetrayl.« less

  2. Time-resolved Studies of Phase Transition Dynamics in Strongly Correlated Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Rini, M; Tobey, R; Dean, N; Wall, S; Ehrke, H; Zhu, Y; Tomioka, Y; Tokura, Y; Schoenlein, R W; Cavalleri, A

    2008-12-05

    Ultrafast light pulses can be used to control electronic, magnetic and structural phases of complex solids. Here, we investigate the dynamics of insulator-metal phase transitions in colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites by a combination of femtosecond visible-to-midinfrared pump-probe techniques and transport measurements. We show that an insulator-metal transition can be stimulated in CMR manganites by both above bandgap excitation and selective excitation of individual vibrational degrees of freedom. These two approaches rely on the ultrafast manipulation of parameters controlling the electronic filling and the electronic bandwidth respectively, extending the concepts of filling and bandwidth control to the ultrafast timescale. The ultrafast vibrational control of correlated-electron phases may provide new insights into the role played by lattice vibrations in determining the electronic properties of complex solids.

  3. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  4. Self-consistent implementation of ensemble density functional theory method for multiple strongly correlated electron pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Liu, Fang; Kim, Kwang S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-12-01

    The spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method is based on an ensemble representation of the density and is capable of correctly describing the non-dynamic electron correlation stemming from (near-)degeneracy of several electronic configurations. The existing REKS methodology describes systems with two electrons in two fractionally occupied orbitals. In this work, the REKS methodology is extended to treat systems with four fractionally occupied orbitals accommodating four electrons and self-consistent implementation of the REKS(4,4) method with simultaneous optimization of the orbitals and their fractional occupation numbers is reported. The new method is applied to a number of molecular systems where simultaneous dissociation of several chemical bonds takes place, as well as to the singlet ground states of organic tetraradicals 2,4-didehydrometaxylylene and 1,4,6,9-spiro[4.4]nonatetrayl.

  5. Earnings and Financial Compensation from Social Security Systems Correlate Strongly with Disability for Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kavaliunas, Andrius; Wiberg, Michael; Tinghög, Petter; Glaser, Anna; Gyllensten, Hanna; Alexanderson, Kristina; Hillert, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients earn lower incomes and receive higher benefits. However, there is limited knowledge of how this is correlated with their disability. To elucidate sources and levels of income among MS patients with different disability, assessed with the Expanded Disability Status Scale. A total of 7929 MS patients aged 21-64 years and living in Sweden in 2010 were identified for this cross-sectional study. Descriptive statistics, logistic and truncated linear regression models were used to estimate differences between MS patients regarding earnings, disability pension, sickness absence, disability allowance, unemployment compensation, and social assistance. The average level of earnings was ten times lower and the average level of health- related benefits was four times higher when comparing MS patients with severe and mild disability. MS patients with severe disability had on average SEK 166,931 less annual income from earnings and SEK 54,534 more income from benefits compared to those with mild disability. The combined average income for MS patients was 35% lower when comparing patients in the same groups. The adjusted risk ratio for having earnings among MS patients with severe disability compared to the patients with mild disability was 0.33 (95% CI 0.29-0.39), while the risk ratio for having benefits was 1.93 (95% CI 1.90-1.94). Disease progression affects the financial situation of MS patients considerably. Correlations between higher disability and patient income were observed, suggesting that earnings and benefits could be used as measures of MS progression and proxies of disability.

  6. Final report for next generation multi-scale quantum simulation software for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Mark

    2014-11-18

    The goal of this project was to develop a new formalism for the correlated electron problem, which we call, the Multi Scale Many Body formalism. This report will focus on the work done at the Louisiana State University (LSU) since the mid term report. The LSU group moved from the University of Cincinnati (UC) to LSU in the summer of 2008. In the last full year at UC, only half of the funds were received and it took nearly two years for the funds to be transferred from UC to LSU . This effectively shut down the research at LSU until the transfer was completed in 2011, there were also two no-cost extensions of the grant until August of this year. The grant ended for the other SciDAC partners at Davis and ORNL in 2011. Since the mid term report, the LSU group has published 19 papers [P1-P19] acknowledging this SciDAC, which are listed below. In addition, numerous invited talked acknowledged the SciDAC. Below, we will summarize the work at LSU since the mid-term report and mainly since funding resumed. The projects include the further development of multi-scale methods for correlated systems (1), the study of quantum criticality at finite doping in the Hubbard model (2), the description of a promising new method to study Anderson localization with a million-fold reduction of computational complexity!, the description of other projects (4), and (5) a workshop to close out the project that brought together exascale program developers (Stellar, MPI, OpenMP,...) with applications developers.

  7. Mean-field approximation for thermodynamic and spectral functions of correlated electrons: Strong coupling and arbitrary band filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiš, Václav; Pokorný, Vladislav; Kauch, Anna

    2017-04-01

    We present a construction of a mean-field theory for thermodynamic and spectral properties of correlated electrons reliable in the strong-coupling limit. We introduce an effective interaction determined self-consistently from the reduced parquet equations. It is a static local approximation of the two-particle irreducible vertex, the kernel of a potentially singular Bethe-Salpeter equation. The effective interaction enters the Ward identity from which a thermodynamic self-energy, renormalizing the one-electron propagators, is determined. The dynamical Schwinger-Dyson equation with the thermodynamic propagators is then used to calculate the spectral properties. The thermodynamic and spectral properties of correlated electrons are in this way determined on the same footing and in a consistent manner. Such a mean-field approximation is analytically controllable and free of unphysical behavior and spurious phase transitions. We apply the construction to the asymmetric Anderson impurity and the Hubbard models in the strong-coupling regime.

  8. Spin-charge transformation of lattice fermion models: duality approach for diagrammatic simulation of strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlström, Johan

    2017-09-01

    I derive a dual description of lattice fermions, specifically focusing on the t-J and Hubbard models, that allow diagrammatic techniques to be employed efficiently in the strongly correlated regime, as well as for systems with a restricted Hilbert space. These constructions are based on spin-charge transformation, where the lattice fermions of the original model are mapped onto spins and spin-less fermions. This mapping can then be combined with Popov-Fedotov fermionisation, where the spins are mapped onto lattice fermions with imaginary chemical potential. The resulting models do not contain any large expansion parameters, even for strongly correlated systems. Also, they exhibit dramatically smaller corrections to the density matrix from nonlinear terms in the Hamiltonian. The combination of these two properties means that they can be addressed with diagrammatic methods, including simulation techniques based on stochastic sampling of diagrammatic expansions.

  9. A strong genetic correlation underlying a behavioural syndrome disappears during development because of genotype–age interactions

    PubMed Central

    Class, Barbara; Brommer, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    In animal populations, as in humans, behavioural differences between individuals that are consistent over time and across contexts are considered to reflect personality, and suites of correlated behaviours expressed by individuals are known as behavioural syndromes. Lifelong stability of behavioural syndromes is often assumed, either implicitly or explicitly. Here, we use a quantitative genetic approach to study the developmental stability of a behavioural syndrome in a wild population of blue tits. We find that a behavioural syndrome formed by a strong genetic correlation of two personality traits in nestlings disappears in adults, and we demonstrate that genotype–age interaction is the likely mechanism underlying this change during development. A behavioural syndrome may hence change during organismal development, even when personality traits seem to be strongly physiologically or functionally linked in one age group. We outline how such developmental plasticity has important ramifications for understanding the mechanistic basis as well as the evolutionary consequences of behavioural syndromes. PMID:26041348

  10. High-quality single crystal growth and strongly correlated electronic states in rare earth and actinide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Honda, Fuminori; Hirose, Yusuke; Settai, Rikio; Takeuchi, Tetsuya

    2016-11-01

    We review the nature of strongly correlated electronic states in rare earth and actinide compounds, focusing on localized versus itinerant electronic states in CeRhIn5, quantum critical phenomena in YbIr2Zn20, residual resistivity in CeCu6, metamagnetism in heavy fermion compounds, and unconventional superconductivity in CeIrSi3 without inversion symmetry in the crystal structure, emphasizing that sample quality is essentially important to clarify the characteristic features for the heavy fermion compounds.

  11. Condensed-matter ab initio approach for strongly correlated electrons: Application to a quantum spin liquid candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, Youhei

    2015-12-31

    Recently, condensed-matter ab initio approaches to strongly correlated electrons confined in crystalline solids have been developed and applied to transition-metal oxides and molecular conductors. In this paper, an ab initio scheme based on constrained random phase approximations and localized Wannier orbitals is applied to a spin liquid candidate Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} and is shown to reproduce experimentally observed specific heat.

  12. Dynamic structure factor of a strongly correlated Fermi superfluid within a density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng; Dalfovo, Franco; Sharma, Rishi; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamic structure factor of a strongly interacting Fermi gas at the crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensates, by developing an improved random phase approximation within the framework of a density functional theory (DFT)—the so-called superfluid local density approximation. Compared with the previous random-phase-approximation studies based on the standard Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, the use of the DFT greatly improves the accuracy of the equation of state at the crossover, and leads to a better description of both collective Bogoliubov-Anderson-Goldstone phonon mode and single-particle fermionic excitations at small transferred momentum. Near unitarity, where the s-wave scattering length diverges, we show that the single-particle excitations start to significantly contribute to the spectrum of dynamic structure factor once the frequency is above a threshold of the energy gap at 2{{Δ }}. The sharp rise in the spectrum at this threshold can be utilized to measure the pairing gap Δ. Together with the sound velocity determined from the phonon branch, the dynamic structure factor provides us some key information of the crossover Fermi superfluid. Our predictions could be examined in experiments with 6Li or 40K atoms using Bragg spectroscopy.

  13. Spin-orbit coupling and transport in strongly correlated two-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2017-05-01

    Measuring the magnetoresistance (MR) of ultraclean GaAs two-dimensional holes for a large rs range of 20-50, two striking behaviors in relation to the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) emerge in response to strong electron-electron interaction. First, in exact correspondence to the zero-field metal-to-insulator transition (MIT), the sign of the MR switches from being positive in the metallic regime to being negative in the insulating regime when the carrier density crosses the critical density pc of MIT (rs˜39 ). Second, as the SOC-driven correction Δ ρ to the MR decreases with reducing carrier density (or the in-plane wave vector), it exhibits an upturn in the close proximity just above pc where rs is beyond 30, indicating a substantially enhanced SOC effect. This peculiar behavior echoes with a trend of delocalization long suspected for the SOC-interaction interplay. Meanwhile, for p 40 , in contrast to the common belief that a magnet field enhances Wigner crystallization, the negative MR is likely linked to enhanced interaction.

  14. Determination of the strong phase in D0-->K+pi- using quantum-correlated measurements.

    PubMed

    Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E

    2008-06-06

    We exploit the quantum coherence between pair-produced D0 and D[over]0 in psi(3770) decays to study charm mixing, which is characterized by the parameters x and y, and to make a first determination of the relative strong phase delta between D0-->K+pi- and D[over]0-->K+pi-. Using 281 pb(-1) of e+e- collision data collected with the CLEO-c detector at Ecm=3.77 GeV, as well as branching fraction input and time-integrated measurements of RM identical with (x2 + y2)/2 and RWS identical with Gamma(D0-->K+pi-)/Gamma(D[over]0-->K+pi-) from other experiments, we find cosdelta=1.03(-0.17)(+0.31)+/-0.06, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. By further including other mixing parameter measurements, we obtain an alternate measurement of cosdelta=1.10+/-0.35+/-0.07, as well as x sindelta=(4.4(-1.8)(+2.7)+/-2.9)x10(-3) and delta=(22(-12-11)(+11+9)) degrees .

  15. Optical Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated (MOTT-HUBBARD, Heavy-Fermion, Unconventional Superconductor) Materials Tuned Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A; Struzhkin, V V

    2003-11-12

    During the past years, the Co-PI's have been responsible for the development and operation of optical techniques (Raman, IR, fluorescence, absorption and reflectance spectroscopy at ultrahigh pressures and high and low temperatures) which have proven to be extremely powerful for studying low-Z, molecular solids including hydrogen, ice, etc. (see results below). Meanwhile, it has become increasingly clear that optical spectroscopy has an equally extraordinary potential for studying metals and superconductors at ultrahigh pressures, thus the result will have a major impact on material research. However, because of the extreme difference in optical properties of opaque metals and transparent insulating molecular solids, successful accomplishment of the present project will require substantial effort in improving the present equipment and developing new techniques, and funds for this are requested here. Below we provide a short description of the work done and techniques developed during the last years. We also propose to explore new frontiers in compressed materials close to the insulator-metal boundaries, spin-crossover, and other quantum critical points.

  16. Observation of correlated spin-orbit order in a strongly anisotropic quantum wire system.

    PubMed

    Brand, C; Pfnür, H; Landolt, G; Muff, S; Dil, J H; Das, Tanmoy; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-09-10

    Quantum wires with spin-orbit coupling provide a unique opportunity to simultaneously control the coupling strength and the screened Coulomb interactions where new exotic phases of matter can be explored. Here we report on the observation of an exotic spin-orbit density wave in Pb-atomic wires on Si(557) surfaces by mapping out the evolution of the modulated spin-texture at various conditions with spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The results are independently quantified by surface transport measurements. The spin polarization, coherence length, spin dephasing rate and the associated quasiparticle gap decrease simultaneously as the screened Coulomb interaction decreases with increasing excess coverage, providing a new mechanism for generating and manipulating a spin-orbit entanglement effect via electronic interaction. Despite clear evidence of spontaneous spin-rotation symmetry breaking and modulation of spin-momentum structure as a function of excess coverage, the average spin polarization over the Brillouin zone vanishes, indicating that time-reversal symmetry is intact as theoretically predicted.

  17. Strong correlation between levels of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals and solar ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrer, Franz; Berresheim, Harald

    2006-07-01

    The most important chemical cleaning agent of the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical, OH. It determines the oxidizing power of the atmosphere, and thereby controls the removal of nearly all gaseous atmospheric pollutants. The atmospheric supply of OH is limited, however, and could be overcome by consumption due to increasing pollution and climate change, with detrimental feedback effects. To date, the high variability of OH concentrations has prevented the use of local observations to monitor possible trends in the concentration of this species. Here we present and analyse long-term measurements of atmospheric OH concentrations, which were taken between 1999 and 2003 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg in southern Germany. We find that the concentration of OH can be described by a surprisingly linear dependence on solar ultraviolet radiation throughout the measurement period, despite the fact that OH concentrations are influenced by thousands of reactants. A detailed numerical model of atmospheric reactions and measured trace gas concentrations indicates that the observed correlation results from compensations between individual processes affecting OH, but that a full understanding of these interactions may not be possible on the basis of our current knowledge of atmospheric chemistry. As a consequence of the stable relationship between OH concentrations and ultraviolet radiation that we observe, we infer that there is no long-term trend in the level of OH in the Hohenpeissenberg data set.

  18. Pairwise Correlations Of Eight Strong DIBs And N(H), N(H2), And E(B-V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Scott David; York, D. G.; McCall, B. J.; Dahlstrom, J.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Welty, D. E.; Drosback, M. M.; Hobbs, L. M.; Rachford, B. L.; Snow, T. P.

    2011-05-01

    We establish correlations between equivalent widths of eight diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), and examine their correlations with N(H), N(H2), and E(B-V). The DIBs are centered at 5780.5, 6204.5, 6283.8, 6196.0, 6613.6, 5705.1, 5797.1, and 5487.7, in decreasing order of Pearson's correlation coefficient with N(H), which range from 0.96 to 0.82. We find the equivalent width of 5780.5 is better correlated with column densities of H than with E(B-V) or H2, confirming earlier results, and the same is true for six of the seven other DIBs presented here. Despite this similarity, the eight strong DIBs chosen are not correlated well enough with each other to suggest they come from the same carrier. These DIBs are more likely to be associated with H than with H2, and hence are not preferentially located in the densest, most UV shielded parts of interstellar clouds. The correlations may be useful in deriving interstellar parameters, such as N(H) from W(5780.5), when more direct methods are not available. Our future plans include closer examination the excellent correlation between 5705.1 and 5780.5 (almost as good as the near perfect correlation of 6613.6 with 6196.0), and on precise measurements of broad DIBS (e.g. 4428.83, 4881.06) and inclusion of these better measurements in correlation studies with the main DIBs noted in this poster.

  19. Emergence of q-statistical functions in a generalized binomial distribution with strong correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, G.; Tsallis, C.

    2015-05-01

    We study a symmetric generalization pk ( N ) ( η , α ) of the binomial distribution recently introduced by Bergeron et al., where η ∈ [0, 1] denotes the win probability and α is a positive parameter. This generalization is based on q-exponential generating functions ( eq gen z ≡ [ 1 + ( 1 - qgen ) z ] 1 / ( 1 - q gen ) ; e1 z = e z ) where qgen = 1 + 1/α. The numerical calculation of the probability distribution function of the number of wins k, related to the number of realizations N, strongly approaches a discrete qdisc-Gaussian distribution, for win-loss equiprobability (i.e., η = 1/2) and all values of α. Asymptotic N → ∞ distribution is in fact a qatt-Gaussian eq att - β z 2 , where qatt = 1 - 2/(α - 2) and β = (2α - 4). The behavior of the scaled quantity k/Nγ is discussed as well. For γ < 1, a large-deviation-like property showing a qldl-exponential decay is found, where qldl = 1 + 1/(ηα). For η = 1/2, qldl and qatt are related through 1/(qldl - 1) + 1/(qatt - 1) = 1, ∀α. For γ = 1, the law of large numbers is violated, and we consistently study the large-deviations with respect to the probability of the N → ∞ limit distribution, yielding a power law, although not exactly a qLD-exponential decay. All q-statistical parameters which emerge are univocally defined by (η, α). Finally, we discuss the analytical connection with the Pólya urn problem.

