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Sample records for exploring strongly correlated

  1. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  2. Strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

    2012-09-18

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO₂ and Fe₃O₄, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials.

  3. Disordered strongly correlated electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Mard, Hossein

    Disorder can have a vast variety of consequences for the physics of phase transitions. Some transitions remain unchanged in the presence of disorder while others are completely destroyed. In this dissertation we study the effects of quenched disorder on electronic systmens at zero temperature. First, we perform variational studies of the interaction-localization problem to describe the interaction-induced renormalizations of the effective (screened) random potential seen by quasiparticles. Here we present results of careful finite-size scaling studies for the conductance of disordered Hubbard chains at half-filling and zero temperature. While our results indicate that quasiparticle wave functions remain exponentially localized even in the presence of moderate to strong repulsive interactions, we show that interactions produce a strong decrease of the characteristic conductance scale g* signaling the crossover to strong localization. This effect, which cannot be captured by a simple renormalization of the disorder strength, instead reflects a peculiar non-Gaussian form of the spatial correlations of the screened disordered potential, a hitherto neglected mechanism to dramatically reduce the impact of Anderson localization (interference) effects. Second, we formulate a strong-disorder renormalization-group (SDRG) approach to study the beta function of the tight-binding model in one dimension with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder for states at the band center. We show that the SDRG method, when used to compute transport properties, yields exact results since it is identical to the transfer matrix method. The beta function is shown to be universal when only off-diagonal disorder is present even though single-parameter scaling is known to be violated. A different single-parameter scaling theory is formulated for this particular (particle-hole symmetric) case. Upon breaking particle-hole symmetry (by adding diagonal disorder), the beta function is shown to

  4. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  5. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  6. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-01

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  7. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-05-16

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines1, 2, 3, 4. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number5. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes6. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  8. Strongly correlated perovskite fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hua; Ramadoss, Koushik; Adam, Suhare; Liu, Huajun; Lee, Sungsik; Shi, Jian; Tsuchiya, Masaru; Fong, Dillon D; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2016-06-09

    Fuel cells convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiencies and environmental benefits, as compared with traditional heat engines. Yttria-stabilized zirconia is perhaps the material with the most potential as an electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), owing to its stability and near-unity ionic transference number. Although there exist materials with superior ionic conductivity, they are often limited by their ability to suppress electronic leakage when exposed to the reducing environment at the fuel interface. Such electronic leakage reduces fuel cell power output and the associated chemo-mechanical stresses can also lead to catastrophic fracture of electrolyte membranes. Here we depart from traditional electrolyte design that relies on cation substitution to sustain ionic conduction. Instead, we use a perovskite nickelate as an electrolyte with high initial ionic and electronic conductivity. Since many such oxides are also correlated electron systems, we can suppress the electronic conduction through a filling-controlled Mott transition induced by spontaneous hydrogen incorporation. Using such a nickelate as the electrolyte in free-standing membrane geometry, we demonstrate a low-temperature micro-fabricated SOFC with high performance. The ionic conductivity of the nickelate perovskite is comparable to the best-performing solid electrolytes in the same temperature range, with a very low activation energy. The results present a design strategy for high-performance materials exhibiting emergent properties arising from strong electron correlations.

  9. Strong correlations in bosons and fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilahun, Dagim

    If there is a general theme to this thesis, it is the effects of strong correlations in both bosons and fermions. The bosonic system considered here consists of ultracold alkali atoms trapped by interfering lasers, so called optical lattices. Strong interactions, realized by increasing the depth of the lattice potential, or through the phenomenon of Feshbach resonances induce strong correlations amongst the atoms, rendering attempts to describe the systems in terms of single particle type physics unsuccessful. Of course strong correlations are not the exclusive domain of bosons, and also are not caused only by strong interactions. Other factors such as reduced dimensionality, in one-dimensional electron gases, or strong magnetic fields, in two-dimensional electron gases are known to induce strong correlations. In this thesis, we explore the manifestations of strong correlations in ultracold atoms in optical lattices and interacting electron gases. Optical lattices provide a near-perfect realization of lattice models, such as the bosonic Hubbard model (BHM) that have been formulated to study solid state systems. This follows from the absence of defects or impurities that usually plague real solid state systems. Another novel feature of optical lattices is the unprecedented control experimenters have in tuning the different lattice parameters, such as the lattice spacing and the intensity of the lasers. This control enables one to study the model Hamiltonians over a wide range of variables, such as the interaction strength between the atoms, thereby opening the door towards the observation of diverse and interesting phenomena. The BHM, and also its variants, predict various quantum phases, such as the strongly correlated Mott insulator (MI) phase that appears as a function of the parameter t/U, the ratio of the nearest neighbor hopping amplitude to the on-site interaction, which one varies experimentally over a wide range of values simply by switching the intensity

  10. Effects of strong disorder in strongly correlated superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Ghosal, Amit

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of strong disorder on a system with strong electronic repulsion. In the absence of disorder, the system has a d-wave superconducting ground state with strong non-BCS features due to its proximity to a Mott insulator. We find that while strong correlations make superconductivity in this system immune to weak disorder, superconductivity is destroyed efficiently when disorder strength is comparable to the effective bandwidth. The suppression of charge motion in regions of strong potential fluctuation leads to the formation of Mott insulating patches, which anchor a larger nonsuperconducting region around them. The system thus breaks into islands of Mott insulating and superconducting regions, with Anderson insulating regions occurring along the boundary of these regions. Thus, electronic correlation and disorder, when both are strong, aid each other in destroying superconductivity, in contrast to their competition at weak disorder. Our results shed light on why zinc impurities are efficient in destroying superconductivity in cuprates, even though it is robust to weaker impurities.

  11. Simulating strongly correlated electrons with a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, John E.

    2013-05-28

    The quantum many-body physics of strongly-correlated fermions is studied in a degenerate, strongly- interacting atomic Fermi gas, first realized by our group with DOE support in 2002. This system, which exhibits strong spin pairing, is now widely studied and provides an important paradigm for testing predictions based on state-of-the-art many-body theory in fields ranging from nuclear matter to high temperature superfluidity and superconductivity. As the system is strongly interacting, both the superfluid and the normal fluid are nontrivial and of great interest. A central part of our program on Fermi gases is the connection between the study of thermodynamics, supported by DOE and the study of hydrodynamic transport, supported by NSF. This connection is especially interesting in view of a recent conjecture from the string theory community on the concept of nearly perfect normal fluids, which exhibit a minimum ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in strongly-interacting, scale-invariant systems.

  12. Dynamics of strongly correlated and strongly inhomogeneous plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kählert, Hanno; Kalman, Gabor J; Bonitz, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Kinetic and fluid equations are derived for the dynamics of classical inhomogeneous trapped plasmas in the strong coupling regime. The starting point is an extended Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander (STLS) ansatz for the dynamic correlation function, which is allowed to depend on time and both particle coordinates separately. The time evolution of the correlation function is determined from the second equation of the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. We study the equations in the linear limit and derive a nonlocal equation for the fluid displacement field. Comparisons to first-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal an excellent quality of our approach thereby overcoming the limitations of the broadly used STLS scheme.

  13. Nanostructure studies of strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiang; Natelson, Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Strongly correlated materials exhibit an amazing variety of phenomena, including metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and high temperature superconductivity, as strong electron-electron and electron-phonon couplings lead to competing correlated ground states. Recently, researchers have begun to apply nanostructure-based techniques to this class of materials, examining electronic transport properties on previously inaccessible length scales, and applying perturbations to drive systems out of equilibrium. We review progress in this area, particularly emphasizing work in transition metal oxides (Fe(3)O(4), VO(2)), manganites, and high temperature cuprate superconductors. We conclude that such nanostructure-based studies have strong potential to reveal new information about the rich physics at work in these materials.

  14. Strong correlations in gravity and biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry

    The unifying theme of this dissertation is the use of correlations. In the first part (chapter 2), we investigate correlations in quantum field theories in de Sitter space. In the second part (chapters 3,4,5), we use correlations to investigate a theoretical proposal that real (observed in nature) transcriptional networks of biological organisms are operating at a critical point in their phase diagram. In chapter 2 we study the infrared dependence of correlators in various external backgrounds. Using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism we calculate loop corrections to the correlators in the case of the Poincare patch and the complete de Sitter space. In the case of the Poincare patch, the loop correction modifies the behavior of the correlator at large distances. In the case of the complete de Sitter space, the loop correction has a strong dependence on the infrared cutoff in the past. It grows linearly with time, suggesting that at some point the correlations become strong and break the symmetry of the classical background. In chapter 3 we derive the signatures of critical behavior in a model organism, the embryo of Drosophila melanogaster. They are: strong correlations in the fluctuations of different genes, a slowing of dynamics, long range correlations in space, and departures from a Gaussian distribution of these fluctuations. We argue that these signatures are observed experimentally. In chapter 4 we construct an effective theory for the zero mode in this system. This theory is different from the standard Landau-Ginsburg description. It contains gauge fields (the result of the broken translational symmetry inside the cell), which produce observable contributions to the two-point function of the order parameter. We show that the behavior of the two-point function for the network of N genes is described by the action of a relativistic particle moving on the surface of the N - 1 dimensional sphere. We derive a theoretical bound on the decay of the correlations and

  15. Strong correlation induced charge localization in antiferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Tian, Chushun; Weng, Zheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The fate of a hole injected in an antiferromagnet is an outstanding issue of strongly correlated physics. It provides important insights into doped Mott insulators closely related to high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we report a systematic numerical study of t-J ladder systems based on the density matrix renormalization group. It reveals a surprising result for the single hole's motion in an otherwise well-understood undoped system. Specifically, we find that the common belief of quasiparticle picture is invalidated by the self-localization of the doped hole. In contrast to Anderson localization caused by disorders, the charge localization discovered here is an entirely new phenomenon purely of strong correlation origin. It results from destructive quantum interference of novel signs picked up by the hole, and since the same effect is of a generic feature of doped Mott physics, our findings unveil a new paradigm which may go beyond the single hole doped system. PMID:24002668

  16. Strongly correlated photons on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Andreas; Volz, Thomas; Winger, Martin; Badolato, Antonio; Hennessy, Kevin J.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Imamoğlu, Ataç

    2012-02-01

    Optical nonlinearities at the single-photon level are key ingredients for future photonic quantum technologies. Prime candidates for the realization of the strong photon-photon interactions necessary for implementing quantum information processing tasks, as well as for studying strongly correlated photons in an integrated photonic device setting, are quantum dots embedded in photonic-crystal nanocavities. Here, we report strong quantum correlations between photons on picosecond timescales. We observe (i) photon antibunching upon resonant excitation of the lowest-energy polariton state, proving that the first cavity photon blocks the subsequent injection events, and (ii) photon bunching when the laser field is in two-photon resonance with the polariton eigenstates of the second Jaynes-Cummings manifold, demonstrating that two photons at this colour are more likely to be injected into the cavity jointly than they would otherwise. Together, these results demonstrate unprecedented strong single-photon nonlinearities, paving the way for the realization of a quantum optical Josephson interferometer or a single-photon transistor.

  17. Gutzwiller approximation in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhua

    Gutzwiller wave function is an important theoretical technique for treating local electron-electron correlations nonperturbatively in condensed matter and materials physics. It is concerned with calculating variationally the ground state wave function by projecting out multi-occupation configurations that are energetically costly. The projection can be carried out analytically in the Gutzwiller approximation that offers an approximate way of calculating expectation values in the Gutzwiller projected wave function. This approach has proven to be very successful in strongly correlated systems such as the high temperature cuprate superconductors, the sodium cobaltates, and the heavy fermion compounds. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that strongly correlated systems have a strong propensity towards forming inhomogeneous electronic states with spatially periodic superstrutural modulations. A good example is the commonly observed stripes and checkerboard states in high- Tc superconductors under a variety of conditions where superconductivity is weakened. There exists currently a real challenge and demand for new theoretical ideas and approaches that treats strongly correlated inhomogeneous electronic states, which is the subject matter of this thesis. This thesis contains four parts. In the first part of the thesis, the Gutzwiller approach is formulated in the grand canonical ensemble where, for the first time, a spatially (and spin) unrestricted Gutzwiller approximation (SUGA) is developed for studying inhomogeneous (both ordered and disordered) quantum electronic states in strongly correlated electron systems. The second part of the thesis applies the SUGA to the t-J model for doped Mott insulators which led to the discovery of checkerboard-like inhomogeneous electronic states competing with d-wave superconductivity, consistent with experimental observations made on several families of high-Tc superconductors. In the third part of the thesis, new

  18. Pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotscheck, E.; Smith, R. A.; Jackson, A. D.

    1981-12-01

    The correlated-basis-function method is extended to deal with pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. With a variational ansatz for the model wave function we derive the "correlated" analog of the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (or Balian-Werthamer), Anderson-Brinkman-Morel theory of pairing. A suitable (and well-controlled) set of approximations brings the theory into a form identical to the conventional theories, but with the bare interaction replaced by a weak effective interaction and the bare single-particle energies replaced by an effective single-particle spectrum. As usual, liquid 3He provides a very stringent test of the theory, as both the interaction and the experimental facts are pretty clear. The variational estimates for the pairing interaction are improved by nonorthogonal perturbation theory. We find the expected enhancement of the attraction in P waves, although the restriction to effective two-body interactions appears to be insufficient to generate P-wave pairing.

  19. Strong spurious phase in teleseismic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Campillo, Michel; Boue, Pierre; Thomas, Christine; Roux, Philippe; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    In the teleseismic correlations of continuous ambient noise data from Fnet array in Japan and Lapnet array in Finland, we observed a clear spurious phase with an apparent slowness of about 4.6 s/deg and an arrival time of about 430 s, far ahead of the P arrival at around 628 s. The spurious signal is rather strong from Fnet to Lapnet, arising from the correlating between the P wave from New Zealand arriving at Fnet and the PKP wave at Lapnet. The spurious phase in the opposite direction is weaker, with the source region locating in the low-latitude Atlantic Ocean near South America. Spurious phases near P and PcP waves are also present.

  20. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, S. E.; Marston, J. B.

    2011-02-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  1. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, S E; Marston, J B

    2011-02-14

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  2. Nanoscale electrodynamics of strongly correlated quantum materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J; Basov, D N

    2017-01-01

    Electronic, magnetic, and structural phase inhomogeneities are ubiquitous in strongly correlated quantum materials. The characteristic length scales of the phase inhomogeneities can range from atomic to mesoscopic, depending on their microscopic origins as well as various sample dependent factors. Therefore, progress with the understanding of correlated phenomena critically depends on the experimental techniques suitable to provide appropriate spatial resolution. This requirement is difficult to meet for some of the most informative methods in condensed matter physics, including infrared and optical spectroscopy. Yet, recent developments in near-field optics and imaging enabled a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic response with a spatial resolution down to 10 nm. Thus it is now feasible to exploit at the nanoscale well-established capabilities of optical methods for characterization of electronic processes and lattice dynamics in diverse classes of correlated quantum systems. This review offers a concise description of the state-of-the-art near-field techniques applied to prototypical correlated quantum materials. We also discuss complementary microscopic and spectroscopic methods which reveal important mesoscopic dynamics of quantum materials at different energy scales.

  3. Nanoscale electrodynamics of strongly correlated quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Basov, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    Electronic, magnetic, and structural phase inhomogeneities are ubiquitous in strongly correlated quantum materials. The characteristic length scales of the phase inhomogeneities can range from atomic to mesoscopic, depending on their microscopic origins as well as various sample dependent factors. Therefore, progress with the understanding of correlated phenomena critically depends on the experimental techniques suitable to provide appropriate spatial resolution. This requirement is difficult to meet for some of the most informative methods in condensed matter physics, including infrared and optical spectroscopy. Yet, recent developments in near-field optics and imaging enabled a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic response with a spatial resolution down to 10 nm. Thus it is now feasible to exploit at the nanoscale well-established capabilities of optical methods for characterization of electronic processes and lattice dynamics in diverse classes of correlated quantum systems. This review offers a concise description of the state-of-the-art near-field techniques applied to prototypical correlated quantum materials. We also discuss complementary microscopic and spectroscopic methods which reveal important mesoscopic dynamics of quantum materials at different energy scales.

  4. Estimating strong correlations in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertis, J.; Friesdorf, M.; Riofrío, C. A.; Eisert, J.

    2016-11-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide one of the most promising platforms for analog quantum simulations of complex quantum many-body systems. Large-size systems can now routinely be reached and are already used to probe a large variety of different physical situations, ranging from quantum phase transitions to artificial gauge theories. At the same time, measurement techniques are still limited and full tomography for these systems seems out of reach. Motivated by this observation, we present a method to directly detect and quantify to what extent a quantum state deviates from a local Gaussian description, based on available noise correlation measurements from in situ and time-of-flight measurements. This is an indicator of the significance of strong correlations in ground and thermal states, as Gaussian states are precisely the ground and thermal states of noninteracting models. We connect our findings, augmented by numerical tensor network simulations, to notions of equilibration, disordered systems, and the suppression of transport in Anderson insulators.

  5. Electronic properties of strongly correlated layered oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng

    The two-dimensional electronic systems (2DESs) have kept surprising physicists for the last few decades. Examples include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, cuprate superconductivity, and graphene. This thesis is intended to develop suitable theoretical tools which can be generalized to study new types of 2DESs with strong correlation feature. The first part of this thesis describes the investigation of heterostructures made by Mott insulators. This work is mostly motivated by the significant improvement of techniques for layer-by-layer growth of transition metal oxides in the last few years. We construct a toy model based on generalized Hubbard model complemented with long-ranged Coulomb interaction, and we study it by Hartree-Fock theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and Thomas-Fermi theory. We argue that interesting 2D strongly correlated electronic systems can be created in such heterostructures under several conditions. Since these 2D systems are formed entirely due to the gap generated by electron-electron interaction, they are not addiabatically connected to a noninteracting electron states. This feature makes these 2D systems distinguish from the ones created in semiconductor heterostructures, and they may be potential systems having non-Fermi liquid behaviors. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the study of collective excitations in high-temperature superconductors. One important achievement in this work is to develop a time-dependent mean-field theory for t -- U -- J -- V model, an effective low energy model for cuprates. The time-dependent mean-field theory is proven to be identical to the generalized random-phase approximation (GRPA) which includes both the bubble and ladder diagrams. We propose that the famous 41 meV magnetic resonance mode observed in the inelastic neutron scattering measurements is a collective mode arising from a conjugation relation, which has been overlooked in previous work, between the antiferromagnetic

  6. Emergent behavior in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pines, David

    2016-09-01

    I describe early work on strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) from the perspective of a theoretical physicist who, while a participant in their reductionist top-down beginnings, is now part of the paradigm change to a bottom-up ‘emergent’ approach with its focus on using phenomenology to find the organizing principles responsible for their emergent behavior disclosed by experiment—and only then constructing microscopic models that incorporate these. After considering the organizing principles responsible for the emergence of plasmons, quasiparticles, and conventional superconductivity in SCES, I consider their application to three of SCES’s sister systems, the helium liquids, nuclei, and the nuclear matter found in neutron stars. I note some recent applications of the random phase approximation and examine briefly the role that paradigm change is playing in two central problems in our field: understanding the emergence and subsequent behavior of heavy electrons in Kondo lattice materials; and finding the mechanism for the unconventional superconductivity found in heavy electron, organic, cuprate, and iron-based materials.

  7. Emergent behavior in strongly correlated electron systems.

    PubMed

    Pines, David

    2016-09-01

    I describe early work on strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) from the perspective of a theoretical physicist who, while a participant in their reductionist top-down beginnings, is now part of the paradigm change to a bottom-up 'emergent' approach with its focus on using phenomenology to find the organizing principles responsible for their emergent behavior disclosed by experiment-and only then constructing microscopic models that incorporate these. After considering the organizing principles responsible for the emergence of plasmons, quasiparticles, and conventional superconductivity in SCES, I consider their application to three of SCES's sister systems, the helium liquids, nuclei, and the nuclear matter found in neutron stars. I note some recent applications of the random phase approximation and examine briefly the role that paradigm change is playing in two central problems in our field: understanding the emergence and subsequent behavior of heavy electrons in Kondo lattice materials; and finding the mechanism for the unconventional superconductivity found in heavy electron, organic, cuprate, and iron-based materials.

  8. Strongly correlated states in ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.

    This thesis deals with novel phases and dynamical effects in strongly correlated quantum systems and is divided in two main parts. The first part deals with the effects of extended interactions on lattice bosons in one dimension. Using the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) we showed that ultracold atoms or molecules with extended interactions, in a one dimensional optical lattice can form a novel quantum phase characterized by non-local string correlations and no broken symmetry[1]. We termed this phase a Haldane insulator due to an analogy with Haldane gapped Heisenberg spin chains. We derived a field theory description of the phase and the phase transitions from it to the conventional states, a Mott insulator and a density wave. One important outcome from this study was the observation that the topological distinction between the Haldane and Mott insulator is protected by the lattice inversion symmetry[2]. In addition, the field theoretical description allowed us to describe universal features in the dynamic response of the system to time-dependent probes[3]. In the second part, we study the effects of time-dependent noise on quantum phase transitions. We consider one particular type of noise, 1/f noise, omnipresent in low-frequency electric devices. This type of noise is scale invariant, and leads to the formation of novel non-equilibrium quantum critical states[?]. We study the effects of small static perturbations around the critical states, through a real-time renormalization group (RG) approach[4]. At the first order of our expansion (valid for short times), we find that these perturbations can lead to a sharp non-equilibrium quantum phase transition, controlled by the non-equilibrium quantum critical state. However, at the second order (valid for longer times), we actually find that the system develops a finite effective temperature, which destroys the scale invariance and turns the phase transition into a smooth crossover. Using the RG approach

  9. Strong Community, Deep Learning: Exploring the Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Carole; Ramondt, Leonie; Smiley, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    This explores the constructivist understanding that shared practitioner research in collaborative online spaces leads to deeper learning. The research was developed within the context of building the National College of School Leaderships (NCSLs) online learning communities. A community and a learning scale, both emerging through grounded…

  10. Strong electronic correlation effects in coherent multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karadimitriou, M E; Kavousanaki, E G; Dani, K M; Fromer, N A; Perakis, I E

    2011-05-12

    We discuss a many-body theory of the coherent ultrafast nonlinear optical response of systems with a strongly correlated electronic ground state that responds unadiabatically to photoexcitation. We introduce a truncation of quantum kinetic density matrix equations of motion that does not rely on an expansion in terms of the interactions and thus applies to strongly correlated systems. For this we expand in terms of the optical field, separate out contributions to the time-evolved many-body state due to correlated and uncorrelated multiple optical transitions, and use "Hubbard operator" density matrices to describe the exact dynamics of the individual contributions within a subspace of strongly coupled states, including "pure dephasing". Our purpose is to develop a quantum mechanical tool capable of exploring how, by coherently photoexciting selected modes, one can trigger nonlinear dynamics of strongly coupled degrees of freedom. Such dynamics could lead to photoinduced phase transitions. We apply our theory to the nonlinear response of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a magnetic field. We coherently photoexcite the two lowest Landau level (LL) excitations using three time-delayed optical pulses. We identify some striking temporal and spectral features due to dynamical coupling of the two LLs facilitated by inter-Landau-level magnetoplasmon and magnetoroton excitations and compare to three-pulse four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments. We show that these features depend sensitively on the dynamics of four-particle correlations between an electron-hole pair and a magnetoplasmon/magnetoroton, reminiscent of exciton-exciton correlations in undoped semiconductors. Our results shed light into unexplored coherent dynamics and relaxation of the quantum Hall system (QHS) and can provide new insight into non-equilibrium co-operative phenomena in strongly correlated systems.

  11. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Longhua

    In this thesis, we investigated the strongly correlated phenomena in bilayer quantum Hall effect, inhomogeneous superconductivity and Boson Hubbard model. Bilayer quantum Hall system is studied in chapter 2. By using the Composite Boson (CB) theory developed by J. Ye, we derive the ground state, quasihole and a quasihole-pair wave functions from the CB theory and its dual action. We find that the ground state wave function is the product of two parts, one in the charge sector which is the well known Halperin's (111) wave function and the other in the spin sector which is non-trivial at any finite d due to the gapless mode. So the total groundstate wave function differs from the well known (111) wave function at any finite d. In addition to commonly known multiplicative factors, the quasihole and quasihole-pair wave functions also contain non-trivial normalization factors multiplying the correct ground state wave function. Then we continue to study the quantum phase transition from the excitonic superfluid (ESF) to a possible pseudo-spin density wave (PSDW) at some intermediate distances driven by the magneto-roton minimum collapsing at a finite wavevector. We analyze the properties of the PSDW and explicitly show that a square lattice is the favored lattice. We suggest that correlated hopping of vacancies in the active and passive layers in the PSDW state leads to very large and temperature-dependent drag, consistent with the experimental data. Comparisons with previous microscopic numerical calculations are made. Further experimental implications are given. In chapter 3, we investigate inhomogeneous superconductivity. Starting from the Ginzburg-Landau free energy describing the normal state to Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state transition, we evaluate the free energy of seven most common lattice structures: stripe, square, triangular, Simple Cubic (SC), Face centered Cubic (FCC), Body centered Cubic (BCC) and Quasicrystal (QC). We find that the stripe

  12. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study on Strongly Correlated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang

    Strongly correlated electrons and spin-orbit interaction have been the two major research directions of condensed matter physics in recent years. The discovery of high temperature superconductors in 1986 not only brought excitement into the field but also challenged our theory on quantum materials. After almost three decades of extensive study, the underlying mechanism of high temperature superconductivity is still not fully understood, the reason for which is mainly a poor understanding of strongly correlated systems. The phase diagram of cuprate superconductors has become more complicated throughout the years as multiple novel electronic phases have been discovered, while few of them are fully understood. Topological insulators are a newly discovered family of materials bearing topological non-trivial quantum states as a result of spin-orbit coupling. The theoretically predicted topological Kondo insulators as strongly correlated systems with strong spin-orbital coupling make an ideal playground to test our theory of quantum materials. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a powerful technique to explore new phenomena in materials with exotic electronic states due to its high spacial resolution and high sensitivity to low energy electronic structures. Moreover, as a surface-sensitive technique, STM is an ideal tool to investigate the electronic properties of topological and non-topological surface states. In this thesis, I will describe experiments we performed on high temperature superconductors and topological Kondo insulators using STM. First, I will describe our experiments on a Bi-based high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CuO6+delta. The quasiparticle interference technique uncovers a Fermi surface reconstruction. We also discovered the coexistence of Bogoliubov quasiparticle and pseudogap state at the antinodes. Afterwards, I will discuss our discovery of d-form factor density wave in the same material, showing the omnipresence of d form factor density

  13. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  14. Transmission of Correlated Messages over Interference Channels with Strong Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhan; Yoon, Eunchul; Moon, Hichan

    Transmission of correlated messages over interference channels with strong interference is considered. As a result, an achievable rate region is presented. It is shown that if the messages are correlated, the achievable rate region can be larger than the capacity region given by Costa and El Gamal. As an example, the Gaussian interference channel is considered.

  15. Strong correlations generically protect d -wave superconductivity against disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shao; Dobrosavljević, V.; Miranda, E.

    2016-05-01

    We address the question of why strongly correlated d -wave superconductors, such as the cuprates, prove to be surprisingly robust against the introduction of nonmagnetic impurities. We show that, very generally, both the pair-breaking and the normal state transport scattering rates are significantly suppressed by strong correlations effects arising in the proximity to a Mott insulating state. We also show that the correlation-renormalized scattering amplitude is generically enhanced in the forward direction, an effect which was previously often ascribed to the specific scattering by charged impurities outside the copper-oxide planes.

  16. Size effects on thermoelectricity in a strongly correlated oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Siemons, Wolter; McGuire, Michael A; Ramesh, R.; Yadav, A.K.; Wu, Vincent; Vailionis, Arturas; Majumdar, Arunava

    2012-01-01

    We investigated size effects on thermoelectricity in thin films of a strongly correlated layered cobaltate. At room temperature, the thermopower is independent of thickness down to 6 nm. This unusual behavior is inconsistent with the Fuchs-Sondheimer theory, which is used to describe conventional metals and semiconductors, and is attributed to the strong electron correlations in this material. On the other hand, the resistivity increases below a critical thickness of {approx}30 nm, as expected. The temperature-dependent thermopower is similar for different thicknesses but the resistivity shows systematic changes with thickness. Our experiments highlight the differences in thermoelectric behavior of strongly correlated and uncorrelated systems when subjected to finite-size effects. We use the atomic-limit Hubbard model at the high-temperature limit to explain our observations. These findings provide new insights into decoupling electrical conductivity and thermopower in correlated systems.

  17. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    2006-09-01

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  18. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  19. Reexamination of strong subadditivity: A quantum-correlation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2017-03-01

    The strong subadditivity inequality of von Neumann entropy relates the entropy of subsystems of a tripartite state ρA B C to that of the composite system. Here, we define T(a )(ρA B C) as the extent to which ρA B C fails to satisfy the strong subadditivity inequality S (ρB) +S (ρC) ≤S (ρA B) +S (ρA C) with equality and investigate its properties. In particular, by introducing auxiliary subsystem E , we consider any purification | ψA B C E> of ρA B C and formulate T(a )(ρA B C) as the extent to which the bipartite quantum correlations of ρA B and ρA C, measured by entanglement of formation and quantum discord, change under the transformation B →B E and C →C E . Invariance of quantum correlations of ρA B and ρA C under such transformation is shown to be a necessary and sufficient condition for vanishing T(a )(ρA B C) . Our approach allows one to characterize, intuitively, the structure of states for which the strong subadditivity is saturated. Moreover, along with providing a conservation law for quantum correlations of states for which the strong subadditivity inequality is satisfied with equality, we find that such states coincide with those that the Koashi-Winter monogamy relation is saturated.

  20. Size, dimensionality, and strong electron correlation in nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Brus, Louis

    2014-10-21

    In electronic structure theory, electron-electron repulsion is normally considered only in an average (or mean field) sense, for example, in a single Hartree-Fock determinant. This is the simple molecular orbital model, which is often a good approximation for molecules. In infinite systems, this averaging treatment leads to delocalized electronic bands, an excellent description of bulk 3D sp(3) semiconductors. However, in reality electrons try to instantaneously avoid each other; their relative motion is correlated. Strong electron-electron repulsion and correlation create new collective states and cause new femtosecond kinetic processes. This is especially true in 1D and 2D systems. The quantum size effect, a single electron property, is widely known: the band gap increases with decreasing size. This Account focuses on the experimental consequences of strong correlation. We first describe π-π* excited states in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). To obtain the spectra of individual CNTs, we developed a white-light, right-angle resonant Rayleigh scattering method. Discrete exciton transitions dominate the optical absorption spectra of both semiconducting and metallic tubes. Excitons are bound neutral excited states in which the electron and hole tightly orbit each other due to their mutual Coulomb attraction. We then describe more generally the independent roles of size and dimensionality in nanoelectronic structure, using additional examples from graphene, trans-polyacetylene chains, transition metal dichalcogenides, organic/inorganic Pb iodide perovskites, quantum dots, and pentacene van der Waals crystals. In 1D and 2D chemical systems, the electronic band structure diagram can be a poor predictor of properties if explicit correlation is not considered. One- and two-dimensional systems show quantum confinement and especially strong correlation as compared with their 3D parent systems. The Coulomb interaction is enhanced because the electrons are on the surface. One- and

  1. Strongly correlated quasi-two-dimensional dipolar fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Mehrtash; Skinner, Brian; Fogler, Michael; Demler, Eugene

    2013-03-01

    We study the collective oscillations of strongly correlated quasi-two-dimensional dipolar fermions at zero temperature. The correlation energy of the quasi-two-dimensional gas is obtained using a novel variational method based on the fixed-node diffusion Monte-Carlo analysis of strictly two-dimensional dipolar Fermi gas. As an application, we predict the dependence of the Wigner crystal transition point on the thickness of the layer, as well as the shift of the monopole oscillation frequency in harmonic traps.

  2. Separation of strong (bond-breaking) from weak (dynamical) correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzelnigg, Werner

    2012-06-01

    A CC (coupled-cluster) ansatz based on a GVB (generalized valence bond) or an APSG (antisymmetrized product of strongly orthogonal geminals) reference function arises naturally if one tries to treat strong correlations exactly (to infinite order), and weak correlations by TCC (traditional coupled cluster) theory. This ansatz is proposed as an alternative to MC-CC (multi-configuration coupled cluster) theory. One uses especially that APSG and GVB are of CC type, but allow to combine separability with the variation principle. The energy and the stationarity conditions are formulated in terms of spinfree density cumulants. The replacement operators corresponding to the APSG ansatz generate a Lie algebra which is a subalgebra of that of all replacement operators.

  3. Exact Kohn-Sham potential of strongly correlated finite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Helbig, N.; Rubio, A.

    2009-12-14

    The dissociation of molecules, even the most simple hydrogen molecule, cannot be described accurately within density functional theory because none of the currently available functionals accounts for strong on-site correlation. This problem led to a discussion of properties that the local Kohn-Sham potential has to satisfy in order to correctly describe strongly correlated systems. We derive an analytic expression for the nontrivial form of the Kohn-Sham potential in between the two fragments for the dissociation of a single bond. We show that the numerical calculations for a one-dimensional two-electron model system indeed approach and reach this limit. It is shown that the functional form of the potential is universal, i.e., independent of the details of the two fragments.

  4. Quantum Engineering of Strongly Correlated Matter with Ultracold Fermi Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    aim at realizing model systems of strongly correlated, disordered electrons using ultracold fermionic atoms stored in an optical "crystal". The general...the fermions can be controlled. In the one-year funding period of the YIP, we have completed and exceeded the goals set for year 1 of the program: We...atoms; we have simultaneously immersed two different kinds of fermionic impurities of differing mass in a Bose-Einstein condensate, that provides a

  5. Connecting strongly correlated superfluids by a quantum point contact.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Dominik; Uchino, Shun; Krinner, Sebastian; Lebrat, Martin; Giamarchi, Thierry; Esslinger, Tilman; Brantut, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-18

    Point contacts provide simple connections between macroscopic particle reservoirs. In electric circuits, strong links between metals, semiconductors, or superconductors have applications for fundamental condensed-matter physics as well as quantum information processing. However, for complex, strongly correlated materials, links have been largely restricted to weak tunnel junctions. We studied resonantly interacting Fermi gases connected by a tunable, ballistic quantum point contact, finding a nonlinear current-bias relation. At low temperature, our observations agree quantitatively with a theoretical model in which the current originates from multiple Andreev reflections. In a wide contact geometry, the competition between superfluidity and thermally activated transport leads to a conductance minimum. Our system offers a controllable platform for the study of mesoscopic devices based on strongly interacting matter.

  6. Theoretical prediction of a strongly correlated Dirac metal.

    PubMed

    Mazin, I I; Jeschke, Harald O; Lechermann, Frank; Lee, Hunpyo; Fink, Mario; Thomale, Ronny; Valentí, Roser

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the most intensely studied objects in the electronic theory of solids have been strongly correlated systems and graphene. However, the fact that the Dirac bands in graphene are made up of sp(2) electrons, which are subject to neither strong Hubbard repulsion U nor strong Hund's rule coupling J, creates certain limitations in terms of novel, interaction-induced physics that could be derived from Dirac points. Here we propose GaCu3(OH)6Cl2 (Ga-substituted herbertsmithite) as a correlated Dirac-Kagome metal combining Dirac electrons, strong interactions and frustrated magnetic interactions. Using density functional theory, we calculate its crystallographic and electronic properties, and observe that it has symmetry-protected Dirac points at the Fermi level. Its many-body physics is diverse, with possible charge, magnetic and superconducting instabilities. Through a combination of various many-body methods we study possible symmetry-lowering phase transitions such as Mott-Hubbard, charge or magnetic ordering, and unconventional superconductivity, which in this compound assumes an f-wave symmetry.

  7. Strong correlations and topological order in one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gottardi, Wade Wells

    This thesis presents theoretical studies of strongly correlated systems as well as topologically ordered systems in 1D. Non-Fermi liquid behavior characteristic of interacting 1D electron systems is investigated with an emphasis on experimentally relevant setups and observables. The existence of end Majorana fermions in a 1D p-wave superconductor subject to periodic, incommensurate and disordered potentials is studied. The Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL), a model of interacting electrons in one spatial dimension, is considered in the context of two systems of experimental interest. First, a study of the electronic properties of single-walled armchair carbon nanotubes in the presence of transverse electric and magnetic fields is presented. As a result of their effect on the band structure and electron wave functions, fields alter the nature of the (effective) Coulomb interaction in tubes. In particular, it is found that fields couple to nanotube bands (or valleys), a quantum degree of freedom inherited from the underlying graphene lattice. As revealed by a detailed TLL calculation, it is predicted that fields induce electrons to disperse into their spin, band, and charge components. Fields also provide a means of tuning the shell-filling behavior associated with short tubes. The phenomenon of charge fractionalization is investigated in a one-dimensional ring. TLL theory predicts that momentum-resolved electrons injected into the ring will fractionalize into clockwise- and counterclockwise-moving quasiparticles. As a complement to transport measurements in quantum wires connected to leads, non-invasive measures involving the magnetic field profiles around the ring are proposed. Topological aspects of 1D p-wave superconductors are explored. The intimate connection between non-trivial topology (fermions) and spontaneous symmetry breaking (spins) in one-dimension is investigated. Building on this connection, a spin ladder system endowed with vortex degrees of freedom is

  8. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Pak, A.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Galtier, E.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; Hastings, J.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Turnbull, D.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Glenzer, S. H.; Döppner, T.

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ˜3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k =4Å-1. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  9. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T. Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Turnbull, D.; Döppner, T.; Fletcher, L.; Galtier, E.; Hastings, J.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; White, T. G.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ∼3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4Å{sup −1}. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  10. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    DOE PAGES

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; ...

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour ismore » predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.« less

  11. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.

  12. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E.-G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states. PMID:26640114

  13. Phase transition transistors based on strongly-correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    The field-effect transistor (FET) provides electrical switching functions through linear control of the number of charges at a channel surface by external voltage. Controlling electronic phases of condensed matters in a FET geometry has long been a central issue of physical science. In particular, FET based on a strongly correlated material, namely ``Mott transistor,'' has attracted considerable interest, because it potentially provides gigantic and diverse electronic responses due to a strong interplay between charge, spin, orbital and lattice. We have investigated electric-field effects on such materials aiming at novel physical phenomena and electronic functions originating from strong correlation effects. Here we demonstrate electrical switching of bulk state of matter over the first-order metal-insulator transition. We fabricated FETs based on VO2 with use of a recently developed electric-double-layer transistor technique, and found that the electrostatically induced carriers at a channel surface drive all preexisting localized carriers of 1022 cm-3 even inside a bulk to motion, leading to bulk carrier delocalization beyond the electrostatic screening length. This non-local switching of bulk phases is achieved with just around 1 V, and moreover, a novel non-volatile memory like character emerges in a voltage-sweep measurement. These observations are apparently distinct from those of conventional FETs based on band insulators, capturing the essential feature of collective interactions in strongly correlated materials. This work was done in collaboration with K. Shibuya, D. Okuyama, T. Hatano, S. Ono, M. Kawasaki, Y. Iwasa, and Y. Tokura. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program).''

  14. Multitask spectral clustering by exploring intertask correlation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Zhigang; Yang, Yi; Nie, Feiping; Shen, Heng Tao

    2015-05-01

    Clustering, as one of the most classical research problems in pattern recognition and data mining, has been widely explored and applied to various applications. Due to the rapid evolution of data on the Web, more emerging challenges have been posed on traditional clustering techniques: 1) correlations among related clustering tasks and/or within individual task are not well captured; 2) the problem of clustering out-of-sample data is seldom considered; and 3) the discriminative property of cluster label matrix is not well explored. In this paper, we propose a novel clustering model, namely multitask spectral clustering (MTSC), to cope with the above challenges. Specifically, two types of correlations are well considered: 1) intertask clustering correlation, which refers the relations among different clustering tasks and 2) intratask learning correlation, which enables the processes of learning cluster labels and learning mapping function to reinforce each other. We incorporate a novel l2,p -norm regularizer to control the coherence of all the tasks based on an assumption that related tasks should share a common low-dimensional representation. Moreover, for each individual task, an explicit mapping function is simultaneously learnt for predicting cluster labels by mapping features to the cluster label matrix. Meanwhile, we show that the learning process can naturally incorporate discriminative information to further improve clustering performance. We explore and discuss the relationships between our proposed model and several representative clustering techniques, including spectral clustering, k -means and discriminative k -means. Extensive experiments on various real-world datasets illustrate the advantage of the proposed MTSC model compared to state-of-the-art clustering approaches.

  15. Zero Pearson coefficient for strongly correlated growing trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Ferreira, A. L.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-03-01

    We obtained Pearson’s coefficient of strongly correlated recursive networks growing by preferential attachment of every new vertex by m edges. We found that the Pearson coefficient is exactly zero in the infinite network limit for the recursive trees (m=1) . If the number of connections of new vertices exceeds one (m>1) , then the Pearson coefficient in the infinite networks equals zero only when the degree distribution exponent γ does not exceed 4. We calculated the Pearson coefficient for finite networks and observed a slow power-law-like approach to an infinite network limit. Our findings indicate that Pearson’s coefficient strongly depends on size and details of networks, which makes this characteristic virtually useless for quantitative comparison of different networks.

  16. Zero Pearson coefficient for strongly correlated growing trees.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, S N; Ferreira, A L; Goltsev, A V; Mendes, J F F

    2010-03-01

    We obtained Pearson's coefficient of strongly correlated recursive networks growing by preferential attachment of every new vertex by m edges. We found that the Pearson coefficient is exactly zero in the infinite network limit for the recursive trees (m=1). If the number of connections of new vertices exceeds one (m>1), then the Pearson coefficient in the infinite networks equals zero only when the degree distribution exponent gamma does not exceed 4. We calculated the Pearson coefficient for finite networks and observed a slow power-law-like approach to an infinite network limit. Our findings indicate that Pearson's coefficient strongly depends on size and details of networks, which makes this characteristic virtually useless for quantitative comparison of different networks.

  17. Robust mesoscopic superposition of strongly correlated ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hallwood, David W.; Ernst, Thomas; Brand, Joachim

    2010-12-15

    We propose a scheme to create coherent superpositions of annular flow of strongly interacting bosonic atoms in a one-dimensional ring trap. The nonrotating ground state is coupled to a vortex state with mesoscopic angular momentum by means of a narrow potential barrier and an applied phase that originates from either rotation or a synthetic magnetic field. We show that superposition states in the Tonks-Girardeau regime are robust against single-particle loss due to the effects of strong correlations. The coupling between the mesoscopically distinct states scales much more favorably with particle number than in schemes relying on weak interactions, thus making particle numbers of hundreds or thousands feasible. Coherent oscillations induced by time variation of parameters may serve as a 'smoking gun' signature for detecting superposition states.

  18. Charge density waves in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Choe, Jesse; Morosan, E.

    2016-08-01

    Strong electron correlations are at the heart of many physical phenomena of current interest to the condensed matter community. Here we present a survey of the mechanisms underlying such correlations in charge density wave (CDW) systems, including the current theoretical understanding and experimental evidence for CDW transitions. The focus is on emergent phenomena that result as CDWs interact with other charge or spin states, such as magnetism and superconductivity. In addition to reviewing the CDW mechanisms in 1D, 2D, and 3D systems, we pay particular attention to the prevalence of this state in two particular classes of compounds, the high temperature superconductors (cuprates) and the layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The possibilities for quantum criticality resulting from the competition between magnetic fluctuations and electronic instabilities (CDW, unconventional superconductivity) are also discussed.

  19. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wenlong

    The past decade has seen a substantial rejuvenation of interest in the study of quantum phase transitions (QPTs), driven by experimental advance on the cuprate superconductors, the heavy fermion materials, organic conductors, Quantum Hall effect, Fe-As based superconductors and other related compounds. It is clear that strong electronic interactions play a crucial role in the systems of current interest, and simple paradigms for the behavior of such systems near quantum critical points remain unclear. Furthermore, the rapid progress in Feshbach resonance and optical lattice provides a flexible platform to study QPT. Quantum Phase Transition (QPT) describes the non-analytic behaviors of the ground-state properties in a many-body system by varying a physical parameter at absolute zero temperature - such as magnetic field or pressure, driven by quantum fluctuations. Such quantum phase transitions can be first-order phase transition or continuous. The phase transition is usually accompanied by a qualitative change in the nature of the correlations in the ground state, and describing this change shall clearly be one of our major interests. We address this issue from three prospects in a few strong correlated many-body systems in this thesis, i.e., identifying the ordered phases, studying the properties of different phases, characterizing the QPT points. In chapter 1, we give an introduction to QPT, and take one-dimensional XXZ model as an example to illustrate the QPT therein. Through this simple example, we would show that when the tunable parameter is varied, the system evolves into different phases, across two quantum QPT points. The distinct phases exhibit very different behaviors. Also a schematic phase diagram is appended. In chapter 2, we are engaged in research on ordered phases. Originating in the work of Landau and Ginzburg on second-order phase transition, the spontaneous symmetry breaking induces nonzero expectation of field operator, e.g., magnetization M

  20. Capacitance and compressibility of heterostructures with strong electronic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Kevin; Frésard, Raymond; Kopp, Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Strong electronic correlations related to a repulsive local interaction suppress the electronic compressibility in a single-band model, and the capacitance of a corresponding metallic film is directly related to its electronic compressibility. Both statements may be altered significantly when two extensions to the system are implemented which we investigate here: (i) we introduce an attractive nearest-neighbor interaction V as antagonist to the repulsive onsite repulsion U , and (ii) we consider nanostructured multilayers (heterostructures) assembled from two-dimensional layers of these systems. We determine the respective total compressibility κ and capacitance C of the heterostructures within a strong coupling evaluation, which builds on a Kotliar-Ruckenstein slave-boson technique. Whereas the capacitance C (n ) for electronic densities n close to half-filling is suppressed, illustrated by a correlation induced dip in C (n ) , it may be appreciably enhanced close to a van Hove singularity. Moreover, we show that the capacitance may be a nonmonotonic function of U close to half-filling for both attractive and repulsive V . The compressibility κ can differ from C substantially, as κ is very sensitive to internal electrostatic energies which in turn depend on the specific setup of the heterostructure. In particular, we show that a capacitor with a polar dielectric has a smaller electronic compressibility and is more stable against phase separation than a standard nonpolar capacitor with the same capacitance.

  1. Correlated Fluctuations in Strongly Coupled Binary Networks Beyond Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, David; Bos, Hannah; Helias, Moritz

    2016-07-01

    Randomly coupled Ising spins constitute the classical model of collective phenomena in disordered systems, with applications covering glassy magnetism and frustration, combinatorial optimization, protein folding, stock market dynamics, and social dynamics. The phase diagram of these systems is obtained in the thermodynamic limit by averaging over the quenched randomness of the couplings. However, many applications require the statistics of activity for a single realization of the possibly asymmetric couplings in finite-sized networks. Examples include reconstruction of couplings from the observed dynamics, representation of probability distributions for sampling-based inference, and learning in the central nervous system based on the dynamic and correlation-dependent modification of synaptic connections. The systematic cumulant expansion for kinetic binary (Ising) threshold units with strong, random, and asymmetric couplings presented here goes beyond mean-field theory and is applicable outside thermodynamic equilibrium; a system of approximate nonlinear equations predicts average activities and pairwise covariances in quantitative agreement with full simulations down to hundreds of units. The linearized theory yields an expansion of the correlation and response functions in collective eigenmodes, leads to an efficient algorithm solving the inverse problem, and shows that correlations are invariant under scaling of the interaction strengths.

  2. Polaronic approach to strongly correlated electron systems with strong electron-phonon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, I. A.; Shneyder, E. I.; Kozlov, P. A.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2015-10-01

    The three-band p -d model of strongly correlated electrons interacting with optical phonons via diagonal and off-diagonal electron-phonon interactions is considered within the cluster perturbation theory. In the beginning, the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian of a CuO4 cluster results in the construction of local polaronic eigenstates |p > with hole numbers nh=0 ,1 ,2 per unit cell. The intercluster hoppings and interactions are exactly written in terms of Hubbard operators Xfp q=|p > at site f . The Fermi-type single-electron quasiparticle dispersion and spectral weight are calculated for the undoped antiferromagnetic parent insulator like La2CuO4 . The quasiparticle dispersion of Hubbard polarons is determined by a hybridization of the Hubbard fermion subbands with local Franck-Condon resonances so the main polaronic effect of the quasiparticle band structure is a splitting of the Hubbard bands on the number of Hubbard polaron subbands. Increasing of the EPI constant results in an increase of splitting, decrease of the subband width, transfer of the spectral weight to high-energy multiphonon excitations, and subsequent localization of the charge carriers. Herewith, the effect of such renormalization for the conduction band and the valence one differs depending on the ratio of the diagonal and off-diagonal EPI. In the framework of the GTB method, the Franck-Condon broadening of the spectral function of polaronic excitations is also reproduced for strongly correlated systems with strong electron-phonon interaction.

  3. Generalized simulated tempering for exploring strong phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E

    2010-10-21

    An extension of the simulation tempering algorithm is proposed. It is shown to be particularly suited to the exploration of first-order phase transition systems characterized by the backbending or S-loop in the statistical temperature or a microcanonical caloric curve. A guided Markov process in an auxiliary parameter space systematically combines a set of parametrized Tsallis-weight ensemble simulations, which are targeted to transform unstable or metastable energy states of canonical ensembles into stable ones and smoothly join ordered and disordered phases across phase transition regions via a succession of unimodal energy distributions. The inverse mapping between the sampling weight and the effective temperature enables an optimal selection of relevant Tsallis-weight parameters. A semianalytic expression for the biasing weight in parameter space is adaptively updated "on the fly" during the simulation to achieve rapid convergence. Accelerated tunneling transitions with a comprehensive sampling for phase-coexistent states are explicitly demonstrated in systems subject to strong hysteresis including Potts and Ising spin models and a 147 atom Lennard-Jones cluster.

  4. Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L

    2011-11-03

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated systems will enable the predicative design of the next generation of supermaterials. In this program, we are harnessing recent advances in the quantum manipulation of ultracold atomic gases to expand our ability to probe these technologically important materials in heretofore unexplored regions of temperature, resolution, and sensitivity parameter space. We are working to demonstrate the use of atom chips to enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux at the 10^-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology developed here will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques---such as scanning SQUIDs---by a factor of 10--1000. We are testing the utility of this technique by using rubidium BECs to image the magnetic fields emanating from charge transport and magnetic domain percolation in strongly correlated materials as they undergo temperature-tuned metal--to--insulator phase transitions. Cryogenic atom chip microscopy introduces three very important features to the toolbox of high-resolution, strongly correlated material microscopy: simultaneous detection of magnetic and electric fields (down to the sub-single electron charge level); no invasive large magnetic fields or gradients; simultaneous micro- and macroscopic spatial resolution; freedom from 1/f flicker noise at low frequencies; and, perhaps most importantly, the complete decoupling of probe and sample temperatures. The first of these features will play an important role in studying the interplay between magnetic and electric domain structure. The last two are crucial for low frequency magnetic noise detection in, e.g., the cuprate pseudogap region and for precision measurements of transport in the high temperature, technologically relevant regime inaccessible to other techniques

  5. Interface-induced magnetism and strong correlation in oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at interfaces between two insulating oxides have attracted significant attention because they can exhibit unique properties, such as strong electron correlations, superconductivity and magnetism. In this presentation, we will discuss the emergent properties of 2DEGs in SrTiO3 quantum wells that are interfaced with Mott insulating rare earth titanates (RTiO3) . We show that the magnetic properties of the 2DEG can be tuned to be either (incipient) ferromagnetic or (incipient) antiferromagnetic, depending on the specific RTiO3 that interfaces it. The thickness of the quantum well is a critical tuning parameter and determines the onset of magnetism, the proximity to a quantum critical point, and the onset of non-Fermi liquid behavior for those quantum wells that are in proximity to an antiferromagnetic transition. We will also discuss the role of symmetry-lowering structural transitions in the quantum well.

  6. Strongly Correlated States of Ultracold Rotating Dipolar Fermi Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Osterloh, Klaus; Barberan, Nuria; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2007-10-19

    We study strongly correlated ground and excited states of rotating quasi-2D Fermi gases constituted of a small number of dipole-dipole interacting particles with dipole moments polarized perpendicular to the plane of motion. As the number of atoms grows, the system enters an intermediate regime, where ground states are subject to a competition between distinct bulk-edge configurations. This effect obscures their description in terms of composite fermions and leads to the appearance of novel quasihole ground states. In the presence of dipolar interactions, the principal Laughlin state at filling {nu}=1/3 exhibits a substantial energy gap for neutral (total angular momentum conserving) excitations and is well-described as an incompressible Fermi liquid. Instead, at lower fillings, the ground state structure favors crystalline order.

  7. Andreev bound state at a strongly correlated oxide interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Tacla, Alexandre; Daley, Andrew; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Josh; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Pekker, David; Levy, Jeremy

    Strongly correlated electrons at oxide interfaces give rise to a set of novel physics phenomena including superconductivity and magnetism. At the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface, signatures of strong electron pairing persist even for conditions where superconductivity is suppressed. Meanwhile, an Andreev bound state (ABS) is a single quasiparticle excitation that mediates pair transport in confined superconductor-normal systems. Here we report a transition from pair resonant transport to ABS in sketched single electron transistors at the LAO/STO interface. This transition is consistent with a change of electron-electron interaction from attractive to repulsive, occurring at or near the Lifshitz transition. Such new electronically tunable electron-electron interaction may be useful for quantum simulation and engineering of novel quantum states in oxide materials. We gratefully acknowledge support from AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0524 (JL, CBE), AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0057 (JL, CBE, AD), NSF DMR-1104191 (JL), ONR N00014-15-1-2847 (JL).

  8. Strong light-field effects in correlated oraganic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yohei; Naitoh, Yota; Itoh, Hirotake; Ishihara, Sumio; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    Optical responses of organic conductors have attracted much attentions, because they exhibit ultrafast solid-state phase transitions in the conducting and/or dielectric natures upon photo-excitations. In this decade, photoinduced melting of correlated insulators with clear charge gap have been extensively investigated. On the other hand, optical rsponses of correlated metal has not been studied well. Here, we describe a charge localization induced by the 9.3 MV/cm instantaneous electric field of a 1.5 cycle (7 fs) infrared pulse in an organic conductor alpha- (bis[ethylenedithio]-tetrathiafulvelene)2I3. A large reflectivity change of 30 percent and a coherent charge oscillation along the time axis reflect the opening of the charge ordering gap in the metallic phase. This optical freezing of charges, which is the reverse of the photoinduced melting of electronic orders, is attributed to the 10 percent reduction of t driven by the strong, high-frequency electric field. Furthermore, the contribution of Coulomb repulsion will be discussed on the basis of the polarization dependence of the pump light and the theory.

  9. Weakly parametrized Jastrow ansatz for a strongly correlated Bose system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsyshyn, Yaroslav

    2017-03-01

    We consider the Jastrow pair-product wavefunction for strongly correlated Bose systems, in our case liquid helium-4. An ansatz is proposed for the pair factors which consist of a numeric solution to a modified and parametrized pair scattering equation. We consider a number of such simple one-variable parametrizations. Additionally, we allow for a parametrizeable cutoff of the pair factors and for the addition of a long-range phonon tail. This approach results in many-body wavefunctions that have between just one and three variational parameters. Calculation of observables is carried with the variational Monte Carlo method. We find that such a simple parametrization is sufficient to produce results that are comparable in quality to the best available two-body factors for helium. For the two-parameter wavefunction, we find variational energies of -6.04 K per particle for a system of one thousand particles. It is also shown that short-range two-body correlations are reproduced in good detail by the two- and three-parameter functions.

  10. Strong electron correlations in biomimetic transition metal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labute, Montiago Xavier

    The first-row transition metals (Fe, Co, V,...) are key players in the active sites of proteins and enzymes responsible for diverse biological processes such as NO regulation and photosynthesis. Many small transition metal complexes possess chemical coordination environments in the vicinity of the metal atom that are reminiscent of these active sites. We have studied the electronic structure of these molecules and discussed the relevance for their biological analogues. The specific question on which we wish to focus is: Do strong correlations (resulting from the localized character of the TM 3d-orbitals) contribute significantly to the reaction energetics of these molecules and, if so, can these effects be observed by experiment? To accomplish these ends we focus on the cobalt valence tautomer molecules and the phenomenon of electron transfer in aqueous hexaammine cobalt ions. We utilize theoretical methods in order to study the cobalt valence tautomer molecules which undergo an interconversion with temperature that is reminiscent of the changes in structure and spin that the heme group experiences as the result of Fe-ligand interactions. We perform fully ab initio calculations using the GGA implementation of density functional theory with the computer code SIESTA. In addition, a simple Anderson Impurity Model has been employed that more properly accounts for the Coulomb interaction among the 3d electrons on the cobalt atom. The calculated Co K x-ray absorption near-edge spectra XANES agrees well with experimental data and a prediction for the Co L-edge XAS that could be tested in future experiments is also presented. We believe that there are structures in both spectra that may only be explained by a strong admixture of configurations. It is conjectured that strong electron correlations help explain the non-Arrhenius rate behavior observed in the high-spin to low-spin relaxation rate at low temperatures. Work on electron-transfer in CoNH32 +/3+6aq using these

  11. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Saxena, S. S.; Sutherland, M. L.; Sebastian, S. E.; Artacho, E.; Grosche, F. M.; Hadzibabic, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 was dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covered a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The meeting welcomed to Cambridge 657 participants from 23 countries, who presented 127 talks (including 16 plenary, 57 invited, and 54 contributed) and 736 posters in 40 sessions over five full days of meetings. This proceedings volume contains papers reporting on the science presented at the meeting. This work deepens our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. Strongly correlated systems are known for their remarkable array of emergent phenomena: the traditional subjects of superconductivity, magnetism and metal-insulator transitions have been joined by non-Fermi liquid phenomena, topologically protected quantum states, atomic and photonic gases, and quantum phase transitions. These are some of the most challenging and interesting phenomena in science. As well as the science driver, there is underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion

  12. Virial Expansion for a Strongly Correlated Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui

    2011-03-01

    Few-body physics can give considerable insight into the challenging many-body problem. A concrete example is the exact Tan relations linking the ``hard'' (few-body) physics at short distance, large-momentum and high frequency to the ``soft'' physics of the equation of state via a contact parameter. This has been demonstrated clearly using the operator product expansion (OPE) method which separates in a natural way few-body from many-body physics. In this talk, we present another example: the quantum virial expansion that bridges few-body and many-body physics. At large temperatures, the properties of a strongly correlated Fermi gas, either static or dynamic, can be expanded in terms of virial coefficients or expansion functions, calculable from the few-fermion solutions. For the equation of state in the resonant unitarity limit, we obtain for the first time an accurate third order virial coefficient. This has been experimentally verified in a measurement at ENS (Paris). For the single-particle spectral function, we demonstrate that an expansion up to second order is able to explain the main features of momentum-resolved RF spectroscopy in a resonantly interacting Fermi gas, as recently reported by JILA. We also obtain a virial expansion of the dynamic structure function, as measured at Swinburne University (Melbourne), and check that the second order expansion functions give the correct OPE coefficients in the limit of large momentum and frequency. The important feature of this expansion is the existence of a small parameter, the fugacity, even for strong interactions. In the future, we anticipate that higher-order virial expansions of dynamic properties such as the single-particle spectral function may provide useful insights into clarifying the debate on the pseudo-gap issue in resonantly interacting Fermi gases.

