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Sample records for exposing dentinal tubules

  1. Invasion of dentinal tubules by oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Jenkinson, H F

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules commonly occurs when dentin is exposed following a breach in the integrity of the overlying enamel or cementum. Bacterial products diffuse through the dentinal tubule toward the pulp and evoke inflammatory changes in the pulpo-dentin complex. These may eliminate the bacterial insult and block the route of infection. Unchecked, invasion results in pulpitis and pulp necrosis, infection of the root canal system, and periapical disease. While several hundred bacterial species are known to inhabit the oral cavity, a relatively small and select group of bacteria is involved in the invasion of dentinal tubules and subsequent infection of the root canal space. Gram-positive organisms dominate the tubule microflora in both carious and non-carious dentin. The relatively high numbers of obligate anaerobes present-such as Eubacterium spp., Propionibacterium spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Peptostreptococcus micros, and Veillonella spp.-suggest that the environment favors growth of these bacteria. Gram-negative obligate anaerobic rods, e.g., Porphyromonas spp., are less frequently recovered. Streptococci are among the most commonly identified bacteria that invade dentin. Recent evidence suggests that streptococci may recognize components present within dentinal tubules, such as collagen type I, which stimulate bacterial adhesion and intra-tubular growth. Specific interactions of other oral bacteria with invading streptococci may then facilitate the invasion of dentin by select bacterial groupings. An understanding the mechanisms involved in dentinal tubule invasion by bacteria should allow for the development of new control strategies, such as inhibitory compounds incorporated into oral health care products or dental materials, which would assist in the practice of endodontics. PMID:12097359

  2. Comparative Morphologic Evaluation and Occluding Effectiveness of Nd: YAG, CO2 and Diode Lasers on Exposed Human Dentinal Tubules: An Invitro SEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dentinal hypersensitivity is one of the most common problem, encountered in dental practice but has least predictable treatment outcome. The advent of lasers in dentistry has provided an additional therapeutic option for treating dentinal hypersensitivity. Although various lasers have been tried over a period of time to treat dentinal hypersensitivity, but still the doubt persist as to which laser leads to maximum dentinal tubular occlusion and is most suitable with minimal hazardous effects. Aim To compare the effects of Nd: YAG, CO2 and 810-nm diode lasers on width of exposed dentinal tubule orifices and to evaluate the morphologic changes on dentinal surface of human tooth after laser irradiation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods Forty root specimens were obtained from ten freshly extracted human premolars, which were randomly divided into four groups of ten each. Group I: control group treated with only saline, Group II: Nd:YAG laser, Group III: CO2 laser and Group IV: 810-nm diode laser. The specimens were examined using SEM. After calculating mean tubular diameter for each group, the values were compared statistically using parametric one-way ANOVA test and Turkey’s post hoc multiple comparison test. Results All the three lased groups showed a highly statistical significant result with p-value of <0.001 as compared to non-lased group. On intergroup comparison within the lased groups, all the three groups showed statistically significant difference in the reduction of dentinal tubular diameter (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion Nd: YAG laser was found to be most effective, followed by the CO2 laser and 810-nm diode laser was found to be least effective. The morphologic changes like craters, cracks and charring effect of the dentine were seen maximum by the use of CO2 laser. PMID:27630957

  3. Comparative Morphologic Evaluation and Occluding Effectiveness of Nd: YAG, CO2 and Diode Lasers on Exposed Human Dentinal Tubules: An Invitro SEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dentinal hypersensitivity is one of the most common problem, encountered in dental practice but has least predictable treatment outcome. The advent of lasers in dentistry has provided an additional therapeutic option for treating dentinal hypersensitivity. Although various lasers have been tried over a period of time to treat dentinal hypersensitivity, but still the doubt persist as to which laser leads to maximum dentinal tubular occlusion and is most suitable with minimal hazardous effects. Aim To compare the effects of Nd: YAG, CO2 and 810-nm diode lasers on width of exposed dentinal tubule orifices and to evaluate the morphologic changes on dentinal surface of human tooth after laser irradiation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods Forty root specimens were obtained from ten freshly extracted human premolars, which were randomly divided into four groups of ten each. Group I: control group treated with only saline, Group II: Nd:YAG laser, Group III: CO2 laser and Group IV: 810-nm diode laser. The specimens were examined using SEM. After calculating mean tubular diameter for each group, the values were compared statistically using parametric one-way ANOVA test and Turkey’s post hoc multiple comparison test. Results All the three lased groups showed a highly statistical significant result with p-value of <0.001 as compared to non-lased group. On intergroup comparison within the lased groups, all the three groups showed statistically significant difference in the reduction of dentinal tubular diameter (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion Nd: YAG laser was found to be most effective, followed by the CO2 laser and 810-nm diode laser was found to be least effective. The morphologic changes like craters, cracks and charring effect of the dentine were seen maximum by the use of CO2 laser.

  4. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules

    PubMed Central

    BRITTAN, Jane L; SPRAGUE, Susan V; MACDONALD, Emma L; LOVE, Robert M; JENKINSON, Howard F; WEST, Nicola X

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF). DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0) to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine. PMID:27119760

  5. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules.

    PubMed

    Brittan, Jane L; Sprague, Susan V; Macdonald, Emma L; Love, Robert M; Jenkinson, Howard F; West, Nicola X

    2016-04-01

    Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF). DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0) to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine. PMID:27119760

  6. Diffusive transport within dentinal tubules: an X-ray microtomographic study.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Masako; Hector, Mark P; Davis, Graham R; Parkinson, Charles R; Rees, Gareth D; Anderson, Paul

    2008-08-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of dentine hypersensitivity proposes that external stimuli cause dentinal fluid movement within dentinal tubules thereby triggering mechanosensitive nerves and eliciting a pain response. The aim of this study was to employ X-ray microtomography (XMT) to monitor diffusion of caesium acetate through dentine to investigate the extent to which transport occurs within the primary tubules compared to that through branched microtubules believed to run perpendicular to the direction of the primary dentinal tubules. 2.0-mm thick coronal dentine disks masked to leave half of the upper surface exposed were imaged by XMT, initially in water, which was then replaced with an aqueous solution of 0.50 mol l(-1) caesium acetate. Further XMT images were acquired after 1 and 6 days immersion. The XMT images were used to measure the change in the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient resulting from caesium acetate ingress into dentine. There was clearly considerable ingress of caesium acetate into the dentine lying below the exposed surface, but considerably less beneath the sealed surface, suggesting that diffusive transport occurs predominantly in the direction of the primary dentinal tubules, with no significant lateral transport. Primary tubules are clearly the dominant transmission route for triggering the mechanosensitive nerves present at the dentine-pulp interface, and for delivery of nerve desensitising agents. PMID:18485329

  7. [SEM investigations on the human sclerosed dentinal tubules].

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Suga, S

    1990-08-01

    Sclerotic changes of dentinal tubules appeared in the dentin beneath the carious, attrition and abrasion lesions and in the transparent root dentin were investigated using the scanning electron microscopy. 1) Shape of crystal-like substances appeared in the dentinal tubules could not be closely related to kinds of dentin destruction. 2) In the dentinal tubules beneath the carious lesions, cuboidal or rhomboid-shaped, short rod-like, long rod-like, plate-like and droplet-like crystals were mainly observed. Combination of cuboidal or rhomboid-shaped and short rod-like crystals or that of long rod-like and plate-like crystals were most frequently observed. 3) In the dentinal tubules beneath attrition and abrasion lesions, cuboidal or rhomboid-shaped, short rod-like and droplet-like crystals were mainly observed, however, the size of cuboidal or rhomboid-shaped crystal was usually smaller than that observed beneath carious lesion and they deposited compactly within the tubules. 4) In the sclerosed dentinal tubules in the transparent root dentin, compact deposition of rhomboid-shaped and irregular sand-like crystals were usually observed. Size of rhomboid-shaped crystal is smaller than that observed beneath carious lesion. The deposit of sand-like crystal in the tubules was easily discriminated from the matrix of peritubular dentin. 5) In any case, the kinds of crystals and pattern of deposition were not necessarily same between the neighboring tubules. However, in a tubule, they were almost same in shape and mode of deposition throughout the entire length of tubule from the outer side to the pulpal side. These facts seem to indicate that mineral deposition within the tubule due to sclerosis is performed under individual condition. 6) Finding showing biological control of mineral deposition within the dentinal tubules by the odontoblasts could not be observed.

  8. Dentinal tubules revealed with X-ray tensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Jud, Christoph; Schaff, Florian; Zanette, Irene; Wolf, Johannes; Fehringer, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Dentin is a mineralized material making up most of the tooth bulk. A system of microtubules, so called dentinal tubules, transverses it radially from the pulp chamber to the outside. This highly oriented structure leads to anisotropic mechanical properties directly connected to the tubules orientation and density: the ultimate tensile strength as well as the fracture toughness and the shear strength are largest perpendicular to dentinal tubules. Consequently, the fatigue strength depends on the direction of dentinal tubules, too. However, none of the existing techniques used to investigate teeth provide access to orientation and density of dentinal tubules for an entire specimen in a non-destructive way. In this paper, we measure a third molar human tooth both with conventional micro-CT and X-ray tensor tomography (XTT). While the achievable resolution in micro-CT is too low to directly resolve the dentinal tubules, we provide strong evidence that the direction and density of dentinal tubules can be indirectly measured by XTT, which exploits small-angle X-ray scattering to retrieve a 3D map of scattering tensors. We show that the mean directions of scattering structures correlate to the orientation of dentinal tubules and that the mean effective scattering strength provides an estimation of the relative density of dentinal tubules. Thus, this method could be applied to investigate the connection between tubule orientation and fatigue or tensile properties of teeth for a full sample without cutting one, non-representative peace of tooth out of the full sample. PMID:27424269

  9. Tubule orientation and the fatigue strength of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Arola, Dwayne D; Reprogel, Robert K

    2006-03-01

    In this study the influence of tubule orientation on the strength of human dentin under static and cyclic loads was examined. Rectangular beams were sectioned from the coronal dentin of virgin extracted molars (N=83) and then loaded in quasi-static 4-point flexure or 4-point flexural fatigue to failure. The flexure strength, energy to fracture and fatigue strength were evaluated for specimens with the dentin tubules aligned parallel (theta=0 degrees ) and perpendicular (theta=90 degrees ) to the plane of maximum normal stress. Results from monotonic loading showed that both the flexural strength and energy to fracture of dentin specimens with theta=0 degrees were significantly greater than those with theta=90 degrees . Furthermore, the apparent endurance strength of dentin with theta=0 degrees (44MPa) was significantly greater than that of the dentin with theta=90 degrees (24MPa). The ratio of apparent endurance strength (for fully reversed loading) to the flexure strength for theta=0 degrees and theta=90 degrees was 0.41 and 0.28, respectively. Although the influence of tubule orientation was most important to mechanical behavior, the flexure strength and energy to fracture also decreased with an increase in tubule density. According to differences in the fatigue strength with tubule orientation, restorative practices promoting large cyclic normal stresses perpendicular to the tubules would be more likely to facilitate fatigue failure in dentin with cyclic loading.

  10. Bacterial penetration and proliferation in root canal dentinal tubules after applying dentin adhesives in vitro.

    PubMed

    Assouline, L S; Fuss, Z; Mazor, Y; Weiss, E I

    2001-06-01

    Endodontic treatment is aimed at eliminating infection and preventing bacterial regrowth in the root canal and dentinal tubules. In the present study the ability of two dentin adhesives to prevent bacterial penetration and subsequent proliferation in dentinal tubules was evaluated. Cylindrical root specimens prepared from freshly extracted bovine teeth were used in an in vitro model of dentinal tubule infection. After removal of the smear layer the intracanal dentinal tubules of the specimens were acid-etched and treated with either Gluma or EBS. Untreated specimens served as controls. Specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis and incubated in Brain Heart Infusion for 21 days. Powder dentin samples obtained from within the canal lumina, using ISO 025 to 033 burs, were examined for the presence of vital bacteria by inoculating on agar plates and counting colony-forming units. A significant difference was found between the experimental groups and the untreated group. After application with Gluma specimens showed the least viable bacteria in dentinal tubules. Data suggested that dentin adhesives reduced bacterial invasion into dentin and therefore have a potential role in endodontic treatment.

  11. Use of Poly (Amidoamine) Dendrimer for Dentinal Tubule Occlusion: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianda; Yang, Sheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity, a significant health problem in dentistry and daily life. The in situ mineralization within dentinal tubules is a promising treatment for dentin hypersensitivity as it induces the formation of mineral on the sensitive regions and occludes the dentinal tubules. This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro effect of a whole generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (G3.0) on dentinal tubule occlusion by inducing mineralization within dentinal tubules. Dentin discs were treated with PAMAM dendrimers using two methods, followed by the in vitro characterization using Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). These results showed that G3.0 PAMAM dendrimers coated on dentin surface and infiltrated in dentinal tubules could induce hydroxyapatite formation and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, crosslinked PAMAM dendrimers could induce the remineralization of demineralized dentin and thus had the potential in dentinal tubule occlusion. In this in vitro study, dentinal tubules occlusion could be achieved by using PAMAM dendrimers. This could lead to the development of a new therapeutic technique for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:25885090

  12. Use of poly (amidoamine) dendrimer for dentinal tubule occlusion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianda; Yang, Sheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity, a significant health problem in dentistry and daily life. The in situ mineralization within dentinal tubules is a promising treatment for dentin hypersensitivity as it induces the formation of mineral on the sensitive regions and occludes the dentinal tubules. This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro effect of a whole generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (G3.0) on dentinal tubule occlusion by inducing mineralization within dentinal tubules. Dentin discs were treated with PAMAM dendrimers using two methods, followed by the in vitro characterization using Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). These results showed that G3.0 PAMAM dendrimers coated on dentin surface and infiltrated in dentinal tubules could induce hydroxyapatite formation and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, crosslinked PAMAM dendrimers could induce the remineralization of demineralized dentin and thus had the potential in dentinal tubule occlusion. In this in vitro study, dentinal tubules occlusion could be achieved by using PAMAM dendrimers. This could lead to the development of a new therapeutic technique for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:25885090

  13. Surface characteristics of dentin experimentally exposed to hydrofluoric acid.

    PubMed

    Pioch, Thomas; Jakob, Heiko; García-Godoy, Franklin; Götz, Hermann; Dörfer, Christof E; Staehle, Hans J

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effect of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the surface characteristics of dentin in vitro. Dentin was exposed in 50 human molars and divided into five groups according to different etching schedules: (i) no etching, (ii) 15 s HF, (iii) 15 s H3PO4, (iv) 15 s HF and 15 s H3PO4, (v) 15 s H3PO4 and 15 s HF. Teeth were examined under a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) or two layers of fluorescence-labeled primer followed by the composite were applied, and the teeth were sectioned and examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). With scanning electron microscopy, no openings of dentinal tubules were found in groups (i), (ii), and (iv). In group (v) only a few tubules were opened and in group (iii) the smear layer was completely removed and tubules appeared open. The EDX analysis revealed that fluoride was incorporated into the dentin surface when HF was used. With CLSM, distinct hybrid layers could be detected only in group (iii). In group (v) the hybrid layer appeared less established compared with group (iii). No dentin hybridization was found in groups (i), (ii), and (iv). It is concluded that HF has the ability to close the openings of dentin tubules which were opened due to etching by phosphoric acid and cannot dissolve the smear layer.

  14. Enhancement of nano-hydroxyapatite bonding to dentin through a collagen/calcium dual-affinitive peptide for dentinal tubule occlusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ronghan; Wang, Qiong; Wang, Xiumei; Tian, Lili; Liu, Huiying; Zhao, Miaomiao; Peng, Ce; Cai, Qiang; Shi, Yunming

    2014-02-01

    Calcium phosphate crystals, as the main component of dentin and enamel, have been widely used for the occlusion of dentinal tubules. However, the low bond strength and poor sealing effect limit their clinical practicality. In this study, a collagen/calcium dual-affinitive peptide E8DS (EEEEEEEEDSpESpSpEEDR) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) flocculi were developed to seal dentin tubules for reducing dentin hypersensitivity, whereas the E8DS peptides were pre-applied to improve the adhesion of occlusive hydroxyapatite coating on dentin collagen matrix for the long-lasting sealing effect and relief from hypersensitivity. Our study showed that E8DS peptides had a strong affinity with dentin collageneous matrix that almost 43.7% of initial E8DS peptides immobilized on exposed dentin samples remained detained after continuous washing by distilled water for four weeks at a rate of 1 mL/min. Nano-HAp flocculi were obtained by re-neutralization of HAp-HCl solution and then brushed onto the surfaces of pre-treated human dentin disks with E8DS peptides, which showed a perfect occlusion of exposed dentinal tubules, as compared with Nano-HAp only and a commercial desensitizer, Green Or. With only around 10-min E8DS peptide pre-treatment, the occlusive mineral layers remained intact against consecutively stirred washing in phosphate-buffered saline or coke for 15 min, and 6 min of tooth-brushing, which implied that our E8DS peptide could comparatively improve the durability of sealant-dentin interface bonds for long-lasting dentine desensitization.

  15. Regional variation in root dentinal tubule infection by Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules at different regions in human roots. Specimens were obtained from single-rooted teeth that had their root canals prepared in a standard manner. Roots were then sectioned longitudinally through the canals and the resulting specimens chemically treated to remove the smear layers. Specimens were immersed in a suspension of Streptococcus gordonii for 3 weeks and then prepared for histological analysis. Sections from the cervical, midroot, and apical areas were examined. The pattern of bacterial infection of the cervical and midroot areas was similar, characterized as a heavy infection with bacteria penetrating as deep as 200 microns. Invasion of the apical dentin was significantly different, with a mild infection and maximum penetration of 60 microns. PMID:8934987

  16. Treatment of dentinal tubules by Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelíčkova, Hana; Zapletalova, Zdeňka; Peřina, Jan, Jr.; Novotný, Radko; Kubínek, Roman; Stranyánek, Martin

    2005-08-01

    Symptom of cervical dentine hypersensitivity attacks from 10% to 15% of population and causes an uncomfortable pain during contact with any matter. Sealing of open dentinal tubules is one of the methods to reach insensibility. Laser as a source of coherent radiation is used to melt dentine surface layers. Melted dentine turns to hard mass with a smooth, non-porous surface. Simulation of this therapy was made in vitro by means of LASAG Nd:YAG pulsed laser system KLS 246-102. Eighty human extracted teeth were cut horizontally to obtain samples from 2 mm to 3 mm thick. First experiments were done on cross section surfaces to find an optimal range of laser parameters. A wide range of energies from 30 mJ to 210 mJ embedded in 0,3 ms long pulse was tested. Motion in X and Y axes was ensured by a CNC driven table and the pulse frequency 15 Hz was chosen to have a suitable overlap of laser spots. Some color agents were examined with the aim to improve surface absorption. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to evaluate all samples and provided optimal values of energies around 50 J.cm-2. Next experiments were done with the beam oriented perpendicularly to a root surface, close to the real situation. Optical fibers with the diameter of 0,6 mm and 0,2 mm were used to guide a laser beam to teeth surfaces. Laser processing heads with lens F = 100 mm and F = 50 mm were used. The best samples were investigated by means of the Atomic Force Microscopy.

  17. Microorganism penetration in dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal walls. In vitro SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sulaiman, Alaa; Al-Rasheed, Fellwa; Alnajjar, Fatimah; Al-Abdulwahab, Bander; Al-Badah, Abdulhakeem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This in vitro study aimed to investigate the ability of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) to penetrate dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal surface of split human teeth. Materials and Methods Sixty intact extracted human single-rooted teeth were divided into 4 groups, negative control, positive control without canal instrumentation, instrumented, and retreated. Root canals in the instrumented group were enlarged with endodontic instruments, while root canals in the retreated group were enlarged, filled, and then removed the canal filling materials. The teeth were split longitudinally after canal preparation in 3 groups except the negative control group. The teeth were inoculated with both microorganisms separately and in combination. Teeth specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the depth of penetration into the dentinal tubules was assessed using the SMILE view software (JEOL Ltd). Results Penetration of C. albicans and E. faecalis into the dentinal tubules was observed in all 3 groups, although penetration was partially restricted by dentin debris of tubules in the instrumented group and remnants of canal filling materials in the retreated group. In all 3 groups, E. faecalis penetrated deeper into the dentinal tubules by way of cell division than C. albicans which built colonies and penetrated by means of hyphae. Conclusions Microorganisms can easily penetrate dentinal tubules of root canals with different appearance based on the microorganism size and status of dentinal tubules. PMID:25383343

  18. Microbial invasion of dentinal tubules: a literature review and a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, Silvio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Samaranayake, Lakshman; Chang, Jeffrey W W; Corbella, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    Various features of endodontic microbiology have been investigated using various methods. The aim of the present study was to review the existing literature on endodontic microbiology in dentinal tubules, and to present the features of two cases with endodontic pathology. An electronic search was performed with a search string created ad hoc. Ex vivo and in vitro studies were included, recording the method of detection and characteristics of analyzed teeth. Twenty studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Seven of them were in vitro laboratory studies on teeth inoculated after extraction, while 13 were ex vivo studies on extracted, infected teeth. Endodontic bacteria were detected in dentinal tubules, both as single units and as biofilm aggregates. Two similar in vitro cases presented here corroborate the latter findings. A number of techniques have been utilized to observe bacteria in the dentinal tubule ecosystem. Dentinal tubules are favorable niches for microbial survival, either in the form of monomicrobial or polymicrobial communities.

  19. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  20. ImageJ analysis of dentin tubule distribution in human teeth.

    PubMed

    Williams, Casia; Wu, Yiching; Bowers, Doria F

    2015-08-01

    Mapping the distribution of dentin tubules is vital to understanding the structure-function relationship of dentin, an important indicator of tooth stability. This study compared the distances between and density of tubules in the external dentin located in the crown region of an adult human incisor and molar to determine if analysis could be conducted using light-level microscopy. Teeth were processed for routine histology, cut in cross-section, images captured using Advanced SPOT Program, and microstructure was analyzed using ImageJ (NIH). Intratubular (peritubular) dentin with or without odontoblast processes were observed and although incisor and molar images appeared visually similar, plot profile graphs differed. Distance-intervals between tubules in the incisor (5.45-7.67 μm) had an overall range of 2.22 μm and in the molar (7.43-8.42 μm) an overall range of 0.99 μm. While molar tubule distribution displayed a tighter overall range, there was a smaller distance between most incisor tubules. The average densities observed in incisors were 15,500 tubules/mm(2), compared with 20,100 tubules/mm(2) in molars. ImageJ analysis of prepared histology microscopic slides provides researchers with a rapid, inexpensive assessment tool when compared with advanced/ultrastructural methodologies. By combining routine histological processing and light microscopic observations followed by ImageJ analysis, tooth structure can be converted into numerical data and easily mastered by laboratory personnel.

  1. Near tubule and intertubular bovine dentin mapped at the 250 nm level

    PubMed Central

    Stock, S. R.; Veis, A.; Telser, A.; Cai, Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, simultaneous diffraction and fluorescence mapping with a (250 nm)2, 10.1 keV synchrotron x-ray beam investigated the spatial distribution of carbonated apatite (cAp) mineral and elemental Ca (and other cations including Zn) around dentin tubules. In 1 μm thick sections of near-pulp root dentin, where peritubular dentin (PTD) is newly forming, high concentrations of Zn, relative to those in intertubular dentin (ITD), were observed adjacent to and surrounding the tubule lumens. Some but not all tubules exhibited hypercalcified collars (high Ca signal relative to the surrounding ITD), and, when present, the zone of high Ca did not extend around the tubule. Diffraction rings from cAp 00.2 and 11.2+21.1+30.0 reflections were observed, and cAp was the only crystal phase detected. Profiles of Ca, Zn and cAp diffracted intensities showed the same transitions from solid to tubule lumen, indicating the same cAp content and organization in ITD far from the tubules and adjacent to them. Further, the matching Ca and diffraction profiles demonstrated that all of the Ca is in cAp or that any noncrystalline Ca was uniformly distributed throughout the dentin. Variation of 00.2 and 11.2+21.1+30.0 diffracted intensity was consistent with the expected biaxial crystallographic texture. Extension of x-ray mapping from near 1 μm resolution to the 250 nm level, performed here for dentin and its tubules, will provide new understanding of other mineralized tissues. PMID:21821132

  2. The effects of tubule orientation on fatigue crack growth in dentin.

    PubMed

    Arola, Dwayne D; Rouland, Joseph A

    2003-10-01

    The fracture of restored teeth is a significant obstacle to lifelong oral health. Recent studies suggest that fatigue cracks originate at flaws introduced during cavity preparation and that fatigue crack growth is a principle cause of restored tooth fractures. In this study, the rate of fatigue crack growth in bovine dentin was estimated under mode I cyclic loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were obtained from bovine molars and subjected to high cycle fatigue loading (10(5) < N < 10(6)). The fatigue crack growth rates were measured and used to estimate the crack growth exponent and coefficient according to the Paris Law. The average fatigue crack growth exponent was 4.7 +/- 0.6 for crack growth parallel to the dentin tubules, which was significantly larger than 4.3 +/- 0.5 for crack growth perpendicular to the tubules (t-test, CI > 80%). Although the crack growth rates varied considerably, there was no significant dependence on tubule orientation or tubule density. However, specific features of the fracture surfaces and tendencies for crack curving away from the tubules suggested preferential fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the dentin tubules. Results from this study are being used to guide an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in human dentin.

  3. In Vitro Ability of a Novel Nanohydroxyapatite Oral Rinse to Occlude Dentine Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert G.; Chen, Xiaohui; Gillam, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of a novel nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) desensitizing oral rinse to occlude dentine tubules compared to selected commercially available desensitizing oral rinses. Methods. 25 caries-free extracted molars were sectioned into 1 mm thick dentine discs. The dentine discs (n = 25) were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed with distilled water, prior to a 30-second application of test and control oral rinses. Evaluation was by (1) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the dentine surface and (2) fluid flow measurements through a dentine disc. Results. Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse. However the hydroxyapatite, 1.4% potassium oxalate, and arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinses, appeared to be relatively more effective than the nHA test and negative control rinses (potassium nitrate) in relation to a reduction in fluid flow measurements. Conclusions. Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse. PMID:26161093

  4. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

    PubMed Central

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser, and diode laser. The effect of disinfection methods was assessed by LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain under the confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the “zone of dead bacteria” (ZDB). Mean values were calculated for ZDB and the difference between groups was established. Results: Penetration of E. faecalis was seen to a depth of >1000 μm. Viable bacteria were detected with NS irrigation. NaOCl and CHX showed partial ZDB. When the root canals were disinfected with Nd: YAG and diode lasers, no viable bacteria were found. Conclusion: E. faecalis has the ability to colonize inside dentinal tubules to a depth of >1000 μm. In contrast to conventional irrigants, both Nd: YAG and diode lasers were effective in eliminating the vitality of E. faecalis. NS, NaOCl, and CHX showed viable bacteria remaining in dentinal tubules.

  5. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

    PubMed Central

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser, and diode laser. The effect of disinfection methods was assessed by LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain under the confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the “zone of dead bacteria” (ZDB). Mean values were calculated for ZDB and the difference between groups was established. Results: Penetration of E. faecalis was seen to a depth of >1000 μm. Viable bacteria were detected with NS irrigation. NaOCl and CHX showed partial ZDB. When the root canals were disinfected with Nd: YAG and diode lasers, no viable bacteria were found. Conclusion: E. faecalis has the ability to colonize inside dentinal tubules to a depth of >1000 μm. In contrast to conventional irrigants, both Nd: YAG and diode lasers were effective in eliminating the vitality of E. faecalis. NS, NaOCl, and CHX showed viable bacteria remaining in dentinal tubules. PMID:27656064

  6. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age < 40). Aged dentin, in which the dentinal tubules were occluded with calcified material, recorded the highest mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen. PMID:26797297

  7. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    DOE PAGES

    He, Peng; Wei, Biao; Wang, Steve; Stock, Stuart R.; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin’s tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT) theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI) from truncated data in amore » theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV) minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen.« less

  8. Comparative evaluation of NovaMin desensitizer and Gluma desensitizer on dentinal tubule occlusion: a scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Surabhi; Gowda, Ashwini Shivananje

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the effect of calcium sodium phosphosilicate (NovaMin) desensitizing agent, which is a powder-based system, and hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glutaraldehyde (Gluma desensitizer), which is liquid-based system, on dentinal tubule occlusion was analyzed by scanning electron microscope. The effects of the above two along with one control group were compared to determine the more effective method of sealing the dentinal tubules after initial application. Methods Twenty specimens were allocated to each of 3 groups: Control, Gluma desensitizer, and NovaMin. Two additional samples were also prepared and treated with Gluma and NovaMin; these samples were longitudinally fractured. The specimens were prepared from extracted sound human premolars and were stored in 10% formalin at room temperature. The teeth were cleaned of gross debris and then sectioned to provide one to two dentin specimens. The dentin specimens were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed in distilled water. Control discs were dried, and the test discs were treated with the desensitizing agents as per the manufacturer's instructions. The discs as well as longitudinal sections were later analyzed under the scanning electron microscope. The proportions of completely occluded, partially occluded, and open tubules within each group were calculated. The ratios of completely and partially occluded tubules to the total tubules for all the groups was determined, and the data was statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests and statistical significance was calculated. Results NovaMin showed more completely occluded tubules (0.545±0.051) while Gluma desensitizer showed more partially occluded tubules (0.532±0.075). The differences among all the groups were statistically significant (P≤ 0.05). Conclusion Both materials were effective in occluding dentinal tubules but NovaMin appeared more promising in occluding tubules completely after initial application. PMID:24455439

  9. Ability of three desensitizing agents in dentinal tubule obliteration and durability: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pathan, Azher Banu; Bolla, Nagesh; Kavuri, Sarath Raj; Sunil, Chukka Ram; Damaraju, Bhargavi; Pattan, Sadhiq Khan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three desensitizing agents on dentinal tubule obliteration and their durability in use on the dentinal tubules. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens were obtained from 30 extracted sound human maxillary first premolars. Each tooth was mesiodistally sectioned to obtain 30 buccal and 30 lingual surfaces, and enamel was removed in order to simulate hypersensitive dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups with 15 specimens each. Group 1 samples were immersed in artificial saliva, Group 2 samples were coated with Vivasens, Group 3 samples were coated with VOCO Admira Protect, and Group 4 samples were coated with Neo Active Apatite suspension. These specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) to find out the occluding ability of the respective products. The specimens were brushed to find out their durability for 1 week and 1 month and were examined under SEM. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Results: Group 1 differed significantly from the Vivasens, Admira, and Neo Active Apatite groups at 5% level of significance (P < 0.05). The Vivasens group differed significantly from the Admira and Neo Active Apatite groups at 5% level of significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The Ormocer-based Admira Protect showed the best results. PMID:26957790

  10. Comparative assessment of the sealing ability of Nd:YAG laser versus a new desensitizing agent in human dentinal tubules: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abed, Ahmad Moghareh; Mahdian, Mina; Seifi, Massoud; Ziaei, Seyyed Ali; Shamsaei, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is a painful condition that occurs following periodontal treatment. Many treatment alternatives have been considered for this problem, including treatments with laser and dentinal adhesives. This study compared the sealing ability of Nd:YAG laser versus a new resin in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. Ten human premolars were sectioned yielding 30 specimens of each premolar, which were randomly divided into three groups. The laser group was irradiated by Nd:YAG laser (1 W, 10 Hz, 60 s), the resin group was treated with the new Seal & Protect resin according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the third group served as the control group and did not receive any interventions. After preparation and gold coating of the samples, they were photographed by SEM at two magnifications (1500× and 4000×). The number and diameter (μm) of the dentinal tubules were recorded in selected fields, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to determine significant differences between groups. The ANOVA results revealed significant differences in both the mean number (P < 0.001) and diameter (P < 0.05) among the three groups. Further statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the laser group and the resin group in both outcome measures (P < 0.05). Thus, both Nd:YAG laser and the new resin reduced the number and diameter of open dentinal tubules, a result that also explains the desensitization mechanism of these interventions. We further conclude that application of the new resin is more effective than Nd:YAG laser in minimizing the number and diameter of exposed dentinal tubules.

  11. Comparative assessment of the sealing ability of Nd:YAG laser versus a new desensitizing agent in human dentinal tubules: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abed, Ahmad Moghareh; Mahdian, Mina; Seifi, Massoud; Ziaei, Seyyed Ali; Shamsaei, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is a painful condition that occurs following periodontal treatment. Many treatment alternatives have been considered for this problem, including treatments with laser and dentinal adhesives. This study compared the sealing ability of Nd:YAG laser versus a new resin in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. Ten human premolars were sectioned yielding 30 specimens of each premolar, which were randomly divided into three groups. The laser group was irradiated by Nd:YAG laser (1 W, 10 Hz, 60 s), the resin group was treated with the new Seal & Protect resin according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the third group served as the control group and did not receive any interventions. After preparation and gold coating of the samples, they were photographed by SEM at two magnifications (1500× and 4000×). The number and diameter (μm) of the dentinal tubules were recorded in selected fields, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to determine significant differences between groups. The ANOVA results revealed significant differences in both the mean number (P < 0.001) and diameter (P < 0.05) among the three groups. Further statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the laser group and the resin group in both outcome measures (P < 0.05). Thus, both Nd:YAG laser and the new resin reduced the number and diameter of open dentinal tubules, a result that also explains the desensitization mechanism of these interventions. We further conclude that application of the new resin is more effective than Nd:YAG laser in minimizing the number and diameter of exposed dentinal tubules. PMID:21271325

  12. Preventive effect of a high fluoride toothpaste and arginine-carbonate toothpaste on dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge: a dentine permeability evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering the current high use of high fluoride toothpastes, the aim of the study was to quantify alterations in the root dentine permeability submitted to treatment with a high fluoride toothpaste and 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste as a preventive treatment for dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge. Methods Thirty-third molars were sectioned below the cementoenamel. The root segments were connected to a hydraulic pressure apparatus to measure dentine permeability after the following sequential steps (n = 10 per group): I) Baseline; II) treatment with phosphoric acid for 30 s (maximum permeability); III) Toothbrushing (1 min) according to the experimental groups (G1- control; G2- 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste; G3- 8% arginine-calcium carbonate toothpaste); IV) acid challenge for 5 min (orange juice). The data were converted into percentage, considering stage II as 100%. Results The results have shown a statistically significant decreasing on dentine permeability after treatment with toothpaste (Friedman test and Dunn’s post hoc test). Comparison among groups demonstrated a high increasing on dentine permeability when acid challenge was performed after toothbrushing with distilled water (control group) (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post hoc test). Conclusion The toothpaste treatment may provide sufficient resistance on dentine surface, preventing dentinal tubules exposure after acid challenge. PMID:24958423

  13. Sympathetic nerve fibers sprout into rat odontoblast layer, but not into dentinal tubules, in response to cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Shimeno, Yoichi; Sugawara, Yumiko; Iikubo, Masahiro; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    This study was designed to determine if sympathetic nerve fibers exist in dentinal tubules in rat normal dental pulp, and if they sprout into the dentinal tubules in response to artificial cavity preparation in dentin. Sympathetic nerve fibers in rat molar dental pulp were labeled using an anterograde axonal transport technique involving injection of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) into the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). They were then observed using light and electron microscopes. In normal dental pulp (control), scattered WGA-HRP reaction products were observed in unmyelinated nerve endings in the odontoblast layer and subodontoblastic region. In injured pulp 3 weeks after cavity preparation, reaction products were about 1.8-times more plentiful in the above areas (versus control pulp). However, no labeled nerve fibers were observed in the dentinal tubules in either control or injured dental pulp. These results indicate that although sympathetic nerve fibers do indeed sprout in rat dental pulp in response to cavity preparation, they do not penetrate into the dentinal tubules in which postganglionic nerve endings derived from the SCG were not originally present.

  14. Dentine hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    West, Nicola; Seong, Joon; Davies, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity is a common oral pain condition affecting many individuals. The aetiology is multifactorial; however, over recent years the importance of erosion has become more evident. For dentine hypersensitivity to occur, the lesion must first be localised on the tooth surface and then initiated to exposed dentine tubules which are patent to the pulp. The short, sharp pain symptom is thought to be derived from the hydrodynamic pain theory and, although transient, is arresting, affecting quality of life. This episodic pain condition is likely to become a more frequent dental complaint in the future due to the increase in longevity of the dentition and the rise in tooth wear, particularly amongst young adults. Many efficacious treatment regimens are now available, in particular a number of over-the-counter home use products. The basic principles of treatment are altering fluid flow in the dentinal tubules with tubule occlusion or modifying or chemically blocking the pulpal nerve. PMID:24993261

  15. Effect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles on dentinal tubule occlusion: an in vitro study using SEM and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lili; Peng, Ce; Shi, Ying; Guo, Xuan; Zhong, Bo; Qi, Juanjuan; Wang, Guanhong; Cai, Qiang; Cui, Fuzhai

    2014-01-01

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is considered to be an effective strategy to treat dentin hypersensitivity. This in vitro study introduced mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for tubular occlusion to achieve deeper sealing. Further, MSNs with independently encapsulated calcium and phosphates (as calcium and phosphate sources) (Ca(2+)/PO₄(3-)@MSNs) were introduced to achieve improved efficacy of tubular occlusion and remineralization. MSNs or Ca(2+)/PO₄(3-)@MSNs were proportionally mixed with distilled water to make their respective desensitizing slurries, which were used to treat dentin surfaces. The efficacy of tubular occlusion was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and an image analyzer, and compared with that achieved with Green-Or -a commonly used densitizer. The results demonstrated that both MSNs and Ca(2+)/PO₄(3-)@MSNs almost completely occluded dentinal tubules and formed a deeper seal which penetrated about 105 μm deep into the dentinal tubules. Significant differences in tubular occlusion were observed between Green-Or densitizer and MSNs or Ca(2+)/PO₄(3-)@MSNs. The novel MSNs-based nanomaterials showed great potential as a treatment option for dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:24492123

  16. Di-Calcium Phosphate and Phytosphingosine as an Innovative Acid-Resistant Treatment to Occlude Dentine Tubules.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Lin, Ching-Yang; Bikker, Floris J; Cama, Giuseppe; Dubruel, Peter; Soria, José M; D''Onofrio, Alessia; Gillam, David

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation evaluated the ability of an experimental di-calcium phosphate (DCP) desensitising agent used alone or combined with phytosphingosine (PHS) to occlude dentine tubules and resist a citric acid (CA) or artificial saliva (AS) challenge. Three groups of human dentine specimens (DS) were treated with the following: (1) PHS alone, (2) DCP or (3) a combination of PHS and DCP. Dentine hydraulic conductance of DS was evaluated using a digital flow sensor at 6.9 kPa. The average fluid volume for each of the treated DS was used to calculate the total dentine permeability reduction (%P) prior to and following CA immersion for 1 min or AS immersion for 4 weeks. The treated DS were subjected to both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis. Statistically significant differences (%P) were identified between the groups by ANOVA and Fisher's multiple comparison test (p < 0.05), respectively. Interestingly, both PHS and DCP appeared to work synergistically. DS treated with DCP or PHS/DCP demonstrated a significant reduction (%P) prior to and following CA or AS challenge (p < 0.05). Both the SEM and FTIR analyses showed consistent brushite crystals occluding the dentine tubules. Conversely, the application of PHS alone failed to demonstrate any significant reduction of dentine permeability (p > 0.05) or show any evidence of occlusion of the dentine tubules. DCP can be used alone or combined with PHS to decrease the dentine permeability as well as to resist a CA and AS challenge. These results would, therefore, suggest that DCP may be a suitable treatment option for dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:27179116

  17. Di-Calcium Phosphate and Phytosphingosine as an Innovative Acid-Resistant Treatment to Occlude Dentine Tubules.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Lin, Ching-Yang; Bikker, Floris J; Cama, Giuseppe; Dubruel, Peter; Soria, José M; D''Onofrio, Alessia; Gillam, David

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation evaluated the ability of an experimental di-calcium phosphate (DCP) desensitising agent used alone or combined with phytosphingosine (PHS) to occlude dentine tubules and resist a citric acid (CA) or artificial saliva (AS) challenge. Three groups of human dentine specimens (DS) were treated with the following: (1) PHS alone, (2) DCP or (3) a combination of PHS and DCP. Dentine hydraulic conductance of DS was evaluated using a digital flow sensor at 6.9 kPa. The average fluid volume for each of the treated DS was used to calculate the total dentine permeability reduction (%P) prior to and following CA immersion for 1 min or AS immersion for 4 weeks. The treated DS were subjected to both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis. Statistically significant differences (%P) were identified between the groups by ANOVA and Fisher's multiple comparison test (p < 0.05), respectively. Interestingly, both PHS and DCP appeared to work synergistically. DS treated with DCP or PHS/DCP demonstrated a significant reduction (%P) prior to and following CA or AS challenge (p < 0.05). Both the SEM and FTIR analyses showed consistent brushite crystals occluding the dentine tubules. Conversely, the application of PHS alone failed to demonstrate any significant reduction of dentine permeability (p > 0.05) or show any evidence of occlusion of the dentine tubules. DCP can be used alone or combined with PHS to decrease the dentine permeability as well as to resist a CA and AS challenge. These results would, therefore, suggest that DCP may be a suitable treatment option for dentine hypersensitivity.

  18. Effects of Dentifrice Containing Hydroxyapatite on Dentinal Tubule Occlusion and Aqueous Hexavalent Chromium Cations Sorption: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Hou, Yarong; Zhu, Manqun; Huang, Jiansheng; Xu, Pingping

    2012-01-01

    In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr6+) solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr6+ from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr6+ from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution. PMID:23300511

  19. Effects of dentifrice containing hydroxyapatite on dentinal tubule occlusion and aqueous hexavalent chromium cations sorption: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peiyan; Shen, Xiaoqing; Liu, Jing; Hou, Yarong; Zhu, Manqun; Huang, Jiansheng; Xu, Pingping

    2012-01-01

    In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr(6+)) solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr(6+) from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr(6+) from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution. PMID:23300511

  20. Influence of Ultrasonic Irrigation and Chloroform on Cleanliness of Dentinal Tubules During Endodontic Retreatment-An Invitro SEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Anurag; Gurtu, Anuraag; Vinayak, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic irrigation has been proved for its remarkable cleaning efficiency in the field of endodontics. But its role in endodontic re-treatment has been understated. There is not much data available to understand the effect of ultrasonic irrigation for the evaluation of cleanliness of dentinal tubules when it is used with or without chloroform, a gutta percha solvent during endodontic retreatment. Aim To compare the influence of ultrasonic irrigation with syringe irrigation on cleanliness of dentinal tubules after gutta perch removal for endodontic retreatment with or without the use of chloroform a gutta percha solvent using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods Freshly extracted 45 human mandibular premolar teeth for periodontal and orthodontic reasons were taken and were occlusally adjusted to a working length of 19 mm. The root canals of all teeth were prepared chemo mechanically to a master apical file size 40 and were divided in various groups. In Group 1 (n = 5; control group), the canals remained unfilled. In Groups 2 and 3 (n = 20 each), the canals were filled using lateral compaction with gutta-percha and AH plus sealer, removal of root fillings was undertaken after 2 weeks using Gates Glidden drills and H files without chloroform in Group 2 and with chloroform in group 3. The specimen of Group 2 and 3 were further divided into two subgroups I and II (n=10). In subgroup I, irrigation was done using side vented needles and sodium hypochlorite. In subgroup II irrigation was done using passive ultrasonic irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Thereafter, the roots were split and the sections were observed under SEM. The number of occluded dentinal tubules /total number of dentinal tubules were calculated for the coronal, middle and apical third of each root half. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test using standardized technique. Result Results indicated that the cleanest dentinal

  1. The Effects of CO2 Laser with or without Nanohydroxyapatite Paste in the Occlusion of Dentinal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Al-maliky, Mohammed Abbood; Mahmood, Ali Shukur; Al-karadaghi, Tamara Sardar; Kurzmann, Christoph; Laky, Markus; Franz, Alexander; Moritz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new treatment modality for the occlusion of dentinal tubules (DTs) via the combination of 10.6 µm carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and nanoparticle hydroxyapatite paste (n-HAp). Forty-six sound human molars were used in the current experiment. Ten of the molars were used to assess the temperature elevation during lasing. Thirty were evaluated for dentinal permeability test, subdivided into 3 groups: the control group (C), laser only (L−), and laser plus n-HAp (L+). Six samples, two per group, were used for surface and cross section morphology, evaluated through scanning electron microscope (SEM). The temperature measurement results showed that the maximum temperature increase was 3.2°C. Morphologically groups (L−) and (L+) presented narrower DTs, and almost a complete occlusion of the dentinal tubules for group (L+) was found. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test for permeability test data showed statistical differences between the groups (P < 0.05). For intergroup comparison all groups were statistically different from each other, with group (L+) showing significant less dye penetration than the control group. We concluded that CO2 laser in moderate power density combined with n-HAp seems to be a good treatment modality for reducing the permeability of dentin. PMID:25386616

  2. Push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of different root canal sealers used with coated core materials

    PubMed Central

    Purali, Nuhan; Coşgun, Erdal; Calt, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of root canal sealers used with coated core materials and conventional gutta-percha. Materials and Methods A total of 72 single-rooted human mandibular incisors were instrumented with NiTi rotary files with irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl. The smear layer was removed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Specimens were assigned into four groups according to the obturation system: Group 1, EndoRez (Ultradent Product Inc.); Group 2, Activ GP (Brasseler); Group 3, SmartSeal (DFRP Ltd. Villa Farm); Group 4, AH 26 (Dentsply de Trey)/gutta-percha (GP). For push-out bond strength measurement, two horizontal slices were obtained from each specimen (n = 20). To compare dentinal tubule penetration, remaining 32 roots assigned to 4 groups as above were obturated with 0.1% Rhodamine B labeled sealers. One horizontal slice was obtained from the middle third of each specimen (n = 8) and scanned under confocal laser scanning electron microscope. Tubule penetration area, depth, and percentage were measured. Kruskall-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. Results EndoRez showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than the others (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found amongst the groups in terms of percentage of sealer penetration. SmartSeal showed the least penetration than the others (p < 0.05). Conclusions The bond strength and sealer penetration of resin-and glass ionomer-based sealers used with coated core was not superior to resin-based sealer used with conventional GP. Dentinal tubule penetration has limited effect on bond strength. The use of conventional GP with sealer seems to be sufficient in terms of push-out bond strength. PMID:27200279

  3. Transmission electron microscopic characterization of hypersensitive human radicular dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiyama, M.; Noiri, Y.; Ozaki, K.; Uchida, A.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ishida, H. )

    1990-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray microanalysis (XMA) were used for the study of the ultrastructure of the lumens of dentinal tubules in superficial layers of dentin specimens obtained by use of a new biopsy technique from both hypersensitive and naturally desensitized areas of exposed root surfaces, in vivo. The TEM images showed clearly that the lumens of most of the tubules were occluded with mineral crystals in naturally desensitized areas, but such lumens were empty and surrounded with peritubular and intertubular dentin in hypersensitive areas. Moreover, electron-dense structures that lined peritubular dentin were observed in the empty lumens of dentinal tubules.

  4. Coinvasion of dentinal tubules by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii depends upon binding specificity of streptococcal antigen I/II adhesin.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; McMillan, M D; Park, Y; Jenkinson, H F

    2000-03-01

    Cell wall-anchored polypeptides of the antigen I/II family are produced by many species of oral streptococci. These proteins mediate adhesion of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins and to other oral microorganisms and promote binding of cells to collagen type I and invasion of dentinal tubules. Since infections of the root canal system have a mixed anaerobic bacterial etiology, we investigated the hypothesis that coadhesion of anaerobic bacteria with streptococci may facilitate invasive endodontic disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 cells were able to invade dentinal tubules when cocultured with Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis) but not when cocultured with Streptococcus mutans NG8. An isogenic noninvasive mutant of S. gordonii, with production of SspA and SspB (antigen I/II family) polypeptides abrogated, was deficient in binding to collagen and had a 40% reduced ability to support adhesion of P. gingivalis. Heterologous expression of the S. mutans SpaP (antigen I/II) protein in this mutant restored collagen binding and tubule invasion but not adhesion to P. gingivalis or the ability to promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. An isogenic afimbrial mutant of P. gingivalis had 50% reduced binding to S. gordonii cells but was unaffected in the ability to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii wild-type cells. Expression of the S. gordonii SspA or SspB polypeptide on the surface of Lactococcus lactis cells endowed these bacteria with the abilities to bind P. gingivalis, penetrate dentinal tubules, and promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. The results demonstrate that collagen-binding and P. gingivalis-binding properties of antigen I/II polypeptides are discrete functions. Specificity of antigen I/II polypeptide recognition accounts for the ability of P. gingivalis to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii but not with S. mutans. This provides evidence that the specificity of interbacterial coadhesion may influence directly the etiology

  5. The evaluation of dentinal tubule occlusion by desensitizing agents: a real-time measurement of dentinal fluid flow rate and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S Y; Kim, E J; Kim, D S; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine changes in dentinal fluid flow (DFF) during the application of a desensitizing agent and to compare the permeability reduction levels among different types of desensitizing agents. A cervical cavity was prepared for the exposure of cervical dentin on an extracted human premolar connected to a subnanoliter fluid flow measuring device under 20 cm of water pressure. The cavity was acid-etched with 32% phosphoric acid to make dentin highly permeable. The different types of desensitizing agents that were applied on the cavity were Seal&Protect as the light-curing adhesive type, SuperSeal and BisBlock as oxalate types, Gluma Desensitizer as the protein-precipitation type, and Bi-Fluoride 12 as the fluoride type. DFF was measured from the time before the application of the desensitizing agent throughout the application procedure to five minutes after the application. The characteristics of dentinal tubule occlusion of each desensitizing agent were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The DFF rate after each desensitizing agent application was significantly reduced when compared to the initial DFF rate before application for all of the desensitizing agents (p<0.05). Seal&Protect showed a greater reduction in the DFF rate when compared to Gluma Desensitizer and Bi-Fluoride 12 (p<0.05). SuperSeal and BisBlock exhibited a greater reduction in DFF rate when compared to Bi-Fluoride 12 (p<0.05). The dentin hypersensitivity treatment effects of the employed desensitizing agents in this study were confirmed through real-time measurements of DFF changes. The light-curing adhesive and oxalate types showed greater reduction in the DFF rate than did the protein-precipitation and fluoride types. PMID:23110582

  6. Bactericidal effect of Er:YAG laser combined with sodium hypochlorite irrigation against Enterococcus faecalis deep inside dentinal tubules in experimentally infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Chen, B; Qiu, J; He, W; Lv, H; Qu, T; Yu, Q; Tian, Y

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the bactericidal effect of Er:YAG laser radiation combined with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) irrigation in the treatment of Enterococcus faecalis deep inside dentinal tubules. The Er:YAG laser was activated, respectively, at 0.3, 0.5 and 1.0 W for either 20 or 30 s; 52.5 g l(-1) NaOCl and normal saline were used for the control groups. Root canals before and after treatments were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacterial reductions both on the root canal walls and at 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules were analysed using a one-way analysis of variance. SEM results showed that the Er:YAG laser combined with NaOCl disinfected the dentinal tubules from 200 to over 500 μm depth as irradiation power and time increased. This combination killed significantly more bacteria than both the negative control group at each level tested and the positive control group at 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules. It reached 100% in all experimental groups, both on the root canal walls and at 100 and 200 μm inside the dentinal tubules. However, at 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules, only the groups treated with 0.5 and 1.0 W for 30s exhibited no bacterial growth. Of the two groups in which no bacteria were detected at all tested depths, Er:YAG laser irradiation at 0.5 W for 30 s combined with NaOCl irrigation was preferable because of the lower emission power and shorter irradiation time, and may serve as a new option for effective root canal disinfection. PMID:26645354

  7. Influence of powder composition and morphology on penetration of Gray and White ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide into dentin tubules.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Long, Leann; Ahn, Chul; Spears, Robert; Zhu, Qiang; C Eberhart, Robert

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the influence of powder composition and morphology on the penetration of Gray and White ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA, WMTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH) into open dentin tubules. GMTA, WMTA, and CH particle dimensions were analyzed by flow particle image analysis (FPIA). Penetration of open dentin tubules into dentin discs was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Five samples of each material were randomly selected and prepared for this study. The GMTA averages for length (μm), width (μm), perimeter (μm), and aspect ratio were 1.94 ± 1.65, 1.43 ± 1.19, 5.61 ± 4.27, and 0.76 ± 0.14, respectively. Corresponding averages for WMTA were 2.04 ± 1.87, 1.49 ± 1.33, 5.88 ± 4.81, and 0.76 ± 0.14, and for CH were 2.26 ± 1.99, 1.62 ± 1.46, 6.70 ± 5.60, and 0.74 ± 0.15, respectively. The rank order of the averages for particle length, width and perimeter from the largest to the smallest material was CH > WMTA > GMTA. The rank order of the averaged aspect ratios was GMTA > WMTA > CH. SEM showed that all three materials, when deposited and agitated on dentin discs, penetrated the open dentin tubules. Tubule occlusion occurred as particle surface concentrations increased. Significant differences in particle length, width, perimeter, and aspect ratio were observed for GMTA, WMTA, and CH (P < 0.0001 in all cases). All particle types penetrated into open tubules when agitated on dentin discs; all tubules were eventually occluded as particle concentrations grew. (J Oral Sci 56, 287-293, 2014).

  8. The influence of obturation technique on sealer thickness and depth of sealer penetration into dentinal tubules evaluated by computer-aided digital analysis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mithun; Neelakantan, Prasanna; Karpagavinayagam, Kumaraguru; Subba Rao, C V

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine sealer penetration into dentinal tubules and sealer thickness with different obturation materials and techniques, with the null hypothesis that sealer cement thickness and dentinal tubule penetration was not affected by obturation technique. This study used 180 freshly extracted human mandibular premolars. Samples were obturated using the lateral condensation technique with either gutta-percha (Group 1) or Resilon (Group 2), using AH Plus (subgroup A) or Epiphany (subgroup B) as a sealer. Other samples were obturated with One-Step Obturator (Group 3) using AH Plus or Epiphany sealer. The sealer thickness and sealer penetration into dentinal tubules was evaluated using stereomicroscopy and analysis of digital images using AutoCAD software at 5.0 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.0 mm from the apex. The mean value of sealer thickness for Group 3 was significantly lower than the mean values of the other groups. There was no significant difference in the mean values between subgroups A and B for Group 1 or Group 3, whereas for Group 2, the mean value in subgroup A was significantly higher than the mean value in subgroup B. The greatest average frequency of the penetration of sealer cement was found at the 5.0 mm level, followed by the 3.0 mm level, which, in turn, was greater than at the 1.0 mm level. The thickness of the sealer cement is dependent on the obturation technique employed, while the penetration of the sealer into the dentinal tubules is independent of the obturation technique. PMID:22313823

  9. Formation of dentin-like particles in dentin defects above exposed pulp by controlled release of fibroblast growth factor 2 from gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Naoki; Kitamura, Chiaki; Morotomi, Takahiko; Inuyama, Yoshio; Ishimatsu, Hirotaka; Tabata, Yashuhiko; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Terashita, Masamichi

    2007-10-01

    The induction of dentin formation on exposed dental pulp is a major challenge in research on the regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex. We examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), which was delivered in either a collagen sponge (noncontrolled release) or incorporated into gelatin hydrogels (controlled release), on the formation of dentin in exposed rat molar pulps. During the early phase of pulp wound healing, pulp cell proliferation and invasion of vessels into dentin defects above exposed pulp were induced in both groups. In the late phase, the induction of dentin formation was distinctly different between the 2 types of FGF2 release. The noncontrolled release of free FGF2 from collagen sponge induced excessive reparative dentin formation in the residual dental pulp, although dentin defects were not noted. In contrast, controlled release of FGF2 from gelatin hydrogels induced the formation of dentin-like particles with dentin defects above exposed pulp. These results suggest the possibility of a novel therapeutic approach for dentin-pulp complex by controlled release of bioactive FGF2.