  20. Symmetries and Topological Order: Realizations and Signals in Correlated Strong Spin-Orbit Coupled Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Ping

    Spin-orbit coupling exists in materials in general. However, it entangles the spin and orbital degrees of freedom and complicates the model. Thus, theorists usually neglect the effects induced by spin-orbit coupling first and consider spin-orbit coupling as perturbation next. The non-perturbative effects brought up by spin-orbit coupling are thus often less studied or overlooked. On the other hand, the majority in the study of interacting topological order focusing on the general structure of theories and made significant advances by leaving material details behind. It is thus important to find possible microscopic models that could realize the new phases in laboratories and benefits from the progress of theories to make experimental predictions. In this thesis, we study the physical effects due to strong spin-orbit coupling from the perspective of searching new quantum orders and the non-trivial responses. (i) The first project, we propose the nontrivial dipolar-octupolar(DO) doublets on the pyrochlore lattice. By studying the most general symmetry allowed model at the localized and the itinerant limit for DO doublets, we found two 3D symmetry enriched topological orders and topological insulator correspondingly. (ii) In the second project, we analyze the 2D model descending from the localized limit of DO doublets on pyrochlore. The discrete onsite symmetry and space group symmetry could lead to a symmetry-enriched topological order with symmetry fractionalization pattern that cannot emerge from a spin model with continuous spin rotational symmetry. The non-trivial symmetry fractionalization pattern contributes to the striking numerical signal that can help identifying the topological order. (iii) In the third project, we develop a theory to understand the high-energy Raman signal in Sr2IrO4.

  1. Building a Unified Computational Model for the Resonant X-Ray Scattering of Strongly Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, Arun

    2016-12-01

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of X-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on understanding and modeling of elastic and inelastic resonant X-ray scattering processes. We worked to unify the three different computational approaches currently used for modeling X-ray scattering—density functional theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and small-cluster exact diagonalization—to achieve a more realistic material-specific picture of the interaction between X-rays and complex matter. To achieve a convergence in the interpretation and to maximize complementary aspects of different theoretical methods, we concentrated on the cuprates, where most experiments have been performed. Our team included both US and international researchers and it fostered new collaborations between researchers currently working with different approaches. In addition, we developed close relationships with experimental groups working in the area at various synchrotron facilities in the US. Our CRT thus helped toward enabling the US to assume a leadership role in the theoretical development of the field, and to create a global network and community of scholars dedicated to X-ray scattering research.

  2. Up-regulation of USP2a and FASN in gliomas correlates strongly with glioma grade.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bang-Bao; He, Hua; Shi, Xiu-hua; Wang, Chun-lin; Li, Wei-qing; Li, Bing; Dong, Yan; Hu, Guo-Han; Hou, Li-Jun; Luo, Chun; Chen, Ju-xiang; Chen, Huai-rui; Yu, Yu-hong; Sun, Qing-fang; Lu, Yi-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Gliomas are the most common neoplasms in the central nervous system. The lack of efficacy of glioma therapies necessitates in-depth studies of glioma pathology, especially of the underlying molecular mechanisms that transform normal glial cells into tumor cells. Here we report that a deubiquitinating enzyme, ubiquitin-specific protease 2a (USP2a), and its substrate, fatty acid synthase (FASN), are over-expressed in glioma tissue. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression and cellular distribution of USP2a and FASN in human glioma tissues. The expression patterns of USP2a and FASN correlated with the pathologic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of USP2a and its substrate FASN were higher in high-grade (World Health Organization [WHO] grades III and IV) glioma tissues than in low-grade (WHO grades I and II) glioma tissues. Western blot analysis indicated that the average optical densitometry ratio of USP2a and its substrate FASN in high-grade gliomas was higher than in low-grade gliomas. Moreover, statistical analysis of grade-classified glioma samples showed that the level of USP2a and FASN expression increased with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma. USP2a protein expression was detected in the nucleus of glioma tissues and an increase in expression was significantly associated with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma by immunohistochemistry. These findings expand our understanding of the molecular profiling of glioma and could shed light on new diagnostic criteria for gliomas.

  3. Targeted metabolomics profiles are strongly correlated with nutritional patterns in women.

    PubMed

    Menni, Cristina; Zhai, Guangju; Macgregor, Alexander; Prehn, Cornelia; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Suhre, Karsten; Adamski, Jerzy; Cassidy, Aedin; Illig, Thomas; Spector, Tim D; Valdes, Ana M

    2013-04-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in human metabolism and health. Metabolomics is a promising tool for clinical, genetic and nutritional studies. A key question is to what extent metabolomic profiles reflect nutritional patterns in an epidemiological setting. We assessed the relationship between metabolomic profiles and nutritional intake in women from a large cross-sectional community study. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) were applied to 1,003 women from the TwinsUK cohort with targeted metabolomic analyses of serum samples using the Biocrates Absolute-IDQ™ Kit p150 (163 metabolites). We analyzed seven nutritional parameters: coffee intake, garlic intake and nutritional scores derived from the FFQs summarizing fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol intake, meat intake, hypo-caloric dieting and a "traditional English" diet. We studied the correlation between metabolite levels and dietary intake patterns in the larger population and identified for each trait between 14 and 20 independent monozygotic twins pairs discordant for nutritional intake and replicated results in this set. Results from both analyses were then meta-analyzed. For the metabolites associated with nutritional patterns, we calculated heritability using structural equation modelling. 42 metabolite nutrient intake associations were statistically significant in the discovery samples (Bonferroni P < 4 × 10(-5)) and 11 metabolite nutrient intake associations remained significant after validation. We found the strongest associations for fruit and vegetables intake and a glycerophospholipid (Phosphatidylcholine diacyl C38:6, P = 1.39 × 10(-9)) and a sphingolipid (Sphingomyeline C26:1, P = 6.95 × 10(-13)). We also found significant associations for coffee (confirming a previous association with C10 reported in an independent study), garlic intake and hypo-caloric dieting. Using the twin study design we find that two thirds the metabolites associated with nutritional patterns have a

  4. Strong electron correlation in UO{sub 2}{sup −}: A photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Li; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Su, Jing; Hu, Han-Shi; Cao, Guo-Jin; Li, Jun

    2014-03-07

    The electronic structures of actinide systems are extremely complicated and pose considerable challenges both experimentally and theoretically because of significant electron correlation and relativistic effects. Here we report an investigation of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of uranium dioxides, UO{sub 2}{sup −} and UO{sub 2}, using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. The electron affinity of UO{sub 2} is measured to be 1.159(20) eV. Intense detachment bands are observed from the UO{sub 2}{sup −} low-lying (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} orbitals and the more deeply bound O2p-based molecular orbitals which are separated by a large energy gap from the U-based orbitals. Surprisingly, numerous weak photodetachment transitions are observed in the gap region due to extensive two-electron transitions, suggesting strong electron correlations among the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}{sup −} and the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 1}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}. These observations are interpreted using multi-reference ab initio calculations with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The strong electron correlations and spin-orbit couplings generate orders-of-magnitude more detachment transitions from UO{sub 2}{sup −} than expected on the basis of the Koopmans’ theorem. The current experimental data on UO{sub 2}{sup −} provide a long-sought opportunity to arbitrating various relativistic quantum chemistry methods aimed at handling systems with strong electron correlations.

  5. Re-sampling strategy to improve the estimation of number of null hypotheses in FDR control under strong correlation structures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Perkins, David L

    2007-01-01

    Background When conducting multiple hypothesis tests, it is important to control the number of false positives, or the False Discovery Rate (FDR). However, there is a tradeoff between controlling FDR and maximizing power. Several methods have been proposed, such as the q-value method, to estimate the proportion of true null hypothesis among the tested hypotheses, and use this estimation in the control of FDR. These methods usually depend on the assumption that the test statistics are independent (or only weakly correlated). However, many types of data, for example microarray data, often contain large scale correlation structures. Our objective was to develop methods to control the FDR while maintaining a greater level of power in highly correlated datasets by improving the estimation of the proportion of null hypotheses. Results We showed that when strong correlation exists among the data, which is common in microarray datasets, the estimation of the proportion of null hypotheses could be highly variable resulting in a high level of variation in the FDR. Therefore, we developed a re-sampling strategy to reduce the variation by breaking the correlations between gene expression values, then using a conservative strategy of selecting the upper quartile of the re-sampling estimations to obtain a strong control of FDR. Conclusion With simulation studies and perturbations on actual microarray datasets, our method, compared to competing methods such as q-value, generated slightly biased estimates on the proportion of null hypotheses but with lower mean square errors. When selecting genes with controlling the same FDR level, our methods have on average a significantly lower false discovery rate in exchange for a minor reduction in the power. PMID:17509157

  6. Development of high-brightness ultrafast electron microscope for studying nanoscale dynamics associated with strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng

    Strongly correlated-electron materials are a class of materials that exhibit numerous intriguing emergent phenomena, including metal-to-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, etc. These phenomena are beyond the reach of the conventional solid state physics, which is based on the band theory. Instead, strong electron-electron correlations are found to play important roles, which leads to complicated interplay between different degrees of freedoms (charge, lattice, spins...). In this thesis, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is used to investigate the photo-induced ultrafast structural dynamics of strongly correlated materials, among which VO2 is taken as an exemplar system, one that reveals the fundamental physics behind photo-induced phase transitions, electron-electron correlation on nanometer scales, and the electron-phonon coupling in this exotic class of materials. The phenomena presented here are expected to have more general significance as they may reflect the physics to which other strongly correlated materials also conform. In polycrystalline VO2 thin films, the structural changes resulting from photoexcitation with femtosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths are observed to lead to non-thermal phase transitions, which require less energy compared to the phase transitions induced by thermal excitation. The details of the structural change are extracted from the UED results revealing stepwise atomic movements after photoexcitation, which suggests the phase transition starts with a dilation of the correlated d electrons. On the other hand, the structural phase transition is found to be decoupled from the metal-to-insulator transition when the sample dimension is reduced to the sub-micrometer scale, which is attributed to the interface charge doping effects from different substrates. A new phase (M3, monoclinic metallic phase) is distinguished, which has not been discussed by the existing theoretical

  7. Orbital engineering of two-dimensional materials with hydrogenation: A realization of giant gap and strongly correlated topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh; Gil, Carmen J.; Smith, Sean C.; Li, Sean

    2015-07-01

    Orbital interaction plays an important role in topological insulators. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that hydrogenation can change two-dimensional (2D) trivial insulator/semimetal-like Pb, Mo, and W to a Z2 topological insulator with giant gaps by filtering unwanted orbitals such as the pz orbital in Pb, and the d3 z2-r2 in Mo and W. For PbH, the large intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) confined in the in-plane orbitals px ,y results in a bulk gap of 1.07 eV. For the case of MoH and WH, hydrogenation results in a novel s d4 hybridization with a Dirac cone formed by the out-of-plane orbital dy z /x z orbitals. Furthermore, due to the electron-electron interaction and the strong SOC in the 4 d and 5 d elements, the bulk band gap is significantly enhanced with a value of 1.28 eV for MoH and 0.30 eV for WH. The strong correlation effect also induces several topological phase transitions in WH like the Dirac semimetal and Mott insulating phase, while MoH remains a topological insulator even with large correlation effect. We propose that these new strongly correlated 2D materials can be realized experimentally by using substrate such as the boron nitride sheet, which can exhibit various novel properties such as the Dirac semimetal phase with large spin-orbit energy splitting as well as the quantum spin Hall property.

  8. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Radaelli, P. G.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2015-01-26

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007–2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  9. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-06

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  10. Strong Correlation between Liver and Serum Levels of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen and RNA in Chronically Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, V.; Op de Beeck, A.; Plassart, C.; Brochot, E.; François, C.; Helle, F.; Adler, M.; Bourgeois, N.; Degré, D.; Duverlie, G.

    2012-01-01

    HCV core antigen (Ag) and HCV RNA levels were evaluated in matched liver biopsy samples and sera from 22 patients with hepatitis C infection by using the quantitative Architect HCV Ag immunoassay and a real-time RT-qPCR assay, respectively. The data showed a strong correlation between liver and serum compartments of HCV Ag levels (r = 0.80) and HCV RNA levels (r = 0.87). In summary, the serum HCV Ag and RNA levels reflect the intrahepatic values. PMID:22162563

  11. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kreula, J. M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case. PMID:27609673

  12. Gauss-Bonnet correction to the R-current correlator in N =4 theory at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yanyan

    2014-04-01

    We consider higher-curvature corrections to the R-current correlator by studying the propagation of a U(1) field in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a negative cosmological constant. We numerically solve the Maxwell equations and plot an R-current spectral function with lightlike momenta, which contains pivotal information of thermal photon emission. We also analytically compute the R-current correlator in the long-distance limit by using the holographic membrane paradigm. In the high-energy regime, the inelastic scattering between R-current and gauge theory plasma is expected to happen, which will reveal the structure of the plasma at strong coupling. It turns out that the Gauss-Bonnet correction effectively rescales all physical quantities considered here by some functions of the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient. In particular, the Gauss-Bonnet terms will enhance or weaken signatures calculated here in accordance with the sign of the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidences of Strong Electronic Correlations in (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Gihyeon; Song, S. J.; Hogan, T.; Wilson, S. D.; Moon, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on infrared spectroscopic studies of the electronic response of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. Our experiments revealed hallmarks of strong electronic correlations in the evolution of the electronic response across the filling-controlled insulator-metal transition. We observed a collapse of the Jeff = 1/2 Mott gap accompanying the transfer of the spectral weight from the high-energy region to the gap region with electron doping. The intraband conductivity at the metallic side of the transition was found to consist of coherent Drude-like and incoherent responses. The sum rule and the extended Drude model analyses further indicated a large mass enhancement. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the electronic correlations in the charge dynamics of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. PMID:27599573

  14. Studies of Diffuse Interstellar Bands V. Pairwise Correlations of Eight Strong DIBs and Neutral Hydrogen, Molecular Hydrogen, and Color Excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Scott D.; York, Donald G.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Dahlstrom, Julie; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Welty, Daniel E.; Drosback, Meredith M.; Hobbs, L. M.; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2011-01-01

    We establish correlations between equivalent widths of eight diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), and examine their correlations with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and E B-V . The DIBs are centered at λλ 5780.5, 6204.5, 6283.8, 6196.0, 6613.6, 5705.1, 5797.1, and 5487.7, in decreasing order of Pearson's correlation coefficient with N(H) (here defined as the column density of neutral hydrogen), ranging from 0.96 to 0.82. We find the equivalent width (EW) of λ5780.5 is better correlated with column densities of H than with E B-V or H2, confirming earlier results based on smaller data sets. We show that the same is true for six of the seven other DIBs presented here. Despite this similarity, the eight strong DIBs chosen are not correlated well enough with each other to suggest they come from the same carrier. We further conclude that these eight DIBs are more likely to be associated with H than with H2, and hence are not preferentially located in the densest, most UV shielded parts of interstellar clouds. We suggest that they arise from different molecules found in diffuse H regions with very little H2 (molecular fraction f < 0.01). Of the 133 stars with available data in our study, there are three with significantly weaker λ5780.5 than our mean H-λ5780.5 relationship, all of which are in regions of high radiation fields, as previously noted by Herbig. The correlations will be useful in deriving interstellar parameters when direct methods are not available. For instance, with care, the value of N(H) can be derived from W λ(5780.5).

  15. Translating mRNAs strongly correlate to proteins in a multivariate manner and their translation ratios are phenotype specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Cui, Yizhi; Jin, Jingjie; Guo, Jiahui; Wang, Guibin; Yin, Xingfeng; He, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Gong

    2013-05-01

    As a well-known phenomenon, total mRNAs poorly correlate to proteins in their abundances as reported. Recent findings calculated with bivariate models suggested even poorer such correlation, whereas focusing on the translating mRNAs (ribosome nascent-chain complex-bound mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs) subset. In this study, we analysed the relative abundances of mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs and proteins on genome-wide scale, comparing human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells with normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells, respectively. As discovered, a strong correlation between RNC-mRNAs and proteins in their relative abundances could be established through a multivariate linear model by integrating the mRNA length as a key factor. The R(2) reached 0.94 and 0.97 in A549 versus HBE and H1299 versus HBE comparisons, respectively. This correlation highlighted that the mRNA length significantly contributes to the translational modulation, especially to the translational initiation, favoured by its correlation with the mRNA translation ratio (TR) as observed. We found TR is highly phenotype specific, which was substantiated by both pathway analysis and biased TRs of the splice variants of BDP1 gene, which is a key transcription factor of transfer RNAs. These findings revealed, for the first time, the intrinsic and genome-wide translation modulations at translatomic level in human cells at steady-state, which are tightly correlated to the protein abundance and functionally relevant to cellular phenotypes.