  13. Strongly correlated quantum transport out-of-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Prasenjit

    The revolutionary advances in nanotechnology and nanofabrication have facilitated the precise control and manipulation of mesoscopic systems where quantum effects are pronounced. Quantum devices with tunable gates have made it possible to access regimes far beyond the purview of linear response theory. In particular, the influence of strong voltage and thermal biases has led to the observation of novel phenomena where the non-equilibrium characteristics of the system are of paramount importance. We study transport through quantum-impurity systems in the regime of strong correlations and determine the effects of large temperature and potential gradients on its many-body physics. In Part I of this thesis we focus on the steady-state dynamics of the system, a commonly encountered experimental scenario. For a system consisting of several leads composed of non-interacting electrons, each individually coupled to a quantum impurity with interactions and maintained at different chemical potentials, we reformulate the system in terms of an effective-equilibrium density matrix. This density matrix has a simple Boltzmann-like form in terms of the system's Lippmann-Schwinger (scattering) operators. We elaborate the conditions for this description to be valid based on the microscopic Hamiltonian of the system. We then prove the equivalence of physical observables computed using this formulation with corresponding expressions in the Schwinger-Keldysh approach and provide a dictionary between Green's functions in either scheme. An imaginary-time functional integral framework to compute finite temperature Green's functions is proposed and used to develop a novel perturbative expansion in the interaction strength which is exact in all other system parameters. We use these tools to study the fate of the Abrikosov-Suhl regime on the Kondo-correlated quantum dot due to the effects of bias and external magnetic fields. Next, we expand the domain of this formalism to additionally

  14. Low-energy Model for Strongly Correlated Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shiu

    We provide a detailed derivation of the low-energy model for site-diluted strongly correlated oxides, an example being Zn-diluted La2CuO 4, in the limit of low doping together with a study of the ground-state properties of that model. The generally complicated Hamiltonian on the energy scale of the most relevant atomic orbitals is systematically downfolded to an effective model containing only spin-spin interactions using several techniques. In our study, beginning with the site-diluted three-band Hubbard model for La2ZnxCu(1- x)O4, we first determine the hybridized electronic states of CuO4 and ZnO4 plaquettes within the CuO2 planes utilizing Wannier-orthogonalization of oxygen orbitals and cell-perturbation of the Hamiltonian of each plaquett. Qualitatively, we find that the hybridization of zinc and oxygen orbitals can result in an impurity state with the energy epsilon, which is lower than the effective Hubbard gap U. Then we apply canonical transformation in the limit of the effective hopping integral t << epsilon, U, to obtain the low-energy, spin-only Hamiltonian, which includes terms of the order t2/U, t4/epsilon3, and t 4/Uepsilon2. In other words, besides the usual diluted nearest-neighbor superexchange J-terms of order t2/U, the low-energy model contains impurity-mediated, further-neighbor frustrating interactions among the Cu spins surrounding Zn-sites in an otherwise unfrustrated antiferromagnetic background. These terms, denoted as J'Zn and J''Zn , are of order t4/epsilon3 and can be substantial when epsilon ˜ U/2, the latter value corresponding to the realistic CuO2 parameters. The other further-neighbor Cu spin interactions are of order t 4/U3, which are neglected in both pure and diluted systems, because they are much lesser than J'Zn and J''Zn and independent of impurity concentration. In order to verify this spin-only model, we subsequently apply the T-matrix approach to study the effect of impurities on the antiferromagnetic order parameter

  15. The shell model for the exchange-correlation hole in the strong-correlation limit.

    PubMed

    Bahmann, Hilke; Zhou, Yongxi; Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2016-09-28

    We present a model for the exchange-correlation hole and the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation (SC) limit of density functional theory. The SC limit is useful in the construction of exchange-correlation functionals through interpolation of the adiabatic connection. The new approximation (referred to as shell model) is an improvement of the non-local radius (NLR) model recently proposed by Wagner and Gori-Giorgi [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052512 (2014)]. The NLR model does not correctly reproduce the limit of the strongly correlated homogeneous electron gas and this shortcoming is remedied by the shell model. As in the case of the NLR model, the spherically averaged electron density ρ(r,u)=∫dΩu4πρ(r+u) is the starting point for the construction of the shell model and it is also its computational bottleneck. We show how ρ(r, u), the NLR, and the shell model can be implemented efficiently. For this purpose, analytical integrals for the normalization and the energy density of the underlying holes are provided. Employing the shell model, we illustrate how improved adiabatic connection interpolations can be constructed.

  16. Far East: Offshore exploration and development continues strong

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    New fields are being added even while recent finds are brought on using floating production systems and gas pipelines. Intensive workover/redrilling continues in older onshore provinces. The paper discusses exploration, development, drilling and production in China, Indonesia, India, Malaysia, Thailand, Viet Nam, Pakistan, Myanmar, Brunei, and the Philippines, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Japan, Mongolia, and Taiwan are briefly mentioned.

  17. Computational studies of model disordered and strongly correlated electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Sonika

    The theory of non-interacting electrons in perfect crystals was completed soon after the advent of quantum mechanics. Though capable of describing electron behaviour in most simple solid state physics systems, this approach falls woefully short of describing condensed matter systems of interest today, and designing the quantum devices of the future. The reason is that nature is never free of disorder, and emergent properties arising from interactions can be clearly seen in the pure, low-dimensional materials that can be engineered today. In this thesis, I address some salient problems in disordered and correlated electronic systems using modern numerical techniques like sparse matrix diagonalization, density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), and large disorder renormalization group (LDRG) methods. The pioneering work of P. W. Anderson, in 1958, led to an understanding of how an electron can stop diffusing and become localized in a region of space when a crystal is sufficiently disordered. Thus disorder can lead to metal-insulator transitions, for instance, in doped semiconductors. Theoretical research on the Anderson disorder model since then has mostly focused on the localization-delocalization phase transition. The localized phase in itself was not thought to exhibit any interesting physics. Our work has uncovered a new singularity in the disorder-averaged inverse participation ratio of wavefunctions within the localized phase, arising from resonant states. The effects of system size, dimension and disorder distribution on the singularity have been studied. A novel wavefunction-based LDRG technique has been designed for the Anderson model which captures the singular behaviour. While localization is well established for a single electron in a disordered potential, the situation is less clear in the case of many interacting particles. Most studies of a many-body localized phase are restricted to a system which is isolated from its environment. Such a condition

  18. The Event Horizon Telescope: exploring strong gravity and accretion physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Angelo; Dexter, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global sub-millimetre wavelength very long baseline interferometry array, is now resolving the innermost regions around the supermassive black holes Sgr A* and M87. Using black hole images from both simple geometric models and relativistic magnetohydrodynamical accretion flow simulations, we perform a variety of experiments to assess the promise of the EHT for studying strong gravity and accretion physics during the stages of its development. We find that (1) the addition of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array along with upgraded instrumentation in the `Complete' stage of the EHT allow detection of the photon ring, a signature of Kerr strong gravity, for predicted values of its total flux; (2) the inclusion of coherently averaged closure phases in our analysis dramatically improves the precision of even the current array, allowing (3) significantly tighter constraints on plausible accretion models and (4) detections of structural variability at the levels predicted by the models. While observations at 345 GHz circumvent problems due to interstellar electron scattering in line of sight to the galactic centre, short baselines provided by CARMA (Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy) and/or the LMT could be required in order to constrain the overall shape of the accretion flow. Given the systematic uncertainties in the underlying models, using the full complement of two observing frequencies (230 and 345 GHz) and sources (Sgr A* and M87) may be critical for achieving transformative science with the EHT experiment.

  19. Rapid independent trait evolution despite a strong pleiotropic genetic correlation.

    PubMed

    Conner, Jeffrey K; Karoly, Keith; Stewart, Christy; Koelling, Vanessa A; Sahli, Heather F; Shaw, Frank H

    2011-10-01

    Genetic correlations are the most commonly studied of all potential constraints on adaptive evolution. We present a comprehensive test of constraints caused by genetic correlation, comparing empirical results to predictions from theory. The additive genetic correlation between the filament and the corolla tube in wild radish flowers is very high in magnitude, is estimated with good precision (0.85 ± 0.06), and is caused by pleiotropy. Thus, evolutionary changes in the relative lengths of these two traits should be constrained. Still, artificial selection produced rapid evolution of these traits in opposite directions, so that in one replicate relative to controls, the difference between them increased by six standard deviations in only nine generations. This would result in a 54% increase in relative fitness on the basis of a previous estimate of natural selection in this population, and it would produce the phenotypes found in the most extreme species in the family Brassicaceae in less than 100 generations. These responses were within theoretical expectations and were much slower than if the genetic correlation was zero; thus, there was evidence for constraint. These results, coupled with comparable results from other species, show that evolution can be rapid despite the constraints caused by genetic correlations.

  20. Exploring Correlation Coefficients with Golf Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the relationships between several pairs of statistics kept on professional golfers on the PGA tour. Specifically, two measures related to the player's ability to drive the ball are compared as are two measures related to the player's ability to putt. An additional analysis is made between one statistic related to putting and…

  1. Strong correlations between text quality and complex networks features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiqueira, L.; Nunes, M. G. V.; Oliveira, O. N., Jr.; F. Costa, L. da

    2007-01-01

    Concepts of complex networks have been used to obtain metrics that were correlated to text quality established by scores assigned by human judges. Texts produced by high-school students in Portuguese were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and shortest path were obtained. Another metric was derived from the dynamics of the network growth, based on the variation of the number of connected components. The scores assigned by the human judges according to three text quality criteria (coherence and cohesion, adherence to standard writing conventions and theme adequacy/development) were correlated with the network measurements. Text quality for all three criteria was found to decrease with increasing average values of outdegrees, clustering coefficient and deviation from the dynamics of network growth. Among the criteria employed, cohesion and coherence showed the strongest correlation, which probably indicates that the network measurements are able to capture how the text is developed in terms of the concepts represented by the nodes in the networks. Though based on a particular set of texts and specific language, the results presented here point to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  2. Signals of strong electronic correlation in ion scattering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Gonzalez, C.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Previous measurements of neutral atom fractions for S r+ scattered by gold polycrystalline surfaces show a singular dependence with the target temperature. There is still not a theoretical model that can properly describe the magnitude and the temperature dependence of the neutralization probabilities found. Here, we applied a first-principles quantum-mechanical theoretical formalism to describe the time-dependent scattering process. Three different electronic correlation approaches consistent with the system analyzed are used: (i) the spinless approach, where two charge channels are considered (S r0 and S r+ ) and the spin degeneration is neglected; (ii) the infinite-U approach, with the same charge channels (S r0 and S r+ ) but considering the spin degeneration; and (iii) the finite-U approach, where the first ionization and second ionization energy levels are considered very, but finitely, separated. Neutral fraction magnitudes and temperature dependence are better described by the finite-U approach, indicating that e -correlation plays a significant role in charge-transfer processes. However, none of them is able to explain the nonmonotonous temperature dependence experimentally obtained. Here, we suggest that small changes in the surface work function introduced by the target heating, and possibly not detected by experimental standard methods, could be responsible for that singular behavior. Additionally, we apply the same theoretical model using the infinite-U approximation for the Mg-Au system, obtaining an excellent description of the experimental neutral fractions measured.

  3. An organizing principle for two-dimensional strongly correlated superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratino, L.; Sémon, P.; Sordi, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Superconductivity in the cuprates exhibits many unusual features. We study the two-dimensional Hubbard model with plaquette dynamical mean-field theory to address these unusual features and relate them to other normal-state phenomena, such as the pseudogap. Previous studies with this method found that upon doping the Mott insulator at low temperature a pseudogap phase appears. The low-temperature transition between that phase and the correlated metal at higher doping is first-order. A series of crossovers emerge along the Widom line extension of that first-order transition in the supercritical region. Here we show that the highly asymmetric dome of the dynamical mean-field superconducting transition temperature , the maximum of the condensation energy as a function of doping, the correlation between maximum and normal-state scattering rate, the change from potential-energy driven to kinetic-energy driven pairing mechanisms can all be understood as remnants of the normal state first-order transition and its associated crossovers that also act as an organizing principle for the superconducting state.

  4. An organizing principle for two-dimensional strongly correlated superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Fratino, L.; Sémon, P.; Sordi, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Superconductivity in the cuprates exhibits many unusual features. We study the two-dimensional Hubbard model with plaquette dynamical mean-field theory to address these unusual features and relate them to other normal-state phenomena, such as the pseudogap. Previous studies with this method found that upon doping the Mott insulator at low temperature a pseudogap phase appears. The low-temperature transition between that phase and the correlated metal at higher doping is first-order. A series of crossovers emerge along the Widom line extension of that first-order transition in the supercritical region. Here we show that the highly asymmetric dome of the dynamical mean-field superconducting transition temperature , the maximum of the condensation energy as a function of doping, the correlation between maximum and normal-state scattering rate, the change from potential-energy driven to kinetic-energy driven pairing mechanisms can all be understood as remnants of the normal state first-order transition and its associated crossovers that also act as an organizing principle for the superconducting state. PMID:26964524

  5. Strongly correlated electron materials. I. Theory of the quasiparticle structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J.; Puig-Puig, L. )

    1993-07-01

    In this paper we give a method for analyzing the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of effective interactions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and from an extended RPA (ERPA) that introduces vertex effects within the bubble polarization. The second step is the determination of the density of states deduced from the spectral functions. Its analysis leads us to conclude that these systems can exhibit three types of resonances in their electronic structures: the lower-, middle-, and upper-energy resonances. Furthermore, we analyze the conditions for which there is only one type of resonance and the causes that lead to the disappearance of the heavy-fermion state. We finally introduce the RPA and ERPA effective interactions within the strong-coupling theory and we give the conditions for obtaining coupling and superconductivity.

  6. Excitonic condensation in systems of strongly correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneš, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The idea of exciton condensation in solids was introduced in the 1960s with the analogy of superconductivity in mind. While exciton supercurrents have been realised only in artificial quantum-well structures so far, the application of the concept of excitonic condensation to bulk solids leads to a rich spectrum of thermodynamic phases with diverse physical properties. In this review we discuss recent developments in the theory of exciton condensation in systems described by Hubbard-type models. In particular, we focus on the connections to their various strong-coupling limits that have been studied in other contexts, e.g. cold atoms physics. One of our goals is to provide a ‘dictionary’ that would allow the reader to efficiently combine results obtained in these different fields.

  7. Residues of correlators in the strongly coupled N=4 plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Amado, Irene; Landsteiner, Karl; Montero, Sergio; Hoyos, Carlos

    2008-03-15

    Quasinormal modes of asymptotically AdS black holes can be interpreted as poles of retarded correlators in the dual gauge theory. To determine the response of the system to small external perturbations it is not enough to know the location of the poles: one also needs to know the residues. We compute them for R-charge currents and find that they are complex except for the hydrodynamic mode, whose residue is purely imaginary. For different quasinormal modes the residue grows with momentum q, whereas for the hydrodynamic mode it behaves as a damped oscillation with distinct zeroes at finite q. Similar to collective excitations at weak coupling the hydrodynamic mode decouples at short wavelengths. Knowledge of the residues allows as well to define the time scale {tau}{sub H} from when on the system enters the hydrodynamic regime, restricting the validity of hydrodynamic simulations to times t>{tau}{sub H}.

  8. Strong correlation effects in a two-dimensional Bose gas with quartic dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radić, Juraj; Natu, Stefan S.; Galitski, Victor

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by the fundamental question of the fate of interacting bosons in flat bands, we consider a two-dimensional Bose gas at zero temperature with an underlying quartic single-particle dispersion in one spatial direction. This type of band structure can be realized using the NIST scheme of spin-orbit coupling [Y.-J. Lin, K. Jiménez-Garcia, and I. B. Spielman, Nature (London) 471, 83 (2011), 10.1038/nature09887], in the regime where the lower-band dispersion has the form ɛk˜kx4/4 +ky2+... , or using the shaken lattice scheme of Parker et al. [C. V. Parker, L.-C. Ha, and C. Chin, Nat. Phys. 9, 769 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2789]. We numerically compare the ground-state energies of the mean-field Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and various trial wave functions, where bosons avoid each other at short distances. We discover that, at low densities, several types of strongly correlated states have an energy per particle (ɛ ), which scales with density (n ) as ɛ ˜n4 /3 , in contrast to ɛ ˜n for the weakly interacting Bose gas. These competing states include a Wigner crystal, quasicondensates described in terms of properly symmetrized fermionic states, and variational wave functions of Jastrow type. We find that one of the latter has the lowest energy among the states we consider. This Jastrow-type state has a strongly reduced, but finite, condensate fraction, and true off-diagonal long-range order, which suggests that the ground state of interacting bosons with quartic dispersion is a strongly correlated condensate reminiscent of superfluid helium-4. Our results show that even for weakly interacting bosons in higher dimensions, one can explore the crossover from a weakly coupled BEC to a strongly correlated condensate by simply tuning the single-particle dispersion or density.

  9. Exploring the neural correlates of visual creativity

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Dandekar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Although creativity has been called the most important of all human resources, its neural basis is still unclear. In the current study, we used fMRI to measure neural activity in participants solving a visuospatial creativity problem that involves divergent thinking and has been considered a canonical right hemisphere task. As hypothesized, both the visual creativity task and the control task as compared to rest activated a variety of areas including the posterior parietal cortex bilaterally and motor regions, which are known to be involved in visuospatial rotation of objects. However, directly comparing the two tasks indicated that the creative task more strongly activated left hemisphere regions including the posterior parietal cortex, the premotor cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the medial PFC. These results demonstrate that even in a task that is specialized to the right hemisphere, robust parallel activity in the left hemisphere supports creative processing. Furthermore, the results support the notion that higher motor planning may be a general component of creative improvisation and that such goal-directed planning of novel solutions may be organized top-down by the left DLPFC and by working memory processing in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:22349801

  10. Construction of exchange-correlation functionals through interpolation between the non-interacting and the strong-correlation limit

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yongxi; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Bahmann, Hilke

    2015-09-28

    Drawing on the adiabatic connection of density functional theory, exchange-correlation functionals of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are constructed which interpolate between the extreme limits of the electron-electron interaction strength. The first limit is the non-interacting one, where there is only exchange. The second limit is the strong correlated one, characterized as the minimum of the electron-electron repulsion energy. The exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit is approximated through a model for the exchange-correlation hole that is referred to as nonlocal-radius model [L. O. Wagner and P. Gori-Giorgi, Phys. Rev. A 90, 052512 (2014)]. Using the non-interacting and strong-correlated extremes, various interpolation schemes are presented that yield new approximations to the adiabatic connection and thus to the exchange-correlation energy. Some of them rely on empiricism while others do not. Several of the proposed approximations yield the exact exchange-correlation energy for one-electron systems where local and semi-local approximations often fail badly. Other proposed approximations generalize existing global hybrids by using a fraction of the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit to replace an equal fraction of the semi-local approximation to the exchange-correlation energy in the strong-correlation limit. The performance of the proposed approximations is evaluated for molecular atomization energies, total atomic energies, and ionization potentials.

  11. Self-consistent field model for strong electrostatic correlations and inhomogeneous dielectric media

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Manman Xu, Zhenli

    2014-12-28

    Electrostatic correlations and variable permittivity of electrolytes are essential for exploring many chemical and physical properties of interfaces in aqueous solutions. We propose a continuum electrostatic model for the treatment of these effects in the framework of the self-consistent field theory. The model incorporates a space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity and an excluded ion-size effect for the correlation energy. This results in a self-energy modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck or Poisson-Boltzmann equation together with state equations for the self energy and the dielectric function. We show that the ionic size is of significant importance in predicting a finite self energy for an ion in an inhomogeneous medium. Asymptotic approximation is proposed for the solution of a generalized Debye-Hückel equation, which has been shown to capture the ionic correlation and dielectric self energy. Through simulating ionic distribution surrounding a macroion, the modified self-consistent field model is shown to agree with particle-based Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical results for symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes demonstrate that the model is able to predict the charge inversion at high correlation regime in the presence of multivalent interfacial ions which is beyond the mean-field theory and also show strong effect to double layer structure due to the space- or field-dependent dielectric permittivity.

  12. Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Allan; Carr, Lincoln D.; Schaefer, Thomas; Steinberg, Peter; Thomas, John E.

    2013-04-01

    off a flurry of interest in holography as a toolkit for studying strongly-correlated many-body systems more generally. Holography also allows us to use results from quantum fluids to study classical and quantum gravity; for example, the phase structure of a quantum many-body system translates into a rich classification of black holes in the dual space-time. Given both the rapid progress in applied holography and the exciting developments in ultracold quantum gases and QCD plasmas discussed above, the time is ripe for new collaborations across traditional lines of specialization. This focus issue explores the convergence between three heretofore separate areas of physics. Over forty research groups have contributed original work, and there will be a review article which complements these advances, overviewing them and presenting them in the context of all three fields and their interconnections. The review concludes with a list of open questions. This sets the tone for the present focus issue; namely, interdisciplinary dialog, openness, innovation, and possibility, an emphasis for which New Journal of Physics, an open-access journal of the highest quality, is especially fitted.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the itinerant-localized model of strongly correlated electrons: Spin-spin correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsov, Ilya; Ferraz, Alvaro; Kochetov, Evgenii

    2016-12-01

    We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the itinerant-localized periodic Kondo-Heisenberg model for the underdoped cuprates to calculate the associated spin correlation functions. The strong electron correlations are shown to play a key role in the abrupt destruction of the quasi-long-range antiferromagnetic order in the lightly doped regime.

  14. Relaxation of a Classical Spin Coupled to a Strongly Correlated Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayad, Mohammad; Rausch, Roman; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    A classical spin which is antiferromagnetically coupled to a system of strongly correlated conduction electrons is shown to exhibit unconventional real-time dynamics which cannot be described by Gilbert damping. Depending on the strength of the local Coulomb interaction U , the two main electronic dissipation channels, namely transport of excitations via correlated hopping and via excitations of correlation-induced magnetic moments, become active on largely different time scales. We demonstrate that correlations can lead to a strongly suppressed relaxation which so far has been observed in purely electronic systems only and which is governed here by proximity to the divergent magnetic time scale in the infinite-U limit.

  15. Correlated multielectron systems in strong laser fields: A multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Koch, O.; Kreuzer, W.

    2005-01-01

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach for the description of correlated few-electron dynamics in the presence of strong laser fields is introduced and a comprehensive description of the method is given. Total ionization and electron spectra for the ground and first excited ionic channels are calculated for one-dimensional model systems with up to six active electrons. Strong correlation effects are found in the shape of photoelectron peaks and the dependence of ionization on molecule size.

  16. The Sum-Rate Capacity of Strong Interference Channels with Correlated Messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhan

    The transmission of correlated messages over strong interference channels is examined. The result is the proposal of a single-letter characterization of the sum-rate capacity of strong interference channels with correlated messages. It is shown that if the messages are independent, the sum-rate capacity is equal to that of [1] obtained by Costa and El Gamal. However, it can be larger than that of [1] if the messages are correlated. It is also shown that, in terms of the sum-rate, the achievable rate region in [2] is indeed the sum-rate capacity.

  17. CeRu4Sn6: a strongly correlated material with nontrivial topology

    PubMed Central

    Sundermann, Martin; Strigari, Fabio; Willers, Thomas; Winkler, Hannes; Prokofiev, Andrey; Ablett, James M.; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Schmitz, Detlef; Weschke, Eugen; Sala, Marco Moretti; Al-Zein, Ali; Tanaka, Arata; Haverkort, Maurits W.; Kasinathan, Deepa; Tjeng, Liu Hao; Paschen, Silke; Severing, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Topological insulators form a novel state of matter that provides new opportunities to create unique quantum phenomena. While the materials used so far are based on semiconductors, recent theoretical studies predict that also strongly correlated systems can show non-trivial topological properties, thereby allowing even the emergence of surface phenomena that are not possible with topological band insulators. From a practical point of view, it is also expected that strong correlations will reduce the disturbing impact of defects or impurities, and at the same increase the Fermi velocities of the topological surface states. The challenge is now to discover such correlated materials. Here, using advanced x-ray spectroscopies in combination with band structure calculations, we infer that CeRu4Sn6 is a strongly correlated material with non-trivial topology. PMID:26658647

  18. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, Arun

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  19. Competing ground states of strongly correlated bosons in the Harper-Hofstadter-Mott model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natu, Stefan S.; Mueller, Erich J.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-06-01

    Using an efficient cluster approach, we study the physics of two-dimensional lattice bosons in a strong magnetic field in the regime where the tunneling is much weaker than the on-site interaction strength. We study both the dilute, hard-core bosons at filling factors much smaller than unity occupation per site and the physics in the vicinity of the superfluid-Mott lobes as the density is tuned away from unity. For hard-core bosons, we carry out extensive numerics for a fixed flux per plaquette ϕ =1 /5 and ϕ =1 /3 . At large flux, the lowest-energy state is a strongly correlated superfluid, analogous to He-4, in which the order parameter is dramatically suppressed, but nonzero. At filling factors ν =1 /2 ,1 , we find competing incompressible states which are metastable. These appear to be commensurate density wave states. For small flux, the situation is reversed and the ground state at ν =1 /2 is an incompressible density wave solid. Here, we find a metastable lattice supersolid phase, where superfluidity and density wave order coexist. We then perform careful numerical studies of the physics near the vicinity of the Mott lobes for ϕ =1 /2 and ϕ =1 /4 . At ϕ =1 /2 , the superfluid ground state has commensurate density wave order. At ϕ =1 /4 , incompressible phases appear outside the Mott lobes at densities n =1.125 and n =1.25 , corresponding to filling fractions ν =1 /2 and 1, respectively. These phases, which are absent in single-site mean-field theory, are metastable and have slightly higher energy than the superfluid, but the energy difference between them shrinks rapidly with increasing cluster size, suggestive of an incompressible ground state. We thus explore the interplay between Mott physics, magnetic Landau levels, and superfluidity, finding a rich phase diagram of competing compressible and incompressible states.

  20. Exploring Tripartite Quantum Correlations: Entanglement Witness and Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Karimi, N.; Heshmati, A.; Amidi, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we explore the tripartite quantum correlations by employing the quantum relative entropy as a distance measure. First, we evaluate the explicit expression for nonlinear entanglement witness (EW) of tripartite systems in the four dimensional space that lends itself to a straightforward algorithm for finding closest separable state (CSS) to the generic state. Then using nonlinear EW with specific feasible regions (FRs), quantum discord is derived analytically for the three-qubit and tripartite systems in the four dimensional space. Furthermore, we explicitly figure out the additivity relation of quantum correlations in tripartite systems.

  1. Exploring Tripartite Quantum Correlations: Entanglement Witness and Quantum Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Karimi, N.; Heshmati, A.; Amidi, D.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we explore the tripartite quantum correlations by employing the quantum relative entropy as a distance measure. First, we evaluate the explicit expression for nonlinear entanglement witness (EW) of tripartite systems in the four dimensional space that lends itself to a straightforward algorithm for finding closest separable state (CSS) to the generic state. Then using nonlinear EW with specific feasible regions (FRs), quantum discord is derived analytically for the three-qubit and tripartite systems in the four dimensional space. Furthermore, we explicitly figure out the additivity relation of quantum correlations in tripartite systems.

  2. Collective modes in strongly correlated yukawa liquids: waves in dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kalman, G; Rosenberg, M; DeWitt, H E

    2000-06-26

    We determine the collective mode structure of a strongly correlated Yukawa fluid, with the purpose of analyzing wave propagation in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. We identify a longitudinal plasmon and a transverse shear mode. The dispersion is characterized by a low- k acoustic behavior, a frequency maximum well below the plasma frequency, and a high- k merging of the two modes around the Einstein frequency of localized oscillations. The damping effect of collisions between neutrals and dust grains is estimated.

  3. Solving the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation for strongly correlated neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Taşkın; Rotter, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Pairs of neurons in brain networks often share much of the input they receive from other neurons. Due to essential nonlinearities of the neuronal dynamics, the consequences for the correlation of the output spike trains are generally not well understood. Here we analyze the case of two leaky integrate-and-fire neurons using an approach which is nonperturbative with respect to the degree of input correlation. Our treatment covers both weakly and strongly correlated dynamics, generalizing previous results based on linear response theory.

  4. Photoresponse of a strongly correlated material determined by scanning photocurrent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasırga, T. Serkan; Sun, Dong; Park, Jae H.; Coy, Jim M.; Fei, Zaiyao; Xu, Xiaodong; Cobden, David H.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of a current by light is a key process in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. In band semiconductors, depletion fields associated with interfaces separate long-lived photo-induced carriers. However, in systems with strong electron-electron and electron-phonon correlations it is unclear what physics will dominate the photoresponse. Here, we investigate photocurrent in VO2, an exemplary strongly correlated material known for its dramatic metal-insulator transition at Tc ~ 68 °C, which could be useful for optoelectronic detection and switching up to ultraviolet wavelengths. Using scanning photocurrent microscopy on individual suspended VO2 nanobeams we observe a photoresponse peaked at the metal-insulator boundary but extending throughout both insulating and metallic phases. We determine that the response is photothermal, implying efficient carrier relaxation to a local equilibrium in a manner consistent with strong correlations. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal subtle phase changes within the insulating state. We further demonstrate switching of the photocurrent by optical control of the metal-insulator boundary arrangement. Our work shows the value of applying scanning photocurrent microscopy to nanoscale crystals in the investigation of strongly correlated materials, and the results are relevant for designing and controlling optoelectronic devices employing such materials.

  5. Effect of strong electron correlation on the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Mazziotti, David A.

    2012-08-21

    Research into the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting has focused on two factors: (1) entanglement of chromophores, and (2) environmental noise. While chromophores are conjugated {pi}-bonding molecules with strongly correlated electrons, previous models have treated this correlation implicitly without a mathematical variable to gauge correlation-enhanced efficiency. Here we generalize the single-electron/exciton models to a multi-electron/exciton model that explicitly shows the effects of enhanced electron correlation within chromophores on the efficiency of energy transfer. The model provides more detailed insight into the interplay of electron correlation within chromophores and electron entanglement between chromophores. Exploiting this interplay is assisting in the design of new energy-efficient materials, which are just beginning to emerge.

  6. Aperture averaging and correlation function measurements in strong atmospheric turbulence for optical wireless applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Heba; Harris, Joseph; Tang, Yunxin; Gammon, Robert; Davis, Christopher

    2008-08-01

    The performance of free space optical (FSO) links in a clear atmosphere is affected by the non-ideal characteristics of the communication channel. Atmospheric turbulence causes fluctuations in the received signal level, which increase the bit errors in a digital communication link. In order to quantify performance limitations, a better understanding of the effect of the intensity fluctuations on the received signal at all turbulence levels is needed. Theory reliably describes the behavior in the weak turbulence regime, but theoretical descriptions in the intermediate and strong turbulence regimes are less well developed. We have developed a flexible empirical approach for characterizing link performance in strong turbulence conditions through image analysis of intensity scintillation patterns coupled with frame aperture averaging on an FSO communication link. These measurements are complemented with direct measurements of temporal and spatial correlation functions. A He-Ne laser beam propagates 106 meters in free-space over flat terrain about a meter above the ground to provide strong atmospheric turbulence conditions. A high performance digital camera with a frame-grabbing computer interface is used to capture received laser intensity distributions at rates up to 30 frames per second and various short shutter speeds, down to 1/16,000s per frame. A scintillometer is used for accurate measurements of the turbulence parameter Cn2. Laboratory measurements use a local strong turbulence generator, which mimics a strong phase screen. Spatial correlation functions are measured using laterally separated point detectors placed in the receiver plane. Correlations and captured image frames are analyzed in Labview to evaluate correlation functions, Cn2, and the aperture averaging factor. The aperture averaging results demonstrate the expected reduction in intensity fluctuations with increasing aperture diameter, and show quantitatively the differences in behavior between

  7. Self-consistent slave rotor mean-field theory for strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, E.; Paramekanti, A.

    2007-11-01

    Building on the work by Florens and Georges [Phys. Rev. B 70, 035114 (2004)], we formulate and study a self-consistent slave rotor mean-field theory for strongly correlated systems. This approach views the electron, in the strong correlation regime, as a composite of a neutral spinon and a charged rotor field. We solve the coupled spinon-rotor model self-consistently using a cluster mean-field theory for the rotors and various Ansätze for the spinon ground state. We illustrate this approach with a number of examples relevant to ongoing experiments in strongly correlated electronic systems such as (i) the phase diagram of the isotropic triangular lattice organic Mott insulators, (ii) quasiparticle excitations and tunneling asymmetry in the weakly doped cuprate superconductors, and (iii) the cyclotron mass of carriers in commensurate spin-density wave and U(1) staggered flux (or d -density wave) normal states of the underdoped cuprates. We compare the estimated cyclotron mass with results from recent quantum oscillation experiments on ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.5 by Doiron-Leyraud [Nature (London) 447, 565 (2007)] which appear to find Fermi pockets in the magnetic field induced normal state. We comment on the relation of this normal ground state to Fermi arcs seen in photoemission experiments above Tc . This slave rotor mean-field theory can be generalized to study inhomogeneous states and strongly interacting models relevant to ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  8. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; ...

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phasemore » where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.« less

  9. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; Chu, J. -H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z. Q.; Chu, C. W.; Fisher, I. R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z. -X.; Lu, D. H.

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  10. Strongly correlated states of a small cold-atom cloud from geometric gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Dagnino, D.; Barberan, N.; Guenter, K. J.; Dalibard, J.; Grass, T.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-11-15

    Using exact diagonalization for a small system of cold bosonic atoms, we analyze the emergence of strongly correlated states in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. This gauge field is generated by a laser beam that couples two internal atomic states, and it is related to Berry's geometrical phase that emerges when an atom follows adiabatically one of the two eigenstates of the atom-laser coupling. Our approach allows us to go beyond the adiabatic approximation, and to characterize the generalized Laughlin wave functions that appear in the strong magnetic-field limit.

  11. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  12. Quantum correlations responsible for remote state creation: strong and weak control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, S. I.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We study the quantum correlations between the two remote qubits (sender and receiver) connected by the transmission line (homogeneous spin-1/2 chain) depending on the parameters of the sender's and receiver's initial states (control parameters). We consider two different measures of quantum correlations: the entanglement (a traditional measure) and the informational correlation (based on the parameter exchange between the sender and receiver). We find the domain in the control parameter space yielding (i) zero entanglement between the sender and receiver during the whole evolution period and (ii) non-vanishing informational correlation between the sender and receiver, thus showing that the informational correlation is responsible for the remote state creation. Among the control parameters, there are the strong parameters (which strongly effect the values of studied measures) and the weak ones (whose effect is negligible), therewith the eigenvalues of the initial state are given a privileged role. We also show that the problem of small entanglement (concurrence) in quantum information processing is similar (in certain sense) to the problem of small determinants in linear algebra. A particular model of 40-node spin-1/2 communication line is presented.

  13. Comparison between theory and experiment for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D.

    2011-06-15

    We compare the theoretical predictions for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas with the latest experimental measurements reported by the ENS group [S. Nascimbene et al., Nature (London) 463, 1057 (2010)] and the Tokyo group [M. Horikoshi et al., Science 327, 442 (2010)]. The theoretical results are obtained using two diagrammatic theories, together with a virial expansion theory combined with a Pade approximation. We find good agreement between theory and experiment. In particular, the virial expansion, using a Pade approximation up to third order, describes the experimental results extremely well down to the superfluid transition temperature, T{sub c{approx}}0.16T{sub F}, where T{sub F} is the Fermi temperature. The comparison in this work complements our previous comparative study on the universal thermodynamics of a strongly correlated but trapped Fermi gas. The comparison also raises interesting issues about the unitary entropy and the applicability of the Pade approximation.

  14. Itinerant-localized dual character of a strongly correlated superfluid Bose gas in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Y.; Kitaura, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    2006-03-15

    We investigate a strongly correlated Bose gas in an optical lattice. Extending the standard-basis operator method developed by Haley and Erdoes to a boson Hubbard model, we calculate excitation spectra in the superfluid phase, as well as in the Mott insulating phase, at T=0. In the Mott phase, the excitation spectrum has a finite energy gap, reflecting the localized character of atoms. In the superfluid phase, the excitation spectrum is shown to have an itinerant-localized dual structure, where the gapless Bogoliubov mode (which describes the itinerant character of superfluid atoms) and a band with a finite energy gap coexist. We also show that the rf-tunneling current measurement would give useful information about the duality of a strongly correlated superfluid Bose gas near the superfluid-insulator transition.

  15. When strong correlations become weak: Consistent merging of G W and DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, L.; Nilsson, F.; Aryasetiawan, F.; Werner, P.

    2016-11-01

    The cubic perovskite SrVO3 is generally considered to be a prototype strongly correlated metal with a characteristic three-peak structure of the d -electron spectral function, featuring a renormalized quasiparticle band in between pronounced Hubbard sidebands. Here we show that this interpretation, which has been supported by numerous "ab initio" simulations, has to be reconsidered. Using a fully self-consistent G W + extended dynamical mean-field theory calculation we find that the screening from nonlocal Coulomb interactions substantially reduces the effective local Coulomb repulsion, and at the same time leads to strong plasmonic effects. The resulting effective local interactions are too weak to produce pronounced Hubbard bands in the local spectral function, while prominent plasmon satellites appear at energies which agree with those of the experimentally observed sidebands. Our results demonstrate the important role of nonlocal interactions and dynamical screening in determining the effective interaction strength of correlated compounds.

  16. Correlation-based virtual source imaging in strongly scattering random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Josselin; Papanicolaou, George

    2012-07-01

    Array imaging in a strongly scattering medium is limited because coherent signals recorded at the array and coming from a reflector to be imaged are weak and dominated by incoherent signals coming from multiple scattering by the medium. If, however, an auxiliary passive array can be placed between the reflector to be imaged and the scattering medium then the cross correlations of the incoherent signals on this array can also be used to image the reflector. In this paper, we show both in the weakly scattering paraxial regime and in strongly scattering layered media that this cross-correlation approach produces images as if the medium between the sources and the passive array was homogeneous and the auxiliary passive array was an active one made up of both sources and receivers.

  17. Two-dimensional nanoscale correlations in the strong negative thermal expansion material ScF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handunkanda, Sahan U.; Occhialini, Connor A.; Said, Ayman H.; Hancock, Jason N.

    2016-12-01

    We present diffuse x-ray scattering data on the strong negative thermal expansion (NTE) material ScF3 and find that two-dimensional nanoscale correlations exist at momentum-space regions associated with possibly rigid rotations of the perovskite octahedra. We address the extent to which rigid octahedral motion describes the dynamical fluctuations behind NTE by generalizing a simple model supporting a single floppy mode that is often used to heuristically describe instances of NTE. We find this model has tendencies toward dynamic inhomogeneities and its application to recent and existing experimental data suggest an intricate link between the nanometer correlation length scale, the energy scale for octahedral tilt fluctuations, and the coefficient of thermal expansion in ScF3. We then investigate the breakdown of the rigid limit and propose a resolution to an outstanding debate concerning the role of molecular rigidity in strong NTE materials.

  18. Transitions between strongly correlated and random steady-states for catalytic CO-oxidation on surfaces at high-pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Da -Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2015-04-02

    We explore simple lattice-gas reaction models for CO-oxidation on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of surface adsorption sites. The models are motivated by studies of CO-oxidation on RuO2(110) at high-pressures. Although adspecies interactions are neglected, the effective absence of adspecies diffusion results in kinetically-induced spatial correlations. A transition occurs from a random mainly CO-populated steady-state at high CO-partial pressure pCO, to a strongly-correlated near-O-covered steady-state for low pCO as noted. In addition, we identify a second transition to a random near-O-covered steady-state at very low pCO.

  19. Transitions between strongly correlated and random steady-states for catalytic CO-oxidation on surfaces at high-pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da -Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2015-04-02

    We explore simple lattice-gas reaction models for CO-oxidation on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of surface adsorption sites. The models are motivated by studies of CO-oxidation on RuO2(110) at high-pressures. Although adspecies interactions are neglected, the effective absence of adspecies diffusion results in kinetically-induced spatial correlations. A transition occurs from a random mainly CO-populated steady-state at high CO-partial pressure pCO, to a strongly-correlated near-O-covered steady-state for low pCO as noted. In addition, we identify a second transition to a random near-O-covered steady-state at very low pCO.

  20. SISGR: Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    2014-05-31

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating the order manifest in condensed matter materials. Up until now, however, no attempts have been made to use modern techniques of ultracold atomic physics to directly explore properties of strongly correlated or topologically protected materials. Our current program is focused on introducing a novel magnetic field microscopy technique into the toolbox of imaging probes. Our prior DOE ESPM program funded the development of a novel instrument using a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a scanning probe capable of measuring tiny magnetic (and electric) DC and AC fields above materials. We successfully built the world's first “scanning cryogenic atom chip microscope” [1], and we now are in the process of characterizing its performance before using the instrument to take the first wide-area images of transport flow within unconventional superconductors, pnictides and oxide interfaces (LAO/STO), topological insulators, and colossal magnetoresistive manganites. We will do so at temperatures outside the capability of scanning SQUIDs, with ~10x better resolution and without 1/f-noise. A notable goal will be to measure the surface-to-bulk conductivity ratio in topological insulators in a relatively model-independent fashion [2]. We have completed the construction of this magnetic microscope, shown in Figure 1. The instrument uses atom chips—substrates supporting micron-sized current-carrying wires that create magnetic microtraps near surfaces for ultracold thermal gases and BECs—to enable single-shot and raster-scanned large-field-of-view detection of magnetic fields. The fields emanating from electronic transport may be detected at the 10-7 flux quantum (Φ0) level and below (see Fig. 2); that is, few to sub-micron resolution of sub-nanotesla fields over single-shot, millimeter-long detection lengths. By harnessing the extreme

  1. Compositional phase stability of strongly correlated electron materials within DFT+U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, Eric B.; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the compositional phase stability of strongly correlated electron materials is an outstanding challenge in condensed matter physics. In this work, we employ the density functional theory plus U (DFT +U ) formalism to address the effects of local correlations due to transition metal d electrons on compositional phase stability in the prototype phase stable and separating materials LixCoO2 and olivine LixFePO4 , respectively. We introduce a spectral decomposition of the DFT +U total energy, revealing the distinct roles of the filling and ordering of the d orbital correlated subspace. The on-site interaction U drives both of these very different materials systems towards phase separation, stemming from enhanced ordering of the d orbital occupancies in the x =0 and x =1 species, whereas changes in the overall filling of the d shell contribute negligibly. We show that DFT +U formation energies are qualitatively consistent with experiments for phase stable LixCoO2 , phase separating LixFePO4 , and phase stable LixCoPO4 . However, we find that charge ordering plays a critical role in the energetics at intermediate x , strongly dampening the tendency for the Hubbard U to drive phase separation. Most relevantly, the phase stability of Li1 /2CoO2 within DFT +U is qualitatively incorrect without allowing charge ordering, which is problematic given that neither charge ordering nor the band gap that it induces are observed in experiment. We demonstrate that charge ordering arises from the correlated subspace interaction energy as opposed to the double counting. Additionally, we predict the Li order-disorder transition temperature for Li1 /2CoO2 , demonstrating that the unphysical charge ordering within DFT +U renders the method problematic, often producing unrealistically large results. Our findings motivate the need for other advanced techniques, such as DFT plus dynamical mean-field theory, for total energies in strongly correlated materials.

  2. Oxide Thermoelectrics: The Role of Crystal Structure on Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Taylor David

    This dissertation reports on the synthesis, structural and thermal characterization and electrical and thermal transport properties of a variety of strongly correlated spinels. General structure property relationships for electrical and thermal transport are discussed. However, the relationship between thermopower and features of the crystal structure such as spin, crystal field, anti-site disorder, and structural distortions are explored in depth. The experimental findings are reported in the context of improving existing oxide thermoelectric materials, screening for new materials or using thermopower as a unique characterization tool to determine the cation distribution in spinels. The need for improved n-type oxide thermoelectric materials has led researchers to consider mixed valence (+3/+4) manganese oxides. Contrary to previous findings we report herein that the LiMn2O4 compound reaches the relatively large n-type thermopower of -73 microV/K which is three times larger than the value observed in other manganese oxides, -25 microV/K. The cause of this increase in thermopower is shown to be the absence of a Jahn-Teller distortion on the Mn3+ ions in LiMn2 O4. By avoiding this structural distortion the orbital degeneracy is doubled and the Koshibae et al.'s modified Heikes formula predicts a thermopower of -79 muV/K in good agreement with the experiment. Altering the Mn 3+/4+ ratio via aliovalent doping did not affect the thermopower and is a second evidence of universal charge transport first reported by Kobayashi et al. The role of anti-site disorder was further examined in FexMn 1-xNiCrO4 x=0, ½, ¾, 1 spinels but the effect on thermopower was inconclusive due to the presence of impurity phases. Next, the thermopower as a function of temperature in Co3O 4 was investigated as a means whereby the Wu and Mason's 30 year old model for using thermopower to calculate cation distribution in spinels could be revisited. We report evidence that Wu and Mason's original

  3. Strong correlations and the search for high-Tc superconductivity in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, J. M.; Calderón, M. J.; Liu, J.; Muñoz, M. C.; Bascones, E.

    2017-02-01

    Undoped iron superconductors accommodate n =6 electrons in five d orbitals. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that the strength of correlations increases with hole doping, as the electronic filling approaches half filling with n =5 electrons. This evidence delineates a scenario in which the parent compound of iron superconductors is the half-filled system, in analogy to cuprate superconductors. In cuprates the superconductivity can be induced upon electron or hole doping. In this work we propose to search for high-Tc superconductivity and strong correlations in chromium pnictides and chalcogenides with n <5 electrons. By means of ab initio slave-spin and multiorbital random-phase-approximation calculations we analyze the strength of the correlations and the superconducting and magnetic instabilities in these systems with the main focus on LaCrAsO. We find that electron-doped LaCrAsO is a strongly correlated system with competing magnetic interactions, with (π ,π ) antiferromagnetism and nodal d -wave pairing being the most plausible magnetic and superconducting instabilities, respectively.

  4. Exact results in a slave boson saddle point approach for a strongly correlated electron model

    SciTech Connect

    Fresard, Raymond; Kopp, Thilo

    2008-08-15

    We revisit the Kotliar-Ruckenstein (KR) slave boson saddle point evaluation for a two-site correlated electron model. As the model can be solved analytically, it is possible to compare the KR saddle point results with the exact many-particle levels. The considered two-site cluster mimics an infinite-U single-impurity Anderson model with a nearest-neighbor Coulomb interaction: one site is strongly correlated with an infinite local Coulomb repulsion, which hybridizes with the second site, on which the local Coulomb repulsion vanishes. Making use of the flexibility of the representation, we introduce appropriate weight factors in the KR saddle point scheme. Ground-state and all excitation levels agree with the exact diagonalization results. Thermodynamics and correlation functions may be recovered in a suitably renormalized saddle point evaluation.

  5. Patient-specific Immune States before Surgery are Strong Correlates of Surgical Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Gaudillière, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Aghaeepour, Nima; Tingle, Martha; Nolan, Garry P.; Angst, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recovery after surgery is highly variable. Risk-stratifying patients based on their predicted recovery profile will afford individualized perioperative management strategies. Recently, application of mass cytometry in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty revealed strong immune correlates of surgical recovery in blood samples collected shortly after surgery. However, the ability to interrogate a patient’s immune state before surgery and predict recovery is highly desirable in perioperative medicine. Methods To evaluate a patient’s pre-surgical immune state, cell-type specific intracellular signaling responses to ex-vivo ligands (LPS, IL-6, IL-10, IL-2/GM-CSF) were quantified by mass cytometry in pre-surgical blood samples. Selected ligands modulate signaling processes perturbed by surgery. Twenty-three cell surface and 11 intracellular markers were used for the phenotypic and functional characterization of major immune cell subsets. Evoked immune responses were regressed against patient-centered outcomes contributing to protracted recovery including functional impairment, postoperative pain, and fatigue. Results Evoked signaling responses varied significantly and defined patient-specific pre-surgical immune states. Eighteen signaling responses correlated significantly with surgical recovery parameters (|R|=0.37–0.70; FDR<0.01). Signaling responses downstream of the TLR4 receptor in CD14+ monocytes were particularly strong correlates, accounting for 50% of observed variance. Pre-surgical immune correlates mirrored correlates previously described in post-surgical samples. Conclusion Convergent findings in pre- and post-surgical analyses provide validation of reported immune correlates and suggest a critical role of the TLR4 signaling pathway in monocytes for the clinical recovery process. The comprehensive assessment of patients’ preoperative immune state is promising for predicting important recovery parameters and may lead to clinical tests using

  6. A Statistical Correlation Between Low L-shell Electrons Measured by NOAA Satellites and Strong Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidani, C.

    2015-12-01

    More than 11 years of the Medium Energy Protons Electrons Detector data from the NOAA polar orbiting satellites were analyzed. Significant electron counting rate fluctuations were evidenced during geomagnetic quiet periods by using a set of adiabatic coordinates. Electron counting rates were compared to earthquakes by defining a seismic event L-shell obtained radially projecting the epicenter geographical positions to a given altitude. Counting rate fluctuations were grouped in every satellite semi-orbit together with strong seismic events and these were chosen with the L-shell coordinates close to each other. Electron data from July 1998 to December 2011 were compared for nearly 1,800 earthquakes with magnitudes larger than or equal to 6, occurring worldwide. When considering 30 - 100 keV energy channels by the vertical NOAA telescopes and earthquake epicenter projections at altitudes greater that 1,300 km, a 4 sigma correlation appeared where time of particle precipitations Tpp occurred 2 - 3 hour prior time of large seismic events Teq. This was in physical agreement with different correlation times obtained from past studies that considered particles with greater energies. The correlation suggested a 4-8 hour advance in preparedness of strong earthquakes influencing the ionosphere. Considering this strong correlation between earthquakes and electron rate fluctuations, and the hypothesis that such fluctuations originated with magnetic disturbances generated underground, a small scale experiment with low cost at ground level is advisable. Plans exists to perform one or more unconventional experiments around an earthquake affected area by private investor in Italy.

  7. Recent progress on correlated electron systems with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, Robert; Kin-Ho Lee, Eric; Yang, Bohm-Jung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of novel quantum ground states in correlated electron systems with strong spin-orbit coupling has been a recent subject of intensive studies. While it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling can provide non-trivial band topology in weakly interacting electron systems, as in topological insulators and semi-metals, the role of electron-electron interaction in strongly spin-orbit coupled systems has not been fully understood. The availability of new materials with significant electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling now makes such investigations possible. Many of these materials contain 5d or 4d transition metal elements; the prominent examples are iridium oxides or iridates. In this review, we succinctly discuss recent theoretical and experimental progress on this subject. After providing a brief overview, we focus on pyrochlore iridates and three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. In pyrochlore iridates, we discuss the quantum criticality of the bulk and surface states, and the relevance of the surface/boundary states in a number of topological and magnetic ground states, both in the bulk and thin film configurations. Experimental signatures of these boundary and bulk states are discussed. Domain wall formation and strongly-direction-dependent magneto-transport are also discussed. In regard to the three-dimensional honeycomb iridates, we consider possible quantum spin liquid phases and unusual magnetic orders in theoretical models with strongly bond-dependent interactions. These theoretical ideas and results are discussed in light of recent resonant x-ray scattering experiments on three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. We also contrast these results with the situation in two-dimensional honeycomb iridates. We conclude with the outlook on other related systems.

  8. Unphysical and physical solutions in many-body theories: from weak to strong correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Adrian; Romaniello, Pina; Rigamonti, Santiago; Reining, Lucia; Berger, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Many-body theory is largely based on self-consistent equations that are constructed in terms of the physical quantity of interest itself, for example the density. Therefore, the calculation of important properties such as total energies or photoemission spectra requires the solution of nonlinear equations that have unphysical and physical solutions. In this work we show in which circumstances one runs into an unphysical solution, and we indicate how one can overcome this problem. Moreover, we solve the puzzle of when and why the interacting Green’s function does not unambiguously determine the underlying system, given in terms of its potential, or non-interacting Green’s function. Our results are general since they originate from the fundamental structure of the equations. The absorption spectrum of lithium fluoride is shown as one illustration, and observations in the literature for some widely used models are explained by our approach. Our findings apply to both the weak and strong-correlation regimes. For the strong-correlation regime we show that one cannot use the expressions that are obtained from standard perturbation theory, and we suggest a different approach that is exact in the limit of strong interaction.

  9. Normalized Movement Quality Measures for Therapeutic Robots Strongly Correlate With Clinical Motor Impairment Measures

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Ozkan; O’Malley, Marcia K.; Boake, Corwin; Levin, Harvey S.; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Reistetter, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the correlations between four clinical measures (Fugl–Meyer upper extremity scale, Motor Activity Log, Action Research Arm Test, and Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test) and four robotic measures (smoothness of movement, trajectory error, average number of target hits per minute, and mean tangential speed), used to assess motor recovery. Data were gathered as part of a hybrid robotic and traditional upper extremity rehabilitation program for nine stroke patients. Smoothness of movement and trajectory error, temporally and spatially normalized measures of movement quality defined for point-to-point movements, were found to have significant moderate to strong correlations with all four of the clinical measures. The strong correlations suggest that smoothness of movement and trajectory error may be used to compare outcomes of different rehabilitation protocols and devices effectively, provide improved resolution for tracking patient progress compared to only pre-and post-treatment measurements, enable accurate adaptation of therapy based on patient progress, and deliver immediate and useful feedback to the patient and therapist. PMID:20388607

  10. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  11. Propagation of a Laguerre-Gaussian correlated Schell-model beam in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yunli; Chen, Zhaoxi; He, Yingji

    2017-04-01

    Analytical expressions for the cross-spectral density function and the second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function of a Laguerre-Gaussian correlated Schell-model (LGCSM) beam propagating in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media are derived. The propagation properties, such as beam irradiance, beam width, the spectral degree of coherence and the propagation factor of a LGCSM beam inside the media are investigated in detail. The effect of the beam parameters and the input power on the evolution properties of a LGCSM is illustrated numerically. It is found that the beam width varies periodically or keeps invariant for a certain proper input power. And both the beam irradiance and the spectral degree of coherence of the LGCSM beam change periodically with the propagation distance for the arbitrary input power which however has no influence on the propagation factor. The coherent length and the mode order mainly affect the evolution speed of the LGCSM beam in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  12. Strong Correlation among Three Biodosimetry Techniques Following Exposures to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-Mo; Yun, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hanna; Kim, Cha Soon

    2016-01-01

    Three in vitro dose calibration curves for biodosimetry such as dicentric chromosome assay, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay for translocation, and micronuclei (MNs) in binucleated cell assay were established after exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocyte samples obtained from healthy donors were irradiated with 60Co source at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min to doses of 0.1–6 Gy. The results from three in vitro dose calibration curves for biodosimetry were analyzed to understand the relationship among biodosimetry assay techniques. Our comparison demonstrates that there is a very strong positive correlation among the dicentric assay, FISH, and MNs analysis, and these three biodosimetry assays strongly support the in vitro dose reconstruction and the emergency preparedness of public or occupational radiation overexposure. PMID:28217287

  13. The quest for stiff, strong and tough hybrid materials: an exhaustive exploration

    PubMed Central

    Barthelat, F.; Mirkhalaf, M.