  10. Dentinal Tubule Disinfection with Propolis & Two Extracts of Azadirachta indica Against Candida albicans Biofilm Formed on Tooth Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Joy Sinha, Dakshita; Garg, Paridhi; Verma, Anurag; Malik, Vibha; Maccune, Edgar Richard; Vasudeva, Agrima

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluates the disinfection of dentinal tubules using Propolis, Azadirachta indica (alcoholic and aqueous extracts), 2% chlorhexidine gel and calcium hydroxide against Candida albicans biofilm formed on tooth substrate. Materials & Method: One hundred and five human teeth were infected with Candida albicans for 2 days. Samples were divided into 7 groups. Group I- Propolis, Group II- Alcoholic extract of Azadirachta indica, Group III- Aqueous extract of Azadirachta indica, Group IV- 2% Chlorhexidine, Group V- Calcium hydroxide, Group VI- Ethanol and Group VII- Saline (negative control). At the end of 1,3 and 5 days, the antimicrobial efficacy of medicaments against Candida albicans was assessed at the depths of 200 µm and 400 µm. Results: The overall percentage inhibition of fungal growth (at 200 µm and 400 µm depth) was 99.2% with 2% chlorhexidine gel. There was no statistical difference between propolis, alcoholic extract of Azadirachta indica (neem) and 2% chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Propolis and alcoholic extract of Azadirachta indica performed equally well as that of 2% Chlorhexidine. PMID:26962368

  11. [Dentinal hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Steinkeller-Dekel, M; Smidt, A; Pilo, R

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is defined as short and transient painful response of exposed dentin, usually cervical, to different stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical osmotic or chemical. The etiology of dentinal hypersensitivity is open tubules (because of enamel loss or gingival recession), allowing painful stimulus to reach the pulp. The hydrodynamic theory explains the mechanism through which pain is aroused. When treating dentinal hypersensitivity, dentists always have to rule out other pathologies, such as carries, leakage, postoperative sensitivity, cracked tooth etc., and only then assess pain intensity and treat the tooth. Treatment always starts with prevention of both stimulus and exposure of dentin, and reducing predisposing factors. The treatment options include OTC products, such as fluoride and/or potassium enriched mouth washes and dentifrices, or in-office treatments, such as high content fluoride varnishes and gels, potassium oxalate chelating agents, Glutaraldehyde containing tissue fixating agents, bonding materials, low viscosity glass ionomers and even non-conservative treatments such as root canal therapy or mucogingival surgical interventions.

  12. [Dentinal hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Steinkeller-Dekel, M; Smidt, A; Pilo, R

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is defined as short and transient painful response of exposed dentin, usually cervical, to different stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical osmotic or chemical. The etiology of dentinal hypersensitivity is open tubules (because of enamel loss or gingival recession), allowing painful stimulus to reach the pulp. The hydrodynamic theory explains the mechanism through which pain is aroused. When treating dentinal hypersensitivity, dentists always have to rule out other pathologies, such as carries, leakage, postoperative sensitivity, cracked tooth etc., and only then assess pain intensity and treat the tooth. Treatment always starts with prevention of both stimulus and exposure of dentin, and reducing predisposing factors. The treatment options include OTC products, such as fluoride and/or potassium enriched mouth washes and dentifrices, or in-office treatments, such as high content fluoride varnishes and gels, potassium oxalate chelating agents, Glutaraldehyde containing tissue fixating agents, bonding materials, low viscosity glass ionomers and even non-conservative treatments such as root canal therapy or mucogingival surgical interventions. PMID:20597258

  13. Tertiary Dentin Formation after Indirect Pulp Capping Using Protein CPNE7.

    PubMed

    Choung, H W; Lee, D S; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shon, W J; Lee, Jong-Ho; Ku, Y; Park, J C

    2016-07-01

    If there is a partial loss of dentin, the exposed dentinal surface should be protected by an indirect pulp capping (IPC) procedure to preserve pulp vitality and prevent symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity. In our previous study, copine7 (CPNE7) induced odontoblast differentiation in vitro and promoted dentin formation in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of IPC therapy using the CPNE7 protein at the exposed dentinal surface and the resulting effects on tertiary dentin formation in a beagle model. CPNE7 promoted mineralization of odontoblasts and had high calcium ion-binding capacity. The in vivo IPC model with canine teeth showed that regeneration of physiologic reactionary dentin with dentinal tubule structures was clearly observed beneath the remaining dentin in the CPNE7 group, whereas irregular features of reparative dentin were generated in the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) group. The CPNE7+MTA group also showed typical reactionary dentin without reparative dentin, showing synergistic effects of CPNE7 with MTA. A scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that dentinal tubules beneath the original dentin were occluded by the deposition of peritubular dentin in the CPNE7 and CPNE7+MTA groups, whereas those in the control group were opened. Therefore, CPNE7 may be able to serve as a novel IPC material and improve symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:27013639

  14. Dentine hypersensitivity. The effects in vitro of acids and dietary substances on root-planed and burred dentine.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Absi, E G; Adams, D

    1987-05-01

    Evidence indicates that teeth exhibiting cervical dentine hypersensitivity have open dentinal tubules at the dentine surface. The identification of factors which render dentine exposed and tubules open is important both to the prevention and management of dentine hypersensitivity. In this study, recently extracted teeth were root planed or burred to expose the root dentine. Specimens were horizontally sectioned and then using the apical portion as control, the coronal portions placed in a variety of strong and weak acids and dietary fluids. Examination under the scanning electron microscope revealed a smear layer covering completely underlying tubules on the control root planed or burred portions. Test portions exposed to strong and weak acids showed loss of the smear layer and exposure of large numbers of tubules. Formic and tannic acids produced no changes. Some dietary fluids, in particular red and white wine, citrus fruit juices, apple juice and yogurt produced similar etching effects to the acids. The low pH carbonated drink, coca-cola, and a blackcurrent cordial produced no effects. The results of this study in vitro cannot necessarily be extrapolated to the clinical situation, but suggest that certain dietary factors could play a rôle in the aetiology of dentine hypersensitivity. Dietary advice to patients may prove important in the management of this often recurrent condition. PMID:3301914

  15. Evaluation of dentinal tubule occlusion and depth of penetration of nano-hydroxyapatite derived from chicken eggshell powder with and without addition of sodium fluoride: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kunam, Divya; Manimaran, Sujatha; Sampath, Vidhya; Sekar, Mahalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This in vitro study evaluated the degree of dentinal tubule occlusion and depth of penetration of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) derived from chicken eggshell powder with and without the addition of 2% sodium fluoride (NaF) using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Materials and Methods: nHAp was synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction and SEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy. Dentin discs were obtained from extracted teeth, pretreated with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid for 5 min and were divided into four groups based on the experimental agents as follows: Group 1: Untreated (control), Group 2: 2% NaF, Group 3: nHAp, Group 4: Combination of nHAp and 2% NaF. The treatment protocol was carried out for 7 days, after which the specimens were viewed under SEM and CLSM. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison tests (P < 0.05). Results: All the experimental agents occluded the dentinal tubules, but to varying degrees and depths. Specimens treated with the combination of nHAp and 2% NaF showed complete dentinal tubular occlusion and significantly greater depth of penetration than those treated with nHAp and 2% NaF alone. Conclusion: The combination of nHAp and 2% NaF was the most effective in occluding dentinal tubules. PMID:27217637

  16. In vitro evaluation of dentinal hydraulic conductance and tubule sealing by a novel calcium-phosphate desensitizer.

    PubMed

    Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2013-02-01

    In the current trend of materials used for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, calcium-phosphate-containing desensitizers are expected to have advantages in oral environment. A newly formulated desensitizer containing tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (CPD-100) was evaluated in comparison to oxalate containing desensitizer (SS) regarding permeability reduction (PR%) by measuring hydraulic conductance on the etched dentin discs in vitro. CPD-100 exhibited mean PR% of 91%, which significantly increased to 98% after immersion in artificial saliva (AS) for 4 weeks (p < 0.001), while SS showed a significant decrease from 99% to 93% (p < 0.01). SEM observation showed newly formed crystallites on CPD-100 treated dentin, which did not exist in SS treated dentin after AS immersion, suggesting that calcium oxalate inhibited formation of new calcium-phosphate minerals. Five-minute acid challenge did not significantly affect PR% of dentin treated by any of the desensitizers. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicated that the formed layer of CPD-100 were minerals with similar Ca/P ratio to hydroxyapatite. In conclusion, the newly developed calcium-phosphate desensitizer has the potential to exhibit long-term stability in the oral environment, owing to its chemical properties that promote the crystal growth in salivary fluid.

  17. In vitro evaluation of dentinal hydraulic conductance and tubule sealing by a novel calcium-phosphate desensitizer.

    PubMed

    Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2013-02-01

    In the current trend of materials used for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, calcium-phosphate-containing desensitizers are expected to have advantages in oral environment. A newly formulated desensitizer containing tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (CPD-100) was evaluated in comparison to oxalate containing desensitizer (SS) regarding permeability reduction (PR%) by measuring hydraulic conductance on the etched dentin discs in vitro. CPD-100 exhibited mean PR% of 91%, which significantly increased to 98% after immersion in artificial saliva (AS) for 4 weeks (p < 0.001), while SS showed a significant decrease from 99% to 93% (p < 0.01). SEM observation showed newly formed crystallites on CPD-100 treated dentin, which did not exist in SS treated dentin after AS immersion, suggesting that calcium oxalate inhibited formation of new calcium-phosphate minerals. Five-minute acid challenge did not significantly affect PR% of dentin treated by any of the desensitizers. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicated that the formed layer of CPD-100 were minerals with similar Ca/P ratio to hydroxyapatite. In conclusion, the newly developed calcium-phosphate desensitizer has the potential to exhibit long-term stability in the oral environment, owing to its chemical properties that promote the crystal growth in salivary fluid. PMID:23166091

  18. Dentinal permeation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunina, Natalia; Derbov, Vladimir; Tuchin, Valery; Altshuler, Gregory

    2008-06-01

    Dentinal permeation is of interest in a wide context of tooth care and treatment, in particular, tooth color improvement using combination of chemical whitening agents and light activation. A simple model of dentinal permeation accounting for the morphology of human tooth dentine and including dentinal tubules, more dense and homogeneous peritubular dentine, and less dense and less homogeneous intertubular dentin is proposed. Calculation of permeability of dentine layer is carried out for H IIO and H IIO II versus the tubule diameter and tubule density taken from the microphotograph analysis. This opens the possibility to calculate the distribution of permeability over the tooth surface taking into account the variations of tubule diameter and density as well as those of the diffusion coefficients and layer thickness

  19. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (p<0.01). EPB (25.6 ± 6.6) and DPB (20.2 ± 4.9) control groups showed significantly higher results than those of

  20. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (p<0.01). EPB (25.6 ± 6.6) and DPB (20.2 ± 4.9) control groups showed significantly higher results than those of

  1. Dentin hypersensitivity: from diagnosis to a breakthrough therapy for everyday sensitivity relief.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge of diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity. It summarizes technical approaches to relieve sensitivity in professional and home-use products, with emphasis on the clinical evidence for the efficacy of desensitizing toothpaste, and introduces a new innovative dentifrice technology containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluoride. Dentin hypersensitivity is characterized by short, sharp pain arising from exposed dentin in response to external stimuli which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or disease. The hydrodynamic theory proposes that pain-producing stimuli cause a change in dentin fluid flow that activates intra-dental nerve fibers, via a mechanoreceptor response, to cause pain. To be hypersensitive, dentin must be exposed and dentin tubules must be open to external stimuli and patent at the pulp. Gingival recession is the primary cause of dentin exposure, and a major predisposing factor for dentin hypersensitivity. Dentin hypersensitivity is a prevalent condition. It has been reported to afflict 15-20% of the adult population, typically 20 to 50-year-olds, with peak incidence between 30 and 39 years. Some studies have reported higher prevalence levels of up to 57%. The incidence of dentin hypersensitivity is expected to rise with changing diets, and as caries and periodontal disease prevention result in improved oral health status, and retention and functionality of the dentition. Treatments to relieve dentin hypersensitivity are based on interruption of the neural response to pain stimuli or occlusion of open tubules to block the hydrodynamic mechanism. Effective and robust dentin occlusion offers the greatest prospect for instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity. In particular, materials which can coat exposed dentin surfaces, in addition to plugging and sealing open dentin tubules, offer the intriguing

  2. Dentin hypersensitivity: from diagnosis to a breakthrough therapy for everyday sensitivity relief.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge of diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity. It summarizes technical approaches to relieve sensitivity in professional and home-use products, with emphasis on the clinical evidence for the efficacy of desensitizing toothpaste, and introduces a new innovative dentifrice technology containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluoride. Dentin hypersensitivity is characterized by short, sharp pain arising from exposed dentin in response to external stimuli which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or disease. The hydrodynamic theory proposes that pain-producing stimuli cause a change in dentin fluid flow that activates intra-dental nerve fibers, via a mechanoreceptor response, to cause pain. To be hypersensitive, dentin must be exposed and dentin tubules must be open to external stimuli and patent at the pulp. Gingival recession is the primary cause of dentin exposure, and a major predisposing factor for dentin hypersensitivity. Dentin hypersensitivity is a prevalent condition. It has been reported to afflict 15-20% of the adult population, typically 20 to 50-year-olds, with peak incidence between 30 and 39 years. Some studies have reported higher prevalence levels of up to 57%. The incidence of dentin hypersensitivity is expected to rise with changing diets, and as caries and periodontal disease prevention result in improved oral health status, and retention and functionality of the dentition. Treatments to relieve dentin hypersensitivity are based on interruption of the neural response to pain stimuli or occlusion of open tubules to block the hydrodynamic mechanism. Effective and robust dentin occlusion offers the greatest prospect for instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity. In particular, materials which can coat exposed dentin surfaces, in addition to plugging and sealing open dentin tubules, offer the intriguing

  3. In Vitro Study of Dentin Hypersensitivity Treated by 980-nm Diode Laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Gao, Jie; Gao, Yan; XU, Shuaimei; Zhan, Xueling; Wu, Buling

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To investigate the ultrastructural changes of dentin irradiated with 980-nm diode laser under different parameters and to observe the morphological alterations of odontoblasts and pulp tissue to determine the safety parameters of 980-nm diode laser in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity (DH). Methods: Twenty extracted human third molars were selected to prepare dentin discs. Each dentin disc was divided into four areas and was irradiated by 980-nm diode laser under different parameters: Group A: control group, 0 J/cm2; Group B: 2 W/CW (continuous mode), 166 J/cm2; Group C: 3W/CW, 250 J/cm2; and Group D: 4W/CW, 333 J/cm2. Ten additional extracted human third molars were selected to prepare dentin discs. Each dentin disc was divided into two areas and was irradiated by 980-nm diode laser: Group E: control group, 0 J/cm2; and Group F: 2.0 W/CW, 166 J/cm2. The morphological alterations of the dentin surfaces and odontoblasts were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the morphological alterations of the dental pulp tissue irradiated by laser were observed with an upright microscope. Results: The study demonstrated that dentinal tubules can be entirely blocked after irradiation by 980-nm diode laser, regardless of the parameter setting. Diode laser with settings of 2.0 W and 980-nm sealed exposed dentin tubules effectively, and no significant morphological alterations of the pulp and odontoblasts were observed after irradiation. Conclusions: Irradiation with 980-nm diode laser could be effective for routine clinical treatment of DH, and 2.0W/CW (166 J/cm2) was a suitable energy parameter due to its rapid sealing of the exposed dentin tubules and its safety to the odontoblasts and pulp tissue. PMID:25606318

  4. Evaluation of the Morphological Characteristics of Laser-Irradiated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Lilaj, Bledar; Franz, Alexander; Degendorfer, Daniela; Moritz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different energy settings of Er:YAG laser irradiation on dentin surface morphology with respect to the number of opened dentinal tubules. Background data: An ideally prepared dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules is a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. No study, however, has yet compared the numbers of opened dentinal tubules with regard to statistical differences. Methods: Conventional preparations using a bur with or without additional acid etching acted as control groups. Dentin specimens were prepared from human third molars and randomly divided into eight groups according to the energy settings of the laser (1, 1.5, 4, 6, 7.5, and 8 W) and two controls (bur and bur plus acid etching). After surface preparation, dentin surfaces were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope, and the number of opened dentinal tubules in a defined area was counted. Results: The control groups showed smooth surfaces with (bur plus acid etching) and without opened dentinal tubules (bur), whereas all laser-irradiated surfaces showed rough surfaces. Using the energy setting of 4 W resulted in significantly more opened dentinal tubules than the conventional preparation technique using the bur with additional acid etching. In contrast, the energy setting of 8 W showed significantly fewer opened dentinal tubules, and also exhibited signs of thermal damage. Conclusions: The Er:YAG laser with an energy setting of 4 W generates a dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules, a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. PMID:26389986

  5. A Mechanistic study of Plasma Treatment Effects on Demineralized Dentin Surfaces for Improved Adhesive/Dentin Interface Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that non-thermal plasma treatment of demineralized dentin significantly (p<0.05) improved adhesive/dentin bonding strength for dental composite restoration as compared with the untreated controls. This study is to achieve mechanistic understanding of the plasma treatment effects on dentin surface through investigating the plasma treated dentin surfaces and their interaction with adhesive monomer, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The plasma treated dentin surfaces from human third molars were evaluated by water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that plasma-treated dentin surface with subsequent HEMA immersion (Plasma/HEMA Treated) had much lower water contact angle compared with only plasma-treated (Plasma Treated) or only HEMA immersed (HEMA Treated) dentin surfaces. With prolong water droplet deposition time, water droplets spread out completely on the Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces. SEM images of Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces verified that dentin tubules were opened-up and filled with HEMA monomers. Extracted type I collagen fibrils, which was used as simulation of the exposed dentinal collagen fibrils after acid etching step, were plasma treated and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. FT-IR spectra of the Plasma/HEMA Treated collage fibrils showed broadened amide I peak at 1660 cm−1 and amide II at 1550 cm−1, which indicate secondary structure changes of the collagen fibrils. CD spectra indicated that 67.4% collagen helix structures were denatured after plasma treatment. These experimental results demonstrate that non-thermal argon plasma treatment was very effective in loosing collagen structure and enhancing adhesive monomer penetration, which are beneficial to thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tag formation, and consequently enhance adhesive/dentin interface bonding. PMID:25267936

  6. Cellular responses in the Malpighian tubules of Scaptotrigona postica (Latreille, 1807) exposed to low doses of fipronil and boric acid.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rafael Alexandre Costa; Silva Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias; Malaspina, Osmar; Bueno, Odair Correa; Tomotake, Maria Eliza Miyoko; Pereira, Andrigo Monroe

    2013-03-01

    Studies of sub-lethal effects of pesticide residues on stingless bees are scarce and morphological analysis of organs would add information to toxicological analysis in order to clarify the continuous exposure of Scaptotrigona postica to insecticides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology and histochemistry of the Malpighian tubules (excretory organ) of S. postica exposed to fipronil or boric acid to detect cellular responses that indicate toxicity or adaptative mechanisms to stress induced by exposure of worker bees to low doses of these chemical compounds. Newly emerged bees were submitted to toxicological bioassays and morphological analyses by optical microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy, as well as histochemical methods, were performed to detect proteins and glycoconjugates. Additionally, immunohistochemical detection of DNA fragmentation and HSP70 (70-kDa Heat shock protein) were performed to detect cell death and stress response, respectively. Statistical analysis, for the bioassays conducted with ingestion of contaminated diet with boric acid at 0.75% (w/w) or with fipronil at 0.1μg/kg of food, showed that the survival of bees that ingested the contaminated diets were significantly different to the survival rate presented by the control group (P<0.0001). Although some characteristics indicative of initiation of cell death were observed, the cells remained metabolically active in the processes of excretion and inactivation of chemical compounds. The data from this study reinforce the importance of research on sublethal effects of low doses of pesticides on bees in an attempt to assess a possible realistic dose and evaluate the risk assessment of stingless bee S. postica foraging in the vicinity of cultivated fields and/or in green urban areas.

  7. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  8. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Fujita, T.; Malmstrom, H.S.; Nedergaard, M.; Ren, Y.F.; Dirksen, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  9. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  10. Clinical status of ten dentin adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Verschueren, M; Gladys, S; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1994-11-01

    Laboratory testing of dentin adhesive systems still requires corroboration by long-term clinical trials for their ultimate clinical effectiveness to be validated. The objective of this clinical investigation was to evaluate, retrospectively, the clinical effectiveness of earlier-investigated dentin adhesive systems (Scotchbond, Gluma, Clearfil New Bond, Scotchbond 2, Tenure, and Tripton), and to compare their clinical results with those obtained with four modern total-etch adhesive systems (Bayer exp. 1 and 2, Clearfil Liner Bond System, and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose). In total, 1177 Class V cervical lesions in the teeth of 346 patients were restored following two cavity designs: In Group A, enamel was neither beveled nor intentionally etched, as per ADA guidelines; in Group B, adjacent enamel was beveled and conditioned. Clinical retention rates definitely indicated the improved clinical efficacy of the newest dentin adhesives over the earlier systems. With regard to adhesion strategy, adhesive systems that removed the smear layer and concurrently demineralized the dentin surface layer performed clinically better than systems that modified the disorderly layer of smear debris without complete removal. Hybridization by resin interdiffusion into the exposed dentinal collagen layer, combined with attachment of resin tags into the opened dentin tubules, appeared to be essential for reliable dentin bonding but might be insufficient by itself. The additional formation of an elastic bonding area as a polymerization shrinkage absorber and the use of a microfine restorative composite apparently guaranteed an efficient clinical result. The perfect one-year retention recorded for Clearfil Liner Bond System and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose must be confirmed at later recalls. PMID:7983255

  11. Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-20

    Dentin hypersensitivity is sharp and unpleasant pains caused by exposed dentinal tubules when enamel outside of the tooth wears away. The occlusion of dentinal tubules via in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite is the best method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity. Commercially available dental desensitizers are generally effective only on a specific area and are relatively toxic, and their performance usually depends on the skill of the clinician. Here, a facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment with remarkable aesthetic improvement inspired by the tunicate-self-healing process is reported. As pyrogallol groups in tunicate proteins conjugate with metal ions to heal the torn body armor of a tunicate, the ingenious mechanism by introducing gallic acid (GA) as a cheap, abundant, and edible alternative to the pyrogallol groups of the tunicate combined with a varied daily intake of metal ion sources is mimicked. In particular, the GA/Fe(3+) complex exhibits the most promising results, to the instant ≈52% blockage in tubules within 4 min and ≈87% after 7 d of immersion in artificial saliva. Overall, the GA/metal ion complex-mediated coating is facile, instant, and effective, and is suggested as an aesthetic solution for treating dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:26867019

  12. Lack of luminal or basolateral uptake and transepithelial transport of mercury in isolated perfused proximal tubules exposed to mercury-metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K.; Cherian, M.G.; Barfuss, D.W.

    1995-08-01

    The lumen-to-bath and bath-to-lumen transport, cellular uptake, and toxicity of inorganic mercury bound to metallothionein ({sup 203}Hg-MT) were studied in isolated perfused S1, S2, and S3 segments of the renal proximal tubule of rabbits. Evidence of very mild toxicity was displayed in some of the segments perfused through the lumen with 18.4 {mu}M inorganic mercury in the form of Hg-MT. The toxic response was restricted primarily to mild swelling of the epithelial cells localized at the end of the tubular segments where the perfusion pipette was inserted into the lumen. The cells in the proximal portions of perfused S2 segments appeared to be most severely affected in that a few blebs would on occasion come off the epithelial cells. Mild cellular swelling was also observed in some S2 and S3 segments that were exposed to 18.4 {mu}M inorganic mercury in the form of Hg-MT in the bath. The swelling was more generalized, involving all the epithelial cells along the perfused segment. Very little, or no, measurable lumen-to-bath or bath-to-lumen transport of Hg as Hg-MT could be detected in any of the 3 perfused segments of the proximal tubule during 40-45 min of perfusion. The complex of Hg-MT appeared to behave in a manner similar to that of the volume marker [{sup 3}H]-L-glucose. The lack of tubular transport of Hg as Hg-MT was confirmed by little or no measurable uptake and accumulation of inorganic mercury in the tubular epithelial cells. Thus, our findings indicate that the Hg-MT complex is not taken up avidly in isolated perfused S1, S2, or S3 segments of the proximal tubule. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Treatment of Dentinal Hypersensitivity by means of Nd:YAP Laser: A Preliminary In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Namour, Amaury; Nammour, Samir; Peremans, André; Heysselaer, Daniel; De Moor, Roeland J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nd:YAP laser to seal dentinal tubules at different parameters. Material and Methods. 24 caries-free human wisdom impacted molars were used. The crowns were sectioned transversally in order to totally expose the dentin. The smear layer was removed by a 1 min application of EDTA. Each surface was divided into four quadrants, but only three quadrants were irradiated at a different output power setting (irradiation speed: 1 mm/sec; optical fiber diameter: 320 µm; tangential incidence of beam and in noncontact mode). Samples were smeared with a graphite paste prior to laser irradiation. All specimens were sent for SEM analysis. Pulp temperature increases in additional twenty teeth were measured by a thermocouple. Results. Morphological changes in dentin surfaces depend on the value of used energy density. Higher energy densities (2 W–4 W; 200–400 mJ; pulse duration: 100 m sec.; and 10 Hz) induce higher dentin modifications. Our results confirmed that Nd:YAP laser irradiations can lead to total or partial occlusion of dentin tubules without provoking fissures or cracks. Measurements of pulp temperature increases showed that Nd:YAP laser beam can be considered as harmless for pulp vitality for following irradiation conditions: 2 W (200 mJ) to 4 W (400 mJ) with an irradiation speed of 1 mm/sec; fiber diameter: 320 micrometers; 10 Hz; pulse duration: 100 m sec; noncontact mode and in tangential incidence to exposed dentin. The perpendicular incidence of the laser beam on exposed dentin may injure pulp vitality even at low output power of 3 W. Conclusions. Nd:YAP laser beam was able to seal the dentin tubules without damaging dentinal surfaces and without harming pulp vitality. Nd:YAP laser is effective and may be safely used for future in vivo treatments of dentinal hypersensitivity under certain conditions. PMID:25383368

  14. Short and long term gene expression variation and networking in human proximal tubule cells when exposed to cadmium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a known nephrotoxin causing tubular necrosis during acute exposure and potentially contributing to renal failure in chronic long-term exposure. To investigate changes in global gene expression elicited by cadmium, an in-vitro exposure system was developed from cultures of human renal epithelial cells derived from cortical tissue obtained from nephrectomies. These cultures exhibit many of the qualities of proximal tubule cells. Using these cells, a study was performed to determine the cadmium-induced global gene expression changes after short-term (1 day, 9, 27, and 45 μM) and long-term cadmium exposure (13 days, 4.5, 9, and 27 μM). These studies revealed fundamental differences in the types of genes expressed during each of these time points. The obtained data was further analyzed using regression to identify cadmium toxicity responsive genes. Regression analysis showed 403 genes were induced and 522 genes were repressed by Cd2+ within 1 day, and 366 and 517 genes were induced and repressed, respectively, after 13 days. We developed a gene set enrichment analysis method to identify the cadmium induced pathways that are unique in comparison to traditional approaches. The perturbation of global gene expression by various Cd2+ concentrations and multiple time points enabled us to study the transcriptional dynamics and gene interaction using a mutual information-based network model. The most prominent network module consisted of INHBA, KIF20A, DNAJA4, AKAP12, ZFAND2A, AKR1B10, SCL7A11, and AKR1C1. PMID:23369406

  15. Heat shock protein 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of CdCl2.

    PubMed Central

    Somji, S; Sens, D A; Garrett, S H; Sens, M A; Todd, J H

    1999-01-01

    The expression of hsp 27 mRNA and protein was determined in cultured human proximal tubule (HPT) cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cd2+ under both acute and extended conditions. Initial procedures demonstrated that HPT cells display the classic stress response following physical and chemical stress. Heat stress (42.5 degrees C for 1 hr) caused an increase in both hsp 27 mRNA and protein as well as a shift in the protein to a more phosphorylated state. Results were similar when the cells were subjected to chemical stress (exposure to 100 microM sodium arsenite for 4 hr). Acute exposure to 53 microM CdCl2 for 4 hr also resulted in an increase in hsp 27 mRNA and protein and a shift to the more phosphorylated protein isoform. Extended Cd2+ exposure involved continuous treatment with Cd2+ at both lethal and sublethal levels over a 16-day time course. The results of this treatment showed that chronic exposure to Cd2+ failed to increase either hsp 27 mRNA or protein expression in HPT cells, even at lethal Cd2+ concentrations. In fact, hsp 27 protein levels decreased as compared to controls at both lethal and sub-lethal exposure to Cd2+. These findings imply that hsp 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells may have two distinct modes depending on the nature (acute vs. chronic) of the stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10379001

  16. On the repair of the dentine barrier.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to study some aspects of the repair of the dentine barrier, especially in conjunction with dental pulp capping. Understanding the events leading to the healing of the dentine and pulp, and hence successfully preserving the vitality and functions of the tooth, would lead to a scientific basis for a less invasive treatment of pulp exposures than performing root canal treatments. The surfaces of the body have physiological barrier functions aimed at protecting the body from external noxious agents. In the tooth, the odontoblasts, which line the outermost part of the pulp and are responsible for the formation of dentine, play a central role in the barrier function and thus in the defence mechanisms of the tooth. The micro-organisms in the caries lesion can reach the pulp via the dentinal tubules. However, the barrier function helps to prevent microbial invasion and thereby avoid deleterious inflammation and subsequent necrosis of the pulp. Dentine repair is an important part of the barrier function. There are however doubts as to whether the repair also leads to restitution of the function and the ability to withstand bacterial influx over the longer term. Pulp capping is a treatment method used when the pulp has been exposed in order to stimulate healing of the pulp and dentine. The evidence for repair of the dentine after pulp capping in humans has been studied by means of a systematic review. The focus of the literature search was studies performed in humans where hard tissue formation had been studied with the aid of a microscope. We concluded, based on the limited evidence available, that calcium hydroxide based materials but not bonding agents promote formation of a hard tissue bridge. Scientific evidence was lacking as to whether MTA was better than calcium hydroxide based materials in this regard. A gel (Emdogain Gel) containing amelogenin, known to be involved in dentinogenesis, was evaluated with regard to formation of hard

  17. Morphology of the dentin structure of sloths Bradypus tridactylus: a light and scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Santana, L N S; Barbosa, L V M; Teixeira, F B; Costa, A M P; Fernandes, L M P; Lima, R R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dentine morphology of sloths (Bradypus tridactylus). The sloth teeth were removed and prepared for light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy analyses (SEM). LM revealed two patterns of tubular dentins: an outer with dentinary tubules over the all tooth length and one in the inner part with larger diameter and more spaced tubules, when compared to those present in the outer dentine. These findings were confirmed by SEM, which revealed a tubular pattern in the outer dentine like in humans. The inner dentine displayed pared grouped tubules that were characterized as vascular channels. It can be concluded that this sloth species present two types of dentins: an inner dentin (ortodentin) and an outer dentin characterized as a vascular dentin. This suggests a partial evolutive/adaptive process of this dental tissue, as compared to other mammalian species.

  18. Morphology of the dentin structure of sloths Bradypus tridactylus: a light and scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Santana, L N S; Barbosa, L V M; Teixeira, F B; Costa, A M P; Fernandes, L M P; Lima, R R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dentine morphology of sloths (Bradypus tridactylus). The sloth teeth were removed and prepared for light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy analyses (SEM). LM revealed two patterns of tubular dentins: an outer with dentinary tubules over the all tooth length and one in the inner part with larger diameter and more spaced tubules, when compared to those present in the outer dentine. These findings were confirmed by SEM, which revealed a tubular pattern in the outer dentine like in humans. The inner dentine displayed pared grouped tubules that were characterized as vascular channels. It can be concluded that this sloth species present two types of dentins: an inner dentin (ortodentin) and an outer dentin characterized as a vascular dentin. This suggests a partial evolutive/adaptive process of this dental tissue, as compared to other mammalian species. PMID:23410180

  19. Dentin hypersensitivity: Recent trends in management.

    PubMed

    Miglani, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Vivek; Ahuja, Bhoomika

    2010-10-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity (DH) is a common clinical condition usually associated with exposed dentinal surfaces. It can affect patients of any age group and most commonly affects the canines and premolars of both the arches. This article concisely reviews the patho-physiology, mechanism and clinical management of the DH. Treatment of DH should start with an accurate diagnosis. Differential diagnosis should be made and all other probable causes should be excluded. An often neglected phase of clinical management of DH is the identification and treatment of the causative factors of DH. By removing the etiological factors, the condition can be even prevented from occurring or recurring. There are various treatment modalities available which can be used at home or may be professionally applied. The "at home" desensitizing agents include toothpastes, mouthwashes or chewing gums and they act by either occluding the dentinal tubules or blocking the neural transmission. This article also discusses the recent treatment options like bioglass, Portland cement, lasers and casein phosphopeptide.

  20. Dentin hypersensitivity: Recent trends in management.

    PubMed

    Miglani, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Vivek; Ahuja, Bhoomika

    2010-10-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity (DH) is a common clinical condition usually associated with exposed dentinal surfaces. It can affect patients of any age group and most commonly affects the canines and premolars of both the arches. This article concisely reviews the patho-physiology, mechanism and clinical management of the DH. Treatment of DH should start with an accurate diagnosis. Differential diagnosis should be made and all other probable causes should be excluded. An often neglected phase of clinical management of DH is the identification and treatment of the causative factors of DH. By removing the etiological factors, the condition can be even prevented from occurring or recurring. There are various treatment modalities available which can be used at home or may be professionally applied. The "at home" desensitizing agents include toothpastes, mouthwashes or chewing gums and they act by either occluding the dentinal tubules or blocking the neural transmission. This article also discusses the recent treatment options like bioglass, Portland cement, lasers and casein phosphopeptide. PMID:21217949

  1. Lack of formic acid production in rat hepatocytes and human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to chloral hydrate or trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lock, Edward A; Reed, Celia J; McMillan, Joellyn M; Oatis, John E; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2007-02-12

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and its major metabolites have been shown to cause formic aciduria in male rats. We have examined whether chloral hydrate (CH) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), known metabolites of TCE, produce an increase in formic acid in vitro in cultures of rat hepatocytes or human renal proximal tubule cells (HRPTC). The metabolism and cytotoxicity of CH was also examined to establish that the cells were metabolically active and not compromised by toxicity. Rat hepatocytes and HRPTC were cultured in serum-free medium and then treated with 0.3-3mM CH for 3 days or 0.03-3mM CH for 10 days, respectively and formic acid production, metabolism to trichloroethanol (TCE-OH) and TCA and cytotoxicity determined. No increase in formic acid production in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to CH was observed over and above that due to chemical degradation, neither was formic acid production observed in rat hepatocytes exposed to TCA. HRPTC metabolized CH to TCE-OH and TCA with a 12-fold greater capacity to form TCE-OH versus TCA. Rat hepatocytes exhibited a 1.6-fold and three-fold greater capacity than HRPTC to form TCE-OH and TCA, respectively. CH and TCA were not cytotoxic to rat hepatocytes at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 3 days. With HRPTC, one sample showed no cytotoxicity to CH at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 10 days, while in another cytotoxicity was seen at 1mM/day for 3 days. In summary, increased formic acid production was not observed in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to TCE metabolites, suggesting that the in vivo response cannot be modelled in vitro. CH was toxic to HRPTC at millimolar concentrations/day over 10 days, while glutathione derived metabolites of TCE were toxic at micromolar concentrations/day over 10 days [Lock, E.A., Reed, C.J., 2006. Trichloroethylene: mechanisms of renal toxicity and renal cancer and relevance to risk assessment. Toxicol. Sci. 19, 313-331] supporting the view that glutathione derived

  2. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A. Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin irradiation with Erbium: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Methods: Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces. PMID:23407579

  3. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin--a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear.

  4. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin - a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear. PMID:24294356

  5. High-resolution nuclear microprobe elemental mapping of teeth enamel-dentine interface exposed to acidic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Eisa, M. E.; Chikte, U. M. E.; Conradie, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    The process of demineralisation in tooth erosion due to exposure to acidic media was investigated in a group of test and control healthy human molar teeth. Analysis by micro-PIXE and proton-backscattering showed that the levels of trace elements were enriched and/or depleted according to experimental treatment. The atomic ratios of major constituents in the matrix were characteristic of test or controls with typical ratios: O 5P 1Ca 3F 1 for tests and O 6P 0.5Ca 3F 0.5 for controls. The correlation between maps of Ca and Zn in and around the interface between dentine and enamel in control samples showed two kinds of correlation strengths (for enamel and dentine). The strongest correlation was related to the enamel area.

  6. Comparison of the Effect of Dentin Bonding, Dentin Sealing Agents on the Microleakage of Provisional Crowns Fabricated with Direct and Indirect Technique-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, B; Kumar, M Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative sensitivity after temporization is a common complaint in Fixed Partial Denture patients. It is caused by weak and ill fitting temporary restorations which results in microleakage. This can be controlled by providing good temporary restorations and by coating the exposed dentinal tubules of the prepared tooth with dentin bonding agent or dental varnish. Aim The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of dentin-bonding, dentin sealing agents on the microleakage of temporary crowns made by tooth colored auto polymerizing resin fabricated with direct and indirect technique. Materials and Methods Thirty premolar and molar human teeth were collected which were extracted recently was used for the study. The teeth were marked and divided into 3 groups each containing 10 nos. They were individually mounted with self-cure acrylic resin. It was then mounted on a milling machine and crown preparations done. Temporary crowns were fabricated by direct and indirect method with two types of materials. In group A (Control group), the temporary crowns fabricated with both direct and indirect method were cemented directly with temporary luting cement. In group B dentine-bonding agent (solobond M) was applied once to the prepared surface of each tooth specimen before the cementation of temporary crowns where as in case of group C a single layer of dental varnish is applied prior to crown cementation. The entire specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue and allowed to undergo thermal treatment. It was then sectioned in a hard tissue microtome. Each section was evaluated for dye penetration into the dentin tubules by comparing it with a visual scale. Statistical Analysis SPSS Version 13 software was used for non-parametric data analysis by a qualified statistician. P-values less than 0.05 (p-value<0.05) were considered to be statistically significant. Results Group B (Dentin Bonding Agent) specimens cemented with crowns fabricated in direct technique

  7. Characterization of transparent dentin in attrited teeth using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Mandurah, Mona M; Sadr, Alireza; Bakhsh, Turki A; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2015-05-01

    Attrition and wear of tooth surface occur with aging and result in loss of enamel, with exposure and histological changes in dentin. Dealing with attrited teeth and restoration of the lost tissue are clinically challenging. The main objective of this study is to characterize the exposed transparent dentin in the occlusal surface of attrited teeth by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Naturally attrited, extracted human teeth with occlusal-transparent dentin were investigated in comparison to sound and carious teeth. The teeth were subjected to OCT imaging and then cross-sectioned and polished. OCT B-scans were compared to light microscopy images of the same cross section. In OCT images, some changes were evident at the transparent dentin in attrited teeth. An OCT attenuation coefficient parameter (μ t) was derived based on the Beer-Lambert law as a function of backscatter signal slope. The mean values of μ t were 1.05 ± 0.3, 2.23 ± 0.4, and 0.61 ± 0.27 mm(-1) for sound, carious, and transparent dentins, respectively. One-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc showed a significant difference between groups (p < 0.05). Physiological changes in transparent dentin that involve deposition of mineral casts in the dentinal tubules lead to lower attenuation of OCT signal. OCT has a potential role to detect transparent dentin on the surface of attrited teeth and can be used in the future as a clinical adjunct tool. PMID:24532117

  8. A scanning electron microscopic study on the distribution of peritubular dentine in cheek teeth of Cervidae and Suidae (Mammalia, Artiodactyla).

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, H; Kierdorf, U

    1992-09-01

    Distribution of peritubular dentine was studied in cheek teeth of fallow deer (Dama dama), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and wild boar (Sus scrofa). In the two cervid species, especially intense peritubular dentine formation was found in the outer regions of mid and cuspal coronal dentine. In these areas a marked asymmetry occurred, peritubular dentine being predominantly secreted onto the side of the dentinal tubule walls nearest to the dentinoenamel junction. Intensity and asymmetry of peritubular dentine formation decreased cervically. In root dentine, the walls of the dentinal tubules were covered with only a thin peritubular dentine layer of even thickness. Here, in contrast to peripheral coronal dentine, the volume of intertubular dentine far exceeded that of peritubular dentine. In porcine coronal dentine, PTD asymmetry, being of lesser extent than in cervids, was observed only in peripheral areas of cuspal and flank regions of the cheek teeth. Because peritubular is more highly mineralized than intertubular dentine, the relative volume of dentine made up from the two components has an important influence on dentinal wear resistance. The significance of variations in volume and distribution of peritubular dentine between different dentinal regions for achieving and maintaining a functional occlusal surface is shown for cervid cheek teeth. Our results suggest that dentinal structure (in addition to enamel structure) should be taken more into consideration when discussing occlusal surface morphology in herbi- and omnivores from a functional point of view.

  9. A novel bioactive glass-ceramic for treating dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tirapelli, Camila; Panzeri, Heitor; Soares, Rodrigo Gongalves; Peitl, Oscar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2010-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity (DH) is a painful response to stimulus applied to the open dentinal tubules of a vital tooth. It's a common oral condition, however, without an ideal treatment available yet. This work evaluated in vitro the effect of micron-sized particles from a novel bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate) in occluding open dentinal tubules. A dentin disc model was employed to observe comparatively, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dentinal tubule occlusion by different products and deposition of hydroxyl carbonate apatite (HCA) on dentin surface by Biosilicate, after a single application: G1 - Dentifrice with potassium nitrate and fluoride; G2 - Two-step calcium phosphate precipitation treatment; G3 - Water-free gel containing Biosilicate particles (1%); G4 - Biosilicate particles mixed with distilled water in a 1:10 ratio; all of them after 1, 12 and 24 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was performed to detect HCA formation on dentin discs filled with Biosilicate after 2 minutes, 30 minutes and 12 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. SEM showed a layer of HCA formed on dentin surface after 24 hours by G4. G1, G2 and G3 promoted not total occlusion of open dentinal tubules after 24 hours. FTIR showed HCA precipitation on the dentin surface induced by Biosilicate after 30 minutes. The micron-sized particles from the bioactive glass-ceramic thus were able to induce HCA deposition in open dentinal tubules in vitro. This finding suggests that Biosilicate may provide a new option for treating DH. PMID:21180956

  10. A novel bioactive glass-ceramic for treating dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tirapelli, Camila; Panzeri, Heitor; Soares, Rodrigo Gongalves; Peitl, Oscar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2010-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity (DH) is a painful response to stimulus applied to the open dentinal tubules of a vital tooth. It's a common oral condition, however, without an ideal treatment available yet. This work evaluated in vitro the effect of micron-sized particles from a novel bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate) in occluding open dentinal tubules. A dentin disc model was employed to observe comparatively, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dentinal tubule occlusion by different products and deposition of hydroxyl carbonate apatite (HCA) on dentin surface by Biosilicate, after a single application: G1 - Dentifrice with potassium nitrate and fluoride; G2 - Two-step calcium phosphate precipitation treatment; G3 - Water-free gel containing Biosilicate particles (1%); G4 - Biosilicate particles mixed with distilled water in a 1:10 ratio; all of them after 1, 12 and 24 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was performed to detect HCA formation on dentin discs filled with Biosilicate after 2 minutes, 30 minutes and 12 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. SEM showed a layer of HCA formed on dentin surface after 24 hours by G4. G1, G2 and G3 promoted not total occlusion of open dentinal tubules after 24 hours. FTIR showed HCA precipitation on the dentin surface induced by Biosilicate after 30 minutes. The micron-sized particles from the bioactive glass-ceramic thus were able to induce HCA deposition in open dentinal tubules in vitro. This finding suggests that Biosilicate may provide a new option for treating DH.

  11. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  12. Distal Convoluted Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule is the nephron segment that lies immediately downstream of the macula densa. Although short in length, the distal convoluted tubule plays a critical role in sodium, potassium, and divalent cation homeostasis. Recent genetic and physiologic studies have greatly expanded our understanding of how the distal convoluted tubule regulates these processes at the molecular level. This article provides an update on the distal convoluted tubule, highlighting concepts and pathophysiology relevant to clinical practice. PMID:24855283

  13. In vitro photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy in dentine contaminated by cariogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, M. A. S.; de-Paula, D. M.; Lima, J. P. M.; Borges, F. M. C.; Steiner-Oliveira, C.; Nobre-Dos-Santos, M.; Zanin, I. C. J.; Barros, E. B.; Rodrigues, L. K. A.

    2010-06-01

    The development of a method to ensure bacterial-free substrates without extensive cavity preparation would be highly useful to dentistry, since there is no currently available effective method for killing residual bacteria in dentinal tissue. This randomized in vitro study determined parameters for using toluidine blue O (TBO) with a light-emitting diode (LED) for dentine caries disinfection and monitored intrapulpal/periodontal temperatures during irradiation. Occlusal human dentine slabs were immersed in Streptococcus mutans culture for demineralization induction. Slabs were allocated to 10 groups ( n = 15), which were treated with 0.1 mg ml-1 TBO with 5 min of incubation time or 0.9% NaCl solution for 5, 10 or 15 min, and submitted or not to irradiation for 5, 10 or 15 min (47, 94, and 144 J/cm2). Before and after treatments, dentine samples were analyzed with regard to S. mutans counts. In whole teeth, temperature in pulp and periodontium was measured by thermocouples during irradiation. Kruskal-Wallis/Student-Newman-Keuls, and ANOVA/Tukey test were respectively utilized to compare log reductions and temperature rises between groups. Bacterial reduction was observed when dentine was exposed to both TBO and LED at all irradiation times, as well as to LED alone for 10 and 15 min. Temperature increases lower than 2°C were observed for either pulp or periodontium. Concluding, LED combined with TBO is a safe and effective approach for dentine caries disinfection. Nevertheless, additional studies should be conducted to determine the influence of the irradiation in S. mutans viability in dentinal surface/tubules.

  14. Transmission of Curing Light through Moist, Air-Dried, and EDTA Treated Dentine and Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo, E.; Varrela, J.; Lassila, L.; Vallittu, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study measured light transmission through enamel and dentin and the effect of exposed dentinal tubules to light propagation. Methods. Light attenuation through enamel and dentin layers of various thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm) was measured using specimens that were (1) moist and (2) air-dried (n = 5). Measurements were repeated after the specimens were treated with EDTA. Specimens were transilluminated with a light curing unit (maximum power output 1869 mW/cm2), and the mean irradiance power of transmitting light was measured. The transmission of light through teeth was studied using 10 extracted intact human incisors and premolars. Results. Transmitted light irradiance through 1 mm thick moist discs was 500 mW/cm2 for enamel and 398 mW/cm2 for dentin (p < 0.05). The increase of the specimen thickness decreased light transmission in all groups (p < 0.005), and moist specimens attenuated light less than air-dried specimens in all thicknesses (p < 0.05). EDTA treatment increased light transmission from 398 mW/cm2 to 439 mW/cm2 (1 mm dentin specimen thickness) (p < 0.05). Light transmission through intact premolar was 6.2 mW/cm2 (average thickness 8.2 mm) and through incisor was 37.6 mW/cm2 (average thickness 5.6 mm). Conclusion. Light transmission through enamel is greater than that through dentin, probably reflecting differences in refractive indices and extinction coefficients. Light transmission through enamel, dentin, and extracted teeth seemed to follow Beer-Lambert's law. PMID:27446954

  15. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  16. Penetration of varnishes into demineralized root dentine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arends, J; Duschner, H; Ruben, J L

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the penetration of three different varnishes employed in caries prevention (Duraphat, Fluor Protector and Cervitec) into demineralized dentine is quantified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results show that the varnish penetration into lesions about 85 microns in depth if for Cervitec about 35 microns and considerably less for Duraphat and Fluor Protector. The penetration is into the dentinal tubules and is influenced by dentinal tubule direction. The drying procedure--pretreatment of the dentine--influences the penetration, though sizeably only for Cervitec applications. This paper shows that varnish penetration into the tissue and presumably 'sealing' tubules completely or partly is valuable with respect to root caries prevention and hypersensitivity. PMID:9165191

  17. Changes in gene expression in human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to low concentrations of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Edward A. . E-mail: e.lock@ljmu.ac.uk; Barth, Jeremy L.; Argraves, Scott W.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2006-10-15

    Epidemiology studies suggest that there may be a weak association between high level exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and renal tubule cell carcinoma. Laboratory animal studies have shown an increased incidence of renal tubule carcinoma in male rats but not mice. TCE can undergo metabolism via glutathione (GSH) conjugation to form metabolites that are known to be nephrotoxic. The GSH conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione (DCVG), is processed further to the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. We have cultured human renal tubule cells (HRPTC) in serum-free medium under a variety of different culture conditions and observed growth, respiratory control and glucose transport over a 20 day period in medium containing low glucose. Cell death was time- and concentration-dependent, with the EC{sub 5} for DCVG being about 3 {mu}M and for DCVC about 7.5 {mu}M over 10 days. Exposure of HRPTC to sub-cytotoxic doses of DCVC (0.1 {mu}M and 1 {mu}M for 10 days) led to a small number of changes in gene expression, as determined by transcript profiling with Affymetrix human genome chips. Using the criterion of a mean 2-fold change over control for the four samples examined, 3 genes at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC increased, namely, adenosine kinase, zinc finger protein X-linked and an enzyme with lyase activity. At 1 {mu}M DCVC, two genes showed a >2-fold decrease, N-acetyltransferase 8 and complement factor H. At a lower stringency (1.5-fold change), a total of 63 probe sets were altered at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC and 45 at 1 {mu}M DCVC. Genes associated with stress, apoptosis, cell proliferation and repair and DCVC metabolism were altered, as were a small number of genes that did not appear to be associated with the known mode of action of DCVC. Some of these genes may serve as molecular markers of TCE exposure and effects in the human kidney.

  18. Infected Dentine Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Edwina; Fejerskov, Ole; Nyvad, Bente

    2015-11-01

    Dentine becomes infected as a result of caries lesion formation on root surfaces and when lesions progress following cavitation of enamel lesions. However, this infection is unimportant because the driving force for lesion formation and progression is the overlying biofilm. This explains why root surface caries can be controlled by mechanical plaque control and fluoride, and restorations are not needed to arrest these lesions. Similarly, the infected dentine in cavitated coronal lesions does not have to be removed to arrest the lesion. If the lesion is either accessible or opened for cleaning by the patient or parent, the lesion can be arrested. Sealing of infected dentine within the tooth, either by a Hall crown in the primary dentition or by partial caries removal prior to placing a well-sealed filling, will also arrest the lesion. When restoring deep lesions in symptomless, vital teeth, vigorous excavation of infected dentine is likely to expose the pulp and make root canal treatment necessary. Thus complete excavation'is not needed and should be avoided. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Root surface caries can be arrested by cleaning and fluoride application. Restorations are not essential. Vigorous excavation of softened dentine in deep cavities of symptomless, vital teeth is contra-indicated. It is not needed and increases the risk of pulp exposure. PMID:26749788

  19. Contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; de Gee, A J; Kaga, M; Feilzer, A J

    2006-08-01

    Adhesives cured under constrained conditions develop contraction stresses. We hypothesized that, with dentin as a bonding substrate, the stress would reach a maximum, followed by a continuous decline. Stress development was determined with a tensilometer for two total-etch systems and two systems with self-etching primers. The adhesives were placed in a thin layer between a glass plate and a flat dentin surface pretreated with phosphoric acid or self-etching primer. After an initial maximum shortly after light-curing, the stress decreased dramatically for the total-etch systems (70%) and, to a lesser extent, for the adhesives with self-etching primers (30%). The greater stress decrease for the total-etch systems was ascribed to water and/or solvents released into the adhesives from the fully opened dentinal tubules by the pulling/sucking action of the contraction stress. This happened less with the adhesives with self-etching primers, where the tubules remained mainly closed.

  20. Dentin matrix protein 1 and phosphate homeostasis are critical for postnatal pulp, dentin and enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Rangiani, Afsaneh; Cao, Zheng-Guo; Liu, Ying; Voisey Rodgers, Anika; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chun-Lin; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2012-12-01

    Deletion or mutation of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) leads to hypophosphatemic rickets and defects within the dentin. However, it is largely unknown if this pathological change is a direct role of DMP1 or an indirect role of phosphate (Pi) or both. It has also been previously shown that Klotho-deficient mice, which displayed a high Pi level due to a failure of Pi excretion, causes mild defects in the dentinal structure. This study was to address the distinct roles of DMP1 and Pi homeostasis in cell differentiation, apoptosis and mineralization of dentin and enamel. Our working hypothesis was that a stable Pi homeostasis is critical for postnatal tooth formation, and that DMP1 has an antiapoptotic role in both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis. To test this hypothesis, Dmp1-null (Dmp1(-/-)), Klotho-deficient (kl/kl), Dmp1/Klotho-double-deficient (Dmp1(-/-)/kl/kl) and wild-type (WT) mice were killed at the age of 6 weeks. Combinations of X-ray, microcomputed tomography (μCT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), histology, apoptosis and immunohistochemical methods were used for characterization of dentin, enamel and pulp structures in these mutant mice. Our results showed that Dmp1(-/-) (a low Pi level) or kl/kl (a high Pi level) mice displayed mild dentin defects such as thin dentin and a reduction of dentin tubules. Neither deficient mouse line exhibited any apparent changes in enamel or pulp structure. However, the double-deficient mice (a high Pi level) displayed severe defects in dentin and enamel structures, including loss of dentinal tubules and enamel prisms, as well as unexpected ectopic ossification within the pulp root canal. TUNEL assay showed a sharp increase in apoptotic cells in ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Based on the above findings, we conclude that DMP1 has a protective role for odontoblasts and ameloblasts in a pro-apoptotic environment (a high Pi level).

  1. Dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialophosphoprotein in human sound and carious teeth: an immunohistochemical and colorimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Martini, D; Trirè, A; Breschi, L; Mazzoni, A; Teti, G; Falconi, M; Ruggeri, A

    2013-10-29

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) are extracellular matrix proteins produced by odontoblasts involved in the dentin mineralization. The aim this study was to compare the distribution of DMP1 and DSPP in human sound dentin vs human sclerotic dentin. Sixteen sound and sixteen carious human molars were selected, fixed in paraformaldehyde and processed for immunohistochemical detection of DMP1 and DSPP by means of light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution field emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy (FEI-SEM). Specimens were submitted to a pre-embedding or a post-embedding immunolabeling technique using primary antibodies anti DMP1 and anti-DSPP and gold-conjugated secondary antibodies. Other samples were processed for the detection of DMP1 and DSPP levels. Dentin from these samples was mechanically fractured to powder, then a protein extraction and a protein level detection assay were performed. DMP1 and DSPP were more abundant in carious than in sound samples. Immunohistochemical analyses in sclerotic dentin disclosed a high expression of DMP1 and DSPP inside the tubules, suggesting an active biomineralization of dentin by odontoblasts. Furthermore, the detection of small amounts of these proteins inside the tubules far from the carious lesion, as shown in the present study, is consistent with the hypothesis of a preventive defense of all dentin after a noxious stimulus has undermined the tooth.

  2. Near tubule and intertubular bovine detin mapped at the 250 nm level.

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, S.R.; Veis, A.; Telser, A.; Cai, Z.