  16. Strong correlation between D 2 density and electron temperature at the target of divertors found in SOLPS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stangeby, P. C.; Sang, Chaofeng

    2017-05-01

    A companion paper (Sang et al 2016 Nucl. Fusion (https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-4326/aa6548)) reports an assessment, using the SOLPS5.0 (B2-EIRENE) code, of the relative importance of two key aspects of divertor-baffle geometry: (i) divertor closure, and (ii) field-target angle. A wide range of the degree of divertor closure and field-target angle were modeled. An unexpectedly strong and simple correlation has been discovered in these data (and is reported here) between the electron temperature, T et, and the D 2 density, n{{D2}t}{} at the target, for T et  <  10 eV and extending over two orders of magnitude for each correlate: {{T}\\text{et}}   =  ~6.14× {{10}13}n{{D2}t}-0.68 with R 2 = 0.98. The values of T et, and n{{D2}t}{} are for each individual flux tube of the computational grid spanning two power decay widths outward from the separatrix. This may imply that achievement of low T et reduces, essentially, to identifying the divertor-baffle geometry which achieves the highest gas density near the target. To try to identify the controlling physics involved, two-point model formatting (2PMF) has been applied to the code output; it finds an equally strong and simple correlation between the 2PMF volumetric power-loss factor, {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}} , and n{{D2}t}{} for each flux tube: {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}}=1.2× {{10}29}n{{D2}t}-1.54~ with R 2 = 0.93. While these trends are broadly as would be expected, the simplicity, tightness and span of the correlations are not understood at present. Additionally, since more of the volumetric power loss is due to impurities than to deuterium, and as the impurities do not radiate just at the target, it is not evident why {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}} is so strongly correlated with n{{D2}t}{} . To address these questions, in future work 2PMF analysis will be extended to compute the individual contributions to {{f}\\text{vol-\\text{pwr}-\\text{loss}}} .

  17. Strong correlations of neutron star radii with the slopes of nuclear matter incompressibility and symmetry energy at saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Agrawal, B. K.; Fortin, M.; Pais, H.; Providência, C.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Sulaksono, A.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the correlations of neutron star radii with the nuclear matter incompressibility, symmetry energy, and their slopes, which are the key parameters of the equation of state (EoS) of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron star radii and the EoS parameters are evaluated using a representative set of 24 Skyrme-type effective forces and 18 relativistic mean field models, and two microscopic calculations, all describing 2 M⊙ neutron stars. Unified EoSs for the inner-crust-core region have been built for all the phenomenological models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic. Our investigation shows the existence of a strong correlation of the neutron star radii with the linear combination of the slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients at the saturation density. Such correlations are found to be almost independent of the neutron star mass in the range 0.6 -1.8 M⊙ . This correlation can be linked to the empirical relation existing between the star radius and the pressure at a nucleonic density between one and two times saturation density, and the dependence of the pressure on the nuclear matter incompressibility, its slope, and the symmetry energy slope. The slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients as estimated from the finite nuclei data yield the radius of a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star in the range 11.09 -12.86 km.

  18. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-03

    new many- body states of matter , new many-body methods to analyze them and new phenomena that would happen in the presence of interactions on the...Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Condensed Matter , Topological Phases of Matter REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S...on finding new many-body states of matter , new many-body methods to analyze them and new phenomena that would happen in the presence of interactions

  19. Effect of Strong Correlations on the High Energy Anomaly in Hole- and Electron-Doped High-Tc Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, B.; Schmitt, F.; Meevasana, W.; Johnston, S.; Motoyama, E.M.; Greven, M.; Lu, D.H.; Kim, C.; Scalettar, R.T.; Shen, Z.-X.; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES

    2010-02-15

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). This paper demonstrates, using a combination of new ARPES measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that the HEA is not simply the byproduct of matrix element effects, but rather represents a cross-over from a quasi-particle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character, in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. the 'waterfall'-like behavior, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying both hole and electron doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram.

  20. Evidence for strong electron correlations in graphene molecular fragments: Theory and experiments on two-photon absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Roberts, Adam; Sandhu, Arvinder; Shukla, Alok; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2013-03-01

    Historically, the occurrence of the lowest two-photon state below the optical one-photon state in linear polyenes, polyacetylenes and polydiacetylenes provided the strongest evidence for strong electron correlations in these linear π-conjugated systems. We demonstrate similar behavior in several molecular fragments of graphene with D6 h symmetry, theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, we have calculated one versus two-photon absorptions in coronene, two different hexabenzocoronenes and circumcoronene, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople π-electron Hamiltonian using high order configuration interaction. Experimentally, we have performed z-scan measurements using a white light super-continuum source on coronene and hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene to determine frequency-dependent two-photon absorption coefficients, for comparison to the ground state absorptions. Excellent agreement between experiment and theory in our work gives strong evidence for significant electron correlations between the π-electrons in the graphene molecular fragments. We particularly benchmark high order electron-hole excitations in graphene fragments as a key element behind the agreement between theory and experiment in this work. We acknowledge NSF-CHE-1151475 grant as our funding source.

  1. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ruben; Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer's disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited (18)F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was (18)F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β ((18)F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein.

  2. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo. However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer’s disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited 18F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was 18F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β (18F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. PMID:27357347

  3. Communication: The description of strong correlation within self-consistent Green's function second-order perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jordan J. Zgid, Dominika

    2014-06-28

    We report an implementation of self-consistent Green's function many-body theory within a second-order approximation (GF2) for application with molecular systems. This is done by iterative solution of the Dyson equation expressed in matrix form in an atomic orbital basis, where the Green's function and self-energy are built on the imaginary frequency and imaginary time domain, respectively, and fast Fourier transform is used to efficiently transform these quantities as needed. We apply this method to several archetypical examples of strong correlation, such as a H{sub 32} finite lattice that displays a highly multireference electronic ground state even at equilibrium lattice spacing. In all cases, GF2 gives a physically meaningful description of the metal to insulator transition in these systems, without resorting to spin-symmetry breaking. Our results show that self-consistent Green's function many-body theory offers a viable route to describing strong correlations while remaining within a computationally tractable single-particle formalism.

  4. Study of two-particle response and phase changes in strongly correlated systems using Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bismayan

    The study of strongly correlated materials is currently perhaps one of the most active areas of research in condensed matter physics. Strongly correlated materials contain localized electronic states which are often hybridized with more itinerant electrons. This interplay between localized and delocalized degrees of freedom means that these compounds have highly complex phase diagrams which makes these compounds very challenging to understand from a theoretical standpoint. Computer simulations have proved to be an invaluable tool in this regard with state of the art ab-initio simulation techniques harnessing the ever-increasing power of modern computers to produce highly accurate descriptions of a variety of strongly correlated materials. One of the most powerful simulation techniques currently in existence is Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT). This thesis describes this powerful simulation technique and its applications to various material systems, as well as addressing some theoretical questions concerning particular implementations of DMFT. This thesis is divided into two parts. In part 1, we describe the theory behind DMFT and its amalgamation with Density Functional Theory (DFT+DMFT). In chapters 2 and 3, we provide the basic theory behind DFT and DMFT respectively. In chapter 4, we describe how these two methods are merged to give us the computational framework that is used in this thesis, namely DFT+DMFT. Finally, we round off part 1 of the thesis in chapter 5, which provides a description of the Continuous Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) impurity solver, which is at the heart of the DFT+DMFT algorithm and is used extensively throughout this thesis. In part two of the thesis, we apply the DFT+DMFT framework to address some important problems in condensed matter physics. In chapter 6, we study the Magnetic Spectral Function of strongly correlated f-shell materials to understand two important problems in condensed matter physics, namely the volume collapse

  5. Liking the odour, liking the food. Toddlers' liking of strongly flavoured foods correlates with liking of their odour.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Issanchou, S; Chabanet, C; Lange, C; Schaal, B; Monnery-Patris, S

    2014-10-01

    Olfaction plays a significant role in the sensing of foods. However, little information is available at any age on the relationship between the hedonic responses to given food odours and the effective liking and disliking of foods bearing these same odours. The present study aimed to assess the relationships between food odour liking and liking of the corresponding foods. This study relied on a longitudinal design involving 235 toddlers who were assessed for both their observed liking of a set of food odours and their parent-reported liking of foods at 12 and 22 months. To assess odour liking, eight odorants representing pleasant and unpleasant foods were presented in bottles along with neutral stimuli. The participants' behaviour towards the odorized and control bottles was measured in terms of mouthing, a behaviour considered to reflect attraction. For each odorant, odour-liking scores were calculated relative to the control. The participants' food liking was rated by the parents at the periods 12-15 and 21-24 months. Positive correlations were found between the odour-liking scores for some of the odours and the liking of the associated foods. These correlations concerned foods with strong, unpleasant flavours at 12 months only, suggesting that the olfactory system acts as an 'alarm' system during this period of food transition. At 22 months, no significant correlations were found, except a marginal one for green vegetables. Whatever the age, no significant correlations were found for pleasant odours. Thus, some correlations were found between the observed odour liking for food-related odours and the liking for the corresponding foods. However, these relationships are subject to developmental fluctuations depending on the hedonic nature of the odorants and the age when infants are tested.

  6. Strong correlations between empathy, emotional intelligence, and personality traits among podiatric medical students: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Kurtis; Randazzo, John; Alabi, Nathaniel; Levenson, Jack; Doucette, John T; Barbosa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability of health-care providers to demonstrate empathy toward their patients results in a number of positive outcomes improving the quality of care. In addition, a provider's level of emotional intelligence (EI) can further the doctor-patient relationship, stimulating a more personalized and comprehensive manner of treating patients. Furthermore, personality traits of a clinician may positively or negatively influence that relationship, as well as clinical outcomes. This study was designed to evaluate empathy levels in podiatric medical students in a 4-year doctoral program. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether EI, personality traits, and demographic variables exhibit correlations with the observed empathy patterns. This cross-sectional study collected data using an anonymous web-based survey completed by 150 students registered at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. There were four survey sections: (1) demographics, (2) empathy (measured by the Jefferson Scale of Physicians' Empathy), (3) EI (measured by the Assessing Emotions Scale), and (4) personality traits (measured by the NEO-Five-Factor Inventory-3). Empathy levels were significantly correlated with EI scores (r = 0.62, n = 150, P< 0.0001). All the five domains of personality were also shown to correlate with empathy scores, as well as with EI scores. With respect to demographics, Asian-American students had lower mean empathy scores than students of other races (P = 0.0018), females had higher mean empathy scores compared to men (P = 0.001), and undergraduate grade point average correlated with empathy scores in a nonmonotonic fashion (P = 0.0269). When measuring the variables, it was evident that there was a strong correlation between empathy, EI, and personality in podiatric medical students. Given the suggested importance and effect of such qualities on patient care, these findings may serve as guidance for possible amendments and warranted curriculum initiatives in medical

  7. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  8. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-14

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  9. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-14

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  10. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  11. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-14

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  12. Strong correlations of dynamical and structural heterogeneities with localized soft modes in a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, F.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z. Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-10-13

    Structural and dynamical heterogeneities in metallic glasses, while intensely studied, remain an enigma. For instance, whether and how the dynamical and structural heterogeneities are correlated is still an outstanding question. Meanwhile, the nature of the impact of medium-range order (MRO) on the dynamical heterogeneity remains elusive. In this paper, we analyzed the structural and dynamical heterogeneities in both as-quenched and relaxed Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} metallic glasses based on the atomistic trajectories collected from molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the majority of the mobile atoms are not involved in icosahedral clusters or Bergman superclusters, indicating that dynamical heterogeneities are strongly correlated with structural heterogeneities. The Bergman-type MRO has an even stronger correlation with the dynamical heterogeneity than the icosahedral short range order. Moreover, we found that the localized soft vibration modes below 1.0 THz are mostly concentrated on the mobile atoms. These results suggest that the vibrational properties can be conveniently utilized to predict the atomic mobility in metallic glasses, which can bridge the studies of dynamical heterogeneity by experiments and simulations.

  13. Strong correlations of dynamical and structural heterogeneities with localized soft modes in a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Zhang, F.; Mendelev, M. I.; Kramer, M. J.; Ho, K. M.

    2014-10-01

    Structural and dynamical heterogeneities in metallic glasses, while intensely studied, remain an enigma. For instance, whether and how the dynamical and structural heterogeneities are correlated is still an outstanding question. Meanwhile, the nature of the impact of medium-range order (MRO) on the dynamical heterogeneity remains elusive. In this paper, we analyzed the structural and dynamical heterogeneities in both as-quenched and relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glasses based on the atomistic trajectories collected from molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the majority of the mobile atoms are not involved in icosahedral clusters or Bergman superclusters, indicating that dynamical heterogeneities are strongly correlated with structural heterogeneities. The Bergman-type MRO has an even stronger correlation with the dynamical heterogeneity than the icosahedral short range order. Moreover, we found that the localized soft vibration modes below 1.0 THz are mostly concentrated on the mobile atoms. These results suggest that the vibrational properties can be conveniently utilized to predict the atomic mobility in metallic glasses, which can bridge the studies of dynamical heterogeneity by experiments and simulations.

  14. Contiguous 3 d and 4 f Magnetism: Strongly Correlated 3 d Electrons in YbFe2Al10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuntia, P.; Peratheepan, P.; Strydom, A. M.; Utsumi, Y.; Ko, K.-T.; Tsuei, K.-D.; Tjeng, L. H.; Steglich, F.; Baenitz, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present magnetization, specific heat, and Al 27 NMR investigations on YbFe2Al10 over a wide range in temperature and magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility at low temperatures is strongly enhanced at weak magnetic fields, accompanied by a ln (T0/T ) divergence of the low-T specific heat coefficient in zero field, which indicates a ground state of correlated electrons. From our hard-x-ray photoemission spectroscopy study, the Yb valence at 50 K is evaluated to be 2.38. The system displays valence fluctuating behavior in the low to intermediate temperature range, whereas above 400 K, Yb3 + carries a full and stable moment, and Fe carries a moment of about 3.1 μB. The enhanced value of the Sommerfeld-Wilson ratio and the dynamic scaling of the spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by T [(1 /T1T ) 27 ] with static susceptibility suggests admixed ferromagnetic correlations. (1 /T1T ) 27 simultaneously tracks the valence fluctuations from the 4 f Yb ions in the high temperature range and field dependent antiferromagnetic correlations among partially Kondo screened Fe 3 d moments at low temperature; the latter evolve out of an Yb 4 f admixed conduction band.

  15. Strong correlations of dynamical and structural heterogeneities with localized soft modes in a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Zhang, Feng; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Kramer, Matthew J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-10-13

    Structural and dynamical heterogeneities in metallic glasses, while intensely studied, remain an enigma. For instance, whether and how the dynamical and structural heterogeneities are correlated is still an outstanding question. Meanwhile, the nature of the impact of medium-range order (MRO) on the dynamical heterogeneity remains elusive. In this paper, we analyzed the structural and dynamical heterogeneities in both as-quenched and relaxed Cu 64.5Zr35.5 metallic glasses based on the atomistic trajectories collected from molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the majority of the mobile atoms are not involved in icosahedral clusters or Bergman superclusters, indicating that dynamical heterogeneities are strongly correlated with structural heterogeneities. The Bergman-type MRO has an even stronger correlation with the dynamical heterogeneity than the icosahedral short range order. Moreover, we found that the localized soft vibration modes below 1.0 THz are mostly concentrated on the mobile atoms. These results suggest that the vibrational properties can be conveniently utilized to predict the atomic mobility in metallic glasses, which can bridge the studies of dynamical heterogeneity by experiments and simulations.

  16. Nonsequential Double Ionization of Atoms in Strong Laser Field: Identifying the Mechanisms behind the Correlated-Electron Momentum Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Difa; Fu, Libin; Liu, Jie

    Within the strong-field physics community, there has been increasing interest on nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) induced by electron-electron (e-e) correlation. A large variety of novel phenomena has been revealed in experiments during the past decades. However, the theoretical understanding and interpretation of this process is still far from being complete. The most accurate simulation, i.e. the exact solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) for two electrons in a laser field is computationally expensive. In order to overcome the difficulty, we proposed a feasible semiclassical model, in which we treat the tunneling ionization of the outmost electron quantum mechanically according to the ADK theory, sample the inner electron from microcanonical distribution and then evolve the two electrons with Newton's equations. With this model, we have successfully explained various NSDI phenomena, including the excessive DI yield, the energy spectra and angular distribution of photoelectrons. Very recently, it is adopted to reveal the physical mechanisms behind the fingerlike structure in the correlated electron momentum spectra, the unexpected correlation-anticorrelation transition close to the recollision threshold, and the anomalous NSDI of alkaline-earth-metal atoms in circularly polarized field. The obvious advantage of our model is that it gives time-resolved insights into the complex dynamics of NSDI, from the turn-on of the laser field to the final escape of the electrons, thus allowing us to disentangle and thoroughly analyze the underlying physical mechanisms.

  17. Correlating intensity of pulse moment with exploration depth in surface NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jianwei; Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Yufen; Bernard, Jean; Chen, Lin; Gao, Lan; Xie, Mengying

    2017-07-01

    Because of its selective sensitivity to groundwater, surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is a method widely applied in hydrogeology and engineering geology. However, the accurate numerical relationship between pulse moment intensity and exploration depth of this method has lacked research. Optimum pulse moment is a concept proposed to describe this correlation. By analyzing, using least-square fitting, various factors that may influence this correlation, an empirical relation for the optimum pulse moment has been obtained. The relation indicates a well-known law: to get a deeper exploration depth, a larger optimum pulse moment is needed. Moreover, from the relation, we found that the increase rate of exploration depth diminishes with the pulse moment increasing. Additionally, the correlation illustrates that the optimum exploration depth of the surface NMR method is not simply proportional to the loop diameter. Hence, to further extend the exploration depth, both the pulse moment intensity and the size of transmitter loop need to be increased simultaneously. Based on a synthetic example, we demonstrate that the optimum pulse sequence which is established from our empirical formula has a better inversion result and higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the probable depth range of the target aquifer is known.