    2013-01-01

    How to arrange soft materials with strong but brittle reinforcements to achieve attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness is an ongoing and fascinating question in engineering and biological materials science. Recent advances in topology optimization and bioinspiration have brought interesting answers to this question, but they provide only small windows into the vast design space associated with this problem. Here, we take a more global approach in which we assess the mechanical performance of thousands of possible microstructures. This exhaustive exploration gives a global picture of structure–property relationships and guarantees that global optima can be found. Landscapes of optimum solutions for different combinations of desired properties can also be created, revealing the robustness of each of the solutions. Interestingly, while some of the major hybrid designs used in engineering are absent from the set of solutions, the microstructures emerging from this process are reminiscent of materials, such as bone, nacre or spider silk. PMID:24068176

  14. Understanding Strongly Correlated Materials thru Theory Algorithms and High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotliar, Gabriel

    A long standing challenge in condensed matter physics is the prediction of physical properties of materials starting from first principles. In the past two decades, substantial advances have taken place in this area. The combination of modern implementations of electronic structure methods in conjunction with Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT), in combination with advanced impurity solvers, modern computer codes and massively parallel computers, are giving new system specific insights into the properties of strongly correlated electron systems enable the calculations of experimentally measurable correlation functions. The predictions of this ''theoretical spectroscopy'' can be directly compared with experimental results. In this talk I will briefly outline the state of the art of the methodology, and illustrate it with an example the origin of the solid state anomalies of elemental Plutonium.

  15. Theoretical development and first-principles analysis of strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen

    A variety of quantum many-body methods have been developed for studying the strongly correlated electron systems. We have also proposed a computationally efficient and accurate approach, named the correlation matrix renormalization (CMR) method to address the challenges. The theoretic development and benchmark tests of the CMR method are included in this thesis. Meanwhile, ground state total energy is the most important property of electronic calculations. We also investigated an alternative approach to calculate the total energy, and extended this method for magnetic anisotropy energy of ferromagnetic materials. In addition, another theoretical tool, dynamical mean-field theory on top of the density functional theory, has also been used in electronic structure calculations for an Iridium oxide to study the phase transition, which results from an interplay of the d electrons' internal degrees of freedom.

  16. Feshbach Prize: New Phenomena and New Physics from Strongly-Correlated Quantum Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Strongly correlated quantum matter is ubiquitous in physics from cold atoms to nuclei to the cold dense matter found in neutron stars. Experiments from table-top to the extremely large scale experiments including FRIB and LIGO will help determine the properties of matter across an incredible scale of distances and energies. Questions to be addressed include the existence of exotic states of matter in cold atoms and nuclei, the response of this correlated matter to external probes, and the behavior of matter in extreme astrophysical environments. A more complete understanding is required, both to understand these diverse phenomena and to employ this understanding to probe for new underlying physics in experiments including neutrinoless double beta decay and accelerator neutrino experiments. I will summarize some aspects of our present understanding and highlight several important prospects for the future.

  17. Metallic quantum well states in artificial structures of strongly correlated oxide.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, K; Horiba, K; Kumigashira, H; Yoshida, T; Fujimori, A; Oshima, M

    2011-07-15

    The quantum confinement of strongly correlated electrons in artificial structures provides a platform for studying the behavior of correlated Fermi-liquid states in reduced dimensions. We report the creation and control of two-dimensional electron-liquid states in ultrathin films of SrVO(3) grown on Nb:SrTiO(3) substrates, which are artificial oxide structures that can be varied in thickness by single monolayers. Angle-resolved photoemission from the SrVO(3)/Nb:SrTiO(3) samples shows metallic quantum well states that are adequately described by the well-known phase-shift quantization rule. The observed quantum well states in SrVO(3) ultrathin films exhibit distinctive features--such as orbital-selective quantization originating from the anisotropic orbital character of the V 3d states and unusual band renormalization of the subbands near the Fermi level--that reflect complex interactions in the quantum well.

  18. Strong correlation between early stage atherosclerosis and electromechanical coupling of aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Yan, F.; Niu, L. L.; Chen, Q. N.; Zheng, H. R.; Li, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases that are responsible for many deaths in the world, and the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is highly desirable. The existing imaging methods, however, are not capable of detecting the early stage of atherosclerosis development due to their limited spatial resolution. Using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), we show that the piezoelectric response of an aortic wall increases as atherosclerosis advances, while the stiffness of the aorta shows a less evident correlation with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we show that there is strong correlation between the coercive electric field necessary to switch the polarity of the artery and the development of atherosclerosis. Thus by measuring the electromechanical coupling of the aortic wall, it is possible to probe atherosclerosis at the early stage of its development, not only improving the spatial resolution by orders of magnitude, but also providing comprehensive quantitative information on the biomechanical properties of the artery.

  19. Electronic structure of strongly correlated materials: from one-particle to many-body theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, F.; Aryasetiawan, F.

    2017-03-01

    One of the great challenges of modern condensed matter theory is to develop reliable and practical methods for describing the electronic structure of strongly correlated materials fully from first principles. It has been known for a long time that the widely used Kohn–Sham density functional theory within the local density approximation (LDA) often fails for these systems. This paper describes the theoretical development of including electron correlations beyond the LDA with emphasis on ab initio methods, starting from the highly successful LDA+U and the many-body Green’s function-based GW method to the state-of-the-art combination of dynamical mean-field theory and GW. Apart from reviewing the development so far we also present some previously unpublished results.

  20. Application of strong zerotrees to compression of correlated MRI image sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloveyko, Olexandr M.; Musatenko, Yurij S.; Kurashov, Vitalij N.; Dubikovskiy, Vladislav A.

    2001-08-01

    It is known that gainful interframe compression of magnetic resonance(MR) image set is quite difficult problem. Only few authors reported gain in performance of compressors like that comparing to separate compression of every MR image from the set (intraframe compression). Known reasons of such a situation are significant noise in MR images and presence of only low frequency correlations in images of the set. Recently we suggested new method of correlated image set compression based on Karhunen-Loeve(KL) transform and special EZW compression scheme with strong zerotrees(KLSEZW). KLSEZW algorithm showed good results in compression of video sequences with low and middle motion even without motion compensation. The paper presents successful application of the basic method and its modification to interframe MR image compression problem.

  1. Critical exponents of strongly correlated fermion systems from diagrammatic multiscale methods.

    PubMed

    Antipov, Andrey E; Gull, Emanuel; Kirchner, Stefan

    2014-06-06

    Self-consistent dynamical approximations for strongly correlated fermion systems are particularly successful in capturing the dynamical competition of local correlations. In these, the effect of spatially extended degrees of freedom is usually only taken into account in a mean field fashion or as a secondary effect. As a result, critical exponents associated with phase transitions have a mean field character. Here we demonstrate that diagrammatic multiscale methods anchored around local approximations are indeed capable of capturing the non-mean-field nature of the critical point of the lattice model encoded in a nonvanishing anomalous dimension and of correctly describing the transition to mean-field-like behavior as the number of spatial dimensions increases.

  2. Effect of correlations on heat transport in a magnetized strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, T.; Bonitz, M.; Donkó, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In a classical ideal plasma, a magnetic field is known to reduce the heat conductivity perpendicular to the field, whereas it does not alter the one along the field. Here we show that, in strongly correlated plasmas that are observed at high pressure and/or low temperature, a magnetic field reduces the perpendicular heat transport much less and even enhances the parallel transport. These surprising observations are explained by the competition of kinetic, potential, and collisional contributions to the heat conductivity. Our results are based on first-principle molecular dynamics simulations of a one-component plasma.

  3. Few-particle systems: An analysis of some strongly correlated states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberán, N.; Taron, J.

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of the quantum Hall response of a small system of interacting ultracold bosonic atoms through the variation of its Hall resistivity against the applied gauge magnetic field provides a powerful method to unmask its strongly correlated states in a quite exhaustive way. Within a fixed range of values of the magnetic field in the lowest Landau-level regime, where the resistivity displays two successive plateaux, we identify the implied states as the Pfaffian and the state with filling factor ν =2 /3 in the thermodynamic limit. We fix the conditions to have good observability.

  4. Density of hole-doped states in strongly correlated electron systems of copper oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, S.G. )

    1994-04-01

    A generalized tight-binding method to calculate quasiparticle band structure and density of states in strongly correlated systems is presented. The band structures of undoped and weakly hole-doped CuO[sub 2] layer are calculated. The insulator gap has a charge transfer nature with a minor contribution from a Cu-O Coulomb interaction. Doping results in the appearance of an in-gap state with a simultaneous decrease of the density of states at the band edges in agreement with small cluster results and experimental data.

  5. Effects of the orbital self-interaction in both strongly and weakly correlated systems.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2009-02-07

    The orbital occupation, which is the centerpiece of both self-interaction and several metal-insulator transition analyses, as well as of the local density or generalized gradient approximation with a Hubbard term, is not well defined, in the sense that it is partially ambiguous. A general treatment can be applied to both strongly and weakly correlated systems. When it is applied to an intermediate- and partially filled band within of the host semiconductor gap whose width is less than the semiconductor gap, the original single band can either split as in a Mott transition or not. The former situation is usual and almost always generalized. However the latter also takes place and results from a dilution effect of the self-interaction where a large orbital correlation is reduced if there are other orbital contributions with lower self-interaction in the band. The key is in the choice of the subspace of correlated orbitals. This effect can neither be ignored nor discarded for those systems where there is a substantial mix of states. Examples of these behaviors will be presented and compared to other results. Moreover, the combination of different Hubbard terms acting on different atomic state subspaces can also be used to correct the spurious self-interaction of the bands and the gap underestimation. The relationship between these terms applied to different subspaces of correlated electrons will be presented.

  6. Spectral functions of strongly correlated extended systems via an exact quantum embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, George H.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2015-04-01

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 186404 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.186404], introduced an approach to quantum cluster embedding methods whereby the mapping of strongly correlated bulk problems to an impurity with finite set of bath states was rigorously formulated to exactly reproduce the entanglement of the ground state. The formalism provided similar physics to dynamical mean-field theory at a tiny fraction of the cost but was inherently limited by the construction of a bath designed to reproduce ground-state, static properties. Here, we generalize the concept of quantum embedding to dynamic properties and demonstrate accurate bulk spectral functions at similarly small computational cost. The proposed spectral DMET utilizes the Schmidt decomposition of a response vector, mapping the bulk dynamic correlation functions to that of a quantum impurity cluster coupled to a set of frequency-dependent bath states. The resultant spectral functions are obtained on the real-frequency axis, without bath discretization error, and allows for the construction of arbitrary dynamic correlation functions. We demonstrate the method on the one- (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model, where we obtain zero temperature and thermodynamic limit spectral functions, and show the trivial extension to two-particle Green's functions. This advance therefore extends the scope and applicability of DMET in condensed-matter problems as a computationally tractable route to correlated spectral functions of extended systems and provides a competitive alternative to dynamical mean-field theory for dynamic quantities.

  7. Image denoising by exploring external and internal correlations.

    PubMed

    Yue, Huanjing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Single image denoising suffers from limited data collection within a noisy image. In this paper, we propose a novel image denoising scheme, which explores both internal and external correlations with the help of web images. For each noisy patch, we build internal and external data cubes by finding similar patches from the noisy and web images, respectively. We then propose reducing noise by a two-stage strategy using different filtering approaches. In the first stage, since the noisy patch may lead to inaccurate patch selection, we propose a graph based optimization method to improve patch matching accuracy in external denoising. The internal denoising is frequency truncation on internal cubes. By combining the internal and external denoising patches, we obtain a preliminary denoising result. In the second stage, we propose reducing noise by filtering of external and internal cubes, respectively, on transform domain. In this stage, the preliminary denoising result not only enhances the patch matching accuracy but also provides reliable estimates of filtering parameters. The final denoising image is obtained by fusing the external and internal filtering results. Experimental results show that our method constantly outperforms state-of-the-art denoising schemes in both subjective and objective quality measurements, e.g., it achieves >2 dB gain compared with BM3D at a wide range of noise levels.

  8. Exploring Jet-Hadron correlations at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Joel

    2016-08-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the conditions are met to produce the hot and dense, strongly interacting medium known as the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The QGP, a state of matter created shortly after the Big Bang, is a phase where the deconfinement of quarks and gluons is hypothesized. Jets, the collimated sprays of hadrons from fragmenting partons, are a key probe of the medium. The experimental methods used for jet measurements at ALICE to remove, reduce, and correct for the underlying background event will be presented. In pp collisions, jet production is well understood within the framework of perturbative QCD and acts as a rigorous baseline measurement for jet quenching measurements. By comparing to heavy ion collision systems, we can study the suppression of the number of jets seen and study the modification of the pT or angular distributions of jet fragments. Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a full (charged + neutral) reconstructed (trigger) jet in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in ALICE will be presented here. Newly developed combinatoric background subtraction methods and their improvement compared to prior techniques will be discussed.

  9. Structure-processing-property relationships and thermoelectricity in strongly correlated cerium-tri(palladium) and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boona, Stephen Richard

    The discovery of high performance thermoelectric materials would enable the development of a wide range of new thermal and electrical energy management technologies, including the possibility of solid state cryogenic coolers. Such discoveries have been sharply inhibited to date, however, by the contraindicated nature of the material properties that comprise the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. Enhancement of ZT generally requires overcoming significant materials science and engineering challenges that become even more restrictive at low temperatures. One possible approach for overcoming these challenges is to shift away from conventional semiconductors and toward strongly correlated electron materials, as these systems often display unusual combinations of electronic and thermal properties that may be exploited to achieve high ZT in the cryogenic temperature regime. This perspective has motivated the current work, in which the thermoelectric properties of strongly correlated CePd3 and related compounds are explored. This work presents a comprehensive and systematic study of the ways in which composition and processing modifications affect the electronic, thermal, magnetic, and structural properties of these materials. The insights gained from this study have led to the highest ZT value reported to date of all p-type bulk polycrystalline materials at low temperatures. A detailed review of these developments is provided along with a discussion of how they may be applied to achieve further enhancements in ZT.

  10. Unstable shear flows in two dimensional strongly correlated liquids - a hydrodynamic and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2016-11-01

    In Navier-Stokes fluids, shear flows are known to become unstable leading to instability and eventually to turbulence. A class of flow namely, Kolmogorov Flows (K-Flows) exhibit such transition at low Reynolds number. Using fluid and molecular dynamics, we address the physics of transition from laminar to turbulent regime in strongly correlated-liquids such as in multi-species plasmas and also in naturally occurring plasmas with K-Flows as initial condition. A 2D phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic model is invoked wherein the effect of strong correlations is incorporated via a viscoelastic memory. To study the stability of K-Flows or in general any shear flow, a generalized eigenvalue solver has been developed along with a spectral solver for the full nonlinear set of fluid equations. A study of the linear and nonlinear features of K-Flow in incompressible and compressible limit exhibits cyclicity and nonlinear pattern formation in vorticity. A first principles based molecular dynamics simulation of particles interacting via Yukawa potential is performed with features such as configurational and kinetic thermostats for K-Flows. This work reveals several interesting similarities and differences between hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics studies.

  11. Ensemble DFT Approach to Excited States of Strongly Correlated Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (DFT) is a novel time-independent formalism for obtaining excitation energies of many-body fermionic systems. A considerable advantage of ensemble DFT over the more common Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT and time-dependent DFT formalisms is that it enables one to account for strong non-dynamic electron correlation in the ground and excited states of molecular systems in a transparent and accurate fashion. Despite its positive aspects, ensemble DFT has not so far found its way into the repertoire of methods of modern computational chemistry, probably because of the perceived lack of practically affordable implementations of the theory. The spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method is perhaps the first computationally feasible implementation of the ideas behind ensemble DFT which enables one to describe accurately electronic transitions in a wide class of molecular systems, including strongly correlated molecules (biradicals, molecules undergoing bond breaking/formation), extended π-conjugated systems, donor-acceptor charge transfer adducts, etc.

  12. Femtosecond switching of magnetism via strongly correlated spin-charge quantum excitations.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianqi; Patz, Aaron; Mouchliadis, Leonidas; Yan, Jiaqiang; Lograsso, Thomas A; Perakis, Ilias E; Wang, Jigang

    2013-04-04

    The technological demand to push the gigahertz (10(9) hertz) switching speed limit of today's magnetic memory and logic devices into the terahertz (10(12) hertz) regime underlies the entire field of spin-electronics and integrated multi-functional devices. This challenge is met by all-optical magnetic switching based on coherent spin manipulation. By analogy to femtosecond chemistry and photosynthetic dynamics--in which photoproducts of chemical and biochemical reactions can be influenced by creating suitable superpositions of molecular states--femtosecond-laser-excited coherence between electronic states can switch magnetic order by 'suddenly' breaking the delicate balance between competing phases of correlated materials: for example, manganites exhibiting colossal magneto-resistance suitable for applications. Here we show femtosecond (10(-15) seconds) photo-induced switching from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, by observing the establishment (within about 120 femtoseconds) of a huge temperature-dependent magnetization with photo-excitation threshold behaviour absent in the optical reflectivity. The development of ferromagnetic correlations during the femtosecond laser pulse reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, distinguished from the picosecond (10(-12) seconds) lattice-heating regime characterized by phase separation without threshold behaviour. Our simulations reproduce the nonlinear femtosecond spin generation and underpin fast quantum spin-flip fluctuations correlated with coherent superpositions of electronic states to initiate local ferromagnetic correlations. These results merge two fields, femtosecond magnetism in metals and band insulators, and non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons, in which local interactions exceeding the kinetic energy produce a complex balance of competing orders.

  13. Strong correlation between the 6-minute walk test and accelerometry functional outcomes in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Zoe E; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J; Walker, Karen Z; Truby, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Accelerometry provides information on habitual physical capability that may be of value in the assessment of function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This preliminary investigation describes the relationship between community ambulation measured by the StepWatch activity monitor and the current standard of functional assessment, the 6-minute walk test, in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 13). All participants completed a 6-minute walk test and wore the StepWatch™ monitor for 5 consecutive days. Both the 6-minute walk test and StepWatch accelerometry identified a decreased capacity for ambulation in boys with Duchenne compared to healthy controls. There were strong, significant correlations between 6-minute walk distance and all StepWatch parameters in affected boys only (r = 0.701-0.804). These data proffer intriguing observations that warrant further exploration. Specifically, accelerometry outcomes may compliment the 6-minute walk test in assessment of therapeutic interventions for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. Incoherent Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Recurrences and Unconstrained Thermalization Mediated by Strong Phase Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasoni, M.; Garnier, J.; Rumpf, B.; Sugny, D.; Fatome, J.; Amrani, F.; Millot, G.; Picozzi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The long-standing and controversial Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem addresses fundamental issues of statistical physics, and the attempt to resolve the mystery of the recurrences has led to many great discoveries, such as chaos, integrable systems, and soliton theory. From a general perspective, the recurrence is commonly considered as a coherent phase-sensitive effect that originates in the property of integrability of the system. In contrast to this interpretation, we show that convection among a pair of waves is responsible for a new recurrence phenomenon that takes place for strongly incoherent waves far from integrability. We explain the incoherent recurrence by developing a nonequilibrium spatiotemporal kinetic formulation that accounts for the existence of phase correlations among incoherent waves. The theory reveals that the recurrence originates in a novel form of modulational instability, which shows that strongly correlated fluctuations are spontaneously created among the random waves. Contrary to conventional incoherent modulational instabilities, we find that Landau damping can be completely suppressed, which unexpectedly removes the threshold of the instability. Consequently, the recurrence can take place for strongly incoherent waves and is thus characterized by a reduction of nonequilibrium entropy that violates the H theorem of entropy growth. In its long-term evolution, the system enters a secondary turbulent regime characterized by an irreversible process of relaxation to equilibrium. At variance with the expected thermalization described by standard Gibbsian statistical mechanics, our thermalization process is not dictated by the usual constraints of energy and momentum conservation: The inverse temperatures associated with energy and momentum are zero. This unveils a previously unrecognized scenario of unconstrained thermalization, which is relevant to a variety of weakly dispersive wave systems. Our work should stimulate the development of new

  15. SO(8) fermion dynamical symmetry and strongly correlated quantum Hall states in monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Murphy, Matthew; Guidry, Mike

    2017-03-01

    A formalism is presented for treating strongly correlated graphene quantum Hall states in terms of an SO(8) fermion dynamical symmetry that includes pairing as well as particle-hole generators. The graphene SO(8) algebra is isomorphic to an SO(8) algebra that has found broad application in nuclear physics, albeit with physically very different generators, and exhibits a strong formal similarity to SU(4) symmetries that have been proposed to describe high-temperature superconductors. The well-known SU(4) symmetry of quantum Hall ferromagnetism for single-layer graphene is recovered as one subgroup of SO(8), but the dynamical symmetry structure associated with the full set of SO(8) subgroup chains extends quantum Hall ferromagnetism and allows analytical many-body solutions for a rich set of collective states exhibiting spontaneously broken symmetry that may be important for the low-energy physics of graphene in strong magnetic fields. The SO(8) symmetry permits a natural definition of generalized coherent states that correspond to symmetry-constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solutions, or equivalently a microscopically derived Ginzburg-Landau formalism, exhibiting the interplay between competing spontaneously broken symmetries in determining the ground state.

  16. Effect of charge on the ferroelectric field effect in strongly correlated oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuegang; Xiao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Zhang, Le; Zhao, Weiwei; Xu, Xiaoshan; Hong, Xia

    We present a systematic study of the effect of charge on the ferroelectric field effect modulation of various strongly correlated oxide materials. We have fabricated high quality epitaxial heterostructures composed of a ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) gate and a correlated oxide channel, including Sm0.5Nd0.5NiO3 (SNNO), La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO), SNNO/LSMO bilayers, and NiCo2O4 (NCO). The Hall effect measurements reveal a carrier density of ~4 holes/u.c. (0.4 cm2V-1s-1) for SNNO to ~2 holes/u.c. (27 cm2V-1s-1) for NCO. We find the magnitude of the field effect is closely related to both the intrinsic carrier density and carrier mobility of the channel material. For devices employing the SNNO/LSMO bilayer channel, we believe the charge transfer between the two correlated oxides play an important role in the observed resistance modulation. The screening capacitor of the channel materials and the interfacial defect states also have significant impact on the retention characteristics of the field effect. Our study reveals the critical role of charge in determining the interfacial coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic oxides, and has important implications in developing ferroelectric-controlled Mott memory devices.

  17. Density-functional theory of strongly correlated Fermi gases in elongated harmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianlong, Gao; Polini, Marco; Asgari, Reza; Tosi, M. P.

    2006-03-01

    Two-component Fermi gases with tunable repulsive or attractive interactions inside quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) harmonic wells may soon become the cleanest laboratory realizations of strongly correlated Luttiger and Luther-Emery liquids under confinement. We present a microscopic Kohn-Sham density-functional theory of these systems, with specific attention to a gas on the approach to a confinement-induced Feshbach resonance. The theory employs the one-dimensional Gaudin-Yang model as the reference system and transfers the appropriate Q1D ground-state correlations to the confined inhomogeneous gas via a suitable local-density approximation to the exchange and correlation energy functional. Quantitative understanding of the role of the interactions in the bulk shell structure of the axial density profile is thereby achieved. While repulsive intercomponent interactions depress the amplitude of the shell structure of the noninteracting gas, attractive interactions stabilize atomic-density waves through spin pairing. These should be clearly observable in atomic clouds containing of the order of up to 100 atoms.

  18. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  19. Information geometry with correlated data: Bayesian explorations of cosmological predictions for the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine; de Bernardis, Francesco; Niemack, Michael; Sethna, James

    We developed a new, generalized fitting algorithm for miltiparameter models which incorporates varying and correlated errors. This was combined with geometrical methods of sampling to explore model prediction space, notably to plot geodesics and determine the size and edges of the model manifold. We illustrate this using the microwave background spectra for all possible universes, as described by the standard Λ-cold dark matter (Λ-CDM) cosmological model. In this case, the predicted data are fluctuations and highly correlated with varying errors, resulting in a manifold with a varying metric (as the natural metric to use is given by the Fisher information matrix). Furthermore, the model manifold shares the hyperribbon structure seen in other models, with the edges forming a strongly distorted image of a hypercube. Practical applications of such an analysis include optimizing experimental instrumentation designed to test more detailed cosmological theories. Funding supported in part by NSERC.

  20. Weak and strong publics: drawing on Nancy Fraser to explore parental participation in neonatal networks

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Andrew J.; Lewando‐Hundt, Gillian; Blaxter, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims  We draw on the work of Nancy Fraser, and in particular her concepts of weak and strong publics, to analyze the process of parental involvement in managed neonatal network boards. Background  Public involvement has moved beyond the individual level to include greater involvement of both patients and the public in governance. However, there is relatively little literature that explores the nature and outcomes of long‐term patient involvement initiatives or has attempted to theorize, particularly at the level of corporate decision making, the process of patient and public involvement. Methods  A repeated survey of all neonatal network managers in England was carried out in 2006–07 to capture developments and changes in parental representation over this time period. This elicited information about the current status of parent representation on neonatal network boards. Four networks were also selected as case studies. This involved interviews with key members of each network board, interviews with parent representatives, observation of meetings and access to board minutes. Results  Data collected show that a wide range of approaches to involving parents has been adopted. These range from decisions not to involve parents at this level to relatively well‐developed systems designed to link parent representatives on network boards to parents in neonatal units. Conclusion  Despite these variations, we suggest that parental participation within neonatal services remains an example of a weak public because the parent representatives had limited participation with little influence on decision making. PMID:22040481

  1. Pseudogap formation and quantum phase transition in strongly-correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Chyh-Hong

    2014-11-15

    Pseudogap formation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in strongly-correlated superconductors, for example cuprates, heavy-fermion superconductors, and iron pnictides. As the system is cooled, an energy gap opens in the excitation spectrum before entering the superconducting phase. The origin of formation and the relevancy to the superconductivity remain unclear, which is the most challenging problem in condensed matter physics. Here, using the cuprate as a model, we demonstrate that the formation of pseudogap is due to a massive gauge interaction between electrons, where the mass of the gauge boson, determining the interaction length scale, is the consequence of the remnant antiferromagnetic fluctuation inherited from the parent compounds. Extracting from experimental data, we predict that there is a quantum phase transition belonging to the 2D XY universality class at the critical doping where pseudogap transition vanishes.

  2. Virial expansion for a strongly correlated Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2010-10-01

    Quantum virial expansion provides an ideal tool to investigate the high-temperature properties of a strongly correlated Fermi gas. Here, we construct the virial expansion in the presence of spin-population imbalance. Up to the third order, we calculate the high-temperature free energy of a unitary Fermi gas as a function of spin imbalance, with infinitely large attractive or repulsive interactions. In the latter repulsive case, we show that there is no itinerant ferromagnetism when quantum virial expansion is applicable. We therefore estimate an upper bound for the ferromagnetic transition temperature Tc. For a harmonically trapped Fermi gas at unitarity, we find that (Tc)upper

  3. Strong correlation in 1D oxygen-ion conduction of apatite-type lanthanum silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, Kouta; Toyoura, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Atsutomo; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Oxygen-ion conduction in apatite-type lanthanum silicate, La9.33+0.67x (SiO4)6O2+x (x = 1), has theoretically been analyzed in a first-principles manner followed by the nudged elastic band method and the kinetic Monte Carlo method. Unlike the conventional cooperative interstitialcy mechanism along the single O4 columns, diffusing interstitial oxygen ions are frequently blocked by adjacent interstitial oxygen ions (Oint ions), leading to the strongly-correlated diffusivity and conductivity of oxygen ions in the case of chemical compositions with large x values. The getting-out mechanism from the O4 column is of importance in the long-range conduction, which temporarily transfers a part of Oint ions out of the columns to relax the blocking effect. The getting-out mechanism plays a key role also in the conduction perpendicular to the c axis (in the ab plane).

  4. Pure density functional for strong correlation and the thermodynamic limit from machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Baker, Thomas E.; White, Steven R.; Burke, Kieron

    2016-12-01

    We use the density-matrix renormalization group, applied to a one-dimensional model of continuum Hamiltonians, to accurately solve chains of hydrogen atoms of various separations and numbers of atoms. We train and test a machine-learned approximation to F [n ] , the universal part of the electronic density functional, to within quantum chemical accuracy. We also develop a data-driven, atom-centered basis set for densities which greatly reduces the computational cost and accurately represents the physical information in the machine-learning calculation. Our calculation (a) bypasses the standard Kohn-Sham approach, avoiding the need to find orbitals, (b) includes the strong correlation of highly stretched bonds without any specific difficulty (unlike all standard DFT approximations), and (c) is so accurate that it can be used to find the energy in the thermodynamic limit to quantum chemical accuracy.

  5. Hot electron transport in a strongly correlated transition-metal oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kumari Gaurav; Yajima, Takeaki; Parui, Subir; Kemper, Alexander F.; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Banerjee, Tamalika

    2013-01-01

    Oxide heterointerfaces are ideal for investigating strong correlation effects to electron transport, relevant for oxide-electronics. Using hot-electrons, we probe electron transport perpendicular to the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO)- Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) interface and find the characteristic hot-electron attenuation length in LSMO to be 1.48 ± 0.10 unit cells (u.c.) at −1.9 V, increasing to 2.02 ± 0.16 u.c. at −1.3 V at room temperature. Theoretical analysis of this energy dispersion reveals the dominance of electron-electron and polaron scattering. Direct visualization of the local electron transport shows different transmission at the terraces and at the step-edges. PMID:23429420

  6. Local structural evidence for strong electronic correlations in spinel LiRh2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, K. R.; Abeykoon, A. M. M.; Zheng, H.; Yin, W.-G.; Tsvelik, A. M.; Mitchell, J. F.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Bozin, E. S.

    2013-11-01

    The local structure of the spinel LiRh2O4 has been studied using atomic-pair distribution function analysis of powder x-ray diffraction data. This measurement is sensitive to the presence of short Rh-Rh bonds that form due to dimerization of Rh4+ ions on the pyrochlore sublattice, independent of the existence of long-range order. We show that structural dimers exist in the low-temperature phase, as previously supposed, with a bond shortening of Δr˜0.15 Å. The dimers persist up to 350 K, well above the insulator-metal transition, with Δr decreasing in magnitude on warming. Such behavior is inconsistent with the Fermi-surface nesting-driven Peierls transition model. Instead, we argue that LiRh2O4 should properly be described as a strongly correlated system.

  7. Infrared and Terahertz Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated Electron Systems under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Okamura, Hidekazu

    2013-02-01

    Owing to its high brilliance, infrared and terahertz synchrotron radiation (IR/THz-SR) has emerged as a powerful tool for spectroscopy under extreme (i.e., technically more difficult) experimental conditions such as high pressure, high magnetic field, high spatial resolution, and a combination of these. The methodologies for pressure- and magnetic-field-dependent spectroscopy and microscopy using IR/THz-SR have advanced rapidly worldwide. By applying them to strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs), many experimental studies have been performed on their electronic structures and phonon/molecular vibration modes under extreme conditions. Here, we review the recent progress of methodologies of IR/THz-SR spectroscopy and microscopy, and the experimental results on SCESs and other systems obtained under extreme conditions.

  8. Nonperturbative emergence of the Dirac fermion in a strongly correlated composite Fermi liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yibin; Luo, Xi; Yu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    The classic composite fermion field theory [B. I. Halperin, P. A. Lee, and N. Read, Phys. Rev. B 47, 7312 (1993)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.47.7312 builds up an excellent framework to uniformly study important physical objects and globally explain anomalous experimental phenomena in fractional quantum Hall physics while there are also inherent weaknesses. We present a nonperturbative emergent Dirac fermion theory from this strongly correlated composite fermion field theory, which overcomes these serious long-standing shortcomings. The particle-hole symmetry of the Dirac equation resolves this particle-hole symmetry enigma in the composite fermion field theory. With the help of presented numerical data, we show that for main Jain's sequences of fractional quantum Hall effects, this emergent Dirac fermion theory in mean field approximation is most likely stable.

  9. Nonadiabatic creation of macroscopic superpositions with strongly correlated one-dimensional bosons in a ring trap

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, C.; Minguzzi, A.; Hekking, F. W. J.

    2011-11-15

    We consider a strongly interacting quasi-one-dimensional Bose gas on a tight ring trap subjected to a localized barrier potential. We explore the possibility of forming a macroscopic superposition of a rotating and a nonrotating state under nonequilibrium conditions, achieved by a sudden quench of the barrier velocity. Using an exact solution for the dynamical evolution in the impenetrable-boson (Tonks-Girardeau) limit, we find an expression for the many-body wave function corresponding to a superposition state. The superposition is formed when the barrier velocity is tuned close to multiples of an integer or half-integer number of Coriolis flux quanta. As a consequence of the strong interactions, we find that (i) the state of the system can be mapped onto a macroscopic superposition of two Fermi spheres rather than two macroscopically occupied single-particle states as in a weakly interacting gas, and (ii) the barrier velocity should be larger than the sound velocity to better discriminate the two components of the superposition.

  10. Signatures of strong correlation effects in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies on cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wan-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Ju; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, spin excitations in doped cuprates have been measured using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The paramagnon dispersions show the large hardening effect in the electron-doped systems and seemingly doping independence in the hole-doped systems, with the energy scales comparable to that of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) magnons. This anomalous hardening effect and the lack of softening were partially explained by using the strong-coupling t -J model but with a three-site term [Nat. Commun. 5, 3314 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms4314], although the hardening effect is already present even without the latter. By considering the t -t'-t''-J model and using the slave-boson mean-field theory, we obtain, via the spin-spin susceptibility, the spin excitations in qualitative agreement with the experiments. The doping-dependent bandwidth due to the strong correlation physics is the origin of the hardening effect. We also show that dispersions in the AFM regime, different from those in the paramagnetic (PM) regime, hardly vary with dopant density. These excitations are mainly collective in nature instead of particle-hole-like. We further discuss the interplay and different contributions of these two kinds of excitations in the PM phase and show that the dominance of the collective excitation increases with decreasing dopant concentrations.

  11. Dynamic equilibrium of collective degrees of freedom in strongly correlated quantum matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfle, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Strongly correlated quantum systems may assume states stabilized by dynamic equilibrium of competing collective degrees of freedom. As a first example we consider the Kondo effect, which may be viewed as governed by a subtle balance of an infinite growth of the exchange coupling constant controled by an increasing local spin relaxation rate, leading to a Fermi liquid stable fixed point at low temperatures. As a second example the quantum critical behavior in antiferromagnetic metals will be considered. It is often found experimentally that the quasiparticle effective mass appears to diverge at the quantum critical point in spite of the fact that the critical spin fluctuations seem to be in the weak coupling domain - a contradiction. It will be shown that the feedback of the diverging mass into the spin fluctuation spectrum allows to establish a balance of the fermionic and bosonic singular degrees of freedom, leading to strong-coupling type quantum critical behavior. The resulting self-consistent theory obeys hyper-scaling of the dominant fermionic degrees of freedom, while the bosonic interaction is still in the weak coupling domain. Excellent agreement is found with experiment for the two candidate cases CeCu6-xAux and YbRh2Si2.

  12. Feature Article: Understanding strongly correlated many-body systems with quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, Catia; Rigol, Marcos; Muramatsu, Alejandro

    2005-08-01

    The cover picture of the current issue, taken from the Feature Article [1], depicts the evolution of local density (a) and its quantum fluctuations (b) in trapped fermions on one-dimensional optical lattices. As the number of fermions in the trap is increased, figure (a) shows the formation of a Mott-insulating plateau (local density equal to one) whereas the quantum fluctuations - see figure (b) - are strongly suppressed, but nonzero. For a larger number of fermions new insulating plateaus appear (this time with local density equal to two), but no density fluctuations. Regions with non-constant density are metallic and exhibit large quantum fluctuations of the density.The first author Catia Lavalle is a Postdoc at the University of Stuttgart. She works in the field of strongly correlated quantum systems by means of Quantum Monte Carlo methods (QMC). While working on her PhD thesis at the University of Stuttgart, she developed a new QMC technique that allows to study dynamical properties of the t-J model.

  13. Strain-Controlled Transport Mechanism in Strongly Correlated LaNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, D.; Kundu, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    A density functional theory + Hubbard U (DFT + U) method is employed to investigate the effect of strain on the electronic and transport properties of the correlated metal LaNiO3. LaNiO3 without strain is characterized by a low temperature Fermi liquid behaviour of resistivity, a negative Seebeck coefficient and a positive Hall coefficient. Density of states, resistivity, thermopower and Hall coefficient obtained within the DFT + U approach reveal that LaNiO3 under both compressive and tensile strain is more metallic compared to the unstrained system. However, LaNiO3 under tensile strain is found to be more strongly correlated than that under compressive strain. Electron localization function calculation shows that there is a substantial increase in the covalent part of the chemical bonding, which corroborates an increase in the resistivity for LaNiO3 under tensile strain. Our first-principle-based calculation clearly demonstrates that the transport properties of LaNiO3 can be tuned by applying suitable strain.

  14. Variation in Rural African Gut Microbiota Is Strongly Correlated with Colonization by Entamoeba and Subsistence

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Elise R.; Lynch, Joshua; Froment, Alain; Lafosse, Sophie; Heyer, Evelyne; Przeworski, Molly; Blekhman, Ran; Ségurel, Laure

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is impacted by host nutrition and health status and therefore represents a potentially adaptive phenotype influenced by metabolic and immune constraints. Previous studies contrasting rural populations in developing countries to urban industrialized ones have shown that industrialization is strongly correlated with patterns in human gut microbiota; however, we know little about the relative contribution of factors such as climate, diet, medicine, hygiene practices, host genetics, and parasitism. Here, we focus on fine-scale comparisons of African rural populations in order to (i) contrast the gut microbiota of populations inhabiting similar environments but having different traditional subsistence modes and either shared or distinct genetic ancestry, and (ii) examine the relationship between gut parasites and bacterial communities. Characterizing the fecal microbiota of Pygmy hunter-gatherers as well as Bantu individuals from both farming and fishing populations in Southwest Cameroon, we found that the gut parasite Entamoeba is significantly correlated with microbiome composition and diversity. We show that across populations, colonization by this protozoa can be predicted with 79% accuracy based on the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, and that several of the taxa most important for distinguishing Entamoeba absence or presence are signature taxa for autoimmune disorders. We also found gut communities to vary significantly with subsistence mode, notably with some taxa previously shown to be enriched in other hunter-gatherers groups (in Tanzania and Peru) also discriminating hunter-gatherers from neighboring farming or fishing populations in Cameroon. PMID:26619199

  15. Concepts relating magnetic interactions, intertwined electronic orders, and strongly correlated superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Davis, J C Séamus; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2013-10-29

    Unconventional superconductivity (SC) is said to occur when Cooper pair formation is dominated by repulsive electron-electron interactions, so that the symmetry of the pair wave function is other than an isotropic s-wave. The strong, on-site, repulsive electron-electron interactions that are the proximate cause of such SC are more typically drivers of commensurate magnetism. Indeed, it is the suppression of commensurate antiferromagnetism (AF) that usually allows this type of unconventional superconductivity to emerge. Importantly, however, intervening between these AF and SC phases, intertwined electronic ordered phases (IP) of an unexpected nature are frequently discovered. For this reason, it has been extremely difficult to distinguish the microscopic essence of the correlated superconductivity from the often spectacular phenomenology of the IPs. Here we introduce a model conceptual framework within which to understand the relationship between AF electron-electron interactions, IPs, and correlated SC. We demonstrate its effectiveness in simultaneously explaining the consequences of AF interactions for the copper-based, iron-based, and heavy-fermion superconductors, as well as for their quite distinct IPs.

  16. Concepts relating magnetic interactions, intertwined electronic orders, and strongly correlated superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. C. Séamus; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional superconductivity (SC) is said to occur when Cooper pair formation is dominated by repulsive electron–electron interactions, so that the symmetry of the pair wave function is other than an isotropic s-wave. The strong, on-site, repulsive electron–electron interactions that are the proximate cause of such SC are more typically drivers of commensurate magnetism. Indeed, it is the suppression of commensurate antiferromagnetism (AF) that usually allows this type of unconventional superconductivity to emerge. Importantly, however, intervening between these AF and SC phases, intertwined electronic ordered phases (IP) of an unexpected nature are frequently discovered. For this reason, it has been extremely difficult to distinguish the microscopic essence of the correlated superconductivity from the often spectacular phenomenology of the IPs. Here we introduce a model conceptual framework within which to understand the relationship between AF electron–electron interactions, IPs, and correlated SC. We demonstrate its effectiveness in simultaneously explaining the consequences of AF interactions for the copper-based, iron-based, and heavy-fermion superconductors, as well as for their quite distinct IPs. PMID:24114268

  17. Tree Tensor Network State with Variable Tensor Order: An Efficient Multireference Method for Strongly Correlated Systems.

    PubMed

    Murg, V; Verstraete, F; Schneider, R; Nagy, P R; Legeza, Ö

    2015-03-10

    We study the tree-tensor-network-state (TTNS) method with variable tensor orders for quantum chemistry. TTNS is a variational method to efficiently approximate complete active space (CAS) configuration interaction (CI) wave functions in a tensor product form. TTNS can be considered as a higher order generalization of the matrix product state (MPS) method. The MPS wave function is formulated as products of matrices in a multiparticle basis spanning a truncated Hilbert space of the original CAS-CI problem. These matrices belong to active orbitals organized in a one-dimensional array, while tensors in TTNS are defined upon a tree-like arrangement of the same orbitals. The tree-structure is advantageous since the distance between two arbitrary orbitals in the tree scales only logarithmically with the number of orbitals N, whereas the scaling is linear in the MPS array. It is found to be beneficial from the computational costs point of view to keep strongly correlated orbitals in close vicinity in both arrangements; therefore, the TTNS ansatz is better suited for multireference problems with numerous highly correlated orbitals. To exploit the advantages of TTNS a novel algorithm is designed to optimize the tree tensor network topology based on quantum information theory and entanglement. The superior performance of the TTNS method is illustrated on the ionic-neutral avoided crossing of LiF. It is also shown that the avoided crossing of LiF can be localized using only ground state properties, namely one-orbital entanglement.

  18. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory: A New Way To Treat Strongly Correlated Systems.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G; Li Manni, Giovanni; Carlson, Rebecca K; Hoyer, Chad E; Bao, Junwei Lucas

    2017-01-17

    The electronic energy of a system provides the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy for internuclear motion and thus determines molecular structure and spectra, bond energies, conformational energies, reaction barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. The development of more efficient and more accurate ways to calculate the electronic energy of systems with inherently multiconfigurational electronic structure is essential for many applications, including transition metal and actinide chemistry, systems with partially broken bonds, many transition states, and most electronically excited states. Inherently multiconfigurational systems are called strongly correlated systems or multireference systems, where the latter name refers to the need for using more than one ("multiple") configuration state function to provide a good zero-order reference wave function. This Account describes multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which was developed as a way to combine the advantages of wave function theory (WFT) and density functional theory (DFT) to provide a better treatment of strongly correlated systems. First we review background material: the widely used Kohn-Sham DFT (which uses only a single Slater determinant as reference wave function), multiconfiguration WFT methods that treat inherently multiconfigurational systems based on an active space, and previous attempts to combine multiconfiguration WFT with DFT. Then we review the formulation of MC-PDFT. It is a generalization of Kohn-Sham DFT in that the electron kinetic energy and classical electrostatic energy are calculated from a reference wave function, while the rest of the energy is obtained from a density functional. However, there are two main differences with respent to Kohn-Sham DFT: (i) The reference wave function is multiconfigurational rather than being a single Slater determinant. (ii) The density functional is a function of the total density and the on-top pair density rather than

  19. Multireference linearized coupled cluster theory for strongly correlated systems using matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Alavi, Ali

    2015-09-01

    We propose a multireference linearized coupled cluster theory using matrix product states (MPSs-LCC) which provides remarkably accurate ground-state energies, at a computational cost that has the same scaling as multireference configuration interaction singles and doubles, for a wide variety of electronic Hamiltonians. These range from first-row dimers at equilibrium and stretched geometries to highly multireference systems such as the chromium dimer and lattice models such as periodic two-dimensional 1-band and 3-band Hubbard models. The MPS-LCC theory shows a speed up of several orders of magnitude over the usual Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm while delivering energies in excellent agreement with converged DMRG calculations. Also, in all the benchmark calculations presented here, MPS-LCC outperformed the commonly used multi-reference quantum chemistry methods in some cases giving energies in excess of an order of magnitude more accurate. As a size-extensive method that can treat large active spaces, MPS-LCC opens up the use of multireference quantum chemical techniques in strongly correlated ab initio Hamiltonians, including two- and three-dimensional solids.

  20. Strong electron correlation on the Fe3O4(0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Henry; Elliott, Simon D.; Foster, Adam; Nieminen, R. M.

    2007-03-01

    Magnetite Fe3O4 is a fascinating material that still is not well understood and presents challenges for the state-of-the-art computational methods. This transition metal oxide undergoes a first-order metal-insulator transition at TV=120 K. The ferrimagnetic properties of Fe3O4 makes it a promising material for spintronic applications. We use a plane wave density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation adding a Hubbard-U parameter to describe properly the strongly correlated Fe--3d electrons. Based on previous results, we compute the surface structure, magnetic properties and electronic structure of several Fe3O4(0 0 1) surfaces with (√2x√2)R45^o reconstruction. The simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images of these surfaces are compared and discussed in the light of available experimental data. Finally, we analyze the possible existence of charge ordering on the Fe3O4(0 0 1) surface and the effect on the surface electronic structure with changing the value of the Hubbard-U parameter on the superficial Fe sites. H. Pinto, S. Elliott, J.Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 10427 (2006)

  1. Multireference linearized coupled cluster theory for strongly correlated systems using matrix product states

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep; Alavi, Ali

    2015-09-14

    We propose a multireference linearized coupled cluster theory using matrix product states (MPSs-LCC) which provides remarkably accurate ground-state energies, at a computational cost that has the same scaling as multireference configuration interaction singles and doubles, for a wide variety of electronic Hamiltonians. These range from first-row dimers at equilibrium and stretched geometries to highly multireference systems such as the chromium dimer and lattice models such as periodic two-dimensional 1-band and 3-band Hubbard models. The MPS-LCC theory shows a speed up of several orders of magnitude over the usual Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm while delivering energies in excellent agreement with converged DMRG calculations. Also, in all the benchmark calculations presented here, MPS-LCC outperformed the commonly used multi-reference quantum chemistry methods in some cases giving energies in excess of an order of magnitude more accurate. As a size-extensive method that can treat large active spaces, MPS-LCC opens up the use of multireference quantum chemical techniques in strongly correlated ab initio Hamiltonians, including two- and three-dimensional solids.

  2. Strong correlation and multi-phase solution in nonequilibrium lattice systems coupled to dissipation medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jong; Li, Jiajun; Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    How does a strongly correlated electronic solid evolve continuously out of equilibrium when an electric field is applied? While this question may seem deceptively simple, it requires rigorous understanding of dissipation. We formulate the nonequilibrium steady-state lattice coupled to fermion baths in the Coulomb gauge. We demonstrate that the Hubbard model solved using the iterative perturbation theory within the dynamical mean-field approximation recovers the DC conductivity independent of the Coulomb interaction in a very narrow linear response regime. Due to the singular dependence of the effective temperature on the damping in the steady-state [2], systems with damping have dramatic field-dependent effect, very different from dissipationless systems. We conclude that the dominant physics in lattice nonequilibrium is not the field vs quasi-particle energy, but rather the Joule heat vs the quasi-particle energy. Furthermore, we show that, in the vicinity of the Mott-insulator transition, the solution supports mixed-phase state scenario which indicates that the electron transport in solids under high-field can be spatially inhomogeneous leading to filamentary conducting paths, as suggested by experiments. Supported by NSF DMR-0907150, NSF DMR-1308141

  3. Evidence for a New Intermediate Phase in a Strongly Correlated 2D System near Wigner Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan; Qiu, Richard; Goble, Nicholas; Serafin, Alex; Yin, Liang; Xia, Jian-Sheng; Sullivan, Neil; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    How the two dimensional (2D) quantum Wigner crystal (WC) transforms into the metallic liquid phase remains an outstanding problem in physics. In theories considering the 2D WC to liquid transition in the clean limit, it was suggested that a number of intermediate phases might exist. We have studied the transformation between the metallic fluid phase and the low magnetic field reentrant insulating phase (RIP) which was interpreted as due to the WC [Qiu et al., PRL 108, 106404 (2012)], in a strongly correlated 2D hole system in GaAs quantum well with large interaction parameter rs (~20-30) and high mobility. Instead of a sharp transition, we found that increasing density (or lowering rs) drives the RIP into a state where the incipient RIP coexists with Fermi liquid. This apparent mixture phase intermediate between Fermi liquid and WC also exhibits a non-trivial temperature dependent resistivity behavior which can be qualitatively understood by the reversed melting of WC in the mixture, in analogy to the Pomeranchuk effect in the solid-liquid mixture of Helium-3. X.G. thanks NSF (DMR-0906415) for supporting work at CWRU. Experiments at the NHMFL High B/T Facility were supported by NSF Grant 0654118 and the State of Florida. L.P. thanks the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and NSF MRSEC (DMR-0819860) for support.

  4. Spin Correlations of Strongly Interacting Massive Fermion Pairs as a Test of Bell's Inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.; Saito, T.; Kuboki, H.; Sasano, M.; Yako, K.; Ikeda, T.; Itoh, K.; Kawabata, T.; Maeda, Y.; Suda, K.; Uesaka, T.; Matsui, N.; Satou, Y.; Rangacharyulu, C.; Sekiguchi, K.; Tamii, A.

    2006-10-13

    We report the results of the first-time test of the local hidden variable theories (Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt) involving strongly interacting pairs of massive spin 1/2 hadrons from the decay of short-lived ({tau}<10{sup -21}sec) {sup 2}He spin-singlet state, populated in the nuclear reaction {sup 2}H+{sup 1}H{yields}{sup 2}He+n. The novel features of this experiment are (a) the use of an 'event body' detector of nearly 100% efficiency to prepare an unbiased sample and (b) a focal-plane polarimeter of full 2{pi} sr acceptance with a random 'post selection' of the reference axes. The spin-correlation function is deduced to be S{sub exp}({pi}/4)=2.83{+-}0.24{sub stat}{+-}0.07{sub sys}. This result is in agreement with nonlocal quantum mechanical prediction and it violates the Bell-CHSH inequality of vertical bar S vertical bar{<=}2 at a confidence level of 99.3%.

  5. Spin-orbit coupling and strong electronic correlations in cyclic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, A. L.; Jacko, A. C.; Merino, J.; Powell, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    In atoms spin-orbit coupling (SOC) cannot raise the angular momentum above a maximum value or lower it below a minimum. Here we show that this need not be the case in materials built from nanoscale structures including multinuclear coordination complexes, materials with decorated lattices, or atoms on surfaces. In such cyclic molecules the electronic spin couples to currents running around the molecule. For odd-fold symmetric molecules (e.g., odd-membered rings) the SOC is highly analogous to the atomic case; but for even-fold symmetric molecules every angular momentum state can be both raised and lowered. These differences arise because for odd-fold symmetric molecules the maximum and minimum molecular orbital angular momentum states are time-reversal conjugates, whereas for even-fold symmetric molecules they are aliases of the same single state. We show, from first-principles calculations, that in suitable molecules this molecular SOC is large, compared to the energy differences between frontier molecular orbitals. Finally, we show that, when electronic correlations are strong, molecular SOC can cause highly anisotropic exchange interactions and discuss how this can lead to effective spin models with compass Hamiltonians.

  6. Two-site fluctuations and multipolar intersite exchange interactions in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourovskii, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    An approach is proposed for evaluating dipolar and multipolar intersite interactions in strongly correlated materials. This approach is based on the single-site dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) in conjunction with the atomic approximation for the local self-energy. Starting from the local-moment paramagnetic state described by DMFT, we derive intersite interactions by considering the response of the DMFT grand potential to small fluctuations of atomic configurations on two neighboring sites. The present method is validated by applying it to one-band and two-band eg Hubbard models on the simple-cubic 3 d lattice. It is also applied to study the spin-orbital order in the parent cubic structure of ternary chromium fluoride KCrF3. We obtain the onset of a G-type antiferro-orbital order at a significantly lower temperature compared to that in real distorted KCrF3. In contrast, its layered A-type antiferromagnetic order and Néel temperature are rather well reproduced. The calculated full Kugel-Khomskii Hamiltonian contains spin-orbital coupling terms inducing a misalignment in the antiferro-orbital order upon the onset of antiferromagnetism.

  7. 11-Beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression in white adipose tissue is strongly correlated with adiposity.

    PubMed

    Milagro, Fermin I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2007-04-01

    Glucocorticoid action within the cells is regulated by the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and two enzymes, 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1), which converts inactive to active glucocorticoids, and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2), which regulates the access of active glucocorticoids to the receptor by converting cortisol/corticosterone to the glucocorticoid-inactive form cortisone/dehydrocorticosterone. Male Wistar rats developed obesity by being fed a high-fat diet for 56 days, and GR, 11betaHSD1 and 11betaHSD2 gene expression were compared with control-diet fed animals. Gene expression analysis of 11betaHSD1, 11betaHSD2 and GR were performed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. High-fat fed animals overexpressed 11betaHSD2 in subcutaneous but not in retroperitoneal fat. Interestingly, mRNA levels strongly correlated in both tissues with different parameters related to obesity, such as body weight, adiposity and insulin resistance, suggesting that this gene is a reliable marker of adiposity in this rat model of obesity. Thus, 11betaHSD2 is expressed in adipose tissue by both adipocytes and stromal-vascular cells, which suggests that this enzyme may play an important role in preventing fat accumulation in adipose tissue.

  8. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of C-QED Arrays in Strong Correlation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Li, Zhi-Hang; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Recently increasing interests are attracted in the physics of controlled arrays of nonlinear cavity resonators because of the rapid experimental progress achieved in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a driven-dissipative two-dimentional planar C-QED array, standard Markov master equation is generally used to study the dynamics of this system. However, when in the case that the on-site photon-photon interaction enters strong correlation regime, standard Markov master equation may lead to incorrect results. In this paper we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a two-dimentional C-QED array, which is homogeneously pumped by an external pulse, at the same time dissipation exits. We study the evolution of the average photon number of a single cavity by deriving a modified master equation to. In comparison with the standard master equation, the numerical result obtained by our newly derived master equation shows significant difference for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system.

  9. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems 2014 (SCES2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES) was held in Grenoble from the 7th to 11th of July on the campus of the University of Grenoble. It was a great privilege to have the conference in Grenoble after the series of meetings in Sendai (1992), San Diego (1993), Amsterdam (1994), Goa (1995), Zürich (1996), Paris (1998), Nagano (1999), Ann Arbor (2001), Krakow (2002), Karlsruhe (2004), Vienna (2005), Houston (2007), Buzios (2008), Santa Fe (2010), Cambridge (2011) and Tokyo (2013). Every three years, SCES joins the triennial conference on magnetism ICM. In 2015, ICM will take place in Barcelona. The meeting gathered an audience of 875 participants who actively interacted inside and outside of conference rooms. A large number of posters (530) was balanced with four parallel oral sessions which included 86 invited speakers and 141 short oral contributions. A useful arrangement was the possibility to put poster presentations on the website so participants could see them all through the conference week. Each morning two plenary sessions were held, ending on Friday with experimental and theoretical summaries delivered by Philipp Gegenwart (Augsburg) and Andrew Millis (Columbia). The plenary sessions were given by Gabriel Kotliar (Rutgers), Masashi Kawasaki (Tokyo), Jennifer Hoffman (Harvard), Mathias Vojta (Dresden), Ashvin Vishwanath (Berkeley), Andrea Cavalleri (Hamburg), Marc-Henri Julien (Grenoble), Neil Mathur (Cambridge), Giniyat Khaliullin (Stuttgart), and Toshiro Sakakibara (Tokyo). The parallel oral sessions were prepared by 40 symposium organizers selected by the chairman (Antoine Georges) and co-chairman (Kamran Behnia) of the Program Committee with the supplementary rule that speakers had not delivered an invited talk at the previous SCES conference held in 2013 in Tokyo. Special attention was given to help young researchers via grants to 40 overseas students. Perhaps due to the additional possibility of cheap

  10. Exploring underwater target detection by imaging polarimetry and correlation techniques.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, M; Delrot, P; Leonard, I; Alfalou, A; Brosseau, C; Dogariu, A

    2013-02-10

    Underwater target detection is investigated by combining active polarization imaging and optical correlation-based approaches. Experiments were conducted in a glass tank filled with tap water with diluted milk or seawater and containing targets of arbitrary polarimetric responses. We found that target estimation obtained by imaging with two orthogonal polarization states always improves detection performances when correlation is used as detection criterion. This experimental study illustrates the potential of polarization imaging for underwater target detection and opens interesting perspectives for the development of underwater imaging systems.

  11. Strong correlation of major earthquakes with solid-earth tides in part of the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, R.E.; Perry, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    East of the eastern American continental divide and south of lat. 42.5??N, moderate to large historic earthquakes correlate strongly with times of high and low solid-earth tides. This effect is most pronounced when solar declination lies between 17??N and 17??S. Significant correlation also exist between major earthquakes, time of day, lunar declinations, and lunar phase. -Authors

  12. Exploring individual differences in children's mathematical skills: a correlational and dimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Sigmundsson, H; Polman, R C J; Lorås, H

    2013-08-01

    Individual differences in mathematical skills are typically explained by an innate capability to solve mathematical tasks. At the behavioural level this implies a consistent level of mathematical achievement that can be captured by strong relationships between tasks, as well as by a single statistical dimension that underlies performance on all mathematical tasks. To investigate this general assumption, the present study explored interrelations and dimensions of mathematical skills. For this purpose, 68 ten-year-old children from two schools were tested using nine mathematics tasks from the Basic Knowledge in Mathematics Test. Relatively low-to-moderate correlations between the mathematics tasks indicated most tasks shared less than 25% of their variance. There were four principal components, accounting for 70% of the variance in mathematical skill across tasks and participants. The high specificity in mathematical skills was discussed in relation to the principle of task specificity of learning.