    2011-11-01

    In this study, simultaneous diffraction and fluorescence mapping with a (250 nm){sup 2}, 10.1 keV synchrotron X-ray beam investigated the spatial distribution of carbonated apatite (cAp) mineral and elemental Ca (and other cations including Zn) around dentin tubules. In 1 {mu}m thick sections of near-pulp root dentin, where peritubular dentin (PTD) is newly forming, high concentrations of Zn, relative to those in intertubular dentin (ITD), were observed adjacent to and surrounding the tubule lumens. Some but not all tubules exhibited hypercalcified collars (high Ca signal relative to the surrounding ITD), and, when present, the zone of high Ca did not extend around the tubule. Diffraction rings from cAp 00.2 and 11.2 + 21.1 + 30.0 reflections were observed, and cAp was the only crystal phase detected. Profiles of Ca, Zn and cAp diffracted intensities showed the same transitions from solid to tubule lumen, indicating the same cAp content and organization in ITD far from the tubules and adjacent to them. Further, the matching Ca and diffraction profiles demonstrated that all of the Ca is in cAp or that any noncrystalline Ca was uniformly distributed throughout the dentin. Variation of 00.2 and 11.2 + 21.1 + 30.0 diffracted intensity was consistent with the expected biaxial crystallographic texture. Extension of X-ray mapping from near 1 {mu}m resolution to the 250 nm level, performed here for dentin and its tubules, will provide new understanding of other mineralized tissues.

  3. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm–Sidak test at P < 0.05. Results: EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Conclusions: Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD.

  4. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm–Sidak test at P < 0.05. Results: EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Conclusions: Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD. PMID:27656059

  5. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in human dentine.

    PubMed

    Miura, Jiro; Nishikawa, Kantaro; Kubo, Mizuho; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Takeshige, Fumio; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Cross-linking of collagen by Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) occurs by non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction). The purpose of this study was to examine whether AGEs are formed in human dentinal collagen, and to consider any possible influence of AGEs on dentinal physiology. Mechanical characteristics, fluorescence spectra and immunohistochemical analyses of demineralized dentine sections from young subjects were compared with those of aged ones. The same investigations were performed with young dentine artificially glycated by incubation in 0.1M ribose solution. Indentation measurement indicated that the sections from aged dentine were mechanically harder than those from young dentine. The hardness of young dentine increased after incubation in ribose solution. Fluorescence peak wavelength of the young dentine was shorter than that of the aged one, but shifted towards the peak wavelength of the aged one after incubation in ribose solution. These changes were considered to be due to accumulation of AGEs. Existence of AGEs in dentinal collagen was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. The obtained results suggest that AGEs accumulation occurs in dentinal collagen and is affected by both human age and physiological conditions such as glucose level in blood because dentinal collagen receives nourishment via dental pulp and tubules. PMID:24370182

  6. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  7. Comparison of propagation-based phase-contrast tomography approaches for the evaluation of dentin microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Lang, Sabrina; Schulz, Georg; Rack, Alexander; Zanette, Irene; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The complex hierarchical structure of human tooth hard tissues, enamel and dentin, guarantees function for decades. On the micrometer level the dentin morphology is dominated by the tubules, micrometer-narrow channels extending from the dentin-enamel junction to the pulp chamber. Their structure has been extensively studied, mainly with two-dimensional approaches. Dentin tubules are formed during tooth growth and their orientation is linked to the morphology of the nanometer-sized components, which is of interest for example for the development of bio-inspired dental fillings. Therefore, a method has to be identified that can access the three-dimensional organization of the tubules, e.g. density and orientation. Tomographic setups with pixel sizes in the sub-micrometer range allow for the three-dimensional visualization of tooth dentin tubules both in phase and absorption contrast modes. We compare high-resolution tomographic scans reconstructed with propagation based phase retrieval algorithms as well as reconstructions without phase retrieval concerning spatial and density resolution as well as rendering of the dentin microstructure to determine the approach best suited for dentin tubule imaging. Reasonable results were obtained with a single-distance phase retrieval algorithm and a propagation distance of about 75% of the critical distance of d2/λ, where d is the size of the smallest objects identifiable in the specimen and λ is the X-ray wavelength.

  8. A description of chloride cell and kidney tubule alterations in the flatfish Solea senegalensis exposed to moderately contaminated sediments from the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro M.; Caeiro, Sandra; Diniz, Mário S.; Lobo, Jorge; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; DelValls, T. Ángel; Costa, M. Helena

    2010-11-01

    The effects of sediment-bound contaminants on kidney and gill chloride cells were surveyed in juvenile Solea senegalensis exposed to fresh sediments collected from three distinct sites of the Sado Estuary (Portugal) in a 28-day laboratorial assay. Sediments were analyzed for metallic contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorines as well as for total organic matter, redox potential and fine fraction. The potential for causing adverse biological effects of each surveyed sediment was assessed by comparison of contaminant levels to available guidelines for coastal sediments, namely the Threshold Effects Level ( TEL) and the Probable Effects Level ( PEL). The Sediment Quality Guideline Quotient indices ( SQGQ) were calculated to compare the overall contamination levels of the three stations. A qualitative approach was employed to analyze the histo/cytopathological traits in gill chloride cells and body kidney of fish exposed to each tested sediment for 0, 14 and 28 days. The results showed that sediment contamination can be considered low to moderate and that the least contaminated sediment (from a reference site, with the lowest SQGQ) caused lesser changes in the surveyed organs. However, the most contaminated sediment (by both metallic and organic xenobiotics, with highest SQGQ) was neither responsible for the highest mortality nor for the most pronounced lesions. Exposure to the sediment presenting an intermediate SQGQ, essentially contaminated by organic compounds, caused the highest mortality (48%) and the most severe damage to kidneys, up to full renal necrosis. Chloride cell alterations were similar in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments and consisted of a pronounced cellular hypertrophy, likely involving fluid retention and loss of mitochondria. It can be concluded that sediment contamination considered to be low or moderate may be responsible for severe injury to cells and parenchyma involved in the maintenance of osmotic

  9. A transmission electron microscopy study of mineralization in age-induced transparent dentin.

    PubMed

    Porter, Alexandra E; Nalla, Ravi K; Minor, Andrew; Jinschek, Joerg R; Kisielowski, Christian; Radmilovic, Velimir; Kinney, John H; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, R O

    2005-12-01

    It is known that fractures are more likely to occur in altered teeth, particularly following restoration or endodontic repair; consequently, it is important to understand the structure of altered forms of dentin, the most abundant tissue in the human tooth, in order to better define the increased propensity for such fractures. Transparent (or sclerotic) dentin, wherein the dentinal tubules become occluded with mineral as a natural progressive consequence of aging, is one such altered form. In the present study, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to investigate the effect of aging on the mineral phase of dentin. Such studies revealed that the intertubular mineral crystallites were smaller in transparent dentin, and that the intratubular mineral (larger crystals deposited within the tubules) was chemically similar to the surrounding intertubular mineral. Exit-wave reconstructed lattice-plane images suggested that the intratubular mineral had nanometer-size grains. These observations support a "dissolution and reprecipitation" mechanism for the formation of transparent dentin.

  10. Mechanism of action of a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate ingredients in the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Part III: Prevention of dye penetration through dentin vs a calcium- and phosphate-free control.

    PubMed

    Winston, Anthony E; Charig, Andrew J; Thong, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the pain of dental hypersensitivity resulting from gum recession is from the movement of fluid within the exposed tubules of dentin, causing changes in pressure on the nerve within the pulpal cavity. One method of treating hypersensitivity is to occlude the tubules, preventing fluid movement. This article discusses the use of a dye penetration technique, which establishes this mechanism of action for a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste containing calcium and phosphate. Two groups of intact teeth were perfectly sealed with enamel paint. Windows 100-micro to 200-micro deep were opened on opposite sides of each tooth at the dentin-enamel junction and briefly etched using 20% polyacrylic acid. One batch of teeth was treated eight times for 30 mins each with a 1:3 slurry of the desensitizing toothpaste and another set with a similar slurry prepared from a calcium- and phosphate-free control. A 0.85% aqueous solution of acid red fuchsin dye was applied to each window and allowed to dry. After a brief rinse, the teeth were sectioned across the windows. Almost no dye penetration was seen in teeth treated with the desensitizing toothpaste; however, extensive penetration through the dentin was visible in the control-treated teeth. The differences in dye penetration for the two sets of teeth were significant by both subjective (P < .001) and objective (P < .01) measures. Tubule occlusion because of calcium and phosphate ions from the desensitizing toothpaste accounts for its tooth desensitizing efficacy.

  11. The effect of aging on crack-growth resistance and toughening mechanisms in human dentin.

    PubMed

    Koester, Kurt J; Ager, Joel W; Ritchie, Robert O

    2008-04-01

    Crack-growth experiments in human dentin have been performed in situ in an environmental scanning electron microscope to measure, for the first time, the crack-growth resistance curve (R-curve) for clinically relevant (<250 microm) crack extensions and to simultaneously identify the salient toughening mechanisms. "Young" dentin from donors 19-30 years in age and "aged" dentin from donors 40-70 years in age were evaluated. The "young" group had 0-4% of its tubules filled with apatite; the "aged" group was subdivided into "opaque" with 12-32% filled tubules and "transparent" with 65-100% filled tubules. Although crack-initiation toughnesses were similar, the crack-growth resistance of "young" dentin was higher by about 40% compared to "aged" dentin. Mechanistically, this behavior is interpreted in terms of three phenomena: (i) gross crack deflection of the growing crack, (ii) microcracks which initiated at unfilled tubules in the high stress region in the vicinity of a propagating crack (no microcracks formed at filled tubules), and (iii) crack propagation which followed a local trajectory through unfilled tubules and deflected around filled tubules. The higher toughness of the "young" dentin was related to enhanced microcracking (at unfilled tubules) ahead of the growing crack, which (i) shields the crack by activating multiple crack tips and by reducing the local stress intensity through crack deflection and (ii) leads to the formation of crack bridges from "uncracked ligaments" due to the incomplete coalescence of these microcracks with the main crack tip. With age, the role of these toughening mechanisms was diminished primarily to the lower fraction of unfilled, and hence microcracked, tubules.

  12. Power toothbrushes, gender, and dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hefti, A F; Stone, C

    2000-06-01

    Power toothbrushes require less force for plaque removal than manual brushes. In addition, in vitro studies have indicated that brushing with low force could occlude patent dentin tubules by formation of a smear layer. Hence, lessening the force necessary to remove plaque may reduce dentin hypersensitivity. However, it was recently suggested that the use of an oscillating/rotating power toothbrush could decrease tooth sensitivity as compared to a sonic power toothbrush. Therefore, the objective of the present research was to compare the effect on dentin hypersensitivity of two different types of power brushes, the Optiva Sonicare and the Braun Oral B Ultra Plaque Remover. The null hypothesis was tested in an 8-week, randomized, parallel group, examiner-blind clinical trial. Fifty-nine subjects with a history of dentin hypersensitivity participated. Dentin hypersensitivity-associated pain was elicited using tactile and evaporative stimuli and assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) instrument. Clinical examinations were carried out at screening and baseline and repeated after 8 weeks of twice daily use of the power brushes. Data analysis was performed on VAS scores obtained at the final visit following adjustment for group differences at baseline. A 35% to 40% reduction in pain as compared to baseline was observed in both treatment groups. Treatment-related differences were not statistically significant. A gender-related effect on dentin hypersensitivity was observed using the tactile stimulus and may merit further investigation.

  13. SEM evaluation of resin-carious dentin interfaces formed by two dentin adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Marshall, Sally J.; Pinzon, Lilliam M.; Watanabe, Larry; Saiz, Eduardo; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the influence of dentin tubule direction and identifiable zone of carious dentin on the microstructure and the thickness of the hybrid-like layer (HL) formed by self-etch and etch-rinse adhesive systems. Methods An etch-rinse and a self-etching adhesive were bonded to dentin carious zones divided into groups with parallel or perpendicular orientation relative to the dentin tubules at the resin-carious dentin interface (N = 5/variable). Bonds were prepared to each of the four zones of carious dentin apparent after staining with Caries Detector: pink, light pink, transparent and apparently normal Six non-carious third molars were controls. The microstructure and thickness of the HL were determined by SEM.and compared using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons (p<0.05). Results Etch-rinse controls gave thicker HLs than self-etching systems; ; orientation did not affect thickness for the self-etch system. Perpendicular orientations gave thicker HLs than parallel for the pink zone bonded with the etch-rinse system. For both adhesives, HL thickness in the pink zone were significantly greater than in light pink for the perpendicular group, but no significant differences were found among other variables. HL microstructure was more granular and rougher for the etch rinse than for the self etching system. Pores and cracks were obvious in the more demineralized zones, Resin tags were shorter and irregular in the transparent zone and often were completely absent in the outer demineralized zones (pink, light pink). Significance Microstructure of bonded interfaces varies markedly depending on adhesive system, tubule orientation and carious zone. PMID:18155289

  14. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Chiba, Ayaka; Scheffel, Debora L S; Hebling, Josimeri; Agee, Kelli; Niu, Li-Na; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM) and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA) and VanishTM (VAN), after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001) and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001). VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents. PMID:27359118

  15. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Chiba, Ayaka; Scheffel, Debora L. S.; Hebling, Josimeri; Agee, Kelli; Niu, Li-na; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM) and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA) and VanishTM (VAN), after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001) and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001). VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents. PMID:27359118

  16. Transition behavior in fatigue of human dentin: structure and anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Reid, J; Cox, M E; Bajaj, D; Sundaram, N; Romberg, E

    2007-09-01

    The influence of tubule orientation on the transition from fatigue to fatigue crack growth in human dentin was examined. Compact tension (CT) and rectangular beam specimens were prepared from the coronal dentin of molars with three unique tubule orientations (i.e., 0 degrees , 45 degrees and 90 degrees). The CT specimens (N=25) were used to characterize fatigue crack initiation and steady-state cyclic extension, whereas the rectangular beams (N=132) were subjected to 4-pt flexure and used in quantifying the stress-life fatigue response. The transition behavior was analyzed using both the Kitagawa-Takahashi and El Haddad approaches. Results showed that both the fatigue crack growth and stress-life responses were dependent on the tubule orientation. The average Paris Law exponent for crack growth perpendicular (90 degrees) to the tubules (m=13.3+/-1.1) was significantly greater (p<0.05) than that for crack growth oblique (45 degrees) to the tubules (m=11.5+/-1.87). Similarly, the fatigue strength of dentin with 90 degrees tubule orientation was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that for the other two orientations, regardless of the range of cyclic stress. The apparent endurance strengths of specimens with 0 degrees (44MPa) and 45 degrees (53MPa) orientations were nearly twice that of the 90 degrees (24MPa) orientation. Based on these results, human dentin exhibits the largest degree of anisotropy within the stress-life regime and the transition from fatigue to fatigue crack growth occurs under the lowest cyclic stress range when the tubules are aligned with the cyclic normal stress (90 degrees orientation).

  17. Contributions of Aging to the Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2±1.5 to 24.1±5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4±3.03 to 22.9±5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy. PMID:22484693

  18. Contributions of aging to the fatigue crack growth resistance of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-07-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2 ± 1.5 to 24.1 ± 5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in-plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4 ± 3.03 to 22.9 ± 5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy.

  19. Vitamin D receptor deficiency affects dentin maturation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueming; Rahemtulla, Firoz G; MacDougall, Mary J; Thomas, Huw F

    2007-12-01

    Mutation of vitamin D receptors (vdr) results in resistance to the vitamin's normal effects which may compromise dentin formation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of vdr deficiency on post-natal dentin maturation in mice. The dentin in mandibular incisors of 70.5-day-old vdr wild-type and vdr knockout mice was compared at different levels along the long axis. Expression of biglycan and decorin was detected by immunolocalisation. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the ultrastructure of the dentin, and micro-computerised tomography was used to determine the degree of dentin mineralisation density. In the vdr knockout mice, the pulp chamber was larger and the dentin wall was thinner compared with the wild-type mice. In addition, the pre-dentin layer was thickened with an irregular front line and diffuse expression of biglycan and decorin. Fewer tubules, lower mineralisation density and pore-like defects were observed in the dentin at the eruptive region and level with the first molar. In conclusion, vdr deficiency compromises dentin maturation.

  20. Sodium hypochlorite alterations of dentin and dentin collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, G. W.; Yücel, N.; Balooch, M.; Kinney, J. H.; Habelitz, S.; Marshall, S. J.

    2001-10-01

    NaOCl aq is used as a cleansing and non-specific deproteinizing agent in endodontic treatment, as a component of new chemomechanical caries treatment, and is under study for its alterations of dentin bonding characteristics. We sought to determine the microstructural and nanomechanical changes with such treatments and to test if NaOCl aq removed dentin collagen without microstructural or nanomechanical alteration of underlying mineralized dentin. Polished human dentin disks were prepared with a double reference technique that allowed changes to be determined following 10% citric acid etching for 15 s and subsequent treatment of the etched and unetched portions of the sample with 6.5% NaOCl aq, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Nanoscope III, Digital Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA). Images and measurements were made at intervals up to 1800 s. A Triboscope (Hysitron, Minneapolis, MN) on the AFM was used to measure nanohardness and the reduced elastic modulus. The double reference method allowed measurements immediately following etching and at intervals during deproteinization. Etching caused deep peritubular dentin removal and a small depth change of hydrated intertubular dentin as mineral was removed and left a remnant collagen matrix. NaOCl aq removed collagen over time, during which individual fibrils could be resolved; the underlying mineralized dentin was left with a unique porous surface containing numerous channels that are not normally observed in etched or fractured dentin. This could provide an attractive bonding substrate because of the increased surface area and high mineral content, if toughness is not reduced too much. Nanomechanical measurements showed that the reduced elastic modulus and hardness were 75% of original values after removal of the exposed collagen. Current dentin bonding systems rely on hybrid layer formation in which hydrophilic primers/polymers penetrate the opened collagen matrix exposed by etching. However some research suggests

  1. Age-related ransparent root dentin: mineral concentration,crystallite size and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, John H.; Nalla, Ravi K.; Pople, John A.; Breunig, Tom M.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2004-12-29

    Many fractures occur in teeth that have been altered, forexample restored or endodontically repaired. It is therefore essential toevaluate the structure and mechanical properties of these altereddentins. One such altered form of dentin is transparent (sometimes calledsclerotic) dentin, which forms gradually with aging. The present studyfocuses on differences in the structure and mechanical properties ofnormal versus transparent dentin. The mineral concentration, as measuredby X-ray computed microtomography, was signifcantly higher in transparentdentin, the elevated concentration being consistent with the closure ofthe tubule lumens. Crystallite size, as measured by small angle X-rayscattering, was slightly smaller in transparent dentin, although theimportance of this ending requires further study. The elastic propertieswere unchanged by transparency; however, transparent dentin, unlikenormal dentin, exhibited almost no yielding before failure. In addition,the fracture toughness was lowered by roughly 20 percent while thefatigue lifetime was deleteriously affected at high stress levels. Theseresults are discussed in terms of the altered microstructure oftransparent dentin.

  2. Dentin permeability: the basis for understanding pulp reactions and adhesive technology.

    PubMed

    Mjör, Ivar A

    2009-01-01

    Permeability involves the passage of fluids, ions, molecules, particulate matter and bacteria into and through a substance or tissue under different and varying conditions. The permeability of the dentin is essential to support the physiology and reaction patterns of the pulp-dentin organ. Nutrients and impulses are transported from the pulp via the odontoblast process and the contents of its tubules maintain the dentin as a vital tissue. However, the main interest of this paper focuses on penetration from the outside towards the pulp rather than from the pulp towards the outside. The present overview centers on the dentinal tubules; how they are formed and how they change as a result of normal and abnormal function, age, and pathological processes and the effect of these processes on the permeability of dentin. Particular attention is focused on the patency of the dentinal tubules.This overview is largely based on the authors own research, clinical insights and active participation in continuing dental education over the last 50 years. It is not a review of the literature related to the permeability of dentin. Rather it presents interpretation of results related to the permeability of dentin based on experience and opinions acquired over a lifetime in dental research.

  3. Essential role of Osterix for tooth root but not crown dentin formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chunlin; Liu, Ying; Ho, Sunita P.; Feng, Jian Q.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth is made of crown and root. It is widely believed that dentin formation in crown and root uses the same regulatory mechanism. However, identification of NFIC’s unique function in determining root but not crown dentin formation challenges the old thought. In searching for the target molecules downstream of NFIC, we unexpectedly found a sharp reduction of OSX (osterix), the key transcription factor in skeleton formation, in the Nfic knockout (KO) tooth root. We then demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of Osx in the odontoblast cell line due to a transient transfection of Nfic expression plasmid. Studies of global and conditional Osx KO mice revealed no apparent changes in the crown dentin tubules and dentin matrix. However, the OSX conditional KO mice (crossed to the 2.3 kb Col 1-Cre) displayed an increase in cell proliferation but great decreases in expressions of root dentin matrix proteins (DMP1 and DSPP), leading to an inhibition in odontoblast differentiation, and short thin root dentin with few dentin tubules. Compared to the Nfic KO tooth, which contains essentially no dentin tubules and remains in a “root-less” status at adult stages, the Osx cKO root phenotype had partially improved at the late stage, indicating that other factors can compensate for OSX function. Thus, we conclude that OSX, one of the key downstream molecules of NFIC, plays a critical role in root, but not crown, formation. PMID:25349111

  4. Nanoleakage of dentin adhesive systems bonded to Carisolv-treated dentin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shisei; Li, Heping; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid layer created in caries-affected dentin has not been fully elucidated and may influence bond durability. This study investigated the nanoleakage patterns of caries-affected dentin after excavation with Carisolv or conventional instruments treated with one of three adhesive systems. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces, including carious lesions, were prepared from extracted human molars and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Carious dentin was removed with Carisolv or round steel burs in conjunction with Caries Detector. PermaQuik, Single Bond or One-Up Bond F was bonded to the excavated dentin surfaces and adjacent flat occlusal surfaces and it was covered with Silux Plus resin-based composite. After 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water, the bonded interfaces were polished to remove flash, and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. Specimens were immersed in 50% (w/v) silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, exposed to photo developing solution for eight hours, then sectioned longitudinally through the bonded, excavated dentin or "normal" dentin surfaces. The sectioned surfaces were polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using back scattered electrons. Silver deposition occurred along the base of the hybrid layer for all specimens. However, Single Bond showed a greater density of silver deposition in the caries-affected dentin compared with normal dentin. PermaQuik had a thicker hybrid layer in caries-affected dentin than normal dentin. One-Up Bond F exhibited a thin hybrid layer in normal dentin, but the hybrid layer was often difficult to detect in caries-affected dentin.

  5. Nanoleakage of dentin adhesive systems bonded to Carisolv-treated dentin.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shisei; Li, Heping; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2002-01-01

    The hybrid layer created in caries-affected dentin has not been fully elucidated and may influence bond durability. This study investigated the nanoleakage patterns of caries-affected dentin after excavation with Carisolv or conventional instruments treated with one of three adhesive systems. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces, including carious lesions, were prepared from extracted human molars and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Carious dentin was removed with Carisolv or round steel burs in conjunction with Caries Detector. PermaQuik, Single Bond or One-Up Bond F was bonded to the excavated dentin surfaces and adjacent flat occlusal surfaces and it was covered with Silux Plus resin-based composite. After 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water, the bonded interfaces were polished to remove flash, and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. Specimens were immersed in 50% (w/v) silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, exposed to photo developing solution for eight hours, then sectioned longitudinally through the bonded, excavated dentin or "normal" dentin surfaces. The sectioned surfaces were polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using back scattered electrons. Silver deposition occurred along the base of the hybrid layer for all specimens. However, Single Bond showed a greater density of silver deposition in the caries-affected dentin compared with normal dentin. PermaQuik had a thicker hybrid layer in caries-affected dentin than normal dentin. One-Up Bond F exhibited a thin hybrid layer in normal dentin, but the hybrid layer was often difficult to detect in caries-affected dentin. PMID:12120777

  6. Dentin and pulp sense cold stimulus.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Masayuki; Tatsuyama, Shoko; Fujisawa, Mari; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoshiko; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Torii, Mistuso

    2015-05-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common symptom, and recent convergent evidences have reported transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in odontoblasts act as mechanical and thermal molecular sensor, which detect stimulation applied on the exposed dentin surface, to drive multiple odontoblastic cellular functions, such as sensory transduction and/or dentin formation. In the present study, we confirmed expression of TRP melastatin subfamily member-8 (TRPM8) channels in primary cultured cells derived from human dental pulp cells (HPCs) and mouse odontoblast-lineage cells (OLCs) as well as in dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP) positive acutely isolated rat odontoblasts from dental pulp tissue slice culture by immunohistochemical analyses. In addition, we detected TRPM8 channel expression on HPCs and OLCs by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. These results indicated that both odontoblasts and dental pulp cells express TRPM8 channels in rat, mouse and human, and therefore we hypothesize they may contribute as cold sensor in tooth.

  7. Age-related changes in ac-impedance spectroscopy studies of normal human dentine: further investigations.

    PubMed

    Eldarrat, A H; High, A S; Kale, G M

    2010-01-01

    One of the age-related changes occurring in dentine structure is the formation of peritubular dentine on the inner walls of dentinal tubules leading to complete closure of tubules. Ac-impedance is safe, fast and non-invasive technique. In the last decade, the popularity of the technique has increased in dental research. Several investigators have used the technique to detect tooth cracks and caries. The results of in vitro studies showed that ac-impedance technique was more advanced for caries detection than visual and radiographic methods. However, other studies demonstrated that the accuracy of impedance measurements can be affected by many factors such as remineralization after tooth eruption. A study has been published on effect of age on impedance measurements by the authors for two age groups by employing ac-impedance spectroscopy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the importance of this technique by conducting further investigations on dentine samples of wider age groups. Dentine samples were prepared from extracted sound third molars of known patient age. The ac-impedance measurements were carried out over a wide range of frequency. After performing all electrical measurements, dentine samples were examined under SEM to correlate the electrical measurements with their structure. Impedance measurements showed that there were differences in impedance between young and old dentine. One-way ANOVA of the means of resistance and capacitance for all age groups (20, 25, 30, 40 and 50 years old dentine) revealed a significant difference (ANOVA, P < 0.0001) as a function of age. Applying Tukey's post hoc test, to the same data showed that this difference was due to the 50 years old dentine for resistance and was due to the 40 and 50 years old dentine for capacitance which were statistically different to all other groups. SEM investigation of dentine samples showed that young dentine is characterized by open dentinal tubules distributed all over the

  8. Crystallographic Texture and Elemental Composition Mapped in Bovine Root Dentin at the 200 nm Level

    PubMed Central

    Deymier-Black, A. C.; Veis, A.; Cai, Z.; Stock, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The relationship between the mineralization of peritubular dentin (PTD) and intertubular dentin (ITD) is not well understood. Tubules are quite small, diameter ~2 μm, and this makes the near-tubule region of dentin difficult to study. Here, advanced characterization techniques are applied in a novel way to examine what organic or nanostructural signatures may indicate the end of ITD or the beginning of PTD mineralization. X-ray fluorescence intensity (Ca, P, and Zn) and X-ray diffraction patterns from carbonated apatite (cAp) were mapped around dentintubules at resolutions ten times smaller than the feature size (200 nm pixels), representing a 36% increase in resolution over earlier work. In the near tubule volumes of near-pulp, root dentin, Zn intensity was higher than in ITD remote from the tubules. This increase in Zn2+, as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis, may indicate the presence of metalloenzymes or transcription factors important to ITD or PTD mineralization. The profiles of the cAp 00.2 X-ray diffraction rings were fitted with a pseudo-Voigt function, and the spatial and azimuthal distribution of these rings’ integrated intensities indicated that the cAp platelets were arranged with their c-axes aligned tangential to the edge of the tubule lumen. This texture was continuous throughout the dentin indicating a lack of structural difference between in the Zn rich near-tubular region and the remote ITD. PMID:23630059

  9. Evaluation of carbon dioxide laser irradiation associated with calcium hydroxide in the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ana Cristina Cury Camargo; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Baldochi, Sônia Lícia; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2011-01-01

    Attempts have been made to treat dentinal hypersensitivity by sealing exposed dentinal tubules, and the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser has been shown to have a sealing effect on dentinal surfaces. The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphological ultra-structure and temperature change after CO(2) laser irradiation of dentin. Fourteen human third molars were selected and cleaned. An area was delimited, and the samples were randomly divided into seven groups: Group 1 (G1): control; G2, calcium hydroxide paste (CA) + CO(2) laser (L) (0.5 W/63,69 W/cm(2)); G3, CA + L (1 W/125,38 W/cm(2)); G4, CA + L (1.5 W/191,08 W/cm(2)); G5, L (0.5 W); G6, L (1 W); G7, L (1.5 W). All irradiation was performed in unfocused mode. The electron micrographs were analyzed by three observers. For temperature analysis, a thermocouple was used. Data were subjected to statistical analysis. The Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test showed statistical differences between the groups (P < 0.05). For the two by two comparisons, all groups treated with calcium hydroxide paste presented significantly higher mean scores. In the groups treated by CO(2) laser only, fusion, re-crystallization, cracks and carbonization were observed. A change of 1 ± 5°C was noted in the temperature. Under the limitation of an in vitro study, and with the protocols used, we concluded that CO(2) laser is safe to use for the establishment of partial fusion and re-solidification of the dentinal surface. PMID:20127133

  10. Chemical and morphological changes in human dentin after Er:YAGlaser irradiation: EDS and SEM analysis.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Arriaga, Belinda; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Olea-Mejìa, Oscar Fernando; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio José; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    Sixty samples of human dentin were divided into six groups (n = 10) and were irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ-19.9 J/cm(2), 150 mJ-29.8 J/cm(2), 100 mJ-35.3 J/cm(2), 150 mJ-53.0 J/cm(2), 200 mJ-70.7 J/cm(2), and 250 mJ-88.5 J/cm(2), respectively, at 7 Hz under a water spray. The atomic percentages of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus and the Ca-to-P molar ratio on the dentin were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The morphological changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy. A paired t-test was used in statistical analysis before and after irradiation, and a one-way ANOVA was performed (P ≤ 0.05). The atomic percent of C tended to decrease in all of the groups after irradiation with statistically significant differences, O and Mg increased with significant differences in all of the groups, and the Ca-to-P molar ratio increased in groups IV, V, and VI, with statistically significant differences between groups II and VI. All the irradiated samples showed morphological changes. Major changes in the chemical composition of dentin were observed in trace elements. A significant increase in the Ca-to-P ratio was observed in the higher energy density groups. Morphological changes included loss of smear layer with exposed dentinal tubules. The changes produced by the different energy densities employed could have clinical implications, additional studies are required to clarify them. PMID:26397964

  11. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modern self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability. PMID:20690420

  12. Tensile Strength of Mineralized/Demineralized Human Normal and Carious Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nishitani, Y.; Yoshiyama, M.; Tay, F.R.; Wadgaonkar, B.; Waller, J.; Agee, K.; Pashley, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    The bond strengths of resins to caries-affected dentin are low. This could be due to weakened organic matrix. The purpose of this work was to determine if the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of excavated carious dentin is weaker than that of normal dentin. Soft caries was excavated from extracted human molars, and the tooth was vertically sectioned into slabs. Each slab was trimmed to an hourglass shape, parallel or perpendicular to the tubule direction. Half of the specimens were mineralized, while the other half were completely demineralized in EDTA. ANOVA on ranks showed that the three-factor interactions (mineralization, caries, tubule direction) were all significant (p < 0.0001), indicating that mineralization and tubule direction gave different UTS results in normal and caries-affected dentin. No significant differences were seen between the UTS of normal and and that of caries-affected demineralized dentin in the parallel or perpendicular group. The matrix of demineralized caries-affected dentin was as strong as that of normal demineralized dentin when tested in the same direction. PMID:16246945

  13. The Reduction in Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Dentin with Depth

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Neerchal, N.K.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2011-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔKth ≈ 0.8 MPa•m0.5) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin. PMID:21628640

  14. The reduction in fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin with depth.

    PubMed

    Ivancik, J; Neerchal, N K; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2011-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth resistance of dentin was characterized as a function of depth from the dentino-enamel junction. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from the crowns of third molars in the deep, middle, and peripheral dentin. The microstructure was quantified in terms of the average tubule dimensions and density. Fatigue cracks were grown in-plane with the tubules and characterized in terms of the initiation and growth responses. Deep dentin exhibited the lowest resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as indicated by the stress intensity threshold (ΔK(th) ≈ 0.8 MPa•m(0.5)) and the highest incremental fatigue crack growth rate (over 1000 times that in peripheral dentin). Cracks in deep dentin underwent incremental extension under cyclic stresses that were 40% lower than those required in peripheral dentin. The average fatigue crack growth rates increased significantly with tubule density, indicating the importance of microstructure on the potential for tooth fracture. Molars with deep restorations are more likely to suffer from the cracked-tooth syndrome, because of the lower fatigue crack growth resistance of deep dentin.

  15. Effects of common dental materials used in preventive or operative dentistry on dentin permeability and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Thompson, Ian; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dentin remineralization induced by bioactive substances contained in common dental materials used in preventive and operative dentistry. Several materials were applied on human dentin segments. Dentin permeability was quantified using a fluid filtration system working at 20 cm H(2)O. Micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, and microhardness calculation were used to evaluate changes in the mineralization of dentin. Dentin treated with the prophylactic materials showed different dentin permeability values, in particular subsequent to immersion in remineralizing solutions (RSS). The bioactive glass (Sylc) was the only substance able to reduce dentin permeability after immersion in remineralizing solution and to show hydroxyapatite precipitation as a sign of dentin remineralization. The reduction in dentin permeability obtained after the application of the other prophylactic materials used in this study was due to the presence of the remnant material in the dentinal tubules, with no remineralization effect after storage in remineralizing solution. In conclusion, the results indicated that bioactive glass prophy powder may induce immediate remineralization of dentin. PMID:21777102

  16. Innervation of different parts of the predentin and dentin in young human premolars.

    PubMed

    Lilja, J

    1979-01-01

    The innervation of the predentin and inner part of the mineralized dentin was studied at the ultrastructural level in ten premolars. Each tooth was divided into fifteen different parts, each containing odontoblasts, predentin and dentin. It was found that the innervation in the coronal dentin was more compact than in the root dentin. Within the coronal dentin itself, the most densely innervated area was the dentin covering the pulp horns. No nerves were identified more than 100 microns from the pulp-dentinal border. No nervous structures were found in the mineralized dentin of the root. Nervous structures which seemed to have no connection with the odontoblastic processes were frequently observed in the predentin of the root. Signs of degeneration of the nervous structures of the predentin of the root was also a common finding. The observation that the intradentinal nerves were confined to the predentin and the most pulpal part of the dentin supports the theory that surface stimulation on dentin has an indirect effect on the nerves activated by movements in the liquid of the dentinal tubules.

  17. Effect of delayed light curing of a resin composite on marginal integrity in cylindrical dentine cavities.

    PubMed

    Manabe, A; Debari, K; Itoh, K; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1993-12-01

    The effect of delayed light curing of resin composite on marginal adaptation has been examined by measuring the wall-to-wall polymerization contraction gap when using a commercial resin composite together with experimental dentine bonding systems to restore cylindrical preparations in dentine. Morphological changes in dentine during dentine bonding procedures were observed using a scanning electron microscope. In a previous report, the contraction gap width for a resin composite increased when irradiation of the resin system was delayed, despite the use of a dentine bonding system considered to be 'contraction' gap free. Such deterioration in marginal adaptation was minimized by use of an experimental dentine primer, 40% erythritol methacrylate aqueous solution (EM), followed by the use of a commercial dual- or autocured dentine bonding agent. Under scanning electron microscopy, the dentine surface microstructure became unclear after EM priming, and a polymer film was detected after polymerization of the dual-cured dentine bonding agent. The hydrogelled primer and the formation of a polymer network on the dentine surface may prevent the flow of fluid from the pulp through the dentine tubules, and maintain marginal integrity if there is delay in light curing of light-activated resin composite systems.

  18. Essential role of osterix for tooth root but not crown dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chunlin; Liu, Ying; Ho, Sunita P; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-04-01

    Tooth is made of crown and root. It is widely believed that dentin formation in crown and root uses the same regulatory mechanism. However, identification of nuclear factor 1 C (NFIC)'s unique function in determining root but not crown dentin formation challenges the old thinking. In searching for the target molecules downstream of NFIC, we unexpectedly found a sharp reduction of osterix (OSX), the key transcription factor in skeleton formation, in the Nfic knockout (Nfic-KO) tooth root. We then demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of Osx in the odontoblast cell line due to a transient transfection of Nfic expression plasmid. Studies of global and conditional Osx-KO mice revealed no apparent changes in the crown dentin tubules and dentin matrix. However, the OSX conditional KO (cKO) mice (crossed to the 2.3-kb collagen type 1 [Col1]-Cre) displayed an increase in cell proliferation but great decreases in expressions of root dentin matrix proteins (dentin matrix protein 1 [DMP1] and dentin sialophosphoprotein [DSPP]), leading to an inhibition in odontoblast differentiation, and short, thin root dentin with few dentin tubules. Compared to the Nfic-KO tooth, which contains essentially no dentin tubules and remains in a "root-less" status at adult stages, the Osx-cKO root phenotype had partially improved at the late stage, indicating that other factors can compensate for OSX function. Thus, we conclude that OSX, one of the key downstream molecules of NFIC, plays a critical role in root, but not crown, formation.

  19. Ecological Hypothesis of Dentin and Root Caries.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Nyvad, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances regarding the caries process indicate that ecological phenomena induced by bacterial acid production tilt the de- and remineralization balance of the dental hard tissues towards demineralization through bacterial acid-induced adaptation and selection within the microbiota - from the dynamic stability stage to the aciduric stage via the acidogenic stage [Takahashi and Nyvad, 2008]. Dentin and root caries can also be partly explained by this hypothesis; however, the fact that these tissues contain a considerable amount of organic material suggests that protein degradation is involved in caries formation. In this review, we compiled relevant histological, biochemical, and microbiological information about dentin/root caries and refined the hypothesis by adding degradation of the organic matrix (the proteolytic stage) to the abovementioned stages. Bacterial acidification not only induces demineralization and exposure of the organic matrix in dentin/root surfaces but also activation of dentin-embedded and salivary matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins. These phenomena initiate degradation of the demineralized organic matrix in dentin/root surfaces. While a bacterial involvement has never been confirmed in the initial degradation of organic material, the detection of proteolytic/amino acid-degrading bacteria and bacterial metabolites in dentin and root caries suggests a bacterial digestion and metabolism of partly degraded matrix. Moreover, bacterial metabolites might induce pulpitis as an inflammatory/immunomodulatory factor. Root and dentin surfaces are always at risk of becoming demineralized in the oral cavity, and exposed organic materials can be degraded by host-derived proteases contained in saliva and dentin itself. New approaches to the prevention and treatment of root/dentin caries are required. PMID:27458979

  20. The effect of diode laser irradiation on dentin as a preventive measure against dental erosion: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    de-Melo, Mary A S; Passos, Vanara F; Alves, Jose J; Barros, Eduardo B; Santiago, Sérgio L; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A

    2011-09-01

    Increasing rates of non-carious cervical lesions due to dental erosion, exposure of dentinal tubules, and hypersensitivity to environmental stimuli have led to the development of new prevention strategies. This study evaluated the effects of a low-intensity diode laser (λ = 808 nm) on the dentinal chemical composition and prevention of demineralization. In addition, the study monitored temperature changes during the course of irradiation. Forty dentin specimens were randomly allocated into four groups (n = 10): G1 - No treatment (control), G2 - irradiated with 15 J/cm(2), G3 - irradiated with 30 J/cm(2), and G4 - irradiated with 60 J/cm(2). Each specimen was partially covered with nail varnish, treated according to the group irradiation levels, and exposed to an erosive challenge (1.0 M hydrochloric acid) for 5 min. Afterwards, dentin loss was profilometrically analyzed and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Intrapulpal temperatures were measured during the dentin irradiation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05) were performed to assess differences. For all irradiated groups, intrapulpal temperature changes were less than 3°C. The G2 group showed statistically significant differences when compared to the other groups, representing the lowest temperature increase. A quantitative element analysis via EDX did not significantly differ (p < 0.05) for Ca, P, F, O, or C between the four groups when measured after irradiation/erosion. The mean wear rates (± SD, μm) were 35.66 ± 7.28; 40.70 ± 5.03; 38.17 ± 10.81 and 25.25 ± 6.87 for G1-G4, respectively. The G4 group statistically differed from all other groups representing the lowest wear rate. These results suggest that dentin irradiation, using a diode laser with levels set at 60 J/cm(2), may induce inhibitory effects on root dentin demineralization without causing any harmful thermal effects. However, the exact mechanism of the action of the laser

  1. Morphological and chemical changes in dentin after using endodontic agents: Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abraha~o.; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2012-07-01

    We examine the morphological and chemical changes in the pulp chamber dentin after using endodontic agents by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), and micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μEDXRF). Thirty teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and divided by six groups (n=5): NT-no treatment; CHX-2% chlorhexidine; CHXE-2% chlorhexidine+17% EDTA E-17% EDTA; SH5-5.25% NaOCl; SH5E-5.25% NaOCl+17% EDTA. The inorganic and organic content was analyzed by FT-Raman. μEDXRF examined calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content as well as Ca/P ratio. Impressions of specimens were evaluated by SEM. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Differences were observed among groups for the 960 cm-1 peak. Ca and P content differences were significant (SH5>NT=SH5E>CHX>E>CHXE). CHXE and E presented the highest Ca/P ratio values compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The SEM images in the EDTA-treated groups had the highest number of open tubules. Erosion in the tubules was observed in CHX and SH5E groups. Endodontic agents change the inorganic and organic content of pulp chamber dentin. NaOCl used alone, or in association with EDTA, was the most effective agent considering chemical and morphological approaches.

  2. Differences in the Microstructure and Fatigue Properties of Dentin Between Residents of North and South America

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Naranjo, M.; Correa, S.; Ossa, A.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial variations in the microstructure of dentin contribute to its mechanical behavior. Objective The objective of this investigation was to compare the microstructure and fatigue behavior of dentin from donors of two different countries. Methods Caries-free third molars were obtained from dental practices in Colombia, South America and the US to assemble two age-matched samples. The microstructure of the coronal dentin was evaluated at three characteristic depths (i.e. deep, middle and superficial dentin) using scanning electron microscopy and image processing techniques. The mechanical behavior of dentin in these three regions was evaluated by the fatigue crack growth resistance. Cyclic crack growth was achieved in-plane with the dentin tubules and the fatigue crack growth behavior was characterized in terms of the stress intensity threshold and the Paris Law parameters. Results There was no difference in the tubule density between the dentin of patients from the two countries. However, there were significant differences (p≤0.05) in the tubule lumen diameters between the two groups in the deep and peripheral regions. In regards to the fatigue resistance, there was a significant increase (p≤0.05) in threshold stress intensity range, and a significant decrease in fatigue crack growth coefficient with increasing distance from the pulp in teeth from the US donors. In contrast, these properties were independent of location for the dentin of teeth from the Colombian donors. Conclusions The microstructure of dentin and its mechanical behavior appear to be a function of patient background, which may include environmental factors and/or ethnicity. PMID:24960115

  3. A new method for characterization of thermal properties of human enamel and dentine: Influence of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.; Liu, Q. D.; Kim, T.; Xu, F.; Bai, B. F.; Lu, T. J.

    2010-11-01

    For better selection of "tooth-like" dental restorative materials, it is of great importance to evaluate the thermal properties of the human tooth. A simple method capable of non-destructively characterizing the thermal properties of the individual layers (dentine and enamel) of human tooth is presented. The traditional method of monotonic heating regime was combined with infrared thermography to measure the thermal diffusivities of enamel and dentine layers without physically separating them, with 4.08 (±0.178) × 10 7 m 2/s measured for enamel and 2.01 (±0.050) × 10 7 m 2/s for dentine. Correspondingly, the thermal conductivity was calculated to be 0.81 W/mK (enamel) and 0.48 W/mK (dentine). To examine the dependence of thermal conductivity on the configuration of dentine microstructure (microtubules), the Maxwell-Eucken and Parallel models of effective thermal conductivity are employed. The effective thermal conductivity of dentine in the direction parallel to tubules was found to be about 1.1 times higher than that perpendicular to the tubules, indicating weak anisotropy. By adopting the Series model, the bulk thermal conductivity of enamel and dentine layers is estimated to be 0.57 W/mK.

  4. Distal convoluted tubule.

    PubMed

    McCormick, James A; Ellison, David H

    2015-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) is a short nephron segment, interposed between the macula densa and collecting duct. Even though it is short, it plays a key role in regulating extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte homeostasis. DCT cells are rich in mitochondria, and possess the highest density of Na+/K+-ATPase along the nephron, where it is expressed on the highly amplified basolateral membranes. DCT cells are largely water impermeable, and reabsorb sodium and chloride across the apical membrane via electroneurtral pathways. Prominent among this is the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, target of widely used diuretic drugs. These cells also play a key role in magnesium reabsorption, which occurs predominantly, via a transient receptor potential channel (TRPM6). Human genetic diseases in which DCT function is perturbed have provided critical insights into the physiological role of the DCT, and how transport is regulated. These include Familial Hyperkalemic Hypertension, the salt-wasting diseases Gitelman syndrome and EAST syndrome, and hereditary hypomagnesemias. The DCT is also established as an important target for the hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone; it also appears to respond to sympathetic-nerve stimulation and changes in plasma potassium. Here, we discuss what is currently known about DCT physiology. Early studies that determined transport rates of ions by the DCT are described, as are the channels and transporters expressed along the DCT with the advent of molecular cloning. Regulation of expression and activity of these channels and transporters is also described; particular emphasis is placed on the contribution of genetic forms of DCT dysregulation to our understanding.

  5. Biomimetic remineralization of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-na; Zhang, Wei; Pashley, David H.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mao, Jing; Chen, Ji-hua; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Remineralization of demineralized dentin is important for improving dentin bonding stability and controlling primary and secondary caries. Nevertheless, conventional dentin remineralization strategy is not suitable for remineralizing completely-demineralized dentin within hybrid layers created by etch-and-rinse and moderately aggressive self-etch adhesive systems, or the superficial part of a caries-affected dentin lesion left behind after minimally invasive caries removal. Biomimetic remineralization represents a different approach to this problem by attempting to backfill the demineralized dentin collagen with liquid-like amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor particles that are stabilized by biomimetic analogs of noncollagenous proteins. Methods This paper reviewed the changing concepts in calcium phosphate mineralization of fibrillar collagen, including the recently discovered, non-classical particle-based crystallization concept, formation of polymer-induced liquid- precursors (PILP), experimental collagen models for mineralization, and the need for using phosphate-containing biomimetic analogs for biomimetic mineralization of collagen. Published work on the remineralization of resin-dentin bonds and artificial caries-like lesions by various research groups was then reviewed. Finally, the problems and progress associated with the translation of a scientifically-sound concept into a clinically-applicable approach are discussed. Results and Significance The particle-based biomimetic remineralization strategy based on the PILP process demonstrates great potential in remineralizing faulty hybrid layers or caries-like dentin. Based on this concept, research in the development of more clinically feasible dentin remineralization strategy, such as incorporating poly(anionic) acid-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor-containing mesoporous silica nanofillers in dentin adhesives, may provide a promising strategy for increasing of the

  6. Effect of UVA-activated riboflavin on dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Cova, A; Breschi, L; Nato, F; Ruggeri, A; Carrilho, M; Tjäderhane, L; Prati, C; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Mazzoni, A

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have reported collagen cross-linking after exposure to riboflavin followed by ultraviolet-A (UVA) exposure. This study is the first to investigate the effect of a riboflavin-containing primer on adhesive interface stability and dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity. Human dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid, treated with 0.1% riboflavin, exposed to UVA for 2 min, and bonded with a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. Adhesive was applied to control specimens without riboflavin/UVA. Specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength tests and pulled to failure after storage for 24 hrs, 6 mos, or 1 yr. Interfacial nanoleakage was evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity, we performed correlative zymographic assays on protein extracts obtained from phosphoric-acid-etched dentin powder with or without riboflavin/UVA treatment and XP Bond. Ultraviolet-activated riboflavin treatment increased the immediate bond strength to dentin at all aging intervals (p < 0.05 vs. control) and decreased interfacial nanoleakage in aged specimens (1 yr; p < 0.05). Zymograms revealed that riboflavin/UVA pre-treatment inhibited dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity (especially MMP-9). In conclusion, dentinal collagen cross-linking induced by riboflavin/UVA increased immediate bond strength, stabilized the adhesive interface, and inhibited dentin matrix metalloproteinases, thereby increasing the durability of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:21940521

  7. Digital moiré interferometric analysis on the effect of nanoparticle conditioning on the mechanical deformation in dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang Chi; Kishen, Anil

    2016-02-01

    Dentin is a biological composite that forms the major bulk of tooth structure. Understanding the biomechanical response of dentin structure to forces is essential to restore the loss of mechanical integrity associated with dentin loss during disease or treatment procedures. Moiré interferometry is an optical interferometry based method, which allows wholefield, real-time analysis of dental structures with high-sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the deformation gradients in dentin during function and subsequent to surface conditioning with bioactive biopolymeric nanoparticle. Slab shaped dentin specimens were prepared and a customized loading jig was used to compressively load the specimens from 10 N to 50 N. Specific regions of interest was chosen on the dentin specimens for strain analysis. The digital moiré interferometry experiments showed a distinct deformation pattern in dentin in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules, which increased with increase in dentin loss. The dentin conditioned with nanoparticles did not display marked increase in strain gradients with loads. The current photomechanical experiment highlighted the impact of nanoparticle treatment to improve the mechanical integrity of dentin.

  8. Age-related transparent root dentin: mineral concentration, crystallite size, and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Kinney, J H; Nalla, R K; Pople, J A; Breunig, T M; Ritchie, R O

    2005-06-01

    Many fractures occur in teeth that have been altered, for example restored or endodontically repaired. It is therefore essential to evaluate the structure and mechanical properties of these altered dentins. One such altered form of dentin is transparent (sometimes called sclerotic) dentin, which forms gradually with aging. The present study focuses on differences in the structure and mechanical properties of normal versus transparent dentin. The mineral concentration, as measured by X-ray computed microtomography, was significantly higher in transparent dentin, the elevated concentration being consistent with the closure of the tubule lumens. Crystallite size, as measured by small angle X-ray scattering, was slightly smaller in transparent dentin, although the importance of this finding requires further study. The elastic properties were unchanged by transparency; however, transparent dentin, unlike normal dentin, exhibited almost no yielding before failure. In addition, the fracture toughness was lowered by roughly 20% while the fatigue lifetime was deleteriously affected at high stress levels. These results are discussed in terms of the altered microstructure of transparent dentin.

  9. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural evaluation of the effects of phosphoric acid etching on dentin proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, A; Rathkamp, H; Dreyer, E

    2000-12-01

    It has been reported that phosphoric acid (PA) produces structural and molecular alterations in dentin collagen fibrils; however, no relevant information exists on the influence of etching with PA on dentin non-collagenous macromolecules. The present study investigated, by immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural histochemistry, the behavior of dentin proteoglycans (PG) after etching human dentin samples with 35% PA gel (thickened with colloidal silica) or with a 35% PA liquid for 15, 30 and 120 s. Immunolabeling with a mouse monoclonal anti-chondroitin sulfate antibody demonstrated that glycosaminoglycans (GAG) were preserved within dentinal tubules opened to the surface after etching with PA gel. In addition, the cationic tracer polyethyleneimine, used for the ultramicroscopic localization of PG anionic sites, revealed that treatment of dentin samples with PA gel preserved the polyanionic peritubular PG in the etched area. On the other hand, etching with the PA liquid produced loss of peritubular GAG and PG anionic sites in the etched dentin surface. The results obtained indicated that similar concentrations of PA in gel or liquid formulations differently affect the organization of dentin PG. The clinical significance of these in vitro findings and the structural and molecular interactions of dentin PG with adhesive systems are still unknown.

  10. Clinical, histological and microbiological study of hand-excavated carious dentine in extracted permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Bönecker, M; Grossman, E; Cleaton-Jones, P E; Parak, R

    2003-08-01

    Changes in cultivable flora in dentine samples collected before and after hand excavation were examined in association with clinical status of the cavity surface, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thirty-five extracted permanent molar teeth with an occlusal caries lesion were excavated with hand instruments according to the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach. Excavation pressure, dentine colour and consistency were recorded at the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) prior to carious dentine removal and at the cavity floor after the final excavation; a microbiological sample of dentine was taken at both stages. Twelve restored teeth; six with positive and six with negative bacterial growth on the second sample, were selected for light microscopy and SEM. The hand-excavation removed tooth structure was soft, irreversibly damaged, dark and highly infected. Hand excavation reached dentine of increased hardness with a more normal colour to provide a sound structural base for restoration. Light and SEM examination of the cavity floor showed infected dentinal tubules in all 12 teeth examined. Linear logistic analysis showed a statistical association between light-yellow dentine on the cavity floor and an absence of bacterial growth (P = 0.006). This short-term in vitro study showed that caries-producing bacteria remained in dentine close to the cavity floor in 26/35 teeth despite clinical observations that indicated a suitably prepared cavity floor. PMID:14649040

  11. Disorders of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Hart, P Suzanne; Hart, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    Dentin, the most abundant tissue in teeth, is produced by odontoblasts, which differentiate from mesenchymal cells of the dental papilla. Dentinogenesis is a highly controlled process that results in the conversion of unmineralized predentin to mineralized dentin. By weight, 70% of the dentin matrix is mineralized, while the organic phase accounts for 20% and water constitutes the remaining 10%. Type I collagen is the primary component (>85%) of the organic portion of dentin. The non-collagenous part of the organic matrix is composed of various proteins, with dentin phosphoprotein predominating, accounting for about 50% of the non-collagenous part. Dentin defects are broadly classified into two major types: dentinogenesis imperfectas (DIs, types I-III) and dentin dysplasias (DDs, types I and II). To date, mutations in DSPP have been found to underlie the dentin disorders DI types II and III and DD type II. With the elucidation of the underlying genetic mechanisms has come the realization that the clinical characteristics associated with DSPP mutations appear to represent a continuum of phenotypes. Thus, these disorders should likely be called DSPP-associated dentin defects, with DD type II representing the mild end of the phenotypic spectrum and DI type III representing the severe end.

  12. Dynamic mechanical behavior of human dentin and collagen: Methods and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, Heonjune

    Experimental evaluations of human coronal dentin and its collagen fibrils were performed by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) using nanoindentation and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The primary objectives were to quantify the changes in mechanical behavior of intertubular and peritubular dentin with age, and to evaluate the nanostructure and mechanical behavior of the collagen fibrils. Specimens of coronal dentin were evaluated by nanoDMA using single indents and in scanning mode via scanning probe microscopy. Collagen fibrils from coronal dentin were evaluated using Pulse-Force Mode (PFM) AFM (Peakforce QNM). Nanoindentation results showed that there were no significant differences in the storage modulus or complex modulus between the two age groups (18-25 versus 54-83 yrs) for either the intertubular or peritubular dentin. However, there were significant differences in the dampening behavior between the young and old tissues, as represented in the loss modulus and tanϕ responses. For both the intertubular and peritubular components, the capacity for dampening was significantly lower in the old group. Scanning based nanoDMA showed that the tubules of old dentin exhibit a gradient in elastic behavior, with decrease in elastic modulus from the cuff to the center of tubules filled with newly deposited mineral. AFM results showed that the stiffness of the old dentin fibrils in the peak and trough regions were greater than the young dentin fibrils. In addition, there were significant differences in the dampening behavior between the young and old dentin fibrils, as represented in the energy dissipation, phase angle and loss modulus responses. For both the peak and trough regions, the dissipative capacity was significantly lower in the old dentin fibrils.