  18. A strong correlation exists between the distribution of retinal ganglion cells and nose length in the dog.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Paul; Grassi, Tanya D; Harman, Alison M

    2004-01-01

    The domestic dog, CANIS LUPUS FAMILIARIS, is a subspecies of the gray wolf, CANIS LUPUS, with almost identical mitochondrial DNA. The dog is the most diverse species on earth, with skull length varying between 7 and 28 cm whereas the wolf skull is around 30 cm long. However, eye size in dogs does not appear to vary as much. For example, small dogs such as the chihuahua appear to have very large eyes in proportion to the skull. Our aim was to examine eye size and retinal cell numbers and distribution to determine whether the dog eye exhibits as much variation as the skull. We found a correlation between eye radius and skull dimensions. However, the most surprising finding was that the distribution of ganglion cells in the eye varied tremendously from a horizontally aligned visual streak of fairly even density across the retina (as seen in the wolf) to a strong area centralis with virtually no streak (for example, as observed in a pug from the current series). This variation in ganglion cell density within a single species is quite unique. Intriguingly, the ratio of peak ganglion cell density in the area centralis to visual streak was highly negatively correlated with skull length (r = -0.795, n = 22) and positively correlated with cephalic index (r = 0.687, n = 22). The orientation of eyelid aperture was also correlated with cephalic index (r = 0.648, n = 22). Therefore, the genetic manipulation of selective breeding, which has produced an abnormal shortening of the skull and eyelids with less lateral apertures, has also produced a considerably more pronounced area centralis in the dog.

  19. The correlation between coloration and exploration behaviour varies across hierarchical levels in a wild passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Nicolaus, M; Piault, R; Ubels, R; Tinbergen, J M; Dingemanse, N J

    2016-09-01

    In vertebrates, darker individuals are often found to be more active and willing to take risks (representing characteristics of a 'proactive' coping style), whereas lighter individuals are instead more cautious and less active (representing characteristics of a 'reactive' coping style). It is thus generally expected that melanin-based coloration and proactivity form a suite of positively integrated traits at the among-individual level. Here, we use a multigenerational pedigree of free-living great tits (Parus major) to partition variation in, and the correlation between, melanin-based breast stripe ('tie') size and exploration behaviour (a proxy for coping style) into its among- and within-individual components. We show that both traits harbour heritable variation. Against predictions, tie size and speed of exploration were negatively correlated at the among-individual level due to the combined influences of permanent environmental and additive genetic effects. By contrast, the two traits were weakly positively correlated within individuals (i.e. individuals increasing in tie size after moult tended to become more explorative). The patterns of among-individual covariance were not caused by correlational selection as we found additive and opposite selection pressures acting on the two traits. These findings imply that testing hypotheses regarding the existence of a 'syndrome' at the among-individual level strictly requires variance partitioning to avoid inappropriate interpretations as the negative 'unpartitioned' phenotypic correlation between exploration and tie size resulted from counteracting effects of within- and among-individual correlations. Identifying sources and levels of (co)variation in phenotypic traits is thus critical to our understanding of biological patterns and evolutionary processes. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Thermal conductivity of the pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6: strong electron correlations and fully gapped superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Y; Shimono, Y; Shibauchi, T; Matsuda, Y; Yonezawa, S; Muraoka, Y; Hiroi, Z

    2006-06-23

    To elucidate the nature of the superconducting ground state of the geometrically frustrated pyrochlore KOs2O6 (Tc=9.6 K), the thermal conductivity was measured down to low temperatures (approximately Tc/100). We found that the quasiparticle mean free path is strikingly enhanced below a transition at Tp=7.8 K, indicating enormous electron inelastic scattering in the normal state. In magnetic fields, the conduction at T-->0 K is nearly constant up to approximately 0.4Hc2, in contrast with the rapid growth expected for superconductors with an anisotropic gap. This unambiguously indicates a fully gapped superconductivity, in contrast with previous studies. These results highlight that KOs2O6 is unique among superconductors with strong electron correlations.

  1. Engineering the strongly correlated properties of bulk Ruddlesden-Popper transition metal oxides via self-doping.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anh; Li, Sean

    2017-05-10

    We demonstrate via first-principles calculations a novel method of tuning the electron-electron interactions in bulk oxide materials via controlling the cationic layer arrangement. Using the Ruddlesden-Popper oxides LaSrMnO4 and LaSrTiO4 as examples, our study demonstrates that a self-doping effect can be induced by changing the stacking of the neutral and charged cationic layers. It is believed that such a phenomenon is associated with different movements of apical oxygen atoms, resulting in diverse bandgaps, magnetism and orbital degrees of freedom in the same stoichiometric strongly-correlated material. This finding may open up a new direction to engineer the transition metal oxides for practical applications requiring tunable electronic properties without external doping.

  2. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated rare-earth intermetallics RIn₃ and RSn₃ (R=Sm, Eu, and Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Shafiq, M.; Ahmad, Iftikhar E-mail: dr.iftikhar@uom.edu.pk; Jalali Asadabadi, S.

    2014-09-14

    In this paper, the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of RIn₃ and RSn₃ (R = Sm, Eu, Gd) compounds have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital method within the density functional theory. The structural properties are investigated using the LDA, GGA, and the band correlated LDA+U and GGA+U schemes. The lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results and the divalent state of Eu is also verified. The spin-orbit coupling is included in order to predict the correct electronic properties and splitting of 4f states of the rare earth elements is also incorporated. We calculated Bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, anisotropic ratio, Kleinman parameters, Poisson's ratio, Lame's co-efficient, sound velocities for shear and longitudinal waves, and Debye temperature. We also predict the Cauchy pressure and B/G ratio in order to explore the ductile and brittle behaviors of these compounds.

  3. GPU-Based Implementations of the Noniterative Regularized-CCSD(T) Corrections: Applications to Strongly Correlated Systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjing; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Villa, Oreste; Kowalski, Karol

    2011-05-10

    The details of the graphical processing unit (GPU) implementation of the most computationally intensive (T)-part of the recently introduced regularized CCSD(T) (Reg-CCSD(T)) method [ Kowalski , K. ; Valiev , M. J. Chem. Phys. 2009 , 131 , 234107 ] for calculating electronic energies of strongly correlated systems are discussed. Parallel tests performed for several molecular systems show very good scalability of the triples part of the Reg-CCSD(T) approach. We also discuss the performance of the Reg-CCSD(T) GPU implementation as a function of the parameters defining the partitioning of the spinorbital domain (tiling structure). The accuracy of the Reg-CCSD(T) method is illustrated on three examples: the methyfluoride molecule, dissociation of dodecane, and open-shell Spiro cation (5,5'(4H,4H')-spirobi[cyclopenta[c]pyrrole] 2,2',6,6'-tetrahydro cation), which is a frequently used model to study electron transfer processes. It is demonstrated that a simple regularization of the cluster amplitudes used in the noniterative corrections accounting for the effect of triply excited configurations significantly improves the accuracies of ground-state energies in the presence of strong quasidegeneracy effects. For methylfluoride, we compare the Reg-CCSD(T) results with the CR-CC(2,3) and CCSDT energies, whereas for Spiro cation we compare Reg-CCSD(T) results with the energies obtained with completely renormalized CCSD(T) method. Performance tests for the Spiro, dodecane, and uracil molecules are also discussed.

  4. Exploring the effects of photon correlations from thermal sources on bacterial photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; De Mendoza, Adriana; Rodríguez, Ferney; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F.

    Thermal light sources can produce photons with strong spatial correlations. We study the role that these correlations might potentially play in bacterial photosynthesis. Our findings show a relationship between the transversal distance between consecutive absorptions and the efficiency of the photosynthetic process. Furthermore, membranes where the clustering of core complexes (so-called RC-LH1) is high, display a range where the organism profits maximally from the spatial correlation of the incoming light. By contrast, no maximum is found for membranes with low core-core clustering. We employ a detailed membrane model with state-of-the-art empirical inputs. Our results suggest that the organization of the membrane's antenna complexes may be well-suited to the spatial correlations present in an natural light source. Future experiments will be needed to test this prediction.

  5. Temperament in bullheads: do laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables correlate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobler, Alexander; Engelen, Brecht; Knaepkens, Guy; Eens, Marcel

    2009-10-01

    The relevance of temperament traits for life history strategy or productivity is increasingly acknowledged. Temperament traits are often either observed in captivity or in the wild, but studies combining both observations are very rare. We examine whether exploratory behaviour in the bullhead ( Cottus perifretum), assayed under laboratory conditions, predicts this behaviour under field conditions. Forty-three PIT-tagged individuals were first assayed for exploration of a novel environment in the aquarium and then released into an unfamiliar stream stretch, where they were later relocated using a mobile antenna. Explorative behaviour assayed in the laboratory was significantly positively related to the exploration in the field, thus predicting distance moved in the field release. Both in the laboratory and in the field, explorative behaviour was not related to individual body length. When bullheads that did not leave the refuge in the aquarium (laboratory assay) and, therefore, did not explore the new environment were excluded from the analysis, the correlation between laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables became weaker. However, overall, our results illustrate that exploration rate of bullheads in isolated single-individual experiments can be used to predict this behaviour in the natural ecosystem.

  6. Temperament in bullheads: do laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables correlate?

    PubMed

    Kobler, Alexander; Engelen, Brecht; Knaepkens, Guy; Eens, Marcel

    2009-10-01

    The relevance of temperament traits for life history strategy or productivity is increasingly acknowledged. Temperament traits are often either observed in captivity or in the wild, but studies combining both observations are very rare. We examine whether exploratory behaviour in the bullhead (Cottus perifretum), assayed under laboratory conditions, predicts this behaviour under field conditions. Forty-three PIT-tagged individuals were first assayed for exploration of a novel environment in the aquarium and then released into an unfamiliar stream stretch, where they were later relocated using a mobile antenna. Explorative behaviour assayed in the laboratory was significantly positively related to the exploration in the field, thus predicting distance moved in the field release. Both in the laboratory and in the field, explorative behaviour was not related to individual body length. When bullheads that did not leave the refuge in the aquarium (laboratory assay) and, therefore, did not explore the new environment were excluded from the analysis, the correlation between laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables became weaker. However, overall, our results illustrate that exploration rate of bullheads in isolated single-individual experiments can be used to predict this behaviour in the natural ecosystem.

  7. Footprints of electron correlation in strong-field double ionization of Kr close to the sequential-ionization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaokai; Wang, Chuncheng; Yuan, Zongqiang; Ye, Difa; Ma, Pan; Hu, Wenhui; Luo, Sizuo; Fu, Libin; Ding, Dajun

    2017-09-01

    By combining kinematically complete measurements and a semiclassical Monte Carlo simulation we study the correlated-electron dynamics in the strong-field double ionization of Kr. Interestingly, we find that, as we step into the sequential-ionization regime, there are still signatures of correlation in the two-electron joint momentum spectrum and, more intriguingly, the scaling law of the high-energy tail is completely different from early predictions on the low-Z atom (He). These experimental observations are well reproduced by our generalized semiclassical model adapting a Green-Sellin-Zachor potential. It is revealed that the competition between the screening effect of inner-shell electrons and the Coulomb focusing of nuclei leads to a non-inverse-square central force, which twists the returned electron trajectory at the vicinity of the parent core and thus significantly increases the probability of hard recollisions between two electrons. Our results might have promising applications ranging from accurately retrieving atomic structures to simulating celestial phenomena in the laboratory.

  8. Mobility and Muscle Strength Together are More Strongly Correlated with Falls in Suburb-Dwelling Older Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyang; Ma, Yixuan; Wang, Jiazhong; Han, Peipei; Dong, Renwei; Kang, Li; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Suxing; Wang, Jing; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, Maoran; Wang, Liancheng; Niu, Kaijun; Guo, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Falls are common in older adults and result in adverse outcomes. Impaired mobility and poor muscle strength have been consistently identified as the main contributors to falls. We choose three easy-to-perform tests (i.e. Timed Up and Go test (TUGT), walking speed (WS) and grip strength (GS)) in order to assess mobility and muscle strength to further define their relationship with falls. This study is cross-sectional, consisting of 1092 residents over 60-year-old; 589 were female. 204 (18.68%) participants reported falling at least once in the past year. It was found that, of the three tests evaluated independently, a TUGT < 9.1750 s had the strongest association with fewer falls. When evaluating these tests as pairs, the combination of a TUGT < 9.1750 s and a WS < 0.9963 m/s was the best protective indicator of falls after adjusting for age, sex and other variables. When evaluating all three tests in conjunction with each other, the combination of a TUGT < 9.1750 s, a WS < 0.9963 m/s, and a GS > 0.3816 was most correlated with less possibility of falls. The combination of a better TUGT performance, a stronger GS, and a slower WS is the most strongly correlated with less possibility of falls. PMID:27146721

  9. Mobility and Muscle Strength Together are More Strongly Correlated with Falls in Suburb-Dwelling Older Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyang; Ma, Yixuan; Wang, Jiazhong; Han, Peipei; Dong, Renwei; Kang, Li; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Suxing; Wang, Jing; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, Maoran; Wang, Liancheng; Niu, Kaijun; Guo, Qi

    2016-05-05

    Falls are common in older adults and result in adverse outcomes. Impaired mobility and poor muscle strength have been consistently identified as the main contributors to falls. We choose three easy-to-perform tests (i.e. Timed Up and Go test (TUGT), walking speed (WS) and grip strength (GS)) in order to assess mobility and muscle strength to further define their relationship with falls. This study is cross-sectional, consisting of 1092 residents over 60-year-old; 589 were female. 204 (18.68%) participants reported falling at least once in the past year. It was found that, of the three tests evaluated independently, a TUGT < 9.1750 s had the strongest association with fewer falls. When evaluating these tests as pairs, the combination of a TUGT < 9.1750 s and a WS < 0.9963 m/s was the best protective indicator of falls after adjusting for age, sex and other variables. When evaluating all three tests in conjunction with each other, the combination of a TUGT < 9.1750 s, a WS < 0.9963 m/s, and a GS > 0.3816 was most correlated with less possibility of falls. The combination of a better TUGT performance, a stronger GS, and a slower WS is the most strongly correlated with less possibility of falls.

  10. Predictive Capability for Strongly Correlated Systems: Mott Transition in MnO, Multielectron Magnetic Moments, and Dynamics Effects in Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei

    2013-02-21

    There are classes of materials that are important to DOE and to the science and technology community, generically referred to as strongly correlated electron systems (SCES), which have proven very difficult to understand and to simulate in a material-specific manner. These range from actinides, which are central to the DOE mission, to transition metal oxides, which include the most promising components of new spin electronics applications as well as the high temperature superconductors, to intermetallic compounds whose heavy fermion characteristics and quantum critical behavior has given rise to some of the most active areas in condensed matter theory. The objective of the CMSN cooperative research team was to focus on the application of these new methodologies to the specific issue of Mott transitions, multi-electron magnetic moments, and dynamical properties correlated materials. Working towards this goal, the W&M team extended its first-principles phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method to accurately calculate structural phase transitions and excited states.

  11. Electron-Mediated Relaxation Following Ultrafast Pumping of Strongly Correlated Materials: Model Evidence of a Correlation-Tuned Crossover between Thermal and Nonthermal States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, B.; Kemper, A. F.; Sentef, M.; Devereaux, T. P.; Freericks, J. K.

    2013-08-01

    We examine electron-electron mediated relaxation following ultrafast electric field pump excitation of the fermionic degrees of freedom in the Falicov-Kimball model for correlated electrons. The results reveal a dichotomy in the temporal evolution of the system as one tunes through the Mott metal-to-insulator transition: in the metallic regime relaxation can be characterized by evolution toward a steady state well described by Fermi-Dirac statistics with an increased effective temperature; however, in the insulating regime this quasithermal paradigm breaks down with relaxation toward a nonthermal state with a complicated electronic distribution as a function of momentum. We characterize the behavior by studying changes in the energy, photoemission response, and electronic distribution as functions of time. This relaxation may be observable qualitatively on short enough time scales that the electrons behave like an isolated system not in contact with additional degrees of freedom which would act as a thermal bath, especially when using strong driving fields and studying materials whose physics may manifest the effects of correlations.