  13. Islet Autoantibody Measurements from Dried Blood Spots on Filter Paper Strongly Correlate to Serum Levels

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Kimber M.; Alkanani, Aimon K.; McDaniel, Kristen A.; Goyne, Christopher; Miao, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Yu, Liping; Michels, Aaron W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasing in incidence and predictable with measurement of serum islet autoantibodies (iAb) years prior to clinical disease onset. Identifying iAb positive individuals reduces diabetic ketoacidosis and identifies individuals for T1D prevention trials. However, large scale screening for iAb remains challenging as assays have varying sensitivities and specificities, insulin autoantibodies remain difficult to measure and venipuncture is generally required to obtain serum. We developed an approach to reliably measure all four major iAb, including insulin autoantibodies, from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter-paper. By spiking iAb positive serum into iAb negative whole blood in a dose titration, we optimized the conditions for autoantibody elution from filter paper as measured by fluid phase radioimmunoassays. After assessing stability of measuring iAb from DBS over time, we then screened iAb from DBS and the corresponding serum in new-onset T1D (n = 52), and controls (n = 72) which included first-degree relatives of T1D patients. iAb measured from eluted DBS in new-onset T1D strongly correlated with serum measurements (R2 = 0.96 for mIAA, GADA = 0.94, IA-2A = 0.85, ZnT8A = 0.82, p<0.01 for each autoantibody). There were no false positives in control subjects, and 5/6 with previously unknown iAb positivity in sera were detected using DBS. With further validation, measuring iAb from DBS can be a reliable method to screen for T1D risk. PMID:27846247

  14. L233P mutation of the Tax protein strongly correlated with leukemogenicity of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Emi; Matsumura, Keiko; Soma, Norihiko; Hirasawa, Shintaro; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Arakaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-27

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) Tax protein is believed to play a crucial role in leukemogenesis by the virus. BLV usually causes asymptomatic infections in cattle, but only one-third develop persistent lymphocytosis that rarely progress after a long incubation period to lymphoid tumors, namely enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL). In the present study, we demonstrated that the BLV tax genes could be divided into two alleles and developed multiplex PCR detecting an L233P mutation of the Tax protein. Then, in order to define the relationship between the Tax protein and leukemogenicity, we examined 360 tumor samples randomly collected from dairy or breeding cattle in Japan, of which Tax proteins were categorized, for age at the time of diagnosis of EBL. The ages of 288 animals (80.0%) associated with L233-Tax and those of 70 animals (19.4%) with P233-Tax individually followed log-normal distributions. Only the two earliest cases (0.6%) with L233-Tax disobeyed the log-normal distribution. These findings suggest that the animals affected by EBL were infected with the virus at a particular point in life, probably less than a few months after birth. Median age of those with P233-Tax was 22 months older than that with L233-Tax and geometric means exhibited a significant difference (P<0.01). It is also quite unlikely that viruses carrying the particular Tax protein infect older cattle. Here, we conclude that BLV could be divided into two categories on the basis of amino acid at position 233 of the Tax protein, which strongly correlated with leukemogenicity.

  15. Emergent high-Tc ferroelectric ordering of strongly correlated and frustrated protons in a heteroepitaxial ice film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Toshiki; Aiga, Norihiro; Otsuki, Yuji; Watanabe, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu

    2016-11-01

    Materials containing strong correlation and frustration have the potential to respond to external perturbations in an unusual way. In the case of common water ice, protons in the hydrogen-bond network are strongly correlated and highly frustrated under Pauling's ice rules. At low temperature, the strongly correlated protons lose ergodicity, and little is understood about the cooperative thermodynamic and electric response to external stimuli. Here, using a model platinum substrate, we demonstrate emergent high-Tc ferroelectric proton ordering in a heteroepitaxial ice film. Such proton ordering is thermodynamically stable and has an extremely high critical temperature of ~175 K. We found that anisotropy and protolysis driven by the electrostatistics at the heterointerface are key factors in stimulating this novel exotic ordering in the many-body correlated proton system. The significant increase in Tc due to the heterointerface suggests the ubiquity of ferroelectric ice in nature--specifically, in space and the polar stratosphere.

  16. Electron correlation explored through electron spectrometry using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.; Whitfield, S.B.; Flemming, M.G. . Dept. of Physics); Krause, M.O. )

    1991-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation facilities as a research tool has made possible experiments which provide new insights into the role which correlation plays in electron dynamics and atomic and molecular structure. Features such as autoionizing resonances, normal and resonant Auger decay modes, and ionization threshold structure have become visible in a wealth of new detail. Some aspects of this information drawn from recent experiments on the alkaline earth metals and the rare gases are presented. The potential for increased flux and resolution inherent in insertion device-based facilities like the Advanced Light Source should advance this understanding even further, and some future directions are suggested. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Exploring socioecological correlates of active living in retirement village residents.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Andrea; Wood, Lisa; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2014-01-01

    This study explored individual, social, and built environmental attributes in and outside of the retirement village setting and associations with various active living outcomes including objectively measured physical activity, specific walking behaviors, and social participation. Residents in Perth, Australia (N = 323), were surveyed on environmental perceptions of the village and surrounding neighborhood, self-reported physical activity, and demographic characteristics and wore accelerometers. Managers (N = 32) were surveyed on village characteristics, and objective neighborhood measures were generated in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results indicated that built- and social-environmental attributes within and outside of retirement villages were associated with active living among residents; however, salient attributes varied depending on the specific outcome considered. Findings suggest that locating villages close to destinations is important for walking and that locating them close to previous and familiar neighborhoods is important for social participation. Further understanding and consideration into retirement village designs that promote both walking and social participation are needed.

  18. Increasing Specificity of Correlate Research: Exploring Correlates of Children’s Lunchtime and After-School Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rebecca M.; Ridley, Kate; Olds, Timothy S.; Dollman, James

    2014-01-01

    Background The lunchtime and after-school contexts are critical windows in a school day for children to be physically active. While numerous studies have investigated correlates of children’s habitual physical activity, few have explored correlates of physical activity occurring at lunchtime and after-school from a social-ecological perspective. Exploring correlates that influence physical activity occurring in specific contexts can potentially improve the prediction and understanding of physical activity. Using a context-specific approach, this study investigated correlates of children’s lunchtime and after-school physical activity. Methods Cross-sectional data were collected from 423 South Australian children aged 10.0–13.9 years (200 boys; 223 girls) attending 10 different schools. Lunchtime and after-school physical activity was assessed using accelerometers. Correlates were assessed using purposely developed context-specific questionnaires. Correlated Component Regression analysis was conducted to derive correlates of context-specific physical activity and determine the variance explained by prediction equations. Results The model of boys’ lunchtime physical activity contained 6 correlates and explained 25% of the variance. For girls, the model explained 17% variance from 9 correlates. Enjoyment of walking during lunchtime was the strongest correlate for both boys and girls. Boys’ and girls’ after-school physical activity models explained 20% variance from 14 correlates and 7% variance from the single item correlate, “I do an organised sport or activity after-school because it gets you fit”, respectively. Conclusions Increasing specificity of correlate research has enabled the identification of unique features of, and a more in-depth interpretation of, lunchtime and after-school physical activity behaviour and is a potential strategy for advancing the physical activity correlate research field. The findings of this study could be used to inform

  19. Ab initio optimization principle for the ground states of translationally invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models.

    PubMed

    Ran, Shi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and fundamental numeric scheme dubbed as ab initio optimization principle (AOP) is proposed for the ground states of translational invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models. The idea is to transform a nondeterministic-polynomial-hard ground-state simulation with infinite degrees of freedom into a single optimization problem of a local function with finite number of physical and ancillary degrees of freedom. This work contributes mainly in the following aspects: (1) AOP provides a simple and efficient scheme to simulate the ground state by solving a local optimization problem. Its solution contains two kinds of boundary states, one of which play the role of the entanglement bath that mimics the interactions between a supercell and the infinite environment, and the other gives the ground state in a tensor network (TN) form. (2) In the sense of TN, a novel decomposition named as tensor ring decomposition (TRD) is proposed to implement AOP. Instead of following the contraction-truncation scheme used by many existing TN-based algorithms, TRD solves the contraction of a uniform TN in an opposite way by encoding the contraction in a set of self-consistent equations that automatically reconstruct the whole TN, making the simulation simple and unified; (3) AOP inherits and develops the ideas of different well-established methods, including the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD), network contractor dynamics, density matrix embedding theory, etc., providing a unified perspective that is previously missing in this fields. (4) AOP as well as TRD give novel implications to existing TN-based algorithms: A modified iTEBD is suggested and the two-dimensional (2D) AOP is argued to be an intrinsic 2D extension of DMRG that is based on infinite projected entangled pair state. This paper is focused on one-dimensional quantum models to present AOP. The benchmark is given on a transverse Ising

  20. Ab initio optimization principle for the ground states of translationally invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and fundamental numeric scheme dubbed as ab initio optimization principle (AOP) is proposed for the ground states of translational invariant strongly correlated quantum lattice models. The idea is to transform a nondeterministic-polynomial-hard ground-state simulation with infinite degrees of freedom into a single optimization problem of a local function with finite number of physical and ancillary degrees of freedom. This work contributes mainly in the following aspects: (1) AOP provides a simple and efficient scheme to simulate the ground state by solving a local optimization problem. Its solution contains two kinds of boundary states, one of which play the role of the entanglement bath that mimics the interactions between a supercell and the infinite environment, and the other gives the ground state in a tensor network (TN) form. (2) In the sense of TN, a novel decomposition named as tensor ring decomposition (TRD) is proposed to implement AOP. Instead of following the contraction-truncation scheme used by many existing TN-based algorithms, TRD solves the contraction of a uniform TN in an opposite way by encoding the contraction in a set of self-consistent equations that automatically reconstruct the whole TN, making the simulation simple and unified; (3) AOP inherits and develops the ideas of different well-established methods, including the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD), network contractor dynamics, density matrix embedding theory, etc., providing a unified perspective that is previously missing in this fields. (4) AOP as well as TRD give novel implications to existing TN-based algorithms: A modified iTEBD is suggested and the two-dimensional (2D) AOP is argued to be an intrinsic 2D extension of DMRG that is based on infinite projected entangled pair state. This paper is focused on one-dimensional quantum models to present AOP. The benchmark is given on a transverse Ising

  1. Protein domains correlate strongly with exons in multiple eukaryotic genomes--evidence of exon shuffling?

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyi; Grigoriev, Andrei

    2004-09-01

    We conducted a multi-genome analysis correlating protein domain organization with the exon-intron structure of genes in nine eukaryotic genomes. We observed a significant correlation between the borders of exons and domains on a genomic scale for both invertebrates and vertebrates. In addition, we found that the more complex organisms displayed consistently stronger exon-domain correlation, with substantially more significant correlations detected in vertebrates compared with invertebrates. Our observations concur with the principles of exon shuffling theory, including the prediction of predominantly symmetric phase of introns flanking the borders of correlating exons. These results suggest that extensive exon shuffling events during evolution significantly contributed to the shaping of eukaryotic proteomes.

  2. Two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour field in pp, pA and AA collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye-Yin; Xu, Ming-Mei; Zhang, Heng-Ying; Wu, Yuan-Fang

    2016-11-01

    Using the CGC formalism, we calculate the two-gluon rapidity correlations of strong colour fields in pp, pA and AA collisions, respectively. If one trigger gluon is fixed at central rapidity, a ridge-like correlation pattern is obtained in symmetry pp and AA collisions, and a huge bump-like correlation pattern is presented in asymmetry pA collisions. It is demonstrated that long-range ridge-like rapidity correlations are caused by the stronger correlation with the gluon of colour source. These features are independent of the azimuthal angular of two selected gluon. They are qualitatively consistent with current observed data at LHC. The transverse momentum and incident energy dependence of the ridge and bump-like correlations are also systematically studied. The ridge is more likely observed at higher incident energy and lower transverse momentum of trigger gluon.

  3. Regional Mapping of the Lunar Crustal Magnetic Field: Correlation of Strong Anomalies with Curvilinear Albedo Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Yingst, A.; Zakharian, A.; Lin, R. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    Using high-resolution regional Lunar Prospector magnetometer magnetic field maps, we report here a close correlation of the strongest individual crustal anomalies with unusual curvilinear albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class.

  4. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems. Progress report, 1 August 1980-31 July 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.D.

    1981-03-01

    Studies of electron correlations of doubly-excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in fast ion-atom collisions are reported. (GHT)

  5. Zeros of the dispersion relation of the elementary excitation and the correlation length of strongly correlated quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuichi

    2007-03-01

    We argue that the imaginary part of a zero of the dispersion relation of the elementary excitation of quantum systems is equal to the inverse correlation length. We confirm the relation for the Hubbard model[1] in the half-filled case; it has been confirmed only for the S=1/2 antiferromagnetic XXZ chain[2]. In order to search zeros of the dispersion relation in the complex momentum space efficiently, we introduce a non-Hermitian generalization of quantum systems by adding an imaginary vector potential ig to the momentum operator[3]. We also show for the half-filled Hubbard model the reason why the non-Hermitian critical point[4] is equal to the inverse correlation length[5] by noting the dispersion relation of the charge excitation. [1] Y. Nakamura and N. Hatano, in preparation. [2] K. Okunishi, Y. Akutsu, N. Akutsu and T. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. B 64 (2001) 104432. [3] Y. Nakamura and N. Hatano, Physica B 378-380 (2006) 292; J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 75 (2006) 114001. [4] T. Fukui and N. Kawakami, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 16051. [5] C. A. Stafford and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. B 48 (1993) 1409.

  6. Strong correlation of atomic thermal motion in the first coordination shell of a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Mattern, N.; Eckert, J.

    2013-02-25

    We demonstrate a strong correlation of atomic thermal motions in the first coordination shell of Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} metallic glass using molecular dynamics simulations, which explains directly the small thermal expansion coefficient calculated by the first maxima of pair correlation functions. The vibrational anisotropy in the glass is found to be even higher than in crystalline copper. The parallel-perpendicular anisotropy gradually decreases upon heating. The anisotropy in Zr-Zr is the strongest bonds among all the interatomic bonds, which is also very stable near the glass transition at 700 K. Structurally, the anisotropy can be correlated to Cu-centered (0 2 8 1) clusters.

  7. Strong polygamy of quantum correlations in multi-party quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new type of polygamy inequality for multi-party quantum entanglement. We first consider the possible amount of bipartite entanglement distributed between a fixed party and any subset of the rest parties in a multi-party quantum system. By using the summation of these distributed entanglements, we provide an upper bound of the distributed entanglement between a party and the rest in multi-party quantum systems. We then show that this upper bound also plays as a lower bound of the usual polygamy inequality, therefore the strong polygamy of multi-party quantum entanglement. For the case of multi-party pure states, we further show that the strong polygamy of entanglement implies the strong polygamy of quantum discord.

  8. Strong electronic correlations in iron pnictides: Comparison of the optical spectra for BaFe2As2-related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    The role of electronic correlations in iron pnictides is one of the hottest issues in research of iron-based superconductors. Utilizing optical spectroscopy, we quantified the strength of electronic correlations in BaFe2As2-related compounds. For the parent compound BaFe2As2, the fraction of the coherent spectral weight in the low-energy optical conductivity spectrum is distinctly small. Such a spectral feature is also observed in KFe2As2, indicating that the charge dynamics is highly incoherent in iron arsenides. It is found that the strength of electronic correlations significantly changes by chemical substitution, either through changing the electron filling and/or the As-Fe-As bond angle. The present result indicates that superconductivity of the iron pnictides emerges when the materials possess adequate amount of electronic correlations, and that either too weak or too strong correlations are not favorable for high-Tc superconductivity. The degree of electronic correlations in iron arsenides turns out to be comparable to that in the hole-underdoped cuprate superconductors. In this sense, the iron arsenides are classified into strongly correlated systems, probably arising from the Hund's rule coupling. This work was done in collaboration with S. Ishida, K. Kihou, Y. Tomioka, C. H. Lee, A. Iyo, T. Ito, H. Eisaki (AIST), T. Tanaka, T. Kakeshita, S. Uchida (University of Tokyo), T. Saito, H. Fukazawa, and Y. Kohori (Chiba University).

  9. Communication: Configuration interaction combined with spin-projection for strongly correlated molecular electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2016-01-07

    We present single and double particle-hole excitations in the recently revived spin-projected Hartree-Fock. Our motivation is to treat static correlation with spin-projection and recover the residual correlation, mostly dynamic in nature, with simple configuration interaction (CI). To this end, we introduce the Wick theorem for nonorthogonal determinants, which enables an efficient implementation in conjunction with the direct CI scheme. The proposed approach, termed spin-extended CI with singles and doubles, achieves a balanced treatment between dynamic and static correlations. To approximately account for the quadruple excitations, we also modify the well-known Davidson correction. We report that our approaches yield surprisingly accurate potential curves for HF, H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}, and a hydrogen lattice, compared to traditional single reference wave function methods at the same computational scaling as regular CI.

  10. What Gives a Wine Its Strong Red Color? Main Correlations Affecting Copigmentation.

    PubMed

    Heras-Roger, Jesus; Díaz-Romero, Carlos; Darias-Martín, Jacinto

    2016-08-31

    Copigmentation and enological parameters were studied in a collection of 250 red wines. Although several copigmentation studies have been performed with model solutions, little is known about the actual consequences directly in wine of anthocyanin interactions. To date, some studies have considered relationships between copigmentation and natural wine constituents, but none correlates copigmentation measurements with the real wide concentration in wine. In this work, published hypotheses based on model solutions such as phenolic acid copigmentation ability or the influence of copigmentation factors such as flavonols are empirically evaluated in a large sample of wines for the first time. The study confirms previous results obtained from solutions, whereas other factors suggested as being relevant seem to be unrelated to the studied effect at the concentration range naturally occurring in the wines studied. For instance, the important role of flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids has been ratified, whereas ethanol, gallic acid, and some metals show significant inverse correlations with copigmentation. Unexpectedly, magnesium content in wine correlates with color, whereas the concentration of traditional copigments, such as quercetin, does not show any correlation with copigmentation.

  11. Z2 slave-spin theory of a strongly correlated Chern insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prychynenko, Diana; Huber, Sebastian D.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the phase diagram of the topological honeycomb model in the presence of strong interactions. We concentrate on half filling and employ a Z2 slave-spin method to find a band insulator with staggered density, a spin-density-wave and a Mott insulating phase. Both the band insulator and the spin-density wave come in various topological varieties. Finally, we calculate the response function relevant for lattice modulation spectroscopy with cold atomic gases in optical lattices.

  12. Exact spectra of strong coulomb correlations of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Shivalika; Kaur, Harsimran; Singh, Sunny; Hazra, Ram Kuntal

    2017-01-01

    Applications of 3-D 2-e systems have proliferated very fast due to technological advancements in wide range of phenomena from atomic landscape to mesoscopic scale. The unusual properties of atomic/mesoscopic systems are the results of interplaying charge interactions among different bound states. The non-trivial e-e correlations in electrically and/or magnetically confined systems improvise wealth of intriguing challenges at fundamental level due to lack of exact solution of Schrödinger equations. For the first time, a novel methodology of exactly finite summed coulomb correlations invented by us is so handy that even usual programmable calculator can be used to examine the electronic structures of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in perpendicular magnetic field (symmetric gauge). Statistics of electronic levels, heat capacity measurements and magnetization (T∼1 K) are also investigated in brief to probe the degree of disorderedness.

  13. Strong Solar Control of Infrared Aurora on Jupiter: Correlation Since the Last Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.

    2009-01-01

    Polar aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere radiate throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X ray through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 5 - 20 micron wavelength). Voyager IRIS data and ground-based spectroscopic measurements of Jupiter's northern mid-IR aurora, acquired since 1982, reveal a correlation between auroral brightness and solar activity that has not been observed in Jovian aurora at other wavelengths. Over nearly three solar cycles, Jupiter auroral ethane emission brightness and solar 10.7 cm radio flux and sunspot number are positively correlated with high confidence. Ethane line emission intensity varies over tenfold between low and high solar activity periods. Detailed measurements have been made using the GSFC HIPWAC spectrometer at the NASA IRTF since the last solar maximum, following the mid-IR emission through the declining phase toward solar minimum. An even more convincing correlation with solar activity is evident in these data. Current analyses of these results will be described, including planned measurements on polar ethane line emission scheduled through the rise of the next solar maximum beginning in 2009, with a steep gradient to a maximum in 2012. This work is relevant to the Juno mission and to the development of the Europa Jupiter System Mission. Results of observations at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program.

  14. Exploring the optical contrast effect in strong atomic lines for exoplanets transiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, Paul W.; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy is a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing planetary atmospheres. Non-photospheric features on the stellar disk, however, can contaminate the planetary signal: during transit the observed spectrum is weighted towards the features not currently being occulted by the planet. This contrast effect can mimic absorption in the planetary atmosphere for strong atomic lines such as Na I, Ca II, and the hydrogen Balmer lines. While the contrast effect is negligible for quiet stars, contributions to the transmission signal from active stellar surfaces can produce ~1% changes in the line core. It is therefore critical that these contrast signals be differentiated from true absorption features in the planetary atmosphere. Here we present our work on simulating the contrast effect for an active stellar surface. We discuss the particular case of HD 189733 b, a well-studied hot Jupiter orbiting an active K-dwarf, due to the plethora of atomic absorption signals reported in its atmosphere.Specifically, we focus on Hα to address recent suggestions that the measured in-transit signals are a result of stellar activity. In the contrast model we include center-to-limb variations and calculate limb darkening parameters as a function of wavelength across the line of interest. The model includes contributions to the spectrum from spots, faculae and plages, filaments, and the bare stellar photosphere. Stellar rotation is also included. We find that it is very difficult to reproduce the measured in-transit Hα signals for reasonable active region parameters. In addition, it is difficult to create an in-transit contrast signature that lasts for the duration of the transit unless the planet is crossing an active latitudinal belt and is always obscuring active regions. This suggests that the Hα measurements arise predominantly in the planetary atmosphere. However, the contrast effect likely contributes to these signals. Furthermore, our results could be

  15. Distinct Topological Crystalline Phases in Models for the Strongly Correlated Topological Insulator SmB_{6}.

    PubMed

    Baruselli, Pier Paolo; Vojta, Matthias

    2015-10-09

    SmB_{6} was recently proposed to be both a strong topological insulator and a topological crystalline insulator. For this and related cubic topological Kondo insulators, we prove the existence of four different topological phases, distinguished by the sign of mirror Chern numbers. We characterize these phases in terms of simple observables, and we provide concrete tight-binding models for each phase. Based on theoretical and experimental results for SmB_{6} we conclude that it realizes the phase with C_{k_{z}=0}^{+}=+2, C_{k_{z}=π}^{+}=+1, C_{k_{x}=k_{y}}^{+}=-1, and we propose a corresponding minimal model.

  16. Probing strong correlations with light scattering: Example of the quantum Ising model

    DOE PAGES

    Babujian, H. M.; Karowski, M.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this article we calculate the nonlinear susceptibility and the resonant Raman cross section for the paramagnetic phase of the ferromagnetic quantum Ising model in one dimension. In this region the spectrum of the Ising model has a gap m. The Raman cross section has a strong singularity when the energy of the outgoing photon is at the spectral gap ωf ≈ m and a square root threshold when the frequency difference between the incident and outgoing photons ωi₋ωf≈2m. Finally, the latter feature reflects the fermionic nature of the Ising model excitations.

  17. Probing strong correlations with light scattering: Example of the quantum Ising model

    SciTech Connect

    Babujian, H. M.; Karowski, M.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this article we calculate the nonlinear susceptibility and the resonant Raman cross section for the paramagnetic phase of the ferromagnetic quantum Ising model in one dimension. In this region the spectrum of the Ising model has a gap m. The Raman cross section has a strong singularity when the energy of the outgoing photon is at the spectral gap ωf ≈ m and a square root threshold when the frequency difference between the incident and outgoing photons ωi₋ωf≈2m. Finally, the latter feature reflects the fermionic nature of the Ising model excitations.

  18. Quantum distillation: Dynamical generation of low-entropy states of strongly correlated fermions in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heidrich-Meisner, F.; Manmana, S. R.; Rigol, M.; Muramatsu, A.; Feiguin, A. E.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between particles can lead to subtle and sometimes counterintuitive phenomena. We analyze one such case, occurring during the sudden expansion of fermions in a lattice when the initial state has a strong admixture of double occupancies. We promote the notion of quantum distillation: during the expansion and in the case of strongly repulsive interactions, doublons group together, forming a nearly ideal band insulator, which is metastable with low entropy. We propose that this effect could be used for cooling purposes in experiments with two-component Fermi gases.

  19. Communication: An adaptive configuration interaction approach for strongly correlated electrons with tunable accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriber, Jeffrey B.; Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a new procedure for iterative selection of determinant spaces capable of describing highly correlated systems. This adaptive configuration interaction (ACI) determines an optimal basis by an iterative procedure in which the determinant space is expanded and coarse grained until self-consistency. Two importance criteria control the selection process and tune the ACI to a user-defined level of accuracy. The ACI is shown to yield potential energy curves of N2 with nearly constant errors, and it predicts singlet-triplet splittings of acenes up to decacene that are in good agreement with the density matrix renormalization group.

  20. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) Strongly Correlates with Increasing HIV-1 Viremia and Markers of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Sanjay; Qiu, Ju; Rupert, Adam W.; Hu, Zonghui; Higgins, Jeanette; Dewar, Robin L.; Stevens, Randy; Rehm, Catherine A.; Metcalf, Julia A.; Sherman, Brad T.; Baseler, Michael W.; Lane, H. Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2016-01-01

    Objective IL-15 has been postulated to play an important role in HIV-1 infection, yet there are conflicting reports regarding its expression levels in these patients. We sought to measure the level of IL-15 in a large, well characterised cohort of HIV-1 infected patients and correlate this with well known markers of inflammation, including CRP, D-dimer, sCD163 and sCD14. Design and Methods IL-15 levels were measured in 501 people (460 patients with HIV-1 infection and 41 uninfected controls). The HIV-1 infected patients were divided into 4 groups based on viral load: <50 copies/ml, 51–10,000 copies/ml, 10,001–100,000 copies/ml and >100,000 copies/ml. The Mann Whitney test (non-parametric) was used to identify significant relationships between different patient groups. Results IL-15 levels were significantly higher in patients with viral loads >100,000 copies/ml (3.02 ± 1.53 pg/ml) compared to both uninfected controls (1.69 ± 0.37 pg/ml, p<0.001) or patients with a viral load <50 copies/ml (1.59 ± 0.40 pg/ml (p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between HIV-1 viremia and IL-15 levels (Spearman r = 0.54, p<0.001) and between CD4+ T cell counts and IL-15 levels (Spearman r = -0.56, p<0.001). Conclusions IL-15 levels are significantly elevated in HIV-1 infected patients with viral loads >100,000 copies/ml compared to uninfected controls, with a significant direct correlation noted between IL-15 and HIV-1 viremia and an inverse correlation between IL-15 levels and CD4+ T cell counts. These data support a potential role for IL-15 in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated immune activation. PMID:27880829

  1. Communication: An adaptive configuration interaction approach for strongly correlated electrons with tunable accuracy.

    PubMed

    Schriber, Jeffrey B; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2016-04-28

    We introduce a new procedure for iterative selection of determinant spaces capable of describing highly correlated systems. This adaptive configuration interaction (ACI) determines an optimal basis by an iterative procedure in which the determinant space is expanded and coarse grained until self-consistency. Two importance criteria control the selection process and tune the ACI to a user-defined level of accuracy. The ACI is shown to yield potential energy curves of N2 with nearly constant errors, and it predicts singlet-triplet splittings of acenes up to decacene that are in good agreement with the density matrix renormalization group.

  2. Quiescence Correlates Strongly with Directly Measured Black Hole Mass in Central Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrazas, Bryan A.; Bell, Eric F.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.; White, Simon D. M.; Cattaneo, Andrea; Woo, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Roughly half of all stars reside in galaxies without significant ongoing star formation. However, galaxy formation models indicate that it is energetically challenging to suppress the cooling of gas and the formation of stars in galaxies that lie at the centers of their dark matter halos. In this Letter, we show that the dependence of quiescence on black hole and stellar mass is a powerful discriminant between differing models for the mechanisms that suppress star formation. Using observations of 91 star-forming and quiescent central galaxies with directly measured black hole masses, we find that quiescent galaxies host more massive black holes than star-forming galaxies with similar stellar masses. This observational result is in qualitative agreement with models that assume that effective, more-or-less continuous active galactic nucleus feedback suppresses star formation, strongly suggesting the importance of the black hole in producing quiescence in central galaxies.

  3. A strong genetic correlation underlying a behavioural syndrome disappears during development because of genotype–age interactions

    PubMed Central

    Class, Barbara; Brommer, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    In animal populations, as in humans, behavioural differences between individuals that are consistent over time and across contexts are considered to reflect personality, and suites of correlated behaviours expressed by individuals are known as behavioural syndromes. Lifelong stability of behavioural syndromes is often assumed, either implicitly or explicitly. Here, we use a quantitative genetic approach to study the developmental stability of a behavioural syndrome in a wild population of blue tits. We find that a behavioural syndrome formed by a strong genetic correlation of two personality traits in nestlings disappears in adults, and we demonstrate that genotype–age interaction is the likely mechanism underlying this change during development. A behavioural syndrome may hence change during organismal development, even when personality traits seem to be strongly physiologically or functionally linked in one age group. We outline how such developmental plasticity has important ramifications for understanding the mechanistic basis as well as the evolutionary consequences of behavioural syndromes. PMID:26041348

  4. Self-consistent implementation of ensemble density functional theory method for multiple strongly correlated electron pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Michael; Liu, Fang; Kim, Kwang S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-12-01

    The spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method is based on an ensemble representation of the density and is capable of correctly describing the non-dynamic electron correlation stemming from (near-)degeneracy of several electronic configurations. The existing REKS methodology describes systems with two electrons in two fractionally occupied orbitals. In this work, the REKS methodology is extended to treat systems with four fractionally occupied orbitals accommodating four electrons and self-consistent implementation of the REKS(4,4) method with simultaneous optimization of the orbitals and their fractional occupation numbers is reported. The new method is applied to a number of molecular systems where simultaneous dissociation of several chemical bonds takes place, as well as to the singlet ground states of organic tetraradicals 2,4-didehydrometaxylylene and 1,4,6,9-spiro[4.4]nonatetrayl.

  5. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  6. Quasiparticles in transition metals with strong local correlations: band formation and collective effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, N.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]We address the question, whether low lying one-particle excitations in the Fermi-liquid phase of highly correlated electron systems can form well defined bands of nearly stable quasiparticles, and comment on features of a universal band picture for these systems. We outline how to derive a description of instabilities to magnetic, charged ordered or superconducting phases, which bears a close analogy to Stoner theory and lends itself to an interpretation in terms of quasiparticle bands and residual interactions at low temperatures. Concepts and problems are illustrated via calculations for some standard models of solid-state theory using modern many-body techniques like NRG, NCA and DMFT. Differences to conventional band structure theory are pointed out. We shortly comment on the relevance of these questions to the physics of inhomogeneous systems and small particles.

  7. Binding of holes to magnetic impurities in a strongly correlated system

    SciTech Connect

    Poilblanc, D.; Scalapino, D.J.; Hanke, W. )

    1994-11-01

    The effect of a magnetic ([ital S]=1/2) impurity coupled to a two-dimensional system of correlated electrons (described by the [ital t]-[ital J] model) is studied by exact diagonalizations. It is found that, if the exchange coupling of the impurity with the neighboring spins is ferromagnetic or weakly antiferromagnetic, an extra hole can form bound states of different spatial symmetries with the impurity extending to a few lattice spacings. The binding energy is maximum when the impurity is completely decoupled (vacancy) and vanishes for an antiferromagnetic coupling exceeding [similar to]0.3[ital J]. Several peaks appear in the single-hole spectral function below the lower edge of the quasiparticle band as signatures of the [ital d]-, [ital s]-, and [ital p]-wave bound states.

  8. Azimuthal charged-particle correlations and possible local strong parity violation.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bnzarov, I; Bonner, B E; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Silva, L C; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E J; Geromitsos, A; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jena, C; Jin, F; Jones, C L; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Konzer, J; Kopytine, M; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, N; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakai, S; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Semertzidis, Y; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xie, W; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2009-12-18

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to nontrivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three-particle azimuthal correlator which is a P even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at square root of s(NN) = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  9. Time-resolved Studies of Phase Transition Dynamics in Strongly Correlated Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Rini, M; Tobey, R; Dean, N; Wall, S; Ehrke, H; Zhu, Y; Tomioka, Y; Tokura, Y; Schoenlein, R W; Cavalleri, A

    2008-12-05

    Ultrafast light pulses can be used to control electronic, magnetic and structural phases of complex solids. Here, we investigate the dynamics of insulator-metal phase transitions in colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites by a combination of femtosecond visible-to-midinfrared pump-probe techniques and transport measurements. We show that an insulator-metal transition can be stimulated in CMR manganites by both above bandgap excitation and selective excitation of individual vibrational degrees of freedom. These two approaches rely on the ultrafast manipulation of parameters controlling the electronic filling and the electronic bandwidth respectively, extending the concepts of filling and bandwidth control to the ultrafast timescale. The ultrafast vibrational control of correlated-electron phases may provide new insights into the role played by lattice vibrations in determining the electronic properties of complex solids.

  10. Computation of electronic structure and magnetic properties of strongly correlated materials with LDA+DMFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, S. L.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2015-04-01

    In this review, we describe general ideas of the LDA+DMFT method which merges dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) and density functional theory (in particular the local density approximation (LDA)). Nowadays, the LDA+DMFT computational scheme is the most powerful numerical tool for studying physical properties of real materials and chemical compounds. It incorporates the advantage of DMFT to treat the full range of local dynamical Coulomb correlations and the ability of band methods to describe material-specific band dispersion caused by the lattice periodicity. We briefly discuss underlying physical ideas of LDA+DMFT and its mathematical implementation. Then different algorithms applied to solution of the DMFT impurity problem are briefly described. We then give examples of successful applications of the LDA+DMFT method to study spectral and magnetic properties of recently synthesized compounds like pnictide superconductors as well as classic charge-transfer systems NiO and MnO.

  11. Final report for next generation multi-scale quantum simulation software for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Mark

    2014-11-18

    The goal of this project was to develop a new formalism for the correlated electron problem, which we call, the Multi Scale Many Body formalism. This report will focus on the work done at the Louisiana State University (LSU) since the mid term report. The LSU group moved from the University of Cincinnati (UC) to LSU in the summer of 2008. In the last full year at UC, only half of the funds were received and it took nearly two years for the funds to be transferred from UC to LSU . This effectively shut down the research at LSU until the transfer was completed in 2011, there were also two no-cost extensions of the grant until August of this year. The grant ended for the other SciDAC partners at Davis and ORNL in 2011. Since the mid term report, the LSU group has published 19 papers [P1-P19] acknowledging this SciDAC, which are listed below. In addition, numerous invited talked acknowledged the SciDAC. Below, we will summarize the work at LSU since the mid-term report and mainly since funding resumed. The projects include the further development of multi-scale methods for correlated systems (1), the study of quantum criticality at finite doping in the Hubbard model (2), the description of a promising new method to study Anderson localization with a million-fold reduction of computational complexity!, the description of other projects (4), and (5) a workshop to close out the project that brought together exascale program developers (Stellar, MPI, OpenMP,...) with applications developers.

  12. Condensed-matter ab initio approach for strongly correlated electrons: Application to a quantum spin liquid candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, Youhei

    2015-12-31

    Recently, condensed-matter ab initio approaches to strongly correlated electrons confined in crystalline solids have been developed and applied to transition-metal oxides and molecular conductors. In this paper, an ab initio scheme based on constrained random phase approximations and localized Wannier orbitals is applied to a spin liquid candidate Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} and is shown to reproduce experimentally observed specific heat.

  13. High-quality single crystal growth and strongly correlated electronic states in rare earth and actinide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Honda, Fuminori; Hirose, Yusuke; Settai, Rikio; Takeuchi, Tetsuya

    2016-11-01

    We review the nature of strongly correlated electronic states in rare earth and actinide compounds, focusing on localized versus itinerant electronic states in CeRhIn5, quantum critical phenomena in YbIr2Zn20, residual resistivity in CeCu6, metamagnetism in heavy fermion compounds, and unconventional superconductivity in CeIrSi3 without inversion symmetry in the crystal structure, emphasizing that sample quality is essentially important to clarify the characteristic features for the heavy fermion compounds.

  14. Observation of correlated spin-orbit order in a strongly anisotropic quantum wire system.

    PubMed

    Brand, C; Pfnür, H; Landolt, G; Muff, S; Dil, J H; Das, Tanmoy; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-09-10

    Quantum wires with spin-orbit coupling provide a unique opportunity to simultaneously control the coupling strength and the screened Coulomb interactions where new exotic phases of matter can be explored. Here we report on the observation of an exotic spin-orbit density wave in Pb-atomic wires on Si(557) surfaces by mapping out the evolution of the modulated spin-texture at various conditions with spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The results are independently quantified by surface transport measurements. The spin polarization, coherence length, spin dephasing rate and the associated quasiparticle gap decrease simultaneously as the screened Coulomb interaction decreases with increasing excess coverage, providing a new mechanism for generating and manipulating a spin-orbit entanglement effect via electronic interaction. Despite clear evidence of spontaneous spin-rotation symmetry breaking and modulation of spin-momentum structure as a function of excess coverage, the average spin polarization over the Brillouin zone vanishes, indicating that time-reversal symmetry is intact as theoretically predicted.

  15. Optical Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated (MOTT-HUBBARD, Heavy-Fermion, Unconventional Superconductor) Materials Tuned Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A; Struzhkin, V V

    2003-11-12

    During the past years, the Co-PI's have been responsible for the development and operation of optical techniques (Raman, IR, fluorescence, absorption and reflectance spectroscopy at ultrahigh pressures and high and low temperatures) which have proven to be extremely powerful for studying low-Z, molecular solids including hydrogen, ice, etc. (see results below). Meanwhile, it has become increasingly clear that optical spectroscopy has an equally extraordinary potential for studying metals and superconductors at ultrahigh pressures, thus the result will have a major impact on material research. However, because of the extreme difference in optical properties of opaque metals and transparent insulating molecular solids, successful accomplishment of the present project will require substantial effort in improving the present equipment and developing new techniques, and funds for this are requested here. Below we provide a short description of the work done and techniques developed during the last years. We also propose to explore new frontiers in compressed materials close to the insulator-metal boundaries, spin-crossover, and other quantum critical points.

  16. Determination of the strong phase in D0-->K+pi- using quantum-correlated measurements.

    PubMed

    Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E

    2008-06-06

    We exploit the quantum coherence between pair-produced D0 and D[over]0 in psi(3770) decays to study charm mixing, which is characterized by the parameters x and y, and to make a first determination of the relative strong phase delta between D0-->K+pi- and D[over]0-->K+pi-. Using 281 pb(-1) of e+e- collision data collected with the CLEO-c detector at Ecm=3.77 GeV, as well as branching fraction input and time-integrated measurements of RM identical with (x2 + y2)/2 and RWS identical with Gamma(D0-->K+pi-)/Gamma(D[over]0-->K+pi-) from other experiments, we find cosdelta=1.03(-0.17)(+0.31)+/-0.06, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. By further including other mixing parameter measurements, we obtain an alternate measurement of cosdelta=1.10+/-0.35+/-0.07, as well as x sindelta=(4.4(-1.8)(+2.7)+/-2.9)x10(-3) and delta=(22(-12-11)(+11+9)) degrees .

  17. Dynamic structure factor of a strongly correlated Fermi superfluid within a density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng; Dalfovo, Franco; Sharma, Rishi; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamic structure factor of a strongly interacting Fermi gas at the crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensates, by developing an improved random phase approximation within the framework of a density functional theory (DFT)—the so-called superfluid local density approximation. Compared with the previous random-phase-approximation studies based on the standard Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, the use of the DFT greatly improves the accuracy of the equation of state at the crossover, and leads to a better description of both collective Bogoliubov-Anderson-Goldstone phonon mode and single-particle fermionic excitations at small transferred momentum. Near unitarity, where the s-wave scattering length diverges, we show that the single-particle excitations start to significantly contribute to the spectrum of dynamic structure factor once the frequency is above a threshold of the energy gap at 2{{Δ }}. The sharp rise in the spectrum at this threshold can be utilized to measure the pairing gap Δ. Together with the sound velocity determined from the phonon branch, the dynamic structure factor provides us some key information of the crossover Fermi superfluid. Our predictions could be examined in experiments with 6Li or 40K atoms using Bragg spectroscopy.

  18. Building a Unified Computational Model for the Resonant X-Ray Scattering of Strongly Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, Arun

    2016-12-01

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of X-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on understanding and modeling of elastic and inelastic resonant X-ray scattering processes. We worked to unify the three different computational approaches currently used for modeling X-ray scattering—density functional theory, dynamical mean-field theory, and small-cluster exact diagonalization—to achieve a more realistic material-specific picture of the interaction between X-rays and complex matter. To achieve a convergence in the interpretation and to maximize complementary aspects of different theoretical methods, we concentrated on the cuprates, where most experiments have been performed. Our team included both US and international researchers and it fostered new collaborations between researchers currently working with different approaches. In addition, we developed close relationships with experimental groups working in the area at various synchrotron facilities in the US. Our CRT thus helped toward enabling the US to assume a leadership role in the theoretical development of the field, and to create a global network and community of scholars dedicated to X-ray scattering research.

  19. Emergence of q-statistical functions in a generalized binomial distribution with strong correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, G.; Tsallis, C.

    2015-05-01

    We study a symmetric generalization pk ( N ) ( η , α ) of the binomial distribution recently introduced by Bergeron et al., where η ∈ [0, 1] denotes the win probability and α is a positive parameter. This generalization is based on q-exponential generating functions ( eq gen z ≡ [ 1 + ( 1 - qgen ) z ] 1 / ( 1 - q gen ) ; e1 z = e z ) where qgen = 1 + 1/α. The numerical calculation of the probability distribution function of the number of wins k, related to the number of realizations N, strongly approaches a discrete qdisc-Gaussian distribution, for win-loss equiprobability (i.e., η = 1/2) and all values of α. Asymptotic N → ∞ distribution is in fact a qatt-Gaussian eq att - β z 2 , where qatt = 1 - 2/(α - 2) and β = (2α - 4). The behavior of the scaled quantity k/Nγ is discussed as well. For γ < 1, a large-deviation-like property showing a qldl-exponential decay is found, where qldl = 1 + 1/(ηα). For η = 1/2, qldl and qatt are related through 1/(qldl - 1) + 1/(qatt - 1) = 1, ∀α. For γ = 1, the law of large numbers is violated, and we consistently study the large-deviations with respect to the probability of the N → ∞ limit distribution, yielding a power law, although not exactly a qLD-exponential decay. All q-statistical parameters which emerge are univocally defined by (η, α). Finally, we discuss the analytical connection with the Pólya urn problem.

  20. Up-regulation of USP2a and FASN in gliomas correlates strongly with glioma grade.

    PubMed

    Tao, Bang-Bao; He, Hua; Shi, Xiu-hua; Wang, Chun-lin; Li, Wei-qing; Li, Bing; Dong, Yan; Hu, Guo-Han; Hou, Li-Jun; Luo, Chun; Chen, Ju-xiang; Chen, Huai-rui; Yu, Yu-hong; Sun, Qing-fang; Lu, Yi-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Gliomas are the most common neoplasms in the central nervous system. The lack of efficacy of glioma therapies necessitates in-depth studies of glioma pathology, especially of the underlying molecular mechanisms that transform normal glial cells into tumor cells. Here we report that a deubiquitinating enzyme, ubiquitin-specific protease 2a (USP2a), and its substrate, fatty acid synthase (FASN), are over-expressed in glioma tissue. Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression and cellular distribution of USP2a and FASN in human glioma tissues. The expression patterns of USP2a and FASN correlated with the pathologic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of USP2a and its substrate FASN were higher in high-grade (World Health Organization [WHO] grades III and IV) glioma tissues than in low-grade (WHO grades I and II) glioma tissues. Western blot analysis indicated that the average optical densitometry ratio of USP2a and its substrate FASN in high-grade gliomas was higher than in low-grade gliomas. Moreover, statistical analysis of grade-classified glioma samples showed that the level of USP2a and FASN expression increased with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma. USP2a protein expression was detected in the nucleus of glioma tissues and an increase in expression was significantly associated with the elevation of the WHO grade of glioma by immunohistochemistry. These findings expand our understanding of the molecular profiling of glioma and could shed light on new diagnostic criteria for gliomas.

  1. Targeted metabolomics profiles are strongly correlated with nutritional patterns in women.

    PubMed

    Menni, Cristina; Zhai, Guangju; Macgregor, Alexander; Prehn, Cornelia; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Suhre, Karsten; Adamski, Jerzy; Cassidy, Aedin; Illig, Thomas; Spector, Tim D; Valdes, Ana M

    2013-04-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in human metabolism and health. Metabolomics is a promising tool for clinical, genetic and nutritional studies. A key question is to what extent metabolomic profiles reflect nutritional patterns in an epidemiological setting. We assessed the relationship between metabolomic profiles and nutritional intake in women from a large cross-sectional community study. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) were applied to 1,003 women from the TwinsUK cohort with targeted metabolomic analyses of serum samples using the Biocrates Absolute-IDQ™ Kit p150 (163 metabolites). We analyzed seven nutritional parameters: coffee intake, garlic intake and nutritional scores derived from the FFQs summarizing fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol intake, meat intake, hypo-caloric dieting and a "traditional English" diet. We studied the correlation between metabolite levels and dietary intake patterns in the larger population and identified for each trait between 14 and 20 independent monozygotic twins pairs discordant for nutritional intake and replicated results in this set. Results from both analyses were then meta-analyzed. For the metabolites associated with nutritional patterns, we calculated heritability using structural equation modelling. 42 metabolite nutrient intake associations were statistically significant in the discovery samples (Bonferroni P < 4 × 10(-5)) and 11 metabolite nutrient intake associations remained significant after validation. We found the strongest associations for fruit and vegetables intake and a glycerophospholipid (Phosphatidylcholine diacyl C38:6, P = 1.39 × 10(-9)) and a sphingolipid (Sphingomyeline C26:1, P = 6.95 × 10(-13)). We also found significant associations for coffee (confirming a previous association with C10 reported in an independent study), garlic intake and hypo-caloric dieting. Using the twin study design we find that two thirds the metabolites associated with nutritional patterns have a

  2. Strong electron correlation in UO{sub 2}{sup −}: A photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Li; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Su, Jing; Hu, Han-Shi; Cao, Guo-Jin; Li, Jun

    2014-03-07

    The electronic structures of actinide systems are extremely complicated and pose considerable challenges both experimentally and theoretically because of significant electron correlation and relativistic effects. Here we report an investigation of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of uranium dioxides, UO{sub 2}{sup −} and UO{sub 2}, using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. The electron affinity of UO{sub 2} is measured to be 1.159(20) eV. Intense detachment bands are observed from the UO{sub 2}{sup −} low-lying (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} orbitals and the more deeply bound O2p-based molecular orbitals which are separated by a large energy gap from the U-based orbitals. Surprisingly, numerous weak photodetachment transitions are observed in the gap region due to extensive two-electron transitions, suggesting strong electron correlations among the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}{sup −} and the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 1}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}. These observations are interpreted using multi-reference ab initio calculations with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The strong electron correlations and spin-orbit couplings generate orders-of-magnitude more detachment transitions from UO{sub 2}{sup −} than expected on the basis of the Koopmans’ theorem. The current experimental data on UO{sub 2}{sup −} provide a long-sought opportunity to arbitrating various relativistic quantum chemistry methods aimed at handling systems with strong electron correlations.

  3. Development of high-brightness ultrafast electron microscope for studying nanoscale dynamics associated with strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng

    Strongly correlated-electron materials are a class of materials that exhibit numerous intriguing emergent phenomena, including metal-to-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, etc. These phenomena are beyond the reach of the conventional solid state physics, which is based on the band theory. Instead, strong electron-electron correlations are found to play important roles, which leads to complicated interplay between different degrees of freedoms (charge, lattice, spins...). In this thesis, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is used to investigate the photo-induced ultrafast structural dynamics of strongly correlated materials, among which VO2 is taken as an exemplar system, one that reveals the fundamental physics behind photo-induced phase transitions, electron-electron correlation on nanometer scales, and the electron-phonon coupling in this exotic class of materials. The phenomena presented here are expected to have more general significance as they may reflect the physics to which other strongly correlated materials also conform. In polycrystalline VO2 thin films, the structural changes resulting from photoexcitation with femtosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths are observed to lead to non-thermal phase transitions, which require less energy compared to the phase transitions induced by thermal excitation. The details of the structural change are extracted from the UED results revealing stepwise atomic movements after photoexcitation, which suggests the phase transition starts with a dilation of the correlated d electrons. On the other hand, the structural phase transition is found to be decoupled from the metal-to-insulator transition when the sample dimension is reduced to the sub-micrometer scale, which is attributed to the interface charge doping effects from different substrates. A new phase (M3, monoclinic metallic phase) is distinguished, which has not been discussed by the existing theoretical

  4. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-14

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  5. Orbital engineering of two-dimensional materials with hydrogenation: A realization of giant gap and strongly correlated topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh; Gil, Carmen J.; Smith, Sean C.; Li, Sean

    2015-07-01

    Orbital interaction plays an important role in topological insulators. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that hydrogenation can change two-dimensional (2D) trivial insulator/semimetal-like Pb, Mo, and W to a Z2 topological insulator with giant gaps by filtering unwanted orbitals such as the pz orbital in Pb, and the d3 z2-r2 in Mo and W. For PbH, the large intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) confined in the in-plane orbitals px ,y results in a bulk gap of 1.07 eV. For the case of MoH and WH, hydrogenation results in a novel s d4 hybridization with a Dirac cone formed by the out-of-plane orbital dy z /x z orbitals. Furthermore, due to the electron-electron interaction and the strong SOC in the 4 d and 5 d elements, the bulk band gap is significantly enhanced with a value of 1.28 eV for MoH and 0.30 eV for WH. The strong correlation effect also induces several topological phase transitions in WH like the Dirac semimetal and Mott insulating phase, while MoH remains a topological insulator even with large correlation effect. We propose that these new strongly correlated 2D materials can be realized experimentally by using substrate such as the boron nitride sheet, which can exhibit various novel properties such as the Dirac semimetal phase with large spin-orbit energy splitting as well as the quantum spin Hall property.

  6. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidences of Strong Electronic Correlations in (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Gihyeon; Song, S. J.; Hogan, T.; Wilson, S. D.; Moon, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on infrared spectroscopic studies of the electronic response of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. Our experiments revealed hallmarks of strong electronic correlations in the evolution of the electronic response across the filling-controlled insulator-metal transition. We observed a collapse of the Jeff = 1/2 Mott gap accompanying the transfer of the spectral weight from the high-energy region to the gap region with electron doping. The intraband conductivity at the metallic side of the transition was found to consist of coherent Drude-like and incoherent responses. The sum rule and the extended Drude model analyses further indicated a large mass enhancement. Our results demonstrate a critical role of the electronic correlations in the charge dynamics of the (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7 system. PMID:27599573

  7. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-06

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  8. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Radaelli, P. G.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2015-01-26

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007–2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  9. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kreula, J. M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case. PMID:27609673

  10. Strong correlations of neutron star radii with the slopes of nuclear matter incompressibility and symmetry energy at saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, N.; Agrawal, B. K.; Fortin, M.; Pais, H.; Providência, C.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Sulaksono, A.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the correlations of neutron star radii with the nuclear matter incompressibility, symmetry energy, and their slopes, which are the key parameters of the equation of state (EoS) of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron star radii and the EoS parameters are evaluated using a representative set of 24 Skyrme-type effective forces and 18 relativistic mean field models, and two microscopic calculations, all describing 2 M⊙ neutron stars. Unified EoSs for the inner-crust-core region have been built for all the phenomenological models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic. Our investigation shows the existence of a strong correlation of the neutron star radii with the linear combination of the slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients at the saturation density. Such correlations are found to be almost independent of the neutron star mass in the range 0.6 -1.8 M⊙ . This correlation can be linked to the empirical relation existing between the star radius and the pressure at a nucleonic density between one and two times saturation density, and the dependence of the pressure on the nuclear matter incompressibility, its slope, and the symmetry energy slope. The slopes of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the symmetry energy coefficients as estimated from the finite nuclei data yield the radius of a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star in the range 11.09 -12.86 km.

  11. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-03

    6.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 Nicolas Regnault, T. Senthil. Microscopic model for the boson integer quantum Hall effect, PHYSICAL REVIEW B (05 2013...accepted) (10 2012) B. Estienne, Z. Papic, N. Regnault, B. A. Bernevig. Matrix product states for trial quantum Hall states, Phys Rev B (11 2012...Simon C. Davenport, Eddy Ardonne, Nicolas Regnault, Steven H. Simon. Spin-singlet Gaffnian wave function for fractional quantum Hall systems

  12. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ruben; Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer's disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited (18)F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was (18)F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β ((18)F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein.

  13. Effect of Strong Correlations on the High Energy Anomaly in Hole- and Electron-Doped High-Tc Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, B.; Schmitt, F.; Meevasana, W.; Johnston, S.; Motoyama, E.M.; Greven, M.; Lu, D.H.; Kim, C.; Scalettar, R.T.; Shen, Z.-X.; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES

    2010-02-15

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). This paper demonstrates, using a combination of new ARPES measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that the HEA is not simply the byproduct of matrix element effects, but rather represents a cross-over from a quasi-particle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character, in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. the 'waterfall'-like behavior, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying both hole and electron doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram.

  14. Evidence for strong electron correlations in graphene molecular fragments: Theory and experiments on two-photon absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Roberts, Adam; Sandhu, Arvinder; Shukla, Alok; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2013-03-01

    Historically, the occurrence of the lowest two-photon state below the optical one-photon state in linear polyenes, polyacetylenes and polydiacetylenes provided the strongest evidence for strong electron correlations in these linear π-conjugated systems. We demonstrate similar behavior in several molecular fragments of graphene with D6 h symmetry, theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, we have calculated one versus two-photon absorptions in coronene, two different hexabenzocoronenes and circumcoronene, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople π-electron Hamiltonian using high order configuration interaction. Experimentally, we have performed z-scan measurements using a white light super-continuum source on coronene and hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene to determine frequency-dependent two-photon absorption coefficients, for comparison to the ground state absorptions. Excellent agreement between experiment and theory in our work gives strong evidence for significant electron correlations between the π-electrons in the graphene molecular fragments. We particularly benchmark high order electron-hole excitations in graphene fragments as a key element behind the agreement between theory and experiment in this work. We acknowledge NSF-CHE-1151475 grant as our funding source.

  15. Liking the odour, liking the food. Toddlers' liking of strongly flavoured foods correlates with liking of their odour.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Issanchou, S; Chabanet, C; Lange, C; Schaal, B; Monnery-Patris, S

    2014-10-01

    Olfaction plays a significant role in the sensing of foods. However, little information is available at any age on the relationship between the hedonic responses to given food odours and the effective liking and disliking of foods bearing these same odours. The present study aimed to assess the relationships between food odour liking and liking of the corresponding foods. This study relied on a longitudinal design involving 235 toddlers who were assessed for both their observed liking of a set of food odours and their parent-reported liking of foods at 12 and 22 months. To assess odour liking, eight odorants representing pleasant and unpleasant foods were presented in bottles along with neutral stimuli. The participants' behaviour towards the odorized and control bottles was measured in terms of mouthing, a behaviour considered to reflect attraction. For each odorant, odour-liking scores were calculated relative to the control. The participants' food liking was rated by the parents at the periods 12-15 and 21-24 months. Positive correlations were found between the odour-liking scores for some of the odours and the liking of the associated foods. These correlations concerned foods with strong, unpleasant flavours at 12 months only, suggesting that the olfactory system acts as an 'alarm' system during this period of food transition. At 22 months, no significant correlations were found, except a marginal one for green vegetables. Whatever the age, no significant correlations were found for pleasant odours. Thus, some correlations were found between the observed odour liking for food-related odours and the liking for the corresponding foods. However, these relationships are subject to developmental fluctuations depending on the hedonic nature of the odorants and the age when infants are tested.

  16. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-14

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  17. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  18. Strong correlations of dynamical and structural heterogeneities with localized soft modes in a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Zhang, F.; Mendelev, M. I.; Kramer, M. J.; Ho, K. M.

    2014-10-01

    Structural and dynamical heterogeneities in metallic glasses, while intensely studied, remain an enigma. For instance, whether and how the dynamical and structural heterogeneities are correlated is still an outstanding question. Meanwhile, the nature of the impact of medium-range order (MRO) on the dynamical heterogeneity remains elusive. In this paper, we analyzed the structural and dynamical heterogeneities in both as-quenched and relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glasses based on the atomistic trajectories collected from molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the majority of the mobile atoms are not involved in icosahedral clusters or Bergman superclusters, indicating that dynamical heterogeneities are strongly correlated with structural heterogeneities. The Bergman-type MRO has an even stronger correlation with the dynamical heterogeneity than the icosahedral short range order. Moreover, we found that the localized soft vibration modes below 1.0 THz are mostly concentrated on the mobile atoms. These results suggest that the vibrational properties can be conveniently utilized to predict the atomic mobility in metallic glasses, which can bridge the studies of dynamical heterogeneity by experiments and simulations.