  13. In vitro evaluation of the effect of natural orange juices on dentin morphology.

    PubMed

    Zandim, Daniela Leal; Corrêa, Fernanda Oliveira Bello; Rossa Júnior, Carlos; Sampaio, José Eduardo Cezar

    2008-01-01

    The patient's diet has been considered an important etiological factor of dentin hypersensitivity. The frequent ingestion of acidic substances can promote the loss of dental structure or remove the smear layer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of smear layer removal and dentinal tubules exposure by different natural orange juices. Extracted human teeth were submitted to manual scaling in order to develop the smear layer. Seventy dentin samples were obtained and distributed into the following groups: Control, lime orange, lime, valência orange, navel orange, mandarin, and tangerine. Each group included 2 methods of application: Topical and topical + friction. After preparation for SEM analysis, photomicrographs were assessed by a blind calibrated examiner using an index system. The Kruskal-Wallis test indicated a significant influence of the orange juices on smear layer removal. Significant difference was observed between navel orange, valência orange, mandarin and the control group (p < 0.05). These orange juices resulted in greater removal of the smear layer and greater opening of dentinal tubules. The comparison between the application methods for each group using the Mann-Whitney test showed that friction increased smear layer removal significantly only for lime orange and lime. The data suggest that certain natural orange juices are more effective in terms of smear layer removal and dentinal tubules exposure than others. PMID:18622489

  14. Morphological analysis and chemical content of natural dentin carious lesion zones.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W H; Konopka, S; Kriwalsky, M S; Gaengler, P

    2003-10-01

    unique mineralization pattern of the translucent zone is a biological reaction to the carious attack. Because active dentin lesions exhibit many non-occluded open dentin tubules, further bacterial invasion or, in case of dentin treatment, the penetration of bonding agents towards the pulp is morphologically not prevented and therefore of clinical importance.

  15. Growth Factor Liberation and DPSC Response Following Dentine Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Sadaghiani, L; Gleeson, H B; Youde, S; Waddington, R J; Lynch, C D; Sloan, A J

    2016-10-01

    Liberation of the sequestrated bioactive molecules from dentine by the action of applied dental materials has been proposed as an important mechanism in inducing a dentinogenic response in teeth with viable pulps. Although adhesive restorations and dentine-bonding procedures are routinely practiced, clinical protocols to improve pulp protection and dentine regeneration are not currently driven by biological knowledge. This study investigated the effect of dentine (powder and slice) conditioning by etchants/conditioners relevant to adhesive restorative systems on growth factor solubilization and odontoblast-like cell differentiation of human dental pulp progenitor cells (DPSCs). The agents included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; 10%, pH 7.2), phosphoric acid (37%, pH <1), citric acid (10%, pH 1.5), and polyacrylic acid (25%, pH 3.9). Growth factors were detected in dentine matrix extracts drawn by EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid from powdered dentine. The dentine matrix extracts were shown to be bioactive, capable of stimulating odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation as observed by gene expression and phenotypic changes in DPSCs cultured in monolayer on plastic. Polyacrylic acid failed to solubilize proteins from powdered dentine and was therefore considered ineffective in triggering a growth factor-mediated response in cells. The study went on to investigate the effect of conditioning dentine slices on growth factor liberation and DPSC behavior. Conditioning by EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid exposed growth factors on dentine and triggered an upregulation in genes associated with mineralized differentiation, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase in DPSCs cultured on dentine. The cells demonstrated odontoblast-like appearances with elongated bodies and long extracellular processes extending on dentine surface. However, phosphoric acid-treated dentine appeared strikingly less populated with cells, suggesting a detrimental impact on cell

  16. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    PubMed Central

    MOLLICA, Fernanda Brandão; TORRES, Carlos Rocha Gomes; GONÇALVES, Sergio Eduardo de Paiva; MANCINI, †Maria Nadir Gasparoto

    2012-01-01

    There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. Objectives The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. Material and methods The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10), according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. Results ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a), Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab), Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc). Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc), Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc), Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d). Conclusions DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values. PMID:23032207

  17. Indirect pulp capping in young patients: immunohistological study of pulp-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Ţuculină, Mihaela Jana; Răescu, Mihaela; Dascălu, Ionela Teodora; Popescu, Mihaela; Andreescu, Claudia Florina; Dăguci, C; Cumpătă, C N; Nimigean, Vanda Roxana; Baniţă, Ileana Monica

    2013-01-01

    Indirect capping is a complex therapy exclusively needed in deep cavities that provides, using biomaterials, a disinfection of the dentinary sore and seals the dentinary tubules, protects the pulp of physical mechanisms and chemical agents and stimulates the mechanisms that produce new dentin. Following this idea, we studied the histological changes in the dental pulp tissue and also the specific immunohistochemical response in various structures when an indirect capping technique was used. We used special histological techniques followed by classical staining or by immunohistochemical reaction in order to assess the odontoblastic, and the vascular reaction. The immunohistochemical study allows us to evaluate the changes in the pulp-dentin complex, as the result of the changes in the dentinal tubules permeability and the biological reactions at this level. PMID:24399005

  18. Adhesion to chondroitinase ABC treated dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Annalisa; Pashley, David H.; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Vita, Francesca; Falconi, Mirella; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Dentin bonding relies on complete resin impregnation throughout the demineralised hydrophilic collagen mesh. Chondroitin sulphate-glycosaminoglycans are claimed to regulate the three-dimensional arrangement of the dentin organic matrix and its hydrophilicity. The aim of this study was to investigate bond strength of two etch-and-rinse adhesives to chondroitinase ABC treated dentin. Human extracted molars were treated with chondroitinase ABC and a double labelling immunohistochemical technique was applied to reveal type I collagen and chondroitin 4/6 sulphate distribution under field emission in-lens scanning electron microscope. The immunohistochemical technique confirmed the effective removal of chondroitin 4/6 sulphate after the enzymatic treatment. Dentin surfaces exposed to chondroitinase ABC and untreated specimens prepared on untreated acid-etched dentin were bonded with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose or Prime & Bond NT. Bonded specimens were submitted to microtensile testing and nanoleakage interfacial analysis under transmission electron microscope. Increased mean values of microtensile bond strength and reduced nanoleakage expression were found for both adhesives after chondroitinase ABC treatment of the dentin surface. Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose increased its bond strength about 28%, while bonding made with Prime & Bond NT almost doubled (92% increase) compared to untreated specimens. This study supports the hypothesis that adhesion can be enhanced by removal of chondroitin 4/6 sulphate and dermatan sulphate, probably due to a reduced amount of water content and enlarged interfibrillar spaces. Further studies should validate this hypothesis investigating the stability of chondroitin 4/6 and dermatan sulphate-depleted dentin bonded interface over time. PMID:18161809

  19. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; Mackie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-11-20

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  20. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; MacKie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  1. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus) adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003). Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064). Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant. PMID:25984475

  2. Dentin and pulp sense cold stimulus.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Masayuki; Tatsuyama, Shoko; Fujisawa, Mari; Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoshiko; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Torii, Mistuso

    2015-05-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common symptom, and recent convergent evidences have reported transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in odontoblasts act as mechanical and thermal molecular sensor, which detect stimulation applied on the exposed dentin surface, to drive multiple odontoblastic cellular functions, such as sensory transduction and/or dentin formation. In the present study, we confirmed expression of TRP melastatin subfamily member-8 (TRPM8) channels in primary cultured cells derived from human dental pulp cells (HPCs) and mouse odontoblast-lineage cells (OLCs) as well as in dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP) positive acutely isolated rat odontoblasts from dental pulp tissue slice culture by immunohistochemical analyses. In addition, we detected TRPM8 channel expression on HPCs and OLCs by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. These results indicated that both odontoblasts and dental pulp cells express TRPM8 channels in rat, mouse and human, and therefore we hypothesize they may contribute as cold sensor in tooth. PMID:25665859

  3. Chlorhexidine Nanocapsule Drug Delivery Approach to the Resin-Dentin Interface.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, B M; Selvan, S T; Lu, T B; Xie, H; Neo, J; Fawzy, A S

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we are introducing a new drug-delivery approach to demineralized dentin substrates through microsized dentinal tubules in the form of drug-loaded nanocapsules. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is widely used in adhesive dentistry due to its nonspecific matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory effect and antibacterial activities. Poly(ε-caprolactone) nanocapsules (nano-PCL) loaded with CHX were fabricated by interfacial polymer deposition at PCL/CHX ratios of 125:10, 125:25, and 125:50. Unloaded nanocapsules (blank) were fabricated as control. The fabricated nanocapsules were characterized in vitro in terms of particle size, surface charges, particle recovery, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading. Nanocapsule morphology, drug inclusion, structural properties, and crystallinity were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Initial screening of the antibacterial activities and the cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules were also conducted. Nanocapsules, as carried on ethanol/water solution, were delivered to demineralized dentin specimens connected to an ex vivo model setup simulating the pulpal pressure to study their infiltration, penetration depth, and retention inside the dentinal tubules by SEM/TEM. Nanocapsules were Ag labeled and delivered to demineralized dentin, followed by the application of a 2-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive. CHX-release profiles were characterized in vitro and ex vivo up to 25 d. Spherical nanocapsules were fabricated with a CHX core coated with a thin PCL shell. The blank nanocapsules exhibited the largest z-average diameter with negatively charged ζ-potential. With CHX incorporation, the nanocapsule size was decreased with a positive shift in ζ-potential. Nano-PCL/CHX at 125:50 showed the highest drug loading, antibacterial effect, and CHX release both in vitro and ex vivo. SEM and TEM revealed the deep

  4. Penetration of smeared or nonsmeared dentine by Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Chandler, N P; Jenkinson, H F

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the penetration of smeared and nonsmeared dentine by Streptococcus gordonii. Prepared human roots, grouped as either nonsmeared or smeared, were immersed in a suspension of S. gordonii cells for 3 weeks. The roots were then prepared for scanning electron microscopy and histological analysis. Dentine discs prepared from coronal dentine were grouped similarly. Using a fluid filtration apparatus, the hydraulic conductance (Lp) of each disc was determined before and after incubation with bacterial suspension. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the roots following infection with bacteria showed no change in the smear layer (P < 0.0001). Histological sections revealed that bacterial penetration of all the nonsmeared samples had occurred, while nine out of 10 smeared samples showed no bacterial penetration (P < 0.0001). The Lp of the nonsmeared discs was significantly reduced by 42% (P < 0.0001) after bacterial penetration. However, the smeared samples revealed a 1% reduction in Lp which was not significant (P > 0.05). The results suggest that dentinal smear layers are an effective barrier to dentinal tubule invasion by S. gordonii. PMID:9206406

  5. Young's modulus of peritubular and intertubular human dentin by nano-indentation tests.

    PubMed

    Ziskind, Daniel; Hasday, Moran; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2011-04-01

    The local Young modulus of dry dentin viewed as a hierarchical composite was measured by nano-indentation using two types of experiments, both in a continuous stiffness measurement mode. First, tests were performed radially along straight lines running across highly mineralized peritubular dentin sections and through less mineralized intertubular dentin areas. These tests revealed a gradual decrease in Young's modulus from the bulk of the peritubular dentin region where modulus values of up to ∼40-42GPa were observed, down to approximately constant values of ∼17GPa in the intertubular dentin region. A second set of nano-indentation experiments was performed on the facets of an irregular polyhedron specimen cut from the intertubular dentin region, so as to probe the modulus of intertubular dentin specimens at different orientations relative to the tubular direction. The results demonstrated that the intertubular dentin region may be considered to be quasi-isotropic, with a slightly higher modulus value (∼22GPa) when the indenting tip axis is parallel to the tubular direction, compared to the values (∼18GPa) obtained when the indenting tip axis is perpendicular to the tubule direction.

  6. Dentin sialophosphoprotein in biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Monica; Butler, William T; Qin, Chunlin

    2010-10-01

    Two of the proteins found in significant quantity in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of dentin are dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). DPP, the most abundant of the noncollagenous proteins (NCPs) in dentin is an unusually polyanionic protein, containing a large number of aspartic acids (Asp) and phosphoserines (Pse) in the repeating sequences of (Asp-Pse)(n). and (Asp-Pse-Pse)(n). The many negatively charged regions of DPP are thought to promote mineralization by binding calcium and presenting it to collagen fibers at the mineralization front during the formation of dentin. This purported role of DPP is supported by a sizeable pool of in vitro mineralization data showing that DPP is an important initiator and modulator for the formation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals. Quite differently, DSP is a glycoprotein, with little or no phosphate. DPP and DSP are the cleavage products of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Human and mouse genetic studies have demonstrated that mutations in, or knockout of, the Dspp gene result in mineralization defects in dentin and/or bone. The discoveries in the past 40 years with regard to DPP, DSP, and DSPP have greatly enhanced our understanding of biomineralization and set a new stage for future studies. In this review, we summarize the important and new developments made in the past four decades regarding the structure and regulation of the Dspp gene, the biochemical characteristics of DSPP, DPP, and DSP as well as the cell/tissue localizations and functions of these molecules.

  7. Kinesin 1 Drives Autolysosome Tubulation.

    PubMed

    Du, Wanqing; Su, Qian Peter; Chen, Yang; Zhu, Yueyao; Jiang, Dong; Rong, Yueguang; Zhang, Senyan; Zhang, Yixiao; Ren, He; Zhang, Chuanmao; Wang, Xinquan; Gao, Ning; Wang, Yanfeng; Sun, Lingfei; Sun, Yujie; Yu, Li

    2016-05-23

    Autophagic lysosome reformation (ALR) plays an important role in maintaining lysosome homeostasis. During ALR, lysosomes are reformed by recycling lysosomal components from autolysosomes. The most noticeable step of ALR is autolysosome tubulation, but it is currently unknown how the process is regulated. Here, using an approach combining in vivo studies and in vitro reconstitution, we found that the kinesin motor protein KIF5B is required for autolysosome tubulation and that KIF5B drives autolysosome tubulation by pulling on the autolysosomal membrane. Furthermore, we show that KIF5B directly interacts with PtdIns(4,5)P2. Kinesin motors are recruited and clustered on autolysosomes via interaction with PtdIns(4,5)P2 in a clathrin-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that clathrin promotes formation of PtdIns(4,5)P2-enriched microdomains, which are required for clustering of KIF5B. Our study reveals a mechanism by which autolysosome tubulation was generated.

  8. Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Oquendo, Anabella

    2011-07-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is exemplified by brief, sharp, well-localized pain in response to thermal, evaporative, tactile, osmotic, or chemical stimuli that cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology. Pulpal pain is usually more prolonged, dull, aching, and poorly localized and lasts longer than the applied stimulus. Up to 30% of adults have dentinal hypersensitivity at some time. Current techniques for treatment may be only transient in nature and results are not always predictable. Two methods of treatment of dentin hypersensitivity are tubular occlusion and blockage of nerve activity. A differential diagnosis needs to be accomplished before any treatment. PMID:21726693

  9. In vitro effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on dentine hypersensitivity. Dentine permeability and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine clinical parameters for the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity. Two antagonist areas were determined as control and experimental areas for irradiation in 90 premolar roots. Each surface was conditioned with 24% EDTA (sub-group 1) and 35% phosphoric acid (sub-group 2) and irradiated with the following settings: 1) Er:YAG, 60 mJ, 2 Hz, defocused; groups 2 to 9: irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 20 Hz, Z6 tip, 0% of air and water: 2) Er,Cr:YSGG 0.25 W; 3) 0.5 W; 4) 0.75 W; 5) 1.0 W; 6) 1.25 W, 7) 1.50 W, 8) 2 W; 9) 2 W. After irradiation, samples were immersed in methylene blue solution and included in epoxy resin to obtain longitudinal cuts. The images were digitalized and analyzed by computer software. Although the samples irradiated with Er:YAG laser showed less microleakage, sub-group 1 showed differences between the groups, differing statistically from groups 3, 6, and 9. The results of sub-group 2 showed that the mean values of Er:YAG samples showed a negative trend, however, no differences were detected between the groups. For scanning electron microscopy analysis, dentine squares were obtained and prepared to evaluate the superficial morphology. Partial closure of dentinal tubules was observed after irradiation with Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser in the 0.25 and 0.50 W protocols. As the energy densities rose, open dentinal tubules, carbonization and cracks were observed. It can be concluded that none of the parameters were capable of eliminating microleakage, however, clinical studies with Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers should be conducted with the lowest protocols in order to determine the most satisfactory setting for dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:21948399

  10. Cryopreserved dentin matrix as a scaffold material for dentin-pulp tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Liang; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Zongting; Feng, Lian; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2014-06-01

    Cryopreservation has been identified as an efficient approach to preserve tissue engineered products for a long term. Our prior studies have suggested that the treated dentin matrix (TDM) could be an ideal bioactive scaffold for dental tissue regeneration. In this study, we hypothesize that the cryopreservation could effectively maintain the survival and viability of dentinogenesis-related proteins of TDM and the cryopreserved dentin matrix (CDM) would provide the suitable biological scaffold and inductive microenvironment for the regeneration of dentin-pulp like tissue. CDM-3 and CDM-6 were prepared by cryopreserving TDM in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C) with cryoprotectant for 3 months and 6 months, respectively. Various biological characteristics of CDM, including mechanical properties, cell proliferation, and odontogenesis ability, were investigated. To further evaluate the inductive capacity of CDM, human dental follicle cells were encapsulated within CDM, and implanted the scaffold into a mouse model for 8 weeks, and the grafts were harvested and assessed histologically. The CDM showed superior mechanical properties than TDM. Compared to TDM, CDM can release more dentinogenesis-related proteins due to the larger pore diameter. Cell proliferation with the addition of CDM extract liquid was similar to that of TDM in the first five days. Human dental follicle cells, under the effect of CDM extract liquid, highly expressed bone sialoprotein, collagen-1, alkaline phosphatase, indicating that CDM, regarded as the inductive microenvironment, plays an important role in odontogenesis. Most importantly, in vivo, CDM could induce dental follicle cells to regenerate new dentin-pulp like tissues, such as dentinal tubules, predentin, collagen fibers, nerves, and blood vessels which were positive for dentin sialophosphoprotein, dental matrix protein-1, Tubulin, and collagen-1. In conclusion, CDM is an ideal biological scaffold material for human dentin-pulp like tissue

  11. Comparative evaluation of self-etching primers with fourth and fifth generation dentin-bonding systems on carious and normal dentin substrates: An in vitro shear bond strength analysis

    PubMed Central

    Giriyappa, Ramesh H; Chandra, B Suresh

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that bonding to caries-affected dentin would yield strengths that are lower than bond strengths achievable when bonded to normal dentin. Dentin-bonding systems used in this study were fourth and fifth generation as well as self-etching primers. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight freshly extracted mandibular and maxillary molars were selected of which 24 were caries-affected teeth and the remaining were noncarious teeth. Random sampling was done with eight teeth in each group based on the bonding system used. In caries-affected teeth, the soft, stainable, caries-infected dentin was excavated using a caries detector dye whereas the hard, caries-affected, nonstainable dentin was retained. All the teeth were subsequently mounted in a suitable acrylic mould. Prepared teeth were restored with a single composite resin, using three different dentin bonding systems. These prepared specimens were transferred to a Hounsfield tensometer to measure the shear bond strength. The results obtained were analyzed using Anova, Student's unpaired t-test, and Student Neuman Keulis test. Results: The results showed that the self-etching primer required the highest mean shear load compared to the fifth and fourth generation dentin-bonding systems in both normal dentin and caries-affected dentin. Conclusion: Bond strength to dentin depends on whether the dentinal tubule is open or occluded. Within the limitations of this study, it was observed that bond strength to caries-affected dentin was low compared to normal dentin. PMID:20351973

  12. CO2 laser improves 45S5 bioglass interaction with dentin.

    PubMed

    Bakry, A S; Takahashi, H; Otsuki, M; Sadr, A; Yamashita, K; Tagami, J

    2011-02-01

    Bioglass 45S5 is a bioactive glass that can create a layer of calcium-phosphate crystals on mineralized hard tissues. In this study, 45S5 bioglass was mixed with phosphoric acid and irradiated with CO(2) laser and examined as a possible aid in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. The dentinal surface modified by the aforementioned technique was chemically and micro-morphologically examined with a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscope (EDS), and the crystalline structures of the examined dentinal surfaces were examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Moreover, the mechanical properties of the newly formed layer were examined by nanoindentation. The results showed that 45S5 bioglass could occlude the dentinal tubule orifices with calcium-phosphate crystals. The application of CO(2) laser potentially improved the mechanical organization of these crystals. PMID:21084716

  13. Effect of Citric Acid and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid on the Surface Morphology of Young and Old Root Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Scelza, Miriam Zaccaro; de Noronha, Fernando; da Silva, Licinio Esmeraldo; Maurício, Marcos; Gallito, Marco Antonio; Scelza, Pantaleo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of 10% citric acid and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) irrigating solutions on the surface morphology of young and old root dentin by determining the number and diameter of dentinal tubules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: Fifty healthy human teeth collected from young (≤30 years) and old (≥60 years) individuals (n=25) were first prepared with a Largo bur #2 to produce smear layer on the root canal surface. Subsequently, the crowns and the root middle and apical thirds were sectioned and removed, and the cervical thirds were sectioned vertically in the buccal-lingual direction into two equal halves. The obtained samples were then immersed in 2.5% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min and randomly separated into two treatment groups for each age group. In each age group, ten samples were selected as controls and did not receive any type of treatment. The rest of the specimens were then rinsed, dried and treated for 4 min with 10% citric acid or 17% EDTA. The samples were then assessed with SEM regarding the number and diameter of dentinal tubules. All data were assessed using Student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Regardless of the type of treatment, no significant differences were observed in the number of open tubules between the young and old root dentin (P>0.05). Nonetheless, the diameter of the tubules in the old root dentin was larger when 17% EDTA was used (P<0.05). Both, young and old root dentin did not differ with the 10% citric acid treatment (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that 17% EDTA treatment induced a significant demineralization in old root dentin. PMID:27471529

  14. Structural analysis of reactionary dentin formed in response to polymicrobial invasion.

    PubMed

    Charadram, Nattida; Austin, Christine; Trimby, Patrick; Simonian, Mary; Swain, Michael V; Hunter, Neil

    2013-03-01

    In response to microbial invasion of dentin odontoblasts secrete an altered calcified matrix termed reactionary dentin (Rd). 3D reconstruction of focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) image slices revealed helical tubular structures in Rd that contrasted with regular cylindrical tubules characteristic of dentin from healthy teeth and affected so-called physiological dentin (Pd) lying exterior to Rd. This helical structure in Rd provided effective constriction of tubule lumen diameter that formed a barrier to bacterial advance towards the dental pulp. SEM of resin cast preparations revealed altered extension of odontoblast processes through Rd. The distribution of key mineral elements was studied by combination of 3D reconstruction of focused-ion-beam based X-ray microanalysis (FIB-EDS), laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). There was a marked redistribution of calcium and phosphorous in Rd together with an increase of diffusely deposited magnesium compatible with the mineral deposition phase of synthesis of this altered matrix. Changes in tubule structure and mineral content characteristic of Rd are consistent with reduced hardness and lower elastic modulus reported for this matrix. Findings provide insight into the unique structure of Rd synthesised as a primary response to infection.

  15. Structural analysis of reactionary dentin formed in response to polymicrobial invasion

    PubMed Central

    Charadram, Nattida; Austin, Christine; Trimby, Patrick; Simonian, Mary; Swain, Michael V.; Hunter, Neil

    2013-01-01

    In response to microbial invasion of dentin odontoblasts secrete an altered calcified matrix termed reactionary dentin (Rd). 3D reconstruction of focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) image slices revealed helical tubular structures in Rd that contrasted with regular cylindrical tubules characteristic of dentin from healthy teeth and affected so-called physiological dentin (Pd) lying exterior to Rd. This helical structure in Rd provided effective constriction of tubule lumen diameter that formed a barrier to bacterial advance towards the dental pulp. SEM of resin cast preparations revealed altered extension of odontoblast processes through Rd. The distribution of key mineral elements was studied by combination of 3D reconstruction of focused-ion-beam based X-ray microanalysis (FIB-EDS), laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). There was a marked redistribution of calcium and phosphorous in Rd together with an increase of diffusely deposited magnesium compatible with the mineral deposition phase of synthesis of this altered matrix. Changes in tubule structure and mineral content characteristic of Rd are consistent with reduced hardness and lower elastic modulus reported for this matrix. Findings provide insight into the unique structure of Rd synthesised as a primary response to infection. PMID:23261402

  16. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  17. Abrasion of eroded root dentine brushed with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    De Menezes, Márcio; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness change and wear provided by different dentifrices on root dentine previously exposed to erosive challenges. According to a randomized complete block design, 150 slabs of bovine root dentine (6 x 3 x 2 mm) were ground flat and polished. In an area of 4 x 3 mm on the dentine surface, specimens were submitted to five erosive/abrasive events, each one composed by: exposure to Sprite Diet or distilled water for 5 min, then to a remineralizing solution for 1 min, and simulation of 5,000 brushing strokes. Four dentifrices--regular (RE), baking soda (BS), whitening (WT) and tartar control (TC)--and distilled water (CO), used as control, were compared. Final texture and the wear depth were evaluated using a profilometer. ANOVA did not show significant interaction, indicating that the effect of dentifrices on both surface roughness change and wear did not depend on whether or not the dentine was eroded ( p>0.05). There was no difference between abrasion of eroded and sound dentine. The Tukey's test revealed that WT, BS and TC provided the highest increase in surface roughness differing from RE and CO. TC yielded the deepest wear of root dentine, whereas RE and CO, the shallowest. No significant difference in wear among BS, TC and WT were observed. Within the limitations of this study, the data showed that abrasion of both eroded and sound root dentine was dependent on the dentifrice used. PMID:15146320

  18. Spectroscopic and morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemor, R. M.; Kruger, Michael B.; Wieliczka, David M.; Swafford, Jim R.; Spencer, Paulette

    1999-01-01

    The potential environmental risks associated with mercury release have forced many European countries to ban the use of dental amalgam. Alternative materials such as composite resins do not provide the clinical function for the length of time characteristically associated with dental amalgam. The weak link in the composite restoration is the dentin/adhesive bond. The purpose of this study was to correlate morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive bond with chemical analyses using micro- Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A commercial dental adhesive was placed on dentin substrates cut from extracted, unerupted human third molars. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface were investigated using infrared radiation produced at the Aladdin synchrotron source; visible radiation from a Kr+ laser was used for the micro-Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface, differentially stained to identify protein, mineral, and adhesive, were examined using light microscopy. Due to its limited spatial resolution and the unknown sample thickness the infrared results cannot be used quantitatively in determining the extent of diffusion. The results from the micro-Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy indicate exposed protein at the dentin/adhesive interface. Using a laser that reduces background fluorescence, the micro-Raman spectroscopy provides quantitative chemical and morphologic information on the dentin/adhesive interface. The staining procedure is sensitive to sites of pure protein and thus, complements the Raman results.

  19. Porcine dentin matrix protein 1: gene structure, cDNA sequence, and expression in teeth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Iwata, Takanori; Hu, Yuan Yuan; Zhang, Hengmin; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2006-02-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic non-collagenous protein that is necessary for the proper biomineralization of bone, cartilage, cementum, dentin, and enamel. Dentin matrix protein 1 is highly phosphorylated and potentially glycosylated, but there is no experimental data identifying which specific amino acids are modified. For the purpose of facilitating the characterization of DMP1 from pig, which has the advantage of large developing teeth for obtaining protein in quantity and extensive structural information concerning other tooth matrix proteins, we characterized the porcine DMP1 cDNA and gene structure, raised anti-peptide immunoglobulins that are specific for porcine DMP1, and detected DMP1 protein in porcine tooth extracts and histological sections. Porcine DMP1 has 510 amino acids, including a 16-amino acid signal peptide. The deduced molecular weight of the secreted, unmodified protein is 53.5 kDa. The protein has 93 serines and 12 threonines in the appropriate context for phosphorylation, and four asparagines in a context suitable for glycosylation. Dentin matrix protein 1 protein bands with apparent molecular weights between 30 and 45 kDa were observed in partially purified dentin extracts. In developing teeth, immunohistochemistry localized DMP1 in odontoblasts and the dentinal tubules of mineralized dentin and in ameloblasts, but not in the enamel matrix.

  20. Importance of age on the dynamic mechanical behavior of intertubular and peritubular dentin.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Heonjune; Romberg, Elaine; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-02-01

    An experimental evaluation of human coronal dentin was performed using nanoscopic dynamic mechanical analysis (nanoDMA). The primary objectives were to quantify any unique changes in mechanical behavior of intertubular and peritubular dentin with age, and to evaluate the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the mineral deposited within the lumens. Specimens of coronal dentin were evaluated by nanoDMA using single indents and in scanning mode via scanning probe microscopy. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the storage modulus or complex modulus between the two age groups (18-25 versus 54-83 yrs) for either the intertubular or peritubular tissue. However, there were significant differences in the dampening behavior between the young and old dentin, as represented in the loss modulus and tanδ responses. For both the intertubular and peritubular components, the capacity for dampening was significantly lower in the old group. Scanning based nanoDMA showed that the tubules of old dentin exhibit a gradient in elastic behavior, with decrease in elastic modulus from the cuff to the center of tubules filled with newly deposited mineral.

  1. Dentin Caries Zones

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, M.K.; Strother, J.; Darling, C.L.; Fried, D.; Gansky, S.A.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-01-01

    Caries Detector staining reveals 4 zones in dentin containing caries lesions, but characteristics of each zone are not well-defined. We therefore investigated the physical and microstructural properties of carious dentin in the 4 different zones to determine important differences revealed by Caries Detector staining. Six arrested dentin caries lesions and 2 normal controls were Caries-Detector-stained, each zone (pink, light pink, transparent, apparently normal) being analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging for microstructure, by AFM nano-indentation for mechanical properties, and by transverse digital microradiography (TMR) for mineral content. Microstructure changes, and nanomechanical properties and mineral content significantly decreased across zones. Hydrated elastic modulus and mineral content from normal dentin to pink Caries-Detector-stained dentin ranged from 19.5 [10.6-25.3] GPa to 1.6 [0.0-5.0] GPa and from 42.9 [39.8-44.6] vol% to 12.4 [9.1-14.2] vol%, respectively. Even the most demineralized pink zone contained considerable residual mineral. PMID:19131321

  2. Apoptosis Activation in Human Carious Dentin. An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, C.; Psaila, A.; Musumeci, G.; Castorina, S.; Leonardi, R.

    2015-01-01

    The exact mechanisms and enzymes involved in caries progression are largely unclear. Apoptosis plays a key role in dentin remodelling related to damage repair; however, it is unclear whether apoptosis in decayed teeth is activated through the extrinsic or the intrinsic pathway. This ex vivo immunohistochemical study explored the localization of TRAIL, DR5, Bcl-2 and Bax, the main proteins involved in apoptosis, in teeth with advanced caries. To evaluate TRAIL, DR5, Bcl-2 and Bax immunoexpressions twelve permanent carious premolars were embedded in paraffin and processed for immunohistochemistry. The results showed that TRAIL and DR5 were overexpressed in dentin and in pulp vessels and mononuclear cells; strong Bax immunostaining was detected in dilated dentinal tubules close to the lesion, and Bcl-2 staining was weak in some dentin areas under the cavity or altogether absent. These findings suggest that both apoptosis pathways are activated in dental caries. Further studies are required to gain insights into its biomolecular mechanisms. PMID:26428882

  3. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  4. Dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein have distinct roles in dentin mineralization.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Sreenath, Taduru; Haruyama, Naoto; Honeycutt, Cherlita; Terse, Anita; Cho, Andrew; Kohler, Thomas; Müller, Ralph; Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-05-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a major non-collagenous matrix protein of odontoblasts, is proteolytically cleaved into dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Our previous studies revealed that DSPP null mice display a phenotype similar to human autosomal dominant dentinogenesis imperfecta, in which teeth have widened predentin and irregular dentin mineralization resulting in sporadic unmineralized areas in dentin and frequent pulp exposure. Earlier in vitro studies suggested that DPP, but not DSP, plays a significant role in initiation and maturation of dentin mineralization. However, the precise in vivo roles of DSP and DPP are far from clear. Here we report the generation of DPPcKO mice, in which only DSP is expressed in a DSPP null background, resulting in a conditional DPP knockout. DPPcKO teeth show a partial rescue of the DSPP null phenotype with the restored predentin width, an absence of irregular unmineralized areas in dentin, and less frequent pulp exposure. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of DPPcKO molars further confirmed this partial rescue with a significant recovery in the dentin volume, but not in the dentin mineral density. These results indicate distinct roles of DSP and DPP in dentin mineralization, with DSP regulating initiation of dentin mineralization, and DPP being involved in the maturation of mineralized dentin.

  5. Laser scanning confocal microscopy coupled with hydraulic permeability measurements for elucidating fluid flow across porous materials: application to human dentine.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cara G; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R; Parkinson, Charles

    2008-04-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) coupled to a constant volume flow-pressure measuring system is introduced as a new technique for the quantitative measurement of fluid flow across porous materials. Such processes are ubiquitous from the life sciences to materials science and the methodology herein could find widespread application. The methodology has been applied to the detection of fluid flow through human dentine, in-vitro, and in the assessment of occlusion actives. Dentine is a calcareous material sandwiched between the pulp and enamel in the tooth structure that contains tubules which traverse dentine in the pulp to enamel direction. The tubules become patent during enamel erosion or gum recession, leading to dentinal hypersensitivity. Understanding the nature of fluid flow is important, as a pressure gradient exists across dentine in-vivo and this has implications for the development of suitable treatments. The methodology described herein firstly allows a ready assessment of the general efficacy of treatments via hydraulic permeability measurements. Second, LSCM images allow the nature of the flow process and the mode of action of the treatments to be revealed at high spatial resolution. For the particular case of dentine, we demonstrate how the method allows candidate treatments to be compared and assessed. PMID:18403832

  6. Pulp-dentin biology in restorative dentistry. Part 4: Dental caries--characteristics of lesions and pulpal reactions.

    PubMed

    Bjørndal, L; Mjör, I A

    2001-10-01

    The infectious disease dental caries results in lesions that may affect enamel, dentin, pulp, and cementum. If a caries lesion has progressed to the stage at which it requires restorative intervention, it is important that the clinician understand the tissue changes in the dentin that are likely to have taken place during lesion development. Until the present, no major distinction between the restorative treatment of active (rapidly progressing) and arrested (slowly progressing) lesions has been made, despite the fact that the two conditions exhibit major differences in tissue changes in the pulp-dentin complex. Intratubular changes and tertiary dentin formation will affect the outcome of the restorative treatment. In unaffected dentin and in rapidly progressing lesions, permeable tubules persist, and when the preparation of carious teeth results in the opening of unaffected dentin, greater care must be taken in all phases of the restorative procedures than if the dentin is impermeable. An active, deep lesion can be changed to an arrested lesion by a two-step excavation approach. Optimal assessment of the prevailing clinical conditions can only be made on the basis of thorough knowledge of the biology of the pulp-dentin organ.

  7. THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL VARIATIONS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Arola, D.

    2012-01-01

    The crack growth resistance of human dentin was characterized as a function of relative distance from the DEJ and the corresponding microstructure. Compact tension specimens were prepared from the coronal dentin of caries-free 3rd molars. The specimens were sectioned from either the outer, middle or inner dentin. Stable crack extension was achieved under Mode I quasi-static loading, with the crack oriented in-plane with the tubules, and the crack growth resistance was characterized in terms of the initiation (Ko), growth (Kg) and plateau (Kp) toughness. A hybrid approach was also used to quantify the contribution of dominant mechanisms to the overall toughness. Results showed that human dentin exhibits increasing crack growth resistance with crack extension in all regions, and that the fracture toughness of inner dentin (2.2±0.5 MPa•m0.5) was significantly lower than that of middle (2.7±0.2 MPa•m0.5) and outer regions (3.4±0.3 MPa•m0.5). Extrinsic toughening, composed mostly of crack bridging, was estimated to cause an average increase in the fracture energy of 26% in all three regions. Based on these findings, dental restorations extended into deep dentin are much more likely to cause tooth fracture due to the greater potential for introduction of flaws and decrease in fracture toughness with depth. PMID:23131531

  8. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Brajkovic, Denis; Ilic, Dragan; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Rakocevic, Zlatko; Djuric, Marija; Busse, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples' microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  9. Can interaction of materials with the dentin-pulp complex contribute to dentin regeneration?

    PubMed

    Ferracane, Jack L; Cooper, Paul R; Smith, Anthony J

    2010-02-01

    Understanding outcomes of the interaction between a dental material and tooth tissue is important in terms not only of biocompatibility but also of the potential for the material to modulate the response of the tissue. This interaction is influenced by many factors, including the chemistry of the material and any of its eluted components or degradation products, and the manner in which the tissue responds to these agents. Past studies of this interaction have primarily been aimed at identifying cytotoxic effects. More recently, investigations have focused on specific cellular responses, and in particular, on understanding how the materials themselves actually may contribute to regenerative processes in the tooth. Recent work has demonstrated the solubilization of proteins from dentin exposed to certain materials, such as calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregate, and acidic solutions that relate to those used in dentin bonding agents, with the subsequent modulation by these proteins of gene expression in odontoblast-like cells. This work suggests that dentin bridge formation under such materials may be stimulated through this process. Thus, there is much merit in examining both how new dental materials can be developed and how more traditional ones can be modified to preferentially stimulate regenerative processes when preferred. This review summarizes current knowledge about the potential beneficial effects derived from the interaction of dental materials with the dentin-pulp complex, as well as potential future developments in this exciting field.

  10. BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT TO PRIMARY DENTIN AFTER CUTTING WITH DIFFERENT BUR TYPES AND DENTIN CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Nicoló, Rebeca Di; Shintome, Luciana Keiko; Myaki, Silvio Issáo; Nagayassu, Marcos Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12). In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer – 3M/ESPE) prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5%) and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence. PMID:19089179

  11. Studies of osteocalcin function in dentin formation in rodent teeth.

    PubMed

    Bronckers, A L; Price, P A; Schrijvers, A; Bervoets, T J; Karsenty, G

    1998-06-01

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a major non-collagenous protein synthesized by osteoblasts, odontoblasts and cementoblasts. We examined the function of OC in dentinogenesis by exposing rat and hamster tooth organ cultures to 1,25(OH)2vit D3 or to bovine OC added to the culture medium. We furthermore examined dentinogenesis in tooth explants cultured in the presence of warfarin (an inhibitor of gamma-carboxylation of OC). Finally, we analyzed dentin from osteocalcin null mutant mice. Exposure to 1,25(OH)2vit D3 increased OC synthesis by odontoblasts in vitro at the transcriptional and protein levels but had no apparent effect on matrix formation or 45Ca uptake. High levels of bovine OC temporarily suppressed the initial formation of dentin and enamel and uptake of 45Ca. This effect was not seen when tooth explants were exposed to thermally decarboxylated OC. Exposure of tooth explants to warfarin had no significant effect on dentinogenesis. Dentin obtained from two-month-old OC null mutants looked structurally normal and did not show marked differences in dentin matrix thickness and mineral content compared to wild type. We concluded that, although OC at supraphysiological levels has the potential to affect dentin mineralization probably through its Gla-residues, the locally produced levels of OC are not sufficient to markedly influence dentinogenesis.

  12. Role of host-derived proteinases in dentine caries and erosion.

    PubMed

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Charone, Senda; Tjäderhane, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Demineralization in dentinal caries and erosion exposes dentine organic matrix. This exposed matrix, containing type I collagen and non-collagenous proteins, is then degraded by host collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. The knowledge of the identities and function of these enzymes in dentine has accumulated only within the last 15 years, but has already formed a field of research called 'dentine degradomics'. This research has demonstrated the role of endogenous collagenolytic enzymes in caries and erosion development. In demineralized dentine, the enzymes degrade triple-helical collagen molecules, leading to the gradual loss of collagen matrix. Even before that, they can cleave off the terminal non-helical ends of collagen molecules called telopeptides, leading to the structural changes at the intramolecular gap areas, which may affect or even prevent intrafibrillar remineralization, which is considered essential in restoring the dentine's mechanical properties. They may also cause the loss of non-collagenous proteins that could serve as nucleation sites for remineralization. Here we review the findings demonstrating that inhibition of salivary or dentine endogenous MMPs and cysteine cathepsins may provide preventive means against the progression of caries or erosion. Furthermore, we also suggest the future directions for the new experimental preventive research to gain more knowledge of the enzymes and their function during and after dentine demineralization, and the pathways to find the clinically acceptable means to prevent the functional activity of these enzymes.

  13. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of dentin matrix protein 1 in human dentin.

    PubMed

    Orsini, G; Ruggeri, A; Mazzoni, A; Nato, F; Falconi, M; Putignano, A; Di Lenarda, R; Nanci, A; Breschi, L

    2008-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous matrix protein with a recognized role in the formation of mineralized tissues such as dentin. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of DMP1 in human dentin by means of immunofluorescence and high-resolution immunogold labeling. Fully developed, sound human dentin specimens were submitted to fluorescence labeling and post-embedding immunolabeling techniques with a rabbit polyclonal antihuman DMP1 antibody followed by corresponding fluorochrome-conjugated or gold-conjugated secondary antibodies. Both immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed an intense labeling associated with the peritubular dentin. In addition, at the ultrastructural level, there was also a moderate and diffuse immunoreaction over intertubular dentin, and a weak labeling within predentin which increased in density towards the mineralization front. This study suggests that in adult human teeth, like in rodents, DMP1 is prevalently concentrated at the level of peritubular dentin and this feature is preserved also in fully developed-teeth. These data are consistent with what has been observed in rodents and suggest that DMP1 plays a role in maintenance of the dentin tubular space.

  15. Mechanotransduction in the renal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yi; Satlin, Lisa M.; Wang, Tong; Weinstein, Alan M.

    2010-01-01

    The role of mechanical forces in the regulation of glomerulotubular balance in the proximal tubule (PT) and Ca2+ signaling in the distal nephron was first recognized a decade ago, when it was proposed that the microvilli in the PT and the primary cilium in the cortical collecting duct (CCD) acted as sensors of local tubular flow. In this review, we present a summary of the theoretical models and experiments that have been conducted to elucidate the structure and function of these unique apical structures in the modulation of Na+, HCO3−, and water reabsorption in the PT and Ca2+ signaling in the CCD. We also contrast the mechanotransduction mechanisms in renal epithelium with those in other cells in which fluid shear stresses have been recognized to play a key role in initiating intracellular signaling, most notably endothelial cells, hair cells in the inner ear, and bone cells. In each case, small hydrodynamic forces need to be greatly amplified before they can be sensed by the cell's intracellular cytoskeleton to enable the cell to regulate its membrane transporters or stretch-activated ion channels in maintaining homeostasis in response to changing flow conditions. PMID:20810611

  16. Bond Strength of High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer Cements is Affected by Tubular Density and Location in Dentin?

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Tamara K; Calvo, Ana Flávia B; Domingues, Gabrielle G; Mendes, Fausto M; Raggio, Daniela P

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of tubular density of different dentin depths and location on the bond strength of high-viscosity glass ionomer cements (GIC). A total of 20 molars were selected and assigned into six experimental groups, considering two different high-viscosity GICs-Fuji IX (FIX) or Ketac Molar (KM), and dentin location-proximal, occlusal superficial, or occlusal deep dentin (n=10). Teeth were cut and a topographical analysis of four sections per group was performed to obtain data about the tubular density of each different dentin location and depths by laser scanning confocal microscopy (100×). Polyethylene tubes were placed over the pretreated surfaces and filled with one of the GICs. Microshear bond strength (µSBS) test was performed after storage in distilled water (24 h at 37°C). Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Multilevel regression analysis was performed to compare the results at a significance level set at 5%. The tubule density was inversely proportional to the bond strength for both GICs (p<0.05). Adhesive/mixed failure prevailed in all experimental groups. Proximal (30036.5±3433.3) and occlusal superficial 29665.3±1434.04 dentin shows lower tubule density, resulting in a better GIC bonding performance (proximal: FIX-3.61±1.05; KM-3.40±1.62; occlusal superficial: FIX-4.70±1.85; KM-4.97±1.25). Thus, we can concluded that the lowest tubule density in proximal and occlusal superficial dentin results in a better GIC bond strength performance.

  17. Clinical efficacy of the Er:YAG laser treatment on hypersensitive dentin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Hang; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2014-06-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common symptomatic condition that causes discomfort and sometimes severe pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the erbium-doped:yttrium, aluminum, and garnet (Er:YAG) laser treatment on cervically exposed hypersensitive dentin. Twenty patients with dentin hypersensitivity of caries-free teeth were selected. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to measure dentin sensitivity in response to air stimulus. A 2-minute Er:YAG laser (energy level: 60 mJ/pulse; repetition rate: 2 Hz) was applied to cervically exposed hypersensitive dentin. After 4 weeks, the hypersensitive teeth were examined again, and the VAS score was measured again and recorded. No complications such as detrimental pulpal effects were observed. Eighteen participants reported significantly reduced dentin hypersensitivity 4 weeks after the laser desensitization treatment. The VAS scores measured 4 weeks after the Er:YAG laser desensitization treatment were significantly decreased as compared with those measured at the baseline (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the Er:YAG laser desensitization treatment can effectively reduce hypersensitivity of cervically exposed hypersensitive dentin. PMID:23602018

  18. Instantaneous adhesion of Cuvierian tubules in the sea cucumber Holothuria forskali.

    PubMed

    Demeuldre, Mélanie; Chinh Ngo, Thi; Hennebert, Elise; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leclère, Philippe; Flammang, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The peculiar Cuvierian tubules of sea cucumbers function as a defense mechanism. They thwart attacks by creating a sticky network composed of elongated tubules within which the potential predator is entangled in a matter of seconds and thus immobilized. Cuvierian tubules are typical instantaneous adhesive organs in which tissue integrity is destroyed during the release of the adhesive secretion. However, very little information is available about this adhesion process. The adhesive epithelium-the mesothelium-and the sticky material it produces were studied in the species Holothuria forskali using different microscopy techniques (light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy). The mesothelium consists of two cell types-peritoneocytes and granular cells-organized in superimposed layers. In tubules before expulsion, peritoneocytes form an outer protective cell layer preventing adhesion when not needed. After expulsion, the elongation process removes this protective layer and allows granular cells to unfold and to become exposed at the tubule surface. At this stage, Cuvierian tubules are still not sticky. Upon contact with a surface, however, granular cells release their granule contents. Once released, this material changes in aspect, swells, and spreads readily on any type of substrate where it forms a thin homogeneous layer. After tubule peeling, this layer remains on the surface but is often contaminated with collagen fibers. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated the adhesive layer to be made up of globular nanostructures measuring about 70 nm in diameter and to be more adhesive than the collagen fibers left on it. The morphological organization of Cuvierian tubules therefore allows contact-dependent deposition of an adhesive material presenting a high affinity for various surfaces. It is certainly an adaptive advantage for a defense organ to be able to entangle different types of predators.

  19. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  20. DMP1-derived Peptides Promote Remineralization of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Padovano, J.D.; Ravindran, S.; Snee, P.T.; Ramachandran, A.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  1. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate.

  2. Calcium Oxalate Accumulation in Malpighian Tubules of Silkworm (Bombyx mori)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Aaron J.; Webb, Mary Alice

    2007-04-01

    Silkworm provides an ideal model system for study of calcium oxalate crystallization in kidney-like organs, called Malpighian tubules. During their growth and development, silkworm larvae accumulate massive amounts of calcium oxalate crystals in their Malpighian tubules with no apparent harm to the organism. This manuscript reports studies of crystal structure in the tubules along with analyses identifying molecular constituents of tubule exudate.

  3. An in vitro comparison of acid etched vs. nonacid etched dentin bonding agents/composite interfaces over primary dentin.

    PubMed

    Donly, K J; Keprta, M; Stratmann, R G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate acid etchant penetration on dentin bonding agents and its effect on the composite resin bond strength. Forty primary molars were mounted, then the buccal and lingual surfaces were prepared into dentin. The teeth were divided into four groups of 10, and four dentin bonding agents were placed on the buccal and lingual surfaces of exposed dentin, as recommended by the manufacturers. One surface of each tooth was etched randomly for 60 sec with 35% phosphoric acid. A standardized tube of composite resin was placed on each dentin surface and polymerized for 60 sec. The tubes were sheared off with an Instron Testing Machine. The specimens then were sectioned to be examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results demonstrated shear strengths (kg/cm2) of etched (e) and unetched (u) bonding agents to be: Scotchbond (3M Dental Products, St. Paul, MN) (e) 116.7 +/- 37.7, (u) 116.7 +/- 63.0; Scotchbond 2 (3M Dental Products, St. Paul, MN) (e) 112.0 +/- 40.6, (u) 127.0 +/- 38.7; Gluma (Bayer Dental, Leverkusen, Federal Republic of Germany) (e) 80.1 +/- 21.7, (u) 107.0 +/- 16.6; Bondlite (Kerr Manufacturing Co., Romulus, MI) (e) 53.4 +/- 34.7, (u) 79.1 +/- 26.3. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated a statistical significance in variance at the P less than 0.001 level. Scheffe's Test indicated no statistically significant differences between the bond strengths of etched vs. nonetched dentin bonding agents and composite resin. SEM evaluation indicated that the acid etchant penetrated none of the dentin bonding agents. PMID:1886824

  4. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Ritts, Andy C; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces used for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were prepared by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various periods of time. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR), and an increase in the amount of carbonyl groups was detected on plasma-treated dentin surfaces. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars and analyzed using tensile testing. Student-Newman-Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s of plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma-treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of the peripheral dentin surface for up to 100 s resulted in an increase in the interfacial bonding strength, while prolonged plasma treatment of dentin surfaces (e.g. 5 min) resulted in a decrease in the interfacial bonding strength.

  5. Maturation of rat proximal tubule chloride permeability.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Quigley, Raymond

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that neonate rabbit tubules have a lower chloride permeability but comparable mannitol permeability compared with adult proximal tubules. The surprising finding of lower chloride permeability in neonate proximals compared with adults impacts net chloride transport in this segment, which reabsorbs 60% of the filtered chloride in adults. However, this maturational difference in chloride permeability may not be applicable to other species. The present in vitro microperfusion study directly examined the chloride and mannitol permeability using in vitro perfused rat proximal tubules during postnatal maturation. Whereas there was no maturational change in mannitol permeability, chloride permeability was 6.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in neonate rat proximal convoluted tubule and 16.1 +/- 2.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in adult rat proximal convoluted tubule (P < 0.01). There was also a maturational increase in chloride permeability in the rat proximal straight tubule (5.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s vs. 9.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s, P < 0.01). There was no maturational change in bicarbonate-to-chloride permeabilities (P(HCO3)/P(Cl)) in the rat proximal straight tubules (PST) and proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) or in the sodium-to-chloride permeability (P(Na)/P(Cl)) in the proximal straight tubule; however, there was a significant maturational decrease in proximal convoluted tubule P(Na)/P(Cl) with postnatal development (1.31 +/- 0.12 in neonates vs. 0.75 +/- 0.06 in adults, P < 0.001). There was no difference in the transepithelial resistance measured by current injection and cable analysis in the PCT, but there was a maturational decrease in the PST (7.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.1 ohms x cm2, P < 0.05). These studies demonstrate there are maturational changes in the rat paracellular pathway that impact net NaCl transport during development. PMID:16051720

  6. Collagen Orientation and Crystallite Size in Human Dentin: A Small Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A.

    2001-03-29

    The mechanical properties of dentin are largely determined by the intertubular dentin matrix, which is a complex composite of type I collagen fibers and a carbonate-rich apatite mineral phase. The authors perform a small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) study on fully mineralized human dentin to quantify this fiber/mineral composite architecture from the nanoscopic through continuum length scales. The SAXS results were consistent with nucleation and growth of the apatite phase within periodic gaps in the collagen fibers. These mineralized fibers were perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and parallel with the mineralization growth front. Within the plane of the mineralization front, the mineralized collagen fibers were isotropic near the pulp, but became mildly anisotropic in the mid-dentin. Analysis of the data also indicated that near the pulp the mineral crystallites were approximately needle-like, and progressed to a more plate-like shape near the dentino-enamel junction. The thickness of these crystallites, {approx} 5 nm, did not vary significantly with position in the tooth. These results were considered within the context of dentinogenesis and maturation.

  7. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fractureresistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information inarchival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. Infact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralizedtissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled,there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. Thepresent study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel setof in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving adouble-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whetherthe critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locallystress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used tocharacterize the notion of "plasticity" in dentin and the interaction ofcracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed thatfracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that thepresence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this processof crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to becritical steps in the development ofa micromechanical model for thefracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence ofboth the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  8. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fracture resistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled, there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. The present study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel set of in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving a double-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whether the critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locally stress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used to characterize the notion of ''plasticity'' in dentin and the interaction of cracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed that fracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that the presence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this process of crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to be critical steps in the development of a micromechanical model for the fracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence of both the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  9. Learning from evolutionary optimisation: what are toughening mechanisms good for in dentine, a nonrepairing bone tissue?

    PubMed

    Zaslansky, Paul; Currey, John D; Fleck, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The main mass of material found in teeth is dentine, a bone-like tissue, riddled with micron-sized tubules and devoid of living cells. It provides support to the outer wear-resistant layer of enamel, and exhibits toughening mechanisms which contribute to crack resistance. And yet unlike most bone tissues, dentine does not remodel and consequently any accumulated damage does not 'self repair'. Because damage containment followed by tissue replacement is a prime reason for the crack-arresting microstructures found in most bones, the occurrence of toughening mechanisms without the biological capability to repair is puzzling. Here we consider the notion that dentine might be overdesigned for strength, because it has to compensate for the lack of cell-mediated healing mechanisms. Based on our own and on literature-reported observations, including quasistatic and fatigue properties, dentine design principles are discussed in light of the functional conditions under which teeth evolved. We conclude that dentine is only slightly overdesigned for everyday cyclic loading because usual mastication stresses may come close to its endurance strength. The in-built toughening mechanisms constitute an evolutionary benefit because they prevent catastrophic failure during rare overload events, which was probably very advantageous in our hunter gatherer ancestor times. From a bio-inspired perspective, understanding the extent of evolutionary overdesign might be useful for optimising biomimetic structures used for load bearing. PMID:27615450

  10. Odontoblasts: Specialized hard-tissue-forming cells in the dentin-pulp complex.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Odontoblasts are specialized cells that produce dentin and exhibit unique morphological characteristics; i.e., they extend cytoplasmic processes into dentinal tubules. While osteoblasts, which are typical hard-tissue-forming cells, are generated from mesenchymal stem cells during normal and pathological bone metabolism, the induction of odontoblasts only occurs once during tooth development, and odontoblasts survive throughout the lives of healthy teeth. During the differentiation of odontoblasts, signaling molecules from the inner enamel epithelium are considered necessary for the differentiation of odontoblast precursors, i.e., peripheral dental papilla cells. If odontoblasts are destroyed by severe external stimuli, such as deep caries, the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into odontoblast-like cells is induced. Various bioactive molecules, such as non-collagenous proteins, might be involved in this process, although the precise mechanisms responsible for odontoblast differentiation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, our knowledge about the other functional activities of odontoblasts (apart from dentin formation) has increased. For example, it has been suggested that odontoblasts might act as nociceptive receptors, and surveillance cells that detect the invasion of exogenous pathogens. The regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex has recently gained much attention as a promising future treatment modality that could increase the longevity of pulpless teeth. Finally, congenital dentin anomalies, which are concerned with the disturbance of odontoblast functions, are summarized. PMID:27131345

  11. Morphological Changes of Human Dentin after Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser Irradiation and Acid-etch Technique: An Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim; Juybanpoor, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of human dentin after Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG), Carbon Dioxide(CO2) laser-irradiation and acid-etching by means of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) Methods: 9 extracted human third molars were used in this study. The teeth were divided in three groups: first group, CO2 laser with power of 1.5 w and frequency of 80 Hz; second group, Er:YAG laser with output power of 1.5 W frequency of 10 Hz, very short pulse with water and air spray was applied; and third group, samples were prepared by acid-etching 37% for 15 sec and rinsed with air-water spray for 20 sec. Then, the samples were prepared for SEM examination. Results: Melting and cracks can be observed in CO2 laser but in Er:YAG laser cleanedablated surfaces and exposed dentinal tubules, without smear layer was seen. Conclusion: It can be concluded that Er:YAG laser can be an alternative technique for surface treatment and can be considered as safe as the conventional methods. But CO2 laser has some thermal side effects which make this device unsuitable for this purpose. PMID:25606306

  12. [Morphologic evaluation of the bonding between adhesive/composite resin and dentin irradiated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers: comparative study using scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Oda, M; Oliveira, D C; Liberti, E A

    2001-01-01

    Since bonding systems were introduced in the restorative procedures carried out with esthetic materials, the treatment of dentin surfaces has been widely studied in order to establish the ideal technique. The application of 37% phosphoric acid on dentin is still the best known method. However, alternative methods for treating the dentin surface have been discussed in the literature, including the utilization of some kinds of laser irradiation. The purpose of this research was to morphologically evaluate the bond between adhesive materials and the dentin treated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers, in a comparative study by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Irradiation either substituted acid etching, or was associated to it. Recently extracted bovine incisors were utilized. They received class V cavity preparations and were restored with a bonding system and a light-cured composite resin. Meanwhile, some of the teeth underwent irradiation with Er:YAG laser or Nd:YAG laser before the application of the bonding agent and the composite resin. The samples were selected, prepared for SEM and submitted to morphological analysis. Data were registered in photomicrographs. Based on the microscopic observations, we concluded that only in the dentin surfaces submitted to irradiation with Er:YAG laser and to acid conditioning there was penetration of resin into the dentine. With the Nd:YAG laser treatment, there was only visual superposition of resin over the dentin surface, which suggests that there was only occlusion of the tubules, with characteristics of fusion in the superficial dentine.