  12. Muscle expression of genes associated with inflammation, growth, and remodeling is strongly correlated in older adults with resistance training outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Richard A.; Zhu, Haiyan; Kortebein, Patrick M.; Bush, Heather M.; Harvey, Jonathan F.; Sullivan, Dennis H.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2009-01-01

    A group (n = 8) of healthy older (68 ± 6 yr) adults participated in a 36-session progressive resistance exercise training program targeting the thigh muscles to determine the relationship between muscle gene expression and gains in muscle size and strength. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis at baseline 72 h after an acute bout of exercise and 72 h after completion of the training program. Training increased thigh muscle size (7%) and strength for the three exercises performed: knee extension (30%) and curl (28%) and leg press (20%). We quantified 18 transcripts encoding factors that function in inflammation, growth, and muscle remodeling that were demonstrated previously to be regulated by aging and acute exercise. The gain in extension strength and muscle size showed a high number of significant correlations with gene expression. These gains were most strongly correlated (P ≤ 0.003, R ≥ 0.89) with the baseline mRNA levels for insulin-like growth factor-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and its inhibitor TIMP1, and ciliary neurotrophic factor. Moreover, strength gains were inversely correlated with the change in these mRNA levels after training (P ≤ 0.002 and R ≤ −0.90). Changes in gene expression after acute exercise were not associated with training outcomes. These results suggest that higher baseline expression for key genes in muscle conveys an adaptive advantage for certain older adults. Individuals with lower baseline expression of these genes show less adaptation to exercise despite increased gene expression in response to training. These genes hold promise as useful predictors of training outcomes that could be used to design more effective exercise regimens for maintaining muscle function in older adults. PMID:19435833

  13. Preterm neonatal lateral ventricle volume from three-dimensional ultrasound is not strongly correlated to two-dimensional ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Jessica; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Salehi, Fateme; Romano, Walter; Lee, David S C; Fenster, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare longitudinal two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound (US) estimates of ventricle size in preterm neonates with posthemorrhagic ventricular dilatation (PHVD) using quantitative measurements of the lateral ventricles. Cranial 2-D US and 3-D US images were acquired from neonatal patients with diagnosed PHVD within 10 min of each other one to two times per week and analyzed offline. Ventricle index, anterior horn width, third ventricle width, and thalamo-occipital distance were measured on the 2-D images and ventricle volume (VV) was measured from 3-D US images. Changes in the measurements between successive image sets were also recorded. No strong correlations were found between VV and 2-D US measurements ([Formula: see text] between 0.69 and 0.36). Additionally, weak correlations were found between changes in 2-D US measurements and 3-D US VV ([Formula: see text] between 0.13 and 0.02). A trend was found between increasing 2-D US measurements and 3-D US-based VV, but this was not the case when comparing changes between 3-D US VV and 2-D US measurements. If 3-D US-based VV provides a more accurate estimate of ventricle size than 2-D US measurements, moderate-weak correlations with 3-D US suggest that monitoring preterm patients with PHVD using 2-D US measurements alone might not accurately represent whether the ventricles are progressively dilating. A volumetric measure (3-D US or MRI) could be used instead to more accurately represent changes.

  14. Instantaneous phase estimation to measure weak velocity variations: application to noise correlation on seismic data at the exploration scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corciulo, M.; Roux, P.; Campillo, M.; Dubucq, D.

    2010-12-01

    Passive imaging from noise cross-correlation is a consolidated analysis applied at continental and regional scale whereas its use at local scale for seismic exploration purposes is still uncertain. The development of passive imaging by cross-correlation analysis is based on the extraction of the Green’s function from seismic noise data. In a completely random field in time and space, the cross-correlation permits to retrieve the complete Green’s function whatever the complexity of the medium. At the exploration scale and at frequency above 2 Hz, the noise sources are not ideally distributed around the stations which strongly affect the extraction of the direct arrivals from the noise cross-correlation process. In order to overcome this problem, the coda waves extracted from noise correlation could be useful. Coda waves describe long and scattered paths sampling the medium in different ways such that they become sensitive to weak velocity variations without being dependent on the noise source distribution. Indeed, scatters in the medium behave as a set of secondary noise sources which randomize the spatial distribution of noise sources contributing to the coda waves in the correlation process. We developed a new technique to measure weak velocity changes based on the computation of the local phase variations (instantaneous phase variation or IPV) of the cross-correlated signals. This newly-developed technique takes advantage from the doublet and stretching techniques classically used to monitor weak velocity variation from coda waves. We apply IPV to data acquired in Northern America (Canada) on a 1-km side square seismic network laid out by 397 stations. Data used to study temporal variations are cross-correlated signals computed on 10-minutes ambient noise in the frequency band 2-5 Hz. As the data set was acquired over five days, about 660 files are processed to perform a complete temporal analysis for each stations pair. The IPV permits to estimate the phase

  15. Time-resolved THz studies of carrier dynamics in semiconductors, superconductors, and strongly-correlated electron materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2006-11-14

    Perhaps the most important aspect of contemporary condensed matter physics involves understanding strong Coulomb interactions between the large number of electrons in a solid. Electronic correlations lead to the emergence of new system properties, such as metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, magneto-resistance, Bose-Einstein condensation, the formation of excitonic gases, or the integer and fractional Quantum Hall effects. The discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in particular was a watershed event, leading to dramatic experimental and theoretical advances in the field of correlated-electron systems. Such materials often exhibit competition between the charge, lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom, whose cause-effect relationships are difficult to ascertain. Experimental insight into the properties of solids is traditionally obtained by time-averaged probes, which measure e.g., linear optical spectra, electrical conduction properties, or the occupied band structure in thermal equilibrium. Many novel physical properties arise from excitations out of the ground state into energetically higher states by thermal, optical, or electrical means. This leads to fundamental interactions between the system's constituents, such as electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, which occur on ultrafast timescales. While these interactions underlie the physical properties of solids, they are often only indirectly inferred from time-averaged measurements. Time-resolved spectroscopy, consequently, is playing an ever increasing role to provide insight into light-matter interaction, microscopic processes, or cause-effect relationships that determine the physics of complex materials. In the past, experiments using visible and near-infrared femtosecond pulses have been extensively employed, e.g. to follow relaxation and dephasing processes in metals and semiconductors. However, many basic excitations in strongly-correlated electron systems and nanoscale

  16. Strong genetic correlation between interview-assessed internalizing disorders and a brief self-report symptom scale.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Line C; Røysamb, Espen; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Orstavik, Ragnhild E; Kendler, Kenneth S; Tambs, Kristian

    2011-02-01

    Self-report scales for symptoms of anxiety and depression are frequently used for screening and research purposes. A moderate phenotypic association between disorders measured by diagnostic interviews and symptoms of anxiety and depression measured by self-report scales has been shown, but little is known about the overlap in these phenotypes' genetic and environmental variance. In the present study, we used twin modeling to identify common genetic and environmental liabilities underlying the phenotypic association between the self-report Symptom Checklist-5 (SCL-5) and lifetime internalizing disorders derived from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The sample consisted of 7,992 young adult twins from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel (NIPHT), who all responded to a questionnaire. A subset of 2,793 individuals later underwent structured interviews. The best fitting model showed a strong genetic correlation of 0.82 (95% confidence interval; 0.61-1.0) between current self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression, and lifetime internalizing disorders, which suggests an almost complete overlap in genetic liability. The correlation between environmental factors was much lower: 0.16 (0.00-0.34, 95% CI). This implies that brief self-report scales capture genetic variance that is highly overlapping with the genetic variance common to internalizing disorder diagnoses. It thus follows that SCL-5 and similar instruments may be used as screening instruments for genetic risk factors that influence liability to internalizing disorders. In addition, existing data on self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression can be used with increased confidence to specify models including effects from genes coding for internalizing disorders.

  17. Strongly correlated electron physics: From Kondo and spin glasses to heavy fermions, hidden order and quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Edmund; Mydosh, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    We summarize the development of strongly correlated electron physics (SCEP) stimu-lated from the 1930's when a strange upturn was found in the electrical resistivity at low temper-atures. It was only in 1965 that this effect was explained as a many-body, spin-flip, scattering of electrons from a magnetic impurity, i.e., the Kondo effect. This marked the beginning of SCEP. When the concentration of these impurities is increased so that they can randomly interact we have the spin glasses and their unconventional, yet classical phase transition. Spin glass physics formed the background know-how for the combination of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic spacer which generated the the giant magnetic resistance and it many applications in com-puter hardware. By fabricating a lattice of the magnetic species, viz., an intermetallic compound based upon certain rare-earth and actinide elements, we then create a heavy Fermi liquid that can support most unusual ground-state behavior, e.g., unconventional superconductivity. This leads to the mysterious and still unexplained "hidden order" phase transition of URu2Si2. Finally, since the heavy fermions commonly exhibit zero temperature phase transitions, aka, quantum phase transitions when tuned with pressure, magnetic field or doping, we are at the summit of today's SCEP - the prime topic of 2012 condensed matter physics.

  18. Exact entanglement studies of strongly correlated systems: role of long-range interactions and symmetries of the system.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Shaon; Goli, V M L Durga Prasad; Ramasesha, S; Sen, Diptiman

    2012-03-21

    We study the bipartite entanglement of strongly correlated systems using exact diagonalization techniques. In particular, we examine how the entanglement changes in the presence of long-range interactions by studying the Pariser-Parr-Pople model with long-range interactions. We compare the results for this model with those obtained for the Hubbard and Heisenberg models with short-range interactions. This study helps us to understand why the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) technique is so successful even in the presence of long-range interactions. To better understand the behavior of long-range interactions and why the DMRG works well with it, we study the entanglement spectrum of the ground state and a few excited states of finite chains. We also investigate if the symmetry properties of a state vector have any significance in relation to its entanglement. Finally, we make an interesting observation on the entanglement profiles of different states (across the energy spectrum) in comparison with the corresponding profile of the density of states. We use isotropic chains and a molecule with non-Abelian symmetry for these numerical investigations.

  19. Impact of Interface Roughness on the Metallic Transport of Strongly Correlated 2D Holes in GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goble, Nicholas; Watson, John; Manfra, Michael; Gao, Xuan

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the non-monotonic behavior in the temperature dependent resistance, R(T) , of strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) carriers in clean semiconductors has been a central issue in the studies of 2D metallic states and metal-insulator transitions. We have studied the transport of high mobility 2D holes in 20nm wide GaAs quantum wells with varying interface roughness by changing the Al fraction x in the AlxGa1-xAs barrier. Prior to this work, no comprehensive study of the non-monotonic resistance peak against controlled barrier characteristics has been conducted. We show that the shape of the electronic contribution to R(T) is qualitatively unchanged throughout all of our measurements, regardless of the percentage of Al in the barrier. It is observed that increasing x or short range interface roughness suppresses both the strength and characteristic temperature scale of the 2D metallicity, pointing to the distinct role of short range versus long range disorder in the 2D metallic transport in this 2D hole system with interaction parameter rs ~ 20. N.G. acknowledges the US DOE GAANN fellowship (P200A090276 & P200A070434). M.J.M. is supported by the Miller Family Foundation and the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DMS (DE-SC0006671). X.P.A.G thanks the NSF for funding support (DMR-0906415).

  20. How Unique is Any Given Seismogram? - Exploring Correlation Methods to Identify Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Dodge, D. A.; Ford, S. R.; Pyle, M. L.; Hauk, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    As with conventional wisdom about snowflakes, we would expect it unlikely that any two broadband seismograms would ever be exactly identical. However depending upon the resolution of our comparison metric, we do expect, and often find, bandpassed seismograms that correlate to very high levels (>0.99). In fact regional (e.g. Schaff and Richards, 2011) and global investigations (e.g. Dodge and Walter, 2015) find large numbers of highly correlated seismograms. Decreasing computational costs are increasing the tremendous potential for correlation in lowering detection, location and identification thresholds for explosion monitoring (e.g. Schaff et al., 2012, Gibbons and Ringdal, 2012; Zhang and Wen, 2015). We have shown in the case of Source Physics Experiment (SPE) chemical explosions, templates at local and near regional stations can detect, locate and identify very small explosions, which might be applied to monitoring active test sites (Ford and Walter, 2015). In terms of elastic theory, seismograms are the convolution between source and Green function terms. Thus high correlation implies similar sources, closely located. How do we quantify this physically? For example it is well known that as the template event and target events are increasingly separated spatially, their correlation diminishes, as the difference in the Green function between the two events grows larger. This is related to the event separation in terms of wavelength, the heterogeneity of the Earth structure, and the time-bandwidth of the correlation parameters used, but this has not been well quantified. We are using the historic dataset of nuclear explosions in southern Nevada to explore empirically where and how well these events correlate as a function of location, depth, size, time-bandwidth and other parameters. A goal is to develop more meaningful and physical metrics that go beyond the correlation coefficient and can be applied to explosion monitoring problems, particularly event

  1. Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very useful in quantifying disease severity, they require an extensive clinical experience and carry a risk of subjectivity. We explore the opportunity to use in vivo near-infrared (NIR) spectra as an objective and noninvasive method for local disease severity assessment in 31 psoriasis patients in whom selected plaques were scored clinically. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was used to analyze and predict the severity scores on the NIR spectra of psoriatic and uninvolved skin. The correlation between predicted and clinically assigned scores was R=0.94 (RMSE=0.96), suggesting that in vivo NIR provides accurate clinical quantification of psoriatic plaques. Hence, NIR may be a practical solution to clinical severity assessment of psoriasis, providing a continuous, linear, numerical value of severity.

  2. A new presentation and exploration of human cerebral vasculature correlated with surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Thirunavuukarasuu, Arumugam; Volkau, Ihar; Marchenko, Yevgen; Aminah, Bivi; Gelas, Arnaud; Huang, Su; Lee, Looi Chow; Liu, Jimin; Ng, Ting Ting; Nowinska, Natalia G; Qian, Guoyu Yu; Puspitasari, Fiftarina; Runge, Val M

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of human body models enabled by advances in diagnostic imaging, computing, and growing knowledge calls for the development of a new generation of systems for intelligent exploration of these models. Here, we introduce a novel paradigm for the exploration of digital body models illustrating cerebral vasculature. It enables dynamic scene compositing, real-time interaction combined with animation, correlation of 3D models with sectional images, quantification as well as 3D manipulation-independent labeling and knowledge-related meta labeling (with name, diameter, description, variants, and references). This novel exploration is incorporated into a 3D atlas of cerebral vasculature with arteries and veins along with the surrounding surface and sectional neuroanatomy derived from 3.0 Tesla scans. This exploration paradigm is useful in medical education, training, research, and clinical applications. It enables development of new generation systems for rapid and intelligent exploration of complicated digital body models in real time with dynamic scene compositing from highly parcellated 3D models, continuous navigation, and manipulation-independent labeling with multiple features.

  3. Producing data-based sensitivity kernels from convolution and correlation in exploration geophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiel, M. J.; Roux, P.; Herrmann, P.; Rondeleux, B.

    2016-12-01

    Many studies have shown that seismic interferometry can be used to estimate surface wave arrivals by correlation of seismic signals recorded at a pair of locations. In the case of ambient noise sources, the convergence towards the surface wave Green's functions is obtained with the criterion of equipartitioned energy. However, seismic acquisition with active, controlled sources gives more possibilities when it comes to interferometry. The use of controlled sources makes it possible to recover the surface wave Green's function between two points using either correlation or convolution. We investigate the convolutional and correlational approaches using land active-seismic data from exploration geophysics. The data were recorded on 10,710 vertical receivers using 51,808 sources (seismic vibrator trucks). The sources spacing is the same in both X and Y directions (30 m) which is known as a "carpet shooting". The receivers are placed in parallel lines with a spacing 150 m in the X direction and 30 m in the Y direction. Invoking spatial reciprocity between sources and receivers, correlation and convolution functions can thus be constructed between either pairs of receivers or pairs of sources. Benefiting from the dense acquisition, we extract sensitivity kernels from correlation and convolution measurements of the seismic data. These sensitivity kernels are subsequently used to produce phase-velocity dispersion curves between two points and to separate the higher mode from the fundamental mode for surface waves. Potential application to surface wave cancellation is also envisaged.

  4. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: A New Challenge for Cold Atom Physics: Achieving the Strongly Correlated Regimes for Cold Atoms in Optical Lattices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tin-Lun

    2008-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices show great promise to generate a whole host of new strongly correlated states and to emulate many theoretical models for strongly interacting electronic systems. However, to reach these strongly correlated regimes, we need to reach unprecedented low temperatures within current experimental settings. To achieve this, it is necessary to remove considerable amount of entropy from the system. Here, we point out a general principle for removing entropies of quantum gases in optical lattices which will allow one to reach some extraordinarily low temperature scales.

  5. Tectonics From Topography: Strong Correlation Between Mountain Front Steepness and Holocene Slip Rates Along the Wasatch Normal Fault, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, S. W.; Struble, W. T.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Tucker, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The footwalls of active normal faults are often decorated with facet slopes: semi-planar, steeply dipping slopes made of bedrock, or bedrock thinly mantled by regolith, that rise up out of the fault trace. Here we test two hypotheses to determine whether normal-fault facet surfaces record information about the local fault slip rate on a 10-100 ky timescale. 1) If rock-mass strength is spatially uniform, relative variations in slip rate along strike of a normal fault can be estimated directly from facet slope angle. 2) If erosion rate is independently known, estimates of absolute slip rates can be obtained. These hypotheses are based on a simple mathematical model of footwall development that predicts that facet slope angle is set by the ratio of bedrock erosion rate to fault slip rate. We tested these hypotheses by first compiling data from the Wasatch Fault Zone (Utah, USA) where the rates of fault slip are unusually well known as a result of decades of intensive paleoseismology studies, and where millennial-scale erosion rates along the range front have been measured using cosmogenic radionuclides. We then mapped spatial variations in facet morphology along the entire length of the range front using 1 m resolution topographic data. We find a strong correlation between along-strike measurements of facet angle and Holocene slip rate. The mean facet steepness of each fault segment varies systematically from > 35 degrees in the center of the fault array to < 20 degrees at the southern end. Assuming characteristic fault dips of 50-60 degrees and erosion rates of 0.1-0.2 mm/yr, our predictions of absolute 100 ka average slip rates are consistent with estimates previously made from offset geomorphic features. These results demonstrate the feasibility of facet-slope analysis as a low-cost paleoseismology tool that can extract information about the rates of slip on range-bounding normal faults, and hence seismic hazard, directly from topography.