  19. Contiguous 3 d and 4 f Magnetism: Strongly Correlated 3 d Electrons in YbFe2Al10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuntia, P.; Peratheepan, P.; Strydom, A. M.; Utsumi, Y.; Ko, K.-T.; Tsuei, K.-D.; Tjeng, L. H.; Steglich, F.; Baenitz, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present magnetization, specific heat, and Al 27 NMR investigations on YbFe2Al10 over a wide range in temperature and magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility at low temperatures is strongly enhanced at weak magnetic fields, accompanied by a ln (T0/T ) divergence of the low-T specific heat coefficient in zero field, which indicates a ground state of correlated electrons. From our hard-x-ray photoemission spectroscopy study, the Yb valence at 50 K is evaluated to be 2.38. The system displays valence fluctuating behavior in the low to intermediate temperature range, whereas above 400 K, Yb3 + carries a full and stable moment, and Fe carries a moment of about 3.1 μB. The enhanced value of the Sommerfeld-Wilson ratio and the dynamic scaling of the spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by T [(1 /T1T ) 27 ] with static susceptibility suggests admixed ferromagnetic correlations. (1 /T1T ) 27 simultaneously tracks the valence fluctuations from the 4 f Yb ions in the high temperature range and field dependent antiferromagnetic correlations among partially Kondo screened Fe 3 d moments at low temperature; the latter evolve out of an Yb 4 f admixed conduction band.

  20. Nonsequential Double Ionization of Atoms in Strong Laser Field: Identifying the Mechanisms behind the Correlated-Electron Momentum Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Difa; Fu, Libin; Liu, Jie

    Within the strong-field physics community, there has been increasing interest on nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) induced by electron-electron (e-e) correlation. A large variety of novel phenomena has been revealed in experiments during the past decades. However, the theoretical understanding and interpretation of this process is still far from being complete. The most accurate simulation, i.e. the exact solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) for two electrons in a laser field is computationally expensive. In order to overcome the difficulty, we proposed a feasible semiclassical model, in which we treat the tunneling ionization of the outmost electron quantum mechanically according to the ADK theory, sample the inner electron from microcanonical distribution and then evolve the two electrons with Newton's equations. With this model, we have successfully explained various NSDI phenomena, including the excessive DI yield, the energy spectra and angular distribution of photoelectrons. Very recently, it is adopted to reveal the physical mechanisms behind the fingerlike structure in the correlated electron momentum spectra, the unexpected correlation-anticorrelation transition close to the recollision threshold, and the anomalous NSDI of alkaline-earth-metal atoms in circularly polarized field. The obvious advantage of our model is that it gives time-resolved insights into the complex dynamics of NSDI, from the turn-on of the laser field to the final escape of the electrons, thus allowing us to disentangle and thoroughly analyze the underlying physical mechanisms.

  1. Strong correlations of dynamical and structural heterogeneities with localized soft modes in a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Zhang, Feng; Mendelev, Mikhail I; Kramer, Matthew J; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-10-13

    Structural and dynamical heterogeneities in metallic glasses, while intensely studied, remain an enigma. For instance, whether and how the dynamical and structural heterogeneities are correlated is still an outstanding question. Meanwhile, the nature of the impact of medium-range order (MRO) on the dynamical heterogeneity remains elusive. In this paper, we analyzed the structural and dynamical heterogeneities in both as-quenched and relaxed Cu 64.5Zr35.5 metallic glasses based on the atomistic trajectories collected from molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the majority of the mobile atoms are not involved in icosahedral clusters or Bergman superclusters, indicating that dynamical heterogeneities are strongly correlated with structural heterogeneities. The Bergman-type MRO has an even stronger correlation with the dynamical heterogeneity than the icosahedral short range order. Moreover, we found that the localized soft vibration modes below 1.0 THz are mostly concentrated on the mobile atoms. These results suggest that the vibrational properties can be conveniently utilized to predict the atomic mobility in metallic glasses, which can bridge the studies of dynamical heterogeneity by experiments and simulations.

  2. Strong correlations of dynamical and structural heterogeneities with localized soft modes in a Cu-Zr metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, F.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z. Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-10-13

    Structural and dynamical heterogeneities in metallic glasses, while intensely studied, remain an enigma. For instance, whether and how the dynamical and structural heterogeneities are correlated is still an outstanding question. Meanwhile, the nature of the impact of medium-range order (MRO) on the dynamical heterogeneity remains elusive. In this paper, we analyzed the structural and dynamical heterogeneities in both as-quenched and relaxed Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} metallic glasses based on the atomistic trajectories collected from molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the majority of the mobile atoms are not involved in icosahedral clusters or Bergman superclusters, indicating that dynamical heterogeneities are strongly correlated with structural heterogeneities. The Bergman-type MRO has an even stronger correlation with the dynamical heterogeneity than the icosahedral short range order. Moreover, we found that the localized soft vibration modes below 1.0 THz are mostly concentrated on the mobile atoms. These results suggest that the vibrational properties can be conveniently utilized to predict the atomic mobility in metallic glasses, which can bridge the studies of dynamical heterogeneity by experiments and simulations.

  3. Exploring the effects of photon correlations from thermal sources on bacterial photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; De Mendoza, Adriana; Rodríguez, Ferney; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F.

    Thermal light sources can produce photons with strong spatial correlations. We study the role that these correlations might potentially play in bacterial photosynthesis. Our findings show a relationship between the transversal distance between consecutive absorptions and the efficiency of the photosynthetic process. Furthermore, membranes where the clustering of core complexes (so-called RC-LH1) is high, display a range where the organism profits maximally from the spatial correlation of the incoming light. By contrast, no maximum is found for membranes with low core-core clustering. We employ a detailed membrane model with state-of-the-art empirical inputs. Our results suggest that the organization of the membrane's antenna complexes may be well-suited to the spatial correlations present in an natural light source. Future experiments will be needed to test this prediction.

  4. Temperament in bullheads: do laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables correlate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobler, Alexander; Engelen, Brecht; Knaepkens, Guy; Eens, Marcel

    2009-10-01

    The relevance of temperament traits for life history strategy or productivity is increasingly acknowledged. Temperament traits are often either observed in captivity or in the wild, but studies combining both observations are very rare. We examine whether exploratory behaviour in the bullhead ( Cottus perifretum), assayed under laboratory conditions, predicts this behaviour under field conditions. Forty-three PIT-tagged individuals were first assayed for exploration of a novel environment in the aquarium and then released into an unfamiliar stream stretch, where they were later relocated using a mobile antenna. Explorative behaviour assayed in the laboratory was significantly positively related to the exploration in the field, thus predicting distance moved in the field release. Both in the laboratory and in the field, explorative behaviour was not related to individual body length. When bullheads that did not leave the refuge in the aquarium (laboratory assay) and, therefore, did not explore the new environment were excluded from the analysis, the correlation between laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables became weaker. However, overall, our results illustrate that exploration rate of bullheads in isolated single-individual experiments can be used to predict this behaviour in the natural ecosystem.

  5. Temperament in bullheads: do laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables correlate?

    PubMed

    Kobler, Alexander; Engelen, Brecht; Knaepkens, Guy; Eens, Marcel

    2009-10-01

    The relevance of temperament traits for life history strategy or productivity is increasingly acknowledged. Temperament traits are often either observed in captivity or in the wild, but studies combining both observations are very rare. We examine whether exploratory behaviour in the bullhead (Cottus perifretum), assayed under laboratory conditions, predicts this behaviour under field conditions. Forty-three PIT-tagged individuals were first assayed for exploration of a novel environment in the aquarium and then released into an unfamiliar stream stretch, where they were later relocated using a mobile antenna. Explorative behaviour assayed in the laboratory was significantly positively related to the exploration in the field, thus predicting distance moved in the field release. Both in the laboratory and in the field, explorative behaviour was not related to individual body length. When bullheads that did not leave the refuge in the aquarium (laboratory assay) and, therefore, did not explore the new environment were excluded from the analysis, the correlation between laboratory and field explorative behaviour variables became weaker. However, overall, our results illustrate that exploration rate of bullheads in isolated single-individual experiments can be used to predict this behaviour in the natural ecosystem.

  6. A strong correlation exists between the distribution of retinal ganglion cells and nose length in the dog.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Paul; Grassi, Tanya D; Harman, Alison M

    2004-01-01

    The domestic dog, CANIS LUPUS FAMILIARIS, is a subspecies of the gray wolf, CANIS LUPUS, with almost identical mitochondrial DNA. The dog is the most diverse species on earth, with skull length varying between 7 and 28 cm whereas the wolf skull is around 30 cm long. However, eye size in dogs does not appear to vary as much. For example, small dogs such as the chihuahua appear to have very large eyes in proportion to the skull. Our aim was to examine eye size and retinal cell numbers and distribution to determine whether the dog eye exhibits as much variation as the skull. We found a correlation between eye radius and skull dimensions. However, the most surprising finding was that the distribution of ganglion cells in the eye varied tremendously from a horizontally aligned visual streak of fairly even density across the retina (as seen in the wolf) to a strong area centralis with virtually no streak (for example, as observed in a pug from the current series). This variation in ganglion cell density within a single species is quite unique. Intriguingly, the ratio of peak ganglion cell density in the area centralis to visual streak was highly negatively correlated with skull length (r = -0.795, n = 22) and positively correlated with cephalic index (r = 0.687, n = 22). The orientation of eyelid aperture was also correlated with cephalic index (r = 0.648, n = 22). Therefore, the genetic manipulation of selective breeding, which has produced an abnormal shortening of the skull and eyelids with less lateral apertures, has also produced a considerably more pronounced area centralis in the dog.

  7. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated rare-earth intermetallics RIn₃ and RSn₃ (R=Sm, Eu, and Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Shafiq, M.; Ahmad, Iftikhar E-mail: dr.iftikhar@uom.edu.pk; Jalali Asadabadi, S.

    2014-09-14

    In this paper, the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of RIn₃ and RSn₃ (R = Sm, Eu, Gd) compounds have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital method within the density functional theory. The structural properties are investigated using the LDA, GGA, and the band correlated LDA+U and GGA+U schemes. The lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results and the divalent state of Eu is also verified. The spin-orbit coupling is included in order to predict the correct electronic properties and splitting of 4f states of the rare earth elements is also incorporated. We calculated Bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, anisotropic ratio, Kleinman parameters, Poisson's ratio, Lame's co-efficient, sound velocities for shear and longitudinal waves, and Debye temperature. We also predict the Cauchy pressure and B/G ratio in order to explore the ductile and brittle behaviors of these compounds.

  8. Thermal conductivity of the pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6: strong electron correlations and fully gapped superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Y; Shimono, Y; Shibauchi, T; Matsuda, Y; Yonezawa, S; Muraoka, Y; Hiroi, Z

    2006-06-23

    To elucidate the nature of the superconducting ground state of the geometrically frustrated pyrochlore KOs2O6 (Tc=9.6 K), the thermal conductivity was measured down to low temperatures (approximately Tc/100). We found that the quasiparticle mean free path is strikingly enhanced below a transition at Tp=7.8 K, indicating enormous electron inelastic scattering in the normal state. In magnetic fields, the conduction at T-->0 K is nearly constant up to approximately 0.4Hc2, in contrast with the rapid growth expected for superconductors with an anisotropic gap. This unambiguously indicates a fully gapped superconductivity, in contrast with previous studies. These results highlight that KOs2O6 is unique among superconductors with strong electron correlations.

  9. Predictive Capability for Strongly Correlated Systems: Mott Transition in MnO, Multielectron Magnetic Moments, and Dynamics Effects in Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei

    2013-02-21

    There are classes of materials that are important to DOE and to the science and technology community, generically referred to as strongly correlated electron systems (SCES), which have proven very difficult to understand and to simulate in a material-specific manner. These range from actinides, which are central to the DOE mission, to transition metal oxides, which include the most promising components of new spin electronics applications as well as the high temperature superconductors, to intermetallic compounds whose heavy fermion characteristics and quantum critical behavior has given rise to some of the most active areas in condensed matter theory. The objective of the CMSN cooperative research team was to focus on the application of these new methodologies to the specific issue of Mott transitions, multi-electron magnetic moments, and dynamical properties correlated materials. Working towards this goal, the W&M team extended its first-principles phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method to accurately calculate structural phase transitions and excited states.

  10. Mobility and Muscle Strength Together are More Strongly Correlated with Falls in Suburb-Dwelling Older Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyang; Ma, Yixuan; Wang, Jiazhong; Han, Peipei; Dong, Renwei; Kang, Li; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Suxing; Wang, Jing; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, Maoran; Wang, Liancheng; Niu, Kaijun; Guo, Qi

    2016-05-05

    Falls are common in older adults and result in adverse outcomes. Impaired mobility and poor muscle strength have been consistently identified as the main contributors to falls. We choose three easy-to-perform tests (i.e. Timed Up and Go test (TUGT), walking speed (WS) and grip strength (GS)) in order to assess mobility and muscle strength to further define their relationship with falls. This study is cross-sectional, consisting of 1092 residents over 60-year-old; 589 were female. 204 (18.68%) participants reported falling at least once in the past year. It was found that, of the three tests evaluated independently, a TUGT < 9.1750 s had the strongest association with fewer falls. When evaluating these tests as pairs, the combination of a TUGT < 9.1750 s and a WS < 0.9963 m/s was the best protective indicator of falls after adjusting for age, sex and other variables. When evaluating all three tests in conjunction with each other, the combination of a TUGT < 9.1750 s, a WS < 0.9963 m/s, and a GS > 0.3816 was most correlated with less possibility of falls. The combination of a better TUGT performance, a stronger GS, and a slower WS is the most strongly correlated with less possibility of falls.

  11. How Unique is Any Given Seismogram? - Exploring Correlation Methods to Identify Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Dodge, D. A.; Ford, S. R.; Pyle, M. L.; Hauk, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    As with conventional wisdom about snowflakes, we would expect it unlikely that any two broadband seismograms would ever be exactly identical. However depending upon the resolution of our comparison metric, we do expect, and often find, bandpassed seismograms that correlate to very high levels (>0.99). In fact regional (e.g. Schaff and Richards, 2011) and global investigations (e.g. Dodge and Walter, 2015) find large numbers of highly correlated seismograms. Decreasing computational costs are increasing the tremendous potential for correlation in lowering detection, location and identification thresholds for explosion monitoring (e.g. Schaff et al., 2012, Gibbons and Ringdal, 2012; Zhang and Wen, 2015). We have shown in the case of Source Physics Experiment (SPE) chemical explosions, templates at local and near regional stations can detect, locate and identify very small explosions, which might be applied to monitoring active test sites (Ford and Walter, 2015). In terms of elastic theory, seismograms are the convolution between source and Green function terms. Thus high correlation implies similar sources, closely located. How do we quantify this physically? For example it is well known that as the template event and target events are increasingly separated spatially, their correlation diminishes, as the difference in the Green function between the two events grows larger. This is related to the event separation in terms of wavelength, the heterogeneity of the Earth structure, and the time-bandwidth of the correlation parameters used, but this has not been well quantified. We are using the historic dataset of nuclear explosions in southern Nevada to explore empirically where and how well these events correlate as a function of location, depth, size, time-bandwidth and other parameters. A goal is to develop more meaningful and physical metrics that go beyond the correlation coefficient and can be applied to explosion monitoring problems, particularly event

  12. Time-resolved THz studies of carrier dynamics in semiconductors, superconductors, and strongly-correlated electron materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2006-11-14

    Perhaps the most important aspect of contemporary condensed matter physics involves understanding strong Coulomb interactions between the large number of electrons in a solid. Electronic correlations lead to the emergence of new system properties, such as metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, magneto-resistance, Bose-Einstein condensation, the formation of excitonic gases, or the integer and fractional Quantum Hall effects. The discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in particular was a watershed event, leading to dramatic experimental and theoretical advances in the field of correlated-electron systems. Such materials often exhibit competition between the charge, lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom, whose cause-effect relationships are difficult to ascertain. Experimental insight into the properties of solids is traditionally obtained by time-averaged probes, which measure e.g., linear optical spectra, electrical conduction properties, or the occupied band structure in thermal equilibrium. Many novel physical properties arise from excitations out of the ground state into energetically higher states by thermal, optical, or electrical means. This leads to fundamental interactions between the system's constituents, such as electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, which occur on ultrafast timescales. While these interactions underlie the physical properties of solids, they are often only indirectly inferred from time-averaged measurements. Time-resolved spectroscopy, consequently, is playing an ever increasing role to provide insight into light-matter interaction, microscopic processes, or cause-effect relationships that determine the physics of complex materials. In the past, experiments using visible and near-infrared femtosecond pulses have been extensively employed, e.g. to follow relaxation and dephasing processes in metals and semiconductors. However, many basic excitations in strongly-correlated electron systems and nanoscale

  13. A new presentation and exploration of human cerebral vasculature correlated with surface and sectional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Thirunavuukarasuu, Arumugam; Volkau, Ihar; Marchenko, Yevgen; Aminah, Bivi; Gelas, Arnaud; Huang, Su; Lee, Looi Chow; Liu, Jimin; Ng, Ting Ting; Nowinska, Natalia G; Qian, Guoyu Yu; Puspitasari, Fiftarina; Runge, Val M

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of human body models enabled by advances in diagnostic imaging, computing, and growing knowledge calls for the development of a new generation of systems for intelligent exploration of these models. Here, we introduce a novel paradigm for the exploration of digital body models illustrating cerebral vasculature. It enables dynamic scene compositing, real-time interaction combined with animation, correlation of 3D models with sectional images, quantification as well as 3D manipulation-independent labeling and knowledge-related meta labeling (with name, diameter, description, variants, and references). This novel exploration is incorporated into a 3D atlas of cerebral vasculature with arteries and veins along with the surrounding surface and sectional neuroanatomy derived from 3.0 Tesla scans. This exploration paradigm is useful in medical education, training, research, and clinical applications. It enables development of new generation systems for rapid and intelligent exploration of complicated digital body models in real time with dynamic scene compositing from highly parcellated 3D models, continuous navigation, and manipulation-independent labeling with multiple features.

  14. Strong genetic correlation between interview-assessed internalizing disorders and a brief self-report symptom scale.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Line C; Røysamb, Espen; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Orstavik, Ragnhild E; Kendler, Kenneth S; Tambs, Kristian

    2011-02-01

    Self-report scales for symptoms of anxiety and depression are frequently used for screening and research purposes. A moderate phenotypic association between disorders measured by diagnostic interviews and symptoms of anxiety and depression measured by self-report scales has been shown, but little is known about the overlap in these phenotypes' genetic and environmental variance. In the present study, we used twin modeling to identify common genetic and environmental liabilities underlying the phenotypic association between the self-report Symptom Checklist-5 (SCL-5) and lifetime internalizing disorders derived from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The sample consisted of 7,992 young adult twins from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel (NIPHT), who all responded to a questionnaire. A subset of 2,793 individuals later underwent structured interviews. The best fitting model showed a strong genetic correlation of 0.82 (95% confidence interval; 0.61-1.0) between current self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression, and lifetime internalizing disorders, which suggests an almost complete overlap in genetic liability. The correlation between environmental factors was much lower: 0.16 (0.00-0.34, 95% CI). This implies that brief self-report scales capture genetic variance that is highly overlapping with the genetic variance common to internalizing disorder diagnoses. It thus follows that SCL-5 and similar instruments may be used as screening instruments for genetic risk factors that influence liability to internalizing disorders. In addition, existing data on self-report symptoms of anxiety and depression can be used with increased confidence to specify models including effects from genes coding for internalizing disorders.

  15. Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very useful in quantifying disease severity, they require an extensive clinical experience and carry a risk of subjectivity. We explore the opportunity to use in vivo near-infrared (NIR) spectra as an objective and noninvasive method for local disease severity assessment in 31 psoriasis patients in whom selected plaques were scored clinically. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was used to analyze and predict the severity scores on the NIR spectra of psoriatic and uninvolved skin. The correlation between predicted and clinically assigned scores was R=0.94 (RMSE=0.96), suggesting that in vivo NIR provides accurate clinical quantification of psoriatic plaques. Hence, NIR may be a practical solution to clinical severity assessment of psoriasis, providing a continuous, linear, numerical value of severity.

  16. Exact entanglement studies of strongly correlated systems: role of long-range interactions and symmetries of the system.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Shaon; Goli, V M L Durga Prasad; Ramasesha, S; Sen, Diptiman

    2012-03-21

    We study the bipartite entanglement of strongly correlated systems using exact diagonalization techniques. In particular, we examine how the entanglement changes in the presence of long-range interactions by studying the Pariser-Parr-Pople model with long-range interactions. We compare the results for this model with those obtained for the Hubbard and Heisenberg models with short-range interactions. This study helps us to understand why the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) technique is so successful even in the presence of long-range interactions. To better understand the behavior of long-range interactions and why the DMRG works well with it, we study the entanglement spectrum of the ground state and a few excited states of finite chains. We also investigate if the symmetry properties of a state vector have any significance in relation to its entanglement. Finally, we make an interesting observation on the entanglement profiles of different states (across the energy spectrum) in comparison with the corresponding profile of the density of states. We use isotropic chains and a molecule with non-Abelian symmetry for these numerical investigations.

  17. Strongly correlated electron physics: From Kondo and spin glasses to heavy fermions, hidden order and quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Edmund; Mydosh, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    We summarize the development of strongly correlated electron physics (SCEP) stimu-lated from the 1930's when a strange upturn was found in the electrical resistivity at low temper-atures. It was only in 1965 that this effect was explained as a many-body, spin-flip, scattering of electrons from a magnetic impurity, i.e., the Kondo effect. This marked the beginning of SCEP. When the concentration of these impurities is increased so that they can randomly interact we have the spin glasses and their unconventional, yet classical phase transition. Spin glass physics formed the background know-how for the combination of two ferromagnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic spacer which generated the the giant magnetic resistance and it many applications in com-puter hardware. By fabricating a lattice of the magnetic species, viz., an intermetallic compound based upon certain rare-earth and actinide elements, we then create a heavy Fermi liquid that can support most unusual ground-state behavior, e.g., unconventional superconductivity. This leads to the mysterious and still unexplained "hidden order" phase transition of URu2Si2. Finally, since the heavy fermions commonly exhibit zero temperature phase transitions, aka, quantum phase transitions when tuned with pressure, magnetic field or doping, we are at the summit of today's SCEP - the prime topic of 2012 condensed matter physics.

  18. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: A New Challenge for Cold Atom Physics: Achieving the Strongly Correlated Regimes for Cold Atoms in Optical Lattices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tin-Lun

    2008-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices show great promise to generate a whole host of new strongly correlated states and to emulate many theoretical models for strongly interacting electronic systems. However, to reach these strongly correlated regimes, we need to reach unprecedented low temperatures within current experimental settings. To achieve this, it is necessary to remove considerable amount of entropy from the system. Here, we point out a general principle for removing entropies of quantum gases in optical lattices which will allow one to reach some extraordinarily low temperature scales.

  19. Observation of strain-controlled electronic modulations revealed by Fermi surface superstructures in strongly correlated LaNiO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyangkeun; Hyun, Seungill; Moreschini, Luca; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Chang, Youngjun; Sohn, Changhee; Jeong, Dawoon; Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Yongsu; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Shim, Jihoon; Noh, Taewon

    2014-03-01

    Control over the electronic properties of strongly correlated electron systems can be achieved by exploiting the misfit strain that exists in epitaxial films on lattice mismatched substrates. Here, we report a systematic investigation of electronic structures in strongly correlated LaNiO3 films under different strain states, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and the dynamical mean field theory. LaNiO3 film shows a change of a Fermi surface (FS) topology, driven by interplay between strong electron-electron correlations and misfit strain effects. Additionally, different from compressive strain case, a FS with tensile strain has a large flat region to induce strong FS nesting. As a result, different FS superstructures are observed in the compressive and tensile strain cases, and their origins are attributed to charge disproportionation and spin density waves, respectively. The more details will be discussed in the presentation.

  20. Perspective: Toward "synthesis by design": Exploring atomic correlations during inorganic materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderholm, L.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    Synthesis of inorganic extended solids is a critical starting point from which real-world functional materials and their consequent technologies originate. However, unlike the rich mechanistic foundation of organic synthesis, with its underlying rules of assembly (e.g., functional groups and their reactivities), the synthesis of inorganic materials lacks an underpinning of such robust organizing principles. In the latter case, any such rules must account for the diversity of chemical species and bonding motifs inherent to inorganic materials and the potential impact of mass transport on kinetics, among other considerations. Without such assembly rules, there is less understanding, less predictive power, and ultimately less control of properties. Despite such hurdles, developing a mechanistic understanding for synthesis of inorganic extended solids would dramatically impact the range of new material discoveries and resulting new functionalities, warranting a broad call to explore what is possible. Here we discuss our recent approaches toward a mechanistic framework for the synthesis of bulk inorganic extended solids, in which either embryonic atomic correlations or fully developed phases in solutions or melts can be identified and tracked during product selection and crystallization. The approach hinges on the application of high-energy x-rays, with their penetrating power and large Q-range, to explore reaction pathways in situ. We illustrate this process using two examples: directed assembly of Zr clusters in aqueous solution and total phase awareness during crystallization from K-Cu-S melts. These examples provide a glimpse of what we see as a larger vision, in which large scale simulations, data-driven science, and in situ studies of atomic correlations combine to accelerate materials discovery and synthesis, based on the assembly of well-defined, prenucleated atomic correlations.

  1. Exploring the Limits of Waveform Correlation Event Detection as Applied to Three Earthquake Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. J.; Carr, D.; Resor, M.; Duffey, S.

    2009-12-01

    Swarms of earthquakes and/or aftershock sequences can dramatically increase the level of seismicity in a region for a period of time lasting from days to months, depending on the swarm or sequence. Such occurrences can provide a large amount of useful information to seismologists. For those who monitor seismic events for possible nuclear explosions, however, these swarms/sequences are a nuisance. In an explosion monitoring system, each event must be treated as a possible nuclear test until it can be proven, to a high degree of confidence, not to be. Seismic events recorded by the same station with highly correlated waveforms almost certainly have a similar location and source type, so clusters of events within a swarm can quickly be identified as earthquakes. We have developed a number of tools that can be used to exploit the high degree of waveform similarity expected to be associated with swarms/sequences. Dendro Tool measures correlations between known events. The Waveform Correlation Detector is intended to act as a detector, finding events in raw data which correlate with known events. The Self Scanner is used to find all correlated segments within a raw data steam and does not require an event library. All three techniques together provide an opportunity to study the similarities of events in an aftershock sequence in different ways. To comprehensively characterize the benefits and limits of waveform correlation techniques, we studied 3 aftershock sequences, using our 3 tools, at multiple stations. We explored the effects of station distance and event magnitudes on correlation results. Lastly, we show the reduction in detection threshold and analyst workload offered by waveform correlation techniques compared to STA/LTA based detection. We analyzed 4 days of data from each aftershock sequence using all three methods. Most known events clustered in a similar manner across the toolsets. Up to 25% of catalogued events were found to be a member of a cluster. In

  2. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1996 uses available data from literature, industry, and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on minerals industry direction are drawn from these data.

  3. Exploring self-perceptions and social influences as correlates of adolescent leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Sabiston, Catherine M; Crocker, Peter R E

    2008-02-01

    This study examined adolescent leisure-time physical activity correlates using the expectancy-value (EV) model. Adolescents (N = 857) completed questionnaires to assess competence and value self-perceptions, social influences, and physical activity. Direct and indirect effects of self-perceptions and parent and best friend influences on physical activity were explored using structural equation modeling. Measurement models were a good fit to the data and gender invariance was supported. The structural mediation model was a reasonable fit to the data, whereby the indirect effects of parents and peers and the direct effects of competence beliefs and values together accounted for 49% of the variance in physical activity. In this model, the pattern of relationships was similar for adolescent males and females. Findings supporting the EV model provide theoretical and practical implications for understanding adolescent physical activity.

  4. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  5. Exploring the correlated phase behavior and electronic properties of parent and doped spin-orbit Mott phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    An unusual manifestation of Mott physics dependent on strong spin-orbit interactions has recently been identified in a growing number of classes of 5d transition metal oxides built from Ir4+ ions. Instead of the naively expected increased itinerancy of these iridates due to the larger orbital extent of their 5d valence electrons, the interplay between the amplified relativistic spin-orbit interaction (intrinsic to large Z iridium cations) and their residual on-site Coulomb interaction U, conspires to stabilize a novel class of spin-orbit assisted Mott insulators with a proposed Jeff = 1/2 ground state wavefunction. The identification of this novel spin-orbit Mott state has been the focus of recent interest due to its potential of hosting a variety of new phases driven by correlated electron phenomena (such as high temperature superconductivity or enhanced ferroic behavior) in a strongly spin-orbit coupled setting. Currently, however, there remains very little understanding of how spin-orbit Mott phases respond to carrier doping and, more specifically, how relevant U remains for the charge carriers of a spin-orbit Mott phase once the bandwidth is increased. Here I will present our group's recent experimental work exploring carrier doping and the resulting electronic phase behavior in one such spin-orbit driven Mott material, Sr3Ir2O7, with the ultimate goal of determining the relevance of U and electron correlation effects within the doped system's ground state. Our results reveal the stabilization of an electronically phase separated ground state in B-site doped Sr3Ir2O7, suggestive of an extended regime of localization of in-plane doped carriers within the spin-orbit Mott phase. This results in a percolative metal-to-insulator transition with a novel, global, antiferromagnetic order. The electronic response of B-site doping in Sr3Ir2O7will then be compared with recent results exploring A-site doping if time permits. Supported by NSF CAREER Award DMR-1056625.

  6. Classical trajectory diagnosis of a fingerlike pattern in the correlated electron momentum distribution in strong field double ionization of helium.

    PubMed

    Ye, D F; Liu, X; Liu, J

    2008-12-05

    With a semiclassical quasistatic model, we identify the distinct roles of nuclear Coulomb attraction, final-state electron repulsion, and the electron-field interaction in forming the fingerlike (or V-shaped) pattern in the correlated electron momentum distribution for helium double ionization in intense laser field [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 263002;Phys.Rev.Lett.99, 263003 (2007)]. The underlying microscopic trajectory configurations responsible for asymmetric electron energy sharing after electron-electron collision have been uncovered, and the corresponding subcycle dynamics is analyzed. The correlation pattern is found to be sensitive to the transverse momentum of correlated electrons.

  7. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1997 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Sulvey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  8. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1999 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The report documents data on exploration budgets by region and commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry. And it presents inferences and observations on mineral industry direction based on these data and discussions.

  9. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Porter, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1998 draws on available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  10. Final Report on ``Theories of Strong Electron Correlations in Molecules and Solids-DE-FG02-97ER45640

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Daniel L

    2013-04-15

    The PI led theoretical studies of correlated hybridization in transition metal complexes, compounds, and molecules, and of electron transport in DNA associated with nanoelectronic conformations attached to gold electrodes and in the presence of DNA repair proteins.

  11. Strong correlation in acene sheets from the active-space variational two-electron reduced density matrix method: effects of symmetry and size.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Kenley; Greenman, Loren; Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2011-06-09

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of organic molecules with importance in several branches of science, including medicine, combustion chemistry, and materials science. The delocalized π-orbital systems in PAHs require highly accurate electronic structure methods to capture strong electron correlation. Treating correlation in PAHs has been challenging because (i) traditional wave function methods for strong correlation have not been applicable since they scale exponentially in the number of strongly correlated orbitals, and (ii) alternative methods such as the density-matrix renormalization group and variational two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) methods have not been applied beyond linear acene chains. In this paper we extend the earlier results from active-space variational 2-RDM theory [Gidofalvi, G.; Mazziotti, D. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 134108] to the more general two-dimensional arrangement of rings--acene sheets--to study the relationship between geometry and electron correlation in PAHs. The acene-sheet calculations, if performed with conventional wave function methods, would require wave function expansions with as many as 1.5 × 10(17) configuration state functions. To measure electron correlation, we employ several RDM-based metrics: (i) natural-orbital occupation numbers, (ii) the 1-RDM von Neumann entropy, (iii) the correlation energy per carbon atom, and (iv) the squared Frobenius norm of the cumulant 2-RDM. The results confirm a trend of increasing polyradical character with increasing molecular size previously observed in linear PAHs and reveal a corresponding trend in two-dimensional (arch-shaped) PAHs. Furthermore, in PAHs of similar size they show significant variations in correlation with geometry. PAHs with the strictly linear geometry (chains) exhibit more electron correlation than PAHs with nonlinear geometries (sheets).

  12. Exploration of the Transition from the Hydrodynamic-like to the Strongly Kinetic Regime in Shock-Driven Implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; ...

    2014-05-05

    Clear evidence of the transition from hydrodynamiclike to strongly kinetic shock-driven implosions is, for the first time, revealed and quantitatively assessed. Implosions with a range of initial equimolar D3He gas densities show that as the density is decreased, hydrodynamic simulations strongly diverge from and increasingly over-predict the observed nuclear yields, from a factor of ~2 at 3.1 mg/cm3 to a factor of 100 at 0.14 mg/cm3. (The corresponding Knudsen number, the ratio of ion mean-free path to minimum shell radius, varied from 0.3 to 9; similarly, the ratio of fusion burn duration to ion diffusion time, another figure of meritmore » of kinetic effects, varied from 0.3 to 14.) This result is shown to be unrelated to the effects of hydrodynamic mix. As a first step to garner insight into this transition, a reduced ion kinetic (RIK) model that includes gradient-diffusion and loss-term approximations to several transport processes was implemented within the framework of a one-dimensional radiation-transport code. After empirical calibration, the RIK simulations reproduce the observed yield trends, largely as a result of ion diffusion and the depletion of the reacting tail ions.« less

  13. Exploration of the Transition from the Hydrodynamic-like to the Strongly Kinetic Regime in Shock-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Skupsky, S.; Bellei, C.; Pino, J.; Wilks, S. C.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-05-05

    Clear evidence of the transition from hydrodynamiclike to strongly kinetic shock-driven implosions is, for the first time, revealed and quantitatively assessed. Implosions with a range of initial equimolar D3He gas densities show that as the density is decreased, hydrodynamic simulations strongly diverge from and increasingly over-predict the observed nuclear yields, from a factor of ~2 at 3.1 mg/cm3 to a factor of 100 at 0.14 mg/cm3. (The corresponding Knudsen number, the ratio of ion mean-free path to minimum shell radius, varied from 0.3 to 9; similarly, the ratio of fusion burn duration to ion diffusion time, another figure of merit of kinetic effects, varied from 0.3 to 14.) This result is shown to be unrelated to the effects of hydrodynamic mix. As a first step to garner insight into this transition, a reduced ion kinetic (RIK) model that includes gradient-diffusion and loss-term approximations to several transport processes was implemented within the framework of a one-dimensional radiation-transport code. After empirical calibration, the RIK simulations reproduce the observed yield trends, largely as a result of ion diffusion and the depletion of the reacting tail ions.

  14. Exploring violin sound quality: investigating English timbre descriptors and correlating resynthesized acoustical modifications with perceptual properties.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Blackwell, Alan F; Cross, Ian; Woodhouse, Jim; Moore, Brian C J

    2012-01-01

    Performers often discuss the sound quality of a violin or the sound obtained by particular playing techniques, calling upon a diverse vocabulary. This study explores the verbal descriptions, made by performers, of the distinctive timbres of different violins. Sixty-one common descriptors were collected and then arranged by violinists on a map, so that words with similar meanings lay close together, and those with different meanings lay far apart. The results of multidimensional scaling demonstrated consistent use among violinists of many words, and highlighted which words are used for similar purposes. These terms and their relations were then used to investigate the perceptual effect of acoustical modifications of violin sounds produced by roving of the levels in five one-octave wide bands, 190-380, 380-760, 760-1520, 1520-3040, and 3040-6080 Hz. Pairs of sounds were presented, and each participant was asked to indicate which of the sounds was more bright, clear, harsh, nasal, or good (in separate runs for each descriptor). Increased brightness and clarity were associated with moderately increased levels in bands 4 and 5, whereas increased harshness was associated with a strongly increased level in band 4. Judgments differed across participants for the qualities nasal and good.

  15. How good strong union men line it out: explorations of the structure and dynamics of coal-miners' class consciousness

    SciTech Connect

    Yarrow, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    This study explores how working-class people apprehend and analyze the class dynamics of their social world. As an exploratory empirical study of the structure and dynamics of working-class consciousness, it seeks to develop the theory of actual class consciousness by bringing previous theories into dialogue with the articulated analyses of coal miners in central Appalachia. Although changing conditions are shown to have a powerful effect on class consciousness, the respondents were found to respond differently to the changing context and to remain loyal to important elements of their earlier perspectives. Suggestions are made for how the theory could be developed further. The data for the study are flexibly structured interviews which were conducted with active, retired, and disabled miners in southern West Virginia and western Virginia. A dozen miners were interviewed during the 1978 strike and again the following summer; during the summer of 1978, nineteen additional miners were interviewed.

  16. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonferrous, nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 58 percent in 2004 from the 2003 budget, according to Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes two years after a five-year period of declining spending for mineral exploration (1998 to 2002). Figures suggest a subsequent 27 percent increase in budgeted expenditures from 2002 to 2003. For the second consecutive year, all regional exploration budget estimates were anticipated to increase.

  17. Exploring effective multiplicity in multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy using eigenvalues of correlation matrices

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Taguchi, Y-h; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Recent advances in multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) allow wide coverage of cortical areas while entailing the necessity to control family-wise errors (FWEs) due to increased multiplicity. Conventionally, the Bonferroni method has been used to control FWE. While Type I errors (false positives) can be strictly controlled, the application of a large number of channel settings may inflate the chance of Type II errors (false negatives). The Bonferroni-based methods are especially stringent in controlling Type I errors of the most activated channel with the smallest p value. To maintain a balance between Types I and II errors, effective multiplicity (Meff) derived from the eigenvalues of correlation matrices is a method that has been introduced in genetic studies. Thus, we explored its feasibility in multichannel fNIRS studies. Applying the Meff method to three kinds of experimental data with different activation profiles, we performed resampling simulations and found that Meff was controlled at 10 to 15 in a 44-channel setting. Consequently, the number of significantly activated channels remained almost constant regardless of the number of measured channels. We demonstrated that the Meff approach can be an effective alternative to Bonferroni-based methods for multichannel fNIRS studies. PMID:26157982

  18. Exploration of the neural correlates of cerebral palsy for sensorimotor BCI control

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Ian; Faller, Josef; Scherer, Reinhold; Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M.; Nasuto, Slawomir J.; Billinger, Martin; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) includes a broad range of disorders, which can result in impairment of posture and movement control. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been proposed as assistive devices for individuals with CP. Better understanding of the neural processing underlying motor control in affected individuals could lead to more targeted BCI rehabilitation and treatment options. We have explored well-known neural correlates of movement, including event-related desynchronization (ERD), phase synchrony, and a recently-introduced measure of phase dynamics, in participants with CP and healthy control participants. Although present, significantly less ERD and phase locking were found in the group with CP. Additionally, inter-group differences in phase dynamics were also significant. Taken together these findings suggest that users with CP exhibit lower levels of motor cortex activation during motor imagery, as reflected in lower levels of ongoing mu suppression and less functional connectivity. These differences indicate that development of BCIs for individuals with CP may pose additional challenges beyond those faced in providing BCIs to healthy individuals. PMID:25071544

  19. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  20. Triangular Spin-Orbit-Coupled Lattice with Strong Coulomb Correlations: Sn Atoms on a SiC(0001) Substrate.

    PubMed

    Glass, S; Li, G; Adler, F; Aulbach, J; Fleszar, A; Thomale, R; Hanke, W; Claessen, R; Schäfer, J

    2015-06-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) atom lattices provide model setups with Coulomb correlations that induce competing ground states. Here, SiC emerges as a wide-gap substrate with reduced screening. We report the first artificial high-Z atom lattice on SiC(0001) by Sn adatoms, based on experimental realization and theoretical modeling. Density-functional theory of our triangular structure model closely reproduces the scanning tunneling microscopy. Photoemission data show a deeply gapped state (∼2  eV gap), and, based on our calculations including dynamic mean-field theory, we argue that this reflects a pronounced Mott-insulating scenario. We also find indications that the system is susceptible to antiferromagnetic superstructures. Such artificial lattices on SiC(0001) thus offer a novel platform for coexisting Coulomb correlations and spin-orbit coupling, with bearing for unusual magnetic phases and proposed topological quantum states of matter.

  1. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, P; Donovan, E R; Labocha, M K; Sears, M W; Downs, C J; Sorensen, D A; Hayes, J P

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selection on mass-independent basal metabolic rate (BMR). Then we tested for responses to selection in MMR and correlated responses to selection in BMR. In other lines, we antagonistically selected for mice with a combination of high mass-independent MMR and low mass-independent BMR. All selection protocols and data analyses included body mass as a covariate, so effects of selection on the metabolic rates are mass adjusted (that is, independent of effects of body mass). The selection lasted eight generations. Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (11.2%) in lines selected for increased MMR, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, higher (2.5%). Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (5.3%) in antagonistically selected lines, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, lower (4.2%). Analysis of breeding values revealed no positive genetic trend for elevated BMR in high-MMR lines. A weak positive genetic correlation was detected between MMR and BMR. That weak positive genetic correlation supports the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy in the sense that it fails to falsify a key model assumption. Overall, the results suggest that at least in these mice there is significant capacity for independent evolution of metabolic traits. Whether that is true in the ancestral animals that evolved endothermy remains an important but unanswered question.

  2. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, P; Donovan, E R; Labocha, M K; Sears, M W; Downs, C J; Sorensen, D A; Hayes, J P

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selection on mass-independent basal metabolic rate (BMR). Then we tested for responses to selection in MMR and correlated responses to selection in BMR. In other lines, we antagonistically selected for mice with a combination of high mass-independent MMR and low mass-independent BMR. All selection protocols and data analyses included body mass as a covariate, so effects of selection on the metabolic rates are mass adjusted (that is, independent of effects of body mass). The selection lasted eight generations. Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (11.2%) in lines selected for increased MMR, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, higher (2.5%). Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (5.3%) in antagonistically selected lines, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, lower (4.2%). Analysis of breeding values revealed no positive genetic trend for elevated BMR in high-MMR lines. A weak positive genetic correlation was detected between MMR and BMR. That weak positive genetic correlation supports the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy in the sense that it fails to falsify a key model assumption. Overall, the results suggest that at least in these mice there is significant capacity for independent evolution of metabolic traits. Whether that is true in the ancestral animals that evolved endothermy remains an important but unanswered question. PMID:25604947

  3. Fermi-liquid theory of ultracold trapped Fermi gases: Implications for pseudogap physics and other strongly correlated phases

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Levin, K.

    2010-07-15

    We show how Fermi-liquid theory can be applied to ultracold Fermi gases, thereby expanding their ''simulation'' capabilities to a class of problems of interest to multiple physics subdisciplines. We introduce procedures for measuring and calculating position-dependent Landau parameters. This lays the groundwork for addressing important controversial issues: (i) the suggestion that thermodynamically, the normal state of a unitary gas is indistinguishable from a Fermi liquid and (ii) that a fermionic system with strong repulsive contact interactions is associated with either ferromagnetism or localization; this relates as well to {sup 3}He and its p-wave superfluidity.

  4. Direct observation of the multisheet Fermi surface in the strongly correlated transition metal compound ZrZn2.

    PubMed

    Major, Zs; Dugdale, S B; Watts, R J; Santi, G; Alam, M A; Hayden, S M; Duffy, J A; Taylor, J W; Jarlborg, T; Bruno, E; Benea, D; Ebert, H

    2004-03-12

    The existence of flat areas of a Fermi surface (FS), predicted by electronic structure calculations and used in models of both magnetically mediated and phonon-mediated Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov superconducting states, is reported in the paramagnetic phase of the ferromagnetic superconductor ZrZn2 using positron annihilation. The strongly mass-renormalized FS sheet, dominating the Fermi level density of states, is seen for the first time. The delocalization of the magnetization is studied using measured and calculated magnetic Compton profiles.

  5. Modification of heparanase gene expression in response to conditioning and LPS treatment: strong correlation to rs4693608 SNP.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Olga; Shimoni, Avichai; Baryakh, Polina; Morgulis, Yan; Mayorov, Margarita; Beider, Katia; Shteingauz, Anna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-04-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves the saccharide chains of HSPGs, important structural and functional components of the ECM. Cleavage of HS leads to loss of the structural integrity of the ECM and release of HS-bound cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive angiogenic- and growth-promoting factors. Our previous study revealed a highly significant correlation of HPSE gene SNPs rs4693608 and rs4364254 and their combination with the risk of developing GVHD. We now demonstrate that HPSE is up-regulated in response to pretransplantation conditioning, followed by a gradual decrease thereafter. Expression of heparanase correlated with the rs4693608 HPSE SNP before and after conditioning. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between recipient and donor rs4693608 SNP discrepancy and the time of neutrophil and platelet recovery. Similarly, the discrepancy in rs4693608 HPSE SNP between recipients and donors was found to be a more significant factor for the risk of aGVHD than patient genotype. The rs4693608 SNP also affected HPSE gene expression in LPS-treated MNCs from PB and CB. Possessors of the AA genotype exhibited up-regulation of heparanase with a high ratio in the LPS-treated MNCs, whereas individuals with genotype GG showed down-regulation or no effect on HPSE gene expression. HPSE up-regulation was mediated by TLR4. The study emphasizes the importance of rs4693608 SNP for HPSE gene expression in activated MNCs, indicating a role in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including postconditioning, engraftment, and GVHD.

  6. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Exploration budgets fell for a fourth successive year in 2001. These decreases reflected low mineral commodity prices, mineral-market investment reluctance, company failures and a continued trend of company mergers and takeovers.

  7. Plasma levels of homocysteine and cysteine increased in pediatric NAFLD and strongly correlated with severity of liver damage.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Anna; Alisi, Anna; di Giovamberardino, Gianna; Crudele, Annalisa; Ceccarelli, Sara; Panera, Nadia; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Nobili, Valerio

    2014-11-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of metabolic abnormalities ranging from simple triglyceride accumulation in the hepatocytes to hepatic steatosis with inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis. It has been demonstrated that the pathogenesis of NAFLD involves increased oxidative stress, with consumption of the major cellular antioxidant, glutathione (GSH). Liver has a fundamental role in sulfur compound metabolism, although the data reported on plasma thiols status in NAFLD are conflicting. We recruited 63 NAFLD patients, and we analyzed all plasma thiols, such as homocysteine (Hcy), cysteine (Cys), cysteinylglycine (CysGly) and GSH, by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. Hcy, Cys and CysGly plasma levels increased in NAFLD patients (p < 0.0001); whereas GSH levels were decreased in NAFLD patients when compared to controls (p < 0.0001). On the contrary, patients with steatohepatitis exhibited lower levels of Hcy and Cys than subjects without. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between Hcy and Cys and the presence of fibrosis in children with NAFLD. Taken together, these data demonstrated a defective hepatic sulfur metabolism in children with NAFLD, and that high levels of Hcy and Cys probably correlates with a pattern of more severe histological liver damage, due to mechanisms that require further studies.

  8. Metal-ligand interplay in strongly correlated oxides: a parametrized phase diagram for pressure-induced spin transitions.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Aleksi; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Badro, James; Vankó, György; Shukla, Abhay

    2007-05-11

    We investigate the magnetic properties of archetypal transition-metal oxides MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO under very high pressure by x-ray emission spectroscopy at the Kbeta line. We observe a strong modification of the magnetism in the megabar range in all the samples except NiO. The results are analyzed within a multiplet approach including charge-transfer effects. The spectral changes are well accounted for by changes of the ligand field acting on the d electrons and allows us to extract the d-hybridization strength, O-2p bandwidth and ionic crystal field across the magnetic transition. This approach allows first-hand insight into the mechanism of the pressure-induced spin transition.

  9. Strong lattice correlation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in a pseudospin-1/2 Mott insulator Sr2IrO4

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yuelin; Schaller, Richard D.; Zhu, Mengze; ...

    2016-01-20

    In correlated oxides the coupling of quasiparticles to other degrees of freedom such as spin and lattice plays critical roles in the emergence of symmetry-breaking quantum ordered states such as high temperature superconductivity. We report a strong lattice coupling of photon-induced quasiparticles in spin-orbital coupling Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 probed via optical excitation. Combining time-resolved x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy techniques, we reconstruct a spatiotemporal map of the diffusion of these quasiparticles. Lastly, due to the unique electronic configuration of the quasiparticles, the strong lattice correlation is unexpected but extends the similarity between Sr2IrO4 and cuprates to a new dimension ofmore » electron-phonon coupling which persists under highly non-equilibrium conditions.« less

  10. Strong lattice correlation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in a pseudospin-1/2 Mott insulator Sr2IrO4

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuelin; Schaller, Richard D.; Zhu, Mengze; Walko, Donald A.; Kim, Jungho; Ke, Xianglin; Miao, Ludi; Mao, Z. Q.

    2016-01-20

    In correlated oxides the coupling of quasiparticles to other degrees of freedom such as spin and lattice plays critical roles in the emergence of symmetry-breaking quantum ordered states such as high temperature superconductivity. We report a strong lattice coupling of photon-induced quasiparticles in spin-orbital coupling Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 probed via optical excitation. Combining time-resolved x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy techniques, we reconstruct a spatiotemporal map of the diffusion of these quasiparticles. Lastly, due to the unique electronic configuration of the quasiparticles, the strong lattice correlation is unexpected but extends the similarity between Sr2IrO4 and cuprates to a new dimension of electron-phonon coupling which persists under highly non-equilibrium conditions.

  11. Strong lattice correlation of non-equilibrium quasiparticles in a pseudospin-1/2 Mott insulator Sr2IrO4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuelin; Schaller, Richard D.; Zhu, Mengze; Walko, Donald A.; Kim, Jungho; Ke, Xianglin; Miao, Ludi; Mao, Z. Q.

    2016-01-01

    In correlated oxides the coupling of quasiparticles to other degrees of freedom such as spin and lattice plays critical roles in the emergence of symmetry-breaking quantum ordered states such as high temperature superconductivity. We report a strong lattice coupling of photon-induced quasiparticles in spin-orbital coupling Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 probed via optical excitation. Combining time-resolved x-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy techniques, we reconstruct a spatiotemporal map of the diffusion of these quasiparticles. Due to the unique electronic configuration of the quasiparticles, the strong lattice correlation is unexpected but extends the similarity between Sr2IrO4 and cuprates to a new dimension of electron-phonon coupling which persists under highly non-equilibrium conditions. PMID:26787094

  12. A versatile setup for ultrafast broadband optical spectroscopy of coherent collective modes in strongly correlated quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Edoardo; Mann, Andreas; Borroni, Simone; Arrell, Christopher; van Mourik, Frank; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    A femtosecond pump-probe setup is described that is optimised for broadband transient reflectivity experiments on solid samples over a wide temperature range. By combining high temporal resolution and a broad detection window, this apparatus can investigate the interplay between coherent collective modes and high-energy electronic excitations, which is a distinctive characteristic of correlated electron systems. Using a single-shot readout array detector at frame rates of 10 kHz allows resolving coherent oscillations with amplitudes <10−4. We demonstrate its operation on the charge-transfer insulator La2CuO4, revealing coherent phonons with frequencies up to 13 THz and providing access into their Raman matrix elements. PMID:27990455

  13. Methylation of bone SOST, its mRNA, and serum sclerostin levels correlate strongly with fracture risk in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Reppe, Sjur; Noer, Agate; Grimholt, Runa M; Halldórsson, Bjarni V; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Gautvik, Vigdis T; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Berg, Jens Petter; Datta, Harish; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lyle, Robert; Collas, Philippe; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of sclerostin, a glycoprotein secreted by osteocytes, offers a new therapeutic paradigm for treatment of osteoporosis (OP) through its critical role as Wnt/catenin signaling regulator. This study describes the epigenetic regulation of SOST expression in bone biopsies of postmenopausal women. We correlated serum sclerostin to bone mineral density (BMD), fractures, and bone remodeling parameters, and related these findings to epigenetic and genetic disease mechanisms. Serum sclerostin and bone remodeling biomarkers were measured in two postmenopausal groups: healthy (BMD T-score > -1) and established OP (BMD T-score < -2.5, with at least one low-energy fracture). Bone specimens were used to analyze SOST mRNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation changes. The SOST gene promoter region showed increased CpG methylation in OP patients (n = 4) compared to age and body mass index (BMI) balanced controls (n = 4) (80.5% versus 63.2%, p = 0.0001) with replication in independent cohorts (n = 27 and n = 36, respectively). Serum sclerostin and bone SOST mRNA expression correlated positively with age-adjusted and BMI-adjusted total hip BMD (r = 0.47 and r = 0.43, respectively; both p < 0.0005), and inversely to serum bone turnover markers. Five SNPs, one of which replicates in an independent population-based genomewide association study (GWAS), showed association with serum sclerostin or SOST mRNA levels under an additive model (p = 0.0016 to 0.0079). Genetic and epigenetic changes in SOST influence its bone mRNA expression and serum sclerostin levels in postmenopausal women. The observations suggest that increased SOST promoter methylation seen in OP is a compensatory counteracting mechanism, which lowers serum sclerostin concentrations and reduces inhibition of Wnt signaling in an attempt to promote bone formation.

  14. Lack of correlation between the amplitudes of TRP channel-mediated responses to weak and strong stimuli in intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Sanchez, Alicia; Radwan, Ahmed; Radwan, Islam; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2013-11-01

    It is often observed in intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments that the amplitudes of the Ca(2+) signals elicited by newly characterized TRP agonists do not correlate with the amplitudes of the responses evoked subsequently by a specific potent agonist. We investigated this rather controversial phenomenon by first testing whether it is inherent to the comparison of the effects of weak and strong stimuli. Using five well-characterized TRP channel agonists in commonly used heterologous expression systems we found that the correlation between the amplitudes of the Ca(2+) signals triggered by two sequentially applied stimuli is only high when both stimuli are strong. Using mathematical simulations of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics we illustrate that the innate heterogeneity in expression and functional properties of Ca(2+) extrusion (e.g. plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase) and influx (TRP channels) pathways across a cellular population is a sufficient condition for low correlation between the amplitude of Ca(2+) signals elicited by weak and strong stimuli. Taken together, our data demonstrate that this phenomenon is an expected outcome of intracellular Ca(2+) imaging experiments that cannot be taken as evidence for lack of specificity of low-efficacy stimuli, or as an indicator of the need of other cellular components for channel stimulation.

  15. Brain electric correlates of strong belief in paranormal phenomena: intracerebral EEG source and regional Omega complexity analyses.

    PubMed

    Pizzagalli, D; Lehmann, D; Gianotti, L; Koenig, T; Tanaka, H; Wackermann, J; Brugger, P

    2000-12-22

    The neurocognitive processes underlying the formation and maintenance of paranormal beliefs are important for understanding schizotypal ideation. Behavioral studies indicated that both schizotypal and paranormal ideation are based on an overreliance on the right hemisphere, whose coarse rather than focussed semantic processing may favor the emergence of 'loose' and 'uncommon' associations. To elucidate the electrophysiological basis of these behavioral observations, 35-channel resting EEG was recorded in pre-screened female strong believers and disbelievers during resting baseline. EEG data were subjected to FFT-Dipole-Approximation analysis, a reference-free frequency-domain dipole source modeling, and Regional (hemispheric) Omega Complexity analysis, a linear approach estimating the complexity of the trajectories of momentary EEG map series in state space. Compared to disbelievers, believers showed: more right-located sources of the beta2 band (18.5-21 Hz, excitatory activity); reduced interhemispheric differences in Omega complexity values; higher scores on the Magical Ideation scale; more general negative affect; and more hypnagogic-like reveries after a 4-min eyes-closed resting period. Thus, subjects differing in their declared paranormal belief displayed different active, cerebral neural populations during resting, task-free conditions. As hypothesized, believers showed relatively higher right hemispheric activation and reduced hemispheric asymmetry of functional complexity. These markers may constitute the neurophysiological basis for paranormal and schizotypal ideation.

  16. Anomalous influence of spin fluctuations on the heat capacity and entropy in a strongly correlated helical ferromagnet MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povzner, A. A.; Volkov, A. G.; Nogovitsyna, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of spin fluctuations on the thermodynamic properties of a helical ferromagnet MnSi has been investigated in the framework of the Hubbard model with the electronic spectrum determined from the first-principles LDA + U + SO calculation, which is extended taking into account the Hund coupling and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya antisymmetric exchange. It has been shown that the ground state of the magnetic material is characterized by large zero-point fluctuations, which disappear at the temperature T* (< T c is the temperature of the magnetic phase transition). In this case, the entropy abruptly increases, and a lambdashaped anomaly appears in the temperature dependence of the heat capacity at constant volume ( C V ( T)). In the temperature range T* < T < T c , thermal fluctuations lead to the disappearance of the inhomogeneous magnetization. The competition between the increase in the entropy due to paramagnon excitations and its decrease as a result of the reduction in the amplitude of local magnetic moments, under the conditions of strong Hund exchange, is responsible for in the appearance of a "shoulder" in the dependence C V ( T)).

  17. Effect of crystal-field splitting and interband hybridization on the metal-insulator transitions of strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteryaev, Alexander I.; Ferrero, Michel; Georges, Antoine; Parcollet, Olivier

    2008-07-01

    We investigate a quarter-filled two-band Hubbard model involving a crystal-field splitting, which lifts the orbital degeneracy as well as an interorbital hopping (interband hybridization). Both terms are relevant to the realistic description of correlated materials such as transition-metal oxides. The nature of the Mott metal-insulator transition is clarified and is found to depend on the magnitude of the crystal-field splitting. At large values of the splitting, a transition from a two-band to a one-band metal is first found as the on-site repulsion is increased and is followed by a Mott transition for the remaining band, which follows the single-band (Brinkman-Rice) scenario well documented previously within dynamical mean-field theory. At small values of the crystal-field splitting, a direct transition from a two-band metal to a Mott insulator with partial orbital polarization is found, which takes place simultaneously for both orbitals. This transition is characterized by a vanishing of the quasiparticle weight for the majority orbital but has a first-order character for the minority orbital. It is pointed out that finite-temperature effects may easily turn the metallic regime into a bad metal close to the orbital polarization transition in the metallic phase.