  13. Immunohistochemical identification of decorin and biglycan in human dentin: a correlative field emission scanning electron microscopy/transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Orsini, G; Ruggeri, A; Mazzoni, A; Papa, V; Mazzotti, G; Di Lenarda, R; Breschi, L

    2007-07-01

    Decorin and biglycan, two small leucine-rich proteoglycans, have been proposed to play important roles in matrix-mediated formation of mineralized tissues, and their three-dimensional arrangement in human dentin is still not completely understood. The aim of this study was to immunohistochemically analyze the distribution of decorin and biglycan in human predentin/dentin organic matrix under a high-resolution field emission in-lens scanning electron microscope (FEI-SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Tooth dentin specimens were submitted to either a preembedding or a postembedding immunolabeling technique using primary antibodies antidecorin and antibiglycan and gold-conjugated secondary antibodies. Correlative FEI-SEM/TEM observations showed that the two antibodies yielded a similar labeling pattern over the processes of odontoblasts and the predentin. Decorin and biglycan were mainly associated with the collagen fibers within the predentin layer, revealing a moderate immunoreaction that was significantly higher compared to the one observed on dentin. Thus, a generally weak labeling for decorin was found in dentin, which, however, was significantly higher on odontoblast processes within dentinal tubules than in intertubular dentin. On the other hand, biglycan immunolocalization on dentin revealed few gold particles rather uniformly distributed, without showing significant differences between tubular and intertubular regions. In conclusion, this study reveals distinct distribution patterns of decorin and biglycan and their relation with collagen. Decorin's and biglycan's precise roles within prematrix and mineralized matrix in human teeth should be further clarified.

  14. Bovine dentin ablation using an MIR-FEL at the wavelength of 6.05 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heya, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Kato, Junji

    2008-02-01

    Background and Objective: 6.05-μm-laser is strongly absorbed by means of both the OH bending of water and the amide-I of proteins. In order to prove the usefulness of dentin ablation by laser irradiation with λ = 6.05 μm, we investigated an ablative behavior of bovine dentin without a water spray. Study Design/Materials and Methods: The dehydrated bovine dentin was irradiated without a water spray by the mid-infrared Free Electron Laser at λ = 6.05 μm and λ = 9.7 μm, while varying the laser parameters, such as the incident fluence and the number of pulse. We observed the configurational changes in the irradiated dentin surface using a scanning electron microscope and estimated the removed volume using a laser confocal microscope. Also, we measured the temperature rise using a radiation thermometer and the emission spectrum using a fiber optics spectrometer during laser irradiation. Results: We found the followings: (1) the dentin was ablated by the evaporation of proteins at the maximum temperature rise of ~400 degC; (2) the irradiated dentin surface had dentinal tubules and was not melted; (3) the extent of the ablative behavior was proportional to the laser parameters used; (4) the tensile bonding strength between the irradiated dentin surface and the composite resin was significantly higher than that for Er:YAG laser irradiation. Conclusion: We can conclude that 6.05-μm-laser can thermo-mechanically excise dentin by the evaporation of proteins even without a water spray. We showed the applicability of a 6.05-μm-laser to a non-invasive laser treatment.

  15. Functional remineralization of carious dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugach, Megan Kardon

    A primary goal of dental tissue engineering is the biological reconstruction of tooth substrate destroyed by caries or other diseases affecting tooth mineralization. Traditionally, dentists treat caries by using invasive techniques to remove the diseased dental tissue and restore the lesion, ideally preventing further progression of decay. Success in strategies associated with remineralization of enamel and root caries have contributed to the less invasive prospect of remineralization of dentinal carious lesions. The central hypothesis of this dissertation is that carious dentin lesions can be remineralized if the lesions contain residual mineral. Caries Detector (CD) stained zones (pink, light pink, transparent and normal) of arrested carious dentin lesions were characterized according to microstructure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, mineral content by digital transverse microradiography, and nanomechanical properties by AFM-based nanoindentation. CD-stained and unstained zones had significantly different microstructure, mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Furthermore, the most demineralized carious zone contained residual mineral. To obtain reproducible, standardized dentin caries lesions, we characterized the lesions from an artificial carious dentin lesion model using a 0.05M acetate demineralization buffer. The artificial caries-like lesions produced by the buffer had similar mineral content and nanomechanical properties in the stained and unstained zones as natural dentin lesions. Both natural and artificial lesions had significant correlations between mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Mineral crystallite size and shape was examined by small angle x-ray scattering. Both natural and artificial carious dentin had different mineral sizes than normal dentin. Collagen in natural and artificial carious dentin lesions was examined by trichrome stain, AFM high-resolution imaging, and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy, to determine if

  16. Rescue of Odontogenesis in Dmp1-deficient Mice by Targeted Re-expression of DMP1 Reveals Roles for DMP1 in Early Odontogenesis and Dentin Apposition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongbo; Ye, Ling; Yu, Shibin; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; McKee, Marc D.; Li, Yanchun; Kong, Juan; Eick, David; Dallas, Sarah L.; Feng, Jian Q.

    2007-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is expressed in both pulp and odontoblast cells and deletion of the Dmp1 gene leads to defects in odontogenesis and mineralization. The goals of this study were to examine how DMP1 controls dentin mineralization and odontogenesis in vivo. Fluorochrome labeling of dentin in Dmp1-null mice showed a diffuse labeling pattern with a three-fold reduction in dentin appositional rate compared to controls. Deletion of DMP1 was also associated with abnormalities in the dentinal tubule system and delayed formation of the third molar. Unlike the mineralization defect in Vitamin D receptor null mice, the mineralization defect in Dmp1-null mice was not rescued by a high calcium and phosphate diet, suggesting that the effects of DMP1 on mineralization are locally mediated. Re-expression of Dmp1 in early and late odontoblasts under control of the Col1a1 promoter rescued the defects mineralization as well as the defects in the dentinal tubules and third molar development. In contrast, re-expression in mature odontoblasts, using the Dspp promoter, produced only a partial rescue of the mineralization defects. These data suggest that DMP1 is a key regulator of odontoblast differentiation, formation of the dentin tubular system and mineralization and its expression is required in both early and late odontoblasts for normal odontogenesis to proceed. PMID:17196192

  17. Rescue of odontogenesis in Dmp1-deficient mice by targeted re-expression of DMP1 reveals roles for DMP1 in early odontogenesis and dentin apposition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongbo; Ye, Ling; Yu, Shibin; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; McKee, Marc D; Li, Yan Chun; Kong, Juan; Eick, J David; Dallas, Sarah L; Feng, Jian Q

    2007-03-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is expressed in both pulp and odontoblast cells and deletion of the Dmp1 gene leads to defects in odontogenesis and mineralization. The goals of this study were to examine how DMP1 controls dentin mineralization and odontogenesis in vivo. Fluorochrome labeling of dentin in Dmp1-null mice showed a diffuse labeling pattern with a 3-fold reduction in dentin appositional rate compared to controls. Deletion of DMP1 was also associated with abnormalities in the dentinal tubule system and delayed formation of the third molar. Unlike the mineralization defect in Vitamin D receptor-null mice, the mineralization defect in Dmp1-null mice was not rescued by a high calcium and phosphate diet, suggesting a different effect of DMP1 on mineralization. Re-expression of Dmp1 in early and late odontoblasts under control of the Col1a1 promoter rescued the defects in mineralization as well as the defects in the dentinal tubules and third molar development. In contrast, re-expression of Dmp1 in mature odontoblasts, using the Dspp promoter, produced only a partial rescue of the mineralization defects. These data suggest that DMP1 is a key regulator of odontoblast differentiation, formation of the dentin tubular system and mineralization and its expression is required in both early and late odontoblasts for normal odontogenesis to proceed.

  18. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  19. Storage effect on dentine structure and on resultant composite bond strengths.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Lin, C T

    1997-11-01

    This study evaluates the effects of a food simulating solution (75 vol% ethanol/water) and an artificial saliva (Moi-Stir) on dentine structure and chemistry, using scanning electron microscopic examination and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) microscopic characterization. The effect on the bonding of composites to the conditioned dentine were evaluated by shear bond strength (SBS) tests. Three adhesive/composite systems were examined: Tenure/Marathon One, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z100, and Optibond/Herculite XRV. Control specimens were stored in either distilled water or tested without storage. Dentine surface exposure to ethanol resulted in partial loss of the smear layer and of plugs, as well as possible perturbation of collagen. Dentine surfaces exposed to artificial saliva or to distilled water had no evidence of any change from normal appearance of the smear layer. The measured FTIR spectra for most specimens conditioned in these two liquids appeared to be similar to those obtained from fresh dentine. SBS data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. The SBS value for the non-preconditioned control (23.0 +/- 3.7 MPa) or for the dentine preconditioned in distilled water (22.9 +/- 4.2 MPa) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that for dentine pre-conditioned in ethanol (20.0 +/- 3.5 MPa). The SBS (13.3 +/- 3.4 MPa) of all bonding systems was reduced by 40-50% (P < 0.001) when artificial saliva pre-conditioned dentine was used. The failure mode at the dentine-bonding agent interface for the artificial saliva group was adhesive in nature. This is in contrast to the complex cohesive fracture mode found in the control groups and in most ethanol conditioned groups. Dentine structure and chemistry, shear bond strength, and the subsequent debonded mode can be significantly affected by exposure to oral environment prior to conditioning.

  20. Enamel and dentine demineralization by a combination of starch and sucrose in a biofilm - caries model.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Juliana Nunes; Villegas-Salinas, Mario; Troncoso-Gajardo, Pía; Giacaman, Rodrigo Andrés; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2016-05-20

    Sucrose is the most cariogenic dietary carbohydrate and starch is considered non-cariogenic for enamel and moderately cariogenic for dentine. However, the cariogenicity of the combination of starch and sucrose remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this combination on Streptococcus mutans biofilm composition and enamel and dentine demineralization. Biofilms of S. mutans UA159 were grown on saliva-coated enamel and dentine slabs in culture medium containing 10% saliva. They were exposed (8 times/day) to one of the following treatments: 0.9% NaCl (negative control), 1% starch, 10% sucrose, or 1% starch and 10% sucrose (starch + sucrose). To simulate the effect of human salivary amylase on the starch metabolization, the biofilms were pretreated with saliva before each treatment and saliva was also added to the culture medium. Acidogenicity of the biofilm was estimated by evaluating (2 times/day) the culture medium pH. After 4 (dentine) or 5 (enamel) days of growth, biofilms (n = 9) were individually collected, and the biomass, viable microorganism count, and polysaccharide content were quantified. Dentine and enamel demineralization was assessed by determining the percentage of surface hardness loss. Biofilms exposed to starch + sucrose were more acidogenic and caused higher demineralization (p < 0.0001) on either enamel or dentine than those exposed to each carbohydrate alone. The findings suggest that starch increases the cariogenic potential of sucrose. PMID:27223133

  1. X-ray microanalysis of Rb+ entry into cricket Malpighian tubule cells via putative K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Alan T; Clode, Peta L

    2009-09-15

    Elemental imaging by X-ray microanalysis of fully frozen-hydrated samples shows that when Malpighian tubules of the black field cricket (Teleogryllus oceanicus L.) are incubated in saline in which Rb(+) has been substituted for K(+), Rb(+) replaces much of the cellular K(+) in the main segment of control Malpighian tubules and this is prevented by incubation in saline containing Ba(2+), a non-selective K(+) channel blocker. Similarly the amount of cellular K(+) is greatly reduced when tubules incubated in normal, i.e. K(+) containing, saline are exposed to Ba(2+). By considering the amounts of cellular K and Rb remaining in the main segments of tubules incubated in either K(+) containing saline or Rb(+) containing saline after Ba(+) treatment, it is suggested that: (a) a major part (56%) of cellular K(+) enters by Ba(2+) sensitive K(+) channels and that Rb(+) can also enter by this route; (b) a smaller fraction (26%) of cellular K(+) enters by a previously proposed Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter, which can also transport Rb(+); (c) a previously proposed Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is responsible for maintaining a K(+) pool (18%) in the tubule cells that is not exchangeable by Rb(+); and (d) entry by this Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is not available to Rb(+). PMID:19717680

  2. Anacardic acid from brazilian cashew nut trees reduces dentine erosion.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Cintia; Oliveira, Flávia; Dos Santos, Maria Lucilia; de Freitas, Thiago; Imparato, José Carlos; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of solutions containing saturated anacardic acid (AA) on dentine erosion in vitro. AA was chemically isolated from natural cashew nutshell liquid obtained by continuous extraction in a Soxhlet extractor and was fully saturated by catalytic hydrogenation. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity, when exposed to buffers containing 100 µmol/l AA, was analyzed using zymography. Bovine root samples were subjected to erosive demineralization (Sprite Zero™, 4 × 90 s/day) and remineralization with artificial saliva between the erosive cycles for 5 days. The samples were treated as follows, after the first and the last acid exposure (1 min; n = 12/group): (1) 100 µmol/l epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (positive control); (2) 0.05% NaF; (3) 100 µmol/l saturated AA; (4) saturated AA and EGCG; (5) saturated AA, EGCG and NaF; (6) untreated (negative control). Dentine erosion was measured using a contact profilometer. Two dentine samples from each group were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Saturated AA reduced the activity of MMP-2. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed that all treatments significantly reduced dentine loss compared to the negative control (6.03 ± 0.98 µm). Solutions containing saturated AA (1.97 ± 1.02 µm) showed the greatest reduction in dentine erosion compared to the NaF (3.93 ± 1.54 µm) and EGCG (3.79 ± 0.83 µm) solutions. Therefore, it may be concluded that AA significantly reduces dentine erosion in vitro, possibly by acting as an MMP-2 inhibitor. PMID:24993776

  3. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  4. Anacardic acid from brazilian cashew nut trees reduces dentine erosion.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Cintia; Oliveira, Flávia; Dos Santos, Maria Lucilia; de Freitas, Thiago; Imparato, José Carlos; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of solutions containing saturated anacardic acid (AA) on dentine erosion in vitro. AA was chemically isolated from natural cashew nutshell liquid obtained by continuous extraction in a Soxhlet extractor and was fully saturated by catalytic hydrogenation. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity, when exposed to buffers containing 100 µmol/l AA, was analyzed using zymography. Bovine root samples were subjected to erosive demineralization (Sprite Zero™, 4 × 90 s/day) and remineralization with artificial saliva between the erosive cycles for 5 days. The samples were treated as follows, after the first and the last acid exposure (1 min; n = 12/group): (1) 100 µmol/l epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (positive control); (2) 0.05% NaF; (3) 100 µmol/l saturated AA; (4) saturated AA and EGCG; (5) saturated AA, EGCG and NaF; (6) untreated (negative control). Dentine erosion was measured using a contact profilometer. Two dentine samples from each group were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Saturated AA reduced the activity of MMP-2. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed that all treatments significantly reduced dentine loss compared to the negative control (6.03 ± 0.98 µm). Solutions containing saturated AA (1.97 ± 1.02 µm) showed the greatest reduction in dentine erosion compared to the NaF (3.93 ± 1.54 µm) and EGCG (3.79 ± 0.83 µm) solutions. Therefore, it may be concluded that AA significantly reduces dentine erosion in vitro, possibly by acting as an MMP-2 inhibitor.

  5. Bioengineered kidney tubules efficiently excrete uremic toxins

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; Fedecostante, M.; Wilmer, M. J.; Peters, J. G.; Kreuser, U. M.; van den Broek, P. H.; Mensink, R. A.; Boltje, T. J.; Stamatialis, D.; Wetzels, J. F.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Masereeuw, R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biotechnological platform for the removal of waste products (e.g. uremic toxins), often bound to proteins in plasma, is a prerequisite to improve current treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Here, we present a newly designed bioengineered renal tubule capable of active uremic toxin secretion through the concerted action of essential renal transporters, viz. organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4). Three-dimensional cell monolayer formation of human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC) on biofunctionalized hollow fibers with maintained barrier function was demonstrated. Using a tailor made flow system, the secretory clearance of human serum albumin-bound uremic toxins, indoxyl sulfate and kynurenic acid, as well as albumin reabsorption across the renal tubule was confirmed. These functional bioengineered renal tubules are promising entities in renal replacement therapies and regenerative medicine, as well as in drug development programs. PMID:27242131

  6. Decontamination of deep dentin by means of erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Franzen, René; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Meister, Jörg; Wallerang, Anja; Vanweersch, Leon; Lampert, Friedrich; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the depth of effectiveness of erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation on microorganism reduction. From human roots, dentin slices of 100 microm to 1,000 microm thickness were prepared. These specimens were sterilized and then inoculated with 1 microl of Enterococcus faecalis suspension. The backs of the specimens were then irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG radiation at a pulse energy of 3.13 mJ, delivered at an incidence angle of 5 degrees to the dentin slice surface. A control group was left without irradiation. The remaining bacteria were collected in 1 ml sterilized NaCl solution, serially diluted and seeded in Columbia-Agar plates. Despite the low pulse energy of 3.13 mJ, the Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation resulted in significant bacterial reduction up to a dentin thickness of 500 microm (P < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs of the contaminated and irradiated surfaces showed the absence of a smear layer and opened dentinal tubules.

  7. Effects of ammonium hexafluorosilicate application on demineralized enamel and dentin of primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Watanabe, Eiko; Tadokoro, Katsumi; Inoue, Takashi; Miyazaki, Masashi; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-09-01

    Silver diamine fluoride (Ag(NH(3))(2)F) arrests caries but stains teeth black. To overcome this drawback, we applied ammonium hexafluorosilicate (AHF; (NH(4))(2)SiF(6)) and observed changes in the color and structure of demineralized enamel and dentin of extracted primary teeth. Enamel and dentin were demineralized in 10% EDTA solution for 90 s followed by 35% phosphoric acid gel for 60 s, then soaked in AHF solution for 60 s. Before analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), enamel and dentin were demineralized in 10% EDTA for 90 s. Teeth were divided into 4 groups according to AHF application and artificial saliva immersion status and then examined. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at a significance level of P < 0.05. AHF treatment did not cause visible discoloration. Enamel prisms and dental tubules appeared by demineralization were covered with precipitates by AHF application. A sphere-filled membranous structure was observed in the saliva immersion groups. EDS analysis showed that AHF application had no effect on enamel; however, F% and Ca/P ratio were significantly higher on dentin surfaces after AHF application without artificial saliva immersion. Further study on arresting caries treatment is required. PMID:23047038

  8. Study on the potential inhibition of root dentine wear adjacent to fluoride-containing restorations.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Domiciano, Silvia Jorge; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the vicinity of root dentine that had been restored with fluoride-releasing materials was at reduced risk for erosive/abrasive wear compared to root dentine restored with a non-fluoride-containing material. According to a randomized complete block design, standardized cavities prepared on the surface of 150 bovine root dentine slabs were restored with glass-ionomer cement, resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified resin composite, fluoride-containing or conventional composite. Specimens were coated with two layers of an acid-resistant nail varnish exposing half of the dentine surface and half of the restoration. Subsequently, specimens were either eroded in an acidic drink or left uneroded, then exposed to artificial saliva and abraded in a toothbrushing machine. Wear depth in the vicinity of restorations was quantified by a stylus profilometer, based on the nonabraded areas surrounding the erosion/abrasion region. Two-way ANOVA did not demonstrate significant interaction between restoratives and eroded-uneroded dentine (p=0.5549) nor significant difference among restorative materials (p=0.8639). Tukey's test ascertained that the wear depth was higher for eroded than for uneroded groups. Fluoride-releasing materials seemed to negligibly inhibit wear in the vicinity of restored root dentine subjected to erosive/abrasive challenges.

  9. Immunohistochemical and biochemical assay of versican in human sound predentine/dentine matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, A.; Orsini, G.; Mazzoni, A.; Nato, F.; Papa, V.; Piccirilli, M.; Putignano, A.; Mazzotti, G.; De Stefano Dorigo, E.; Breschi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of versican proteoglycan within the human dentine organic matrix by means of a correlative immunohistochemical analysis with field emission in-lens scanning electron microscope (FEI-SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), fluorescence microscope (FM) and biochemical assay. Specimens containing dentine and predentine were obtained from non carious human teeth and divided in three groups: 1) FEI-SEM group: sections were exposed to a pre-embedding immunohistochemical procedure; 2) TEM group: specimens were fixed, demineralised, embedded and submitted to a post-embedding immunohistochemical procedure; 3) FM group: sections mineralised and submitted to a pre-embedding immunohistochemical procedure with fluorescence labelling. Specimens were exposed to two different antibodies to assay distribution of versican fragments and whole versican molecule. Western Blotting analysis of dentine and pulp extracts was also performed. The correlative FEI-SEM,TEM and FM analysis revealed positive immunoreaction for versican fragments both in predentine and dentine, while few gold particles identifying the whole versican molecule were found in predentine only under TEM. No labelling of versican whole molecule was detected by FEI-SEM and FM analysis. The immunoblotting analysis confirmed the morphological findings. This study suggests that in fully developed human teeth versican fragments are significant constituents of the human dentine and predentine organic matrix, while versican whole molecule can be visualised in scarce amount within predentine only. The role of versican fragments within human dentine organic matrix should be further elucidated.

  10. Ultrastructural organization of dentin in mice lacking dentin sialo-phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ping-An; Verdelis, Kostas; Yang, Xu; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Beniash, Elia

    2014-08-01

    Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is the major non-collagenous protein of dentin and plays a significant role in dentin mineralization. Recently, animal models lacking DSPP have been developed and the DSPP KO phenotype has been characterized at the histological level. Little is known, however, about the DSPP KO dentin at nano- and meso-scale. Dentin is a hierarchical material spanning from nano- to macroscale, hence information on the effects of DSPP deficiency at the submicron scale is essential for understanding of its role in dentin biomineralization. To bridge this gap, we have conducted ultrastructural studies of dentin from DSPP KO animals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of DSPP KO dentin revealed that although the overall ultrastructural organization was similar to the WT, the mineral particles were less organized. Scanning electron microscopy in the back-scattered mode (BS-SEM) of the DSPP KO dentin revealed that circumpulpal dentin comprises large areas of non-mineralized matrix, with numerous spherulitic mineralized inclusions, while the mantle dentin appeared largely unaffected. Analysis of the mineral distribution in the circumpulpal dentin of the DSPP KO mice suggests a reduction in the number of mineral nucleation sites and an increase in the nucleation barrier in DSPP KO dentin. These preliminary results indicate that in addition to the reduction of mineralized and total dentin volume in DSPP KO animals significant changes in the ultrastructural organization exist. These changes are likely related to the role of DSPP in the regulation of mineral formation and organization in dentin.

  11. Dentin hypersensitivity and its management.

    PubMed

    Chu, C H; Lam, Anty; Lo, Edward C M

    2011-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common patient complaint that is more prevalent than the profession realizes. It is important for dentists to diagnose dentin hypersensitivity by exclusion and provide appropriate treatment recommendations for patients. Various treatment methods have been proposed but no universally accepted desensitizing agent or treatment has been identified. When a patient has symptoms that can be attributed to dentin hypersensitivity, a thorough clinical examination should be carried out to rule out other likely causes prior to diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the identified cause, a combination of individualized instructions on proper oral health behaviors, use of at-home products, and professional treatment may be required to manage the problem. PMID:21903521

  12. Morphological aspects and physical properties of enamel and dentine of Sus domesticus: A tooth model in laboratory research.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Nathalia Carolina Fernandes; Cardoso, Miquéias André Gomes; Miranda, Mayara Sabrina Luz; Silva, Raira de Brito; Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Nogueira, Bárbara Catarina Lima; Nogueira, Brenna Magdalena Lima; de Melo, Sara Elisama Silva; da Costa, Natacha Malu Miranda; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to describe and analyze morphological and physical properties of deciduous teeth of Sus domesticus. Ultrastructural analysis, mineral composition and microhardness of enamel and dentine tissues were performed on 10 skulls of S. domesticus. External anatomic characteristics and the internal anatomy of the teeth were also described. Data regarding microhardness and ultrastructural analysis were subjected to statistical tests. For ultrastructural analysis, we used the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's post hoc (p≤0.05) test. In the analysis of microhardness, the difference between the enamel and dentine tissues was analyzed by a Student's t test. Values were expressed as mean with standard error. The results of ultrastructural analysis showed the presence of an enamel prism pattern. A dentinal tubule pattern was also observed, with a larger diameter in the pulp chamber and the cervical third, in comparison to middle and apical thirds. We observed an average microhardness of 259.2kgf/mm(2) for enamel and 55.17kgf/mm(2) for dentine. In porcine enamel and dentine, the chemical elements Ca and P showed the highest concentration. The analysis of internal anatomy revealed the presence of a simple root canal system and the occurrence of main canals in the roots. The observed features are compatible with the functional demand of these animals, following a pattern very similar to that seen in other groups of mammals, which can encourage the development of research using dental elements from the pig as a substitute for human teeth in laboratory research.

  13. Main concepts of dentin adhesion (review).

    PubMed

    Mamaladze, M; Sanodze, L; Vadachkoria, D

    2009-03-01

    This review examines fundamental concepts in bonding to dentin. Emphasis is placed on the structure and permeability characteristics of dentin and how they may influence its interaction with adhesive resin. Several new techniques to examine the interfaces between resin and dentin are reviewed along with some of their limitations. The advantages and disadvantages of acid etchants/conditioners versus self-etching conditioners/primers are discussed. The problems of matching the surface tension of resin bonding systems to the surface energy of the substrate are reviewed in terms of wetting the various components of dentin. The problems associated with matching the permeability of intertubular dentin to the diffusibility of bonding reagents are explored. Speculation is advanced on how to ensure polymerization and wetting of dentinal collagen. Theoretical problems associated with dentin bonding and with bond testing are reviewed in order to encourage future research in this rapidly developing area. PMID:19359716

  14. Influence of caries detection dye on bond strength of sound and carious affected dentin: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Udai Pratp; Tikku, AP; Chandra, Anil; Loomba, Kapil; Boruah, Lalit Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of caries detection dye on the in-vitro tensile bond strength of adhesive materials to sound and carious affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy and carious human molars were ground to expose superficial sound dentin and carious affected dentin. Caries Detector dye was applied to sound and carious affected dentin and rinsed. Subsequently the dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and rinsed leaving a moist dentin surface. The adhesive (Single bond) was applied in single layers and light cured. A posterior composite (Filtek Z 250) were used to prepare the bond strength specimens with a 3 mm in diameter bonding area. Control and experimental groups were made with and without application of dye respectively. Each group includes both sound and carious affected dentin. After 24 hour immersion in distilled water, tensile bond strength (MPa) was measured using an Instron testing machine. Results: Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate the data. The tensile bond strength were significantly less in experimental subgroup than control subgroups. Conclusion: The tensile bond strengths were higher in sound and carious affected dentin without application of caries detection dyes. PMID:21691502

  15. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  16. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  17. The effect of IDS (immediate dentin sealing) on dentin bond strength under various thermocycling periods

    PubMed Central

    Leesungbok, Richard; Lee, Sang-Min; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Suk-Won; Lee, Do Yun; Im, Byung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) on bond strength of ceramic restoration under various thermocycling periods with DBA (dentin bonding agent system). MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty freshly extracted human mandibular third molars were divided into 5 groups (1 control and 4 experimental groups) of 10 teeth. We removed enamel layer of sound teeth and embedded them which will proceed to be IDS, using All Bond II. A thermocycling was applied to experimental groups for 1, 2, 7, 14 days respectively and was not applied to control group. IPS Empress II for ceramic was acid-etched with ceramic etchant (9.5% HF) and silane was applied. Each ceramic disc was bonded to specimens with Duo-link, dual curable resin cement by means of light curing for 100 seconds. After the cementation procedures, shear bond strength measurement and SEM analysis of the fractured surface were done. The data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences between 4 experimental groups and control group, however the mean value started to decrease in group 7d, and group 14d showed the lowest mean bond strength in all groups. Also, group 7d and 14d showed distinct exposed dentin and collapsed hybrid layer was observed in SEM analysis. CONCLUSION In the present study, it can be concluded that ceramic restorations like a laminate veneer restoration should be bonded using resin cement within one week after IDS procedure. PMID:26140174

  18. Immunohistochemical localization of the NH(2)-terminal and COOH-terminal fragments of dentin sialoprotein in mouse teeth.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guohua; Yang, Guobin; Song, Guangtai; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Shuo

    2012-08-01

    Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) is a major non-collagenous protein in dentin. Mutation studies in human, along with gene knockout and transgenic experiments in mice, have confirmed the critical role of DSP for dentin formation. Our previous study reported that DSP is processed into fragments in mouse odontoblast-like cells. In order to gain insights into the function of DSP fragments, we further evaluated the expression pattern of DSP in the mouse odontoblast-like cells using immunohistochemistry and western blot assay with antibodies against the NH(2)-terminal and COOH-terminal regions of DSP. Then, the distribution profiles of the DSP NH(2)-terminal and COOH-terminal fragments and osteopontin (OPN) were investigated in mouse teeth at different ages by immunohistochemistry. In the odontoblast-like cells, multiple low molecular weight DSP fragments were detected, suggesting that part of the DSP protein was processed in the odontoblast-like cells. In mouse first lower molars, immunoreactions for anti-DSP-NH(2) antibody were intense in the predentin matrix but weak in mineralized dentin; in contrast, for anti-DSP-COOH antibody, strong immunoreactions were found in mineralized dentin, in particular dentinal tubules but weak in predentin. Therefore, DSP NH(2)-terminal and COOH-terminal fragments from odontoblasts were secreted to different parts of teeth, suggesting that they may play distinct roles in dentinogenesis. Meanwhile, both DSP antibodies showed weak staining in reactionary dentin (RD), whereas osteopontin (OPN) was clearly positive in RD. Therefore, DSP may be less crucial for RD formation than OPN.

  19. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Glucotoxicity and Tumorigenesis Downstream the Renal Proximal Tubule?

    PubMed

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    At present, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end-stage renal disease. Effective glycaemic management is the most powerful tool to delay the establishment of diabetic complications, such as diabetic kidney disease. Together with reducing blood glucose levels, new anti-diabetic agents are expected not only to control the progression but also to restore known defects of the diabetic kidney. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are promising anti-diabetic agents that reduce hyperglycaemia by impairing glucose reabsorption in proximal tubule of the kidney and increasing glucosuria. SGLT2 inhibitors have shown to reduce glucotoxicity in isolated proximal tubule cells and also to attenuate expression of markers of overall kidney damage in experimental animal models of diabetes, but the actual renoprotective effect for downstream nephron segments is still unknown and deserves further attention. Here, we briefly discuss possible undesired effects of enhanced glucosuria and albuminuria in nephron segments beyond the proximal tubule after SGLT2 inhibitor treatment, offering new lines of research to further understand the renoprotective action of these anti-diabetic agents. Strategies blocking glucose reabsorption by renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) may be protective for RPTEC, but downstream nephron segments will still be exposed to high glucose and albumin levels through the luminal face. The actual effect of constant enhanced glucosuria over distal nephron segments remains to be established. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1635-1637, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661279

  20. Cementum and dentin in hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, T; Handoko, G; Niehof, A; Ryan, L M; Coburn, S P; Whyte, M P; Beertsen, W

    2005-11-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) often leads to premature loss of deciduous teeth, due to disturbed cementum formation. We addressed the question to what extent cementum and dentin are similarly affected. To this end, we compared teeth from children with HPP with those from matched controls and analyzed them microscopically and chemically. It was observed that both acellular and cellular cementum formation was affected. For dentin, however, no differences in mineral content were recorded. To explain the dissimilar effects on cementum and dentin in HPP, we assessed pyrophosphate (an inhibitor of mineralization) and the expression/activity of enzymes related to pyrophosphate metabolism in both the periodontal ligament and the pulp of normal teeth. Expression of nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1) in pulp proved to be significantly lower than in the periodontal ligament. Also, the activity of NPP1 was less in pulp, as was the concentration of pyrophosphate. Our findings suggest that mineralization of dentin is less likely to be under the influence of the inhibitory action of pyrophosphate than mineralization of cementum. PMID:16246934

  1. The use of dentin matrix scaffold and dental follicle cells for dentin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; He, Yong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Lu, Wei; Wang, Chunmei; Yu, Hua; Liu, Yuan; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yalei; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Manjing; Deng, Zhihong; Jin, Yan

    2009-12-01

    Scaffold and inductive microenvironment are the two most important factors for dentin regeneration. They have been addressed with hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate, polyglycolic acid, calcined bovine bone, and collagen, among other things. However, as of yet, no scaffold and inductive microenvironment combination has been shown to contribute to the regeneration of complete and prefabricated-shaped dentin tissues that include dentin, predentin and odontoblasts. To test the supporting and inductive effects of treated dentin matrix (TDM) on complete and prefabricated-shaped dentin regeneration, dental follicle cells (DFCs) were seeded onto TDM and further incubated for 1 and 2 weeks in vitro and for 2 and 4 weeks in vivo. The results show that in vitro, in addition to dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) (regarded as identifying markers of odontoblasts), DFCs induced by TDM expressed osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, type I collagen, osteopontin, osteonectin and alkaline phosphatase (all expressed by odontoblasts), and that complete and prefabricated-shaped dentin was successfully regenerated. Most importantly, it was found that in vivo TDM supports and induces regeneration of complete and prefabricated-shaped dentin, and regenerated dentin expresses DSP and DMP1, which are identifying dentin markers. Taken together, these results suggest that, for dentin regeneration, TDM is a suitable scaffold and inductive microenvironment and DFCs are a suitable cell type. The combination of TDM and DFCs may constitute a promising approach for future clinical dentin regeneration.

  2. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems to Er:YAG-laser-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Brulat, Nathalie; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Leforestier, Eric; Fiorucci, Gilbert; Nammour, Samir; Bertrand, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin bonded to Er:YAG laser or bur-prepared dentin surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems. The occlusal surfaces of 120 human third molars were ground flat to expose dentin. The dentin was prepared using either a carbide bur or an Er:YAG laser at 350 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (fluence, 44.5 J/cm(2)). Three different self-etching adhesive systems were applied: iBond, Xeno III and Clearfil SE Bond. Rods of composite resin were bonded to dentin surfaces and shear bond tests were carried out. Both dentin surfaces after debonding and resin rods were observed using a scanning electron microscope. When the Xeno III was used, no difference was observed on shear bond strength values when bur and Er:YAG laser were compared. When using iBond and Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values measured on Er:YAG-laser-prepared surfaces were lower than those observed on bur-prepared surfaces. The absence of smear layer formation during the preparation of the dentin by the Er:YAG laser did not improve the adhesion values of self-etching adhesive systems.

  3. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of carious dentin from transparent zone to normal zone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Yao, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that caries invasion leads to the differentiation of dentin into zones with altered composition, collagen integrity and mineral identity. However, understanding of these changes from the fundamental perspective of molecular structure has been lacking so far. In light of this, the present work aims to utilize Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to directly extract molecular information regarding collagen's and hydroxyapatite's structural changes as dentin transitions from the transparent zone (TZ) into the normal zone (NZ). Unembedded ultrathin dentin films were sectioned from carious teeth, and an FTIR imaging system was used to obtain spatially resolved FTIR spectra. According to the mineral-to-matrix ratio image generated from large-area low-spectral-resolution scan, the TZ, the NZ and the intermediate subtransparent zone (STZ) were identified. High-spectral-resolution spectra were taken from each zone and subsequently examined with regard to mineral content, carbonate distribution, collagen denaturation and carbonate substitution patterns. The integrity of collagen's triple helical structure was also evaluated based on spectra collected from demineralized dentin films of selected teeth. The results support the argument that STZ is the real sclerotic layer, and they corroborate the established knowledge that collagen in TZ is hardly altered and therefore should be reserved for reparative purposes. Moreover, the close resemblance between the STZ and the NZ in terms of carbonate content, and that between the STZ and the TZ in terms of being A-type carbonate-rich, suggest that the mineral that initially occludes dentin tubules is hydroxyapatite newly generated from odontoblastic activities, which is then transformed into whitlockite in the demineralization/remineralization process as caries progresses.

  4. A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis of Carious Dentin from Transparent Zone to Normal Zone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Yao, X.; Liu, Y.W.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that caries invasion leads to the differentiation of dentin into zones with altered composition, collagen integrity and mineral identity. However, understanding of these changes from the fundamental perspective of molecular structure has been lacking so far. In light of this, the present work aims to utilize Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to directly extract molecular information regarding collagen's and hydroxyapatite's structural changes as dentin transitions from the transparent zone (TZ) into the normal zone (NZ). Unembedded ultrathin dentin films were sectioned from carious teeth, and an FTIR imaging system was used to obtain spatially resolved FTIR spectra. According to the mineral-to-matrix ratio image generated from large-area low-spectral-resolution scan, the TZ, the NZ and the intermediate subtransparent zone (STZ) were identified. High-spectral-resolution spectra were taken from each zone and subsequently examined with regard to mineral content, carbonate distribution, collagen denaturation and carbonate substitution patterns. The integrity of collagen's triple helical structure was also evaluated based on spectra collected from demineralized dentin films of selected teeth. The results support the argument that STZ is the real sclerotic layer, and they corroborate the established knowledge that collagen in TZ is hardly altered and therefore should be reserved for reparative purposes. Moreover, the close resemblance between the STZ and the NZ in terms of carbonate content, and that between the STZ and the TZ in terms of being A-type carbonate-rich, suggest that the mineral that initially occludes dentin tubules is hydroxyapatite newly generated from odontoblastic activities, which is then transformed into whitlockite in the demineralization/remineralization process as caries progresses. PMID:24556607

  5. Coupled water transport by rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Green, R; Giebisch, G; Unwin, R; Weinstein, A M

    1991-12-01

    Simultaneous microperfusion of proximal tubules and peritubular capillaries in kidneys of rats anesthetized with Inactin was used to examine water reabsorption by this epithelium. Osmolality of the luminal solution was varied with changes in NaCl concentration and by the addition of raffinose. Capillary perfusates contained either low (2 g/dl) or high (16 g/dl) concentrations of albumin. We used low-bicarbonate perfusates for both lumen and capillary so that we might apply the nonequilibrium thermodynamic model of transport for a single solute (NaCl) to interpret our observations. Linear regression with the volume flux equation Jv = -Lp delta II - Lp sigma delta C + Jav (where Jv is volume flux, Lp is hydraulic conductance, delta II is oncotic force, sigma is osmotic reflection coefficient, delta C is salt concentration difference, and Jav is the component of Jv not attributed to transepithelial hydrostatic or osmotic forces) revealed a tubule water permeability (Pf = 0.11 +/- 0.01 cm/s) and a sigma (0.74 +/- 0.08) in agreement with previous determinations. These transport parameters were unaffected by changes in peritubular protein. We also found that Jav was substantial, approximately three-fourths of the rate of isotonic transport under these perfusion conditions. Further, this component of water transport nearly doubled with the transition from low- to high-protein peritubular capillary perfusion. When expressed as a capacity for water reabsorption against an osmotic gradient, the salt concentration differences required to null volume flux were 13.2 +/- 2.4 and 29.4 +/- 4.0 mosmol/kgH2O under low and high peritubular protein. Our data suggest that this protein effect is, most likely, an increase in solute transport by the tubule epithelial cells. PMID:1750518

  6. Interpretation of male rat renal tubule tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, I.S.; Baetcke, K.P.

    1993-12-01

    Based on an analysis of recent scientific studies, a Technical Panel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Risk Assessment Forum recently advised EPA risk assessors against using information on certain male rat renal tubule tumors to assess human risk under conditions specified in a new Forum report. Risk assessment approaches generally assume that chemicals producing tumors in laboratory animals are a potential cancer hazard to humans. For most chemicals, including classical rodent kidney carcinogens such as N-ethyl-N-hydroxyethylnitrosamine, this extrapolation remains appropriate. Some chemicals, however, induce accumulation of {alpha}{sub 2u}-globulin ({alpha}{sub 2u}-g), a low molecular weight protein, in the male rat kidney. The {alpha}{sub 2u}-g accumulation initiates a sequence of events that appears to lead to renal tubule tumor formation. Female rats and other laboratory mammals administered the same chemicals do not accumulate low molecular weight protein in the kidney, and they do not develop renal tubule tumors. Because humans appear to be more like other laboratory animals than like the male rat, in this special situation, the male rat is not a good model for assessing human risk. The Forum report stresses the need for full scrutiny of a substantial set of data to determine when it is reasonable to presume that renal tumors in male rats are linked to a process involving {alpha}{sub 2u}-g accumulation and to select appropriate procedures for estimating human risks under such circumstances. 92 refs.

  7. Effects of Nd: YAG laser irradiation on the root canal wall dentin of human teeth: a SEM study.

    PubMed

    Kaitsas, V; Signore, A; Fonzi, L; Benedicenti, S; Barone, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological and histological changes on the root canal walls after Nd:YAG laser application. Twenty vital, recently extracted single-rooted human teeth were used for this study. Root canals were cleaned and shaped by a conventional step-back technique--by means of k files up to a 20 k-file type at working length--and subsequently shaped by Ni-Ti root-canal rotary instrumentation up to 30/06 and irrigated with 2.5% hypochlorite solution. Ten teeth (control group) were left unlased, while the other ten teeth were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser by means of a 320 microns fibre inserted in the root canal at 1 mm from the apex with a power of 1.5 Watt and a frequency of 15 pps for five seconds in retraction with rotating movements. The control specimen showed debris and smear layer on the root canal surface obscuring the dentin tubules. The root canal walls irradiated with Nd:YAG laser showed a clear glazed surface, some open dentinal tubules and some surface craters with cracks. Such results confirm that smear layer and debris are removable with Nd:YAG laser, however clearing all root canal walls is still difficult and, if the energy level and duration of application are inadequate, a certain degree of thermal damage and morphological changes in dentin structure are observable. PMID:11938590

  8. Effect of preliminary treatment of the dentin surface on the shear bond strength of resin composite to dentin.

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Cardash, H S; Oz-Ari, B; Ben-Amar, A

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two dentin disinfectants (Consepsis, Tubulicid), one aqueous HEMA solution (Aqua Prep), a combination of Aqua Prep and Tubulicid and an air abrasion treatment (50 microns aluminum oxide) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of two acetone-based single bottle adhesives (One Step and Prime & Bond 2.1). The occlusal surfaces of 167 freshly extracted human third molars were ground flat to expose the dentin, then polished with a 600 grit-polishing disc. The teeth were randomly assigned to 12 test groups (two bonding agents, six pretreatment protocols). The exposed dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 20 seconds, rinsed and briefly (1-2 seconds) air dried. Six pretreatment protocols were then applied. The air abrasion groups were exceptional, as etching was carried out only after pretreatment. One Step, or Prime & Bond 2.1 was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. Cylinders of Z-100 composite were bonded to the flat dentin surfaces by transparent gelatin capsules. Specimens were thermocycled in water baths between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, then sheared in an Instron Testing Machine. One-way and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests were used for statistical analysis. In the One Step group, Consepsis yielded a significantly higher SBS (17.8 MPa) than air abrasion (9.5 MPa), Control (11.8 MPa) and Aqua Prep + Tubilicid (11.9 MPa), and a comparable SBS with Tubilicid (12.5 MPa) and Aqua Prep (14.8 MPa). In the Prime & Bond 2.1 group, Aqua Prep (24.9 MPa) showed a significantly higher SBS than all other groups: air abrasion (9.3 MPa), Control (9.97 MPa), Tubilicid (12.2 MPa), Consepsis (13.0 MPa) and Tubilicid + Aqua Prep (13.3 MPa).

  9. Comparative study of dentine permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 microm TEA CO2 and Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gouw-Soares, S; Stabholz, A; Lage-Marques, J L; Zezell, D M; Groth, E B; Eduardo, C P

    2004-04-01

    Failure of apicectomies is generally attributed to dentine surface permeability as well as to the lack of an adequate marginal sealing of the retrofilling material, which allows the percolation of microorganisms and their products from the root canal system to the periodontal region, thus compromising periapical healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentine and the marginal permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 micro m TEA CO(2) or Er:YAG 2.94 micro m laser irradiation. Sixty-five single rooted human endodontically treated teeth were divided into five experimental groups: group I (control), apicectomy with high speed bur; group II, similar procedure to that of group I, followed by dentinal surface treatment with 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser; group III, similar procedure to group I followed by dentinal surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m; group IV, apicectomy and surface treatment with CO(2) 9.6 micro m laser; and group V, apicectomy and surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m. The analysis of methylene blue dye infiltration through the dentinal surface and the retrofilling material demonstrated that the samples from the groups that were irradiated with the lasers showed significantly lower infiltration indexes than the ones from the control group. These results were compatible with the structural morphological changes evidenced through SEM analysis. Samples from groups II and IV (9.6 micro m CO(2)) showed clean smooth surfaces, fusion, and recrystallized dentine distributed homogeneously throughout the irradiated area sealing the dentinal tubules. Samples from groups III and V (Er:YAG 2.94 micro m) also presented clean surfaces, without smear layer, but roughly compatible to the ablationed dentine and without evidence of dentinal tubules. Through the conditions of this study, the Er:YAG 2.94 micro m and the 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser used for root canal resection and dentine surface treatment showed a reduction of

  10. Comparative study of dentine permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 microm TEA CO2 and Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gouw-Soares, S; Stabholz, A; Lage-Marques, J L; Zezell, D M; Groth, E B; Eduardo, C P

    2004-04-01

    Failure of apicectomies is generally attributed to dentine surface permeability as well as to the lack of an adequate marginal sealing of the retrofilling material, which allows the percolation of microorganisms and their products from the root canal system to the periodontal region, thus compromising periapical healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentine and the marginal permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 micro m TEA CO(2) or Er:YAG 2.94 micro m laser irradiation. Sixty-five single rooted human endodontically treated teeth were divided into five experimental groups: group I (control), apicectomy with high speed bur; group II, similar procedure to that of group I, followed by dentinal surface treatment with 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser; group III, similar procedure to group I followed by dentinal surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m; group IV, apicectomy and surface treatment with CO(2) 9.6 micro m laser; and group V, apicectomy and surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m. The analysis of methylene blue dye infiltration through the dentinal surface and the retrofilling material demonstrated that the samples from the groups that were irradiated with the lasers showed significantly lower infiltration indexes than the ones from the control group. These results were compatible with the structural morphological changes evidenced through SEM analysis. Samples from groups II and IV (9.6 micro m CO(2)) showed clean smooth surfaces, fusion, and recrystallized dentine distributed homogeneously throughout the irradiated area sealing the dentinal tubules. Samples from groups III and V (Er:YAG 2.94 micro m) also presented clean surfaces, without smear layer, but roughly compatible to the ablationed dentine and without evidence of dentinal tubules. Through the conditions of this study, the Er:YAG 2.94 micro m and the 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser used for root canal resection and dentine surface treatment showed a reduction of

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinase 20 Co-expression With Dentin Sialophosphoprotein in Human and Monkey Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Ogbureke, Kalu U E; Koli, Komal; Saxena, Geetu

    2016-10-01

    We recently reported the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20), hitherto thought to be tooth specific, in the metabolically active ductal epithelial cells of human salivary glands. Furthermore, our report indicated that MMP20 co-expressed and potentially interacts with dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a member of the small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). Our earlier reports have shown the co-expression of three MMPs, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9, with specific members of the SIBLING family: bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and dentin matrix protein 1, respectively. This study investigated the expression of MMP20 and verified its co-expression with DSPP in human and monkey kidney sections and human mixed renal cells by IHC, in situ proximity ligation assay, and immunofluorescence. Our results show that MMP20 is expressed in all segments of the human and monkey nephron with marked intensity in the proximal and distal tubules, and was absent in the glomeruli. Furthermore, MMP20 co-expressed with DSPP in the proximal, distal, and collecting tubules, and in mixed renal cells. Consistent with other SIBLING-MMP pairs, the DSPP-MMP20 pair may play a role in the normal turnover of cell surface proteins and/or repair of pericellular matrix proteins of the basement membranes in the metabolically active duct epithelial system of the nephrons. PMID:27666430

  12. Bond strength and SEM observation of CO2 laser irradiated dentin, bonded with simplified-step adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koshiro, K; Inoue, S; Niimi, K; Koase, K; Sano, H

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated, mechanically and morphologically, whether the dentin surface irradiated by CO2 laser could be a possible adherent when bonded with simplified-step adhesives. Buccal enamel and cementum of extracted human premolars were removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were irradiated continuously with CO2 laser at 1.0 W. Before bonding with either a single-bottle adhesive (Single Bond) or a self-etching priming system (Mega Bond), the irradiated dentin surface was treated as follows: no treatment, NaHCO3 powder abrasion and wet-grinding with 600-grit SiC paper. The treated dentin surfaces were bonded to resin composite with either of the two adhesives. Non-irradiated dentin surfaces were also used as control. Resin bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and subjected to microtensile bond test. Additionally, to observe the resin/irradiated dentin interface, resin-bonded specimens were similarly prepared, sectioned into slabs, embedded in epoxy resin, polished with diamond pastes, sputter coated Au-Pd and examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After SEM observation, the specimens were further polished with diamond paste to remove the Au-Pd sputter-coat, immersed in HCL and NaOCl and finally observed by SEM again. In the presence of carbonized dentin, microtensile bond strength drastically decreased but recovered to the control value by removing the carbonized dentin layer visually with SiC paper for both adhesive systems. However, the laser-affected dentin that remained on the bonded interface was easily dissolved with NaOCl and HCl. PMID:15853101

  13. Validation of a Cariogenic Biofilm Model to Evaluate the Effect of Fluoride on Enamel and Root Dentine Demineralization.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Constanza E; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2016-01-01

    Due to gingival recession both enamel and root dentine are at risk of developing caries. Both tissues are exposed to a similar environment, however there is not a validated model to evaluate the effect of fluoride on these dental substrates simultaneously. Hence, this study aimed to validate a caries model to evaluate the effect of fluoride to prevent demineralization on enamel and root-dentine. Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on saliva-coated bovine enamel and root dentine slabs (n = 12 per group) mounted in the same well of culture plates. The biofilms were exposed 8×/day to 10% sucrose and treated 2×/day with fluoridated solutions containing 0, 150, 450, or 1,350 ppm F; thus, simulating the use of low to high fluoride concentration toothpastes. The pH values of the culture medium was monitored 2×/day as a biofilm acidogenicity indicator. After 96 h, biofilms were collected for fluoride concentration analysis. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL) was calculated for slabs. The fluoride uptake by the enamel and dentine was also determined. The model showed a dose-response because the biofilm and fluoride uptake increased and %SHL decreased at increasing fluoride concentrations (p < 0.05). Fluoride in the biofilm formed on dentine and fluoride uptake by dentine were higher than those for enamel. With the same fluoride concentration treatment, the percentage of reduction of demineralization was lower for dentine than for enamel. In conclusion, the model was validated in terms of a dose-response effect of fluoride on enamel and root dentine. Furthermore, the findings support the clinical data, suggesting that higher fluoride concentrations are necessary to control caries of root dentine than of enamel.

  14. Validation of a Cariogenic Biofilm Model to Evaluate the Effect of Fluoride on Enamel and Root Dentine Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Due to gingival recession both enamel and root dentine are at risk of developing caries. Both tissues are exposed to a similar environment, however there is not a validated model to evaluate the effect of fluoride on these dental substrates simultaneously. Hence, this study aimed to validate a caries model to evaluate the effect of fluoride to prevent demineralization on enamel and root-dentine. Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on saliva-coated bovine enamel and root dentine slabs (n = 12 per group) mounted in the same well of culture plates. The biofilms were exposed 8×/day to 10% sucrose and treated 2×/day with fluoridated solutions containing 0, 150, 450, or 1,350 ppm F; thus, simulating the use of low to high fluoride concentration toothpastes. The pH values of the culture medium was monitored 2×/day as a biofilm acidogenicity indicator. After 96 h, biofilms were collected for fluoride concentration analysis. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL) was calculated for slabs. The fluoride uptake by the enamel and dentine was also determined. The model showed a dose-response because the biofilm and fluoride uptake increased and %SHL decreased at increasing fluoride concentrations (p < 0.05). Fluoride in the biofilm formed on dentine and fluoride uptake by dentine were higher than those for enamel. With the same fluoride concentration treatment, the percentage of reduction of demineralization was lower for dentine than for enamel. In conclusion, the model was validated in terms of a dose-response effect of fluoride on enamel and root dentine. Furthermore, the findings support the clinical data, suggesting that higher fluoride concentrations are necessary to control caries of root dentine than of enamel. PMID:26731743

  15. Validation of a Cariogenic Biofilm Model to Evaluate the Effect of Fluoride on Enamel and Root Dentine Demineralization.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Constanza E; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2016-01-01

    Due to gingival recession both enamel and root dentine are at risk of developing caries. Both tissues are exposed to a similar environment, however there is not a validated model to evaluate the effect of fluoride on these dental substrates simultaneously. Hence, this study aimed to validate a caries model to evaluate the effect of fluoride to prevent demineralization on enamel and root-dentine. Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on saliva-coated bovine enamel and root dentine slabs (n = 12 per group) mounted in the same well of culture plates. The biofilms were exposed 8×/day to 10% sucrose and treated 2×/day with fluoridated solutions containing 0, 150, 450, or 1,350 ppm F; thus, simulating the use of low to high fluoride concentration toothpastes. The pH values of the culture medium was monitored 2×/day as a biofilm acidogenicity indicator. After 96 h, biofilms were collected for fluoride concentration analysis. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL) was calculated for slabs. The fluoride uptake by the enamel and dentine was also determined. The model showed a dose-response because the biofilm and fluoride uptake increased and %SHL decreased at increasing fluoride concentrations (p < 0.05). Fluoride in the biofilm formed on dentine and fluoride uptake by dentine were higher than those for enamel. With the same fluoride concentration treatment, the percentage of reduction of demineralization was lower for dentine than for enamel. In conclusion, the model was validated in terms of a dose-response effect of fluoride on enamel and root dentine. Furthermore, the findings support the clinical data, suggesting that higher fluoride concentrations are necessary to control caries of root dentine than of enamel. PMID:26731743

  16. Excretion of alkaloids by malpighian tubules of insects.

    PubMed

    Maddrell, S H; Gardiner, B O

    1976-04-01

    Nicotine is transported at high rates by Malpighian tubules of larvae of Manduca sexta, Pieris brassicae and Rhodnius prolixus and the transport persists in the absence of alkaloid from the diet. In the fluid-secreting portion of Rhodnius tubules this transport is not coupled to ion transport, nor is it dependent on the physiological state of the animal. The transport, which can occur against a steep electrochemical gradient, shows saturation kinetics with a maximal rate of 700 pmol. min-1 per tubule and is half saturated at 2-3 mM. Nicotine transport independent of ion movements also occurs in the lower resorptive parts of Rhodnius tubules. Both portions of Rhodnius tubules can transport morphine and atropine. These alkaloids and nicotine compete with one naother and are presumed to be carried by the smae transport system. Nicotine transport in Rhodnius was unaffected by organic anions, such as amaranth and benzyl penicillin, or by the organic anion transport inhibitor, probenecid. Fluid secretion in 5-HT-stimulated tubules was reduced by atropine and nicotine, probably by blocking the 5-HT receptors. The Malpighian tubules of adult Calliphora erythrocephala and Musca domestica remove nicotine from bathing solutions, an unknown metabolic accumulating in the tubules. Adult P. brassicae and M. sexta do not exhibit transport of nicotine by their Malpighian tubules.