  6. Parasympathetic neurogenesis is strongly associated with tumor budding and correlates with an adverse prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingfu; Guo, Limei; Tao, Ming; Fu, Wei; Xiu, Dianrong

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the frequency of parasympathetic neurogenesis and determine its association with tumor budding and prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Parasympathetic neurogenesis was defined as the distribution of abnormal parasympathetic nerves in the stroma tissue. Staining of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), as a marker for parasympathetic neurogenesis, was performed on a representative specimen of the tumor for 59 PDAC patients with available clinical, pathologic, and follow-up information. Three specimens containing normal pancreatic tissues were stained in parallel. The number of parasympathetic nerve fibers was counted in five high-power microscopic fields (5×0.785 mm(2)). Cut-off values were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. VAChT-positive parasympathetic nerve fibers were not seen in the stroma of 3 cases of normal pancreatic tissues. In 59 PDAC cases, the range of parasympathetic neurogenesis was 4-38 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2), with a median of 18 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2). Patients with parasympathetic neurogenesis >15 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2) were defined as the high-density group (39 patients, 66.1%), and those with parasympathetic neurogenesis 15 fibers/(5×0.785) mm(2) as the low-density group (20 patients, 33.9%). The high-density group had a higher occurrence of tumor budding (P=0.001) and a higher rate of early recurrence (P=0.035). Parasympathetic neurogenesis appeared to be an independent adverse prognostic factor [hazard ratio (HR)=2.45, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.25-4.81, P=0.009], in addition to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage (P=0.010) and tumor budding (P=0.009). Parasympathetic neurogenesis is strongly associated with tumor budding and correlates with an adverse prognosis in PDAC.

  7. Observation of strain-controlled electronic modulations revealed by Fermi surface superstructures in strongly correlated LaNiO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyangkeun; Hyun, Seungill; Moreschini, Luca; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Chang, Youngjun; Sohn, Changhee; Jeong, Dawoon; Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Yongsu; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Shim, Jihoon; Noh, Taewon

    2014-03-01

    Control over the electronic properties of strongly correlated electron systems can be achieved by exploiting the misfit strain that exists in epitaxial films on lattice mismatched substrates. Here, we report a systematic investigation of electronic structures in strongly correlated LaNiO3 films under different strain states, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and the dynamical mean field theory. LaNiO3 film shows a change of a Fermi surface (FS) topology, driven by interplay between strong electron-electron correlations and misfit strain effects. Additionally, different from compressive strain case, a FS with tensile strain has a large flat region to induce strong FS nesting. As a result, different FS superstructures are observed in the compressive and tensile strain cases, and their origins are attributed to charge disproportionation and spin density waves, respectively. The more details will be discussed in the presentation.

  8. POLD2 and KSP37 (FGFBP2) Correlate Strongly with Histology, Stage and Outcome in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Elgaaen, Bente Vilming; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Fortunati, Dario; Onsrud, Mathias; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Sauer, Torill; Gautvik, Kaare M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) constitutes more than 90% of ovarian cancers and is associated with high mortality. EOC comprises a heterogeneous group of tumours, and the causes and molecular pathology are essentially unknown. Improved insight into the molecular characteristics of the different subgroups of EOC is urgently needed, and should eventually lead to earlier diagnosis as well as more individualized and effective treatments. Previously, we reported a limited number of mRNAs strongly upregulated in human osteosarcomas and other malignancies, and six were selected to be tested for a possible association with three subgroups of ovarian carcinomas and clinical parameters. Methodology/Principal Findings The six selected mRNAs were quantified by RT-qPCR in biopsies from eleven poorly differentiated serous carcinomas (PDSC, stage III–IV), twelve moderately differentiated serous carcinomas (MDSC, stage III–IV) and eight clear cell carcinomas (CCC, stage I–IV) of the ovary. Superficial scrapings from six normal ovaries (SNO), as well as biopsies from three normal ovaries (BNO) and three benign ovarian cysts (BBOC) were analyzed for comparison. The gene expression level was related to the histological and clinical parameters of human ovarian carcinoma samples. One of the mRNAs, DNA polymerase delta 2 small subunit (POLD2), was increased in average 2.5- to almost 20-fold in MDSC and PDSC, respectively, paralleling the degree of dedifferentiation and concordant with a poor prognosis. Except for POLD2, the serous carcinomas showed a similar transcription profile, being clearly different from CCC. Another mRNA, Killer-specific secretory protein of 37 kDa (KSP37) showed six- to eight-fold higher levels in CCC stage I compared with the more advanced staged carcinomas, and correlated positively with an improved clinical outcome. Conclusions/Significance We have identified two biomarkers which are markedly upregulated in two subgroups of ovarian carcinomas

  9. Static and dynamic properties of strongly correlated lattice models under electric fields (Dynamical Mean Field Theory approach)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joura, Alexander V.

    In this thesis we study the Falicov-Kimball model within the framework of Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT). We derive expressions for the electrical conductivity, electronic thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient (thermopower) and thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) for the infinite dimensional hypercubic lattice and the Bethe lattice of infinite connectivity within linear response theory. We use these formulas to numerically calculate thermoelectric properties of the model away from half-filling. We also derive explicit analytic formulas for the retarded Green's function, the retarded self-energy and the relaxation time near the pole in the insulating regime on the hypercubic lattice. Using these results we compare thermal and electric transport properties of the correlated insulator to that of a generic insulator in the small temperature regime. Using analytic expressions for the self-energy near the pole in the insulator phase, we derive analytic formulas for the metal-insulator transition Ucr on the hypercubic lattice. For the Bethe lattice we derive explicit analytic formulas for the electric conductivity, the electronic part of the thermal conductivity, the Seebeck coefficient, the Lorentz number and the figure of merit in the low temperature limit. We also examine the problem of calculating the density of states for single-band lattice Hamiltonians with an applied constant and uniform external electric field, when the field is large enough that nonlinear effects are important. To do this we develop a general formalism (based on the nonequilibrium Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh theory), which can be applied to a wide variety of different many-body Hamiltonians. We assume that the electric field was turned on in the distant past, so the system has reached the steady state. We present numerical solutions of the equations derived for the Falicov-Kimball model within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory. Finally, nonequilibrium properties of the Hubbard model

  10. Perspective: Toward "synthesis by design": Exploring atomic correlations during inorganic materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderholm, L.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    Synthesis of inorganic extended solids is a critical starting point from which real-world functional materials and their consequent technologies originate. However, unlike the rich mechanistic foundation of organic synthesis, with its underlying rules of assembly (e.g., functional groups and their reactivities), the synthesis of inorganic materials lacks an underpinning of such robust organizing principles. In the latter case, any such rules must account for the diversity of chemical species and bonding motifs inherent to inorganic materials and the potential impact of mass transport on kinetics, among other considerations. Without such assembly rules, there is less understanding, less predictive power, and ultimately less control of properties. Despite such hurdles, developing a mechanistic understanding for synthesis of inorganic extended solids would dramatically impact the range of new material discoveries and resulting new functionalities, warranting a broad call to explore what is possible. Here we discuss our recent approaches toward a mechanistic framework for the synthesis of bulk inorganic extended solids, in which either embryonic atomic correlations or fully developed phases in solutions or melts can be identified and tracked during product selection and crystallization. The approach hinges on the application of high-energy x-rays, with their penetrating power and large Q-range, to explore reaction pathways in situ. We illustrate this process using two examples: directed assembly of Zr clusters in aqueous solution and total phase awareness during crystallization from K-Cu-S melts. These examples provide a glimpse of what we see as a larger vision, in which large scale simulations, data-driven science, and in situ studies of atomic correlations combine to accelerate materials discovery and synthesis, based on the assembly of well-defined, prenucleated atomic correlations.

  11. Perspective: Toward “synthesis by design”: Exploring atomic correlations during inorganic materials synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Soderholm, L.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2016-05-26

    Synthesis of inorganic extended solids is a critical starting point from which real-world functional materials and their consequent technologies originate. However, unlike the rich mechanistic foundation of organic synthesis, with its underlying rules of assembly (e.g., functional groups and their reactivities), the synthesis of inorganic materials lacks an underpinning of such robust organizing principles. In the latter case, any such rules must account for the diversity of chemical species and bonding motifs inherent to inorganic materials and the potential impact of mass transport on kinetics, among other considerations. Without such assembly rules, there is less understanding, less predictive power, and ultimately less control of properties. Despite such hurdles, developing a mechanistic understanding for synthesis of inorganic extended solids would dramatically impact the range of new material discoveries and resulting new functionalities, warranting a broad call to explore what is possible. Here we discuss our recent approaches toward a mechanistic framework for the synthesis of bulk inorganic extended solids, in which either embryonic atomic correlations or fully developed phases in solutions or melts can be identified and tracked during product selection and crystallization. The approach hinges on the application of high-energy x-rays, with their penetrating power and large Q-range, to explore reaction pathways in situ. We illustrate this process using two examples: directed assembly of Zr clusters in aqueous solution and total phase awareness during crystallization from K–Cu–S melts. These examples provide a glimpse of what we see as a larger vision, in which large scale simulations, data-driven science, and in situ studies of atomic correlations combine to accelerate materials discovery and synthesis, based on the assembly of well-defined, prenucleated atomic correlations.

  12. Perspective: Toward “synthesis by design”: Exploring atomic correlations during inorganic materials synthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Soderholm, L.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2016-05-26

    Synthesis of inorganic extended solids is a critical starting point from which real-world functional materials and their consequent technologies originate. However, unlike the rich mechanistic foundation of organic synthesis, with its underlying rules of assembly (e.g., functional groups and their reactivities), the synthesis of inorganic materials lacks an underpinning of such robust organizing principles. In the latter case, any such rules must account for the diversity of chemical species and bonding motifs inherent to inorganic materials and the potential impact of mass transport on kinetics, among other considerations. Without such assembly rules, there is less understanding, less predictive power, andmore » ultimately less control of properties. Despite such hurdles, developing a mechanistic understanding for synthesis of inorganic extended solids would dramatically impact the range of new material discoveries and resulting new functionalities, warranting a broad call to explore what is possible. Here we discuss our recent approaches toward a mechanistic framework for the synthesis of bulk inorganic extended solids, in which either embryonic atomic correlations or fully developed phases in solutions or melts can be identified and tracked during product selection and crystallization. The approach hinges on the application of high-energy x-rays, with their penetrating power and large Q-range, to explore reaction pathways in situ. We illustrate this process using two examples: directed assembly of Zr clusters in aqueous solution and total phase awareness during crystallization from K–Cu–S melts. These examples provide a glimpse of what we see as a larger vision, in which large scale simulations, data-driven science, and in situ studies of atomic correlations combine to accelerate materials discovery and synthesis, based on the assembly of well-defined, prenucleated atomic correlations.« less

  13. The self-trapping transition in the non-half-filled strongly correlated extended Holstein-Hubbard model in two-dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, I. V. Chatterjee, Ashok

    2014-04-24

    The two-dimensional extended Holstein-Hubbard model (EHH) has been considered at strong correlation regime in the non-half-filled band case to understand the self-trapping transition of electrons in strongly correlated electron system. We have used the method of optimized canonical transformations to transform an EHH model into an effective extended Hubbard (EEH) model. In the strong on-site correlation limit an EH model can be transformed into a t-J model which is finally solved using Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA). We found that, for non-half-filled band case, the transition is abrupt in the adiabatic region whereas it is continuous in the anti-adiabatic region.

  14. Exploring the Limits of Waveform Correlation Event Detection as Applied to Three Earthquake Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. J.; Carr, D.; Resor, M.; Duffey, S.

    2009-12-01

    Swarms of earthquakes and/or aftershock sequences can dramatically increase the level of seismicity in a region for a period of time lasting from days to months, depending on the swarm or sequence. Such occurrences can provide a large amount of useful information to seismologists. For those who monitor seismic events for possible nuclear explosions, however, these swarms/sequences are a nuisance. In an explosion monitoring system, each event must be treated as a possible nuclear test until it can be proven, to a high degree of confidence, not to be. Seismic events recorded by the same station with highly correlated waveforms almost certainly have a similar location and source type, so clusters of events within a swarm can quickly be identified as earthquakes. We have developed a number of tools that can be used to exploit the high degree of waveform similarity expected to be associated with swarms/sequences. Dendro Tool measures correlations between known events. The Waveform Correlation Detector is intended to act as a detector, finding events in raw data which correlate with known events. The Self Scanner is used to find all correlated segments within a raw data steam and does not require an event library. All three techniques together provide an opportunity to study the similarities of events in an aftershock sequence in different ways. To comprehensively characterize the benefits and limits of waveform correlation techniques, we studied 3 aftershock sequences, using our 3 tools, at multiple stations. We explored the effects of station distance and event magnitudes on correlation results. Lastly, we show the reduction in detection threshold and analyst workload offered by waveform correlation techniques compared to STA/LTA based detection. We analyzed 4 days of data from each aftershock sequence using all three methods. Most known events clustered in a similar manner across the toolsets. Up to 25% of catalogued events were found to be a member of a cluster. In

  15. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1996 uses available data from literature, industry, and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on minerals industry direction are drawn from these data.

  16. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  17. Exploring self-perceptions and social influences as correlates of adolescent leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Sabiston, Catherine M; Crocker, Peter R E

    2008-02-01

    This study examined adolescent leisure-time physical activity correlates using the expectancy-value (EV) model. Adolescents (N = 857) completed questionnaires to assess competence and value self-perceptions, social influences, and physical activity. Direct and indirect effects of self-perceptions and parent and best friend influences on physical activity were explored using structural equation modeling. Measurement models were a good fit to the data and gender invariance was supported. The structural mediation model was a reasonable fit to the data, whereby the indirect effects of parents and peers and the direct effects of competence beliefs and values together accounted for 49% of the variance in physical activity. In this model, the pattern of relationships was similar for adolescent males and females. Findings supporting the EV model provide theoretical and practical implications for understanding adolescent physical activity.

  18. Final Report on ``Theories of Strong Electron Correlations in Molecules and Solids-DE-FG02-97ER45640

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Daniel L

    2013-04-15

    The PI led theoretical studies of correlated hybridization in transition metal complexes, compounds, and molecules, and of electron transport in DNA associated with nanoelectronic conformations attached to gold electrodes and in the presence of DNA repair proteins.

  19. Exploration of the Transition from the Hydrodynamic-like to the Strongly Kinetic Regime in Shock-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Skupsky, S.; Bellei, C.; Pino, J.; Wilks, S. C.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-05-05

    Clear evidence of the transition from hydrodynamiclike to strongly kinetic shock-driven implosions is, for the first time, revealed and quantitatively assessed. Implosions with a range of initial equimolar D3He gas densities show that as the density is decreased, hydrodynamic simulations strongly diverge from and increasingly over-predict the observed nuclear yields, from a factor of ~2 at 3.1 mg/cm3 to a factor of 100 at 0.14 mg/cm3. (The corresponding Knudsen number, the ratio of ion mean-free path to minimum shell radius, varied from 0.3 to 9; similarly, the ratio of fusion burn duration to ion diffusion time, another figure of merit of kinetic effects, varied from 0.3 to 14.) This result is shown to be unrelated to the effects of hydrodynamic mix. As a first step to garner insight into this transition, a reduced ion kinetic (RIK) model that includes gradient-diffusion and loss-term approximations to several transport processes was implemented within the framework of a one-dimensional radiation-transport code. After empirical calibration, the RIK simulations reproduce the observed yield trends, largely as a result of ion diffusion and the depletion of the reacting tail ions.

  20. Exploration of the Transition from the Hydrodynamic-like to the Strongly Kinetic Regime in Shock-Driven Implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; ...

    2014-05-05

    Clear evidence of the transition from hydrodynamiclike to strongly kinetic shock-driven implosions is, for the first time, revealed and quantitatively assessed. Implosions with a range of initial equimolar D3He gas densities show that as the density is decreased, hydrodynamic simulations strongly diverge from and increasingly over-predict the observed nuclear yields, from a factor of ~2 at 3.1 mg/cm3 to a factor of 100 at 0.14 mg/cm3. (The corresponding Knudsen number, the ratio of ion mean-free path to minimum shell radius, varied from 0.3 to 9; similarly, the ratio of fusion burn duration to ion diffusion time, another figure of meritmore » of kinetic effects, varied from 0.3 to 14.) This result is shown to be unrelated to the effects of hydrodynamic mix. As a first step to garner insight into this transition, a reduced ion kinetic (RIK) model that includes gradient-diffusion and loss-term approximations to several transport processes was implemented within the framework of a one-dimensional radiation-transport code. After empirical calibration, the RIK simulations reproduce the observed yield trends, largely as a result of ion diffusion and the depletion of the reacting tail ions.« less

  1. Strong correlation in acene sheets from the active-space variational two-electron reduced density matrix method: effects of symmetry and size.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Kenley; Greenman, Loren; Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2011-06-09

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of organic molecules with importance in several branches of science, including medicine, combustion chemistry, and materials science. The delocalized π-orbital systems in PAHs require highly accurate electronic structure methods to capture strong electron correlation. Treating correlation in PAHs has been challenging because (i) traditional wave function methods for strong correlation have not been applicable since they scale exponentially in the number of strongly correlated orbitals, and (ii) alternative methods such as the density-matrix renormalization group and variational two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) methods have not been applied beyond linear acene chains. In this paper we extend the earlier results from active-space variational 2-RDM theory [Gidofalvi, G.; Mazziotti, D. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 134108] to the more general two-dimensional arrangement of rings--acene sheets--to study the relationship between geometry and electron correlation in PAHs. The acene-sheet calculations, if performed with conventional wave function methods, would require wave function expansions with as many as 1.5 × 10(17) configuration state functions. To measure electron correlation, we employ several RDM-based metrics: (i) natural-orbital occupation numbers, (ii) the 1-RDM von Neumann entropy, (iii) the correlation energy per carbon atom, and (iv) the squared Frobenius norm of the cumulant 2-RDM. The results confirm a trend of increasing polyradical character with increasing molecular size previously observed in linear PAHs and reveal a corresponding trend in two-dimensional (arch-shaped) PAHs. Furthermore, in PAHs of similar size they show significant variations in correlation with geometry. PAHs with the strictly linear geometry (chains) exhibit more electron correlation than PAHs with nonlinear geometries (sheets).