  18. Limb dominance changes in walking evolution explored by asymmetric correlations in gait dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, Juan C.; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Velasco, Alejandra; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2010-04-01

    Fluctuations in the stride interval time series of unconstrained walking are not random but seem to exhibit long-range correlations that decay as a power law (Hausdorff et al. (1995) [35]). Here, we examine whether asymmetries are present in the long-range correlations of different gait parameters (stride, swing and stance intervals) for the left and right limbs. Gait dynamics corresponding to 16 healthy subjects were obtained from the Physionet database, which contains stride, stance and swing intervals for both left and right limbs. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) revealed the presence of asymmetric long-range correlations in all gait cycle variables investigated. A rich variety of scaling exponent dynamics was found, with the presence of synchronicity, decreased correlations and dominant correlations. The results are discussed in terms of the hypothesis that reduced strength of long-range correlations reflect both enhanced stability and adaptability.

  19. A New Presentation and Exploration of Human Cerebral Vasculature Correlated with Surface and Sectional Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, Arumugam; Volkau, Ihar; Marchenko, Yevgen; Aminah, Bivi; Gelas, Arnaud; Huang, Su; Lee, Looi Chow; Liu, Jimin; Ng, Ting Ting; Nowinska, Natalia G.; Qian, Guoyu Yu; Puspitasari, Fiftarina; Runge, Val M.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of human body models enabled by advances in diagnostic imaging, computing, and growing knowledge calls for the development of a new generation of systems for intelligent exploration of these models. Here, we introduce a novel paradigm for the exploration of digital body models illustrating cerebral vasculature. It enables…

  20. Theory of the orbital Kondo effect with assisted hopping in strongly correlated electron systems: Parquet equations, superconductivity, and mass enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penc, K.; Zawadowski, A.

    1994-10-01

    The orbital Kondo effect is treated in a model where, additional to the conduction band, there are localized orbitals close to the Fermi energy. If the hopping between the conduction band and the localized heavy orbitals depends on the occupation of the atomic orbitals in the conduction band, then orbital Kondo correlation occurs. The noncommutative nature of the coupling required for the Kondo effect is formally due to the form factors associated with the assisted hopping, which in the momentum representation depends on the momenta of the conduction electrons involved. The leading logarithmic vertex corrections are due to the local Coulomb interaction between the electrons on the heavy orbital and in the conduction band. The renormalized vertex functions are obtained as a solution of a closed set of differential equations and they show power behavior. The amplitude of large renormalization is determined by an infrared cutoff due to finite energy and dispersion of the heavy particles. The enhanced assisted hopping rate results in mass enhancement and attractive interaction in the conduction band. The superconductivity transition temperature calculated is largest for the intermediate mass enhancement, m*/m~=2-3. For larger mass enhancement the small one-particle weight (Z) in the Green's function reduces the transition temperature, which may be characteristic for other models as well. The theory is developed for different one-dimensional and square-lattice models, but the applicability is not limited to them. In the one-dimensional case charge- and spin-density susceptibilities are also discussed. Good candidates for the heavy orbital are f bands in the heavy fermionic systems and nonbonding oxygen orbitals in high-temperature superconductors and different flatbands in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductors.

  1. Superconducting dome in doped quasi-two-dimensional organic Mott insulators: A paradigm for strongly correlated superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Charles-David; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2015-11-01

    first-order transition between metal and pseudogap. Finally, we predict that electron doping should also lead to an increased range of U /t for superconductivity but with a reduced maximum Tc. This work also clearly shows that the superconducting dome in organic superconductors is tied to the Mott transition and its continuation as a transition separating pseudogap phase from correlated metal in doped compounds, as in the cuprates. Contrary to heavy fermions for example, the maximum Tc is definitely not attached to an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. That can also be verified experimentally.

  2. Susceptibility of human sperm to in situ DNA denaturation is strongly correlated with DNA strand breaks identified by single-cell electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, G R; Bjordahl, J; Jost, L K; Evenson, D P

    1997-10-10

    Susceptibility of mammalian sperm DNA to low pH- or heat-induced denaturation in situ has shown very strong dose-response relationships with animal and human exposure to chemical and physical toxicants and also fertility potential. In this study, 23 human semen samples representing a wide range in percentage (7-86%) of sperm exhibiting abnormally high susceptibility of DNA in situ to denaturation were studied for the integrity of their DNA using alkaline comet assay (single-cell microgel electrophoresis, pH 10.0). The percentage of comets observed for these samples ranged from 5 to 95%; these data correlated strongly with the percentage of sperm with increased DNA denaturability (r = 0.973; P < 0.001). Labeling of 3' ends of nicked DNA sites with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate (BrdUTP) followed by tagging with FITC-BrdUTP monoclonal antibody and flow cytometry also indicated significantly strong correlations of BrdUTP incorporation with both abnormal susceptibility of DNA to denaturation (r = 0.859, P < 0.001) and comet assay (r = 0.812, P < 0.001). The relationship among susceptibility of sperm chromatin to acid denaturation in situ, BrdUTP incorporation, and formation of comets suggests that DNA fragmentation monitored by these assays may have important physiological relevance in terms of sperm quality and fertility potential.

  3. Three-dimensional correlation imaging for total amplitude magnetic anomaly and normalized source strength in the presence of strong remanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lianghui; Meng, Xiaohong; Zhang, Guoli

    2014-12-01

    We present the 3D correlation imaging approach for the total magnitude magnetic anomaly and the normalized source strength data for reducing effects of strong remanent magnetization. We divide the subsurface space into a 3D regular grid and then calculate the cross correlation between the observed total magnitude magnetic anomaly or normalized source strength and the theoretical total magnitude magnetic anomaly or normalized source strength at each grid node due to a magnetic dipole. The resultant correlation coefficients are used to describe the equivalent magnetic dipole distribution underground in a probabilistic sense. The two approaches were tested both on the synthetic magnetic data and the real magnetic data from a metallic deposit area in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River, China. The results show that the two approaches can considerably reduce effects of remanent magnetization and delineate magnetic sources in the subsurface, and that the approach for the normalized source strength is less sensitive to strong remanent magnetization than that of the total magnitude magnetic anomaly.

  4. Explore Interregional EEG Correlations Changed by Sport Training Using Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the interregional correlation changed by sport training through electroencephalography (EEG) signals using the techniques of classification and feature selection. The EEG data are obtained from students with long-time professional sport training and normal students without sport training as baseline. Every channel of the 19-channel EEG signals is considered as a node in the brain network and Pearson Correlation Coefficients are calculated between every two nodes as the new features of EEG signals. Then, the Partial Least Square (PLS) is used to select the top 10 most varied features and Pearson Correlation Coefficients of selected features are compared to show the difference of two groups. Result shows that the classification accuracy of two groups is improved from 88.13% by the method using measurement of EEG overall energy to 97.19% by the method using EEG correlation measurement. Furthermore, the features selected reveal that the most important interregional EEG correlation changed by training is the correlation between left inferior frontal and left middle temporal with a decreased value. PMID:26880880

  5. Assessing Hubbard-corrected AM05+U and PBEsol+U density functionals for strongly correlated oxides CeO2 and Ce2O3.

    PubMed

    Weck, Philippe F; Kim, Eunja

    2016-09-29

    The structure-property relationships of bulk CeO2 and Ce2O3 have been investigated using AM05 and PBEsol exchange-correlation functionals within the frameworks of Hubbard-corrected density functional theory (DFT+U) and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT+U). Compared with conventional PBE+U, RPBE+U, PW91+U and LDA+U functionals, AM05+U and PBEsol+U describe experimental crystalline parameters and properties of CeO2 and Ce2O3 with superior accuracy, especially when +U is chosen close to its value derived by the linear-response approach. The present findings call for a reexamination of some of the problematic oxide materials featuring strong f- and d-electron correlation using AM05+U and PBEsol+U.

  6. Assessing Hubbard-corrected AM05+U and PBEsol+U density functionals for strongly correlated oxides CeO2 and Ce2O3

    DOE PAGES

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja

    2016-09-12

    The structure–property relationships of bulk CeO2 and Ce2O3 have been investigated using AM05 and PBEsol exchange–correlation functionals within the frameworks of Hubbard-corrected density functional theory (DFT+U) and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT+U). Compared with conventional PBE+U, RPBE+U, PW91+U and LDA+U functionals, AM05+U and PBEsol+U describe experimental crystalline parameters and properties of CeO2 and Ce2O3 with superior accuracy, especially when +U is chosen close to its value derived by the linear-response approach. Lastly, the present findings call for a reexamination of some of the problematic oxide materials featuring strong f- and d-electron correlation using AM05+U and PBEsol+U.

  7. DFT, L(S)DA, LDA+U, LDA+DMFT, …, whether we do approach to a proper description of optical response for strongly correlated systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    I present a critical overview of so-called "ab initio" DFT (density fuctional theory) based calculation schemes for the description of the electronic structure, energy spectrum, and optical response for strongly correlated 3 d oxides, in particular, crystal-field and charge transfer transitions as compared with an "old" cluster model that does generalize crystal-field and ligand-field theory. As a most instructive illustration of validity of numerous calculation techniques I address the prototypical 3 d insulator NiO predicted to be a metal in frames of a standard LDA (local density approximation) band theory.

  8. What does the muon spin-relaxation rate measure in 4f paramagnets with strong crystal fields and weak inter-site correlations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmas de Réotier, P.; Yaouanc, A.; Bonville, P.

    1996-07-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of the longitudinal muon spin-relaxation rate 0953-8984/8/27/020/img6 measured for a paramagnet at temperatures high with respect to the magnetic phase transition temperature. The depolarization rate 0953-8984/8/27/020/img6 is shown to be a function of the relaxation rates of the quasi-elastic and inelastic magnetic excitations. Using this analysis, we consider recently published 0953-8984/8/27/020/img8 data recorded on the strongly correlated electron systems CeNiSn and 0953-8984/8/27/020/img9.

  9. (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET and gene expression profile in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas: strong correlation between PET tracer uptake and gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingrid H; Langer, Seppo W; Federspiel, Birgitte H; Oxbøl, Jytte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor expression on both protein and gene expression level was compared with in vivo (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Twenty-one patients with verified NEC who underwent a (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT between November 2012 and May 2014, were retrospectively included. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, we quantitatively determined the gene expression of several genes and compared with (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET uptake. By immunohistochemistry we qualitatively studied the expression of assorted proteins in NEC. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years (range 41-84) years. All patients had WHO performance status 0-1. Median Ki67 index was 50% (range 20-100%). Gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype (SSTR) 2 and Ki67 were both positively correlated to the (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake (r=0.89; p<0.0001 and r=0.5; p=0.021, respectively). Furthermore, SSTR2 and SSTR5 gene expression were strongly and positively correlated (r=0.57; p=0.006). This study as the first verifies a positive and close correlation of (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake and gene expression of SSTR2 in NEC. SSTR2 gene expression has a stronger correlation to (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake than SSTR5. In addition, the results indicate that the gene expression levels of SSTR2 and SSTR5 at large follow one another.

  10. Exploring Posttraumatic Growth in Children Impacted by Hurricane Katrina: Correlates of the Phenomenon and Developmental Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmer, Ryan P.; Gil-Rivas, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    This study explored posttraumatic growth (PTG), positive change resulting from struggling with trauma, among 7- to 10-year-olds impacted by Hurricane Katrina. Analyses focused on child self-system functioning and cognitive processes, and the caregiving context, in predicting PTG at 2 time points (Time 1n = 66, Time 2n = 51). Findings suggest that…

  11. Exploring Arts Instruction Models and Correlates with Teacher Satisfaction and Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Kristen Leigh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore uses of arts instruction in regular K-5 elementary school classrooms in a large southeastern school district to determine which arts instruction models were being employed and whether or not any particular model had a greater perceived impact on students and teachers. The mixed-methods study combined…

  12. Correlation and facies analysis in exploration for subtle traps within Hunton Group, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, R.D.

    1987-08-01

    The bulk of Hunton production to date is associated with rather well-defined structural and/or truncation-style traps. Yet the trapping mechanism in these settings, to a large extent, depends on the development of particular depositional facies within the Hunton Group. Accurate correlation and subdivision of the Hunton require an understanding of the overall depositional environment and history. The depositional model for the Silurian Chimneyhill and Henryhouse formations and the Devonian Haragan and Bois d'Arc formations is a carbonate ramp. Both aggradational and progradational sequences formed, as did several unconformities during periods of erosion and nondeposition. The Frisco, however, was deposited on submerged paleohighs, probably as a mud-mound deposit. Using the foregoing depositional models as a guide, subdivisions of the Hunton, based on regional markers related to changes in sea level between progradational episodes, can be recognized and correlated throughout the Anadarko-Arkoma region. Comparing core data and log signatures, along with applying depositional cycles, permits more detailed correlations as their component facies are recognized by log character. Reservoir-prone facies within the carbonate cycles can then be identified, correlated, and mapped.

  13. Socialization in Context: Exploring Longitudinal Correlates of Mothers' Value Messages of Compassion and Caution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray-Lake, Laura; Flanagan, Constance A.; Maggs, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined correlates of mothers' value messages using mother and adolescent reports across 3 years (N =1,638 dyads). Two fundamental socialization dimensions were assessed: compassion messages (e.g., caring for others) and caution messages (e.g., being wary of others). Multilevel models revealed distinct between-person and within-person…

  14. A Field-Particle Correlation Technique to Explore the Collisionless Damping of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Kristopher

    2016-10-01

    The nature of the dominant mechanisms which damp turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations remains an unanswered question in the study of a variety of collisionless plasma systems. Proposed damping mechanisms can be generally, but not exclusively, classified as resonant, e.g. Landau and cyclotron damping, non-resonant, e.g. stochastic ion heating, and intermittent, e.g. energization via current sheets or magnetic reconnection. To determine the role these mechanisms play in turbulent plasmas, we propose the application of field-particle correlations to time series of single spatial point observations of the type typically measured in the solar wind. This correlation, motivated by the form of the collisionless Vlasov equation, is the time averaged product of the factors comprising the nonlinear field-particle interaction term. The correlation both captures the secular transfer of energy between fields and perturbed plasma distributions by averaging out the conservative oscillatory energy transfer, and retains the velocity space structure of the secular transfer, allowing for observational characterization of the damping mechanism. Field-particle correlations are applied to a set of nonlinear kinetic numerical simulations of increasing complexity, including electrostatic, gyrokinetic, and hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell systems. These correlations are shown to capture the secular energy transfer between fields and particles and distinguish between the mechanisms accessible to the chosen system. We conclude with a discussion of the application of this general technique to data from current and upcoming spacecraft missions, including MMS, DSCOVR, Solar Probe Plus and THOR, which should help in determining which damping mechanisms operate in a variety of heliospheric plasmas. This work was performed in collaboration with Gregory Howes, Jason TenBarge, Nuno Loureiro, Ryusuke Numata, Francesco Valetini, Oreste Pezzi, Matt Kunz, Justin Kasper, and Chris Chen, with support from Grants

  15. Polarized hard X-ray photoemission system with micro-positioning technique for probing ground-state symmetry of strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hidenori; Naimen, Sho; Higashiya, Atsushi; Kanai, Yuina; Yomosa, Hiroshi; Yamagami, Kohei; Kiss, Takayuki; Kadono, Toshiharu; Imada, Shin; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Takase, Kouichi; Otsuka, Shintaro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso; Suga, Shigemasa; Yabashi, Makina; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Sekiyama, Akira

    2016-05-01

    An angle-resolved linearly polarized hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) system has been developed to study the ground-state symmetry of strongly correlated materials. The linear polarization of the incoming X-ray beam is switched by a transmission-type phase retarder composed of two diamond (100) crystals. The best value of the degree of linear polarization was found to be -0.96, containing a vertical polarization component of 98%. A newly developed low-temperature two-axis manipulator enables easy polar and azimuthal rotations to select the detection direction of photoelectrons. The lowest temperature achieved was 9 K, offering the chance to access the ground state even for strongly correlated electron systems in cubic symmetry. A co-axial sample monitoring system with long-working-distance microscope enables the same region on the sample surface to be measured before and after rotation. Combining this sample monitoring system with a micro-focused X-ray beam by means of an ellipsoidal Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror (25 µm × 25 µm FWHM), polarized valence-band HAXPES has been performed on NiO for voltage application as resistive random access memory to demonstrate the micro-positioning technique and polarization switching.

  16. Interplay between spin-orbit coupling and strong correlation effects: Comparison of the three osmate double perovskites Ba2A OsO6 (A =Na , Ca, Y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Shruba; Pickett, Warren E.

    2016-04-01

    High formal valence Os-based double perovskites are a focus of current interest because they display strong interplay of large spin-orbit coupling and strong electronic correlation. Here we present the electronic and magnetic characteristics of a sequence of three cubic Os based double perovskites Ba2A OsO6 (A =Na , Ca, Y), with formal valences of Os +7(d1) ,Os +6(d2) , and Os +5(d3) . For these first principles based calculations we apply an "exact exchange for correlated electrons" functional, with exact exchange applied in a hybrid fashion solely to the Os (5 d ) states. While Ba2NaOsO6 is a reported ferromagnetic Dirac-Mott insulator studied previously, the other two show antiferromagnetic ordering while all retain the undistorted cubic structure. For comparison purposes we have investigated only the ferromagnetic ordered phase. A metal-insulator transition is predicted to occur upon rotating the direction of magnetization in all three materials, reflecting the central role of spin-orbit coupling in these small gap osmates. Surprises arising from comparing formal charge states with the radial charge densities are discussed. Chemical shielding factors and orbital susceptibilities are provided for comparison with future nuclear magnetic resonance data.

  17. Spin-orbit coupling, strong correlation, and insulator-metal transitions: The Jeff=32 ferromagnetic Dirac-Mott insulator Ba2NaOsO6

    DOE PAGES

    Gangopadhyay, Shruba; Pickett, Warren E.

    2015-01-15

    The double perovskite Ba2NaOsO6 (BNOO), an exotic example of a very high oxidation state (heptavalent) osmium d1 compound and also uncommon by being a ferromagnetic open d-shell (Mott) insulator without Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion, is modeled using a density functional theory based hybrid functional incorporating exact exchange for correlated electronic orbitals and including the large spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The experimentally observed narrow-gap ferromagnetic insulating ground state is obtained, but only when including spin-orbit coupling, making this a Dirac-Mott insulator. The calculated easy axis along [110] is in accord with experiment, providing additional support that this approach provides a realistic method formore » studying this system. The predicted spin density for [110] spin orientation is nearly cubic (unlike for other directions), providing an explanation for the absence of JT distortion. An orbital moment of –0.4μB strongly compensates the +0.5μB spin moment on Os, leaving a strongly compensated moment more in line with experiment. Remarkably, the net moment lies primarily on the oxygen ions. An insulator-metal transition, by rotating the magnetization direction with an external field under moderate pressure, is predicted as one consequence of strong SOC, and metallization under moderate pressure is predicted. In conclusion, a comparison is made with the isostructural, isovalent insulator Ba2LiOsO6, which, however, orders antiferromagnetically.« less

  18. Lymph node and circulating T cell characteristics are strongly correlated in end-stage renal disease patients, but highly differentiated T cells reside within the circulation.

    PubMed

    Dedeoglu, B; de Weerd, A E; Huang, L; Langerak, A W; Dor, F J; Klepper, M; Verschoor, W; Reijerkerk, D; Baan, C C; Litjens, N H R; Betjes, M G H

    2017-05-01

    Ageing is associated with changes in the peripheral T cell immune system, which can be influenced significantly by latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. To what extent changes in circulating T cell populations correlate with T cell composition of the lymph node (LN) is unclear, but is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the T cell system. T cells from peripheral blood (PB) and LN of end-stage renal disease patients were analysed for frequency of recent thymic emigrants using CD31 expression and T cell receptor excision circle content, relative telomere length and expression of differentiation markers. Compared with PB, LN contained relatively more CD4(+) than CD8(+) T cells (P < 0·001). The percentage of naive and central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and thymic output parameters showed a strong linear correlation between PB and LN. Highly differentiated CD28(null) T cells, being CD27(-) , CD57(+) or programmed death 1 (PD-1(+) ), were found almost exclusively in the circulation but not in LN. An age-related decline in naive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell frequency was observed (P = 0·035 and P = 0·002, respectively) within LN, concomitant with an increase in central memory CD8(+) T cells (P = 0·033). Latent CMV infection increased dramatically the frequency of circulating terminally differentiated T cells, but did not alter T cell composition and ageing parameters of LN significantly. Overall T cell composition and measures of thymic function in PB and LN are correlated strongly. However, highly differentiated CD28(null) T cells, which may comprise a large part of circulating T cells in CMV-seropositive individuals, are found almost exclusively within the circulation.

  19. Brain correlates of hypnosis: A systematic review and meta-analytic exploration.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mathieu; Lifshitz, Michael; Raz, Amir

    2017-02-23

    Imaging of the living human brain elucidates the neural dynamics of hypnosis; however, few reliable brain patterns emerge across studies. Here, we methodically assess neuroimaging assays of hypnosis to uncover common neural configurations using a twofold approach. First, we systematically review research on the neural correlates of hypnotic phenomena; then, we meta-analyze these collective data seeking specific activation and deactivation patterns that typify hypnosis. Anchored around the role of top-down control processes, our comprehensive examination focuses on the involvement of intrinsic brain networks known to operationalize cognitive control and self-referential cognition, including the executive, salience, and default networks. We discuss how these neural dynamics may relate to contemporary theories of hypnosis and show that hypnosis correlates with activation of the lingual gyrus-a brain region involved in higher-order visual processing and mental imagery. Our findings help to better understand the neurobiological substrates comprising the appellation hypnosis.

  20. Ultimate fracture load of cadaver proximal humeri correlates more strongly with mean combined cortical thickness than with areal cortical index, DEXA density, or canal-to-calcar ratio

    PubMed Central

    Mears, C. S.; Burkhead, W. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This investigation sought to advance the work published in our prior biomechanical study (Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 2016). We specifically sought to determine whether there are additional easy-to-measure parameters on plain radiographs of the proximal humerus that correlate more strongly with ultimate fracture load, and whether a parameter resembling the Dorr strength/quality characterisation of proximal femurs can be applied to humeri. Materials and Methods A total of 33 adult humeri were used from a previous study where we quantified bone mineral density of the proximal humerus using radiographs and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), and regional mean cortical thickness and cortical index using radiographs. The bones were fractured in a simulated backwards fall with the humeral head loaded at 2 mm/second via a frustum angled at 30° from the long axis of the bone. Correlations were assessed with ultimate fracture load and these new parameters: cortical index expressed in areas (“areal cortical index”) of larger regions of the diaphysis; the canal-to-calcar ratio used analogous to its application in proximal femurs; and the recently described medial cortical ratio. Results The three new parameters showed the following correlations with ultimate fracture load: areal cortical index (r = 0.56, p < 0.001); canal-to-calcar ratio (r = 0.38, p = 0.03); and medial cortical ratio (r = 0.49, p < 0.005). These correlations were weaker when compared with those that we previously reported: mean cortical thickness of the proximal diaphysis versus ultimate fracture load (r = 0.71; p < 0.001); and mean density in the central humeral head versus ultimate fracture load (r = 0.70; p < 0.001). Conclusion Simple-to-measure radiographic parameters of the proximal humerus reported previously are more useful in predicting ultimate fracture load than are areal cortical index, canal-to-calcar ratio, and medial cortical ratio. Cite this article: J. G. Skedros, C

  1. Exploring the z-dependence of the two-point angular correlation function in galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Alyssa; Bellis, Matthew; Bard, Debbie

    2014-03-01

    The two-point angular correlation function (2ACF) is used to quantify the scales of clustering of galaxies. The 2ACF changes as we look further back in time (higher redshift z) and the clustering evolves. We calculate the exact Landy-Szalay estimator for the 2ACF using GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) and employ novel visualizations to observe the evolution of this function with increasing redshift. We use data from the MICE Grand Challenge dataset, a 70-billion particle n-body simulation that is publicly available, and compare to data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The current status of this project will be presented.

  2. Exploration of the volumetric composition of human lung cancer nodules in correlated histopathology and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sieren, J C; Smith, A R; Thiesse, J; Namati, E; Hoffman, E A; Kline, J N; McLennan, G

    2011-10-01

    Gaining a complete and comprehensive understanding of lung cancer nodule histological compositions and how these tissues are represented in radiological data is important not only for expanding the current knowledge base of cancer growth and development but also has potential implications for classification standards, radiological diagnosis methods and for the evaluation of treatment response. In this study we generate large scale histological segmentations of the cancerous and non-cancerous tissues within resected lung nodules. We have implemented a processing pipeline which allows for the direct correlation between histological data and spatially corresponding computed tomography data. Utilizing these correlated datasets we evaluated the statistical separation between Hounsfield Unit (HU) histogram values for each tissue type. The findings of this study revealed that lung cancer nodules contain a complex intermixing of cellular tissue types and that trends exist in the relationship between these tissue types. It was found that the mean Hounsfield Unit values for isolated lung cancer nodules imaged with computed tomography, had statistically significantly different values for non-solid bronchoalveolar carcinoma, solid cancerous tumor, blood, and inactive fibrotic stromal tissue.

  3. Exploring the brain on multiple scales with correlative two-photon and light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2014-02-01

    One of the unique features of the brain is that its activity cannot be framed in a single spatio-temporal scale, but rather spans many orders of magnitude both in space and time. A single imaging technique can reveal only a small part of this complex machinery. To obtain a more comprehensive view of brain functionality, complementary approaches should be combined into a correlative framework. Here, we describe a method to integrate data from in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging and ex vivo light sheet microscopy, taking advantage of blood vessels as reference chart. We show how the apical dendritic arbor of a single cortical pyramidal neuron imaged in living thy1-GFP-M mice can be found in the large-scale brain reconstruction obtained with light sheet microscopy. Starting from the apical portion, the whole pyramidal neuron can then be segmented. The correlative approach presented here allows contextualizing within a three-dimensional anatomic framework the neurons whose dynamics have been observed with high detail in vivo.

  4. Estimation of dc transport dynamics in strongly correlated (La,Pr,Ca)MnO{sub 3} film using an insulator-metal composite model for terahertz conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V. A.; Hattori, A. N.; Nakamura, T.; Fujiwara, K.; Tanaka, H.; Nagai, M.; Ashida, M.

    2014-07-14

    Temperature-dependent conductivities at dc and terahertz (THz) frequency region (σ{sub THz}(ω,T)) were obtained for a strongly correlated (La{sub 0.275}Pr{sub 0.35}Ca{sub 0.375})MnO{sub 3} (LPCMO) film using THz time domain spectroscopy. A composite model that describes σ{sub THz}(ω,T) for LPCMO through the insulator-metal transition (IMT) was established by incorporating Austin-Mott model characterizing the hopping of localized electrons and Drude model explaining the behavior of free electrons. This model enables us to reliably investigate the dc transport dynamics from THz conductivity measurement, i.e., simultaneously evaluate the dc conductivity and the competing composition of metal and insulator phases through the IMT, reflecting the changes in microscopic conductivity of these phases.

  5. Importance of the Hubbard correction on the thermal conductivity calculation of strongly correlated materials: a case study of ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Consiglio, Anthony; Tian, Zhiting

    2016-01-01

    The wide bandgap semiconductor, ZnO, has gained interest recently as a promising option for use in power electronics such as thermoelectric and piezoelectric generators, as well as optoelectronic devices. Though much work has been done to improve its electronic properties, relatively little is known of its thermal transport properties with large variations in measured thermal conductivity. In this study, we examine the effects of a Hubbard corrected energy functional on the lattice thermal conductivity of wurtzite ZnO calculated using density functional theory and an iterative solution to the Boltzmann transport equation. Showing good agreement with existing experimental measurements, and with a detailed analysis of the mode-dependence and phonon properties, the results from this study highlight the importance of the Hubbard correction in calculations of thermal transport properties of materials with strongly correlated electron systems. PMID:27830737

  6. Importance of the Hubbard correction on the thermal conductivity calculation of strongly correlated materials: a case study of ZnO.

    PubMed

    Consiglio, Anthony; Tian, Zhiting

    2016-11-10

    The wide bandgap semiconductor, ZnO, has gained interest recently as a promising option for use in power electronics such as thermoelectric and piezoelectric generators, as well as optoelectronic devices. Though much work has been done to improve its electronic properties, relatively little is known of its thermal transport properties with large variations in measured thermal conductivity. In this study, we examine the effects of a Hubbard corrected energy functional on the lattice thermal conductivity of wurtzite ZnO calculated using density functional theory and an iterative solution to the Boltzmann transport equation. Showing good agreement with existing experimental measurements, and with a detailed analysis of the mode-dependence and phonon properties, the results from this study highlight the importance of the Hubbard correction in calculations of thermal transport properties of materials with strongly correlated electron systems.

  7. Importance of the Hubbard correction on the thermal conductivity calculation of strongly correlated materials: a case study of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consiglio, Anthony; Tian, Zhiting

    2016-11-01

    The wide bandgap semiconductor, ZnO, has gained interest recently as a promising option for use in power electronics such as thermoelectric and piezoelectric generators, as well as optoelectronic devices. Though much work has been done to improve its electronic properties, relatively little is known of its thermal transport properties with large variations in measured thermal conductivity. In this study, we examine the effects of a Hubbard corrected energy functional on the lattice thermal conductivity of wurtzite ZnO calculated using density functional theory and an iterative solution to the Boltzmann transport equation. Showing good agreement with existing experimental measurements, and with a detailed analysis of the mode-dependence and phonon properties, the results from this study highlight the importance of the Hubbard correction in calculations of thermal transport properties of materials with strongly correlated electron systems.

  8. Strong correlation between the antifungal effect of amphotericin B and its inhibitory action on germ-tube formation in a Candida albicans URA⁺ strain.

    PubMed

    Guirao-Abad, José P; González-Párraga, Pilar; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2015-03-01

    The hypothetical capacity of amphotericin B to suppress the formation of germ-tubes, which is the first step of yeast-to-hypha conversion in Candida albicans, has been investigated in the wild-type strain CEY.1 (CAI.4-URA⁺). Exponential cells exposed to concentrations of amphotericin B below or around the MIC90, exhibited a weak reduction in the percentage of human serum-induced germ-tube formation at 37ºC compared with a non-exposed control. However, the dimorphic transition was drastically suppressed after addition of potentially lethal doses of amphotericin B, which also caused severe cell killing. In contrast, an identical experimental approach carried out with the fungistatic compound 5-fluorocytosine had no significant effect on the level of the germ-tube formation. Together, these results strongly point to a close correlation between the fungicidal action of amphotericin B and its ability to impair morphogenetic conversion in C. albicans.

  9. Exploring the physiological correlates of chronic mild traumatic brain injury symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Astafiev, Serguei V.; Zinn, Kristina L.; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of a multimodal imaging study involving behavioral assessments, evoked and resting-state BOLD fMRI, and DTI in chronic mTBI subjects. We found that larger task-evoked BOLD activity in the MT+/LO region in extra-striate visual cortex correlated with mTBI and PTSD symptoms, especially light sensitivity. Moreover, higher FA values near the left optic radiation (OR) were associated with both light sensitivity and higher BOLD activity in the MT+/LO region. The MT+/LO region was localized as a region of abnormal functional connectivity with central white matter regions previously found to have abnormal physiological signals during visual eye movement tracking (Astafiev et al., 2015). We conclude that mTBI symptoms and light sensitivity may be related to excessive responsiveness of visual cortex to sensory stimuli. This abnormal sensitivity may be related to chronic remodeling of white matter visual pathways acutely injured. PMID:26909324

  10. Ecogenomic Perspectives on Domains of Unknown Function: Correlation-Based Exploration of Marine Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Hankeln, Wolfgang; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Kottmann, Renzo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Duhaime, Melissa Beth; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of conserved DNA sequences with no clear function is steadily growing in bioinformatics databases. Studies of sequence and structural homology have indicated that many uncharacterized protein domain sequences are variants of functionally described domains. If these variants promote an organism's ecological fitness, they are likely to be conserved in the genome of its progeny and the population at large. The genetic composition of microbial communities in their native ecosystems is accessible through metagenomics. We hypothesize the co-variation of protein domain sequences across metagenomes from similar ecosystems will provide insights into their potential roles and aid further investigation. Methodology/Principal findings We calculated the correlation of Pfam protein domain sequences across the Global Ocean Sampling metagenome collection, employing conservative detection and correlation thresholds to limit results to well-supported hits and associations. We then examined intercorrelations between domains of unknown function (DUFs) and domains involved in known metabolic pathways using network visualization and cluster-detection tools. We used a cautious “guilty-by-association” approach, referencing knowledge-level resources to identify and discuss associations that offer insight into DUF function. We observed numerous DUFs associated to photobiologically active domains and prevalent in the Cyanobacteria. Other clusters included DUFs associated with DNA maintenance and repair, inorganic nutrient metabolism, and sodium-translocating transport domains. We also observed a number of clusters reflecting known metabolic associations and cases that predicted functional reclassification of DUFs. Conclusion/Significance Critically examining domain covariation across metagenomic datasets can grant new perspectives on the roles and associations of DUFs in an ecological setting. Targeted attempts at DUF characterization in the laboratory or in

  11. Correlation of Lunar South Polar Epithermal Neutron Maps: Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector and Lunar Prospector Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Sagdeev, R.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Chin, G.; Garvin, J.; Sanin, A. B.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Harshman, K.; Finch, M. J.; Nandikotkur, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO), Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) was developed to refine the lunar surface hydrogen (H) measurements generated by the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. LPNS measurements indicated a approx.4,6% decrease in polar epithermal fluxes equivalent to (1.5+/-0,8)% H concentration and are direct geochemical evidence indicating water /high H at the poles. Given the similar operational and instrumental objectives of the LEND and LPNS systems, an important science analysis step for LEND is to test correlation with existing research including LPNS measurements. In this analysis, we compare corrected low altitude epithermal rate data from LPNS available via NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) with calibrated LEND epithermal maps using a cross-correlation technique

  12. Exploring the correlation between Southern Africa NDVI and Pacific sea surface temperatures: Results for the 1998 maize growing season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, J.; Funk, C.; Klaver, R.; Roberts, D.

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have identified statistically significant correlations between Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies and NDVI anomalies in Southern Africa. The potential predictive value of the relationship was explored for the 1998 maize growing season. Cross-validation techniques suggested a more useful relationship for regions of wet anomaly than for regions of dry anomaly. Observed 1998 NDVI anomaly patterns were consistent with this result. Wet anomalies were observed as expected, but wide areas of expected dry anomalies exhibited average or above-average greeness.

  13. A truncation hierarchy of coupled cluster models of strongly correlated systems based on perfect-pairing references: The singles+doubles models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhill, John A.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Paired, active-space treatments of static correlation are augmented with additional amplitudes to produce a hierarchy of parsimonious and efficient cluster truncations that approximate the total energy. The number of parameters introduced in these models grow with system size in a tractable way: two powers larger than the static correlation model it is built upon: for instance cubic for the models built on perfect pairing, fourth order for a perfect quadruples (PQ) reference, and fifth order for the models built on perfect hextuples. These methods are called singles+doubles (SD) corrections to perfect pairing, PQ, perfect hextuples, and two variants are explored. An implementation of the SD methods is compared to benchmark results for F2 and H2O dissociation problems, the H4 and H8 model systems, and the insertion of beryllium into hydrogen. In the cases examined even the quartic number of parameters associated with PQSD is able to provide results which meaningfully improve on coupled-cluster singles doubles (CCSD) (which also has quartic amplitudes) and compete with existing multi-reference alternatives.

  14. pp60v-src transformation of rat cells but not chicken cells strongly correlates with low-affinity phosphopeptide binding by the SH2 domain.

    PubMed Central

    Verderame, M F

    1997-01-01

    Substrates critical for transformation by pp60v-src remain unknown, as does the precise role of the src homology 2 (SH2) domain in this process. To continue exploring the role of the SH2 domain in pp60v-src-mediated transformation, site-directed mutagenesis was used to create mutant v-src alleles predicted to encode proteins with overall structural integrity intact but with reduced ability to bind phosphotyrosine-containing peptides. Arginine-175, which makes critical contacts in the phosphotyrosine-binding pocket, was mutated to lysine or alanine. Unexpectedly, both mutations created v-src alleles that transform chicken cells with wild-type (wt) efficiency and are reduced for transformation of rat cells; these alleles are host dependent for transformation. Additionally, these alleles resulted in a round morphological transformation of chicken cells, unlike 12 of the 13 known host-dependent src SH2 mutations that result in a fusiform morphology. Analysis of phosphopeptide binding by the mutant SH2 domains reveal that the in vitro ability to bind phosphopeptides known to have a high affinity for wt src SH2 correlates with wt (round) morphological transformation in chicken cells and in vitro ability to bind phosphopeptides known to have a low affinity for wt src SH2 correlates with rat cell transformation. These results suggest that the search for critical substrates in rat cells should be among proteins that interact with pp60v-src with low affinity. Images PMID:9168470

  15. CRISPR-Cas9 cleavage efficiency correlates strongly with target-sgRNA folding stability: from physical mechanism to off-target assessment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Duan, Dongsheng; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2017-12-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 complex, a bacterial immune response system, has been widely adopted for RNA-guided genome editing and transcription regulation in applications such as targeted genome modification and site-directed mutagenesis. However, the physical basis for its target specificity is not fully understood. In this study, based on a statistical mechanical analysis for the whole ensemble of sgRNA-target complex conformations, we identify a strong correlation between Cas9 cleavage efficiency and the stability of the DNA-RNA (R-loop) complex structures, with a Pearson correlation coefficient ranging from 0.775 to 0.886 for the tested systems. The finding leads to quantitative insights into important experimental results, such as the greater Cas9 tolerance to single-base mismatches in PAM-distal region than to PAM-proximal region and the high specificity and efficiency for shorter protospacers. Moreover, the results from the genome-wide off-target assessments, compared with other off-target scoring tools, indicate that the statistical mechanics-based approach provides more reliable off-target analyses and sgRNA design. To facilitate the genome engineering applications, a new web-based tool for genome-wide off-target assessment is established.

  16. Low-frequency oscillations measured in the periphery with near-infrared spectroscopy are strongly correlated with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia Maria; Licata, Stephanie C.; deB. Frederick, Blaise

    2012-10-01

    Low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) in the range of 0.01-0.15 Hz are commonly observed in functional imaging studies, such as blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Some of these LFOs are nonneuronal and are closely related to autonomic physiological processes. In the current study, we conducted a concurrent resting-state fMRI and NIRS experiment with healthy volunteers. LFO data was collected simultaneously at peripheral sites (middle fingertip and big toes) by NIRS, and centrally in the brain by BOLD fMRI. The cross-correlations of the LFOs collected from the finger, toes, and brain were calculated. Our data show that the LFOs measured in the periphery (NIRS signals) and in the brain (BOLD fMRI) were strongly correlated with varying time delays. This demonstrates that some portion of the LFOs actually reflect systemic physiological circulatory effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NIRS is effective for measuring the peripheral LFOs, and that these LFOs and the temporal shifts between them are consistent in healthy participants and may serve as useful biomarkers for detecting and monitoring circulatory dysfunction.

  17. Anomalous echo: Exploring abnormal experience correlates of emotional motor resonance in Schizophrenia Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sestito, Mariateresa; Raballo, Andrea; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Amore, Mario; Maggini, Carlo; Gallese, Vittorio

    2015-09-30

    Anomalous experiences such as Basic Symptoms (BS) are considered the first subjective manifestation of the neurobiological substrate of schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a low or high emotional motor resonance occurring in Schizophrenia Spectrum (SzSp) patients was related to patients׳ clinical features and to their anomalous subjective experiences as indexed by the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS). To this aim, we employed a validated paradigm sensitive in evoking a congruent facial mimicry (measured by means of facial electromyographic activity, EMG) through multimodal positive and negative emotional stimuli presentation. Results showed that SzSp patients more resonating with negative emotional stimuli (i.e. Externalizers) had significantly higher scores in BSABS Cluster 3 (Vulnerability) and more psychotic episodes than Internalizers patients. On the other hand, SzSp patients more resonating with positive emotional stimuli (i.e. Externalizers) scored higher in BSABS Cluster 5 (Interpersonal irritation) than Internalizers. Drawing upon a phenomenological-based perspective, we attempted to shed new light on the abnormal experiences characterizing schizophrenia, explaining them in terms of a disruption of the normal self-perception conveyed by the basic, low-level emotional motor mechanisms.

  18. Exploring doxorubicin localization in eluting TiO2 nanotube arrays through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Ilaria; Sanguigno, Luigi; Causa, Filippo; Monetta, Tullio; Netti, Paolo A

    2012-11-07

    Drug elution properties of TiO(2) nanotube arrays have been largely investigated by means of solely macroscopic observations. Controversial elution performances have been reported so far and a clear comprehension of these phenomena is still missing as a consequence of a lack of molecular investigation methods. Here we propose a way to discern drug elution properties of nanotubes through the evaluation of drug localization by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) analysis. We verified this method upon doxorubicin elution from differently loaded TiO(2) nanotubes. Diverse elution profiles were obtained from nanotubes filled by soaking and wet vacuum impregnation methods. Impregnated nanotubes controlled drug diffusion up to thirty days, while soaked samples completed elution in seven days. FCS analysis of doxorubicin motion in loaded nanotubes clarified that more than 90% of drugs dwell preferentially in inter-nanotube spaces in soaked samples due to decorrelation in a 2D fashion, while a 97% fraction of molecules showed 1D mobility ascribable to displacements along the nanotube vertical axis of wet vacuum impregnated nanotubes. The diverse drug localizations inferred from FCS measurements, together with distinct drug-surface interaction strengths resulting from diverse drug filling techniques, could explain the variability in elution kinetics.

  19. Neural plasticity explored by correlative two-photon and electron/SPIM microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra Mascaro, A. L.; Silvestri, L.; Costantini, I.; Sacconi, L.; Maco, B.; Knott, G. W.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-06-01

    Plasticity of the central nervous system is a complex process which involves the remodeling of neuronal processes and synaptic contacts. However, a single imaging technique can reveal only a small part of this complex machinery. To obtain a more complete view, complementary approaches should be combined. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy, combined with multi-photon laser nanosurgery, allow following the real-time dynamics of single neuronal processes in the cerebral cortex of living mice. The structural rearrangement elicited by this highly confined paradigm of injury can be imaged in vivo first, and then the same neuron could be retrieved ex-vivo and characterized in terms of ultrastructural features of the damaged neuronal branch by means of electron microscopy. Afterwards, we describe a method to integrate data from in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging and ex vivo light sheet microscopy, based on the use of major blood vessels as reference chart. We show how the apical dendritic arbor of a single cortical pyramidal neuron imaged in living mice can be found in the large-scale brain reconstruction obtained with light sheet microscopy. Starting from its apical portion, the whole pyramidal neuron can then be segmented and located in the correct cortical layer. With the correlative approach presented here, researchers will be able to place in a three-dimensional anatomic context the neurons whose dynamics have been observed with high detail in vivo.

  20. Exploring depressive personality traits in youth: origins, correlates, and developmental consequences.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Karen D; Klein, Daniel N

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that depressive personality (DP) disorder may represent a persistent, trait-based form of depression that lies along an affective spectrum ranging from personality traits to diagnosable clinical disorders. A significant gap in this area of research concerns the development of DP and its applicability to youth. The present research explored the construct of DP traits in youth. Specifically, this study examined the reliability, stability, and validity of the construct, potential origins of DP traits, and the developmental consequences of DP traits. A sample of 143 youth (mean age = 12.37 years, SD = 1.26) and their caregivers completed semistructured interviews and questionnaires on two occasions, separated by a 12-month interval. The measure of DP traits was reliable and moderately stable over time. Providing evidence of construct validity, DP traits were associated with a network of constructs, including a negative self-focus, high-negative and low-positive emotionality, and heightened stress reactivity. Moreover, several potential origins of DP traits were identified, including a history of family adversity, maternal DP traits, and maternal depression. Consistent with hypotheses regarding their developmental significance, DP traits predicted the generation of stress and the emergence of depression (but not nondepressive psychopathology) during the pubertal transition. Finally, depression predicted subsequent DP traits, suggesting a reciprocal process whereby DP traits heighten risk for depression, which then exacerbates these traits. These findings support the construct of DP traits in youth, and suggest that these traits may be a useful addition to developmental models of risk for youth depression.

  1. An Exploration of Molecular Correlates Relevant to Radiation Combined Skin-Burn Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Aminul; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Zhai, Min; Swift, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to high dose radiation in combination with physical injuries such as burn or wound trauma can produce a more harmful set of medical complications requiring specialist interventions. Currently these interventions are unavailable as are the precise biomarkers needed to help both accurately assess and treat such conditions. In the present study, we tried to identify and explore the possible role of serum exosome microRNA (miRNA) signatures as potential biomarkers for radiation combined burn injury (RCBI). Methodology Female B6D2F1/J mice were assigned to four experimental groups (n = 6): sham control (SHAM), burn injury (BURN), radiation injury (RI) and combined radiation skin burn injury (CI). We performed serum multiplex cytokine analysis and serum exosome miRNA expression profiling to determine novel miRNA signatures and important biological pathways associated with radiation combined skin-burn trauma. Principal Findings Serum cytokines, IL-5 and MCP-1, were significantly induced only in CI mice (p<0.05). From 890 differentially expressed miRNAs identified, microarray analysis showed 47 distinct miRNA seed sequences significantly associated with CI mice compared to SHAM control mice (fold change ≥ 1.2, p<0.05). Furthermore, only two major miRNA seed sequences (miR-690 and miR-223) were validated to be differentially expressed for CI mice specifically (fold change ≥ 1.5, p<0.05). Conclusions Serum exosome miRNA signature data of adult mice, following RCBI, provides new insights into the molecular and biochemical pathways associated with radiation combined skin-burn trauma in vivo. PMID:26247844

  2. Genetic correlation between alcohol preference and conditioned fear: Exploring a functional relationship.

    PubMed

    Chester, Julia A; Weera, Marcus M

    2017-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol-use disorders have a high rate of co-occurrence, possibly because they are regulated by common genes. In support of this idea, mice selectively bred for high (HAP) alcohol preference show greater fear potentiated startle (FPS), a model for fear-related disorders such as PTSD, compared to mice selectively bred for low (LAP) alcohol preference. This positive genetic correlation between alcohol preference and FPS behavior suggests that the two traits may be functionally related. This study examined the effects of fear conditioning on alcohol consumption and the effects of alcohol consumption on the expression of FPS in male and female HAP2 and LAP2 mice. In experiment 1, alcohol consumption (g/kg) under continuous-access conditions was monitored daily for 4 weeks following a single fear-conditioning or control treatment (foot shock and no shock). FPS was assessed three times (once at the end of the 4-week alcohol access period, once at 24 h after removal of alcohol, and once at 6-8 days after removal of alcohol), followed by two more weeks of alcohol access. Results showed no change in alcohol consumption, but alcohol-consuming, fear-conditioned, HAP2 males showed increased FPS at 24 h during the alcohol abstinence period compared to control groups. In experiment 2, alcohol consumption under limited-access conditions was monitored daily for 4 weeks. Fear-conditioning or control treatments occurred four times during the first 12 days and FPS testing occurred four times during the second 12 days of the 4-week alcohol consumption period. Results showed that fear conditioning increased alcohol intake in both HAP2 and LAP2 mice immediately following the first conditioning session. Fear-conditioned HAP2 but not LAP2 mice showed greater alcohol intake compared to control groups on drinking days that occurred between fear conditioning and FPS test sessions. FPS did not change as a function of alcohol consumption in either

  3. Exploring scale-dependent correlations between cancer mortality rates using factorial kriging and population-weighted semivariograms

    PubMed Central

    Goovaerts, Pierre; Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Greiling, Dunrie

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a geostatistical methodology which accounts for spatially varying population size in the processing of cancer mortality data. The approach proceeds in two steps: (1) spatial patterns are first described and modeled using population-weighted semivariogram estimators, (2) spatial components corresponding to nested structures identified on semivariograms are then estimated and mapped using a variant of factorial kriging. The main benefit over traditional spatial smoothers is that the pattern of spatial variability (i.e. direction-dependent variability, range of correlation, presence of nested scales of variability) is directly incorporated into the computation of weights assigned to surrounding observations. Moreover, besides filtering the noise in the data the procedure allows the decomposition of the structured component into several spatial components (i.e. local versus regional variability) on the basis of semivariogram models. A simulation study demonstrates that maps of spatial components are closer to the underlying risk maps in terms of prediction errors and provide a better visualization of regional patterns than the original maps of mortality rates or the maps smoothed using weighted linear averages. The proposed approach also attenuates the underestimation of the magnitude of the correlation between various cancer rates resulting from noise attached to the data. This methodology has great potential to explore scale-dependent correlation between risks of developing cancers and to detect clusters at various spatial scales, which should lead to a more accurate representation of geographic variation in cancer risk, and ultimately to a better understanding of causative relationships. PMID:16915345

  4. High-momentum tails as magnetic-structure probes for strongly correlated SU(κ ) fermionic mixtures in one-dimensional traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Jean; Jünemann, Johannes; Albert, Mathias; Rizzi, Matteo; Minguzzi, Anna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    A universal k-4 decay of the large-momentum tails of the momentum distribution, fixed by Tan's contact coefficients, constitutes a direct signature of strong correlations in a short-range interacting quantum gas. Here we consider a repulsive multicomponent Fermi gas under harmonic confinement, as in the experiment of G. Pagano et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 198 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2878], realizing a gas with tunable SU(κ ) symmetry. We exploit an exact solution at infinite repulsion to show a direct correspondence between the value of the Tan's contact for each of the κ components of the gas and the Young tableaux for the SN permutation symmetry group identifying the magnetic structure of the ground state. This opens a route for the experimental determination of magnetic configurations in cold atomic gases, employing only standard (spin-resolved) time-of-flight techniques. Combining the exact result with matrix-product-state simulations, we obtain the Tan's contact at all values of repulsive interactions. We show that a local-density approximation (LDA) on the Bethe-ansatz equation of state for the homogeneous mixture is in excellent agreement with the results for the harmonically confined gas. At strong interactions, the LDA predicts a scaling behavior of the Tan's contact. This provides a useful analytical expression for the dependence on the number of fermions, number of components, and interaction strength. Moreover, using a virial approach, we study the Tan's contact behavior at high temperature and in the limit of infinite interactions, and we show that it increases with the temperature and the number of components. At zero temperature, we predict that the weight of the momentum distribution tails increases with interaction strength and the number of components if the population per component is kept constant. This latter property was experimentally observed in G. Pagano et al. [Nat. Phys. 10, 198 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2878].

  5. Strong magnetic correlations to 900 K in single crystals of the trigonal antiferromagnetic insulators SrMn2As2 and CaMn2As2

    DOE PAGES

    Sangeetha, N. S.; Pandey, Abhishek; Benson, Zackery A.; ...

    2016-09-15

    Crystallographic, electronic transport, thermal, and magnetic properties are reported for SrMn2As2 and CaMn2As2 single crystals grown using Sn flux. Rietveld refinements of powder x-ray diffraction data show that the two compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the trigonal CaAl2Si2-type structure (space groupmore » $$P\\bar{3}$$ m1), in agreement with the literature. Electrical resistivity ρ versus temperature T measurements demonstrate insulating ground states for both compounds with activation energies of 85 meV for SrMn2As2 and 61 meV for CaMn2As2. In a local-moment picture, the Mn+2 3d5 ions are expected to have high-spin S=5/2 with spectroscopic splitting factor g≈2. Magnetic susceptibility χ and heat capacity Cp measurements versus T reveal antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at TN=120(2) K and 62(3) K for SrMn2As2 and CaMn2As2, respectively. The anisotropic χ(T≤TN) data indicate that the hexagonal c axis is the hard axis and hence that the ordered Mn moments are aligned in the ab plane. Finally, the χ(T) data for both compounds and the Cp(T) for SrMn2As2 show strong dynamic short-range AFM correlations from TN up to at least 900 K, likely associated with quasi-two-dimensional connectivity of strong AFM exchange interactions between the Mn spins within the corrugated honeycomb Mn layers parallel to the ab plane.« less

  6. Strong Correlation of Genome-Wide Expression after Traumatic Brain Injury In Vitro and In Vivo Implicates a Role for SORLA.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Michael R; Elkin, Benjamin S; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Crary, John F; Hammers, Jennifer L; Huh, Jimmy W; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Morrison, Barclay

    2017-01-01

    The utility of in vitro models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) depends on their ability to recapitulate the in vivo TBI cascade. In this study, we used a genome-wide approach to compare changes in gene expression at several time points post-injury in both an in vitro model and an in vivo model of TBI. We found a total of 2073 differentially expressed genes in our in vitro model and 877 differentially expressed genes in our in vivo model when compared to noninjured controls. We found a strong correlation in gene expression changes between the two models (r = 0.69), providing confidence that the in vitro model represented at least part of the in vivo injury cascade. From these data, we searched for genes with significant changes in expression over time (analysis of covariance) and identified sorting protein-related receptor with A-type repeats (SORLA). SORLA directs amyloid precursor protein to the recycling pathway by direct binding and away from amyloid-beta producing enzymes. Mutations of SORLA have been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We confirmed downregulation of SORLA expression in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and present preliminary data from human tissue that is consistent with these experimental results. Together, these data suggest that the in vitro model of TBI used in this study strongly recapitulates the in vivo TBI pathobiology and is well suited for future mechanistic or therapeutic studies. The data also suggest the possible involvement of SORLA in the post-traumatic cascade linking TBI to AD.

  7. Simultaneous Quantification of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 and 24,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Rats Shows Strong Correlations between Serum and Brain Tissue Levels.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; He, Xin; Li, Huan-De; Deng, Yang; Yan, Miao; Cai, Hua-Lin; Tang, Mi-Mi; Dang, Rui-Li; Jiang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    While vitamin D3 is recognized as a neuroactive steroid affecting both brain development and function, efficient analytical method in determining vitamin D3 metabolites in the brain tissue is still lacking, and the relationship of vitamin D3 status between serum and brain remains elusive. Therefore, we developed a novel analysis method by using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to simultaneously quantify the concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25(OH)2D3) in the serum and brain of rats fed with different dose of vitamin D3. We further investigated whether variations of serum vitamin D3 metabolites could affect vitamin D3 metabolite levels in the brain. Serum and brain tissue were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS with electrospray ionization following derivatization with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD). The method is highly sensitive, specific, and accurate to quantify 25(OH)D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 in animal brain tissue. Vitamin D3 metabolites in brain tissue were significantly lower in rats fed with a vitamin D deficiency diet than in rats fed with high vitamin D3 diet. There was also a strong correlation of vitamin D3 metabolites in serum and brain. These results indicate that vitamin D3 status in serum affects bioavailability of vitamin D3 metabolites in the brain.

  8. Simultaneous Quantification of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 and 24,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Rats Shows Strong Correlations between Serum and Brain Tissue Levels

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; He, Xin; Li, Huan-De; Deng, Yang; Yan, Miao; Cai, Hua-Lin; Tang, Mi-Mi; Dang, Rui-Li; Jiang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    While vitamin D3 is recognized as a neuroactive steroid affecting both brain development and function, efficient analytical method in determining vitamin D3 metabolites in the brain tissue is still lacking, and the relationship of vitamin D3 status between serum and brain remains elusive. Therefore, we developed a novel analysis method by using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to simultaneously quantify the concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25(OH)2D3) in the serum and brain of rats fed with different dose of vitamin D3. We further investigated whether variations of serum vitamin D3 metabolites could affect vitamin D3 metabolite levels in the brain. Serum and brain tissue were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS with electrospray ionization following derivatization with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD). The method is highly sensitive, specific, and accurate to quantify 25(OH)D3 and 24,25(OH)2D3 in animal brain tissue. Vitamin D3 metabolites in brain tissue were significantly lower in rats fed with a vitamin D deficiency diet than in rats fed with high vitamin D3 diet. There was also a strong correlation of vitamin D3 metabolites in serum and brain. These results indicate that vitamin D3 status in serum affects bioavailability of vitamin D3 metabolites in the brain. PMID:26713090

  9. A Transition from Localized to Strongly Correlated Electron Behavior and Mixed Valence Driven by Physical or Chemical Pressure in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Haskel, Daniel; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander A.; Cao, H.; Thompson, Corey M.; Kovnir, Kirill; Menushenkov, Alexey P.; Chernikov, Roman V.; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Shatruk, Michael

    2016-03-02

    We demonstrate that the action of physical pressure, chemical compression, or aliovalent substitution in ACo(2)As(2) (A = Eu and Ca) has a general consequence of causing these antiferromagnetic materials to become ferromagnets. In all cases, the mixed valence triggered at the electropositive A site results in the increase of the Co 3d density of states at the Fermi level. Remarkably, the dramatic alteration of magnetic behavior results from the very minor (<0.15 eleetron) change in the population of the 3d orbitals. The mixed valence state of En observed in the high-pressure (HP) form of EuCo2As2 exhibits a remarkable stability, achieving the average oxidation state of +2.25 at 12.6 GPa. In the case of CaCo2As2, substituting even 10% of Eu or La into the Ca site causes ferromagnetic ordering of Co moments. Similar to HP-EuCo2As2, the itinerant 3d ferromagnetism emerges from electronic doping into the Co layer because of chemical compression of Eu sites in Ca0.9Eu0.1Co1.91As2 or direct electron doping in Ca0.85La0.15Co1.89As2. The results reported herein demonstrate the general possibility of amplifying minor localized electronic effects to achieve major changes in material's properties via involvement of strongly correlated electrons.

  10. No strong correlations between serum cytokine levels, CMV serostatus and hand-grip strength in older subjects in the Berlin BASE-II cohort.