  17. Influence of dentin pre-treatment with NaOCl on the morphology of adhesive interface of self-etching adhesive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino, Carina Sinclér; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of pre-treatment using NaOCl in the morphology of dentin/resin interface. The three self-etching adhesive systems were selected: One-Up Bond F (Tokuyama, Tokyo, Japan), Prime & Bond NT/NRC (Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) and Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan). Nine dentin disks were used in this study. Half disk was treated strictly following manufacturers' instructions (control groups). The other half was treated with a solution of 2.5% NaOCl (experimental groups). After the bonding protocols were accomplished, a low viscosity resin (Flow-it/Jeneric Pentron) was inserted and light-cured. Specimens were prepared for SEM. Morphological aspects were observed, comparing both the groups. The analysis of the photomicrographs revealed formation of a hybrid layer for both controls groups along the interface. The experimental groups showed a resin/dentin interface more irregular and produced topographical features with funnel-shaped dentin tubules. Areas with absence of hybrid layer formation were observed, mainly for One-Up Bond F, although tubules their lateral branches were filled with Prime & Bond NT/NRC and Clearfil Se Bond adhesive systems. It was concluded that the use of NaOCl influenced negatively in the formation of the hybrid layer, mainly for the One-Up Bond F.

  18. Cytotoxic effects of thiamethoxam in the midgut and malpighian tubules of Africanized Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Catae, Aline Fernanda; Roat, Thaisa Cristina; De Oliveira, Regiane Alves; Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio Ferreira; Malaspina, Osmar

    2014-04-01

    Due to its expansion, agriculture has become increasingly dependent on the use of pesticides. However, the indiscriminate use of insecticides has had additional effects on the environment. These products have a broad spectrum of action, and therefore the insecticide affects not only the pests but also non-target insects such as bees, which are important pollinators of agricultural crops and natural environments. Among the most used pesticides, the neonicotinoids are particularly harmful. One of the neonicotinoids of specific concern is thiamethoxam, which is used on a wide variety of crops and is toxic to bees. Thus, this study aimed to analyze the effects of this insecticide in the midgut and Malpighian tubule cells of Africanized Apis mellifera. Newly emerged workers were exposed until 8 days to a diet containing a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam equal to 1/10 of LC₅₀ (0.0428 ng a.i./l L of diet). The bees were dissected and the organs were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that thiamethoxam is cytotoxic to midgut and Malpighian tubules. In the midgut, the damage was more evident in bees exposed to the insecticide on the first day. On the eighth day, the cells were ultrastructurally intact suggesting a recovery of this organ. The Malpighian tubules showed pronounced alterations on the eighth day of exposure of bees to the insecticide. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure to a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam can impair organs that are used during the metabolism of the insecticide.

  19. Comparative evaluation of the effect of chlorhexidine and Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) on dentin stabilization using shear bond testing

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Dakshita Joy; Jaiswal, Natasha; Vasudeva, Agrima; Garg, Paridhi; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Chandra, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of adhesive dentistry is to create an effective, durable union between the tooth structure and restorative material. However, degradation of adhesive dentine interface remains largely responsible for the relatively short lifetime of tooth colored resin restoration. Aim: The aim of the study is to compare the dentin collagen stabilization property of Chlorhexidine (CHX) and Aloe barbadensis Miller using shear bond strength testing. Materials and Methods: Occlusal reduction was done in sixty extracted human mandibular molars to expose the mid coronal dentin and divided into three groups n = 20. Following the surface pretreatment (Group 1 = control, Group 2 = CHX, Group 3 = Aloevera), dentine bonding agent and composite resin were applied and cured. The specimens were then subjected to shear bond strength testing. Results: From the results analyzed, it was noted that there was statistically significant difference between the groups Control and CHX and Control and A. barbadensis Miller (P < 0.05), specifically the values of Control < CHX and Control < A. barbadensis Miller (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference between CHX and A. barbadensis Miller (P > 0.05). Hence, the following result for the shear bond strengths to dentin was obtained: Control < CHX ≈ A. barbadensis Miller. Conclusion: CHX and A. barbadensis Miller, as pretreatment agents of acid demineralized dentin collagen, has no adverse effect on the immediate shear bond strength of a two-step etch and rinse adhesive to dentin.

  20. Comparative evaluation of the effect of chlorhexidine and Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) on dentin stabilization using shear bond testing

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Dakshita Joy; Jaiswal, Natasha; Vasudeva, Agrima; Garg, Paridhi; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Chandra, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of adhesive dentistry is to create an effective, durable union between the tooth structure and restorative material. However, degradation of adhesive dentine interface remains largely responsible for the relatively short lifetime of tooth colored resin restoration. Aim: The aim of the study is to compare the dentin collagen stabilization property of Chlorhexidine (CHX) and Aloe barbadensis Miller using shear bond strength testing. Materials and Methods: Occlusal reduction was done in sixty extracted human mandibular molars to expose the mid coronal dentin and divided into three groups n = 20. Following the surface pretreatment (Group 1 = control, Group 2 = CHX, Group 3 = Aloevera), dentine bonding agent and composite resin were applied and cured. The specimens were then subjected to shear bond strength testing. Results: From the results analyzed, it was noted that there was statistically significant difference between the groups Control and CHX and Control and A. barbadensis Miller (P < 0.05), specifically the values of Control < CHX and Control < A. barbadensis Miller (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference between CHX and A. barbadensis Miller (P > 0.05). Hence, the following result for the shear bond strengths to dentin was obtained: Control < CHX ≈ A. barbadensis Miller. Conclusion: CHX and A. barbadensis Miller, as pretreatment agents of acid demineralized dentin collagen, has no adverse effect on the immediate shear bond strength of a two-step etch and rinse adhesive to dentin. PMID:27656056

  1. Ptychographic X-ray nanotomography quantifies mineral distributions in human dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanette, I.; Enders, B.; Dierolf, M.; Thibault, P.; Gradl, R.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Menzel, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Zaslansky, P.

    2015-03-01

    Bones are bio-composites with biologically tunable mechanical properties, where a polymer matrix of nanofibrillar collagen is reinforced by apatite mineral crystals. Some bones, such as antler, form and change rapidly, while other bone tissues, such as human tooth dentine, develop slowly and maintain constant composition and architecture for entire lifetimes. When studying apatite mineral microarchitecture, mineral distributions or mineralization activity of bone-forming cells, representative samples of tissue are best studied at submicrometre resolution while minimizing sample-preparation damage. Here, we demonstrate the power of ptychographic X-ray tomography to map variations in the mineral content distribution in three dimensions and at the nanometre scale. Using this non-destructive method, we observe nanostructures surrounding hollow tracts that exist in human dentine forming dentinal tubules. We reveal unprecedented quantitative details of the ultrastructure clearly revealing the spatially varying mineralization density. Such information is essential for understanding a variety of natural and therapeutic effects for example in bone tissue healing and ageing.

  2. Ptychographic X-ray nanotomography quantifies mineral distributions in human dentine.

    PubMed

    Zanette, I; Enders, B; Dierolf, M; Thibault, P; Gradl, R; Diaz, A; Guizar-Sicairos, M; Menzel, A; Pfeiffer, F; Zaslansky, P

    2015-01-01

    Bones are bio-composites with biologically tunable mechanical properties, where a polymer matrix of nanofibrillar collagen is reinforced by apatite mineral crystals. Some bones, such as antler, form and change rapidly, while other bone tissues, such as human tooth dentine, develop slowly and maintain constant composition and architecture for entire lifetimes. When studying apatite mineral microarchitecture, mineral distributions or mineralization activity of bone-forming cells, representative samples of tissue are best studied at submicrometre resolution while minimizing sample-preparation damage. Here, we demonstrate the power of ptychographic X-ray tomography to map variations in the mineral content distribution in three dimensions and at the nanometre scale. Using this non-destructive method, we observe nanostructures surrounding hollow tracts that exist in human dentine forming dentinal tubules. We reveal unprecedented quantitative details of the ultrastructure clearly revealing the spatially varying mineralization density. Such information is essential for understanding a variety of natural and therapeutic effects for example in bone tissue healing and ageing. PMID:25790969

  3. Holmium:YAG laser: effects on dentin demineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1995-05-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser at 2.12 microns wavelength was used to compare the changes in resistance to demineralization of the dentinal root surfaces of human extracted teeth in vitro. Three protocols were used: Group #1, and application of nonfilled resin/NaF (4%) solution followed by exposure with the Holmium:YAG laser beam; Group #2, an application of an aqueous solution of NaF (4%) only; and Group #3, irradiation with the laser beam only. The teeth were exposed on the root surfaces with untreated control and experimental sites on opposite sides of the teeth. A 3 mm spot size covered an area of 3 X 5 mm with 0.450 (+/- .05) joules at a fluence of 2.66 - 3.3 J/cm2. All teeth were decalcified in a 10% Formic acid solution for a timed period. Samples were prepared for staining by sectioning the teeth at the dentoenamel junction and 3 mm apically to produce a cross-section of each tooth root surface. Each sample was placed in toluidine blue dye to observe the depth of dye penetration into the dentin of treated and control sites. Toluidine blue dye showed a consistent greater depth of dye penetration into the dentinal areas of the untreated control sites versus the resin/NaF-lased group. The topical fluoride only group did not appear different than the untreated control sites of the teeth. The lased only group showed areas of dye penetration similar to the untreated control sides with other areas of little or no dye penetration. The finding that HO:YAG laser energy/chemical agent produced increased resistance to demineralization of dentinal surfaces in vitro suggested potential clinical applications of this combined modality.

  4. Shape transitions in anisotropic multicomponent lipid tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim

    2016-05-01

    Abstract Ternary mixtures of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol can be induced to phase separate by photo-peroxidation into lipid-ordered Lo and lipid-disordered Ld domains. Because these have different mechanical properties, the phase separation is accompanied by dramatic changes in morphology. This work considers a tubule composed of Ld phase with Lo phase inclusions that possess greater rigidity; this system has been shown experimentally by Yuan and coworkers to spontaneously adopt either banded or disc configurations following phase separation. The static behaviour of inter-domain interactions is analyzed in each of these geometries by solving the linearized shape equations. These calculations suggest a possible mechanism by which the two structures form.

  5. Fluorine analysis of human dentin surrounding resin composite after fluoride application by μ-PIGE/PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Katsushi; Komatsu, Hisanori; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Pereira, Patricia N. R.; Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Sato, Takahiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2011-10-01

    The use of fluoride for the prevention of caries is based on the transformation of hydroxylapatite to fluoroapatite in the presence of fluoride ions, thereby strengthening tooth structure. Adhesion of dentin and resin composite (tooth-colored restoration material) requires a dentin bonding system, since resin composite is not able to adhere to dentin directly. Demineralization of dentin by acid etching is an important step in the dentin bonding system, however, demineralization also introduces weaknesses in tooth structure. If the demineralized dentin could be strengthened by the application of fluoride, then the dentin-resin composite bond strength might also improve. To test this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the influence of fluoride applications on the strength of the dentin-resin composite bond by (1) tensile strength testing analyses, (2) SEM analyses of tooth structure, and (3) detection of calcium (Ca) and fluorine (F) distribution patterns by micro proton-induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) and micro proton-induced gamma-ray emission (μ-PIGE) analyses conducted at the Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA) at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI). In this study, the dentin in extracted human molars was exposed by grinding and the dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid. Fluoride was applied at two concentrations, 0.022% (100 ppm F) and 2.21% (10,000 ppm F) NaF solution, for two time periods, 30 and 60 s, prior to bonding the resin composite with the treated dentin. Controls were prepared in the same manner, but without the fluoride application. Bond strength was measured with a micro-tensile testing unit, and the fluorine and calcium distributions at the interface between dentin and resin composite were detected by μ-PIGE and μ-PIXE analysis, respectively. Results indicate that the 10,000 ppm F applications resulted in higher bond strengths than observed in either the 100 ppm F applications or

  6. Self-(Un)rolling Biopolymer Microstructures: Rings, Tubules, and Helical Tubules from the Same Material.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunhong; Nikolov, Svetoslav V; Calabrese, Rossella; Dindar, Amir; Alexeev, Alexander; Kippelen, Bernard; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2015-07-13

    We have demonstrated the facile formation of reversible and fast self-rolling biopolymer microstructures from sandwiched active-passive, silk-on-silk materials. Both experimental and modeling results confirmed that the shape of individual sheets effectively controls biaxial stresses within these sheets, which can self-roll into distinct 3D structures including microscopic rings, tubules, and helical tubules. This is a unique example of tailoring self-rolled 3D geometries through shape design without changing the inner morphology of active bimorph biomaterials. In contrast to traditional organic-soluble synthetic materials, we utilized a biocompatible and biodegradable biopolymer that underwent a facile aqueous layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly process for the fabrication of 2D films. The resulting films can undergo reversible pH-triggered rolling/unrolling, with a variety of 3D structures forming from biopolymer structures that have identical morphology and composition.

  7. Effects of adsorbed and templated nanosilver in mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles on inhibition of bacteria colonization of dentin.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Wu, Daming; Tay, Franklin R; Ma, Tengjiao; Wu, Yujie; Fan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles (MCSNs) are advanced biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and mineralization induction. Nanosilver-incorporated MCSNs (Ag-MCSNs) were prepared in the present study using both the adsorption and template methods. Both versions of Ag-MCSNs showed characteristic morphology of mesoporous materials and exhibited sustained release of ions over time. In antibacterial testing against planktonic Enterococcus faecalis, Ag-MCSNs showed significantly better antibacterial effects when compared with MCSNs (P<0.05). The Ag-MCSNs aggregated on the dentin surface of root canal walls and infiltrated into dentinal tubules after ultrasound activation, significantly inhibiting the adherence and colonization of E. faecalis on dentin (P<0.05). Despite this, Ag-MCSNs with templated nanosilver showed much lower cytotoxicity than Ag-MCSNs with adsorbed nanosilver (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that nanosilver could be incorporated into MCSNs using the template method. The templated nanosilver could release silver ions and inhibit the growth and colonization of E. faecalis both in the planktonic form and as biofilms on dentin surfaces as absorbed nanosilver. Templated Ag-MCSNs may be developed into a new intracanal disinfectant for root canal disinfection due to their antibacterial ability and low cytotoxicity, and as controlled release devices for other bioactive molecules to produce multifunctional biomaterials.

  8. Effects of adsorbed and templated nanosilver in mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles on inhibition of bacteria colonization of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Wu, Daming; Tay, Franklin R; Ma, Tengjiao; Wu, Yujie; Fan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles (MCSNs) are advanced biomaterials for controlled drug delivery and mineralization induction. Nanosilver-incorporated MCSNs (Ag-MCSNs) were prepared in the present study using both the adsorption and template methods. Both versions of Ag-MCSNs showed characteristic morphology of mesoporous materials and exhibited sustained release of ions over time. In antibacterial testing against planktonic Enterococcus faecalis, Ag-MCSNs showed significantly better antibacterial effects when compared with MCSNs (P<0.05). The Ag-MCSNs aggregated on the dentin surface of root canal walls and infiltrated into dentinal tubules after ultrasound activation, significantly inhibiting the adherence and colonization of E. faecalis on dentin (P<0.05). Despite this, Ag-MCSNs with templated nanosilver showed much lower cytotoxicity than Ag-MCSNs with adsorbed nanosilver (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that nanosilver could be incorporated into MCSNs using the template method. The templated nanosilver could release silver ions and inhibit the growth and colonization of E. faecalis both in the planktonic form and as biofilms on dentin surfaces as absorbed nanosilver. Templated Ag-MCSNs may be developed into a new intracanal disinfectant for root canal disinfection due to their antibacterial ability and low cytotoxicity, and as controlled release devices for other bioactive molecules to produce multifunctional biomaterials. PMID:25419127

  9. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  10. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  11. Hydration and dynamic fatigue of dentin.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Zheng, W

    2006-04-01

    An experimental investigation on the dynamic fatigue response of dentin was conducted to examine the influence of stress rate on the strength and energy to fracture. Rectangular beams were prepared from the coronal dentin of bovine maxillary molars and subjected to four-point flexure to failure. The dentin beams were examined in the fully hydrated and dehydrated condition at stress rates (sigma) ranging from 0.01 to 100 MPa/s. Results for the hydrated dentin showed that the flexure strength, energy to fracture, and flexure modulus all increased with increasing stress rate; the flexure strength increased from 100 MPa ((sigma) = 0.01 MPa/s) to 250 MPa ((sigma) = 100 MPa/s). In contrast, the elastic modulus and strength of the dehydrated dentin decreased with increasing stress rate; the flexural strength of the dehydrated dentin deceased from 170 MPa ((sigma) = 0.01 MPa/s) to 100 MPa ((sigma) = 100 MPa/s). While the hydrated dentin behaved more like a brittle material at low stress rates, the strain to fracture was found to be nearly independent of (sigma). According to the experimental results, restorative conditions that cause development of static stresses within the tooth could promote a decrease in the damage tolerance of dentin.

  12. Management of dentinal hypersensitivity: a review.

    PubMed

    Parolia, Abhishek; Kundabala, M; Mohan, Mandakini

    2011-03-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is a very common clinical finding that can cause considerable concern for the patient. Clinicians must understand the various etiological factors, their complexities, and numerous treatment options available. This article reviews the etiology, management, and prevention of dentinal hypersensitivity. PMID:21563596

  13. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Dusevich, Vladimir; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-um-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min) / input power (5–15 w). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen’s banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen. PMID:25458523

  14. Dentine caries: take it or leave it?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Watson, T F; Kidd, E A

    2001-04-01

    In modern dentistry the primary aim when excavating carious dentine is to eradicate only the highly infected, irreversibly demineralised and denatured biomass in order to allow effective restoration of the cavity, restoration of the surface anatomy of the tooth and to prevent disease progression. However, the boundary between this superficial zone of dentine requiring excavation and the deeper, affected but repairable tissue is not always obvious either in the clinic or in the research laboratory. The inherent subjectivity in detecting this excavation boundary can result in clinically significant differences in the quality and quantity of dentine removed by different operators and makes the in vitro comparison of newer excavation techniques more difficult. This article discusses the rationale behind carious dentine excavation and the criteria available to the dentist, both clinical and laboratory, to help identify the dentine requiring removal. PMID:11436234

  15. Dentine caries: take it or leave it?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Watson, T F; Kidd, E A

    2000-01-01

    In modern dentistry the primary aim when excavating carious dentine is to eradicate only the highly infected, irreversibly demineralized and denatured biomass in order to allow effective restoration of the cavity, restoration of the surface anatomy of the tooth and to prevent disease progression. However, the boundary between this superficial zone of dentine requiring excavation and the deeper, affected but repairable tissue is not always obvious either in the clinic or in the research laboratory. The inherent subjectivity in detecting this excavation boundary can result in clinically significant differences in the quality and quantity of dentine removed by different operators and makes the in vitro comparison of newer excavation techniques more difficult. This article discusses the rationale behind carious dentine excavation and the criteria available to the dentist, both clinical and laboratory, to help identify the dentine requiring removal. PMID:11218463

  16. Capacity of a hydroxyapatite–lysozyme combination against Streptococcus mutans for the treatment of dentinal caries

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; da Rocha, Nathany Nunes; Peres, Mariane de Lourdes Hernandes Martins

    2016-01-01

    Background: One current strategy for the treatment of carious lesions is the use of biomaterials with antimicrobial activity. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate a combination of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme for the treatment of dentinal caries by measuring Streptococcus mutans counts before carious tissue sealing, and 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after treatment. Materials and Methods: Forty permanent third molars were selected, and flat dentin surfaces were prepared. The teeth were exposed to a cariogenic challenge with S. mutans. After challenge, the dentinal caries were collected from five specimens. The remaining specimens were treated with a mixture of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme in sodium laureth sulfate and sealed with composite resin. S. mutans counts were obtained 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after sealing. Statistical Analysis: The results were evaluated by descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: a significant reduction in S. mutans (CFU/mL) was observed in dentinal lesions 1 month after treatment with hydroxyapatite/lysozyme in sodium laureth sulfate (P = 0.0254). Comparison of S. mutans counts obtained 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after treatment revealed reductions only at the 1-month time point (P = 0.0318). Conclusions: the combination of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme may be an alternative for reducing the S. mutans burden in dentinal caries.

  17. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bronzato, Juliana Delatorre; Cecchin, Doglas; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; de Almeida, José Flávio Affonso; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone) on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control); G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl); G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05). Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05). A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05). G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently. PMID:26957789

  18. Capacity of a hydroxyapatite–lysozyme combination against Streptococcus mutans for the treatment of dentinal caries

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; da Rocha, Nathany Nunes; Peres, Mariane de Lourdes Hernandes Martins

    2016-01-01

    Background: One current strategy for the treatment of carious lesions is the use of biomaterials with antimicrobial activity. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate a combination of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme for the treatment of dentinal caries by measuring Streptococcus mutans counts before carious tissue sealing, and 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after treatment. Materials and Methods: Forty permanent third molars were selected, and flat dentin surfaces were prepared. The teeth were exposed to a cariogenic challenge with S. mutans. After challenge, the dentinal caries were collected from five specimens. The remaining specimens were treated with a mixture of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme in sodium laureth sulfate and sealed with composite resin. S. mutans counts were obtained 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after sealing. Statistical Analysis: The results were evaluated by descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: a significant reduction in S. mutans (CFU/mL) was observed in dentinal lesions 1 month after treatment with hydroxyapatite/lysozyme in sodium laureth sulfate (P = 0.0254). Comparison of S. mutans counts obtained 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after treatment revealed reductions only at the 1-month time point (P = 0.0318). Conclusions: the combination of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme may be an alternative for reducing the S. mutans burden in dentinal caries. PMID:27656068

  19. Comparative evaluation of a dentifrice containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate to a dentifrice containing potassium nitrate for dentinal hypersensitivity: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Satyapal, Tanya; Mali, Rohini; Mali, Amita; Patil, Vishakha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Calcium sodium phosphosilicate is a recently introduced desensitizing agent which acts by occluding the dentinal tubules and also resists acid decalcification. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of a new toothpaste containing 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity and also compare it with 5% potassium nitrate. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with the chief complaint of dentinal hypersensitivity were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) scores were taken for water and air stimuli at baseline, 3 weeks after usage of the respective toothpaste, and 3 weeks after discontinuation of the respective toothpaste. Results: Both the groups showed reduction in hypersensitivity scores at 3 weeks and 6 weeks for air stimulus and cold water. The calcium sodium phosphosilicate group, however, showed significantly reduction in hypersensitivity compared to the potassium nitrate group at any time point for both measures of hypersensitivity. Conclusion: The 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate group showed immense reduction in dentinal hypersensitivity symptoms. The 5% calcium sodium phosphosilicate showed prolonged effects even after discontinuation as compared to 5% potassium nitrate, due to its dentinal tubular occlusion property. PMID:25425819

  20. Polyene antibiotics: relative degrees of in vitro cytotoxicity and potential effects on tubule phospholipid and ceramide content.

    PubMed

    Zager, R A

    2000-08-01

    Polyene antibiotic administration is limited by dose-dependent nephrotoxicity. The latter is believed to be mediated by polyene anchoring to plasma membrane cholesterol, resulting in pore formation, abnormal ion/solute flux, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) declines, and, ultimately, a loss of tubule viability. The relative nephrotoxicity of these agents and their liposomal preparations has remained poorly defined. Thus, freshly isolated mouse proximal tubules or cultured human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells were exposed to either nystatin, amphotericin B, or three different polyene liposomal preparations (Nyotran, AmBisome, or Abelcet; 4 to 64 microg/mL). The impact of these agents on (1) plasma membrane injury (sodium-driven ATP consumption, assessed by ATP-adenosine diphosphate [ADP] ratios); (2) cellular susceptibility to superimposed injury (chemical hypoxia or ferrous ammonium sulfate-mediated oxidative stress; assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release); and (3) membrane cholesterol, phospholipid, and ceramide expression was assessed. Amphotericin B was more cytotoxic than nystatin (approximately 25% to 50% greater ATP-ADP ratio declines). Most of this toxicity could be eliminated by polyene liposomal formulation. Nevertheless, the liposomal polyenes still fully sensitized tubule cells to superimposed chemical hypoxic (antimycin/deoxyglucose), but not oxidant, attack. Nystatin and amphotericin B caused acute increments in tubule sphingomyelin-phosphatidylcholine ratios and ceramide content (indicating an impact on the plasma membrane extending beyond the classic view of pore formation with ion flux). In conclusion, (1) nystatin is seemingly less cytotoxic than amphotericin B (in contrast to the prevailing clinical view); (2) liposomal formulation markedly decreases this cytotoxicity; (3) despite this reduced toxicity, liposomal polyenes are still able to render tubule cells more vulnerable to selected forms of superimposed injury; and (4) acute alterations in

  1. T-tubule disease: Relationship between t-tubule organization and regional contractile performance in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Crossman, David J; Young, Alistair A; Ruygrok, Peter N; Nason, Guy P; Baddelely, David; Soeller, Christian; Cannell, Mark B

    2015-07-01

    Evidence from animal models suggest that t-tubule changes may play an important role in the contractile deficit associated with heart failure. However samples are usually taken at random with no regard as to regional variability present in failing hearts which leads to uncertainty in the relationship between contractile performance and possible t-tubule derangement. Regional contraction in human hearts was measured by tagged cine MRI and model fitting. At transplant, failing hearts were biopsy sampled in identified regions and immunocytochemistry was used to label t-tubules and sarcomeric z-lines. Computer image analysis was used to assess 5 different unbiased measures of t-tubule structure/organization. In regions of failing hearts that showed good contractile performance, t-tubule organization was similar to that seen in normal hearts, with worsening structure correlating with the loss of regional contractile performance. Statistical analysis showed that t-tubule direction was most highly correlated with local contractile performance, followed by the amplitude of the sarcomeric peak in the Fourier transform of the t-tubule image. Other area based measures were less well correlated. We conclude that regional contractile performance in failing human hearts is strongly correlated with the local t-tubule organization. Cluster tree analysis with a functional definition of failing contraction strength allowed a pathological definition of 't-tubule disease'. The regional variability in contractile performance and cellular structure is a confounding issue for analysis of samples taken from failing human hearts, although this may be overcome with regional analysis by using tagged cMRI and biopsy mapping.

  2. Dentin hypersensitivity: differential diagnosis, tests, and etiology.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2014-02-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity (DHS) is a painful condition that affects up to 57 percent of the adult population. It occurs as a result of exposure of dentin to the oral environment. Ensuring the correct diagnosis of this condition is based on history and examination. An oral screening for DHS should encompass such elements as patient history, clinical examination that includes radiographs, a variety of tests, identification of risk factors, and a differential diagnosis. An understanding of dentinal fluid and odontoblasts is also beneficial for diagnosis. PMID:24571559

  3. Surface temperature and thermal penetration depth of Nd:YAG laser applied to enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel M.; Neev, Joseph; Goodis, Harold E.; Berns, Michael W.

    1992-06-01

    The determination of the thermal effects of Nd:YAG laser energy on enamel and dentin is critical in understanding the clinical applications of caries removal and surface modification. Recently extracted non-carious third molars were sterilized with gamma irradiation. Calculus and cementum were removed using scaling instruments and 600 grit sand paper. The smear layer produced by sanding was removed with a solution of 0.5 M EDTA (pH 7.4) for two minutes. Enamel and dentin surfaces were exposed to a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 150 microsecond(s) pulse duration. Laser energy was delivered to the teeth with a 320 micrometers diameter fiberoptic delivery system, for exposure times of 1, 10 and 30 seconds. Laser parameters varied from 0.3 to 3.0 W, 10 to 30 Hz and 30 to 150 mJ/pulse. Other conditions included applications of hot coffee, carbide bur in a dental air-cooled turbine drill and soldering iron. Infrared thermography was used to measure the maximum surface temperature on, and thermal penetration distance into enamel and dentin. Thermographic data were analyzed with a video image processor to determine the diameter of maximum surface temperature and thermal penetration distance of each treatment. Between/within statistical analysis of variance (p dentin in thermal effects from the Nd:YAG laser. Enamel had lower maximum surface temperatures than dentin for all laser powers and times. The surface temperature ranged from 34 +/- 1 degree(s)C to 110 +/- 4 degree(s)C on enamel and 62 +/- 5 degree(s)C to 392 +/- 82 degree(s)C on dentin. As power and time of exposure increased, both the maximum surface temperature and thermal penetration distance increased. The greatest length of thermal effect on the surface (11.0 +/- 0.9 mm) and thermal penetration distance (4.7 +/- 0.4 mm) recorded were caused by the air-cooled turbine drill on dentin. Surface temperatures were much higher for the Nd:YAG laser applied to enamel

  4. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Transparent Non-Carious Human Dentin and Dentin-Enamel Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Gallagher, R.R.; Demos, S.

    1999-12-14

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  5. Reconstitution of Phospholipase A2-Dependent Golgi Membrane Tubules.

    PubMed

    Cluett, Edward B; de Figueiredo, Paul; Bechler, Marie E; Thorsen, Kevin D; Brown, William J

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is the Grand Central Station of intracellular membrane trafficking in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Anterograde and retrograde export of cargo from the Golgi complex involves a complex interplay between the formation of coated vesicles and membrane tubules, although much less is known about tubule-mediated trafficking. Recent advances using in vitro assays have identified several cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes that are required for the biogenesis of membrane tubules and their roles in the functional organization of the Golgi complex. In this chapter we describe methods for the cell-free reconstitution of PLA2-dependent Golgi membrane tubule formation. These methods should facilitate the identification of other proteins that regulate this process. PMID:27632003

  6. Heterogeneity of T-Tubules in Pig Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Gadeberg, Hanne C.; Bond, Richard C.; Kong, Cherrie H. T.; Chanoit, Guillaume P.; Ascione, Raimondo; Cannell, Mark B.; James, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Background T-tubules are invaginations of the sarcolemma that play a key role in excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian cardiac myocytes. Although t-tubules were generally considered to be effectively absent in atrial myocytes, recent studies on atrial cells from larger mammals suggest that t-tubules may be more numerous than previously supposed. However, the degree of heterogeneity between cardiomyocytes in the extent of the t-tubule network remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the t-tubule network of pig atrial myocytes in comparison with ventricular tissue. Methods Cardiac tissue was obtained from young female Landrace White pigs (45–75 kg, 5–6 months old). Cardiomyocytes were isolated by arterial perfusion with a collagenase-containing solution. Ca2+ transients were examined in field-stimulated isolated cells loaded with fluo-4-AM. Membranes of isolated cells were visualized using di-8-ANEPPS. T-tubules were visualized in fixed-frozen tissue sections stained with Alexa-Fluor 488-conjugated WGA. Binary images were obtained by application of a threshold and t-tubule density (TTD) calculated. A distance mapping approach was used to calculate half-distance to nearest t-tubule (HDTT). Results & Conclusion The spatio-temporal properties of the Ca2+ transient appeared to be consistent with the absence of functional t-tubules in isolated atrial myocytes. However, t-tubules could be identified in a sub-population of atrial cells in frozen sections. While all ventricular myocytes had TTD >3% (mean TTD = 6.94±0.395%, n = 24), this was true of just 5/22 atrial cells. Mean atrial TTD (2.35±0.457%, n = 22) was lower than ventricular TTD (P<0.0001). TTD correlated with cell-width (r = 0.7756, n = 46, P<0.0001). HDTT was significantly greater in the atrial cells with TTD ≤3% (2.29±0.16 μm, n = 17) than in either ventricular cells (1.33±0.05 μm, n = 24, P<0.0001) or in atrial cells with TTD >3% (1.65±0.06 μm, n = 5, P<0.05). These

  7. Acemannan, an extracted product from Aloe vera, stimulates dental pulp cell proliferation, differentiation, mineralization, and dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Jittapiromsak, Nawaporn; Sahawat, Dusida; Banlunara, Wijit; Sangvanich, Polkit; Thunyakitpisal, Pasutha

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of acemannan (Aloe vera gel polysaccharide) on dentin formation. Primary human dental pulp cells were treated with acemannan. New DNA synthesis, bone morphogenetic protein-2, alkaline phosphatase activity, dentin sialoprotein expression, and mineralization were determined by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, biochemical assay, western blotting, and Alizarin Red staining, respectively. Then the upper first molars of 24 male Sprague Dawley rats were intentionally exposed and capped with either acemannan or calcium hydroxide. At day 28, the teeth were histopathologically examined and evaluated for the degree of inflammation, dentin bridge formation, and pulp tissue organization. The results revealed that acemannan significantly increased pulp cell proliferation, bone morphogenetic protein-2, alkaline phosphatase activity, dentin sialoprotein expression, and mineralization, compared with the untreated group. The acemannan-treated group also exhibited a complete homogeneous calcified dentin bridge and good pulp tissue organization, whereas neither was detected in the calcium hydroxide-treated and sham groups. In the acemannan-treated group, either mild or no inflammation was found, whereas the other groups had various degrees of inflammation. The data suggest that acemannan promotes dentin formation by stimulating primary human dental pulp cell proliferation, differentiation, extracellular matrix formation, and mineralization. Acemannan also has pulpal biocompatibility and promotes soft tissue organization.

  8. Water distribution in dentin matrices: bound vs. unbound water

    PubMed Central

    Agee, Kelli A.; Prakki, Anuradha; Abu-Haimed, Tariq; Naguib, Ghada H.; Nawareg, Manar Abu; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Scheffel, Debora L.S.; Chen, Chen; Jang, Seung Soon; Hwang, Hyea; Brackett, Martha; Grégoire, Geneviéve; Tay, Franklin R.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This work measured the amount of bound versus unbound water in completely-demineralized dentin. Methods Dentin beams prepared from extracted human teeth were completely demineralized, rinsed and dried to constant mass. They were rehydrated in 41% relative humidity (RH), while gravimetrically measuring their mass increase until the first plateau was reached at 0.064 (vacuum) or 0.116 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite). The specimens were then exposed to 60% RH until attaining the second plateau at 0.220 (vacuum) or 0.191 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite), and subsequently exposed to 99% RH until attaining the third plateau at 0.493 (vacuum) or 0.401 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite). Results Exposure of the first layer of bound water to 0% RH for 5 min produced a −0.3% loss of bound water; in the second layer of bound water it caused a −3.3% loss of bound water; in the third layer it caused a −6% loss of bound water. Immersion in 100% ethanol or acetone for 5 min produced a 2.8 and 1.9% loss of bound water from the first layer, respectively; it caused a −4 and −7% loss of bound water in the second layer, respectively; and a −17 and −23% loss of bound water in the third layer.. Bound water represented 21–25% of total dentin water. Chemical dehydration of water-saturated dentin with ethanol/acetone for 1 min only removed between 25 to 35% of unbound water, respectively. Significance Attempts to remove bound water by evaporation were not very successful. Chemical dehydration with 100% acetone was more successful than 100% ethanol especially the third layer of bound water. Since unbound water represents between 75–79% of total matrix water, the more such water can be removed, the more resin can be infiltrated. PMID:25612786

  9. Physical, chemical, and histologic changes in dentin caries lesions of primary teeth induced by regular use of polyol chewing gums.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, K K; Chiego, D J; Allen, P; Bennett, C; Isotupa, K P; Tiekso, J; Mäkinen, P L

    1998-06-01

    A previous clinical trial showed that long-term use of saliva-stimulating polyol (xylitol and sorbitol) chewing gums was associated with arrest of dental caries in young subjects. After a 20-22-month intervention (when the subjects were 8 years old), a total of 23 primary teeth with extensive dentin caries lesions whose surface in clinical examination was found to be totally rehardened (remineralized) could be removed because the teeth were near their physiologic exfoliation time. These teeth were subjected to histologic, microhardness, and electron microscopic tests. The majority of the specimens had been remineralized from the surface by a non-cellular-mediated process within the remaining collapsed, organic extracellular matrix associated with the remaining dentinal surface. Many of the underlying dentinal tubules were filled with a matrix that had been subsequently mineralized. Dental microanalyses showed that the topmost (outer) 20-microm-thick rehardened layer of the lesions exhibited the highest Ca:P ratio, which leveled off at a depth of approximately 150 microm. The rehardened surface layer (normally <0.1 mm in thickness) was significantly (P < 0.001) harder than sound dentin and nearly as hard as sound enamel. Although the main source of the mineral present in the rehardened layer was most likely of salivary origin, some extracellular remineralization was probably mediated by odontoblasts. The results complete the dinical diagnoses of the original trial and suggest that regular use of polyol chewing gums may induce changes in dentin caries lesions, which in histologic and physiochemical studies show typical characteristics of rehardening and mineralization.

  10. Function-informed transcriptome analysis of Drosophila renal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Kean, Laura; Yang, Jingli; Allan, Adrian K; Davies, Shireen A; Herzyk, Pawel; Dow, Julian AT

    2004-01-01

    Background Comprehensive, tissue-specific, microarray analysis is a potent tool for the identification of tightly defined expression patterns that might be missed in whole-organism scans. We applied such an analysis to Drosophila melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubule, a defined differentiated tissue. Results The transcriptome of the D. melanogaster Malpighian tubule is highly reproducible and significantly different from that obtained from whole-organism arrays. More than 200 genes are more than 10-fold enriched and over 1,000 are significantly enriched. Of the top 200 genes, only 18 have previously been named, and only 45% have even estimates of function. In addition, 30 transcription factors, not previously implicated in tubule development, are shown to be enriched in adult tubule, and their expression patterns respect precisely the domains and cell types previously identified by enhancer trapping. Of Drosophila genes with close human disease homologs, 50 are enriched threefold or more, and eight enriched 10-fold or more, in tubule. Intriguingly, several of these diseases have human renal phenotypes, implying close conservation of renal function across 400 million years of divergent evolution. Conclusions From those genes that are identifiable, a radically new view of the function of the tubule, emphasizing solute transport rather than fluid secretion, can be obtained. The results illustrate the phenotype gap: historically, the effort expended on a model organism has tended to concentrate on a relatively small set of processes, rather than on the spread of genes in the genome. PMID:15345053

  11. Immunodissection and culture of rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, W.S.; Sonnenburg, W.K.; Allen, M.L.; Arend, L.J.; Gerozissis, K.; Smith, W.L.

    1986-08-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody designated IgG3 (rct-30) has been prepared that reacts specifically with an antigen on the surface of all cells comprising the cortical and medullary rabbit renal collecting tubule including the arcades. Plastic culture dishes coated with IgG3 (rct-30) were used to isolate collecting tubule cells from collagenase dispersions of rabbit renal cortical cells by immunoadsorption. Typically, 10W rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT) cells were obtained from 5 g of renal cortex (2 kidneys). Between 20 and 30% of the RCCT cells were reactive with peanut lectin suggesting that RCCT cells are a mixture of principal and intercalated cells. Approximately 10X RCCT cells were obtained after 4 to 5 days in primary culture. Moreover, RCCT cells continued to proliferate after passaging with a doubling time of approx.32 h. RCCT cells passaged once and then cultured 4-5 days were found 1) to synthesize cAMP in response to arginine vasopressin (AVP), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), isoproterenol, and parathyroid hormone, but not calcitonin, prostaglandin D2, or prostaglandin I, and 2) to release PGE2 in response to bradykinin but not arginine vasopressin or isoproterenol. The results indicate that cultured RCCT cells retain many of the hormonal, histochemical, and morphological properties expected for a mixture of principal and intercalated rabbit cortical collecting tubule epithelia. RCCT cells should prove useful both for studying hormonal interactions in the cortical collecting tubule and as a starting population for isolating intercalated collecting tubule epithelia.

  12. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  13. Isolated dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia: revision of the classification.

    PubMed

    de La Dure-Molla, Muriel; Philippe Fournier, Benjamin; Berdal, Ariane

    2015-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by severe hypomineralization of dentin and altered dentin structure. Dentin extra cellular matrix is composed of 90% of collagen type I and 10% of non-collagenous proteins among which dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) are crucial in dentinogenesis. These proteins are encoded by a single gene: dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and undergo several post-translational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation to contribute and to control mineralization. Human mutations of this DSPP gene are responsible for three isolated dentinal diseases classified by Shield in 1973: type II and III dentinogenesis imperfecta and type II dentin dysplasia. Shield classification was based on clinical phenotypes observed in patient. Genetics results show now that these three diseases are a severity variation of the same pathology. So this review aims to revise and to propose a new classification of the isolated forms of DI to simplify diagnosis for practitioners.

  14. From single molecule to single tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chin-Lin

    2012-02-01

    Biological systems often make decisions upon conformational changes and assembly of single molecules. In vivo, epithelial cells (such as the mammary gland cells) can respond to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, type I collagen (COL), and switch their morphology from a lobular lumen (100-200 micron) to a tubular lumen (1mm-1cm). However, how cells make such a morphogenetic decision through interactions with each other and with COL is unclear. Using a temporal control of cell-ECM interaction, we find that epithelial cells, in response to a fine-tuned percentage of type I collagen (COL) in ECM, develop various linear patterns. Remarkably, these patterns allow cells to self-assemble into a tubule of length ˜ 1cm and diameter ˜ 400 micron in the liquid phase (i.e., scaffold-free conditions). In contrast with conventional thought, the linear patterns arise through bi-directional transmission of traction force, but not through diffusible biochemical factors secreted by cells. In turn, the transmission of force evokes a long-range (˜ 600 micron) intercellular mechanical interaction. A feedback effect is encountered when the mechanical interaction modifies cell positioning and COL alignment. Micro-patterning experiments further reveal that such a feedback is a novel cell-number-dependent, rich-get-richer process, which allows cells to integrate mechanical interactions into long-range (> 1mm) linear coordination. Our results suggest a mechanism cells can use to form and coordinate long-range tubular patterns, independent of those controlled by diffusible biochemical factors, and provide a new strategy to engineer/regenerate epithelial organs using scaffold-free self-assembly methods.

  15. Human proximal tubule cells form functional microtissues.

    PubMed

    Prange, Jenny A; Bieri, Manuela; Segerer, Stephan; Burger, Charlotte; Kaech, Andres; Moritz, Wolfgang; Devuyst, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial cells lining the proximal tubules of the kidney mediate complex transport processes and are particularly vulnerable to drug toxicity. Drug toxicity studies are classically based on two-dimensional cultures of immortalized proximal tubular cells. Such immortalized cells are dedifferentiated, and lose transport properties (including saturable endocytic uptake) encountered in vivo. Generating differentiated, organotypic human microtissues would potentially alleviate these limitations and facilitate drug toxicity studies. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of kidney microtissues from immortalized (HK-2) and primary (HRPTEpiC) human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells under well-defined conditions. Microtissue cultures were done in hanging drop GravityPLUS™ culture plates and were characterized for morphology, proliferation and differentiation markers, and by monitoring the endocytic uptake of albumin. Kidney microtissues were successfully obtained by co-culturing HK-2 or HRPTEpiC cells with fibroblasts. The HK-2 microtissues formed highly proliferative, but dedifferentiated microtissues within 10 days of culture, while co-culture with fibroblasts yielded spherical structures already after 2 days. Low passage HRPTEpiC microtissues (mono- and co-culture) were less proliferative and expressed tissue-specific differentiation markers. Electron microscopy evidenced epithelial differentiation markers including microvilli, tight junctions, endosomes, and lysosomes in the co-cultured HRPTEpiC microtissues. The co-cultured HRPTEpiC microtissues showed specific uptake of albumin that could be inhibited by cadmium and gentamycin. In conclusion, we established a reliable hanging drop protocol to obtain functional kidney microtissues with proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. These microtissues could be used for high-throughput drug and toxicology screenings, with endocytosis as a functional readout. PMID:26676951

  16. Effect of acidic solutions on the microhardness of dentin and set OrthoMTA and their cytotoxicity on murine macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Won-Jun; Lee, Woocheol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of three acids on the microhardness of set mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and root dentin, and cytotoxicity on murine macrophage. Materials and Methods OrthoMTA (BioMTA) was mixed and packed into the human root dentin blocks of 1.5 mm diameter and 5 mm height. Four groups, each of ten roots, were exposed to 10% citric acid (CA), 5% glycolic acid (GA), 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and saline for five minutes after setting of the OrthoMTA. Vickers surface microhardness of set MTA and dentin was measured before and after exposure to solutions, and compared between groups using one-way ANOVA with Tukey test. The microhardness value of each group was analyzed using student t test. Acid-treated OrthoMTA and dentin was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cell viability of tested solutions was assessed using WST-8 assay and murine macrophage. Results Three test solutions reduced microhardness of dentin. 17% EDTA demonstrated severe dentinal erosion, significantly reduced the dentinal microhardness compared to 10% CA (p = 0.034) or 5% GA (p = 0.006). 10% CA or 5% GA significantly reduced the surface microhardness of set MTA compared to 17% EDTA and saline (p < 0.001). Acid-treated OrthoMTA demonstrated microporous structure with destruction of globular crystal. EDTA exhibited significantly more cellular toxicity than the other acidic solutions at diluted concentrations (0.2, 0.5, 1.0%). Conclusions Tested acidic solutions reduced microhardness of root dentin. Five minute's application of 10% CA and 5% GA significantly reduced the microhardness of set OrthoMTA with lower cellular cytotoxicity compared to 17% EDTA. PMID:26877986

  17. Biomechanical Perspective on the Remineralization of Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Bertassoni, L.E.; Habelitz, S.; Kinney, J.H.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article is to critically evaluate the methods that are used to assess outcomes of remineralization of dentin. Currently, the most used assessment methods fall either into quantitative analysis of the mineral content of the remineralized structures or dry measurements of their mechanical properties. Properties obtained from the dehydrated organic dentin matrix may not reflect the true mechanical behavior of the remineralized tissue under physiological and hydrated conditions. Here we seek to clarify the biomechanical aspects of remineralization of dentin, pointing out the effects of hydration and dehydration on the mechanical properties of treated tissues. We also emphasize that a more appropriate endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness of remineralization in dentin should be associated with the recovery of the mechanical properties of the hydrated tissue, which is presumed to correlate well with its overall functionality. PMID:19208991

  18. Cytosolic redox potential and phosphate transport in the proximal tubule of the rabbit. A study in the isolated perfused tubules.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, N; Nagami, G T; Kurokawa, K

    1985-01-01

    Recently it has been proposed that cytosolic NAD+ may play a regulatory role in phosphate transport across the renal proximal tubules. To test this thesis, we have examined the effect of altering the cytosolic redox potential (NAD+/NADH) on phosphate flux across the isolated perfused rabbit proximal tubules. The cytosolic redox potential was shifted to a more oxidized state either by changing the substrate in the bathing medium from lactate to pyruvate or by adding methylene blue to the bath medium. On the other hand, cytosolic redox potential was shifted to a more reduced state by changing the substrate in the bath medium from pyruvate to lactate. In either case the phosphate flux across the proximal tubule was unaffected. It was concluded that cytosolic redox potential may not play a significant role in regulating the phosphate transport in renal proximal tubules.

  19. Substantivity of Chlorhexidine to Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, Marcela R.; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Sousa, Ethan N.; Nicolau, José; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Tjäderhane, Leo; Tay, Franklin R.; Agee, Kelli; Pashley, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To better comprehend the role of CHX in the preservation of resin-dentin bonds, this study investigated the substantivity of CHX to human dentin. Material and Methods Dentin disks (n= 45) were obtained from the mid-coronal portion of human third molars. One-third of dentin disks were kept mineralized (MD), while the other two-thirds had one of the surfaces partially demineralized with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s (PDD) or they were totally demineralized with 10% phosphoric acid (TDD). Disks of hydroxyapatite (HA) were also prepared. Specimens were treated with: 1) 10 μL of distilled water (controls), 2) 10 μL of 0.2% chlorhexidine diacetate (0.2% CHX) or 3) 10 μL of 2% chlorhexidine diacetate (2% CHX). Then, they were incubated in 1 mL of PBS (pH 7.4, 37 °C). Substantivity was evaluated as a function of the CHX-applied dose after: 0.5h, 1h, 3h, 6h, 24h, 168h (1wk), 672h (4wks) and 1344h (8wks) of incubation. CHX concentration in eluates was spectrophotometrically analyzed at 260 nm. Results Significant amounts of CHX remained retained in dentin substrates (MD, PPD or TDD), independent on the CHX-applied dose or time of incubation (p<0.05). High amounts of retained CHX onto HA were observed only for specimens treated with the highest concentration of CHX (2%) (p<0.05). Conclusion The outstanding substantivity of CHX to dentin and its reported effect on the inhibition of dentinal proteases may explain why CHX can prolong the durability of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:20472282

  20. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  1. A novel type of developmental dentin defect.

    PubMed

    Lukinmaa, P L; Waltimo, J; Hölttä, P; Risteli, L; Risteli, J; Alaluusua, S

    1996-01-01

    We describe a developmental dentin disorder distinct from dentin defects characterized thus far. The proband was a 9-year-old boy who was the only family member known to be affected in five generations. The dental defect was not associated with any general disease or developmental disorder. The teeth appeared normal with the exception of the pink hue seen in some primary teeth. Radiographs showed pathological resorption of primary teeth and abnormally shaped pulp chambers and denticles in permanent teeth. Root canals were wide in developing teeth, but appeared thin in erupted teeth. Histological examination of two primary molars revealed canal-like defects in dentin. In the crown, the canals appeared as clusters, which alternated with columns of normal tubular dentin, and in the virtually atubular root dentin they were haphazardly distributed. Scanning electron microscopic examination confirmed the distribution pattern of the canals. In transmission electron microscopy, the defects were found to contain symmetrically banded, segmental collagenous structures. The canal contents immunostained with antibodies to the N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, suggesting retention of the propeptide extension in type I collagen. Whereas type III collagen reactivity was barely detectable in the canal region, staining for type V collagen and the non-fibril-forming type VI collagen was strong. The findings imply that the pathogenesis of the defect could be related to a local failure of odontoblasts to produce normal dentin matrix.

  2. A Bioartificial Renal Tubule Device Embedding Human Renal Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sciancalepore, Anna Giovanna; Sallustio, Fabio; Girardo, Salvatore; Gioia Passione, Laura; Camposeo, Andrea; Mele, Elisa; Di Lorenzo, Mirella; Costantino, Vincenzo; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We present a bio-inspired renal microdevice that resembles the in vivo structure of a kidney proximal tubule. For the first time, a population of tubular adult renal stem/progenitor cells (ARPCs) was embedded into a microsystem to create a bioengineered renal tubule. These cells have both multipotent differentiation abilities and an extraordinary capacity for injured renal cell regeneration. Therefore, ARPCs may be considered a promising tool for promoting regenerative processes in the kidney to treat acute and chronic renal injury. Here ARPCs were grown to confluence and exposed to a laminar fluid shear stress into the chip, in order to induce a functional cell polarization. Exposing ARPCs to fluid shear stress in the chip led the aquaporin-2 transporter to localize at their apical region and the Na+K+ATPase pump at their basolateral portion, in contrast to statically cultured ARPCs. A recovery of urea and creatinine of (20±5)% and (13±5)%, respectively, was obtained by the device. The microengineered biochip here-proposed might be an innovative “lab-on-a-chip” platform to investigate in vitro ARPCs behaviour or to test drugs for therapeutic and toxicological responses. PMID:24498117

  3. The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55℃. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392

  4. Age, dehydration and fatigue crack growth in dentin.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Devendra; Sundaram, Naryana; Nazari, Ahmad; Arola, D

    2006-04-01

    A preliminary study of the effects from age and dehydration on fatigue crack growth in human dentin was conducted. Compact tension (CT) fatigue specimens of coronal dentin were prepared from extracted molars and subjected to high cycle fatigue (10(5)dentin (mean age=25+/-7 years), old hydrated dentin (mean age=55+/-14 years) and young dehydrated dentin (mean age=20+/-2 years) were examined. Fatigue crack growth rates were quantified according to the Paris Law in terms of the crack growth exponent (m) and coefficient (C). The average fatigue crack growth exponent for the young hydrated dentin (m=13.3+/-1.1) was significantly less than that for the hydrated old (m=21.6+/-5.2; p<0.003) and dehydrated young dentin (m=18.8+/-2.8; p<0.01). Fatigue cracks in the old dentin underwent initiation at a lower stress intensity range than in young dentin and propagated at as significantly faster rate (over 100x). Differences in the microscopic features of the fracture surfaces from the old and young dentin suggested that particular mechanisms contributing to energy dissipation and crack growth resistance in the young hydrated dentin were not present in the old dentin. Based on results of this study, the fatigue crack growth resistance of human dentin decreases with both age of the tissue and dehydration.

  5. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials.