  2. Exploring the correlated phase behavior and electronic properties of parent and doped spin-orbit Mott phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    An unusual manifestation of Mott physics dependent on strong spin-orbit interactions has recently been identified in a growing number of classes of 5d transition metal oxides built from Ir4+ ions. Instead of the naively expected increased itinerancy of these iridates due to the larger orbital extent of their 5d valence electrons, the interplay between the amplified relativistic spin-orbit interaction (intrinsic to large Z iridium cations) and their residual on-site Coulomb interaction U, conspires to stabilize a novel class of spin-orbit assisted Mott insulators with a proposed Jeff = 1/2 ground state wavefunction. The identification of this novel spin-orbit Mott state has been the focus of recent interest due to its potential of hosting a variety of new phases driven by correlated electron phenomena (such as high temperature superconductivity or enhanced ferroic behavior) in a strongly spin-orbit coupled setting. Currently, however, there remains very little understanding of how spin-orbit Mott phases respond to carrier doping and, more specifically, how relevant U remains for the charge carriers of a spin-orbit Mott phase once the bandwidth is increased. Here I will present our group's recent experimental work exploring carrier doping and the resulting electronic phase behavior in one such spin-orbit driven Mott material, Sr3Ir2O7, with the ultimate goal of determining the relevance of U and electron correlation effects within the doped system's ground state. Our results reveal the stabilization of an electronically phase separated ground state in B-site doped Sr3Ir2O7, suggestive of an extended regime of localization of in-plane doped carriers within the spin-orbit Mott phase. This results in a percolative metal-to-insulator transition with a novel, global, antiferromagnetic order. The electronic response of B-site doping in Sr3Ir2O7will then be compared with recent results exploring A-site doping if time permits. Supported by NSF CAREER Award DMR-1056625.

  3. How good strong union men line it out: explorations of the structure and dynamics of coal-miners' class consciousness

    SciTech Connect

    Yarrow, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    This study explores how working-class people apprehend and analyze the class dynamics of their social world. As an exploratory empirical study of the structure and dynamics of working-class consciousness, it seeks to develop the theory of actual class consciousness by bringing previous theories into dialogue with the articulated analyses of coal miners in central Appalachia. Although changing conditions are shown to have a powerful effect on class consciousness, the respondents were found to respond differently to the changing context and to remain loyal to important elements of their earlier perspectives. Suggestions are made for how the theory could be developed further. The data for the study are flexibly structured interviews which were conducted with active, retired, and disabled miners in southern West Virginia and western Virginia. A dozen miners were interviewed during the 1978 strike and again the following summer; during the summer of 1978, nineteen additional miners were interviewed.

  4. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1999 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The report documents data on exploration budgets by region and commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry. And it presents inferences and observations on mineral industry direction based on these data and discussions.

  5. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1997 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Sulvey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  6. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Porter, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1998 draws on available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  7. An electric field-driven MIT in strongly-correlated thin-film superlattices: an inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakalov, Petar; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    Using an inhomogeneous dynamical mean-field theory (IDMFT) approach to the single-band Hubbard model we investigate the properties of thin-film superlattices made up of alternating strongly (U1) and weakly (U2 correlated regions. In particular, we study the influence of temperature, doping, interaction strengths (U1 ,U2), superlattice parameters (L1 ,L2) and transverse electric field on the correlation driven Mott-Hubbard metal-to-insulator transition. We find that when the periodicity of the superlattice is such that the strongly correlated regions are below a certain thickness, the MIT is suppressed due to proximity effects. This work was partially funded by the Flemish Fund for Scientific Research (FWO - Vlaanderen) under FWO Grant G.0520.10 and by the SITOGA FP7 project. Most of the calculations were performed on KU Leuven's ThinKing HPC cluster.

  8. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  9. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  10. Towards strongly correlated photons in arrays of dissipative nonlinear cavities under a frequency-dependent incoherent pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreuilly, José; Wouters, Michiel; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-10-01

    We report a theoretical study of a quantum optical model consisting of an array of strongly nonlinear cavities incoherently pumped by an ensemble of population-inverted two-level atoms. Projective methods are used to eliminate the atomic dynamics and write a generalized master equation for the photonic degrees of freedom only, where the frequency-dependence of gain introduces non-Markovian features. In the simplest single cavity configuration, this pumping scheme gives novel optical bistability effects and allows for the selective generation of Fock states with a well-defined photon number. For many cavities in a weakly non-Markovian limit, the non-equilibrium steady state recovers a Grand-Canonical statistical ensemble at a temperature determined by the effective atomic linewidth. For a two-cavity system in the strongly nonlinear regime, signatures of a Mott state with one photon per cavity are found. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Triangular Spin-Orbit-Coupled Lattice with Strong Coulomb Correlations: Sn Atoms on a SiC(0001) Substrate.

    PubMed

    Glass, S; Li, G; Adler, F; Aulbach, J; Fleszar, A; Thomale, R; Hanke, W; Claessen, R; Schäfer, J

    2015-06-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) atom lattices provide model setups with Coulomb correlations that induce competing ground states. Here, SiC emerges as a wide-gap substrate with reduced screening. We report the first artificial high-Z atom lattice on SiC(0001) by Sn adatoms, based on experimental realization and theoretical modeling. Density-functional theory of our triangular structure model closely reproduces the scanning tunneling microscopy. Photoemission data show a deeply gapped state (∼2  eV gap), and, based on our calculations including dynamic mean-field theory, we argue that this reflects a pronounced Mott-insulating scenario. We also find indications that the system is susceptible to antiferromagnetic superstructures. Such artificial lattices on SiC(0001) thus offer a novel platform for coexisting Coulomb correlations and spin-orbit coupling, with bearing for unusual magnetic phases and proposed topological quantum states of matter.

  12. Explicitly-correlated non-born-oppenheimer calculations of the HD molecule in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamowicz, Ludwik; Stanke, Monika; Tellgren, Erik; Helgaker, Trygve

    2017-08-01

    Explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions with shifted centers (ECGs) are implemented within the earlier proposed effective variational non-Born-Oppenheimer method for calculating bound states of molecular systems in magnetic field (Adamowicz et al., 2015). The Hamiltonian used in the calculations is obtained by subtracting the operator representing the kinetic energy of the center-of-mass motion from the total laboratory-frame Hamiltonian. Test ECG calculations are performed for the HD molecule.

  13. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, P; Donovan, E R; Labocha, M K; Sears, M W; Downs, C J; Sorensen, D A; Hayes, J P

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selection on mass-independent basal metabolic rate (BMR). Then we tested for responses to selection in MMR and correlated responses to selection in BMR. In other lines, we antagonistically selected for mice with a combination of high mass-independent MMR and low mass-independent BMR. All selection protocols and data analyses included body mass as a covariate, so effects of selection on the metabolic rates are mass adjusted (that is, independent of effects of body mass). The selection lasted eight generations. Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (11.2%) in lines selected for increased MMR, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, higher (2.5%). Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (5.3%) in antagonistically selected lines, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, lower (4.2%). Analysis of breeding values revealed no positive genetic trend for elevated BMR in high-MMR lines. A weak positive genetic correlation was detected between MMR and BMR. That weak positive genetic correlation supports the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy in the sense that it fails to falsify a key model assumption. Overall, the results suggest that at least in these mice there is significant capacity for independent evolution of metabolic traits. Whether that is true in the ancestral animals that evolved endothermy remains an important but unanswered question.

  14. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, P; Donovan, E R; Labocha, M K; Sears, M W; Downs, C J; Sorensen, D A; Hayes, J P

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selection on mass-independent basal metabolic rate (BMR). Then we tested for responses to selection in MMR and correlated responses to selection in BMR. In other lines, we antagonistically selected for mice with a combination of high mass-independent MMR and low mass-independent BMR. All selection protocols and data analyses included body mass as a covariate, so effects of selection on the metabolic rates are mass adjusted (that is, independent of effects of body mass). The selection lasted eight generations. Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (11.2%) in lines selected for increased MMR, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, higher (2.5%). Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (5.3%) in antagonistically selected lines, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, lower (4.2%). Analysis of breeding values revealed no positive genetic trend for elevated BMR in high-MMR lines. A weak positive genetic correlation was detected between MMR and BMR. That weak positive genetic correlation supports the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy in the sense that it fails to falsify a key model assumption. Overall, the results suggest that at least in these mice there is significant capacity for independent evolution of metabolic traits. Whether that is true in the ancestral animals that evolved endothermy remains an important but unanswered question. PMID:25604947

  15. Exploring violin sound quality: investigating English timbre descriptors and correlating resynthesized acoustical modifications with perceptual properties.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Blackwell, Alan F; Cross, Ian; Woodhouse, Jim; Moore, Brian C J

    2012-01-01

    Performers often discuss the sound quality of a violin or the sound obtained by particular playing techniques, calling upon a diverse vocabulary. This study explores the verbal descriptions, made by performers, of the distinctive timbres of different violins. Sixty-one common descriptors were collected and then arranged by violinists on a map, so that words with similar meanings lay close together, and those with different meanings lay far apart. The results of multidimensional scaling demonstrated consistent use among violinists of many words, and highlighted which words are used for similar purposes. These terms and their relations were then used to investigate the perceptual effect of acoustical modifications of violin sounds produced by roving of the levels in five one-octave wide bands, 190-380, 380-760, 760-1520, 1520-3040, and 3040-6080 Hz. Pairs of sounds were presented, and each participant was asked to indicate which of the sounds was more bright, clear, harsh, nasal, or good (in separate runs for each descriptor). Increased brightness and clarity were associated with moderately increased levels in bands 4 and 5, whereas increased harshness was associated with a strongly increased level in band 4. Judgments differed across participants for the qualities nasal and good.

  16. Evaluating the correlation between liquid fragility and glass-forming ability in the extremely strong Ce-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, B.

    2017-09-01

    This investigation focuses on liquid fragility (m) and its correlation with glass-forming ability (GFA) of Ce-Ga-Cu, Ce-Al-Cu-Ni and newly developed Ce-Ga-Cu-Ni bulk metallic glass (BMG) systems. The present Ce-based BMGs belong to the extremely strong glass-forming system, whose fragility m values lie in a strong liquid range of 18-33. The quantitative correlation between m and GFA in the present Ce-based BMGs cannot be described well by previous criteria proposed by Senkov [Phys. Rev. B 76, 104202 (2007)], Wang [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 261913 (2012)], and Johnson [Nat. Commun. 7, 10313 (2016)]. By considering both the stability of the liquid phase and the stability of the competing crystalline phases, it is found that the stability of the competing crystalline phases plays a dominant role in the determination of GFA of strong Ce-based BMGs. And, the influence of reduced glass transition temperature (Trg) on GFA would be submerged by that of fragility m when m is below ˜30. The results help in further understanding the underlying correlation between fragility and GFA in metallic glasses, especially for the strong glass-forming liquids.

  17. Fermi-liquid theory of ultracold trapped Fermi gases: Implications for pseudogap physics and other strongly correlated phases

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Levin, K.

    2010-07-15

    We show how Fermi-liquid theory can be applied to ultracold Fermi gases, thereby expanding their ''simulation'' capabilities to a class of problems of interest to multiple physics subdisciplines. We introduce procedures for measuring and calculating position-dependent Landau parameters. This lays the groundwork for addressing important controversial issues: (i) the suggestion that thermodynamically, the normal state of a unitary gas is indistinguishable from a Fermi liquid and (ii) that a fermionic system with strong repulsive contact interactions is associated with either ferromagnetism or localization; this relates as well to {sup 3}He and its p-wave superfluidity.

  18. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonferrous, nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 58 percent in 2004 from the 2003 budget, according to Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes two years after a five-year period of declining spending for mineral exploration (1998 to 2002). Figures suggest a subsequent 27 percent increase in budgeted expenditures from 2002 to 2003. For the second consecutive year, all regional exploration budget estimates were anticipated to increase.

  19. Modification of heparanase gene expression in response to conditioning and LPS treatment: strong correlation to rs4693608 SNP.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Olga; Shimoni, Avichai; Baryakh, Polina; Morgulis, Yan; Mayorov, Margarita; Beider, Katia; Shteingauz, Anna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-04-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves the saccharide chains of HSPGs, important structural and functional components of the ECM. Cleavage of HS leads to loss of the structural integrity of the ECM and release of HS-bound cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive angiogenic- and growth-promoting factors. Our previous study revealed a highly significant correlation of HPSE gene SNPs rs4693608 and rs4364254 and their combination with the risk of developing GVHD. We now demonstrate that HPSE is up-regulated in response to pretransplantation conditioning, followed by a gradual decrease thereafter. Expression of heparanase correlated with the rs4693608 HPSE SNP before and after conditioning. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between recipient and donor rs4693608 SNP discrepancy and the time of neutrophil and platelet recovery. Similarly, the discrepancy in rs4693608 HPSE SNP between recipients and donors was found to be a more significant factor for the risk of aGVHD than patient genotype. The rs4693608 SNP also affected HPSE gene expression in LPS-treated MNCs from PB and CB. Possessors of the AA genotype exhibited up-regulation of heparanase with a high ratio in the LPS-treated MNCs, whereas individuals with genotype GG showed down-regulation or no effect on HPSE gene expression. HPSE up-regulation was mediated by TLR4. The study emphasizes the importance of rs4693608 SNP for HPSE gene expression in activated MNCs, indicating a role in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including postconditioning, engraftment, and GVHD.

  20. Current-voltage profile of a strongly correlated materials heterostructure using non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Khadijeh; Freericks, James

    We investigate the nonlinear electronic transport across a multilayered heterostructure which consists of Mott insulator layers connected to ballistic metal leads on both sides. To create current flow, we turn on an electric field in the leads for a finite period of time and then turn it off and let the system reach the steady state by adding an electric field over the correlated region. We use nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to obtain the current-voltage relation. To do so, we current bias the device, and adjust the voltage profile to ensure current conservation and charge conservation throughout. The calculation ultimately works directly in the steady-state limit.

  1. Exploration of the neural correlates of cerebral palsy for sensorimotor BCI control

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Ian; Faller, Josef; Scherer, Reinhold; Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M.; Nasuto, Slawomir J.; Billinger, Martin; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) includes a broad range of disorders, which can result in impairment of posture and movement control. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been proposed as assistive devices for individuals with CP. Better understanding of the neural processing underlying motor control in affected individuals could lead to more targeted BCI rehabilitation and treatment options. We have explored well-known neural correlates of movement, including event-related desynchronization (ERD), phase synchrony, and a recently-introduced measure of phase dynamics, in participants with CP and healthy control participants. Although present, significantly less ERD and phase locking were found in the group with CP. Additionally, inter-group differences in phase dynamics were also significant. Taken together these findings suggest that users with CP exhibit lower levels of motor cortex activation during motor imagery, as reflected in lower levels of ongoing mu suppression and less functional connectivity. These differences indicate that development of BCIs for individuals with CP may pose additional challenges beyond those faced in providing BCIs to healthy individuals. PMID:25071544

  2. Exploring effective multiplicity in multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy using eigenvalues of correlation matrices

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Taguchi, Y-h; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Recent advances in multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) allow wide coverage of cortical areas while entailing the necessity to control family-wise errors (FWEs) due to increased multiplicity. Conventionally, the Bonferroni method has been used to control FWE. While Type I errors (false positives) can be strictly controlled, the application of a large number of channel settings may inflate the chance of Type II errors (false negatives). The Bonferroni-based methods are especially stringent in controlling Type I errors of the most activated channel with the smallest p value. To maintain a balance between Types I and II errors, effective multiplicity (Meff) derived from the eigenvalues of correlation matrices is a method that has been introduced in genetic studies. Thus, we explored its feasibility in multichannel fNIRS studies. Applying the Meff method to three kinds of experimental data with different activation profiles, we performed resampling simulations and found that Meff was controlled at 10 to 15 in a 44-channel setting. Consequently, the number of significantly activated channels remained almost constant regardless of the number of measured channels. We demonstrated that the Meff approach can be an effective alternative to Bonferroni-based methods for multichannel fNIRS studies. PMID:26157982

  3. Plasma levels of homocysteine and cysteine increased in pediatric NAFLD and strongly correlated with severity of liver damage.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Anna; Alisi, Anna; di Giovamberardino, Gianna; Crudele, Annalisa; Ceccarelli, Sara; Panera, Nadia; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Nobili, Valerio

    2014-11-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of metabolic abnormalities ranging from simple triglyceride accumulation in the hepatocytes to hepatic steatosis with inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis. It has been demonstrated that the pathogenesis of NAFLD involves increased oxidative stress, with consumption of the major cellular antioxidant, glutathione (GSH). Liver has a fundamental role in sulfur compound metabolism, although the data reported on plasma thiols status in NAFLD are conflicting. We recruited 63 NAFLD patients, and we analyzed all plasma thiols, such as homocysteine (Hcy), cysteine (Cys), cysteinylglycine (CysGly) and GSH, by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. Hcy, Cys and CysGly plasma levels increased in NAFLD patients (p < 0.0001); whereas GSH levels were decreased in NAFLD patients when compared to controls (p < 0.0001). On the contrary, patients with steatohepatitis exhibited lower levels of Hcy and Cys than subjects without. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between Hcy and Cys and the presence of fibrosis in children with NAFLD. Taken together, these data demonstrated a defective hepatic sulfur metabolism in children with NAFLD, and that high levels of Hcy and Cys probably correlates with a pattern of more severe histological liver damage, due to mechanisms that require further studies.