    PubMed

    Goldeck, David; Pawelec, Graham; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Oettinger, Lilly; Haehnel, Karin; Demuth, Ilja

    2016-02-01

    Hand-grip strength is strongly correlated with measures of muscle mass and can be taken to predict morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hand-grip strength and other markers associated with immune ageing, such as Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, leukocyte telomere length and serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in the elderly. We have assessed grip strength with the Smedley Dynamometer in younger (22-37 years) and older (60-85 years) men and women in a sample of people living in Berlin (the BASE-II study). Serum cytokine levels were determined by flow-cytometry, CMV serostatus via ELISA and leukocyte telomere length by quantitative PCR. IL-1β levels tended to be negatively associated with grip strength, but we did not find a significant association with IL-6 levels. CMV-seropositivity was not associated with higher levels of IL-1β, IL-6 or TNF, nor with weaker grip strength in men or women at any age. A putative general measure of organismal ageing, overall leukocyte telomere length, was also found not to be associated with lower grip strength in the elderly. Hand-grip strength remains an important biomarker independent of CMV infection or shorter telomere lengths, and poorly reflected in peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, all of which have been associated in some studies with frailty and mortality.

  11. A Transition from Localized to Strongly Correlated Electron Behavior and Mixed Valence Driven by Physical or Chemical Pressure in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca).

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Haskel, Daniel; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander A; Cao, Huibo; Thompson, Corey M; Kovnir, Kirill; Menushenkov, Alexey P; Chernikov, Roman V; Garlea, V Ovidiu; Shatruk, Michael

    2016-03-02

    We demonstrate that the action of physical pressure, chemical compression, or aliovalent substitution in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca) has a general consequence of causing these antiferromagnetic materials to become ferromagnets. In all cases, the mixed valence triggered at the electropositive A site results in the increase of the Co 3d density of states at the Fermi level. Remarkably, the dramatic alteration of magnetic behavior results from the very minor (<0.15 electron) change in the population of the 3d orbitals. The mixed valence state of Eu observed in the high-pressure (HP) form of EuCo2As2 exhibits a remarkable stability, achieving the average oxidation state of +2.25 at 12.6 GPa. In the case of CaCo2As2, substituting even 10% of Eu or La into the Ca site causes ferromagnetic ordering of Co moments. Similar to HP-EuCo2As2, the itinerant 3d ferromagnetism emerges from electronic doping into the Co layer because of chemical compression of Eu sites in Ca0.9Eu0.1Co1.91As2 or direct electron doping in Ca0.85La0.15Co1.89As2. The results reported herein demonstrate the general possibility of amplifying minor localized electronic effects to achieve major changes in material's properties via involvement of strongly correlated electrons.

  12. Anomalous excitons and screenings unveiling strong electronic correlations in SrTi1 -xNbxO3 (0 ≤x ≤0.005 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Pranjal Kumar; Sponza, Lorenzo; Schmidt, Daniel; Asmara, Teguh Citra; Diao, Caozheng; Lim, Jason C. W.; Poh, Sock Mui; Kimura, Shin-ichi; Trevisanutto, Paolo E.; Olevano, Valerio; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2015-07-01

    Electron-electron (e-e) and electron-hole (e-h) interactions are often associated with many exotic phenomena in correlated electron systems. Here, we report an observation of anomalous excitons at 3.75, 4.67, and 6.11 eV at 4.2 K in bulk SrTiO3. Fully supported by ab initio G W Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, these excitons are due to strong e-h and e-e interactions with different characters: 4.67 and 6.11 eV are resonant excitons and 3.75 eV is a bound Wannier-like exciton with an unexpectedly higher level of delocalization. Measurements and calculations on SrTi1 -xNbxO3 for 0.0001 ≤x ≤0.005 further show that the energy and spectral-weight of the excitonic peaks vary as a function of electron doping (x ) and temperature, which are attributed to screening effects. Our results show the importance of e-h and e-e interactions yielding to anomalous excitons and thus bring out a new fundamental perspective in SrTiO3.

  13. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2.

  14. Supraphysiological serum relaxin concentration during pregnancy achieved by in-vitro fertilization is strongly correlated to the number of growing follicles in the treatment cycle.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, P; Svärdsudd, K; von Schoultz, B; Wramsby, H

    1996-09-01

    In order to analyse the relationship between the ovarian response to stimulation in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment cycles and relaxin concentrations during subsequent pregnancies, 31 healthy women pregnant after IVF treatment were studied prospectively. The maximum number of follicles observed from day -4 to day -2 in relation to ovum retrieval and the number of oocytes recovered were recorded. In addition, blood samples were drawn in the follicular phase, the luteal phase, early pregnancy and at gestational weeks 12, 16, 20, 27 and 35 to assess oestradiol, progesterone, human chorionic gonadotrophin and relaxin. The maximum numbers (mean +/- SEM) of follicles observed and oocytes recovered were 9.0 +/- 0.6 and 6.1 +/- 0.5 respectively. The supraphysiological mean relaxin values were strongly correlated to the maximum number of follicles observed (r = 0.72, P < 0.0001) and the number of oocytes recovered (r = 0.64, P < 0.0001), indicating that the source of increased relaxin production during IVF pregnancy might be the ovary. These results are supported by experimental data. In the present study, the occurrence of multiple pregnancy was not associated with higher relaxin concentrations, which is further support for the hypothesis that the ovary is the main source of serum relaxin.

  15. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A.

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502–R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C{sub 2}, CN, Cr {sub 2}, and NO {sub 2}.

  16. A Transition from Localized to Strongly Correlated Electron Behavior and Mixed Valence Driven by Physical or Chemical Pressure in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca)

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Haskel, Daniel; ...

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the action of physical pressure, chemical compression, or aliovalent substitution in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca) has a general consequence of causing these antiferromagnetic materials to become ferromagnets. In all cases, the mixed valence triggered at the electropositive A site results in the increase of the Co 3d density of states at the Fermi level. Remarkably, the dramatic alteration of magnetic behavior results from the very minor (<0.15 electron) change in the population of the 3d orbitals. The mixed valence state of Eu observed in the high-pressure (HP) form of EuCo2As2 exhibits amore » remarkable stability, achieving the average oxidation state of +2.25 at 12.6 GPa. In the case of CaCo2As2, substituting even 10% of Eu or La into the Ca site causes ferromagnetic ordering of Co moments. Similar to HP-EuCo2As2, the itinerant 3d ferromagnetism emerges from electronic doping into the Co layer because of chemical compression of Eu sites in Ca0.9Eu0.1Co1.91As2 or direct electron doping in Ca0.85La0.15Co1.89As2. Finally, the results reported herein demonstrate the general possibility of amplifying minor localized electronic effects to achieve major changes in material’s properties via involvement of strongly correlated electrons.« less

  17. Raman signatures of strong Kitaev exchange correlations in (Na1-xLix)2IrO3: Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Gupta, Satyendra; Sriluckshmy, P. V.; Mehlawat, Kavita; Balodhi, Ashiwini; Mishra, Dileep K.; Hassan, S. R.; Ramakrishnan, T. V.; Muthu, D. V. S.; Singh, Yogesh; Sood, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Inelastic light scattering studies on single crystals of (Na1-x Li x )2IrO3 (x = 0, 0.05 and 0.15) show a polarization-independent broad band at ˜ 2750 cm-1 with a large band-width ˜ 1800 \\text{cm}-1 . For Na2IrO3 the broad band is seen for temperatures ≤ 200 \\text{K} and persists inside the magnetically ordered state. For Li samples, the intensity of this mode increases, shifts to lower wave numbers, and persists to higher temperatures. Such a mode has recently been predicted (by Knolle et al.) as a signature of the Kitaev spin liquid. We assign the observation of the broad band to be a signature of strong Kitaev exchange correlations. The fact that the broad band persists even inside the magnetically ordered state suggests that dynamically fluctuating moments survive even below T N . This is further supported by our mean-field calculations. The Raman response calculated in mean-field theory shows that the broad band predicted for the SL state survives in the magnetically ordered state near the zigzag-spin liquid phase boundary. A comparison with the theoretical model gives an estimate of the Kitaev exchange interaction parameter to be J_K≈ 57 \\text{meV} .

  18. Exploring correlation between redox potential and other edaphic factors in field and laboratory conditions in relation to methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Singh, S N

    2001-10-01

    Methane is primarily a biogenic gas, which is implicated in global warming. Although its production in the anoxic conditions is regulated by several edaphic factors, aquatic macrophytes also influence methane emission by providing aerenchyma to act as chimney for CH4 transport from the sediment to troposphere, by releasing root exudates to the sediment to serve as substrate for methanogenic bacteria and by transporting atmospheric O2 to rhizosphere, which stimulates CH4 consumption. Among the edaphic factors, redox potential (Eh) is the most important, which largely determines the action of methanogenic bacteria. Hence, a study was undertaken first to find out the correlation between CH4 emission and edaphic factors in the field conditions and then to understand the relationship between Eh and other edaphic factors. The field studies revealed that natural wetlands were the major source of CH4 emission, and the vegetation plays an important role in CH4 emission from the water bodies. However, it was very difficult to establish a strong relationship between the CH4 emission and the edaphic factors in the field conditions due to other limiting factors and their constant fluctuations. In this connection, the laboratory experiments exhibited that soil temperature, pH, moisture regime and incubation period were negatively correlated with Eh, which determines the initiation of methanogenic process. However, organic carbon and the water regime over the soil surface did not show any impact on Eh in this study.

  19. CoRoT light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars. Evidence of a strong correlation between phase and amplitude modulations of CoRoT ID 0105288363

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadid, M.; Perini, C.; Bono, G.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Deboscher, J.

    2011-03-01

    Context. The CoRoT - Convection Rotation and planetary Transits - space mission provides a unique opportunity to monitor RR Lyrae stars with excellent time-sampling, unprecedented photometric precision, and a long time base of 150 days. Aims: The pulsation characteristics of RR Lyrae stars rely on robust physics, but we still lack a firm quantitative understanding of the physical mechanisms driving the Blazhko modulation and the long-term changes in their pulsation behavior. We use the high-precision space data of an unknown RR Lyrae star CoRoT ID 0105288363 observed during a second long run centered on the Galaxy - LRc02 -, to improve our understanding of the pulsation properties of RR Lyrae stars. Methods: The CoRoT data were corrected using a jump and trend filtering code. We applied different period-finding techniques including Period04, MuFrAn, PDM, and SigSpec. Amplitude and phase modulation were investigated using an analytical function method as well as traditional O-C diagrams. Results: For the first time, we detect significant cycle-to-cycle changes in the Blazhko modulation, which appear to be analogous to those predicted by Stothers - owing to the suppression of turbulent convection - to explain this phenomenon. We discuss the clear correlations between the phase and the amplitude of the bump, and the skewness and acuteness of the light curve during different Blazhko cycles. We find that these quantities are strongly anticorrelated with the fundamental pulsation period. This provides a strong support to the slow convective cycle model suggested by Stothers. We also detect a long-term modulation period in the maximum brightness spectrum. A more extended coverage of the long-term modulation is required to constrain its period. Seventh-order side peaks of the pulsation multiplet structure are also visible with the left-side peak amplitudes being higher than those of the right. This has never previously been detected. Future theoretical investigations are

  20. The zinc finger gene ZIC2 has features of an oncogene and its over- expression correlates strongly with the clinical course of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Sergio; Poynor, Elizabeth; Barakat, Richard R; Clivio, Luca; Cinquini, Michela; Fruscio, Robert; Porcu, Luca; Bussani, Cecilia; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Erba, Eugenio; Romano, Michela; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Koff, Andrew; Luzzatto, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Epithelial ovarian tumors (EOTs) are amongst the most lethal of malignancies in women. We have previously identified ZIC2 as expressed at a higher level in samples of a malignant form (MAL) of EOT than in samples of a form with low malignant potential (LMP). We have now investigated the role of ZIC2 in driving tumor growth and its association with clinical outcomes. Experimental Design ZIC2 expression levels were analysed in two independent tumor tissue collections of LMP and MAL. In vitro experiments aimed to test the role of ZIC2 as a transforming gene. Cox models were used to correlate ZIC2 expression with clinical endpoints. Results ZIC2 expression was about 40-fold in terms of mRNA and about 17-fold in terms of protein in MAL (n = 193) versus LMP (n = 39) tumors. ZIC2 mRNA levels were high in MAL cell lines, but undetectable in LMP cell lines. Over-expression of ZIC2 was localized to the nucleus. ZIC2 over-expression increases the growth rate and foci formation of NIH 3T3 cells, and stimulates anchorage-independent colony formation; down-regulation of ZIC2 decreases the growth rate of MAL cell lines. Zinc finger domains 1 and 2 are required for transforming activity. In stage I MAL ZIC2 expression was significantly associated with overall survival in both univariate (p = 0.046), and multivariate model (p = 0.049). Conclusions ZIC2, a transcription factor related to the sonic hedgehog pathway, is a strong discriminant between MAL and LMP tumors: it may be a major determinant of outcome of EOT. PMID:22733541

  1. Early Operations Flight Correlation of the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD) on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume; Yang, Kan; Nguyen, Daniel; Cornwell, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission launched on September 7, 2013 with a one month cruise before lunar insertion. The LADEE spacecraft is a power limited, octagonal, composite bus structure with solar panels on all eight sides with four vertical segments per side and 2 panels dedicated to instruments. One of these panels has the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD), which represents a furthering of the laser communications technology demonstration proved out by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). LLCD increases the bandwidth of communication to and from the moon with less mass and power than LROs technology demonstrator. The LLCD Modem and Controller boxes are mounted to an internal cruciform composite panel and have no dedicated radiator. The thermal design relies on power cycling of the boxes and radiation of waste heat to the inside of the panels, which then reject the heat when facing cold space. The LADEE mission includes a slow roll and numerous attitudes to accommodate the challenging thermal requirements for all the instruments on board. During the cruise phase, the internal Modem and Controller avionics for LLCD were warmer than predicted by more than modeling uncertainty would suggest. This caused concern that if the boxes were considerably warmer than expected while off, they would also be warmer when operating and could limit the operational time when in lunar orbit. The thermal group at Goddard Space Flight Center evaluated the models and design for these critical avionics for LLCD. Upon receipt of the spacecraft models and audit was performed and data was collected from the flight telemetry to perform a sanity check of the models and to correlate to flight where possible. This paper describes the efforts to correlate the model to flight data and to predict the thermal performance when in lunar orbit and presents some lessons learned.

  2. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  3. Exploring Demographic and Substance Use Correlates of Hookah Use in a Sample of Southern California Community College Students

    PubMed Central

    De Borba-Silva, Maria; Singh, Pramil; dos Santos, Hildemar; Job, Jayakaran S.; Brink, T.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hookah smoking is a growing young adult phenomenon, particularly among college students. Many users feel that it is safer than other tobacco products, although its health threats are well documented. Little is known about hookah use rates in community colleges that are attended by nearly half of all US college students. This study examined hookah use in a diverse convenience sample of students attending two southern California community colleges. Methods In fall 2011, a cross-sectional, in-classroom survey was administered to 1,207 students. A series of fully adjusted multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to explore demographic, other substance use, and attitudinal correlates of lifetime and current hookah use. Results Lifetime hookah use (56%) was higher than lifetime cigarette use (49%). Gender and personal socioeconomic status were not related to hookah use. Current use (10.8%) was associated with current use of alcohol, cigars, and cigarettes. Compared to African-Americans, Whites were 2.9 times more likely to be current users, and students who perceive hookah to be more socially acceptable were 21 times more likely to currently use. Conclusion Since hookah use rates are high, colleges should offer health education programs to inform incoming students about the health risks of hookah and cessation programs. PMID:26688673

  4. Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, F.; Vogelsang, V.

    2009-09-29

    We will give here an overview of our theory of the strong interactions, Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and its properties. We will also briefly review the history of the study of the strong interactions, and the discoveries that ultimately led to the formulation of QCD. The strong force is one of the four known fundamental forces in nature, the others being the electromagnetic, the weak and the gravitational force. The strong force, usually referred to by scientists as the 'strong interaction', is relevant at the subatomic level, where it is responsible for the binding of protons and neutrons to atomic nuclei. To do this, it must overcome the electric repulsion between the protons in an atomic nucleus and be the most powerful force over distances of a few fm (1fm=1 femtometer=1 fermi=10{sup -15}m), the typical size of a nucleus. This property gave the strong force its name.

  5. Composing a Good Strong Story: The Advantages of a Liberal Arts Environment for Experiencing and Exploring the Narrative Complexity of Human Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, William

    2012-01-01

    A liberal arts environment invites the expansion of one's understanding of himself/herself and the world by exposing him/her to multiple disciplines across the humanities and social sciences. For its part, the topic of "narrative" is intrinsically interdisciplinary and, as such, can be explored to particular advantage within a liberal arts…

  6. Estimation of shallow S-wave velocity structure using microtremor array exploration at temporary strong motion observation stations for aftershocks of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimoto, Kosuke; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Tsuno, Seiji; Miyake, Hiroe; Yamada, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    Shallow S-wave velocity V S profiles were estimated for 26 temporary strong motion observation sites surrounding the epicenters of a sequence of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. The microtremor array method was used to gather the dispersion characteristics of Rayleigh waves. V S profiles were obtained by inverting the dispersion curves for each site and those of three permanent strong motion stations that recorded the sequence of seismic events. The shallow V S profiles near two of the permanent strong motion stations in the town of Mashiki were almost identical. However, the V S profiles at other stations varied. The V S profiles were found to have the common feature of the uppermost low-velocity layer being widely distributed from Mashiki to the village of Minami-Aso, and it was especially thick in the areas that suffered heavy damage. This low-velocity layer was a major contributor to the site amplification. The horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of the microtremors indicate that both the shallow soil and deep sedimentary layers may control the site response characteristics over a broad frequency range.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Screening of RB1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with retinoblastoma and preliminary exploration of genotype–phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-yan; An, Yu; Qian, Xiao-wen; Li, Gang; Qian, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinoblastoma (RB) sets the paradigm for hereditary cancer syndromes, for which medical care can change depending on the results of genetic testing. In this study, we screened constitutional mutations in the RB1 gene via a method combining DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and performed a preliminary exploration of genotype–phenotype correlations. Methods The peripheral blood of 85 retinoblastoma probands, including 39 bilateral and 46 unilateral, was collected, and genomic DNA was extracted. DNA sequencing was conducted first. MLPA analysis was applied for patients with bilateral RB with negative sequencing results and unilateral probands whose age at diagnosis was less than 1 year old. Results Thirty-four distinct mutations were identified in 40 (47.1%) of the 85 probands (36 bilateral and four unilateral), of which 20% (8/40) was identified by MLPA. The total detection rate in bilateral cases was 92.3% (36/39). Of the total mutations identified, 77.5% (31/40) probands with a mean age of 10.7 months at diagnosis had null mutations, and 22.5% (9/40) with a mean age of 13.5 months at diagnosis had in-frame mutations. Of the 31 probands with null mutations, bilateral RB accounted for 96.8% (30/31). Of the nine probands with in-frame mutations, 66.7% had bilateral RB. There were seven new mutations of RB1 identified in this report, including six null mutations and one missense mutation. Clinical staging of the tumor did not show obvious differences between patients with null mutations and in-frame mutations. Conclusions Our results confirm that the type of mutation is related to age of onset and the laterality, but not staging of the retinoblastoma tumor. MLPA is a reliable method for detecting gross deletion or duplication of the RB1 gene. The combination of sequencing and MLPA improves the clinical diagnosis of RB. PMID:24791139

  8. Correlating multispectral imaging and compositional data from the Mars Exploration Rovers and implications for Mars Science Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Bell, James F.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to infer compositional information about distant targets based on multispectral imaging data, we investigated methods of relating Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Pancam multispectral remote sensing observations to in situ alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS)-derived elemental abundances and Mössbauer (MB)-derived abundances of Fe-bearing phases at the MER field sites in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The majority of the partial correlation coefficients between these data sets were not statistically significant. Restricting the targets to those that were abraded by the rock abrasion tool (RAT) led to improved Pearson’s correlations, most notably between the red–blue ratio (673 nm/434 nm) and Fe3+-bearing phases, but partial correlations were not statistically significant. Partial Least Squares (PLS) calculations relating Pancam 11-color visible to near-IR (VNIR; ∼400–1000 nm) “spectra” to APXS and Mössbauer element or mineral abundances showed generally poor performance, although the presence of compositional outliers led to improved PLS results for data from Meridiani. When the Meridiani PLS model for pyroxene was tested by predicting the pyroxene content of Gusev targets, the results were poor, indicating that the PLS models for Meridiani are not applicable to data from other sites. Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) classification of Gusev crater data showed mixed results. Of the 24 Gusev test regions of interest (ROIs) with known classes, 11 had >30% of the pixels in the ROI classified correctly, while others were mis-classified or unclassified. k-Means clustering of APXS and Mössbauer data was used to assign Meridiani targets to compositional classes. The clustering-derived classes corresponded to meaningful geologic and/or color unit differences, and SIMCA classification using these classes was somewhat successful, with >30% of pixels correctly classified in 9 of the 11 ROIs with known classes. This work shows

  9. Correlating multispectral imaging and compositional data from the Mars Exploration Rovers and implications for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Bell, James F.

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to infer compositional information about distant targets based on multispectral imaging data, we investigated methods of relating Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Pancam multispectral remote sensing observations to in situ alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS)-derived elemental abundances and Mössbauer (MB)-derived abundances of Fe-bearing phases at the MER field sites in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The majority of the partial correlation coefficients between these data sets were not statistically significant. Restricting the targets to those that were abraded by the rock abrasion tool (RAT) led to improved Pearson’s correlations, most notably between the red-blue ratio (673 nm/434 nm) and Fe3+-bearing phases, but partial correlations were not statistically significant. Partial Least Squares (PLS) calculations relating Pancam 11-color visible to near-IR (VNIR; ∼400-1000 nm) “spectra” to APXS and Mössbauer element or mineral abundances showed generally poor performance, although the presence of compositional outliers led to improved PLS results for data from Meridiani. When the Meridiani PLS model for pyroxene was tested by predicting the pyroxene content of Gusev targets, the results were poor, indicating that the PLS models for Meridiani are not applicable to data from other sites. Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) classification of Gusev crater data showed mixed results. Of the 24 Gusev test regions of interest (ROIs) with known classes, 11 had >30% of the pixels in the ROI classified correctly, while others were mis-classified or unclassified. k-Means clustering of APXS and Mössbauer data was used to assign Meridiani targets to compositional classes. The clustering-derived classes corresponded to meaningful geologic and/or color unit differences, and SIMCA classification using these classes was somewhat successful, with >30% of pixels correctly classified in 9 of the 11 ROIs with known classes. This work shows that

  10. Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster reaches its maximum in Ethiopia and correlates most strongly with ultra-violet radiation in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pigmentation has a long history of investigation in evolutionary biology. In Drosophila melanogaster, latitudinal and altitudinal clines have been found but their underlying causes remain unclear. Moreover, most studies were conducted on cosmopolitan populations which have a relatively low level of genetic structure and diversity compared to sub-Saharan African populations. We investigated: 1) the correlation between pigmentation traits within and between the thorax and the fourth abdominal segment, and 2) their associations with different geographical and ecological variables, using 710 lines belonging to 30 sub-Saharan and cosmopolitan populations. Results Pigmentation clines substantially differed between sub-Saharan and cosmopolitan populations. While positive correlations with latitude have previously been described in Europe, India and Australia, in agreement with Bogert's rule or the thermal melanism hypothesis, we found a significant negative correlation in Africa. This correlation persisted even after correction for altitude, which in its turn showed a positive correlation with pigmentation independently from latitude. More importantly, we found that thoracic pigmentation reaches its maximal values in this species in high-altitude populations of Ethiopia (1,600-3,100 m). Ethiopian flies have a diffuse wide thoracic trident making the mesonotum and the head almost black, a phenotype that is absent from all other sub-Saharan or cosmopolitan populations including high-altitude flies from Peru (~3,400 m). Ecological analyses indicated that the variable most predictive of pigmentation in Africa, especially for the thorax, was ultra-violet (UV) intensity, consistent with the so-called Gloger's rule invoking a role of melanin in UV protection. Conclusion Our data suggest that different environmental factors may shape clinal variation in tropical and temperate regions, and may lead to the evolution of different degrees of melanism in different high

  11. Determination of K Value and Its Correlation With Vs30, Based On Strong Motion Records of The Athens September 1999 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Ch. A.; Margaris, V. N.; Kalogeras, I.; Hatzidimitriou, P. M.

    In the present study, using strong motion data recorded after the strong (M=5.9) earth- quake in Athens on September 7, 1999, the spectral decay parameters, k and k0, (An- derson and Hough, 1984) are determined. The results show that the attenuation in the area of Athens in less compared with mean of the Greek area. The value of the param- eter k0 was found equal to 0.035 (+-0.009) and 0.049 (+-0.008) msec/km for the soils of type B and C respectively according to NEHRP (1997) classification. The plot of the parameter k as a function of the frequency f95 shows a dependence on the depth of the recording station. The resulted values are related to the shear wave velocity of the shallow layer, VS30, for the geotechnical classification of the examined sites. Further- more an attempt is made to investigate the influence of the spectral parameters and the VS30 values for various soil categories on the spectral shapes. Finally an application of these values is made for the simulation of the strong ground motion in four differ- ent sites. The comparison between the predicted and observed spectra shows a good agreement in the frequency range 0.2-20 Hz.

  12. Correlated parameters in the quasi-classical treatment of atomic ground states using effective momentum dependent potentials for molecular dynamics simulation of strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verboncoeur, John; Dharuman, Gautham; Christlieb, Andrew; Murillo, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Ground state energies and configurations of N, F, Ne, Al, S, Ar and Ca are obtained using a quasi-classical treatment with Kirschbaum-Wilets potentials. The effect of phase space parameters on the ground state energy is studied in detail and compared with Hartree-Fock values. The phase space parameters that resulted in ground state energies comparable to Hartree-Fock values are found to be correlated and follow a pattern with atomic number which led to identifying a predictive capability in the model. The change in ground state configurations for different phase space parameters is studied and correlated with the corresponding change in ground state energies. Work supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  13. Exploring the 5'-UTR DNA region as a target for optimizing recombinant gene expression from the strong and inducible Pm promoter in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berg, Laila; Kucharova, Veronika; Bakke, Ingrid; Valla, Svein; Brautaset, Trygve

    2012-04-30

    By using the strong and inducible Pm promoter as a model, we recently reported that the β-lactamase production (encoded by bla) can be stimulated up to 20-fold in Escherichia coli by mutating the DNA region corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of mRNA (UTR). One striking observation was the unexpected large stimulatory effect some of these UTR variants had on the bla transcript production level. We here demonstrate that such UTR variants can also be used to improve the expression level of the alternative genes celB (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and inf-α2b (encoding human cytokine interferon α2b), which both can be expressed to high levels even with the wild-type Pm UTR DNA sequence. Our data indicated some degree of context dependency between the UTR DNA and concomitant recombinant gene sequences. By constructing and using a synthetic operon, we demonstrated that UTR variants optimized for high-level expression of probably any recombinant gene can be efficiently selected from large UTR mutant libraries. The stimulation affected both the transcript production and translational level, and such modified UTR sequences therefore clearly have a significant applied potential for improvement of recombinant gene expression processes.

  14. Standards Supporting Cooperation on Mission Planning, Data Analysis and Correlation of Results Within a Broad-Based Mars Exploration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This poster is an invitation for participation in the specification and implementation of engineering and ancillary data standards, and allied software tools needed to conceptualize, designs, operate and analyze the data returned from Mars and other solar system exploration missions

  15. Electronic structure of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub delta/ including strong correlation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Balle, S.; Salvador, R.

    1989-05-01

    The occupied and unoccupied valence-band density of states of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub delta/ is determined considering a coherent potential which includes the Coulomb intrasite d-d correlation. The p states tend to be all occupied and, as a consequence, the most localized d states with the XZ symmetry tend to be unoccupied giving rise to an upper Hubbard band. This picture is in good agreement with the direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopies.

  16. Plasma Levels of Acylation-Stimulating Protein Are Strongly Predicted by Waist/Hip Ratio and Correlate with Decreased LDL Size in Men

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Jumana; Wahab, Rabab A.; Farhan, Hatem; Al-Amri, Issa; Cianflone, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    The association of abdominal obesity with cardiovascular risk is often linked to altered secretion of adipose-derived factors and an abnormal lipid profile including formation of atherogenic small dense low density lipoprotein particles (sdLDL). Acylation-stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipose-derived hormone that exhibits potent lipogenic effects. Plasma ASP levels increase in obesity; however, the association of ASP levels with body fat distribution is not yet established, and no study to date has investigated the association of ASP with LDL size. In this study, we examined the association of ASP levels with abdominal obesity measures and the lipid profile including LDL size in 83 men with a wide range of abdominal girths. Regression analysis showed that waist/hip ratio was the main predictor of ASP levels (β = 0.52, P < 0.0001), significantly followed by decreased LDL size. BMI and TG levels, although positively correlated with ASP levels, were excluded as significant predictors in regression analysis. No correlation was found with LDL-C or apoB levels. ASP levels were 62.5% higher in abdominally obese compared to nonobese men. Waist/hip ratio presenting as the main predictor of ASP levels, suggests increased ASP production by abdominal fat which, as proposed previously, may result from resistance to ASP function causing delayed TG clearance and subsequent formation of atherogenic sdLDL. PMID:24533222

  17. Single-valley quantum Hall ferromagnet in a dilute MgxZn1-xO/ZnO strongly correlated two-dimensional electron system

    DOE PAGES

    Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Maryenko, D.; ...

    2012-02-03

    We investigate the spin susceptibility (g*m*) of dilute two-dimensional (2D) electrons confined at the MgxZn1-xO/ZnO heterointerface. Magnetotransport measurements show a four-fold enhancement of g*m*, dominated by the increase in the Landé g-factor. The g-factor enhancement leads to a ferromagnetic instability of the electron gas as evidenced by sharp resistance spikes. At high magnetic field, the large g*m* leads to full spin polarization, where we found sudden increase in resistance around the filling factors of half-integer, accompanied by complete disappearance of fractional quantum Hall (QH) states. Along with its large effective mass and the high electron mobility, our result indicates thatmore » the ZnO 2D system is ideal for investigating the effect of electron correlations in the QH regime.« less

  18. Thermodynamic prediction of glass formation tendency, cluster-in-jellium model for metallic glasses, ab initio tight-binding calculations, and new density functional theory development for systems with strong electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yongxin

    2009-01-01

    also plays an important role, as it may directly track the movement of every atom. Simulation time is a major limit for molecular dynamics, not only because of “slow” computer speed, but also because of the accumulation error in the numerical treatment of the motion equations. There is also a great concern about the reliability of the emperical potentials if using classical molecular dynamics. Ab initio methods based on density functional theory(DFT) do not have this problem, however, it suffers from small simulation cells and is more demanding computationally. When crystal phase is involved, size effect of the simulation cell is more pronounced since long-range elastic energy would be established. Simulation methods which are more efficient in computation but yet have similar reliability as the ab initio methods, like tight-binding method, are highly desirable. While the complexity of metallic glasses comes from the atomistic level, there is also a large field which deals with the complexity from electronic level. The only “ab initio” method applicable to solid state systems is density functional theory with local density approximation( LDA) or generalized gradient approximation(GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy. It is very successful for simple sp element, where it reaches an high accuracy for determining the surface reconstruction. However, there is a large class of materials with strong electron correlation, where DFT based on LDA or GGA fails in a fundamental way. An “ab initio” method which can generally apply to correlated materials, as LDA for simple sp element, is still to be developed. The thesis is prepared to address some of the above problems.

  19. Exploring lag times between monthly atmospheric deposition and stream chemistry in Appalachian forests using cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWalle, David R.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Buda, Anthony R.

    2016-12-01

    Forecasts of ecosystem changes due to variations in atmospheric emissions policies require a fundamental understanding of lag times between changes in chemical inputs and watershed response. Impacts of changes in atmospheric deposition in the United States have been documented using national and regional long-term environmental monitoring programs beginning several decades ago. Consequently, time series of weekly NADP atmospheric wet deposition and monthly EPA-Long Term Monitoring stream chemistry now exist for much of the Northeast which may provide insights into lag times. In this study of Appalachian forest basins, we estimated lag times for S, N and Cl by cross-correlating monthly data from four pairs of stream and deposition monitoring sites during the period from 1978 to 2012. A systems or impulse response function approach to cross-correlation was used to estimate lag times where the input deposition time series was pre-whitened using regression modeling and the stream response time series was filtered using the deposition regression model prior to cross-correlation. Cross-correlations for S were greatest at annual intervals over a relatively well-defined range of lags with the maximum correlations occurring at mean lags of 48 months. Chloride results were similar but more erratic with a mean lag of 57 months. Few high-correlation lags for N were indicated. Given the growing availability of atmospheric deposition and surface water chemistry monitoring data and our results for four Appalachian basins, further testing of cross-correlation as a method of estimating lag times on other basins appears justified.

  20. Direct correlation and strong reduction of native point defects and microwave dielectric loss in air-annealed (Ba,Sr)TiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Z. Q.; Podpirka, A.; Kirchoefer, S. W.; Asel, T. J.; Brillson, L. J.

    2015-05-04

    We report on the native defect and microwave properties of 1 μm thick Ba{sub 0.50}Sr{sub 0.50}TiO{sub 3} (BST) films grown on MgO (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS) showed high densities of native point defects in as-deposited BST films, causing strong subgap emission between 2.0 eV and 3.0 eV due to mixed cation V{sub C} and oxygen Vo vacancies. Post growth air anneals reduce these defects with 2.2, 2.65, and 3.0 eV V{sub O} and 2.4 eV V{sub C} intensities decreasing with increasing anneal temperature and by nearly two orders of magnitude after 950 °C annealing. These low-defect annealed BST films exhibited high quality microwave properties, including room temperature interdigitated capacitor tunability of 13% under an electric bias of 40 V and tan δ of 0.002 at 10 GHz and 40 V bias. The results provide a feasible route to grow high quality BST films by MBE through post-air annealing guided by DRCLS.

  1. Assessment of SMOS Salinity and SST in the Aegean Sea (Greece) and correlations with MODIS SST measurements. Exploring the SSS and SST correlation to 137Cs inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykioti, Olga; Florou, Heleni

    2014-05-01

    . Additionally, for the same coordinates and for the same acquisition dates, we have retrieved SST (both at 4μm and 11μm) from MODIS Level 2 Ocean products. MODIS satellites provide nearly daily ocean color and SST measurements at 1km resolution with day and night coverage. Therefore, separate correlations are performed for AQUA or TERRA and day or night passes (when data exist). Despite significant differences in spatial resolution and acquisition time in the day, results show high correlation coefficients (r2 above 80%) between SMOS and MODIS SST. Concluding, concerning SSS in regional seas such as the Aegean Sea, SMOS presents significant problems and difficulties to overcome. SSS comparisons with the corresponding AQUARIUS ones are foreseen. Concerning SST, values are highly correlated to similar ones from other satellite systems such as MODIS. Considering that SMOS acquisitions are insensitive to cloud cover and despite the relatively low spatial resolution, they present a considerable advantage compared to optical systems. This ongoing study is being carried out in NOA and NCSR "D" in the frame of the coordinated ESA Cat-1 Project AOSMOS.4681 which is acknowledged.

  2. Untangling the Alliance-Outcome Correlation: Exploring the Relative Importance of Therapist and Patient Variability in the Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Wampold, Bruce E.; Imel, Zac E.

    2007-01-01

    Although the therapeutic alliance is a consistent predictor of psychotherapy outcomes, research has not distinguished between the roles of patient and therapist variability in the alliance. Multilevel models were used to explore the relative importance of patient and therapist variability in the alliance as they relate to outcome among 331…

  3. Detailed investigation of thermal and electron transport properties in strongly correlated compound Ce6Pd12In5 and its nonmagnetic analog La6Pd12In5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, M.; Krychowski, D.; Strydom, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    An in-depth study of thermal and electron transport properties including thermal conductivity κ(T), thermoelectric power S(T), and electrical resistivity ρ(T) of the heavy fermion Kondo lattice Ce6Pd12In5 and its nonmagnetic reference compound La6Pd12In5 is presented. The absolute κ(T) value of Ce6Pd12In5 is smaller that than of La6Pd12In5, which indicates that conduction electron-4f electron scattering has a large impact on the reduction of thermal conductivity. The isolated 4f electron contributions to the electrical resistivity ρ 4 f (T), electronic thermal resistivity displayed in the form W e l , 4 f (T) .T, and thermoelectric power S 4 f (T) reveal a low- and high-temperature -lnT behaviour characteristic of Kondo systems with strong crystal-electric field (CEF) interactions. The analysis of phonon scattering processes of lattice thermal conductivity κph(T) in (Ce, La)6Pd12In5 was performed over the whole accessible temperature range according to the Callaway model. In the scope of a theoretical approach based on the perturbation type calculation, we were able to describe our experimental data of ρ 4 f (T) and W e l , 4 f (T) .T by using the model incorporating simultaneously the Kondo effect in the presence of the CEF splitting, as it is foreseen in the framework of the Cornut-Coqblin and Bhattacharjee-Coqblin theory. Considering the fact that there are not many cases of similar studies at all, we also show the numerical calculations of temperature-dependent behaviour of spin-disorder resistivity ρs(T), magnetic resistivity ρ 4 f (T), and occupation number ⟨ N i ⟩ due to the various types of degeneracy of the ground state multiplet of Ce 3 + (J = 5/2).

  4. Strong Correlation of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase 1 Expression with Basal-Like Phenotype and Increased Lymphocytic Infiltration in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sewha; Park, Sanghui; Cho, Min Sun; Lim, Woosung; Moon, Byung-In; Sung, Sun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an immunosuppressive enzyme involved in tumor immune escape. Blockade of the IDO1 pathway is an emerging modality of cancer immunotherapy. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) lacks established therapeutic targets and may be a good candidate for this novel immunotherapeutic agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics of the IDO1-expressing TNBC subset. A tissue microarray was constructed from 200 patients with TNBC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for IDO1 and TNBC molecular subtype-surrogate markers (AR, GCDFP-15, claudin-3, E-cadherin, CK5/6, and EGFR) was performed using this tissue microarray. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the IDO1 mRNA expression level in 16 fresh-frozen TNBC samples. Two hundred TNBCs were classified into four subtypes based on surrogate IHC results: 22 luminal androgen receptor type (11.0%), 23 claudin-low type (11.4%), 103 basal-like type (51.5%), and 52 mixed type (26.0%). IDO1 positivity (defined as expression of >10% tumor cells) was observed in 37% of all TNBCs. IDO1 IHC expression was well correlated with mRNA expression. IDO1 positivity was significantly associated with smaller tumor size, dense stromal lymphocytic infiltration, and basal-like phenotype; however, it did not affect the patients' prognosis. IDO1 expression in basal-like TNBCs is considered an immune inhibitory signal that counterbalances active immunity and may reflect the high mutational load of these tumors. Our results suggest which patients with TNBC would be more efficaciously treated with IDO1 blockade. PMID:28123606

  5. A multi-species comparative structural bioinformatics analysis of inherited mutations in α-D-Mannosidase reveals strong genotype-phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysosomal α-mannosidase is an enzyme that acts to degrade N-linked oligosaccharides and hence plays an important role in mannose metabolism in humans and other mammalian species, especially livestock. Mutations in the gene (MAN2B1) encoding lysosomal α-D-mannosidase cause improper coding, resulting in dysfunctional or non-functional protein, causing the disease α-mannosidosis. Mapping disease mutations to the structure of the protein can help in understanding the functional consequences of these mutations and thus indirectly, the finer aspects of the pathology and clinical manifestations of the disease, including phenotypic severity as a function of the genotype. Results A comprehensive homology modeling study of all the wild-type and inherited mutations of lysosomal α-mannosidase in four different species, human, cow, cat and guinea pig, reveals a significant correlation between the severity of the genotype and the phenotype in α-mannosidosis. We used the X-ray crystallographic structure of bovine lysosomal α-mannosidase as template, containing only two disulphide bonds and some ligands, to build structural models of wild-type structures with four disulfide linkages and all bound ligands. These wild-type models were then used as templates for disease mutations. All the truncations and substitutions involving the residues in and around the active site and those that destabilize the fold led to severe genotypes resulting in lethal phenotypes, whereas the mutations lying away from the active site were milder in both their genotypic and phenotypic expression. Conclusion Based on the co-location of mutations from different organisms and their proximity to the enzyme active site, we have extrapolated observed mutations from one species to homologous positions in other organisms, as a predictive approach for detecting likely α-mannosidosis. Besides predicting new disease mutations, this approach also provides a way for detecting mutation hotspots in the

  6. Explore the high-density QCD medium via particle correlations in pPb collisions at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-15

    The observation of a long-range, near-side two-particle correlation (“ridge”) in very high multiplicity proton–proton and proton–lead collisions has opened up new opportunity of studying novel QCD phenomena in small collision systems. In 2013, high luminosity pPb data were collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. New results of two- and multi-particle correlations in pPb collisions from CMS are presented over a wide event multiplicity and transverse momentum range. A direct comparison of pPb and PbPb systems is provided. Physics implications, especially in the context of color glass condensate and hydrodynamics models are also discussed.

  7. Exploring the motives and mental health correlates of intentional food restriction prior to alcohol use in university students.

    PubMed

    Roosen, Kaley M; Mills, Jennifer S

    2015-06-01

    This study explored the prevalence of and motivations behind 'drunkorexia' – restricting food intake prior to drinking alcohol. For both male and female university students (N = 3409), intentionally changing eating behaviour prior to drinking alcohol was common practice (46%). Analyses performed on a targeted sample of women (n = 226) revealed that food restriction prior to alcohol use was associated with greater symptomology than eating more food. Those who restrict eating prior to drinking to avoid weight gain scored higher on measures of disordered eating, whereas those who restrict to get intoxicated faster scored higher on measures of alcohol abuse.

  8. Evidence of strong correlations at the Van Hove singularity in the scanning-tunneling spectra of superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, Arun; Nieminen, Jouko; Suominen, Ilpo; Das, Tanmoy; Markiewicz, Robert

    2012-02-01

    We present realistic multiband calculations of scanning tunneling spectra in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ over a wide doping range. Our modeling incorporates effects of a competing pseudogap and pairing gap as well as effects of strong electronic correlations, which are included by introducing self-energy corrections in the one-particle propagators. The calculations provide a good description of the two-gap features seen in experiments at low energies. In particular, the Van Hove singularity (VHS) in the underlying electronic states is found to split into a prominent incoherent feature at high energies and a weaker coherent part near the Fermi level which is strongly involved in gap formation. The progressive hybridization of the localized VHS into the Fermi surface with increasing doping is suggestive of Kondo physics which has been proposed previously for cuprates and heavy fermion compounds.

  9. Exploring Heterozygosity-Survival Correlations in a Wild Songbird Population: Contrasting Effects between Juvenile and Adult Stages

    PubMed Central

    Canal, David; Serrano, David; Potti, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between genetic diversity and fitness, a major issue in evolutionary and conservation biology, is expected to be stronger in traits affected by many loci and those directly influencing fitness. Here we explore the influence of heterozygosity measured at 15 neutral markers on individual survival, one of the most important parameters determining individual fitness. We followed individual survival up to recruitment and during subsequent adult life of 863 fledgling pied flycatchers born in two consecutive breeding seasons. Mark-recapture analyses showed that individual heterozygosity did not influence juvenile or adult survival. In contrast, the genetic relatedness of parents was negatively associated with the offspring’s survival during the adult life, but this effect was not apparent in the juvenile (from fledgling to recruitment) stage. Stochastic factors experienced during the first year of life in this long-distance migratory species may have swamped a relationship between heterozygosity and survival up to recruitment. PMID:25122217

  10. Exploration in a dispersal task: Effects of early experience and correlation with other behaviors in prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Arias Del Razo, Rocío; Bales, Karen L

    2016-11-01

    Socially monogamous prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) display remarkable individual variation in social behaviors, which has been associated with differences in early life experience and neuropeptide receptor densities. These differences are also seen in the wild, where approximately 70% of young voles remain in their natal group as non-breeding alloparents, while the other 30% disperse. We investigated whether natural variation in early parental care could contribute to offspring's willingness to "disperse" (willingness to explore) in a laboratory context. Behavioral differences between dispersers and residents could also provide a way to interpret individual variation in other behaviors commonly observed under laboratory conditions. Breeder pairs ranked as high, medium or low-contact, according to the amount of early parental care they provided to offspring, were used to produce and rear experimental subjects. Effects of early parental care on the offspring's willingness to disperse were seen at post-natal day 21, with high-contact offspring spending more time in the start cage and low-contact offspring spending more time exploring. Variations in parental care were also associated with differences in juvenile and adult behaviors that could potentially encourage philopatry or dispersal behavior in the wild. High-contact offspring displayed less anxiety-like behavior compared to low-contact animals. Low-contact offspring displayed the lowest amount of alloparental care. High-contact offspring spent more time in side-by-side contact with a potential partner compared to medium and low-contact offspring. These results suggest that variations in early parental care can impact weanlings' exploratory behavior, but that philopatry is not driven by high anxiety.

  11. Evidence of strong correlations at the van Hove singularity in the scanning tunneling spectra of superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Jouko; Suominen, Ilpo; Das, Tanmoy; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.

    2012-06-01

    We present realistic multiband calculations of scanning tunneling spectra in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ over a wide doping range. Our modeling incorporates effects of a competing pseudogap and pairing gap as well as effects of strong electronic correlations, which are included by introducing self-energy corrections in the one-particle propagators. The calculations provide a good description of the two-gap features seen in experiments at low energies and the evolution of the van Hove singularity (VHS) with doping, and suggest a possible quantum critical point near the point where the VHS crosses the Fermi level.

  12. Electronic duality in strongly correlated matter

    PubMed Central

    Park, T.; Graf, M. J.; Boulaevskii, L.; Sarrao, J. L.; Thompson, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Superconductivity develops from an attractive interaction between itinerant electrons that creates electron pairs, which condense into a macroscopic quantum state—the superconducting state. On the other hand, magnetic order in a metal arises from electrons localized close to the ionic core and whose interaction is mediated by itinerant electrons. The dichotomy between local moment magnetic order and superconductivity raises the question of whether these two states can coexist and involve the same electrons. Here, we show that the single 4f electron of cerium in CeRhIn5 simultaneously produces magnetism, characteristic of localization, and superconductivity that requires itinerancy. The dual nature of the 4f-electron allows microscopic coexistence of antiferromagnetic order and superconductivity whose competition is tuned by small changes in pressure and magnetic field. Electronic duality contrasts with conventional interpretations of coexisting spin-density magnetism and superconductivity and offers a new avenue for understanding complex states in classes of materials. PMID:18463288

  13. Exploring the Ecological Validity of Thinking on Demand: Neural Correlates of Elicited vs. Spontaneously Occurring Inner Speech.

    PubMed

    Hurlburt, Russell T; Alderson-Day, Ben; Kühn, Simone; Fernyhough, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Psychology and cognitive neuroscience often use standardized tasks to elicit particular experiences. We explore whether elicited experiences are similar to spontaneous experiences. In an MRI scanner, five participants performed tasks designed to elicit inner speech (covertly repeating experimenter-supplied words), inner seeing, inner hearing, feeling, and sensing. Then, in their natural environments, participants were trained in four days of random-beep-triggered Descriptive Experience Sampling (DES). They subsequently returned to the scanner for nine 25-min resting-state sessions; during each they received four DES beeps and described those moments (9 × 4 = 36 moments per participant) of spontaneously occurring experience. Enough of those moments included spontaneous inner speech to allow us to compare brain activation during spontaneous inner speech with what we had found in task-elicited inner speech. ROI analysis was used to compare activation in two relevant areas (Heschl's gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus). Task-elicited inner speech was associated with decreased activation in Heschl's gyrus and increased activation in left inferior frontal gyrus. However, spontaneous inner speech had the opposite effect in Heschl's gyrus and no significant effect in left inferior frontal gyrus. This study demonstrates how spontaneous phenomena can be investigated in MRI and calls into question the assumption that task-created phenomena are often neurophysiologically and psychologically similar to spontaneously occurring phenomena.

  14. Exploring the Ecological Validity of Thinking on Demand: Neural Correlates of Elicited vs. Spontaneously Occurring Inner Speech

    PubMed Central

    Hurlburt, Russell T.; Alderson-Day, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Psychology and cognitive neuroscience often use standardized tasks to elicit particular experiences. We explore whether elicited experiences are similar to spontaneous experiences. In an MRI scanner, five participants performed tasks designed to elicit inner speech (covertly repeating experimenter-supplied words), inner seeing, inner hearing, feeling, and sensing. Then, in their natural environments, participants were trained in four days of random-beep-triggered Descriptive Experience Sampling (DES). They subsequently returned to the scanner for nine 25-min resting-state sessions; during each they received four DES beeps and described those moments (9 × 4 = 36 moments per participant) of spontaneously occurring experience. Enough of those moments included spontaneous inner speech to allow us to compare brain activation during spontaneous inner speech with what we had found in task-elicited inner speech. ROI analysis was used to compare activation in two relevant areas (Heschl’s gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus). Task-elicited inner speech was associated with decreased activation in Heschl’s gyrus and increased activation in left inferior frontal gyrus. However, spontaneous inner speech had the opposite effect in Heschl’s gyrus and no significant effect in left inferior frontal gyrus. This study demonstrates how spontaneous phenomena can be investigated in MRI and calls into question the assumption that task-created phenomena are often neurophysiologically and psychologically similar to spontaneously occurring phenomena. PMID:26845028

  15. Intimate Partner Violence and Stalking Behavior: Exploration of Patterns and Correlates in a Sample of Acutely Battered Women

    PubMed Central

    Mechanic, Mindy B.; Weaver, Terri L.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide descriptive data on stalking in a sample of acutely battered women and to assess the interrelationship between constructs of emotional abuse, physical violence, and stalking in battered women. We recruited a sample of 114 battered women from shelters, agencies, and from the community at large. Results support the growing consensus that violent and harassing stalking behaviors occur with alarming frequency among physically battered women, both while they are in the relationship and after they leave their abusive partners. Emotional and psychological abuse emerged as strong predictors of within- and postrelationship stalking, and contributed a unique variance to women’s fears of future serious harm or death, even after the effects of physical violence were controlled. The length of time a woman was out of the violent relationship was the strongest predictor of postseparation stalking, with increased stalking found with greater time out of the relationship. Results suggest the need to further study the heterogeneity of stalking and to clarify its relationship to constructs of emotional and physical abuse in diverse samples that include stalked but nonbattered women, as women exposed to emotional abuse, and dating violence. PMID:10972514

  16. Strong Correlation Between Concentrations of Tenofovir (TFV) Emtricitabine (FTC) in Hair and TFV Diphosphate and FTC Triphosphate in Dried Blood Spots in the iPrEx Open Label Extension: Implications for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Adherence Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Monica; Glidden, David V; Liu, Albert; Anderson, Peter L; Horng, Howard; Defechereux, Patricia; Guanira, Juan V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Grant, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Self-reported adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has limitations, raising interest in pharmacologic monitoring. Drug concentrations in hair and dried blood spots (DBS) are used to assess long-term-exposure; hair shipment/storage occurs at room temperature. The iPrEx Open Label Extension collected DBS routinely, with opt-in hair collection; concentrations were measured with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In 806 hair-DBS pairs, tenofovir (TFV) hair levels and TFV diphosphate (DP) in DBS were strongly correlated (Spearman coefficient r = 0.734; P < .001), as were hair TFV/DBS emtricitabine (FTC) triphosphate (TP) (r = 0.781; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS TFV-DP (r = 0.74; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS FTC-TP (r = 0.587; P < .001). Drug detectability was generally concordant by matrix. Hair TFV/FTC concentrations correlate strongly with DBS levels, which are predictive of PrEP outcomes.

  17. Exploring correlations between positive psychological resources and symptoms of psychological distress among hematological cancer patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Yue; Liu, Li; Shi, Meng; Wang, Lie

    2016-07-01

    Hematological cancer patients experience high levels of psychological distress during diagnoses and intensive treatments. The aim of the present study is to explore the effects of positive psychological resources on depressive and anxiety symptoms in hematological cancer patients. This survey was conducted in a hospital during the period from July 2013 to April 2014. A total of 300 inpatients were recruited and finally 227 of them completed the questionnaires. Questionnaires included demographic and clinical variables, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, the Life Orientation Scale-Revised, the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Resilience Scale-14. Results showed that the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms was 66.1 and 45.8%, respectively. Both optimism (β = -.479, p < .001) and resilience (β = -.174, p < .05) were negatively associated with depressive symptoms, and optimism (β = -.393, p < .001) was negatively associated with anxiety symptoms. However, resilience (β = -.133, p > .05) was not significantly associated with anxiety symptoms, and self-efficacy was not significantly associated with depressive (β = -.032, p > .05) or anxiety symptoms (β = -.055, p > .05). The results suggest that hematological cancer patients who possess high levels of positive psychological resources may have fewer symptoms of psychological distress. The findings indicate that enhancing positive psychological resources can be considered in developing intervention strategies for decreasing depressive and anxiety symptoms.

  18. Prevalence and correlates of transactional sex among an urban emergency department sample: Exploring substance use and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Patton, Rikki; Blow, Frederic C; Bohnert, Amy S B; Bonar, Erin E; Barry, Kristen L; Walton, Maureen A

    2014-06-01

    Men and women involved in transactional sex (TS) report increased rates of HIV risk behaviors and substance use problems as compared with the general population. When people engaged in TS seek health care, they may be more likely to utilize the emergency department (ED) rather than primary care services. Our goal was to examine the prevalence and correlates of TS involvement among an ED sample of men and women. Adults ages 18-60 were recruited from an urban ED, as part of a larger randomized control trial. Participants (n = 4,575; 3,045 women, 1,530 men) self-administered a screening survey that assessed past 3-month substance use (including alcohol, marijuana, illicit drugs, and prescription drugs) and HIV risk behaviors, including TS (i.e., being paid in exchange of a sexual behavior), inconsistent condom use, multiple partners, and anal sex. Of the sample, 13.3% (n = 610) reported TS within the past 3 months (64.4% were female). Bivariate analysis showed TS was significantly positively associated with alcohol use severity, marijuana use, and both illicit and prescription drug use, and multiple HIV risk behaviors. These variables (except marijuana) remained significantly positively associated with TS in a binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of recent TS involvement among both male and female ED patients is substantial. These individuals were more likely to report higher levels of alcohol/drug use and HIV risk behaviors. The ED may be a prime location to engage both men and women who are involved in TS in behavioral interventions for substance use and sexual risk reduction.

  19. Dynamics of Hubbard Nano-Clusters Following Strong Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, M.; Hermanns, S.; Balzer, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Hubbard model is a prototype for strongly correlated electrons in condensed matter, for molecules and fermions or bosons in optical lattices. While the equilibrium properties of these systems have been studied in detail, the excitation and relaxation dynamics following a perturbation of the system are only poorly explored. Here, we present results for the dynamics of electrons following nonlinear strong excitation that are based on a nonequilibrium Green functions approach. We focus on small systems---"Hubbard nano-clusters"---that contain just a few particles where, in addition to the correlation effects, finite size effects and spatial inhomegeneity can be studied systematically.

  20. Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students at the Lebanese University and Exploring its Correlation With Facebook Relevance: A Questionnaire Study

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ramzi S

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of major depression is particularly high in medical students, affecting around one-third of this population. Moreover, online social media, in particular Facebook, is becoming an intrinsic part in the life of a growing proportion of individuals worldwide. Objective Our primary objective is to identify the prevalence of depression in medical students at the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine, a unique state university in Lebanon, its correlation with the utilization of the interactive features of Facebook, and the way students may resort to these features. Methods Students of the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine were assessed for (1) depression and (2) Facebook activity. To screen for major depression, we used the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale. To test for Facebook activity, we developed the Facebook Resorting Questionnaire (FbRQ), which measures the degree to which students resort to Facebook. Results A total of 365 out of 480 students (76.0%) participated in the survey. A total of 25 students were excluded, hence 340 students were included in the final analysis. Current depression was reported in 117 students out of 340 (34.4%) and t tests showed female predominance. Moreover, PHQ-9 score multiple regression analysis showed that feeling depressed is explained 63.5% of the time by specific independent variables studied from the PHQ-9 and the FbRQ. Depression varied significantly among the different academic years (P<.001) and it peaked in the third-year students. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that depression and resorting to Facebook had a positive and significant relationship (P=.003) and the different FbRQ categories had significant differences in resorting-to-Facebook power. The like, add friend, and check-in features students used when resorting to Facebook were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions This study showed that depression was highly prevalent among students of the

  1. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: Beyond strong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murch, Kater

    2017-01-01

    When light and matter are strongly coupled, they lose their distinct character and merge into a hybrid state. Three experiments explore this exotic regime using artificial atoms, with promise for quantum technologies.

  2. Self-organising maps and correlation analysis as a tool to explore patterns in excitation-emission matrix data sets and to discriminate dissolved organic matter fluorescence components.