  6. Regulation of reactionary dentin formation by odontoblasts in response to polymicrobial invasion of dentin matrix

    PubMed Central

    Charadram, Nattida; Farahani, Ramin M; Harty, Derek; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V; Hunter, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Odontoblast synthesis of dentin proceeds through discrete but overlapping phases characterized by formation of a patterned organic matrix followed by remodelling and active mineralization. Microbial invasion of dentin in caries triggers an adaptive response by odontoblasts, culminating in formation of a structurally altered reactionary dentin, marked by biochemical and architectonic modifications including diminished tubularity. Scanning electron microscopy of the collagen framework in reactionary dentin revealed a radically modified yet highly organized meshwork as indicated by fractal and lacunarity analyses. Immuno-gold labelling demonstrated increased density and regular spatial distribution of dentin sialoprotein (DSP) in reactionary dentin. DSP contributes putative hydroxyapatite nucleation sites on the collagen scaffold. To further dissect the formation of this altered dentin matrix, the associated enzymatic machinery was investigated. Analysis of extracted dentin matrix indicated increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the reactionary zone referenced to physiologic dentin. Likewise, gene expression analysis of micro-dissected odontoblast layer revealed up-regulation of MMP-2. Parallel up-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and membrane type 1- matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) was observed in response to caries. Next, modulation of odontoblastic dentinogenic enzyme repertoire was addressed. In the odontoblast layer expression of Toll-like receptors was markedly altered in response to bacterial invasion. In carious teeth TLR-2 and the gene encoding the corresponding adaptor protein MyD88 were down-regulated whereas genes encoding TLR-4 and adaptor proteins TRAM and Mal/TIRAP were up-regulated. TLR-4 signalling mediated by binding of bacterial products has been linked to up-regulation of MMP-2. Further, increased expression of genes encoding components of the TGF-β signalling pathway, namely SMAD-2 and SMAD-4

  7. Regulation of reactionary dentin formation by odontoblasts in response to polymicrobial invasion of dentin matrix.

    PubMed

    Charadram, Nattida; Farahani, Ramin M; Harty, Derek; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V; Hunter, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Odontoblast synthesis of dentin proceeds through discrete but overlapping phases characterized by formation of a patterned organic matrix followed by remodelling and active mineralization. Microbial invasion of dentin in caries triggers an adaptive response by odontoblasts, culminating in formation of a structurally altered reactionary dentin, marked by biochemical and architectonic modifications including diminished tubularity. Scanning electron microscopy of the collagen framework in reactionary dentin revealed a radically modified yet highly organized meshwork as indicated by fractal and lacunarity analyses. Immuno-gold labelling demonstrated increased density and regular spatial distribution of dentin sialoprotein (DSP) in reactionary dentin. DSP contributes putative hydroxyapatite nucleation sites on the collagen scaffold. To further dissect the formation of this altered dentin matrix, the associated enzymatic machinery was investigated. Analysis of extracted dentin matrix indicated increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the reactionary zone referenced to physiologic dentin. Likewise, gene expression analysis of micro-dissected odontoblast layer revealed up-regulation of MMP-2. Parallel up-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and membrane type 1- matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) was observed in response to caries. Next, modulation of odontoblastic dentinogenic enzyme repertoire was addressed. In the odontoblast layer expression of Toll-like receptors was markedly altered in response to bacterial invasion. In carious teeth TLR-2 and the gene encoding the corresponding adaptor protein MyD88 were down-regulated whereas genes encoding TLR-4 and adaptor proteins TRAM and Mal/TIRAP were up-regulated. TLR-4 signalling mediated by binding of bacterial products has been linked to up-regulation of MMP-2. Further, increased expression of genes encoding components of the TGF-β signalling pathway, namely SMAD-2 and SMAD-4

  8. The Composition of Bovine Peritubular Dentin: Matching TOF-SIMS, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Biochemical Component Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Gotliv, Bat Ami; Veis, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Peritubular dentin (PTD) is a hypermineralized phase within the dentinal tubules in some vertebrate teeth as an interface between the intertubular dentin (ITD) and the cell processes. Our aim has been to understand the composition, structure and role of PTD as a mineralized tissue. We have utilized the technique of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to map the distribution of positive and negative inorganic ions as well as organic components in the fully mineralized, intact PTD structure in bovine tooth cross-sections, and correlated these with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in standard and backscatter modes. In recent work, we developed a procedure to freeze fracture the teeth and separate PTD from the less dense ITD by the use of aqueous sodium phosphotungstate step density gradients, after degrading the ITD collagen with NaOCl. Here, PTD-containing fragments were characterized by SEM and TOF-SIMS surface structure analysis. The TOF-SIMS data show that the isolated PTD does not contain collagen, but its surface is rich in glutamic acid-containing protein(s). The TOF-SIMS spectra also indicated that the intact PTD fragments contain phospholipids, and chemical analyses showed phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine as the principal lipid components. In SEM sections, untreated PTD shows as a smooth collar around the tubule, but after digestion with ethylenediamine to remove all organic components, the porous nature of the mineral phase of small, thin platy apatite crystals becomes evident. Thus, the organic matrix of PTD appears to be a proteolipid-phospholipid complex. PMID:18728348

  9. Effect of the application time of phosphoric acid and self-etch adhesive systems to sclerotic dentin

    PubMed Central

    MENA-SERRANO, Alexandra Patricia; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; PEREZ, Miguel Muñoz; MARTINS, Gislaine Cristine; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; REIS, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of application time on the resin-dentin bond strength (µTBS) and etching pattern of adhesive systems applied on sclerotic dentine. Material and Methods: A total of forty-two bovine incisors had their roots removed. The 1-step self-etch GO (SDI), the 2-step self-etch Adper SE Bond (3MESPE) and the 35% phosphoric acid (3MESPE) from the 2-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 (3MESPE) were applied on the bovine incisal surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions or duplicating the recommended conditioning time. After adhesive application, thirty teeth were restored with composite resin, stored for 24 h in distilled water at 37º C, and sectioned into resin-dentin bonded sticks (0.8 mm2) and tested according to the µTBS at 0.5 mm/min. The etching pattern of the remaining twelve teeth (n=4 for each material) was examined under scanning electron microscopy. Each tooth was divided into a buccal-to-lingual direction into three thirds, and each third randomly assigned to the groups: control (no treatment), according to the manufacturers' instructions and duplicating the recommended application time. The µTBS and the relative percentage of the tubule area opening were evaluated by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Results: The duplication of the conditioning time favored only the GO adhesive (p<0.05). Both application methods significantly increased the tubule area opening (p<0.05) compared to the controls. Conclusions: The efficacy of duplicating the conditioning time was only effective for the 1-step self-etch adhesive system tested. PMID:23739856

  10. Effect of pretreatment with calcium-containing desensitizer on the dentine bonding of mild self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Pei, Dandan; Liu, Siying; Huang, Cui; Du, Xijin; Yang, Hongye; Wang, Yake; Deng, Donglai

    2013-06-01

    Desensitizing agents are frequently applied to sensitive teeth and may affect subsequent resin bonding. The current study aimed to evaluate the bonding performance of two self-etch adhesives containing functional monomers to dentine pretreated with three new calcium-containing desensitizers. No desensitizer was applied in the control group. Groups 1, 2, and 3 were treated with an arginine-calcium carbonate-containing polishing paste, a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP)-containing paste, and an experimental hydroxyapatite paste, respectively. G-Bond and Clearfil S(3) Bond were used for bonding after desensitizer treatments. The microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was tested (n = 20 beams per group) and failure mode distribution was analyzed. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the occlusion of dentinal tubules. The mean (±SD) μTBS values, expressed in MPa, of groups 1, 2, and 3 and the control group were, respectively, 30.81 (7.79), 44.41 (8.02), 31.49 (6.13), and 41.40 (8.67) for G-Bond and 39.63 (9.59), 32.55 (7.86), 37.50 (8.60), 27.90 (6.52) for S3 Bond. Most failures were recorded as adhesive failure (69.375%), instead of cohesive failure or mixed failure. The dentinal tubules were seldom plugged in group 2, but were mostly occluded in groups 1 and 3. Two-way anova indicated that desensitizer application in association with a compatible adhesive system should be used when endeavoring to control hypersensitivity without adverse interference in bonding. PMID:23659244

  11. Effect of biological contamination on dentine bond strength of adhesive resins.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, J H; Botha, F S; van der Vyver, P J; de Wet, F A; Botha, S J

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of saliva (S) and blood (B) contamination on the dentine bond strength of two single-component dentine bonding systems. The occlusal thirds of 120 recently extracted, human molars were removed with a low speed saw and subsequently embedded in Bencor rings by means of self-curing, acrylic resin. The occlusal surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit silicone carbide paper in a polishing machine to expose superficial dentine and to create a smear layer. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups (n = 10). All the dentine surfaces were etched with 34% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds rinsed with water, air-dried for 3 seconds, leaving the surfaces visibly moist. For the control groups (C) the etched dentine surfaces were treated with either, Scotchbond 1 (SB1, 3M) or Prime & Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply) according to the manufacturer's instructions. In the contaminated groups, the saliva or blood was applied by means of a disposable brush, left undisturbed for 1 minute, and the excess then thinned by air spray. The dentine bonding systems were then applied, also according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite (Z250 and TPH) and Compomer (F2000 and Dyract AP (D-AP)) stubs were packed and cured incrementally to the corresponding pretreated dentine surfaces. All specimens were stored for 24 hours under water at 37 degrees C. The bonds were then stressed to failure with a Zwick testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured samples were examined in a Scanning Electron Microscope. The data were statistically analysed (Student-t test). The mean SBS (MPa) were. SB1 with Z250: C = 19.1 +/- 4.4; S = 17.3 +/- 3.5; B = 2.6 +/- 0.9; SB1 with F2000: C = 11.8 +/- 3.3; S = 9.7 +/- 1.8; B = 4.7 +/- 1.6. PBNT with TPH: C = 9.2 +/- 3.2; S = 6.5 +/- 3.0; B = 4.3 +/- 1.5; PBNT with D-AP: C = 10.2 +/- 3.6; S = 9.3 +/- 2.9 and B = 7.3 +/- 2.5. There was no statistical significant difference in shear bond

  12. Accelerated Fatigue of Dentin with Exposure to Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Majd, H.; Ryou, H.; Mutluay, M. M.; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Arola, D.

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm than other dental materials. This increases the likelihood for the hard tissues supporting a restoration (i.e. dentin and enamel) to be exposed to acidic conditions beyond that resulting from dietary variations. In this investigation the fatigue strength and fatigue crack growth resistance of human coronal dentin were characterized within a lactic acid solution (with pH=5) and compared to that of controls evaluated in neutral conditions (pH=7). A comparison of the fatigue life distributions showed that the lactic acid exposure resulted in a significant reduction in the fatigue strength (p≤0.001), and nearly 30% reduction in the apparent endurance limit (from 44 MPa to 32 MPa). The reduction in pH also caused a significant decrease (p≤0.05) in the threshold stress intensity range required for the initiation of cyclic crack growth, and significant increase in the incremental rate of crack extension. Exposure of tooth structure to lactic acid may cause demineralization, but it also increases the likelihood of restored tooth failures via fatigue, and after short time periods. PMID:23948166

  13. Accelerated fatigue of dentin with exposure to lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Do, Dominic; Orrego, Santiago; Majd, Hessam; Ryou, Heonjune; Mutluay, Mustafa M; Xu, Hockin H K; Arola, Dwayne D

    2013-11-01

    Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm than other dental materials. This increases the likelihood for the hard tissues supporting a restoration (i.e. dentin and enamel) to be exposed to acidic conditions beyond that resulting from dietary variations. In this investigation the fatigue strength and fatigue crack growth resistance of human coronal dentin were characterized within a lactic acid solution (with pH = 5) and compared to that of controls evaluated in neutral conditions (pH = 7). A comparison of the fatigue life distributions showed that the lactic acid exposure resulted in a significant reduction in the fatigue strength (p ≤ 0.001), and nearly 30% reduction in the apparent endurance limit (from 44 MPa to 32 MPa). The reduction in pH also caused a significant decrease (p ≤ 0.05) in the threshold stress intensity range required for the initiation of cyclic crack growth, and significant increase in the incremental rate of crack extension. Exposure of tooth structure to lactic acid may cause demineralization, but it also increases the likelihood of restored tooth failures via fatigue, and after short time periods.

  14. Fine structure of seminiferous tubules in antarctic seals.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A A; Erickson, A W; Seal, U S

    1977-03-01

    The fine structure of seminiferous tubules from 5 crabeater, 2 leopard and 2 Ross seals showed that during the nonbreeding season the tubules were essentially similar in possessing spermatogenic and Sertoli cells. However, the tubules of leopard and Ross seals had more primary and secondary spermatocytes and spermatids than the crabeater seals. In general, the tubules were devoid of spermatozoa. The spermatids showed stages of maturation such as Golgi phase of acrosome formation, acrosomal cap formation and condensation of nuclei. Some spermatids degenerated in tubules. Both maturing and degenerating spermatids were closely associated with Sertoli cells. Junctional complexes with plaques of filaments were observed between Sertoli cells and the spermatogenic cells. Sertoli cells, irregular and polygonal, contained highly convoluted nuclei, strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complexes, small mitochondria, variable amounts of lipid droplets, lysosomes, lipofuscin granules and highly plicated plasma membranes. In brief, the spermatogenic activity had practically ceased in the testes and the animals probably secreted low levels of testosterone during the nonbreeding season. PMID:844074

  15. Degradation and transport of AVP by proximal tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Carone, F.A.; Christensen, E.I.; Flouret, G. Univ. of Aarhus )

    1987-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that (3,4,5-{sup 3}H-Phe{sup 3},Arg{sup 8})vasopressin (({sup 3}H)AVP) was not degraded by isolated renal brush-border membranes or by a cortical lysosomal fraction in vitro; however, in the presence of 1 mM reduced glutathione, ({sup 3}H)AVP was degraded by both preparations. Renal cortical homogenates in vitro and luminal peptidases of proximal tubule in vivo degraded ({sup 3}H)AVP and in both instances yielded phenylalanine, hexapeptide AVP 1-6, heptapeptide AVP 1-7, octapeptide AVP 1-8, and two uncharacterized products X and Y. These data suggest that filtered AVP is reduced in the proximal tubule by a reduced glutathione-dependent transhydrogenase and subsequently cleaved to ({sup 3}H)Phe by tubular aminopeptidases. Following microinfusion of ({sup 3}H)AVP into proximal tubules, 15.7% of the label was absorbed. Five and fifteen minutes after infusion of ({sup 3}H)AVP, sequestration of total label in proximal tubules was 4.5 and 2.1%, respectively, and quantitative electron microscope autoradiography revealed accumulation of grains over apical endocytic vacuoles and lysosomes consistent with endocytic uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation of AVP and/or a large metabolite. Thus, enzymatic cleavage of AVP by luminal and lysosomal peptidases in proximal tubules could involve disulfide bond, C-terminal, and N-terminal loci.

  16. Tenofovir renal toxicity targets mitochondria of renal proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J; Hosseini, Seyed H; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Green, Elgin; Johnson, David M; Russ, Rodney; Tran, Dung; Raper, C Michael; Santoianni, Robert; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is an analog of adenosine monophosphate that inhibits HIV reverse transcriptase in HIV/AIDS. Despite its therapeutic success, renal tubular side effects are reported. The mechanisms and targets of tenofovir toxicity were determined using ‘2 × 2’ factorial protocols, and HIV transgenic (TG) and wild-type (WT) littermate mice with or without TDF (5 weeks). A parallel study used didanosine (ddI) instead of TDF. At termination, heart, kidney, and liver samples were retrieved. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) abundance, and histo- and ultrastructural pathology were analyzed. Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate renal proximal tubules for molecular analyses. Tenofovir increased mtDNA abundance in TG whole kidneys, but not in their hearts or livers. In contrast, ddI decreased mtDNA abundance in the livers of WTs and TGs, but had no effect on their hearts or kidneys. Histological analyses of kidneys showed no disruption of glomeruli or proximal tubules with TDF or ddI treatments. Ultrastructural changes in renal proximal tubules from TDF-treated TGs included an increased number and irregular shape of mitochondria with sparse fragmented cristae. LCM-captured renal proximal tubules from TGs showed decreased mtDNA abundance with tenofovir. The results indicate that tenofovir targets mitochondrial toxicity on the renal proximal tubule in an AIDS model. PMID:19274046

  17. Effects of Tetracycline, EDTA and Citric Acid Application on Nonfluorosed and Fluorosed Dentin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadanand, K.; Vandana, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorosis is one of the factors that may bring about mineralization changes in teeth. Routine treatment of root biomodification is commonly followed during Periodontal therapy. Background: The Purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the morphological changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed root dentin subsequent to the application of Tetracycline, EDTA and Citric acid. Both fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth comprising of periodontally healthy and diseased were included in this study. Method: Each of them was grouped into Tetracycline Hydrochloride, EDTA and Citric acid treatment groupes. Using scanning electron microscope (SEM), the photomicrographs of dentin specimens were obtained. Results: Showed that there was no significant difference in exposure of number of tubules in different groups, while significant increase in the tubular width and tubular surface area was seen in fluorosed healthy, followed by fluorosed diseased groups, nonfluorosed healthy and nonfluorosed diseased groups after root biomodification procedure using various root conditioning agents. The root biomodification procedure brings in definite difference between fluorosed and nonfluorosed dentin specimens. PMID:27335611

  18. Dentinal surface-cutting efficiency using a high-speed diamond bur, ultrasound and laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, M.; Quinelato, A.; Youssef, F.; Pelino, J. E. Pelizon; Salvadori, M. C.; Mori, M.

    2008-04-01

    We compare an ultrasound bur with a conventional one and an Er:YAG laser for cavity preparations. Human molars were embedded in resin and sliced for this study. The surface abrasion was performed by a high-speed instrument and ultrasound. The cavity preparation was initially performed with a high-speed diamond bur. After this, a 2.94-μm laser with 400 mJ/pulse at 4 Hz, and a pulse width from 250-500 μs was applied to the tooth surface for 30 s in a sweeping motion. The samples were analyzed by SEM. The abrasion surface with a conventional bur showed structure removal with different grooves, a smear-layer presence, and occluded dentinal tubules. The abraded surface with the CVD bur suggested a removal process in layers. The laser-irradiated surface showed a rough aspect with opened tubules and the absence of a smear layer. The results of this study suggest that a high-speed diamond bur, ultrasound, and laser were able to perform cavity preparation. However, the CVD bur presented a higher surface quality.

  19. On the fatigue behavior of resin-dentin bonds after degradation by biofilm.

    PubMed

    Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Zhang, Ke; Ryou, Heonjune; Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Majd, Hessam; Xu, Hockin H K; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-02-01

    The durability of resin-dentin bonds is a growing concern in the placement of composite restorations. Most reported evaluations concerning the mechanical behavior of the bonded interface are conducted using static loading to failure only. They also do not account for the acid production of biofilms, which is one of the most common contributors to interfacial failures in vivo. In this investigation resin-dentin bonded interface specimens were exposed to S. mutans for 14 days and then subjected to quasi-static or cyclic four-point flexure to failure. Control specimens (without biofilm) were evaluated after aging for one and fourteen days. While no significant difference in flexure strength resulted from the duration of water aging (66.2 MPa vs. 56.9 MPa), biofilm exposure caused a significant reduction in strength (29.3 MPa; p ≤ 0.000). After water aging for one and fourteen days the apparent endurance limits were 13.0 MPa and 13.1 MPa, respectively. Biofilm treatment caused a significant (p ≤ 0.001) reduction in fatigue resistance of the interface, and the endurance limit was reduced to 9.9 MPa. Fatigue failure of the control specimens initiated within the resin composite adjacent to the interface, whereas failure of the biofilm treated specimens initiated within the hybrid layer and appeared attributed to the localized demineralization of dentin. Biofilm degradation is an important consideration in assessing the durability of resin-dentin bonds.

  20. On the fatigue behavior of resin-dentin bonds after degradation by biofilm.

    PubMed

    Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Zhang, Ke; Ryou, Heonjune; Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Majd, Hessam; Xu, Hockin H K; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-02-01

    The durability of resin-dentin bonds is a growing concern in the placement of composite restorations. Most reported evaluations concerning the mechanical behavior of the bonded interface are conducted using static loading to failure only. They also do not account for the acid production of biofilms, which is one of the most common contributors to interfacial failures in vivo. In this investigation resin-dentin bonded interface specimens were exposed to S. mutans for 14 days and then subjected to quasi-static or cyclic four-point flexure to failure. Control specimens (without biofilm) were evaluated after aging for one and fourteen days. While no significant difference in flexure strength resulted from the duration of water aging (66.2 MPa vs. 56.9 MPa), biofilm exposure caused a significant reduction in strength (29.3 MPa; p ≤ 0.000). After water aging for one and fourteen days the apparent endurance limits were 13.0 MPa and 13.1 MPa, respectively. Biofilm treatment caused a significant (p ≤ 0.001) reduction in fatigue resistance of the interface, and the endurance limit was reduced to 9.9 MPa. Fatigue failure of the control specimens initiated within the resin composite adjacent to the interface, whereas failure of the biofilm treated specimens initiated within the hybrid layer and appeared attributed to the localized demineralization of dentin. Biofilm degradation is an important consideration in assessing the durability of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:23276517

  1. On the Fatigue Behavior of Resin-Dentin Bonds after Degradation by Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Zhang, Ke; Ryou, Heonjune; Yahyazadefar, Mobin; Majd, Hessam; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    The durability of resin-dentin bonds is a growing concern in the placement of composite restorations. Most reported evaluations concerning the mechanical behavior of the bonded interface are conducted using static loading to failure only. They also do not account for the acid production of biofilms, which is one of the most common contributors to interfacial failures in vivo. In this investigation resin-dentin bonded interface specimens were exposed to S. mutans for 14 days and then subjected to quasi-static or cyclic four-point flexure to failure. Control specimens (without biofilm) were evaluated after aging for one and fourteen days. While no significant difference in flexure strength resulted from the duration of water aging (66.2 MPa vs 56.9 MPa), biofilm exposure caused a significant reduction in strength (29.3 MPa; p≤0.000). After water aging for one and fourteen days the apparent endurance limits were 13.0 MPa and 13.1 MPa, respectively. Biofilm treatment caused a significant (p≤0.001) reduction in fatigue resistance of the interface, and the endurance limit was reduced to 9.9 MPa. Fatigue failure of the control specimens initiated within the resin composite adjacent to the interface, whereas failure of the biofilm treated specimens initiated within the hybrid layer and appeared attributed to the localized demineralization of dentin. Biofilm degradation is an important consideration in assessing the durability of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:23276517

  2. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  3. Accelerated reabsorption in the proximal tubule produced by volume depletion.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M W; Weinman, E J; Kashgarian, M; Hayslett, J P

    1971-07-01

    The renal response to chronic depletion of extracellular volume was examined using the techniques of micropuncture. Depletion of salt and water was produced by administration of furosemide to rats maintained on a sodium-free diet. There was a marked fall in body weight, plasma volume, and glomerular filtration rate. The intrinsic reabsorptive capacity of the proximal tubule, measured by the split-droplet technique, was greatly enhanced. The acceleration of proximal fluid reabsorption could not be accounted for by changes in filtration rate, tubular geometry, or aldosterone secretion. The half-time of droplet reabsorption in the distal tubule was not altered by sodium depletion. An increase in the reabsorption of fluid in the proximal tubule, as demonstrated directly in the present experiments, provides an explanation for a variety of clinical phenomena associated with volume depletion.

  4. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  5. Dentin caries zones: mineral, structure, and properties.

    PubMed

    Pugach, M K; Strother, J; Darling, C L; Fried, D; Gansky, S A; Marshall, S J; Marshall, G W

    2009-01-01

    Caries Detector staining reveals 4 zones in dentin containing caries lesions, but characteristics of each zone are not well-defined. We therefore investigated the physical and microstructural properties of carious dentin in the 4 different zones to determine important differences revealed by Caries Detector staining. Six arrested dentin caries lesions and 2 normal controls were Caries-Detector-stained, each zone (pink, light pink, transparent, apparently normal) being analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging for microstructure, by AFM nano-indentation for mechanical properties, and by transverse digital microradiography (TMR) for mineral content. Microstructure changes, and nanomechanical properties and mineral content significantly decreased across zones. Hydrated elastic modulus and mineral content from normal dentin to pink Caries-Detector-stained dentin ranged from 19.5 [10.6-25.3] GPa to 1.6 [0.0-5.0] GPa and from 42.9 [39.8-44.6] vol% to 12.4 [9.1-14.2] vol%, respectively. Even the most demineralized pink zone contained considerable residual mineral.

  6. Apical potassium channels in the rat connecting tubule.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2004-11-01

    Apical membrane K channels in the rat connecting tubule (CNT) were studied using the patch-clamp technique. Tubules were isolated from the cortical labyrinth of the kidney and split open to provide access to the apical membrane. Cell-attached patches were formed on presumed principal and/or connecting tubule cells. The major channel type observed had a single-channel conductance of 52 pS, high open probability and kinetics that were only weakly dependent on voltage. These correspond closely to the "SK"-type channels in the cortical collecting duct, identified with the ROMK (Kir1.1) gene product. A second channel type, which was less frequently observed, mediated larger currents and was strongly activated by depolarization of the apical membrane voltage. These were identified as BK or maxi-K channels. The density of active SK channels revealed a high degree of clustering. Although heterogeneity of tubules or of cell types within a tubule could not be excluded, the major factor underlying the distribution appeared to be the presence of channel clusters on the membrane of individual cells. The overall density of channels was higher than that previously found in the cortical collecting tubule (CCT). In contrast to results in the CCT, we did not detect an increase in the overall density of SK channels in the apical membrane after feeding the animals a high-K diet. However, the activity of amiloride-sensitive Na channels was undetectable under control conditions but was increased after both 1 day (90 +/- 24 pA/cell) or 7 days (385 +/- 82 pA/cell) of K loading. Thus one important factor leading to an increased K secretion in the CNT in response to increased dietary K is an increased apical Na conductance, leading to depolarization of the apical membrane voltage and an increased driving force for K movement out into the tubular lumen. PMID:15280155

  7. Oxygen deprivation-induced injury to isolated rabbit kidney tubules.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, J M

    1985-01-01

    The utility of freshly isolated suspensions of rabbit tubules enriched in proximal segments for studying the pathogenesis of oxygen deprivation-induced renal tubular cell injury was evaluated. Oxygenated control preparations exhibited very good stability of critical cell injury-related metabolic parameters including oxygen consumption, cell cation homeostasis, and adenine nucleotide metabolism for periods in excess of 2 h. Highly reproducible models of oxygen deprivation-induced injury and recovery were developed and alterations of injury-related metabolic parameters in these models were characterized in detail. When oxygen deprivation was produced under hypoxic conditions, tubules sustained widespread lethal cell injury and associated metabolic alterations within 15-30 min. However, when oxygen deprivation was produced under simulated ischemic conditions, tubules tolerated 30-60 min with only moderate amounts of lethal cell injury occurring, a situation similar to that seen with ischemia in vivo. Like ischemia in vivo, simulated ischemia in vitro was characterized by a fall in pH during oxygen deprivation. No such fall in pH occurred in the hypoxic model. To test whether this fall in pH could contribute to the protection seen during simulated ischemia in vitro, tubules were subjected to hypoxia at medium pHs ranging from 7.45 to 6.41. Striking protection from hypoxic injury was seen as pH was reduced with maximal protection occurring in tubules made hypoxic at pHs below 7.0. Measurements of injury-associated metabolic parameters suggested that the protective effect of reduced pH may be mediated by pH-induced alterations of tubule cell Ca++ metabolism. This study has, thus, defined and characterized in detail a new and extremely versatile model system for the study of oxygen deprivation-induced cell injury in the kidney and has established that pH alterations play a major role in modulating such injury. PMID:4044830

  8. The effect of early weaning on dentin formation and dentinal caries in rats.

    PubMed

    Hietala, E L; Autio, J; Larmas, M

    1997-08-01

    The effect of early weaning on caries progression, dentin formation, and dentin mineralization was examined in four groups of rats. Two groups received a normal diet and were weaned on day 18 or 21, and another two received a sucrose-rich diet and were weaned on day 18 or 21. At age 35 days the lower molars were sectioned sagittally, and the areas of dentin formation and of the dentinal caries were quantified. The width of the predentin zone was measured from histologically stained sections of maxillary molars. Early weaning reduced dentin formation in the group on the high-sucrose diet only the first days; later this effect was partially caught up with. A high-sucrose diet significantly increased caries frequency and extension of caries lesions compared with a normal diet in both early weaned and normally weaned groups. The effect of early weaning on caries frequency and extension in the high-sucrose group was insignificant compared with the normally weaned group on a high-sucrose diet. The predentin zone was wider in the sucrose groups than in the control groups at the end of the experiment. These results indicate that the effect of sucrose on dentin formation was dependent on the stage of physiologic dentin formation, but early weaning as such did not affect this.

  9. Assessment of Pain Intensity in Patients with Dentin Hypersensitivity After Application of Prophylaxis Paste Based on Calcium Sodium Phosphosilicate Formula

    PubMed Central

    Chałas, Renata; Wójcik-Chęcińska, Ilona; Zamościńska, Jolanta; Bachanek, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background One of many functions of the pulp-dentin complex is sensory function. Acute, situated, receding pain after the cessation of the stimulus action is called dentin pain. Dentin hypersensitivity has been described as one of the most painful and least successfully treated chronic ailments of teeth. The aim of this research was the clinical evaluation of the effectiveness of professional polishing paste containing calcium sodium phosphosilicate formula (NovaMin) in eliminating dentin hypersensitivity after a single application. Material/Methods The study comprised 92 teeth with dentin hypersensitivity diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. The pain reaction of exposed dentine was induced by tactile and dehydrating stimuli, asking patients to assess the severity of pain on the VAS scale. Clinical trial and survey were carried out twice: before and 1 week after the application of the polishing paste. Results After the application of the examined paste, the percentage of teeth reacting with a severe pain to the touch of the probe decreased from 16.3% to 4.3%, and with a moderate pain from 42.4% to 12%. Examination after applying dehydrating stimulus a week after carrying out the application showed a decrease in the proportion of teeth with strong pain from 28.3% to 0% and moderate pain from 38% to 15.2%. The lack of pain increased from 12% to about 50%. Conclusions The use of prophylactic professional paste with NovaMin formula in in-office procedure provides the reduction of dentin hypersensitivity noticeable by 1 week after application. PMID:26429677

  10. Effect of dentin pretreatment and curing mode on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim was to evaluate the effect of curing mode and different dentin surface pretreatment on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six extracted human permanent molars were sectioned horizontally exposing flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into 12 groups (3 teeth/group) according to the dentin surface pretreatment methods (control, 18% EDTA, 10% Polyacrylic acid) and curing mode (self-curing vs. light-curing) of cement. After pretreatment, composite resin blocks were cemented with the following: (a) G-CEM LinkAce; (b) RelyX U200, followed by either self-curing or light-curing. After storage, the teeth were sectioned and µTBS test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Student T-test and Scheffe's post-hoc test at P<.05 level. RESULTS For G-CEM LinkAce cement groups, polyacrylic acid pretreatment showed the highest µTBS in the self-cured group. In the light-cured group, no significant improvements were observed according to the dentin surface pretreatment. There were no significant differences between curing modes. Both dentin surface pretreatment methods helped to increase the µTBS of RelyX U200 resin cement significantly and degree of pretreatment effect was similar. No significant differences were found regarding curing modes except control groups. In the comparisons of two self-adhesive resin cements, all groups within the same pretreatment and curing mode were significantly different excluding self-cured control groups. CONCLUSION Selecting RelyX U200 used in this study and application of dentin surface pretreatment with EDTA and polyacrylic acid might be recommended to enhance the bond strength of cement to dentin. PMID:26330979

  11. Comparative evaluation of demineralization of radicular dentin with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 10% citric acid, and MTAD at different time intervals: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yogender; Lohar, Jitendra; Bhat, Sureka; Bhati, Manisha; Gandhi, Aanesh; Mehta, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The smear layer has the capability to protect the bacteria within the dentinal tubules from intracanal medicament. After removal of the smear layer from infected root canals, it allows disinfection of the entire root canal. The smear layer compromising the seal between the root canal sealer and root canal wall also decreases the penetration of irrigants into dentinal tubules. Aims: This study compares the amount of phosphorous liberated and demineralization of the radicular dentin with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 10% citric acid and mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Extracted maxillary single-rooted teeth were prepared by using a combination of passive step-back and rotary 0.04 taper nickel-titanium files. Sodium hypochlorite 5.25% and sterile distilled water were used as an intracanal irrigant. The canals were then treated with 5 mL of one of the following solutions such as final rinse sterile distilled water, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent. The presence or absence of smear layer and the amount of erosion on the surface of the root canal walls at the coronal, middle, and apical portions of each canal were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine whether there were significant differences between the groups. Results: The results show that mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent is an effective solution for the removal of the smear layer and does not significantly change the structure of the dentinal tubules. Conclusions: In this study, 10% citric acid shows the maximum amount of dimeneralization of radicular dentine followed by mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent, and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. When all the subgroups were compared, it was seen

  12. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering.

  13. Clinical management of infected root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-08-01

    Several hundred different species of bacteria are present in the human intraoral environment. Bacterial penetration of root canal dentin occurs when bacteria invade the root canal system. These bacteria may constitute a reservoir from which root canal reinfection may occur during or after endodontic treatment. The learning objective of this article is to review endodontic microbiology, update readers on the role of bacteria in pulp and periapical disease, and discuss the principles of management of infected root canal dentin. Complete debridement, removal of microorganisms and affected dentin, and chemomechanical cleansing of the root canal are suggested as being the cornerstones of successful endodontic therapy, followed by intracanal medication to remove residual bacteria, when required. PMID:9242125

  14. Clinical and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser therapy for treating dentine hypersensitivity: short-term, randomised, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, H G; Bayindir, H

    2014-05-01

    Er,Cr:YSGG laser is a rising treatment option for dentine hypersensitivity (DH). However, there is no data available concerning the scanning electron microscope (SEM) evaluation of the clinical application of Er,Cr:YSGG laser in the treatment of DH. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the desensitising and tubule occlusion effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with different power settings. Twenty patients (60 teeth) participated in this study. For each patient, teeth were randomised to 3 groups. In groups 1 and 2, patients were treated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 0.25 and 0.5 W, respectively. In control group, same laser was applied without laser emission. DH was assessed for all groups with a visual analogue scale (VAS). When compared with the baseline data and control group, in both active treatment groups laser irradiation provided a desensitising effect immediately after treatment (P < 0.001). In group 2, VAS scores were significantly lower than group 1. The tubule diameters in the both laser groups were significantly smaller than the control group (P < 0.01). When group 1 compared with group 2, group 2 showed significantly smaller tubule diameters (P < 0.001). Both 0.25 and 0.5 W laser irradiation were effective for the treatment of DH; however, 0.5 W laser irradiation showed best results for the decrease in VAS scores. The SEM findings of the reduction in number/patency of dentine tubules seem to be related to the clinical findings, which were associated with improvement in treatment efficacy.

  15. Clinical and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser therapy for treating dentine hypersensitivity: short-term, randomised, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, H G; Bayindir, H

    2014-05-01

    Er,Cr:YSGG laser is a rising treatment option for dentine hypersensitivity (DH). However, there is no data available concerning the scanning electron microscope (SEM) evaluation of the clinical application of Er,Cr:YSGG laser in the treatment of DH. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the desensitising and tubule occlusion effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with different power settings. Twenty patients (60 teeth) participated in this study. For each patient, teeth were randomised to 3 groups. In groups 1 and 2, patients were treated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 0.25 and 0.5 W, respectively. In control group, same laser was applied without laser emission. DH was assessed for all groups with a visual analogue scale (VAS). When compared with the baseline data and control group, in both active treatment groups laser irradiation provided a desensitising effect immediately after treatment (P < 0.001). In group 2, VAS scores were significantly lower than group 1. The tubule diameters in the both laser groups were significantly smaller than the control group (P < 0.01). When group 1 compared with group 2, group 2 showed significantly smaller tubule diameters (P < 0.001). Both 0.25 and 0.5 W laser irradiation were effective for the treatment of DH; however, 0.5 W laser irradiation showed best results for the decrease in VAS scores. The SEM findings of the reduction in number/patency of dentine tubules seem to be related to the clinical findings, which were associated with improvement in treatment efficacy. PMID:24602082

  16. AFM Investigation of mechanical properties of dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Sidney R; Apter, Nathan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Barlam, David; Peretz, Adi Idit; Ziskind, Daniel; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of peritubular dentin were investigated using scanning probe microscopy techniques, namely Nanoindentation and Band Excitation. Particular attention was directed to the possible existence of a gradient in these properties moving outward from the tubular lumen to the junction with the intertubular dentin. Finite element analysis showed that the influence of the boundaries is small relative to the effects observed. Thus, these results strongly support the concept of a lowering of modulus and hardness from the tubular exterior to its periphery, which appear to correlate with graded changes in the mineral content.

  17. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE-CONTAINING DESENSITIZING AGENTS ON THE BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN-BASED CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Saraç, Duygu; Külünk, Safak; Saraç, Y. Sinasi; Karakas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Material and Methods: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO) was used. The shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05). The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001). PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05). PMID:19936532

  18. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 1: Fourier transform-Raman study.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Junior, Aldo Brugnera; Zanin, Fátima Anto Nia Aparecida; da Silva Carvalho, Carolina; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2009-01-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied using Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy. Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided in two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in thymol aqueous solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ, and total energy of 12 J). Samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy; we collected three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). The integrated areas of five Raman peaks were calculated to yield average spectra. The areas of the peaks associated with phosphate content (P<0.001), type I collagen, and organic C-H bonds (P<0.05) were reduced significantly in group A (control). Analyses of samples irradiated with reduced laser energies did not show significant changes in the dentin components. These results suggest that thymol storage treatment is advised for in vitro study; furthermore, 12 J of Er:YAG laser energy does not affect dentin components.

  19. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 1: Fourier transform-Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Junior, Aldo Brugnera; Zanin, Fátima Antônia Aparecida; da Silva Carvalho, Carolina; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martin, Airton Abraha~O.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied using Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy. Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided in two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in thymol aqueous solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ, and total energy of 12 J). Samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy; we collected three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). The integrated areas of five Raman peaks were calculated to yield average spectra. The areas of the peaks associated with phosphate content (P<0.001), type I collagen, and organic C-H bonds (P<0.05) were reduced significantly in group A (control). Analyses of samples irradiated with reduced laser energies did not show significant changes in the dentin components. These results suggest that thymol storage treatment is advised for in vitro study; furthermore, 12 J of Er:YAG laser energy does not affect dentin components.

  20. Effect of desensitizing treatments on bond strength of resin composites to dentin – an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Makkar, Sameer; Goyal, Meenu; Kaushal, Ashih; Hegde, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Hypersensitivity is a common clinical multietiological problem. Many desensitizing treatments are there to overcome hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different dentin-desensitizing treatments on the tensile bond strength of composite restoration. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four sound human molars were used. Enamel was wet abraded to expose flat dentin surfaces, polished with sandpaper. The specimens were then divided into three groups (n = 8) based on the type of dentin-desensitizing treatment given. The first group: G1 was the control group where no desensitizing agent was used. The second group: G2 was treated with desensitizing dentifrice containing a combination of potassium nitrate, triclosan, and sodium monoflorophosphate. The third group: G3 was treated with Er:YAG laser. Afterwards, the desensitized specimens were treated with one step self-etch adhesive according to manufacturer's instructions and composite microcylinders were packed. The specimens were then examined for tensile bond strength using universal tensile machine (KMITM ). Results: Statistical analysis of the data obtained revealed the mean values for the tensile bond strengths were 10.2613 MPa, 5.9400 MPa and 6.3575 MPa for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. These values were statistically significantly different between groups pretreated with laser or dentifrice as compared to control group. Conclusions: Dentifrice and Laser pre-treated dentin has lower tensile bond strength with resin composites as compared to dentin that is untreated. PMID:25298648

  1. Innervation of the renal proximal convoluted tubule of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas, L.; Powers, K. )

    1989-12-01

    Experimental data suggest the proximal tubule as a major site of neurogenic influence on tubular function. The functional and anatomical axial heterogeneity of the proximal tubule prompted this study of the distribution of innervation sites along the early, mid, and late proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) of the rat. Serial section autoradiograms, with tritiated norepinephrine serving as a marker for monoaminergic nerves, were used in this study. Freehand clay models and graphic reconstructions of proximal tubules permitted a rough estimation of the location of the innervation sites along the PCT. In the subcapsular nephrons, the early PCT (first third) was devoid of innervation sites with most of the innervation occurring in the mid (middle third) and in the late (last third) PCT. Innervation sites were found in the early PCT in nephrons located deeper in the cortex. In juxtamedullary nephrons, innervation sites could be observed on the PCT as it left the glomerulus. This gradient of PCT innervation can be explained by the different tubulovascular relationships of nephrons at different levels of the cortex. The absence of innervation sites in the early PCT of subcapsular nephrons suggests that any influence of the renal nerves on the early PCT might be due to an effect of neurotransmitter released from renal nerves reaching the early PCT via the interstitium and/or capillaries.

  2. Dynamic tubulation of mitochondria drives mitochondrial network formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Du, Wanqing; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Mingli; Feng, Peiyuan; Li, Ying; Zhou, Yichen; Mi, Na; Zhu, Yueyao; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Senyan; Zhang, Zerui; Sun, Yujie; Yu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria form networks. Formation of mitochondrial networks is important for maintaining mitochondrial DNA integrity and interchanging mitochondrial material, whereas disruption of the mitochondrial network affects mitochondrial functions. According to the current view, mitochondrial networks are formed by fusion of individual mitochondria. Here, we report a new mechanism for formation of mitochondrial networks through KIF5B-mediated dynamic tubulation of mitochondria. We found that KIF5B pulls thin, highly dynamic tubules out of mitochondria. Fusion of these dynamic tubules, which is mediated by mitofusins, gives rise to the mitochondrial network. We further demonstrated that dynamic tubulation and fusion is sufficient for mitochondrial network formation, by reconstituting mitochondrial networks in vitro using purified fusion-competent mitochondria, recombinant KIF5B, and polymerized microtubules. Interestingly, KIF5B only controls network formation in the peripheral zone of the cell, indicating that the mitochondrial network is divided into subzones, which may be constructed by different mechanisms. Our data not only uncover an essential mechanism for mitochondrial network formation, but also reveal that different parts of the mitochondrial network are formed by different mechanisms. PMID:26206315

  3. Dynamic tubulation of mitochondria drives mitochondrial network formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Du, Wanqing; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Mingli; Feng, Peiyuan; Li, Ying; Zhou, Yichen; Mi, Na; Zhu, Yueyao; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Senyan; Zhang, Zerui; Sun, Yujie; Yu, Li

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria form networks. Formation of mitochondrial networks is important for maintaining mitochondrial DNA integrity and interchanging mitochondrial material, whereas disruption of the mitochondrial network affects mitochondrial functions. According to the current view, mitochondrial networks are formed by fusion of individual mitochondria. Here, we report a new mechanism for formation of mitochondrial networks through KIF5B-mediated dynamic tubulation of mitochondria. We found that KIF5B pulls thin, highly dynamic tubules out of mitochondria. Fusion of these dynamic tubules, which is mediated by mitofusins, gives rise to the mitochondrial network. We further demonstrated that dynamic tubulation and fusion is sufficient for mitochondrial network formation, by reconstituting mitochondrial networks in vitro using purified fusion-competent mitochondria, recombinant KIF5B, and polymerized microtubules. Interestingly, KIF5B only controls network formation in the peripheral zone of the cell, indicating that the mitochondrial network is divided into subzones, which may be constructed by different mechanisms. Our data not only uncover an essential mechanism for mitochondrial network formation, but also reveal that different parts of the mitochondrial network are formed by different mechanisms.

  4. Increased sodium transport by cortical collecting tubules from remnant kidneys.

    PubMed

    Vehaskari, V M; Hering-Smith, K S; Klahr, S; Hamm, L L

    1989-07-01

    To determine whether intrinsic changes in cortical collecting tubule (CCT) transport contribute to the maintenance of sodium and acid-base balance after loss of renal mass, we studied transport functions in isolated perfused CCT from rabbit remnant kidneys. The rabbits were sacrificed three weeks after surgical reduction of renal mass (by 3/4 to 7/8) at which time they were mildly azotemic but had no systemic electrolyte or acid-base disturbances. When perfused by standard methods in vitro, CCT from remnant kidneys exhibited sodium transport rates (lumen-to-bath 22Na-flux) approximately twice as high as those in CCT from control animals (111 +/- 19 vs. 54 +/- 7 pmol/min mm, P less than 0.02). A similar difference was present in the ouabain-sensitive sodium fluxes (81 +/- 16 vs. 39 +/- 8 pmol/min mm, P less than 0.05). In contrast, there were no significant differences in net bicarbonate transport. Significant hypertrophy of the remnant kidney CCT was reflected by 30 to 45% increases in tubule diameters. To examine the possible role of differences in food intake, we studied a separate group of weight-matched, pair-fed sham-operated and remnant kidney rabbits. Similar differences in total and ouabain-sensitive 22Na-flux, and in tubule size persisted in the pair-fed animals. A dissociation between active sodium transport and tubule hypertrophy was documented in the outer medullary collecting tubule: despite the lack of active sodium transport, hypertrophy was present. Our studies show that loss of renal mass results in a selective augmentation of certain transport processes in the CCT, implying selective or specific signals and mechanisms. PMID:2811058

  5. Dentin Biomodification Potential Depends on Polyphenol Source

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, T.R.; Vidal, C.M.P.; Phansalkar, R.S.; Todorova, I.; Napolitano, J.G.; McAlpine, J.B.; Chen, S.N.; Pauli, G.F.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Although proanthocyanidins (PACs) modify dentin, the effectiveness of different PAC sources and the correlation with their specific chemical composition are still unknown. This study describes the chemical profiling of natural PAC-rich extracts from 7 plants using ultra high pressure/performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) to determine the overall composition of these extracts and, in parallel, comprehensively evaluate their effect on dentin properties. The total polyphenol content of the extracts was determined (as gallic acid equivalents) using Folin-Ciocalteau assays. Dentin biomodification was assessed by the modulus of elasticity, mass change, and resistance to enzymatic biodegradation. Extracts with a high polyphenol and PAC content from Vitis vinifera, Theobroma cacao, Camellia sinensis, and Pinus massoniana induced a significant increase in modulus of elasticity and mass. The UHPLC analysis showed the presence of multiple types of polyphenols, ranging from simple phenolic acids to oligomeric PACs and highly condensed tannins. Protective effect against enzymatic degradation was observed for all experimental groups; however, statistically significant differences were observed between plant extracts. The findings provide clear evidence that the dentin bioactivities of PACs are source dependent, resulting from a combination of concentration and specific chemical constitution of the complex PAC mixtures. PMID:24574140

  6. Effects of aging on the mechanical behavior of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Reprogel, R K

    2005-06-01

    An experimental study on the mechanical behavior of human dentin and the influence of age was conducted. Beams with rectangular cross-section were sectioned from the coronal dentin of virgin extracted molars (N = 76) that were obtained from (N = 70) patients between 17 and 80 years of age. The beams were loaded in either quasi-static 4-point flexure or 4-point flexural fatigue to failure and the stiffness, strength and fatigue properties were evaluated. In characterizing the fatigue response the beams were divided into two age groups that were regarded as young (17 < or = age < or = 30, mean +/- std. dev. = 25 +/- 5 years) and old (50 < or = age < or = 80, mean +/- std. dev. = 64 +/- 9 years) dentin. Results from monotonic loading showed that both the flexural strength and strain to fracture of dentin decreased significantly with age. The fatigue life of dentin increased with a reduction in cyclic stress amplitude and the fatigue strength of young dentin was greater than that of old dentin at all cyclic stress amplitudes. The endurance strength of young dentin (at 10(7) cycles) was approximately 44 MPa, whereas the old dentin exhibited an endurance strength of approximately 23 MPa. Based on differences in the mechanical behavior and microscopic features of the fracture surfaces from the young and old specimens, aging appears to result in an increase in both the rate of damage initiation and propagation in dentin.

  7. Extracellular matrix proteins and the dynamics of dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Butler, William T; Brunn, Jan C; Qin, Chunlin; McKee, Marc D

    2002-01-01

    Dentinogenesis involves controlled reactions that result in conversion of unmineralized predentin to dentin when apatite crystals are formed. This process is dynamic: Maturation events occur within predentin beginning at the proximal layer and progressing to the predentin-dentin (PD) border. One type of controlled reaction is the proteolytic processing of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) to dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), by cleavage of at least three highly conserved peptide bonds. We postulate that this processing event represents an activation step, resulting in release of DPP, which is active in its effects on formation and growth of apatite crystals. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DPM1), present as a processed fragment (57-kD protein) in bone, is seen in dentin on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as one intact protein of 150-200 kD. Anti-57-kD antibodies elicit immunoreactivity in bone, dentin, and cellular cementum. In bone, the reactivity is associated with osteocytes and their cell processes. Similarly, dentin shows reactivity in odontoblasts, predentin, and the odontoblast processes. In summary, the processing of large sialic acid-rich proteins into smaller fragments may be an important part of the controlled conversion of predentin to dentin and osteoid to bone.

  8. Photodynamically crosslinked and chitosan-incorporated dentin collagen.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, A; Friedman, S; Kishen, A

    2011-11-01

    A lingering concern with restored root-filled teeth is the loss of structural integrity of the dentin and dentin-sealer interface over time. We hypothesized that crosslinking of dentin collagen with simultaneous incorporation of a biopolymer into collagen matrix would improve its structural stability. This study aimed to investigate the effects of combining chemical/photodynamic crosslinking of dentin collagen with the incorporation of carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMCS) on the resistance to enzymatic degradation and mechanical properties of dentin collagen. Ninety-six demineralized dentin collagen specimens (human, n = 72; and bovine, n = 24) were prepared and crosslinked chemically/ photodynamically, with/without CMCS. Glutaraldehyde and carbodiimides were used for chemical crosslinking, while rose Bengal activated with a non-coherent light (540 nm) at 20 J/cm(2) was applied for photodynamic crosslinking. The crosslinked human dentin collagen was subjected to chemical characterization, 7 days enzymatic degradation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), while the bovine dentin collagen was used for tensile-testing. Crosslinked collagen showed significantly higher resistance to enzymatic degradation (p < 0.01), stable ultrastructure, and increased tensile strength (p < 0.05). Crosslinking CMCS with collagen matrix as observed in the TEM further improved the mechanical properties of dentin collagen (p < 0.01). This study highlighted the possibility of improving the resistance and toughness of dentin collagen by chemically/photodynamically crosslinking collagen matrix with CMCS.

  9. Surface microanalysis and chemical imaging of early dentin remineralization.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Cabello, Inmaculada; Vílchez, Miguel Angel Cabrerizo; Fernández, Miguel Angel; Osorio, Raquel

    2014-02-01

    This study reports physical and chemical changes that occur at early dentin remineralization stages. Extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain dentin discs. After polishing the dentin surfaces, three groups were established: (1) untreated dentin (UD), (2) 37% phosphoric acid application for 15 s (partially demineralized dentin-PDD), and (3) 10% phosphoric acid for 12 h at 25° C (totally demineralized dentin-TDD). Five different remineralizing solutions were used: chlorhexidine (CHX), artificial saliva (AS), phosphate solution (PS), ZnCl2, and ZnO. Wettability (contact angle), ζ potential and Raman spectroscopy analysis were determined on dentin surfaces. Demineralization of dentin resulted in a higher contact angle. Wettability decreased after immersion in all solutions. ζ potential analysis showed dissimilar performance ranging from -6.21 mV (TDD + AS) up to 3.02 mV (PDD + PS). Raman analysis showed an increase in mineral components after immersing the dentin specimens, in terms of crystallinity, mineral content, and concentration. This confirmed the optimal incorporation and deposition of mineral on dentin collagen. Organic content reflected scarce changes, except in TDD that appeared partially denatured. Pyridinium, as an expression of cross-linking, appeared in all spectra except in specimens immersed in PS. PMID:24160361

  10. WPH-6112A thermal expansion test of PRESS tubulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Sites, R.L.; Cobb, W.R.

    1994-05-26

    We recently performed the WPH-6112A thermal expansion test of the lower portion of the PRESS program tubulation. The objective of the test was to determine whether the tubulation welds could withstand typical stresses from a 1200 C thermal cycle. Test components failed in two areas: (1) the friction welded Monel to Vanadium tube fitting at the dissimilar metal interface and fell against the outer vanadium tube wall causing it to fail and (2) the thin-walled, outer stainless steel tubing failed by cracking at the weld. Both failures were due to irregular occurences for this system. We feel that the strength of all weldments is adequate to withstand the normal thermal stresses from a 1200 C cycle without failing prematurely.

  11. Porcine enamel matrix derivative enhances the formation of reparative dentine and dentine bridges during wound healing of amputated rat molars.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Rie; Sahara, Takako; Shimizu-Ishiura, Miho; Sasaki, Takahisa

    2003-01-01

    We examined the biological effects of porcine enamel matrix derivative (EMD; Emdogain) on the formation of reparative dentine and dentine bridges in rat molars after pulp amputation. The pulp chambers of upper molars of Wistar rats were perforated and the amputated pulp surfaces were directly capped with either EMD or its carrier propylene glycol alginate (PGA) as control. The cavities were then restored with glass-ionomer cement. On post-amputation days 4-30, the dissected maxillae were examined by light and electron microscopy. In PGA-capped pulp, reparative dentine had been formed over the dentine walls under the prepared cavity on day 7 post-amputation and its thickness extended until day 30. On day 30, as well as reparative dentine formation, diffuse calcification had occurred beneath the amputated wound surfaces. Dentine bridge formation under the amputated coronal pulp surface was observed in 18.2% of amputated pulp on day 30. In EMD-capped pulp, reparative dentine had already been formed by odontoblast-like cells over the dentine walls, already on day 4 post-amputation, and its thickness extended until day 30. The Ca and P weight % and Ca/P ratio of reparative dentine matrix were similar to those of pre-existing dentine matrix, and these values were not different between PGA and EMD-capped pulp. Dentine bridge formation was observed in 27.3% of EMD-capped pulp on day 30. Our results suggest that EMD enhances the formation of both reparative dentine and dentine bridges during wound healing of amputated rat molar pulp. PMID:12868593

  12. Mesoscale Nanoparticles Selectively Target the Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Shah, Janki; Ng, Brandon D.; Minton, Denise R.; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Park, Christopher Y.; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized “mesoscale” nanoparticles, approximately 400 nm in diameter, which unexpectedly localized selectively in renal proximal tubules and up to 7 times more efficiently in the kidney than other organs. Although nanoparticles typically localize in the liver and spleen, modulating their size and opsonization potential allowed for stable targeting of the kidneys through a new proposed uptake mechanism. Applying this kidney targeting strategy, we anticipate use in the treatment of renal disease and the study of renal physiology. PMID:25811353

  13. Tributyltin alters osteocalcin, matrix metalloproteinase 20 and dentin sialophosphoprotein gene expression in mineralizing mouse embryonic tooth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Eija; Alaluusua, Satu; Sahlberg, Carin; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa

    2012-01-01

    We showed in a previous in vitro study that tributyltin (TBT) arrests dentin mineralization and enamel formation in developing mouse tooth. The present aim was to investigate the effect of TBT on the expression of genes associated with mineralization of dental hard tissues. Embryonic day 18 mouse mandibular first molars were cultured for 3, 5 or 7 days and exposed to 1.0 μM TBT and studied by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) for the expressions of osteocalcin (Ocn), alkaline phosphatase (Alpl), dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) and matrix metalloproteinase 20 (Mmp-20).Ocn, Mmp-20 and Dspp, whose expressions showed changes in RT- QPCR, were further analyzed by in situ hybridization of tissue sections. In situ hybridization showed that TBT decreased Ocn expression in odontoblasts but increased the expression in the epithelial tooth compartment. In QPCR assays, the net effect in the whole tooth was increased expression. TBT also reduced Mmp-20 expression in ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Dspp expression varied but both QPCR assays and in situ hybridization showed a decreasing trend. TBT exposure had no clear effect on Alpl and Dmp1 expressions. Increased Ocn expression by epithelial enamel organ may inhibit dentin mineralization and enamel formation. Decreased Ocn, Mmp-20 and Dspp expressions in odontoblasts may indicate delayed cell differentiation, or TBT may specifically decrease the expression of genes involved in dentin mineralization. While decreased Mmp-20 expression by TBT in ameloblasts may impair enamel mineralization, the coincident reduction in Mmp-20 and Dspp expressions in odontoblasts may potentiate the delay of dentin mineralization.

  14. Tip cells act as dynamic cellular anchors in the morphogenesis of looped renal tubules in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2013-11-11

    Tissue morphogenesis involves both the sculpting of tissue shape and the positioning of tissues relative to one another in the body. Using the renal tubules of Drosophila, we show that a specific distal tubule cell regulates both tissue architecture and position in the body cavity. Focusing on the anterior tubules, we demonstrate that tip cells make transient contacts with alary muscles at abdominal segment boundaries, moving progressively forward as convergent extension movements lengthen the tubule. Tip cell anchorage antagonizes forward-directed, TGF-β-guided tubule elongation, thereby ensuring the looped morphology characteristic of renal tubules from worms to humans. Distinctive tip cell exploratory behavior, adhesion, and basement membrane clearing underlie target recognition and dynamic interactions. Defects in these features obliterate tip cell anchorage, producing misshapen and misplaced tubules with impaired physiological function. PMID:24229645

  15. Microbiological assessment of dentin stained with a caries detector dye.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, M A; Munshi, A K

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess microbiologically the efficacy of 1% acid red in propylene glycol dye to stain carious dentin. Thirty teeth with primary carious lesions involving dentin were chosen. Cavity preparation using the conventional visual and tactile criteria was done and the dye was applied to the prepared cavity. Dentin samples were collected, from carious dentin prior to cavity preparation, dye stained areas and unstained areas. The total colony forming units (CFU) in each sample were then assessed microbiologically. The results showed a highly significant difference in the total colony forming units in dye stained and dye unstained dentin samples. The 1% acid red dye in propylene glycol dye was found to be effective as an adjunctive aid in the diagnosis of carious dentin.