  4. Updating the (supermassive black hole mass)-(spiral arm pitch angle) relation: a strong correlation for galaxies with pseudobulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Graham, Alister W.; Seigar, Marc S.

    2017-10-01

    We have conducted an image analysis of the (current) full sample of 44 spiral galaxies with directly measured supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, MBH, to determine each galaxy's logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle, ϕ. For predicting black hole masses, we have derived the relation: log (MBH/M⊙) = (7.01 ± 0.07) - (0.171 ± 0.017)[|ϕ| - 15°]. The total root mean square scatter associated with this relation is 0.43 dex in the log MBH direction, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.30 ± 0.08 dex. The MBH-ϕ relation is therefore at least as accurate at predicting SMBH masses in spiral galaxies as the other known relations. By definition, the existence of an MBH-ϕ relation demands that the SMBH mass must correlate with the galaxy discs in some manner. Moreover, with the majority of our sample (37 of 44) classified in the literature as having a pseudobulge morphology, we additionally reveal that the SMBH mass correlates with the large-scale spiral pattern and thus the discs of galaxies hosting pseudobulges. Furthermore, given that the MBH-ϕ relation is capable of estimating black hole masses in bulge-less spiral galaxies, it therefore has great promise for predicting which galaxies may harbour intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs, MBH < 105 M⊙). Extrapolating from the current relation, we predict that galaxies with |ϕ| ≥ 26.7° should possess IMBHs.

  5. Metal-ligand interplay in strongly correlated oxides: a parametrized phase diagram for pressure-induced spin transitions.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Aleksi; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Badro, James; Vankó, György; Shukla, Abhay

    2007-05-11

    We investigate the magnetic properties of archetypal transition-metal oxides MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO under very high pressure by x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Kbeta line. We observe a strong modification of the magnetism in the megabar range in all the samples except NiO. The results are analyzed within a multiplet approach including charge-transfer effects. The spectral changes are well accounted for by changes of the ligand field acting on the d electrons and allows us to extract the d-hybridization strength, O-2p bandwidth and ionic crystal field across the magnetic transition. This approach allows first-hand insight into the mechanism of the pressure-induced spin transition.

  6. A versatile setup for ultrafast broadband optical spectroscopy of coherent collective modes in strongly correlated quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Edoardo; Mann, Andreas; Borroni, Simone; Arrell, Christopher; van Mourik, Frank; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    A femtosecond pump-probe setup is described that is optimised for broadband transient reflectivity experiments on solid samples over a wide temperature range. By combining high temporal resolution and a broad detection window, this apparatus can investigate the interplay between coherent collective modes and high-energy electronic excitations, which is a distinctive characteristic of correlated electron systems. Using a single-shot readout array detector at frame rates of 10 kHz allows resolving coherent oscillations with amplitudes <10−4. We demonstrate its operation on the charge-transfer insulator La2CuO4, revealing coherent phonons with frequencies up to 13 THz and providing access into their Raman matrix elements. PMID:27990455

  7. Native State Mass Spectrometry, Surface Plasmon Resonance, and X-ray Crystallography Correlate Strongly as a Fragment Screening Combination.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lucy A; Dolezal, Olan; Ren, Bin; Ryan, John H; Peat, Thomas S; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-03-10

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is contingent on the development of analytical methods to identify weak protein-fragment noncovalent interactions. Herein we have combined an underutilized fragment screening method, native state mass spectrometry, together with two proven and popular fragment screening methods, surface plasmon resonance and X-ray crystallography, in a fragment screening campaign against human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II). In an initial fragment screen against a 720-member fragment library (the "CSIRO Fragment Library") seven CA II binding fragments, including a selection of nonclassical CA II binding chemotypes, were identified. A further 70 compounds that comprised the initial hit chemotypes were subsequently sourced from the full CSIRO compound collection and screened. The fragment results were extremely well correlated across the three methods. Our findings demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity to apply native state mass spectrometry as a complementary fragment screening method to accelerate drug discovery.

  8. Methylation of bone SOST, its mRNA, and serum sclerostin levels correlate strongly with fracture risk in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Reppe, Sjur; Noer, Agate; Grimholt, Runa M; Halldórsson, Bjarni V; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Gautvik, Vigdis T; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Berg, Jens Petter; Datta, Harish; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lyle, Robert; Collas, Philippe; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of sclerostin, a glycoprotein secreted by osteocytes, offers a new therapeutic paradigm for treatment of osteoporosis (OP) through its critical role as Wnt/catenin signaling regulator. This study describes the epigenetic regulation of SOST expression in bone biopsies of postmenopausal women. We correlated serum sclerostin to bone mineral density (BMD), fractures, and bone remodeling parameters, and related these findings to epigenetic and genetic disease mechanisms. Serum sclerostin and bone remodeling biomarkers were measured in two postmenopausal groups: healthy (BMD T-score > -1) and established OP (BMD T-score < -2.5, with at least one low-energy fracture). Bone specimens were used to analyze SOST mRNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation changes. The SOST gene promoter region showed increased CpG methylation in OP patients (n = 4) compared to age and body mass index (BMI) balanced controls (n = 4) (80.5% versus 63.2%, p = 0.0001) with replication in independent cohorts (n = 27 and n = 36, respectively). Serum sclerostin and bone SOST mRNA expression correlated positively with age-adjusted and BMI-adjusted total hip BMD (r = 0.47 and r = 0.43, respectively; both p < 0.0005), and inversely to serum bone turnover markers. Five SNPs, one of which replicates in an independent population-based genomewide association study (GWAS), showed association with serum sclerostin or SOST mRNA levels under an additive model (p = 0.0016 to 0.0079). Genetic and epigenetic changes in SOST influence its bone mRNA expression and serum sclerostin levels in postmenopausal women. The observations suggest that increased SOST promoter methylation seen in OP is a compensatory counteracting mechanism, which lowers serum sclerostin concentrations and reduces inhibition of Wnt signaling in an attempt to promote bone formation.

  9. Strong lattice correlation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in a pseudospin-1/2 Mott insulator Sr2IrO4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuelin; Schaller, Richard D.; Zhu, Mengze; Walko, Donald A.; Kim, Jungho; Ke, Xianglin; Miao, Ludi; Mao, Z. Q.

    2016-01-01

    In correlated oxides the coupling of quasiparticles to other degrees of freedom such as spin and lattice plays critical roles in the emergence of symmetry-breaking quantum ordered states such as high temperature superconductivity. We report a strong lattice coupling of photon-induced quasiparticles in spin-orbital coupling Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 probed via optical excitation. Combining time-resolved x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy techniques, we reconstruct a spatiotemporal map of the diffusion of these quasiparticles. Due to the unique electronic configuration of the quasiparticles, the strong lattice correlation is unexpected but extends the similarity between Sr2IrO4 and cuprates to a new dimension of electron-phonon coupling which persists under highly non-equilibrium conditions. PMID:26787094

  10. Strong lattice correlation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in a pseudospin-1/2 Mott insulator Sr2IrO4

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuelin; Schaller, Richard D.; Zhu, Mengze; Walko, Donald A.; Kim, Jungho; Ke, Xianglin; Miao, Ludi; Mao, Z. Q.

    2016-01-20

    In correlated oxides the coupling of quasiparticles to other degrees of freedom such as spin and lattice plays critical roles in the emergence of symmetry-breaking quantum ordered states such as high temperature superconductivity. We report a strong lattice coupling of photon-induced quasiparticles in spin-orbital coupling Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 probed via optical excitation. Combining time-resolved x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy techniques, we reconstruct a spatiotemporal map of the diffusion of these quasiparticles. Lastly, due to the unique electronic configuration of the quasiparticles, the strong lattice correlation is unexpected but extends the similarity between Sr2IrO4 and cuprates to a new dimension of electron-phonon coupling which persists under highly non-equilibrium conditions.

  11. Strong lattice correlation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in a pseudospin-1/2 Mott insulator Sr2IrO4

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yuelin; Schaller, Richard D.; Zhu, Mengze; ...

    2016-01-20

    In correlated oxides the coupling of quasiparticles to other degrees of freedom such as spin and lattice plays critical roles in the emergence of symmetry-breaking quantum ordered states such as high temperature superconductivity. We report a strong lattice coupling of photon-induced quasiparticles in spin-orbital coupling Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 probed via optical excitation. Combining time-resolved x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy techniques, we reconstruct a spatiotemporal map of the diffusion of these quasiparticles. Lastly, due to the unique electronic configuration of the quasiparticles, the strong lattice correlation is unexpected but extends the similarity between Sr2IrO4 and cuprates to a new dimension ofmore » electron-phonon coupling which persists under highly non-equilibrium conditions.« less

  12. Anomalous influence of spin fluctuations on the heat capacity and entropy in a strongly correlated helical ferromagnet MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povzner, A. A.; Volkov, A. G.; Nogovitsyna, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of spin fluctuations on the thermodynamic properties of a helical ferromagnet MnSi has been investigated in the framework of the Hubbard model with the electronic spectrum determined from the first-principles LDA + U + SO calculation, which is extended taking into account the Hund coupling and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antisymmetric exchange. It has been shown that the ground state of the magnetic material is characterized by large zero-point fluctuations, which disappear at the temperature T* (< T c is the temperature of the magnetic phase transition). In this case, the entropy abruptly increases, and a lambdashaped anomaly appears in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity at constant volume ( C V ( T)). In the temperature range T* < T < T c , thermal fluctuations lead to the disappearance of the inhomogeneous magnetization. The competition between the increase in the entropy due to paramagnon excitations and its decrease as a result of the reduction in the amplitude of local magnetic moments, under the conditions of strong Hund exchange, is responsible for in the appearance of a "shoulder" in the dependence C V ( T)).

  13. Brain electric correlates of strong belief in paranormal phenomena: intracerebral EEG source and regional Omega complexity analyses.

    PubMed

    Pizzagalli, D; Lehmann, D; Gianotti, L; Koenig, T; Tanaka, H; Wackermann, J; Brugger, P

    2000-12-22

    The neurocognitive processes underlying the formation and maintenance of paranormal beliefs are important for understanding schizotypal ideation. Behavioral studies indicated that both schizotypal and paranormal ideation are based on an overreliance on the right hemisphere, whose coarse rather than focussed semantic processing may favor the emergence of 'loose' and 'uncommon' associations. To elucidate the electrophysiological basis of these behavioral observations, 35-channel resting EEG was recorded in pre-screened female strong believers and disbelievers during resting baseline. EEG data were subjected to FFT-Dipole-Approximation analysis, a reference-free frequency-domain dipole source modeling, and Regional (hemispheric) Omega Complexity analysis, a linear approach estimating the complexity of the trajectories of momentary EEG map series in state space. Compared to disbelievers, believers showed: more right-located sources of the beta2 band (18.5-21 Hz, excitatory activity); reduced interhemispheric differences in Omega complexity values; higher scores on the Magical Ideation scale; more general negative affect; and more hypnagogic-like reveries after a 4-min eyes-closed resting period. Thus, subjects differing in their declared paranormal belief displayed different active, cerebral neural populations during resting, task-free conditions. As hypothesized, believers showed relatively higher right hemispheric activation and reduced hemispheric asymmetry of functional complexity. These markers may constitute the neurophysiological basis for paranormal and schizotypal ideation.

  14. Lack of correlation between the amplitudes of TRP channel-mediated responses to weak and strong stimuli in intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Sanchez, Alicia; Radwan, Ahmed; Radwan, Islam; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2013-11-01

    It is often observed in intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments that the amplitudes of the Ca(2+) signals elicited by newly characterized TRP agonists do not correlate with the amplitudes of the responses evoked subsequently by a specific potent agonist. We investigated this rather controversial phenomenon by first testing whether it is inherent to the comparison of the effects of weak and strong stimuli. Using five well-characterized TRP channel agonists in commonly used heterologous expression systems we found that the correlation between the amplitudes of the Ca(2+) signals triggered by two sequentially applied stimuli is only high when both stimuli are strong. Using mathematical simulations of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics we illustrate that the innate heterogeneity in expression and functional properties of Ca(2+) extrusion (e.g. plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase) and influx (TRP channels) pathways across a cellular population is a sufficient condition for low correlation between the amplitude of Ca(2+) signals elicited by weak and strong stimuli. Taken together, our data demonstrate that this phenomenon is an expected outcome of intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments that cannot be taken as evidence for lack of specificity of low-efficacy stimuli, or as an indicator of the need of other cellular components for channel stimulation.

  15. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Exploration budgets fell for a fourth successive year in 2001. These decreases reflected low mineral commodity prices, mineral-market investment reluctance, company failures and a continued trend of company mergers and takeovers.

  16. Oviposition Preference for Young Plants by the Large Cabbage Butterfly (Pieris brassicae ) Does not Strongly Correlate with Caterpillar Performance.

    PubMed

    Fei, Minghui; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Yin, Yi; Gols, Rieta

    2017-06-01

    The effects of temporal variation in the quality of short-lived annual plants on oviposition preference and larval performance of insect herbivores has thus far received little attention. This study examines the effects of plant age on female oviposition preference and offspring performance in the large cabbage white butterfly Pieris brassicae. Adult female butterflies lay variable clusters of eggs on the underside of short-lived annual species in the family Brassicaceae, including the short-lived annuals Brassica nigra and Sinapis arvensis, which are important food plants for P. brassicae in The Netherlands. Here, we compared oviposition preference and larval performance of P. brassicae on three age classes (young, mature, and pre-senescing) of B. nigra and S. arvensis plants. Oviposition preference of P. brassicae declined with plant age in both plant species. Whereas larvae performed similarly on all three age classes in B. nigra, preference and performance were weakly correlated in S. arvensis. Analysis of primary (sugars and amino acids) and secondary (glucosinolates) chemistry in the plant shoots revealed that differences in their quality and quantity were more pronounced with respect to tissue type (leaves vs. flowers) than among different developmental stages of both plant species. Butterflies of P. brassicae may prefer younger and smaller plants for oviposition anticipating that future plant growth and size is optimally synchronized with the final larval instar, which contributes >80% of larval growth before pupation.

  17. Effect of crystal-field splitting and interband hybridization on the metal-insulator transitions of strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteryaev, Alexander I.; Ferrero, Michel; Georges, Antoine; Parcollet, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    We investigate a quarter-filled two-band Hubbard model involving a crystal-field splitting, which lifts the orbital degeneracy as well as an interorbital hopping (interband hybridization). Both terms are relevant to the realistic description of correlated materials such as transition-metal oxides. The nature of the Mott metal-insulator transition is clarified and is found to depend on the magnitude of the crystal-field splitting. At large values of the splitting, a transition from a two-band to a one-band metal is first found as the on-site repulsion is increased and is followed by a Mott transition for the remaining band, which follows the single-band (Brinkman-Rice) scenario well documented previously within dynamical mean-field theory. At small values of the crystal-field splitting, a direct transition from a two-band metal to a Mott insulator with partial orbital polarization is found, which takes place simultaneously for both orbitals. This transition is characterized by a vanishing of the quasiparticle weight for the majority orbital but has a first-order character for the minority orbital. It is pointed out that finite-temperature effects may easily turn the metallic regime into a bad metal close to the orbital polarization transition in the metallic phase.

  18. Theory of the orbital Kondo effect with assisted hopping in strongly correlated electron systems: Parquet equations, superconductivity, and mass enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penc, K.; Zawadowski, A.

    1994-10-01

    The orbital Kondo effect is treated in a model where, additional to the conduction band, there are localized orbitals close to the Fermi energy. If the hopping between the conduction band and the localized heavy orbitals depends on the occupation of the atomic orbitals in the conduction band, then orbital Kondo correlation occurs. The noncommutative nature of the coupling required for the Kondo effect is formally due to the form factors associated with the assisted hopping, which in the momentum representation depends on the momenta of the conduction electrons involved. The leading logarithmic vertex corrections are due to the local Coulomb interaction between the electrons on the heavy orbital and in the conduction band. The renormalized vertex functions are obtained as a solution of a closed set of differential equations and they show power behavior. The amplitude of large renormalization is determined by an infrared cutoff due to finite energy and dispersion of the heavy particles. The enhanced assisted hopping rate results in mass enhancement and attractive interaction in the conduction band. The superconductivity transition temperature calculated is largest for the intermediate mass enhancement, m*/m~=2-3. For larger mass enhancement the small one-particle weight (Z) in the Green's function reduces the transition temperature, which may be characteristic for other models as well. The theory is developed for different one-dimensional and square-lattice models, but the applicability is not limited to them. In the one-dimensional case charge- and spin-density susceptibilities are also discussed. Good candidates for the heavy orbital are f bands in the heavy fermionic systems and nonbonding oxygen orbitals in high-temperature superconductors and different flatbands in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors.

  19. Superconducting dome in doped quasi-two-dimensional organic Mott insulators: A paradigm for strongly correlated superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Charles-David; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2015-11-01

    first-order transition between metal and pseudogap. Finally, we predict that electron doping should also lead to an increased range of U /t for superconductivity but with a