    PubMed

    Ejarque-Gonzalez, Elisabet; Butturini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of organic compounds, ubiquitous in marine and freshwater systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy, by means of Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEM), has become an indispensable tool to study DOM sources, transport and fate in aquatic ecosystems. However the statistical treatment of large and heterogeneous EEM data sets still represents an important challenge for biogeochemists. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOM) has been proposed as a tool to explore patterns in large EEM data sets. SOM is a pattern recognition method which clusterizes and reduces the dimensionality of input EEMs without relying on any assumption about the data structure. In this paper, we show how SOM, coupled with a correlation analysis of the component planes, can be used both to explore patterns among samples, as well as to identify individual fluorescence components. We analysed a large and heterogeneous EEM data set, including samples from a river catchment collected under a range of hydrological conditions, along a 60-km downstream gradient, and under the influence of different degrees of anthropogenic impact. According to our results, chemical industry effluents appeared to have unique and distinctive spectral characteristics. On the other hand, river samples collected under flash flood conditions showed homogeneous EEM shapes. The correlation analysis of the component planes suggested the presence of four fluorescence components, consistent with DOM components previously described in the literature. A remarkable strength of this methodology was that outlier samples appeared naturally integrated in the analysis. We conclude that SOM coupled with a correlation analysis procedure is a promising tool for studying large and heterogeneous EEM data sets.

  3. Self-Organising Maps and Correlation Analysis as a Tool to Explore Patterns in Excitation-Emission Matrix Data Sets and to Discriminate Dissolved Organic Matter Fluorescence Components

    PubMed Central

    Ejarque-Gonzalez, Elisabet; Butturini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex mixture of organic compounds, ubiquitous in marine and freshwater systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy, by means of Excitation-Emission Matrices (EEM), has become an indispensable tool to study DOM sources, transport and fate in aquatic ecosystems. However the statistical treatment of large and heterogeneous EEM data sets still represents an important challenge for biogeochemists. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOM) has been proposed as a tool to explore patterns in large EEM data sets. SOM is a pattern recognition method which clusterizes and reduces the dimensionality of input EEMs without relying on any assumption about the data structure. In this paper, we show how SOM, coupled with a correlation analysis of the component planes, can be used both to explore patterns among samples, as well as to identify individual fluorescence components. We analysed a large and heterogeneous EEM data set, including samples from a river catchment collected under a range of hydrological conditions, along a 60-km downstream gradient, and under the influence of different degrees of anthropogenic impact. According to our results, chemical industry effluents appeared to have unique and distinctive spectral characteristics. On the other hand, river samples collected under flash flood conditions showed homogeneous EEM shapes. The correlation analysis of the component planes suggested the presence of four fluorescence components, consistent with DOM components previously described in the literature. A remarkable strength of this methodology was that outlier samples appeared naturally integrated in the analysis. We conclude that SOM coupled with a correlation analysis procedure is a promising tool for studying large and heterogeneous EEM data sets. PMID:24906009

  4. Assessing Hubbard-corrected AM05+U and PBEsol+U density functionals for strongly correlated oxides CeO2 and Ce2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja

    2016-09-12

    The structure–property relationships of bulk CeO2 and Ce2O3 have been investigated using AM05 and PBEsol exchange–correlation functionals within the frameworks of Hubbard-corrected density functional theory (DFT+U) and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT+U). Compared with conventional PBE+U, RPBE+U, PW91+U and LDA+U functionals, AM05+U and PBEsol+U describe experimental crystalline parameters and properties of CeO2 and Ce2O3 with superior accuracy, especially when +U is chosen close to its value derived by the linear-response approach. Lastly, the present findings call for a reexamination of some of the problematic oxide materials featuring strong f- and d-electron correlation using AM05+U and PBEsol+U.

  5. Exploring Neuro-Physiological Correlates of Drivers' Mental Fatigue Caused by Sleep Deprivation Using Simultaneous EEG, ECG, and fNIRS Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sangtae; Nguyen, Thien; Jang, Hyojung; Kim, Jae G.; Jun, Sung C.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the neuro-physiological correlates of mental loads, or states, have attracted significant attention recently, as it is particularly important to evaluate mental fatigue in drivers operating a motor vehicle. In this research, we collected multimodal EEG/ECG/EOG and fNIRS data simultaneously to develop algorithms to explore neuro-physiological correlates of drivers' mental states. Each subject performed simulated driving under two different conditions (well-rested and sleep-deprived) on different days. During the experiment, we used 68 electrodes for EEG/ECG/EOG and 8 channels for fNIRS recordings. We extracted the prominent features of each modality to distinguish between the well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions, and all multimodal features, except EOG, were combined to quantify mental fatigue during driving. Finally, a novel driving condition level (DCL) was proposed that distinguished clearly between the features of well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions. This proposed DCL measure may be applicable to real-time monitoring of the mental states of vehicle drivers. Further, the combination of methods based on each classifier yielded substantial improvements in the classification accuracy between these two conditions. PMID:27242483

  6. Exploring Neuro-Physiological Correlates of Drivers' Mental Fatigue Caused by Sleep Deprivation Using Simultaneous EEG, ECG, and fNIRS Data.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sangtae; Nguyen, Thien; Jang, Hyojung; Kim, Jae G; Jun, Sung C

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the neuro-physiological correlates of mental loads, or states, have attracted significant attention recently, as it is particularly important to evaluate mental fatigue in drivers operating a motor vehicle. In this research, we collected multimodal EEG/ECG/EOG and fNIRS data simultaneously to develop algorithms to explore neuro-physiological correlates of drivers' mental states. Each subject performed simulated driving under two different conditions (well-rested and sleep-deprived) on different days. During the experiment, we used 68 electrodes for EEG/ECG/EOG and 8 channels for fNIRS recordings. We extracted the prominent features of each modality to distinguish between the well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions, and all multimodal features, except EOG, were combined to quantify mental fatigue during driving. Finally, a novel driving condition level (DCL) was proposed that distinguished clearly between the features of well-rested and sleep-deprived conditions. This proposed DCL measure may be applicable to real-time monitoring of the mental states of vehicle drivers. Further, the combination of methods based on each classifier yielded substantial improvements in the classification accuracy between these two conditions.

  7. Exploring the interactions and binding sites between Cd and functional groups in soil using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fusheng; Polizzotto, Matthew L; Guan, Dongxing; Wu, Jun; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; Wang, Boren; Yu, Guanghui

    2017-03-15

    Understanding how heavy metals bind and interact in soils is essential for predicting their distributions, reactions and fates in the environment. Here we propose a novel strategy, i.e., combining two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D COS) and synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopies, for identifying heavy metal binding to functional groups in soils. The results showed that although long-term (23 yrs) organic fertilization treatment caused the accumulation of Cd (over 3 times) in soils when compared to no fertilization and chemical fertilization treatments, it significantly (p<0.05) reduced the Cd concentration in wheat grain. The 2D COS analyses demonstrated that soil functional groups controlling Cd binding were modified by fertilization treatments, providing implications for the reduced bioavailability of heavy metals in organic fertilized soils. Furthermore, correlative micro X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy, electron probe micro-analyzer mapping, and synchrotron-radiation-based FTIR spectromicroscopy analysis showed that Cd, minerals, and organic functional groups were heterogeneously distributed at the micro-scale in soil colloids. Only minerals, rather than organic groups, had a similar distribution pattern with Cd. Together, this strategy has a potential to explore the interactions and binding sites among heavy metals, minerals and organic components in soil.

  8. Tomography 3D models of S wave from cross-correlation of seismic noise to explore irregularities of subsoil under the artificial lake of Chapultepec Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-Soto, M.; Valdes, J. E.; Escobedo-Zenil, D.

    2013-05-01

    In June 2006, the base of the artificial lake in Chapultepec Park collapsed. 20 thousand liters of water were filtered to the ground through a crack increasing the dimensions of initial gap. Studies indicated that the collapse was due to saturated material associated with a sudden and massive water filtration process. Geological studies indicates that all the area of this section the subsoil is composed of vulcano-sedimentary materials that were economically exploited in the mid-20th century, leaving a series of underground mines that were rehabilitated for the construction of the Park. Currently, the Lake is rehabilitated and running for recreational activities. In this study we have applied two methods of seismic noise correlation; seismic interferometry (SI) in time domain and the Spatial Power Auto Correlation (SPAC) in frequency domain, in order to explore the 3D subsoil velocity structure. The aim is to highlight major variations in velocity that can be associated with irregularities in the subsoil that may pose a risk to the stability of the Lake. For this purpose we use 96 vertical geophones of 4.5 Hz with 5-m spacing that conform a semi-circular array that provide a length of 480 m around the lake zone. For both correlation methods, we extract the phase velocity associated with the dispersion characteristics between each pair of stations in the frequency range from 4 to 12 Hz. In the SPAC method the process was through the dispersion curve, and in SI method we use the time delay of the maximum amplitude in the correlation pulse, which was previously filtered in multiple frequency bands. The results of both processes were captured in 3D velocity volumes (in the case SI a process of traveltime tomography was applied). We observed that in the frequency range from 6 to 8 Hz, appear irregular structures, with high velocity contrast in relation with the shear wave velocity of surface layer (ten thick m of saturated sediments). One of these anomalies is related

  9. Quantification of sphingosine 1-phosphate by validated LC-MS/MS method revealing strong correlation with apolipoprotein M in plasma but not in serum due to platelet activation during blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Andersson, Anders; Larsson, Benny; Guo, Li Jun; Norström, Eva; Happonen, Kaisa E; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a signalling sphingolipid affecting multiple cellular functions of vascular and immune systems. It circulates at submicromolar levels bound to HDL-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) or to albumin. S1P in blood is mainly produced by platelets and erythrocytes, making blood sampling for S1P quantification delicate. Standardisation of sampling is thereby of great importance to obtain robust data. By optimising and characterising the extraction procedure and the LC-MS/MS analysis, we have developed and validated a highly specific and sensitive method for S1P quantification. Blood was collected from healthy individuals (n = 15) to evaluate the effects of differential blood sampling on S1P levels. To evaluate correlation between S1P and apoM in different types of plasma and serum, apoM was measured by ELISA. The method showed good accuracy and precision in the range of 0.011 to 0.9 μM with less than 0.07 % carryover. We found that the methanol precipitation used to extract S1P co-extracted apoM and several other HDL-proteins from plasma. The platelet-associated S1P was released during coagulation, thus increasing the S1P concentration to double in serum as compared to that in plasma. Gel filtration chromatography revealed that the platelet-released S1P was mainly bound to albumin. This explains why the strong correlation between S1P and apoM levels in plasma is lost upon the clotting process and hence not observed in serum. We have developed, characterised and validated an efficient, highly sensitive and specific method for the quantification of S1P in biological material.

  10. Low fingertip temperature rebound measured by digital thermal monitoring strongly correlates with the presence and extent of coronary artery disease diagnosed by 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Naser; Nabavi, Vahid; Nuguri, Vivek; Hajsadeghi, Fereshteh; Flores, Ferdinand; Akhtar, Mohammad; Kleis, Stanley; Hecht, Harvey; Naghavi, Morteza; Budoff, Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies showed strong correlations between low fingertip temperature rebound measured by digital thermal monitoring (DTM) during a 5 min arm-cuff induced reactive hyperemia and both the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in asymptomatic populations. This study evaluates the correlation between DTM and coronary artery disease (CAD) measured by CT angiography (CTA) in symptomatic patients. It also investigates the correlation between CTA and a new index of neurovascular reactivity measured by DTM. 129 patients, age 63 +/- 9 years, 68% male, underwent DTM, CAC and CTA. Adjusted DTM indices in the occluded arm were calculated: temperature rebound: aTR and area under the temperature curve aTMP-AUC. DTM neurovascular reactivity (NVR) index was measured based on increased fingertip temperature in the non-occluded arm. Obstructive CAD was defined as >or=50% luminal stenosis, and normal as no stenosis and CAC = 0. Baseline fingertip temperature was not different across the groups. However, all DTM indices of vascular and neurovascular reactivity significantly decreased from normal to non-obstructive to obstructive CAD [(aTR 1.77 +/- 1.18 to 1.24 +/- 1.14 to 0.94 +/- 0.92) (P = 0.009), (aTMP-AUC: 355.6 +/- 242.4 to 277.4 +/- 182.4 to 184.4 +/- 171.2) (P = 0.001), (NVR: 161.5 +/- 147.4 to 77.6 +/- 88.2 to 48.8 +/- 63.8) (P = 0.015)]. After adjusting for risk factors, the odds ratio for obstructive CAD compared to normal in the lowest versus two upper tertiles of FRS, aTR, aTMP-AUC, and NVR were 2.41 (1.02-5.93), P = 0.05, 8.67 (2.6-9.4), P = 0.001, 11.62 (5.1-28.7), P = 0.001, and 3.58 (1.09-11.69), P = 0.01, respectively. DTM indices and FRS combined resulted in a ROC curve area of 0.88 for the prediction of obstructive CAD. In patients suspected of CAD, low fingertip temperature rebound measured by DTM significantly predicted CTA-diagnosed obstructive disease.

  11. In vitro correlates of in vivo therapy with cyclosporine to immunosuppress rejection of heterotopic rat cardiac allografts across strong (RT-1) plus weak (non-RT-1) histocompatibility differences.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, S; Stepkowski, S M; Lawen, J G; Rutzky, L P; Kahan, B D

    1991-11-01

    This study correlated different oral cyclosporine doses with in vivo graft survival, blood and tissue drug levels, and in vitro immune performances. Wistar-Furth (WFu, RT-1u) hosts engrafted with heterotopic cardiac transplants from strongly histoincompatible Buffalo (BUF, RT-1b) rats were treated postoperatively with 14-day courses of different doses of CsA delivered per gavage. There was a graded prolongation of graft survival--namely, no effect at the 1.5 mg/kg dose; a modest effect at 3 mg/kg; a therapeutic effect at 5 mg/kg; and long-term unresponsiveness at 10 mg/kg. Whole blood, serum, and tissue CsA concentrations correlated with drug dose. On day 7 posttransplantation--that is, during the peak of the immune response of untreated recipients and midway during the period of daily CsA therapy--in vitro immune performances were examined in each experimental group. On the one hand, the mixed lymphocyte reaction of WFu host splenic T cells toward donor-type BUF stimulators poorly reflected the administered CsA dose. On the other hand, there was a good correlation between drug dose and both impaired cell-mediated lympholysis and reduced frequency of alloantigen-specific T cytotoxic cell precursors f(CTL)p. Animals treated with therapeutic doses of CsA showed different patterns of T cell-mediated lympholysis: 3 mg/kg did not prevent anti-BUF Tc cell sensitization; 5 mg/kg maintained f(CTL)p levels similar to the normal controls; and 10 mg/kg significantly reduced Tc clones against donor but not third-party targets. These data demonstrate that the fate of alloantigen-specific Tc clones activated in vivo depends upon the local drug concentration. Furthermore, the present studies suggest that CML and f(CTL)p afford useful in vitro indices of in vivo immunosuppression with CsA in rat cardiac allograft recipients.

  12. A Transition from Localized to Strongly Correlated Electron Behavior and Mixed Valence Driven by Physical or Chemical Pressure in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca)

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Haskel, Daniel; Yaroslavtsev, Alexander A.; Cao, Huibo; Thompson, Corey M.; Kovnir, Kirill; Menushenkov, Alexey P.; Chernikov, Roman V.; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Shatruk, Michael

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the action of physical pressure, chemical compression, or aliovalent substitution in ACo2As2 (A = Eu and Ca) has a general consequence of causing these antiferromagnetic materials to become ferromagnets. In all cases, the mixed valence triggered at the electropositive A site results in the increase of the Co 3d density of states at the Fermi level. Remarkably, the dramatic alteration of magnetic behavior results from the very minor (<0.15 electron) change in the population of the 3d orbitals. The mixed valence state of Eu observed in the high-pressure (HP) form of EuCo2As2 exhibits a remarkable stability, achieving the average oxidation state of +2.25 at 12.6 GPa. In the case of CaCo2As2, substituting even 10% of Eu or La into the Ca site causes ferromagnetic ordering of Co moments. Similar to HP-EuCo2As2, the itinerant 3d ferromagnetism emerges from electronic doping into the Co layer because of chemical compression of Eu sites in Ca0.9Eu0.1Co1.91As2 or direct electron doping in Ca0.85La0.15Co1.89As2. Finally, the results reported herein demonstrate the general possibility of amplifying minor localized electronic effects to achieve major changes in material’s properties via involvement of strongly correlated electrons.

  13. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    SciTech Connect

    Volkas, R. R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G. C.

    1989-07-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3)/sub 1//direct product/SU(3)/sub 2//direct product/SU(3)/sub 3/ gauge theory, where quarks of the /ital i/th generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub /ital i// and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements.

  14. Strong Photoassociation in Ultracold Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Jamison, Alan; Rvachov, Timur; Ebadi, Sepher; Son, Hyungmok; Jiang, Yijun; Zwierlein, Martin; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Despite many studies there are still open questions about strong photoassociation in ultracold gases. Photoassociation occurs only at short range and thus can be used as a tool to probe and control the two-body correlation function in an interacting many-body system and to engineer Hamiltonians using dissipation. We propose the possibility to slow down decoherence by photoassociation through the quantum Zeno effect. This can realized by shining strong photoassociation light on the superposition of the lowest two hyperfine states of Lithium 6. NSF, ARO-MURI, Samsung, NSERC.

  15. Strong interaction of a transmon qubit with 1D band-gap medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanbing; Sadri, Darius; Houck, Andrew; Bronn, Nicholas; Chow, Jerry; Gambetta, Jay

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneous emission of an atom will be enhanced or suppressed in a structured vacuum, commonly known as Purcell effect. Moreover, in a frequency gap medium, an atom-photon bound state is predicted to exist in the band gap, causing the localization of light. Here using the technology of circuit quantum electrodynamics, we experimentally explore this mechanism by fabricating a microwave step-impedance filter strongly coupled to a transmon qubit. Standard transmission and spectroscopy measurements support the existence of atom-photon bound states in the system. Correlation measurement shows that the atom-photon interaction induces strong correlation of the transmitted light through the system. Thanks support from IARPA

  16. Limbic Correlates of Fearlessness and Disinhibition in Incarcerated Youth: Exploring the Brain-Behavior Relationship with the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Glenn D.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether scores on two temperament dimensions (fearlessness and disinhibition) correlated differentially with gray matter volumes in two limbic regions (amygdala and hippocampus). It was predicted that the fearlessness dimension would correlate with low gray matter volumes in the amygdala and the disinhibition dimension would correlate with low gray matter volumes in the hippocampus after controlling for age, IQ, regular substance use, and total brain volume. Participants were 191 male adolescents (age range = 13–19 years) incarcerated in a maximum-security juvenile facility. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of the limbic and paralimbic regions of the brain was conducted. The temperament dimensions were estimated with items from the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL: YV: Forth et al., 2003). Analyses showed that the fearlessness dimension correlated negatively with gray matter volumes in the amygdala and the disinhibition dimension correlated negatively with gray matter volumes in the hippocampus but not vice versa. These findings provide preliminary support for the construct validity of the fearlessness and disinhibition temperament dimensions and offer confirmatory evidence for involvement of the amygdala and hippocampus in fear conditioning and behavioral inhibition, respectively. PMID:26363777

  17. Epithermal Neutrons, Illumination, Spatial Scale and Topography: A Correlative Analysis of Factors Influencing the Detection of Slope Hydration Using LRO's Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Livengood, T.; Sagdeev, R.; Parsons, A. M.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Harshman, K.; Hamara, D.; Bodnarik, J.

    2014-10-01

    This research correlates the Moon’s south polar epithermal neutron flux, topography and a visible illumination model and shows that there is a widespread hydration of polward-facing (PF) slopes that is occurring at a continuum of spatial scales.

  18. Review of Rate Constants and Exploration of Correlations of the Halogen Transfer Reaction of Tri-substituted Carbon-centered Radicals with Molecular Halogens

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2012-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction (R 3C + X2 R 3CX + X ; X = F, Cl, Br, and I) are reviewed. Because of curved Arrhenius plots and negative EX values, empirical structure-reactivity correlations are sought for log kX,298 rather than EX. The well-known poor correlation with measures of reaction enthalpy is demonstrated. The best quantitative predictor for R 3C is p, the sum of the Hammett p constants for the three substituents, R . Electronegative substituents with lone pairs, such as halogen or oxygen, thus appear to destabilize the formation of a polarized pre-reaction complex and/or TS ( +R---X---X -) by -inductive/field electron withdrawal while simultaneously stabilizing them by -resonance electron donation. The best quantitative predictor of the reactivity order of the halogens, I2 > Br2 >> Cl2 F2, is the polarizability of the halogen, (X-X). For the data set of 60 rate constants which span 6.5 orders of magnitude, a modestly successful correlation of log kX,298 is achieved with only two parameters, p and (X-X), with a mean unsigned deviation of 0.59 log units. How much of this residual variance is the result of inaccuracies in the data compared with over-simplification of the correlation approach remains to be seen.

  19. Partially strong WW scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Chiang Chengwei; Yuan Tzuchiang

    2008-09-01

    What if only a light Higgs boson is discovered at the CERN LHC? Conventional wisdom tells us that the scattering of longitudinal weak gauge bosons would not grow strong at high energies. However, this is generally not true. In some composite models or general two-Higgs-doublet models, the presence of a light Higgs boson does not guarantee complete unitarization of the WW scattering. After partial unitarization by the light Higgs boson, the WW scattering becomes strongly interacting until it hits one or more heavier Higgs bosons or other strong dynamics. We analyze how LHC experiments can reveal this interesting possibility of partially strong WW scattering.

  20. Keeping Marriages Strong in Challenging Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, Marci Wolff

    2009-01-01

    What makes a strong marriage anyway...? There are definite qualities that exist in healthy marriages, that is, a marriage that is defined by both partners to be "mostly" or "usually" very satisfying. This article explores these qualities and looks at what really works to make and keep marriages strong, healthy, and satisfying…

  1. Review of rate constants and exploration of correlations of the halogen transfer reaction of trisubstituted carbon-centered radicals with molecular halogens.

    PubMed

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2012-03-16

    Rate constants for the reaction (R'(3)C(•) + X(2) → R'(3)CX + X(•); X = F, Cl, Br, I) are reviewed. Because of curved Arrhenius plots and negative E(X) values, empirical structure-reactivity correlations are sought for log k(X,298) rather than E(X). The well-known poor correlation with measures of reaction enthalpy is demonstrated. The best quantitative predictor for R'(3)C(•) is Σσ(p), the sum of the Hammett σ(p) constants for the three substituents, R'. Electronegative substituents with lone pairs, such as halogen and oxygen, thus appear to destabilize the formation of a polarized prereaction complex and/or TS ((δ+)R- - -X- - -X(δ-)) by σ inductive/field electron withdrawal while simultaneously stabilizing them by π resonance electron donation. The best quantitative predictor of the reactivity order of the halogens, I(2) > Br(2) ≫ Cl(2) ≈ F(2), is the polarizability of the halogen, α(X(2)). For the data set of 60 rate constants which span 6.5 orders of magnitude, a modestly successful correlation of log k(X,298) is achieved with only two parameters, Σσ(p) and α(X(2)), with a mean unsigned deviation of 0.59 log unit. How much of this residual variance is the result of inaccuracies in the data in comparison with oversimplification of the correlation approach remains to be seen.

  2. Energy Spectrum and Optical Absorption Spectra of Fullerene C76 Isomers and Endohedral Metal Complexes on Their Basis Within the Limits of the Concept of a Strongly Correlated State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Yu. A.; Lobanov, B. V.; Murzashev, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    The energy spectra of five fullerene C76 isomers are calculated for the Hubbard model in the static fluctuation approximation. Based on the spectra obtained, the optical absorption spectra of pure fullerene C76 represented by the isomer of symmetry D2 and endohedral Lu2@C76, Sm@C76, and DySc2N@C76 metal complexes are calculated. The calculated optical absorption spectra agree qualitatively well with the available experimental data, thereby indicating a need to consider the strong Coulomb interactions in the study of the π-electron fullerene subsystem.

  3. Exploring the Career Construction Interview for Vocational Personality Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Susan R.; Wolff, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored the validity and usefulness of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) with college students (n = 83) from a midsize Southern university. Using Pearson's "r" correlations, comparisons were made between the three-letter RIASEC Strong Interest Inventory (SII) theme code and RIASEC theme codes derived from…

  4. Strong Navajo Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skogrand, Linda; Mueller, Mary Lou; Arrington, Rachel; LeBlanc, Heidi; Spotted Elk, Davina; Dayzie, Irene; Rosenbrand, Reva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study, conducted in two Navajo Nation chapters, was to learn what makes Navajo marriages strong because no research has been done on this topic. Twenty-one Navajo couples (42 individuals) who felt they had strong marriages volunteered to participate in the study. Couples identified the following marital strengths:…

  5. Exploring the Relationship Between Changes in Weight and Utterances in an Online Weight Loss Forum: A Content and Correlational Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Gaurav; McDonald, David W; Poole, Erika S; Li, Victor; Eikey, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the use of online forums as a component of eHealth weight loss interventions. Although the research is mixed on the utility of online forums in general, results suggest that there is promise to this, particularly if the systems can be designed well to support healthful interactions that foster weight loss and continued engagement. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the styles of utterances individuals make on an online weight loss forum and week-to-week fluctuations in weight. This analysis was conducted to generate hypotheses on possible strategies that could be used to improve the overall design of online support groups to facilitate more healthful interactions. Methods A convenience sample of individuals using an online weight loss forum (N=4132) included data both on online forum use and weight check-in data. All interactions were coded utilizing the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) system. Mixed model analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between these LIWC variables and weight over time. Results Results suggested that increased use of past-tense verbs (P=.05) and motion (P=.02) were associated with lower weekly weights whereas increased use of conjunctions (eg, and, but, whereas; P=.001) and exclusion words (eg, but, without, exclude; P=.07) were both associated with higher weight during the weeks when these utterances were used more. Conclusions These results provide some insights on the styles of interactions that appear to be associated with weight fluctuations. Future work should explore the stability of these findings and also explore possibilities for fostering these types of interactions more explicitly within online weight loss forums. PMID:25513997

  6. Do Speleothem Stable Isotope Records Contain Hidden Tropical Cyclone Histories? Exploring C-O Isotope Correlation Patterns for Indicators of Tropical Cyclone Masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappier, A. E.; Rossington, C.

    2013-12-01

    The newly-described tropical cyclone masking effect on stable isotope paleohydrological signals in speleothem records arises from the intermittent delivery of large pulses of isotopically distinct tropical cyclone rain. Recent work shows that 18-O depleted tropical cyclone stormwater depresses the δ18O value of speleothem calcite for months to years following a tropical cyclone event, masking the background stable isotope signal of persistent climate variability. Periods of high local storm activity can lead to speleothem calcite paleohydrological signals with significant wet biases on interannual to decadal timescales. Because speleothem carbon isotope ratios are independent of tropical cyclone rainfall, tropical speleothems are known to exhibit moderate C-O isotope covariation over time, periods when C-O isotope covariation breaks down and δ18O values are low may provide a marker for times when tropical cyclone masking is important. If so, existing speleothem stable isotope records from tropical cyclone-prone regions may contain signatures of tropical cyclone masking in the temporal evolution of C-O isotope covariation patterns. We present results from an exploratory analysis of several published speleothem records that are candidates for containing tropical cyclone masking signals. For each speleothem, overall C-O isotope covariation coefficients were calculated, and transient covariation patterns were analyzed using a sliding correlation index, the Covariation of Stable Isotopes (CoSI) index, and Local Correlation (LoCo). Local tropical cyclone historical and paleotempest records are compared and a method is presented to test for the presence of tropical cyclone masking intervals. The implications for speleothem paleoclimatology and paleotempestology are discussed.

  7. The Strong Nuclear Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-05-24

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  8. The Strong Nuclear Force

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  9. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  10. Coherency properties of strong Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D. )

    1989-01-01

    Strongly correlated Langmuir wave collapse has been observed in two dimensional simulations of Zakharov's model in a regime characterized by strong ion sound wave damping and an external drive frequency, {omega}{sub 0}, close to but less than the plasma frequency, ({omega}{sub p} {minus} {omega}{sub 0})/{omega}{sub 0} > {epsilon} with {epsilon} {approx equal} 0.005. Caviton-caviton interactions induce temporal correlations between different collapse sites on a time scale the order of a collapse cycle, and on a longer time scale site locations migrate possibly leading to strong spatial correlations. Certain features of ionospheric incoherent scatter radar (ISR) spectra are consistent with such correlations. 6 refs.

  11. Neural Correlates of Bridging Inferences and Coherence Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sung-il; Yoon, Misun; Kim, Wonsik; Lee, Sunyoung; Kang, Eunjoo

    2012-01-01

    We explored the neural correlates of bridging inferences and coherence processing during story comprehension using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Ten healthy right-handed volunteers were visually presented three types of stories (Strong Coherence, Weak Coherence, and Control) consisted of three sentences. The causal connectedness among…

  12. Examination of a polycrystalline thin-film model to explore the relation between probe size and structural correlation length in fluctuation electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Treacy, M M J; Gibson, J M

    2012-02-01

    We examine simulated electron microdiffraction patterns from models of thin polycrystalline silicon. The models are made by a Voronoi tessellation of random points in a box. The Voronoi domains are randomly selected to contain either a randomly-oriented cubic crystalline grain or a region of continuous random network material. The microdiffraction simulations from coherent probes of different widths are computed at the ideal kinematical limit, ignoring inelastic and multiple scattering. By examining the normalized intensity variance that is obtained in fluctuation electron microscopy experiments, we confirm that intensity fluctuations increase monotonically with the percentage of crystalline grains in the material. However, anomalously high variance is observed for models that have 100% crystalline grains with no imperfections. We confirm that the reduced normalized variance, V(k,R) - 1, that is associated with four-body correlations at scattering vector k, varies inversely with specimen thickness. Further, for probe sizes R larger than the mean grain size, we confirm that the reduced normalized variance obeys the predicted form given by Gibson et al. [Ultramicroscopy, 83, 169-178 (2000)] for the kinematical coherent scattering limit.

  13. On Strong Anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, N.; Turvey, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    We examine Dubois's (2003) distinction between weak anticipation and strong anticipation. Anticipation is weak if it arises from a model of the system via internal simulations. Anticipation is strong if it arises from the system itself via lawful regularities embedded in the system's ordinary mode of functioning. The assumption of weak anticipation dominates cognitive science and neuroscience and in particular the study of perception and action. The assumption of strong anticipation, however, seems to be required by anticipation's ubiquity. It is, for example, characteristic of homeostatic processes at the level of the organism, organs, and cells. We develop the formal distinction between strong and weak anticipation by elaboration of anticipating synchronization, a phenomenon arising from time delays in appropriately coupled dynamical systems. The elaboration is conducted in respect to (a) strictly physical systems, (b) the defining features of circadian rhythms, often viewed as paradigmatic of biological behavior based in internal models, (c) Pavlovian learning, and (d) forward models in motor control. We identify the common thread of strongly anticipatory systems and argue for its significance in furthering understanding of notions such as “internal”, “model” and “prediction”. PMID:20191086

  14. Yugoslav strong motion network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Vladimir

    1985-04-01

    Data concerning ground motion and the response of structures during strong earthquakes are necessary for seismic hazard evaluation and the definition of design criteria for structures to be constructed in seismically active zones. The only way to obtain such data is the installation of a strong-motion instrument network. The Yugoslav strong-motion programme was created in 1972 to recover strong-motion response data used by the structural engineering community in developing earthquake resistant design. Instruments, accelerographs SMA-1 and seismoscopes WM-1, were installed in free-field stations and on structures (high-rise buildings, dams, bridges, etc.). A total number of 176 accelerographs and 137 seismoscopes have been installed and are operating in Yugoslavia. The strong-motion programme in Yugoslavia consists of five subactivities: network design, network operation, data processing, network management and research as well as application. All these activities are under the responsibility of IZIIS in cooperation with the Yugoslav Association of Seismology. By 1975 in the realisation of this project participated the CALTECH as cooperative institution in the joint American-Yugoslav cooperative project. The results obtained which are presented in this paper, and their application in the aseismic design justify the necessity for the existence of such a network in Yugoslavia.

  15. Information-limiting correlations

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén; Beck, Jeffrey; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pitkow, Xaq; Latham, Peter; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Computational strategies used by the brain strongly depend on the amount of information that can be stored in population activity, which in turn strongly depends on the pattern of noise correlations. In vivo, noise correlations tend to be positive and proportional to the similarity in tuning properties. Such correlations are thought to limit information, which has led to the suggestion that decorrelation increases information. In contrast, we found, analytically and numerically, that decorrelation does not imply an increase in information. Instead, the only information-limiting correlations are what we refer to as differential correlations: correlations proportional to the product of the derivatives of the tuning curves. Unfortunately, differential correlations are likely to be very small and buried under correlations that do not limit information, making them particularly difficult to detect. We found, however, that the effect of differential correlations on information can be detected with relatively simple decoders. PMID:25195105

  16. Partners: Forging Strong Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Ellen, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This newsletter issue asserts that sound, effective relationships in which diverse groups of people and organizations work together toward a common goal are the basis of the collaborative efforts in education that can accomplish change. The first article, "Partners: Forging Strong Relationships" (Sarah E. Torian), briefly describes the…

  17. Strong Little Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Did you know that some strong little cylindrical magnets available in local hardware stores can have an effective circumferential current of 2500 A? This intriguing information can be obtained by hanging a pair of magnets at the center of a coil, as shown in Fig. 1, and measuring the oscillation frequency as a function of coil current.

  18. Intensity correlations near a cavity QED antiresonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qing; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    We explore the antiresonance phenomenon, where a two-level atom is excited inside a single-mode, laser-driven cavity without appreciably exciting the field mode. Antiresonance is well known in classical physics and the excitation of the atomic and field degrees of freedom by a weak laser field can be easily understood in a classical oscillator picture. The temporal intensity correlations in the signal emitted from the atom and from the cavity, however, show strong signs of nonclassical behavior. We calculate these correlations and show how they can be interpreted in terms of a conditional quantum trajectory dynamics of the system.

  19. Diffusive Mixing in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, Abdourahmane; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    A multispecies hydrodynamic model based on moments of the Born-Bogolyubov-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy is developed for physical conditions relevant to astrophysical plasmas. The modified transport equations incorporate strong correlations through a density functional theory closure, while fluctuations enters through a mixture BGK operator. This model extends the usual Burgers equations for a dilute gas to strongly coupled and isothermal plasmas mixtures. The diffusive currents for these strongly coupled plasmas is self-consistently derived. The settling of impurities and its impact on cooling of white dwarfs and neutron stars can be greatly affected by strong Coulomb coupling, which we show can be quantified using the direct-correlation function. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0344).

  20. Thermalization of strongly disordered nonlinear chains.

    PubMed

    Kottos, Tsampikos; Shapiro, Boris

    2011-06-01

    Thermalization of systems described by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation, in the strong disorder limit, is investigated both theoretically and numerically. We show that introducing correlations in the disorder potential, while keeping the "effective" disorder fixed (as measured by the localization properties of wave-packet dynamics), strongly facilitates the thermalization process and leads to a standard grand canonical distribution of the probability norms associated with each site.

  1. Strongly Regular Graphs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    The theory of strongly regular graphs was introduced by Bose r7 1 in 1963, in connection with partial geometries and 2 class association schemes. One...non adjacent vertices is constant and equal to ~. We shall denote by ~(p) (reap.r(p)) the set of vertices adjacent (resp.non adjacent) to a vertex p...is the complement of .2’ if the set of vertices of ~ is the set of vertices of .2’ and if two vertices in .2’ are adjacent if and only if they were

  2. Electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Jenet, F. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-02-15

    The first large-scale simulations of continuously driven, two-dimensional electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are performed, for electron thermal speeds 0.01c{<=}v{<=}0.57c, by integrating the Zakharov equations for coupled Langmuir and transverse (T) waves near the plasma frequency. Turbulence scalings and wave number spectra are calculated, a transition is found from a mix of trapped and free T eigenstates for v{>=}0.1c to just free eigenstates for v{<=}0.1c, and wave energy densities are observed to undergo slow quasiperiodic oscillations.

  3. Strong dynamics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittisamai, Pawin

    The limitations of the Standard Model of particle physics, despite its being a well-established theory, have prompted various proposals for new physics capable of addressing its shortcomings. The particular issue to be explored here is the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the probing of which lies within the TeV-scale physics accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This thesis focuses on the phenomenology of a class of models featuring a dynamical breaking of the electroweak symmetry via strong dynamics. Consequences of recent experiments and aspects of near-future experiments are presented. We study the implications of the LHC Higgs searches available at the time the related journal article was written for technicolor models that feature colored technifermions. Then we discuss the properties of a technicolor model featuring strong-top dynamics that is viable for explaining the recently discovered boson of mass 126 GeV. We introduce a novel method of characterizing the color structure of a new massive vector boson, often predicted in various new physics models, using information that will be promptly available if it is discovered in the near-future experiments at the LHC. We generalize the idea for more realistic models where a vector boson has flavor non-universal couplings to quarks. Finally, we discuss the possibilities of probing the chiral structure of a new color-octet vector boson.

  4. Emergent phenomena in strongly correlated f-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kevin

    Superconductivity has long motivated researchers for its promise in energy applications; many of the studies have focused on the d-electron high Tc cuprates and how to increase the superconducting critical temperature, Tc. While the focus is understandable, there are still such vacancies in our knowledge of superconductivity that many avenues of research can be fruitful. Therefore, the work in this dissertation focuses on two f-electron superconducting systems: the filled skutterudite Prx Ce1-x Pt4Ge12 and the ferromagnetic superconductor UCo 1-xFexGe. Poly and single crystal samples were synthesized during the course of the studies and were characterized by measurements of electrical resistivity, DC magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, thermopower, and powder x-ray diffraction. Poly and single crystal samples were synthesized during the course of the studies and were characterized by measurements of electrical resistivity, DC magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, thermopower, and powder x-ray diffraction.

  5. STIR: Novel Electronic States by Gating Strongly Correlated Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    electron behavior which could be modulated by gating: spin liquids (e.g. a layered Sodium Iridate compound) and multiferroics (e.g. Bismuth Ferrite). We...electron behavior which could be modulated by gating: spin liquids (e.g. a layered Sodium Iridate compound) and multiferroics (e.g. Bismuth Ferrite

  6. String Theory, Strongly Correlated Systems, and Duality Twists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Chicon, Nesty Ray

    In the first part of this dissertation (Chapter 1), I present a construction of a six dimensional (2,0)-theory model that describes the dynamics of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). The FQHE appears as part of the low energy description of the Coulomb branch of the A1 (2,0)-theory formulated on a geometry (S 1 x R2)/Zk. At low-energy, the configuration is described in terms of a 4+1D supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory on a cone (R2/Z k) with additional 2+1D degrees of freedom at the tip of the cone that include fractionally charged particles. These fractionally charged "quasi-particles" are BPS strings of the (2,0)-theory wrapped on short cycles. In this framework, a W-boson can be modeled as a bound state of k quasi-particles, which can be used to understand the dynamics of the FQHE. In the second part of this dissertation (Chapters 2-3), I investigate the N=4 SYM theory compactified on a circle, with a varying coupling constant (Janus configuration) and an S-duality twist. I relate this setup to a three dimensional topological theory and to a dual string theory. The equality of these descriptions is exhibited by matching the operator algebra, and the dimensions of the Hilbert space. Additionally, this dissertation addresses a classic result in number theory, called quadratic reciprocity, using string theory language. I present a proof that quadratic reciprocity is a direct consequence of T-duality of Type-II string theory. This is demonstrated by analyzing a partition function of abelian N=4 SYM theory on a certain supersymmetry-preserving four-manifold with variable coupling constant and a SL(2,Z)-duality twist.

  7. Gate control of percolative conduction in strongly correlated manganite films.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Takafumi; Sheng, Zhigao; Nakamura, Masao; Nakano, Masaki; Kawasaki, Masashi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    Gate control of percolative conduction in a phase-separated manganite system is demonstrated in a field-effect transistor geometry, resulting in ambipolar switching from a metallic state to an insulating state.

  8. Modeling Strongly Correlated Fermi Systems Using Ultra-Cold Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-28

    NUMBER(S) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) The public reporting burden for this collection of information...applicable. On classified documents, enter the title classification in parentheses. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER. Enter all contract numbers as they appear in the...Key words or phrases identifying major concepts in the report. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION . Enter security classification in accordance with

  9. Recent advances in spectroscopy of strongly correlated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Sauvan, P.; Gauthier, P.; Angelo, P.; Derfoul, H.; Alexiou, S.; Poquerusse, A.; Ceccotti, T.; Calisti, A.

    1998-09-01

    The Quasimolecular Model using a Two Centre basis to describe the electronic emitting structure gives an alternative treatment of line broadening in dense and hot plasmas. Two codes are developed: IDEFIX for the radiative properties, QMSPECTRA (postprocessed to the first one) for the spectral line shapes. The observability of dense plasma effects (PPS, asymmetries and satellite features) in spectroscopic measurements is analysed within the proposed model and taking care of the eventual integrations over density gradients.

  10. Charge transfer in heterostructures of strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Lopez Del Castillo, Ivan; Okamoto, Satoshi; Yunoki, Seiji; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2008-01-01

    In this work, recent theoretical investigations by the authors in the area of oxide multilayers are briefly reviewed. The calculations were carried out using model Hamiltonians and a variety of non-perturbative techniques. Moreover, new results are also included here. They correspond to the generation of a metallic state by mixing insulators in a multilayer geometry, using the Hubbard and double-exchange models. For the latter, the resulting metallic state is also ferromagnetic. This illustrates how electron or hole doping via transfer of charge in multilayers can lead to the study of phase diagrams of transition metal oxides in the clean limit. Currently, these phase diagrams are much affected by the disordering standard chemical doping procedure, which introduces quenched disorder in the material.

  11. Charge transfer in heterostructures of strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    González, I; Okamoto, S; Yunoki, S; Moreo, A; Dagotto, E

    2008-07-02

    In this work, recent theoretical investigations by the authors in the area of oxide multilayers are briefly reviewed. The calculations were carried out using model Hamiltonians and a variety of non-perturbative techniques. Moreover, new results are also included here. They correspond to the generation of a metallic state by mixing insulators in a multilayer geometry, using the Hubbard and double-exchange models. For the latter, the resulting metallic state is also ferromagnetic. This illustrates how electron or hole doping via transfer of charge in multilayers can lead to the study of phase diagrams of transition metal oxides in the clean limit. Currently, these phase diagrams are much affected by the disordering standard chemical doping procedure, which introduces quenched disorder in the material.

  12. Density profile of strongly correlated spherical Yukawa plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, M.; Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Golubnychiy, V.; Baumgartner, H.; Piel, A.; Block, D.

    2006-10-01

    Recently the discovery of 3D-dust crystals [1] excited intensive experimental and theoretical activities [2-4]. Details of the shell structure of these crystals has been very well explained theoretically by a simple model involving an isotropic Yukawa-type pair repulsion and an external harmonic confinement potential [4]. On the other hand, it has remained an open question how the average radial density profile, looks like. We show that screening has a dramatic effect on the density profile, which we derive analytically for the ground state. Interestingly, the result applies not only to a continuous plasma distribution but also to simulation data for the Coulomb crystals exhibiting the above mentioned shell structure. Furthermore, excellent agreement between the continuum model and shell models is found [5]. [1] O. Arp, D. Block, A. Piel, and A. Melzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] H. Totsuji, C. Totsuji, T. Ogawa, and K. Tsuruta, Phys. Rev. E 71, 045401 (2005) [3] P. Ludwig, S. Kosse, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. E 71, 046403 (2005) [4] M. Bonitz, D. Block, O. Arp, V. Golubnychiy, H. Baumgartner, P. Ludwig, A. Piel, and A. Filinov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006) [5] C. Henning, M. Bonitz, A. Piel, P. Ludwig, H. Baumgartner, V. Golubnichiy, and D. Block, submitted to Phys. Rev. E

  13. Magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems: Spin and orbital contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Secchi, A.; Lichtenstein, A.I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2015-09-15

    We present a technique to map an electronic model with local interactions (a generalized multi-orbital Hubbard model) onto an effective model of interacting classical spins, by requiring that the thermodynamic potentials associated to spin rotations in the two systems are equivalent up to second order in the rotation angles, when the electronic system is in a symmetry-broken phase. This allows to determine the parameters of relativistic and non-relativistic magnetic interactions in the effective spin model in terms of equilibrium Green’s functions of the electronic model. The Hamiltonian of the electronic system includes, in addition to the non-relativistic part, relativistic single-particle terms such as the Zeeman coupling to an external magnetic field, spin–orbit coupling, and arbitrary magnetic anisotropies; the orbital degrees of freedom of the electrons are explicitly taken into account. We determine the complete relativistic exchange tensors, accounting for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions, as well as additional non-diagonal symmetric terms (which may include dipole–dipole interaction). The expressions of all these magnetic interactions are determined in a unified framework, including previously disregarded features such as the vertices of two-particle Green’s functions and non-local self-energies. We do not assume any smallness in spin–orbit coupling, so our treatment is in this sense exact. Finally, we show how to distinguish and address separately the spin, orbital and spin–orbital contributions to magnetism, providing expressions that can be computed within a tight-binding Dynamical Mean Field Theory.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Thermopower in Strongly Correlated Multiorbital Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekino, M; Okamoto, Satoshi; Koshibae, W; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Temperature dependence of thermopower in the multiorbital Hubbard model is studied by using the dynamical mean-field theory with the non-crossing approximation impurity solver. It is found that the Coulomb interaction, the Hund coupling, and the crystal filed splitting bring about nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the hermopower, including its sign reversal. The implication of our theoretical results to some materials is discussed.

  15. Exploring the autonomic correlates of personality.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel; Mulgrew, Joseph; Hautus, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between personality and resting heart rate variability (HRV) indices. Healthy volunteers (n=106) completed a 240-item Big Five personality inventory, the state/Trait Anxiety inventory, and a ten minute electrocardiographic recording. Time and frequency domain estimates of HRV were derived from the cardiac time series and related to the Big Five dimensions of personality, to personality types extracted from a cluster analysis, and to Trait Anxiety. Frequency domain measures of HRV (HRV-HF, LF/HF) were associated with specific dimensions of personality, but significance was not noted for the time domain measure (STD-RR). Furthermore, distressed personality types exhibited significantly greater autonomic imbalance (LF/HF) than other personality types. However, significance was not noted for the time domain measure (STD-RR). These results can be explained with reference to a contemporary model of neurovisceral integration.

  16. Strong photoassociation in a degenerate fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rvachov, Timur; Jamison, Alan; Jing, Li; Son, Hyungmok; Ebadi, Sepehr; Jiang, Yijun; Zwierlein, Martin; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Despite many studies there remain open questions about strong photoassociation in ultracold gases. We study the effects of strong photoassociation in ultracold fermions. Photoassociation occurs only at short range and thus can be used as a tool to probe and control the two-body correlation function in an interacting many-body system. We study the effects of strong photoassociation in 6 Li, the onset of saturation, and its effects on spin polarized and interacting spin-mixtures. This work was funded by the NSF, ARO-MURI, SAMSUNG, and NSERC.

  17. Strong Female Characters in Recent Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heine, Pat; Inkster, Christine; Kazemek, Frank; Williams, Sandra; Raschke, Sylvia; Stevens, Della

    1999-01-01

    Shares the authors' criteria for evaluating female characters as positive role models in children's literature. Explores the criteria by examining "The Ballad of Lucy Wipple" (Karen Cushman). Discusses other recently published picture books and novels which feature strong females in history, in contemporary times, and in fantasy. (SR)

  18. Quine's 'needlessly strong' holism.

    PubMed

    Verhaegh, Sander

    2017-02-01

    Quine is routinely perceived as having changed his mind about the scope of the Duhem-Quine thesis, shifting from what has been called an 'extreme holism' to a more moderate view. Where the Quine of 'Two Dogmas of Empiricism' argues that "the unit of empirical significance is the whole of science" (1951, 42), the later Quine seems to back away from this "needlessly strong statement of holism" (1991, 393). In this paper, I show that the received view is incorrect. I distinguish three ways in which Quine's early holism can be said to be wide-scoped and show that he has never changed his mind about any one of these aspects of his early view. Instead, I argue that Quine's apparent change of mind can be explained away as a mere shift of emphasis.

  19. Strong, Lightweight, Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi

    2007-01-01

    A new class of strong, lightweight, porous materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less porous and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.

  20. Strongly-coupled high- n Rydberg atom pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. B.

    2015-05-01

    Creation of pairs of high n, n ~ 300 , Rydberg atoms with well-defined initial separations enables study and control of their mutual interactions. If the atoms are initially well separated, their interactions are weak and they evolve independently. Their interactions can be dramatically increased, however, by transferring them to even higher levels using carefully-tailored sequences of one, or more, short electric field pulses, the degree of coupling being strongly influenced by the final target state. Since both atoms are subject to the same pulse(s), strongly-correlated macroscopic two-electron wave packets can be created whose subsequent dynamics can be monitored by application of further probe fields. Interest focuses on energy exchange and formation of long lived two-electron-excited states in which, due to their correlated motions, the electrons remain far apart. The production and properties of such states, which lie at the classical-quantum interface, are being explored experimentally and through classical and quantum simulations. Research supported by the NSF, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the FWF (Austria).

  1. Cooking strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clérouin, Jean

    2015-09-01

    We present the orbital-free method for dense plasmas which allows for efficient variable ionisation molecular dynamics. This approach is a literal application of density functional theory where the use of orbitals is bypassed by a semi-classical estimation of the electron kinetic energy through the Thomas-Fermi theory. Thanks to a coherent definition of ionisation, we evidence a particular regime in which the static structure no longer depends on the temperature: the Γ-plateau. With the help of the well-known Thomas-Fermi scaling laws, we derive the conditions required to obtain a plasma at a given value of the coupling parameter and deduce useful fits. Static and dynamical properties are predicted as well as a a simple equation of state valid on the Γ-plateau. We show that the one component plasma model can be helpful to describe the correlations in real systems.

  2. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2006 draws upon available information from literature, industry and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based upon these data.

  3. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2008 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry, and presents analyses of exploration activities by the mineral industry based upon these data.

  4. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Vasil, R.L.; Nolting, A.

    2011-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2010 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry.

  5. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Bourget, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2009 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on industry exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities by the mineral industry based upon these data.

  6. Biomorphic Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, the first NASA/JPL workshop on Biomorphic Explorers for future missions. The topics include: 1) Biomorphic Explorers: Classification (Based on Mobility and Ambient Environment); 2) Biomorphic Flight Systems: Vision; 3) Biomorphic Explorer: Conceptual Design; 4) Biomorphic Gliders; 5) Summary and Roadmap; 6) Coordinated/Cooperative Exploration Scenario; and 7) Applications. This paper also presents illustrations of the various biomorphic explorers.

  7. Foreshocks of strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.; Sobisevich, L. E.; Sobisevich, A. L.; Lavrov, I. P.

    2014-07-01

    The specific enhancement of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations a few hours prior to the strong earthquakes, which was previously mentioned in the literature, motivated us to search for the distinctive features of the mechanical (foreshock) activity of the Earth's crust in the epicentral zones of the future earthquakes. Activation of the foreshocks three hours before the main shock is revealed, which is roughly similar to the enhancement of the specific electromagnetic ULF emission. It is hypothesized that the round-the-world seismic echo signals from the earthquakes, which form the peak of energy release 2 h 50 min before the main events, act as the triggers of the main shocks due to the cumulative action of the surface waves converging to the epicenter. It is established that the frequency of the fluctuations in the foreshock activity decreases at the final stages of the preparation of the main shocks, which probably testifies to the so-called mode softening at the approach of the failure point according to the catastrophe theory.

  8. Unconventional Disorder Effects in Correlated Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastiasoro, Maria N.; Bernardini, Fabio; Andersen, Brian M.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of disorder on unconventional superconductors in the presence of correlations, and explore a novel correlated disorder paradigm dominated by strong deviations from standard Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory due to generation of local bound states and cooperative impurity behavior driven by Coulomb interactions. Specifically we explain under which circumstances magnetic disorder acts as a strong poison destroying high-Tc superconductivity at the sub-1% level, and when nonmagnetic disorder, counterintuitively, hardly affects the unconventional superconducting state while concomitantly inducing an inhomogeneous full-volume magnetic phase. Recent experimental studies of Fe-based superconductors have discovered that such unusual disorder behavior seems to be indeed present in those systems.

  9. Unconventional Disorder Effects in Correlated Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Gastiasoro, Maria N; Bernardini, Fabio; Andersen, Brian M

    2016-12-16

    We study the effects of disorder on unconventional superconductors in the presence of correlations, and explore a novel correlated disorder paradigm dominated by strong deviations from standard Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory due to generation of local bound states and cooperative impurity behavior driven by Coulomb interactions. Specifically we explain under which circumstances magnetic disorder acts as a strong poison destroying high-T_{c} superconductivity at the sub-1% level, and when nonmagnetic disorder, counterintuitively, hardly affects the unconventional superconducting state while concomitantly inducing an inhomogeneous full-volume magnetic phase. Recent experimental studies of Fe-based superconductors have discovered that such unusual disorder behavior seems to be indeed present in those systems.

  10. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Norman, Genri E.

    2006-04-01

    each area new results from theory, simulations and experiments were presented. In addition, a special symposium was held one evening to explore the questions on high-energy-density matter generated by intense heavy ion beams and to discuss the outlook for applications to industry. As this special issue illustrates, the field remains vibrant and challenging, being driven to a great extent by new experimental tools and access to new strongly coupled conditions. This is illustrated by the inclusion of developments in the areas of warm matter, dusty plasmas, condensed matter and ultra-cold plasmas. In total, 200 participants from 17 countries attended the conference, including 42 invited speakers. The individuals giving presentations at the conference, including invited plenary and topical talks and posters, were asked to contribute to this special issue and most have done so. We trust that this special issue will accurately record the contents of the conference, and provide a valuable resource for researchers in this rapidly evolving field. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Board and all members of the Programme Committee for their contributions to the conference. Of course, nothing would have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the Local Organizing Committee, in particular Igor Morozov and Valery Sultanov. We wish to thank the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute for High Energy Densities, the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Moscow Committee of Science and Technologies, the Russian Joint Stock Company `Unified Energy System of Russia', and The International Association for the Promotion of Co-operation with Scientists from the New Independent States (NIS) of the Former Soviet Union for sponsoring this conference.

  11. Studies on Strong Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriano, Claudio

    Five studies, four in Quantum field theory and one in fermionic molecular dynamics are presented. In the first study, introduced in chapter one and developed in chapter two of this dissertation, we formulate an extension of QCD sum rules to Compton scattering of the pion at intermediate energy. The chapter is based on the research paper Fixed angle pion Compton scattering and QCD sum rules by Prof. George Sterman and the author, which has been submitted for publication as a regular article. In chapter 3 we discuss the relation between traditional bosonic exchange models of nuclear strong interaction and soliton models, in the particular case of the sine-Gordon model. The chapter is based on the research paper "Scattering in soliton models and bosonic exchange descriptions", by R. R. Parwani, H. Yamagishi, I. Zahed and the author, and is published in Phys. Rev. D 45 (1992), 2542. A preprint of this paper (Preprint 1) has been included as an Appendix to the Chapter. In Chapter 4 we discuss aspects of the propagation of quantized fields in classical backgrounds, using the light-cone expansion of the propagator. The chapter is based on the research papers "Electrodynamics in the presence of an axion", published by the author in Modern Physics Letters A 7 (1992), 1253, and on the paper "Singularity of Green's function and the effective action in massive Yang Mills theories, by Prof. H. Yamagishi and the author. This last paper is published in Physical Review D 41 (1990), 3226 and its reprint appears in the final part of the Chapter (Reprint 1). In chapter 5, entitled "On the time dependent Rayleigh-Ritz equations", we discuss aspects of the variational approach to fermionic molecular dynamics. This investigation by R. Parwani, H. Yamagishi and the author has been published in Nucl. Physics A 522 (1991), 591. A preprint of this research paper has been inserted in the final part of the Chapter (Preprint 2).

  12. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  13. Exploration Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Stanley, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2012 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry. Three sources of information are reported and analyzed in this annual review of international exploration for 2012: 1) budgetary statistics expressed in U.S. nominal dollars provided by SNL Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia; 2) regional and site-specific exploration activities that took place in 2012 as compiled by the USGS and 3) regional events including economic, social and political conditions that affected exploration activities, which were derived from published sources and unpublished discussions with USGS and industry specialists.

  14. Participatory Exploration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kathy Nado delivers a presentation on Participatory Exploration on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to present NASA'...

  15. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2007 draws upon available information from industry, literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based upon these data.

  16. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2005 draws upon available information from literature, industry and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. It provides data on exploration budgets by global region and mineral commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based on these data.

  17. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Rapstine, T.D.; Lee, E.C.

    2012-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2011 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. This summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents surveys returned by companies primarily focused on precious (gold, platinum-group metals and silver) and base (copper, lead, nickel and zinc) metals.

  18. Metallic Clusters in Strong Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraud, Eric; Reinhard, P.-G.; Ullrich, Carsten A.

    1998-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron response of a Na_9^+ cluster excited by strong femtosecond laser pulses.(C. A. Ullrich, P.-G. Reinhard, and E. Suraud, J. Phys. B 30), 5043 (1997) Our approach is based on time-dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation, including a recently developed self-interaction correction scheme. We investigate numerically the full electronic dipolar response and multiphoton ionization of the cluster and discuss the ionization mechanism. A strong correlation between induced electronic dipole oscillations and electron emission is observed, leading to a pronounced resonant enhancement of ionization at the frequency of the Mie plasmon.

  19. Concepts in strong Langmuir turbulence theory

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, D.F.; Rose, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the basic concepts of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) theory are reviewed. In SLT system, a major fraction of the turbulent energy is carried by local, time-dependent, nonlinear excitations called cavitons. Modulational instability, localization of Langmuir fields by density fluctuations, caviton nucleation, collapse, and burnout and caviton correlations are reviewed. Recent experimental evidence will be presented for SLT phenomena in the interaction of powerful HF waves with the ionosphere and in laser-plasma interaction experiments. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 27 percent in 2003 from the 2002 budget, according to the Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes after five years of declining spending for mineral exploration.