  16. Changes in matrix phosphorylation during bovine dentin development.

    PubMed

    Verdelis, Kostas; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Atsawasuwan, Peter; Wright, John T; Peterson, Margaret G E; Jha, Divya; Boskey, Adele L

    2007-08-01

    Phosphorylation of the organic matrix proteins of dentin is important for the initiation of mineralization, but its relevance in later mineralization stages is controversial. The objective of this study was to analyze changes in the total matrix phosphate content during dentin development and to identify their origin. Amino acid and total matrix phosphate analyses of microdissected developing mantle and circumpulpal fetal bovine dentin specimens were performed. The amino acid composition showed few changes during mantle and circumpulpal dentin maturation. However, the total matrix phosphate content showed a significant, positive correlation with tissue maturation in both mantle and circumpulpal dentin, with a two- and a three-fold increase, respectively, being observed. The data indicate that changes occur in the pattern of phosphorylation of matrix proteins during dentin maturation, which we suggest may play a functional role in later stages of tooth mineralization.

  17. Fate of cadmium in rat renal tubules: a microinjection study

    SciTech Connect

    Felley-Bosco, E.; Diezi, J.

    1987-11-01

    /sup 109/Cd was injected into the lumen of superficial proximal or distal tubules of rat kidneys, and recovery in the pelvic urine from the ipsilateral kidney was measured. Fractional recovery of labeled inulin always exceeded 90%. About 70% of injected inorganic Cd (CdCl/sub 2/) was taken up by the epithelium of proximal tubules, while more than 90% of the injected amount was recovered after distal microinjection. The proximal fractional Cd uptake of a 1:1 (molar) Cd-L-cysteine complex was 82%, but was below 60% for a 5-10:1 molar ratio of cysteine:Cd. The chelate Cd-pentetic acid was recovered in final urine nearly quantitatively after proximal or distal microinjection. Fractional uptake of /sup 109/Cd from a Cd-metallothionein (Mt) complex, following proximal microinjection, ranged between 17 (Cd-Mt 0.19 mM) and 8% (Cd-Mt 1.5 mM). It is concluded that luminal Cd uptake by the tubular epithelium depends markedly on the chemical form of Cd and, when present, occurs mostly or exclusively in proximal tubules.

  18. Mechanosensory function of microvilli of the kidney proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhaopeng; Duan, Yi; Yan, QingShang; Weinstein, Alan M.; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Wang, Tong

    2004-01-01

    Normal variations in glomerular filtration induce proportional changes in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption. This “glomerulotubular balance” derives from flow dependence of Na+ uptake across luminal cell membranes; however, the underlying physical mechanism is unknown. Our hypothesis is that flow-dependent reabsorption is an autoregulatory mechanism that is independent of neural and hormonal systems. It is signaled by the hydrodynamic torque (bending moment) on epithelial microvilli. Such signals need to be transmitted to the terminal web to modulate Na+-H+-exchange activity. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined Na+ transport and tubular diameter in response to different flow rates during the microperfusion of isolated S2 proximal tubules from mouse kidneys. The data were analyzed by using a mathematical model to estimate the microvillous torque as function of flow. In this model, increases in luminal diameter have the effect of blunting the impact of flow velocity on microvillous shear stress and, thus, microvillous torque. We found that variations in microvillous torque produce nearly identical fractional changes in Na+ reabsorption. Furthermore, the flow-dependent Na+ transport is increased by increasing luminal fluid viscosity, diminished in Na+-H+ exchanger isoform 3 knockout mice, and abolished by nontoxic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. These data support our hypothesis that the “brush-border” microvilli serve a mechanosensory function in which fluid dynamic torque is transmitted to the actin cytoskeleton and modulates Na+ absorption in kidney proximal tubules. PMID:15319475

  19. Dysferlin and myoferlin regulate transverse tubule formation and glycerol sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Demonbreun, Alexis R; Rossi, Ann E; Alvarez, Manuel G; Swanson, Kaitlin E; Deveaux, H Kieran; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vohra, Ravneet; Walter, Glenn A; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Dysferlin is a membrane-associated protein implicated in muscular dystrophy and vesicle movement and function in muscles. The precise role of dysferlin has been debated, partly because of the mild phenotype in dysferlin-null mice (Dysf). We bred Dysf mice to mice lacking myoferlin (MKO) to generate mice lacking both myoferlin and dysferlin (FER). FER animals displayed progressive muscle damage with myofiber necrosis, internalized nuclei, and, at older ages, chronic remodeling and increasing creatine kinase levels. These changes were most prominent in proximal limb and trunk muscles and were more severe than in Dysf mice. Consistently, FER animals had reduced ad libitum activity. Ultrastructural studies uncovered progressive dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and ectopic and misaligned transverse tubules in FER skeletal muscle. FER muscle, and Dysf- and MKO-null muscle, exuded lipid, and serum glycerol levels were elevated in FER and Dysf mice. Glycerol injection into muscle is known to induce myopathy, and glycerol exposure promotes detachment of transverse tubules from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Dysf, MKO, and FER muscles were highly susceptible to glycerol exposure in vitro, demonstrating a dysfunctional sarcotubule system, and in vivo glycerol exposure induced severe muscular dystrophy, especially in FER muscle. Together, these findings demonstrate the importance of dysferlin and myoferlin for transverse tubule function and in the genesis of muscular dystrophy.

  20. Dysferlin and Myoferlin Regulate Transverse Tubule Formation and Glycerol Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Rossi, Ann E.; Alvarez, Manuel G.; Swanson, Kaitlin E.; Deveaux, H. Kieran; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Vohra, Ravneet; Walter, Glenn A.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Dysferlin is a membrane-associated protein implicated in muscular dystrophy and vesicle movement and function in muscles. The precise role of dysferlin has been debated, partly because of the mild phenotype in dysferlin-null mice (Dysf). We bred Dysf mice to mice lacking myoferlin (MKO) to generate mice lacking both myoferlin and dysferlin (FER). FER animals displayed progressive muscle damage with myofiber necrosis, internalized nuclei, and, at older ages, chronic remodeling and increasing creatine kinase levels. These changes were most prominent in proximal limb and trunk muscles and were more severe than in Dysf mice. Consistently, FER animals had reduced ad libitum activity. Ultrastructural studies uncovered progressive dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and ectopic and misaligned transverse tubules in FER skeletal muscle. FER muscle, and Dysf- and MKO-null muscle, exuded lipid, and serum glycerol levels were elevated in FER and Dysf mice. Glycerol injection into muscle is known to induce myopathy, and glycerol exposure promotes detachment of transverse tubules from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Dysf, MKO, and FER muscles were highly susceptible to glycerol exposure in vitro, demonstrating a dysfunctional sarcotubule system, and in vivo glycerol exposure induced severe muscular dystrophy, especially in FER muscle. Together, these findings demonstrate the importance of dysferlin and myoferlin for transverse tubule function and in the genesis of muscular dystrophy. PMID:24177035

  1. Malpighian tubule development in the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum).

    PubMed

    King, Benedict; Denholm, Barry

    2014-11-01

    Malpighian tubules (MpTs) are the major organ for excretion and osmoregulation in most insects. MpT development is characterised for Drosophila melanogaster, but not other species. We therefore do not know the extent to which the MpT developmental programme is conserved across insects. To redress this we provide a comprehensive description of MpT development in the beetle Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera), a species separated from Drosophila by >315 million years. We identify similarities with Drosophila MpT development including: 1) the onset of morphological development, beginning when tubules bud from the gut and proliferate to increase organ size. 2) the tubule is shaped by convergent-extension movements and oriented cell divisions. 3) differentiated tip cells activate EGF-signalling in distal MpT cells through the ligand Spitz. 4) MpTs contain two main cell types - principal and stellate cells, differing in morphology and gene expression. We also describe development of the beetle cryptonephridial system, an adaptation for water conservation, which represents a major modification of the MpT ground plan characterised by intimate association between MpTs and rectum. This work establishes a new model to compare MpT development across insects, and provides a framework to help understand how an evolutionary novelty - the cryptonephridial system - arose during organ evolution.

  2. Malpighian tubule development in the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum).

    PubMed

    King, Benedict; Denholm, Barry

    2014-11-01

    Malpighian tubules (MpTs) are the major organ for excretion and osmoregulation in most insects. MpT development is characterised for Drosophila melanogaster, but not other species. We therefore do not know the extent to which the MpT developmental programme is conserved across insects. To redress this we provide a comprehensive description of MpT development in the beetle Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera), a species separated from Drosophila by >315 million years. We identify similarities with Drosophila MpT development including: 1) the onset of morphological development, beginning when tubules bud from the gut and proliferate to increase organ size. 2) the tubule is shaped by convergent-extension movements and oriented cell divisions. 3) differentiated tip cells activate EGF-signalling in distal MpT cells through the ligand Spitz. 4) MpTs contain two main cell types - principal and stellate cells, differing in morphology and gene expression. We also describe development of the beetle cryptonephridial system, an adaptation for water conservation, which represents a major modification of the MpT ground plan characterised by intimate association between MpTs and rectum. This work establishes a new model to compare MpT development across insects, and provides a framework to help understand how an evolutionary novelty - the cryptonephridial system - arose during organ evolution. PMID:25242057

  3. Dentin phosphoprotein compound mutation in dentin sialophosphoprotein causes dentinogenesis imperfecta type III.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gu, TingTing; Jeffords, Leticia; MacDougall, Mary

    2005-01-30

    A rare compound mutation involving a 36 bp deletion and 18 bp insertion within exon 5 of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene has been identified in a family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III (DGI-III). The DSPP gene encodes two major tooth matrix proteins dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSPP mutations associated with DGI-III results in an in frame truncation of the serine aspartic acid triplet repeat found in DPP near the highly conserved carboxyl terminal region shortening the protein by six amino acids. Clinically this family presents with discolored amber opalescent teeth and severe attrition of the tooth structure. This study is the first report of a mutation within DPP associated with a genetic dentin disease. Our study indicates that DGI-III is allelic with some forms of DGI-II with and without progressive hearing loss and dentin dysplasia type II that have been shown to be caused by mutations within the DSP coding or signal peptide regions.

  4. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. PMID:20949630

  5. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II.

  6. SEM evaluation of nanoparticulate silver penetration into dentine collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Bilenko, David I.; Venig, Sergey B.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study a novel approach to caries management based on the application of nanoparticles of different nature to increase the mineral phase of demineralized dentin has been developed. Silver nanoparticles have been tested as a material for dentine matrix infiltration. Research findings clearly show that collagen fibers of demineralized dentine could be considered as a scaffold for mineral component delivery and the place where mineral growth can occur.

  7. Grape seed extracts inhibit dentin matrix degradation by MMP-3

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Le Denmat, Dominique; Tjaderhane, Leo; Menashi, Suzanne; Chaussain, Catherine; Rochefort, Gaël Y.; Boukpessi, Tchilalo

    2014-01-01

    Since Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been suggested to contribute to dentin caries progression, the hypothesis that MMP inhibition would affect the progression of dentin caries is clinically relevant. Grape seed extracts (GSE) have been previously reported to be natural inhibitors of MMPs. Objective: To evaluate the capacity of a GSE mouthrinse to prevent the degradation of demineralized dentin matrix by MMP-3 (stromelysin-1). Materials and Methods: Standardized blocks of dentin obtained from sound permanent teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were demineralized with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and pretreated either with (A) GSE (0.2% w/v), (B) amine fluoride (AmF) (20% w/v), (C) a mouthrinse which contains both, (D) placebo, (E) sodium fluoride (0.15 mg.ml−1), (F) PBS, (G) Chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), or (H) zinc chloride (ZnCl2). The dentin blocks were then incubated with activated recombinant MMP-3. The supernatants were analyzed by Western Blot for several dentin matrix proteins known to be MMP-3 substrate. In parallel, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on resin replica of the dentin blocks. Results: Western blot analysis of the supernatants revealed that MMP-3 released from the dentin matrix small proteoglycans (decorin and biglycan) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP) in the AmF, sodium fluoride, PBS and placebo pretreated groups, but not in the GSE and mouthrinse pretreated groups. SEM examination of resin replica showed that the mouthrinse and its active components not only had an anti-MMP action but also modified the dentin surface accessibility. Conclusion: This study shows that GSE either alone or combined with AmF as in the evaluated mouthrinse limits dentin matrix degradation. This association may be promising to prevent the progression of caries within dentin. However, the procedure should be adapted to clinically relevant durations. PMID:25400590

  8. Photosensitizer and light diffusion through dentin in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Ana C.; Graciano, Ariane X.; Nagata, Juliana Y.; Fujimaki, Mitsue; Terada, Raquel S. S.; Bento, Antonio C.; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been considered a potential antimicrobial modality against oral infections, including dental caries. A model to estimate the penetration of both photosensitizers and light through human dentin, a factor of interest in photodynamic therapy, is proposed. The photoacoustic spectroscopy technique was used to evaluate in vitro dentin permeability of three different photosensitizers. Using the dentin optical absorption and scattering coefficients, it was possible to propose a semi-quantitative model predicting both photosensitizer and light doses within dentin. The graphic illustrations obtained provided guidelines that may be useful in photodynamic therapy protocols used as antimicrobial tools in caries lesions.

  9. Effect of cleaning dentine with soap and pumice on shear bond strength of dentine-bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, M; Paul, S J; Lüthy, H; Schärer, P

    1997-06-01

    This in vitro study reports on the cleaning effect of different soaps on the shear bond strength of various dentine-bonding agents. Human teeth were coated with provisional cements for 24 h or for 14 days. After removing the provisional cements with a scaler, the dentinal surface was cleaned with a cotton pellet and non-fluoridated flour of pumice and soap for 10 sec. Different dentine-bonding agents and a luting resin were bonded to the dentinal surface according to manufacturers' instructions with the bonding agent and the composite material being light-cured at the same time. The bonding agents were tested under intrapulpal pressure and with thermal cycling to imitate physiological conditions. Compared with cleaning the dentine with water and pumice, all soaps investigated in this study decreased the shear bond strength values of the tested dentine-bonding agents considerably.

  10. Caries-resistant bonding layer in dentin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-na; Hu, Lin; Jiao, Kai; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-juan; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the mechanism for caries resistance and the pulp responses in vital teeth following the use of the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique. Dentin adhesives were applied to the surface of sound dentin disks in 4 experimental groups: non-antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (N-G), non-antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (N-H), antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (A-G), antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (A-H). The depth of demineralization induced by biological or chemical demineralization models was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Pulp responses of vital dog’s teeth to the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique were evaluated using light microscopy. Depth of demineralization was significantly affected by “adhesive type” and “intensity of adhesive displacement” for biological demineralization. For chemical demineralization, only “intensity of adhesive displacement” showed significant influence on lesion depth. Pulp response of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa groups showed only moderate disorganization of the odontoblast layer at 24 hours that completely re-organized after 3 weeks. Augmented-pressure adhesive displacement improves the caries resistance property of bonded dentin and does not cause irreversible pulpal damage to vital teeth when the air pressure employed is equal or smaller than 0.3 MPa. PMID:27599621

  11. Chlorhexidine Preserves Dentin Bond in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, M. R. O.; Carvalho, R. M.; de Goes, M. F.; di Hipólito, V.; Geraldeli, S.; Tay, F. R.; Pashley, D. H.; Tjäderhane, L.

    2008-01-01

    Loss of hybrid layer integrity compromises resin-dentin bond stability. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may be partially responsible for hybrid layer degradation. Since chlorhexidine inhibits MMPs, we hypothesized that chlorhexidine would decelerate the loss of resin-dentin bonds. Class I preparations in extracted third molars were sectioned into two halves. One half was customarily restored (etch-and-rinse adhesive/resin composite), and the other was treated with 2% chlorhexidine after being acid-etched before restoration. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva with/without protease inhibitors. Microtensile bond strengths and failure mode distribution under SEM were analyzed immediately after specimens' preparation and 6 months later. With chlorhexidine, significantly better preservation of bond strength was observed after 6 months; protease inhibitors in the storage medium had no effect. Failure analysis showed significantly less failure in the hybrid layer with chlorhexidine, compared with controls after 6 months. In conclusion, this in vitro study suggests that chlorhexidine might be useful for the preservation of dentin bond strength. PMID:17189470

  12. Radiopacities in dentine under amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rudolphy, M P; van Amerongen, J P; ten Cate, J M

    1994-01-01

    Radiopacities, caused by tin or zinc deposits in partly demineralized dental tissue, are frequently seen under amalgam restorations. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent these radiopaque areas could be identified by Caries Detector (1% acid red in propylene glycol) which is claimed to stain the irreversibly demineralized dentine. Twenty-eight extracted teeth showing radiopacities under amalgam fillings were selected. The restorations were removed, and Caries Detector was applied. Caries was excavated until the dentine did no longer stain with the Caries Detector. Standardized radiographs were taken at different stages. In all teeth the radiopaque areas stained with the Caries Detector. Visual inspection of the radiographs, taken after excavation, revealed that the radiopacities had disappeared completely in 6 teeth; in 5 teeth a very small part of the radiopaque area remained; in 17 teeth the cavity floor appeared as a thin white line on X-ray. Overall, line scan analysis confirmed the data obtained by visual observation. The residual radiopacities and radiopaque lines were a very small fraction of the initial radiopacities. Therefore, it is concluded that the radiopaque zone under amalgam fillings represents almost entirely an area of irreversibly demineralized dentine as indicated by the Caries Detector.

  13. In vitro quality testing of dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Oilo, G; Austrheim, E K

    1993-08-01

    A tensile and a shear bond strength test are compared, using two well-known and two more recently marketed dentin adhesive systems: Gluma (Bayer), Scotchbond 2 (3M), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M), and Syntac (Vivadent). The adhesives were used to bond composite resins to the buccal surface of human third molars. Specimens stored for 24 h before testing did not show significant differences between bond strength values obtained by either the tensile or the shear test method for any of the materials. The bond strength of thermocycled specimens did not differ for Gluma, was significantly lower for Scotchbond 2, and significantly higher for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Syntac. SEM observations showed increasing amounts of cohesive failure in resin with increasing bond strength values. Cohesive fractures in dentin were also observed. It is concluded that either the tensile or the shear test method can be used for quality testing of dentin adhesives. Thermocycling may provide interesting information about the quality of a bond.

  14. Glycosaminoglycan chain of dentin sialoprotein proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Q; Sun, Y; Prasad, M; Wang, X; Yamoah, A K; Li, Y; Feng, J; Qin, C

    2010-08-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is processed into dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein. A molecular variant of rat DSP, referred to as "HMW-DSP", has been speculated to be a proteoglycan form of DSP. To determine if HMW-DSP is the proteoglycan form of DSP and to identify the glycosaminoglycan side-chain attachment site(s), we further characterized HMW-DSP. Chondroitinase ABC treatment reduced the migration rate for portions of rat HMW-DSP to the level of DSP. Disaccharide analysis showed that rat HMW-DSP contains glycosaminoglycan chains made of chondroitin-4-sulfate and has an average of 31-32 disaccharides/mol. These observations confirmed that HMW-DSP is the proteoglycan form of DSP (renamed "DSP-PG"). Edman degradation and mass spectrometric analyses of tryptic peptides from rat DSP-PG, along with substitution analyses of candidate Ser residues in mouse DSPP, confirmed that 2 glycosaminoglycan chains are attached to Ser(241) and Ser(253) in the rat, or Ser(242) and Ser(254) in the mouse DSPP sequence.

  15. Caries-resistant bonding layer in dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-Na; Hu, Lin; Jiao, Kai; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-Juan; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The present study examined the mechanism for caries resistance and the pulp responses in vital teeth following the use of the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique. Dentin adhesives were applied to the surface of sound dentin disks in 4 experimental groups: non-antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (N-G), non-antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (N-H), antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (A-G), antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (A-H). The depth of demineralization induced by biological or chemical demineralization models was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Pulp responses of vital dog’s teeth to the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique were evaluated using light microscopy. Depth of demineralization was significantly affected by “adhesive type” and “intensity of adhesive displacement” for biological demineralization. For chemical demineralization, only “intensity of adhesive displacement” showed significant influence on lesion depth. Pulp response of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa groups showed only moderate disorganization of the odontoblast layer at 24 hours that completely re-organized after 3 weeks. Augmented-pressure adhesive displacement improves the caries resistance property of bonded dentin and does not cause irreversible pulpal damage to vital teeth when the air pressure employed is equal or smaller than 0.3 MPa.

  16. Cigarette smoke affects bonding to dentin.

    PubMed

    Almeida e Silva, Junio S; de Araujo, Edson Medeiro; Araujo, Elito

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (muTBS) of composite resin bonded to dentin that had been contaminated by cigarette smoke. Ten extracted unerupted human third molars were used: Six molars were prepared for muTBS testing, while the other four molars were assigned to pre- and post-etching scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. The 20 specimens obtained from the 10 coronal portions were distributed into two experimental groups so that each tooth served as its own control. Group 1 underwent a daily toothbrushing simulation and exposure to a smoking simulation chamber, while Group 2 received only a daily simulated toothbrushing. Student's t-test demonstrated that Group 1 samples demonstrated significantly lower bond strength (49.58 MPa) than Group 2 samples (58.48 MPa). Pre and postetching SEM analysis revealed the presence of contaminants on the dentinal surfaces of the Group 1 specimens. It was concluded that contamination by cigarette smoke decreases the bond strength between dentin and composite resin.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel C C M; Andrade, Ana K M; Montes, Marcos A J R

    2009-09-01

    This bibliographic review provides a general view of the etiology, characteristics and treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity, so that professionals can use this information in the therapeutic management of this clinical condition. For this purpose, the authors have analyzed whole texts of relevant articles on the subject. This study showed that the predisposing factors associated with the causes of dentinal hypersensitivity must be controlled or eliminated, by educating the patient regarding the excessive intake of acidic food, as well as providing guidance on the proper tooth brushing technique and analysis of occlusion. Effective treatment must be preceded by a proper diagnosis, established after the exclusion of any other possible causes of the pain. These cases must be managed efficiently, quickly and permanently. The availability of a wide variety of treatment could be an indicator that there is still no effective desensitizing agent to completely resolve the patient's discomfort, or that it is difficult to treat, irrespective of the available treatment options. Even with the large number of published studies, it has not been possible to reach a consensus about the product that represents the gold standard in the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity. PMID:19776498

  18. Caries-resistant bonding layer in dentin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-Na; Hu, Lin; Jiao, Kai; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-Juan; Tay, Franklin R; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the mechanism for caries resistance and the pulp responses in vital teeth following the use of the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique. Dentin adhesives were applied to the surface of sound dentin disks in 4 experimental groups: non-antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (N-G), non-antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (N-H), antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (A-G), antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (A-H). The depth of demineralization induced by biological or chemical demineralization models was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Pulp responses of vital dog's teeth to the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique were evaluated using light microscopy. Depth of demineralization was significantly affected by "adhesive type" and "intensity of adhesive displacement" for biological demineralization. For chemical demineralization, only "intensity of adhesive displacement" showed significant influence on lesion depth. Pulp response of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa groups showed only moderate disorganization of the odontoblast layer at 24 hours that completely re-organized after 3 weeks. Augmented-pressure adhesive displacement improves the caries resistance property of bonded dentin and does not cause irreversible pulpal damage to vital teeth when the air pressure employed is equal or smaller than 0.3 MPa. PMID:27599621

  19. Effect of high energy X-ray irradiation on the nano-mechanical properties of human enamel and dentine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue; Zhang, Jing Yang; Cheng, Iek Ka; Li, Ji Yao

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for malignancies in the head and neck can cause common complications that can result in tooth damage that are also known as radiation caries. The aim of this study was to examine damage to the surface topography and calculate changes in friction behavior and the nano-mechanical properties (elastic modulus, nanohardness and friction coefficient) of enamel and dentine from extracted human third molars caused by exposure to radiation. Enamel and dentine samples from 50 human third molars were randomly assigned to four test groups or a control group. The test groups were exposed to high energy X-rays at 2 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 days (10 Gy group), 15 days (30 Gy group), 25 days (50 Gy group), 35 days (70 Gy group); the control group was not exposed. The nanohardness, elastic modulus, and friction coefficient were analyzed using a Hysitron Triboindenter. The nano-mechanical properties of both enamel and dentine showed significant dose-response relationships. The nanohardness and elastic modulus were most variable between 30-50 Gy, while the friction coefficient was most variable between 0-10 Gy for dentine and 30-50 Gy for enamel. After exposure to X-rays, the fracture resistance of the teeth clearly decreased (rapidly increasing friction coefficient with increasing doses under the same load), and they were more fragile. These nano-mechanical changes in dental hard tissue may increase the susceptibility to caries. Radiotherapy caused nano-mechanical changes in dentine and enamel that were dose related. The key doses were 30-50 Gy and the key time points occurred during the 15th-25th days of treatment, which is when application of measures to prevent radiation caries should be considered.

  20. Effects of Simulated Functional Loading Conditions on Dentin, Composite, and Laminate Structures

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mary P.; Teitelbaum, Heather K.; Eick, J. David; Williams, Karen B.

    2008-01-01

    Use of composite restorations continues to increase, tempered by more potential problems when placed in posterior dentition. Thus, it is essential to understand how these materials function under stress-bearing clinical conditions. Since mastication is difficult to replicate in the laboratory, cyclic loading is frequently used within in vitro evaluations but often employs traditional fatigue testing, which typically does not simulate occlusal loading because higher stresses and loading frequencies are used, so failure mechanisms may be different. The present investigation utilized relevant parameters (specimen size; loading frequency) to assess the effects of cyclic loading on flexural mechanical properties and fracture morphology of (coronal) dentin, composite, and dentin-adhesive-composite “laminate” structures. Incremental monitoring of flexural modulus on individual beams over 60,000 loading cycles revealed a gradual increase across materials; post-hoc comparisons indicated statistical significance only for 1 versus 60k cycles. Paired specimens were tested (one exposed to 60k loading cycles, one to static loading only), and comparisons of flexural modulus and strength showed statistically significantly higher values for cyclically-loaded specimens across materials, with no observable differences in fracture morphology. Localized reorganization of dentin collagen and polymer chains could have increased flexural modulus and strength during cyclic loading, which may have implications toward the life and failure mechanisms of clinical restorations and underlying tooth structure. PMID:18823019

  1. A new improved protocol for in vitro intratubular dentinal bacterial contamination for antimicrobial endodontic tests: standardization and validation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Flaviana Bombarda; ARIAS, Marcela Paola Castro; MALIZA, Amanda Garcia Alves; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro; GRAEFF, Márcia Sirlene Zardin; AMOROSO-SILVA, Pablo Andrés; MIDENA, Raquel Zanin; de MORAES, Ivaldo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare three methods of intratubular contamination that simulate endodontic infections using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Material and Methods Two pre-existing models of dentinal contamination were used to induce intratubular infection (groups A and B). These methods were modified in an attempt to improve the model (group C). Among the modifications it may be included: specimen contamination for five days, ultrasonic bath with BHI broth after specimen sterilization, use of E. faecalis during the exponential growth phase, greater concentration of inoculum, and two cycles of centrifugation on alternate days with changes of culture media. All specimens were longitudinally sectioned and stained with of LIVE/DEAD® for 20 min. Specimens were assessed using CLSM, which provided images of the depth of viable bacterial proliferation inside the dentinal tubules. Additionally, three examiners used scores to classify the CLSM images according to the following parameters: homogeneity, density, and depth of the bacterial contamination inside the dentinal tubules. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests were used to evaluate the live and dead cells rates, and the scores obtained. Results The contamination scores revealed higher contamination levels in group C when compared with groups A and B (p<0.05). No differences were observed between group A and B (p>0.05). The volume of live cells in group C was higher than in groups A and B (p<0.05). Conclusion The new protocol for intratubular infection resulted in high and uniform patterns of bacterial contamination and higher cell viability in all specimens when compared with the current methods. PMID:26200524

  2. Identification of full-length dentin matrix protein 1 in dentin and bone.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingzhen; Maciejewska, Izabela; Sun, Yao; Peng, Tao; Qin, Disheng; Lu, Yongbo; Bonewald, Lynda; Butler, William T; Feng, Jian; Qin, Chunlin

    2008-05-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) has been identified in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of dentin and bone as the processed NH(2)-terminal and COOH-terminal fragment. However, the full-length form of DMP1 has not been identified in these tissues. The focus of this investigation was to search for the intact full-length DMP1 in dentin and bone. We used two types of anti-DMP1 antibodies to identify DMP1: one type specifically recognizes the NH(2)-terminal region and the other type is only reactive to the COOH-terminal region of the DMP1 amino acid sequence. An approximately 105-kDa protein, extracted from the ECM of rat dentin and bone, was recognized by both types of antibodies; and the migration rate of this protein was identical to the recombinant mouse full-length DMP1 made in eukaryotic cells. We concluded that this approximately 105-kDa protein is the full-length form of DMP1, which is considerably less abundant than its processed fragments in the ECM of dentin and bone. We also detected the full-length form of DMP1 and its processed fragments in the extract of dental pulp/odontoblast complex dissected from rat teeth. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis showed that in MC3T3-E1 cells the NH(2)-terminal and COOH-terminal fragments of DMP1 are distributed differently. Our findings indicate that the majority of DMP1 must be cleaved within the cells that synthesize it and that minor amounts of uncleaved DMP1 molecules are secreted into the ECM of dentin and bone.

  3. Effects of dentin surface treatments on the fracture toughness and tensile bond strength of a dentin-composite adhesive interface.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Pilliar, R M

    1994-09-01

    It has been proposed that the fracture toughness test provides an appropriate method for assessing the fracture resistance of the dentin-composite interface. The plane-strain fracture toughness test was therefore applied to a dentin-composite interface, with use of a specific dentinal adhesive, so that the effects of various dentin surface treatments on dentin-bond integrity could be studied. Interfacial fracture toughness (KIC) values were determined following 24h and 180 days of specimen aging in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Tensile bond strength (TBS) results following 24-hour aging were also obtained for comparison with the 24-hour KIC results. In general, the fracture resistance of the dentin-composite interface was highest when the dentin surface was conditioned with acid but not air-dried, intermediate when the dentin surface was conditioned with acid and subsequently air-dried, and lowest when the dentin was not conditioned with acid. The tensile bond strength results differed from the fracture toughness results in indicating differences in surface preparation effects and the type of interfacial failure observed.

  4. The nano-hardness and elastic modulus of sound deciduous canine dentin and young premolar dentin--preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Y; Marshall, G W

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the nano-hardness and elastic modulus among deciduous and permanent dentin, buccal and lingual sides, incisal, center and cervical areas, and outer, middle and inner layers. Three premolars and three deciduous canines were bucco lingually (BL) sectioned, and three deciduous canines were mesio-distally (MD) sectioned parallel to the long axis at the center of the tooth. Hardness (H), plastic hardness (PH) and Young's modulus (Y) were measured using a nano-indentation tester. The H, PH and Y values from the deciduous canine dentin were significantly lower than those from the premolar dentin at most sites. For deciduous canine dentin, the H and PH values of the MD sectioned dentin were significantly higher than those of the BL sectioned dentin in many layers of many areas. Generally deciduous canine dentin had H, PH and Y values that decreased from outer toward the inner layers and significant differences were obtained among the layers in many areas. For MD sectioned deciduous canine and BD sectioned premolar dentin, the H, PH and Y values of the cervical area were significantly lower than those of the incisal and center areas in many layers. It is possible that optimum bonding may require different treatments for deciduous and permanent dentin and perhaps also for different intratooth locations.

  5. Mercury Induces the Externalization of Phosphatidyl-Serine in Human Renal Proximal Tubule (HK-2) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Dwayne J.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2007-01-01

    The underlying mechanism for the biological activity of inorganic mercury is believed to be the high affinity binding of divalent mercuric cations to thiols of sulfhydryl groups of proteins. A comprehensive analysis of published data indicates that inorganic mercury is one of the most environmentally abundant toxic metals, is a potent and selective nephrotoxicant that preferentially accumulates in the kidneys, and is known to produce cellular injury in the kidneys. Binding sites are present in the proximal tubules, and it is in the epithelial cells of these tubules that toxicants such as inorganic mercury are reabsorbed. This can affect the enzymatic activity and the structure of various proteins. Mercury may alter protein and membrane structure and function in the epithelial cells and this alteration may result in long term residual effects. This research was therefore designed to evaluate the dose-response relationship in human renal proximal tubule (HK-2) cells following exposure to inorganic mercury. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay for cell viability. The Annexin-V assay was performed by flow cytometry to determine the extent of phosphatidylserine externalization. Cells were exposed to mercury for 24 hours at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 μg/mL. Cytotoxicity experiments yielded a LD50 value of 4.65 ± 0.6 μg/mL indicating that mercury is highly toxic. The percentages of cells undergoing early apoptosis were 0.70 ± 0.03%, 10.0 ± 0.02%, 11.70 ± 0.03%, 15.20 ± 0.02%, 16.70 ± 0.03%, 24.20 ±0.02%, and 25.60 ± 0.04% at treatments of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 μg/mL of mercury respectively. This indicates a dose-response relationship with regard to mercury-induced cytotoxicity and the externalization of phosphatidylserine in HK-2 cells. PMID:17617677

  6. Effects of Chemical Cross-linkers on Caries-affected Dentin Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, G.V.; Yamauchi, M.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    The achievement of a strong and stable bond between composite resin and dentin remains a challenge in restorative dentistry. Over the past two decades, dental materials have been substantially improved, with better handling and bonding characteristics. However, little attention has been paid to the contribution of collagen structure/stability to bond strength. We hypothesized that the induction of cross-linking in dentin collagen improves dentin collagen stability and bond strength. This study investigated the effects of glutaraldehyde- and grape seed extract-induced cross-linking on the dentin bond strengths of sound and caries-affected dentin, and on the stability of dentin collagen. Our results demonstrated that the application of chemical cross-linking agents to etched dentin prior to bonding procedures significantly enhanced the dentin bond strengths of caries-affected and sound dentin. Glutaraldehyde and grape seed extract significantly increased dentin collagen stability in sound and caries-affected dentin, likely via distinct mechanisms. PMID:19892915

  7. Evaluation of mineral content of dentin prepared by erbium, chromium:yttrium scandium gallium garnet laser.

    PubMed

    Secilmis, Asli; Altintas, Subutayhan; Usumez, Aslihan; Berk, Gizem

    2008-10-01

    Laser etching has an effect on the mineral content of dentin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin prepared at three different power settings with an erbium, chromium:yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser. The enamel of five, lower, wisdom, molar teeth was removed to expose the dentin surface. Four dentin slabs were obtained, then each tooth was randomly divided into four portions (groups 1 W, 2 W, 3 W and control) so that we could evaluate the effect of laser treatment. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser used for the study had a pulse duration of 140 micros, a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz and a power output range of 0 W to 6 W. Laser energy was delivered through a fiberoptic system to a sapphire tip terminal 6 mm long and 600 microm in diameter, using a non-contact mode. The levels of five elements: magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), potassium (K), and sodium (Na), in each slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). There were significant differences between the groups (1 W, 2 W, 3 W and control) for Ca, Mg, Na, P and Ca/P ratio (P<0.05); however, there were no significant differences for K (P=0.43). Laser treatment at 1 W significantly affected the mean percentage weight of all element groups except K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photographs indicated that the surface irregularities increased with increasing power setting. PMID:17952486

  8. Effect of Adhesive Cementation Strategies on the Bonding of Y-TZP to Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mll; Campos, F; Bergoli, C D; Bottino, M A; Özcan, M; Souza, Roa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive strategies on the adhesion of zirconia to dentin using conventional and self-adhesive cements and their corresponding adhesive resins. The occlusal parts of human molars (N=80) were sectioned, exposing the dentin. The teeth and zirconia cylinders (N=80) (diameter=3.4 mm; height=4 mm) were randomly divided into eight groups according to the factors "surface conditioning" and "cement type" (n=10 per group). One conventional cement (CC: RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) and one self-adhesive cement (SA: RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) and their corresponding adhesive resin (for CC, Adper Single Bond Plus; for SA, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-SU) were applied on dentin. Zirconia specimens were conditioned either using chairside (CJ: CoJet, 30 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), laboratory silica coating (RC: Rocatec, 110 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), or universal primer (Single Bond Universal-UP). Nonconditioned groups for both cements acted as the control (C). Specimens were stored in water (37°C, 30 days) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing (1 mm/min). Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α=0.05). While surface conditioning significantly affected the SBS values (p=0.0001) (Cdentin compared to the control group, regardless of the type of resin cement used.

  9. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. Results: The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. Conclusion: There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems. PMID:27011738

  10. Dentinal permeability of the dog canine after exposure of a cervical cavity to the beam of a CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Bonin, P; Boivin, R; Poulard, J

    1991-03-01

    The dentinal permeability of the axial wall of a class V cavities in the canine of the dog was analyzed before and after its laser CO2 irradiation at two energy levels: 285 J per cm2 and 570 J per cm2. The sealing of the exposed dentin was verified by means of a pellet of cotton wool placed in contact with the axial wall and on which 20 microliters of a 50 mg per ml solution of noradrenaline was injected with a micrometric syringe. The transdentinal passage of noradrenaline induces a vasoconstriction of the pulp which is attested by a drop in its blood pressure. The absence of any variation in the pulpal pressure is an indication of the sealing to noradrenaline of the dentinal wall irradiated with an energy level of 570 J per cm2. This experimentation illustrates that it is possible to obtain dentinal sealing by means of laser irradiation without affecting the underlying pulp. The quality of this reduction in permeability is dependent upon the different factors which define the energy level.

  11. Bacterial reduction and dentin microhardness after treatment by a pulsed fiber optic delivered Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodis, Harold E.; White, Joel M.; Marshall, Sally J.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the microhardness and extent of bacterial reduction of contaminated dentin following pulsed fiber optic delivered Nd:YAG laser exposure. Knoop hardness was determined before and after laser exposures from 0.3 to 3.0 W and repetition rates of 10 to 30 Hz. Half the sections were covered with an organic black pigment before laser exposure to evaluate the use of the pigment as an initiator to increase laser absorbance on the surface. Repeated measures design was employed to determine the microhardness of cut and polished dentin sections. Additional dentin sections were sterilized by gamma irradiation and then inoculated with B. subtilis, E. coli or B. stearothermophilus. The contaminated sections were exposed to contact delivered Nd:YAG laser. Cultures were obtained from the dentin surfaces and the colony forming units counted. Increased microhardness was found for all laser treatments above the physical modification. Bacterial reduction was obtained but complete sterilization was not.

  12. Voltage clamping single cells in intact malpighian tubules of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Masia, R; Aneshansley, D; Nagel, W; Nachman, R J; Beyenbach, K W

    2000-10-01

    Principal cells of the Malpighian tubule of the yellow fever mosquito were studied with the methods of two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). Intracellular voltage (V(pc)) was -86.7 mV, and input resistance (R(pc)) was 388.5 kOmega (n = 49 cells). In six cells, Ba(2+) (15 mM) had negligible effects on V(pc), but it increased R(pc) from 325.3 to 684.5 kOmega (P < 0.001). In the presence of Ba(2+), leucokinin-VIII (1 microM) increased V(pc) to -101.8 mV (P < 0.001) and reduced R(pc) to 340.2 kOmega (P < 0.002). Circuit analysis yields the following: basolateral membrane resistance, 652. 0 kOmega; apical membrane resistance, 340.2 kOmega; shunt resistance (R(sh)), 344.3 kOmega; transcellular resistance, 992.2 kOmega. The fractional resistance of the apical membrane (0.35) and the ratio of transcellular resistance and R(sh) (3.53) agree closely with values obtained by cable analysis in isolated perfused tubules and confirm the usefulness of TEVC methods in single principal cells of the intact Malpighian tubule. Dinitrophenol (0.1 mM) reversibly depolarized V(pc) from -94.3 to -10.7 mV (P < 0.001) and reversibly increased R(pc) from 412 to 2,879 kOmega (P < 0.001), effects that were duplicated by cyanide (0.3 mM). Significant effects of metabolic inhibition on voltage and resistance suggest a role of ATP in electrogenesis and the maintenance of conductive transport pathways. PMID:10997925

  13. Triacylglycerol metabolism in isolated rat kidney cortex tubules

    PubMed Central

    Wirthensohn, Gabriele; Guder, Walter G.

    1980-01-01

    Triacylglycerol metabolism has been studied in kidney cortex tubules from starved rats, prepared by collagenase treatment. Triacylglycerol was determined by a newly developed fully enzymic method. Incubation of tubules in the absence of fatty acids led to a decrease of endogenous triacylglycerol by about 50% in 1h. Addition of albuminbound oleate or palmitate resulted in a steady increase of tissue triacylglycerol over 2h. The rate of triacylglycerol synthesis was linearly dependent on oleate concentration up to 0.8mm, reaching a saturation at higher concentrations. Triacylglycerol formation from palmitate was less than that from oleate. This difference was qualitatively the same when net synthesis was compared with incorporation of labelled fatty acids. Quantitatively, however, the difference was less with the incorporation technique. Gluconeogenic substrates, which by themselves had no effect on triacylglycerol concentrations, stimulated neutral lipid formation from fatty acids. Glucose and lysine did not have such a stimulatory effect. Inhibition of gluconeogenesis from lactate by mercaptopicolinic acid likewise inhibited triacylglycerol formation. This inhibitory effect was seen with oleate as well as with oleate plus lactate. When [2-14C]lactate was used the incorporation of label into triacylglycerol was found in the glycerol moiety exclusively. Addition of dl-β-hydroxybutyrate (5mm) to the incubation medium in the presence of oleate or oleate plus lactate led to a significant increase in triacylglycerol formation. In contrast with the gluconeogenic substrates, dl-β-hydroxybutyrate had no stimulatory effect on fatty acid uptake. The results suggest that renal triacylglycerol formation is a quantitatively important metabolic process. The finding that gluconeogenic substrates, but not glucose, increase lipid formation, indicates that the glycerol moiety is formed by glyceroneogenesis in the proximal tubules. The effect of ketone bodies seems to be caused by

  14. Resin–dentin bonds to EDTA-treated vs. acid-etched dentin using ethanol wet-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Sauro, Salvatore; Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fatima Sánchez; Mannocci, Francesco; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.; Watson, Timothy F.; Osorio, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare resin–dentin bond strengths and the micropermeability of hydrophobic vs. hydrophilic resins bonded to acid-etched or EDTA-treated dentin, using the ethanol wet-bonding technique. Methods Flat dentin surfaces from extracted human third molars were conditioned before bonding with: 37% H3PO4 (15 s) or 0.1 M EDTA (60 s). Five experimental resin blends of different hydrophilicities and one commercial adhesive (SBMP: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose) were applied to ethanol wet-dentin (1 min) and light-cured (20 s). The solvated resins were used as primers (50% ethanol/50% comonomers) and their respective neat resins were used as the adhesive. The resin-bonded teeth were stored in distilled water (24 h) and sectioned in beams for microtensile bond strength testing. Modes of failure were examined by stereoscopic light microscopy and SEM. Confocal tandem scanning microscopy (TSM) interfacial characterization and micropermeability were also performed after filling the pulp chamber with 1 wt% aqueous rhodamine-B. Results The most hydrophobic resin 1 gave the lowest bond strength values to acid-etched dentin and all beams failed prematurely when the resin was applied to EDTA-treated dentin. Resins 2 and 3 gave intermediate bond strengths to both conditioned substrates. Resin 4, an acidic hydrophilic resin, gave the highest bond strengths to both EDTA-treated and acid-etched dentin. Resin 5 was the only hydrophilic resin showing poor resin infiltration when applied on acid-etched dentin. Significance The ethanol wet-bonding technique may improve the infiltration of most of the adhesives used in this study into dentin, especially when applied to EDTA-treated dentin. The chemical composition of the resin blends was a determining factor influencing the ability of adhesives to bond to EDTA-treated or 37% H3PO4 acid-etched dentin, when using the ethanol wet-bonding technique in a clinically relevant time period. PMID:20074787

  15. Proteomic analysis of the plasma membrane-movement tubule complex of cowpea mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Paulus W; de Sousa Geraldino Duarte, Priscilla; Bloksma, Hanke; Boeren, Sjef; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus forms tubules constructed from the movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (PD) to achieve cell-to-cell movement of its virions. Similar tubules, delineated by the plasma membrane (PM), are formed protruding from the surface of infected protoplasts. These PM-tubule complexes were isolated from protoplasts by immunoprecipitation and analysed for their protein content by tandem mass spectrometry to identify host proteins with affinity for the movement tubule. Seven host proteins were abundantly present in the PM-tubule complex, including molecular chaperonins and an AAA protein. Members of both protein families have been implicated in establishment of systemic infection. The potential role of these proteins in tubule-guided cell-cell transport is discussed. PMID:26780773

  16. Proteomic analysis of the plasma membrane-movement tubule complex of cowpea mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Paulus W; de Sousa Geraldino Duarte, Priscilla; Bloksma, Hanke; Boeren, Sjef; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus forms tubules constructed from the movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (PD) to achieve cell-to-cell movement of its virions. Similar tubules, delineated by the plasma membrane (PM), are formed protruding from the surface of infected protoplasts. These PM-tubule complexes were isolated from protoplasts by immunoprecipitation and analysed for their protein content by tandem mass spectrometry to identify host proteins with affinity for the movement tubule. Seven host proteins were abundantly present in the PM-tubule complex, including molecular chaperonins and an AAA protein. Members of both protein families have been implicated in establishment of systemic infection. The potential role of these proteins in tubule-guided cell-cell transport is discussed.

  17. Tooth dentin defects reflect genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Vital, S. Opsahl; Gaucher, C.; Bardet, C.; Rowe, P.S.; George, A.; Linglart, A.; Chaussain, C.

    2012-01-01

    Several genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization may manifest during dentin mineralization. Dentin and bone are similar in several aspects, especially pertaining to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which is secreted by well-differentiated odontoblasts and osteoblasts, respectively. However, unlike bone, dentin is not remodelled and is not involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism. In contrast to bone, teeth are accessible tissues with the shedding of deciduous teeth and the extractions of premolars and third molars for orthodontic treatment. The feasibility of obtaining dentin makes this a good model to study biomineralization in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we focus on two genetic diseases that disrupt both bone and dentin mineralization. Hypophosphatemic rickets is related to abnormal secretory proteins involved in the ECM organization of both bone and dentin, as well as in the calcium and phosphate metabolism. Osteogenesis imperfecta affects proteins involved in the local organization of the ECM. In addition, dentin examination permits evaluation of the effects of the systemic treatment prescribed to hypophosphatemic patients during growth. In conclusion, dentin constitutes a valuable tool for better understanding of the pathological processes affecting biomineralization. PMID:22296718

  18. The influence of neuropeptides on Malpighian tubule writhing and its significance for excretion.

    PubMed

    Coast, G M

    1998-01-01

    Diuretic peptides (locustakinin and Locusta-DH) increase the spontaneous contractile activity of visceral muscle fibers associated with Malpighian tubules from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) at concentrations that increase urine production. Muscle activity is shown to assist the flow of material in the tubule lumen, but is not essential for diuresis. Tubule writhing also serves to reduce unstirred layers (USLs) at the basolateral surface of the epithelium and thereby facilitates the excretion of solutes entering the lumen by passive diffusion. PMID:9533634

  19. Effect of Non-Thermal Argon Plasma on Bond Strength of a Self-Etch Adhesive System to NaOCl-Treated Dentin.

    PubMed

    Abreu, João Luiz Bittencourt de; Prado, Maíra; Simão, Renata Antoun; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da; Dias, Katia Regina Hostilio Cervantes

    2016-01-01

    Studies have been showing a decrease of bond strength in dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of non-thermal argon plasma on the bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system to dentin exposed to NaOCl. Thirty-two flat dentin surfaces of bovine incisors were immersed in 2.5% NaOCl for 30 min to simulate the irrigation step during endodontic treatment. The specimens were divided into four groups (n=8), according to the surface treatment: Control (without plasma treatment), AR15 (argon plasma for 15 s), AR30 (argon plasma for 30 s) and AR45 (argon plasma for 45 s). For microtensile bond strength test, 5 specimens were used per group. In each group, the specimens were hybridized with a self-etch adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond) and resin composite buildups were constructed. After 48 h of water storage, specimens were sectioned into sticks (5 per tooth, 25 per group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength test (μTBS) until failure, evaluating failure mode. Three specimens per group were analyzed under FTIR spectroscopy to verify the chemical modifications produced in dentin. μTBS data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tamhane tests (p<0.05). AR30 showed the highest μTBS (20.86±9.0). AR15 (13.81±6.4) and AR45 (11.51±6.8) were statistically similar to control (13.67±8.1). FTIR spectroscopy showed that argon plasma treatment produced chemical modifications in dentin. In conclusion, non-thermal argon plasma treatment for 30 s produced chemical changes in dentin and improved the μTBs of Clearfil SE Bond to NaOCl-treated dentin. PMID:27652709

  20. Effect of Non-Thermal Argon Plasma on Bond Strength of a Self-Etch Adhesive System to NaOCl-Treated Dentin.

    PubMed

    Abreu, João Luiz Bittencourt de; Prado, Maíra; Simão, Renata Antoun; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da; Dias, Katia Regina Hostilio Cervantes

    2016-01-01

    Studies have been showing a decrease of bond strength in dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of non-thermal argon plasma on the bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system to dentin exposed to NaOCl. Thirty-two flat dentin surfaces of bovine incisors were immersed in 2.5% NaOCl for 30 min to simulate the irrigation step during endodontic treatment. The specimens were divided into four groups (n=8), according to the surface treatment: Control (without plasma treatment), AR15 (argon plasma for 15 s), AR30 (argon plasma for 30 s) and AR45 (argon plasma for 45 s). For microtensile bond strength test, 5 specimens were used per group. In each group, the specimens were hybridized with a self-etch adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond) and resin composite buildups were constructed. After 48 h of water storage, specimens were sectioned into sticks (5 per tooth, 25 per group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength test (μTBS) until failure, evaluating failure mode. Three specimens per group were analyzed under FTIR spectroscopy to verify the chemical modifications produced in dentin. μTBS data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tamhane tests (p<0.05). AR30 showed the highest μTBS (20.86±9.0). AR15 (13.81±6.4) and AR45 (11.51±6.8) were statistically similar to control (13.67±8.1). FTIR spectroscopy showed that argon plasma treatment produced chemical modifications in dentin. In conclusion, non-thermal argon plasma treatment for 30 s produced chemical changes in dentin and improved the μTBs of Clearfil SE Bond to NaOCl-treated dentin.

  1. Dentin noncollagenous matrix proteins in familial hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Céline; Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Septier, Dominique; Jehan, Frédéric; Rowe, Peter S; Garabédian, Michèle; Goldberg, Michel; Chaussain-Miller, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Familial hypophosphatemic rickets is transmitted in most cases as an X-linked dominant trait and results from the mutation of the PHEX gene predominantly expressed in osteoblast and odontoblast. Patients with rickets have been reported to display important dentin defects. Our purpose was to explore the structure, composition and distribution of noncollagenous proteins (NCPs) of hypophosphatemic dentin. We collected teeth from 10 hypophosphatemic patients whose mineralization occurred either in a hypophosphatemic environment or in a corrected phosphate and vitamin environment. Teeth were examined by scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. An abnormal distribution (accumulation in interglobular spaces) and cleavage of the NCPs and particularly of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein were observed in deciduous dentin. In contrast, it was close to normal in permanent dentin mineralized under corrected conditions. In conclusion, dentin mineralization in a corrected phosphate and vitamin D environment compensates the adverse effect of PHEX mutation.

  2. Bone Induction by Demineralized Dentin Matrix in Nude Mouse Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the osteoinductive activity of demineralized human dentin matrix for nude mice. Methods: Twenty healthy nude mice weighing about 15 to 20 g were used for study. Demineralized human dentin matrix was prepared and implanted into the dorsal portion of nude mice (subcutaneous), which were sacrificed at two, four, and eight weeks after demineralized dentin matrix grafting and evaluated histologically by H&E and Masson trichrome staining. The specimens were also evaluated histomorphometrically. Results: The demineralized dentin matrix induced bone and cartilage formation independently in soft tissues. Histological examination showed bone-forming cells such as osteoblasts and fibroblasts at two, four, and eight weeks. Conclusion: These results suggest that demineralized human dentin matrix has osteoinductive ability, and is a good alternative to autogenous bone graft materials. PMID:27489810

  3. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin specifically reduces mRNA for the mineralization-related dentin sialophosphoprotein in cultured mouse embryonic molar teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Kiukkonen, Anu . E-mail: Anu.Kiukkonen@helsinki.fi; Sahlberg, Carin; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu; Peltonen, Eija; Partanen, Anna-Maija

    2006-11-01

    Previous studies show that the most toxic dioxin congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), interferes with mineralization of the dental matrices in developing mouse and rat teeth. Culture of mouse embryonic molar teeth with TCDD leads to the failure of enamel to be deposited and dentin to undergo mineralization. Lactationally exposed rats show defectively matured enamel and retardation of dentin mineralization. To see if the impaired mineralization is associated with changes in the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp), Bono1 and/or matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20), thought to be involved in mineralization of the dental hard tissues, we cultured mouse (NMRI) E18 mandibular molars for 3, 5 or 7 days and exposed them to 1 {mu}M TCDD after 2 days of culture. As detected by in situ hybridization of tissue sections, localization and intensity of Bono1 and MMP-20 expression showed no definite difference between the control and exposed tooth explants, suggesting that TCDD does not affect their expression. On the contrary, TCDD reduced or prevented the expression of Dspp in secretory odontoblasts and decreased it in presecretory ameloblasts. The results suggest that the retardation of dentin mineralization by TCDD in mouse molar teeth involves specific interference with Dspp expression.

  4. Histological and three dimensional organizations of lymphoid tubules in normal lymphoid organ of Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Duangsuwan, Pornsawan; Phoungpetchara, Ittipon; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Sobhon, Prasert

    2008-04-01

    The normal lymphoid organ of Penaeus monodon (which tested negative for WSSV and YHV) was composed of two parts: lymphoid tubules and interstitial spaces, which were permeated with haemal sinuses filled with large numbers of haemocytes. There were three permanent types of cells present in the wall of lymphoid tubules: endothelial, stromal and capsular cells. Haemocytes penetrated the endothelium of the lymphoid tubule's wall to reside among the fixed cells. The outermost layer of the lymphoid tubule was covered by a network of fibers embedded in a PAS-positive extracellular matrix, which corresponded to a basket-like network that covered all the lymphoid tubules as visualized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Argyrophilic reticular fibers surrounded haemal sinuses and lymphoid tubules. Together they formed the scaffold that supported the lymphoid tubule. Using vascular cast and SEM, the three dimensional structure of the subgastric artery that supplies each lobe of the lymphoid organ was reconstructed. This artery branched into highly convoluted and blind-ending terminal capillaries, each forming the lumen of a lymphoid tubule around which haemocytes and other cells aggregated to form a cuff-like wall. Stromal cells which form part of the tubular scaffold were immunostained for vimentin. Examination of the whole-mounted lymphoid organ, immunostained for vimentin, by confocal microscopy exhibited the highly branching and convoluted lymphoid tubules matching the pattern of the vascular cast observed in SEM.

  5. Identification of new rat dentin proteoglycans utilizing C18 chromatography.

    PubMed

    Steinfort, J; van de Stadt, R; Beertsen, W

    1994-09-01

    Although only one small PG has been identified in dentin until now, a preliminary investigation has shown indications of the presence of several new proteoglycans (PGs) in rat incisor dentin. The aim of the present investigation was to isolate and characterize these PGs, which were labeled with 35S to facilitate the analysis. C18 chromatography resolved five dentin PGs. Based on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their size varied from 100 to 400 kDa. The core proteins of the first four PGs appeared as 25, 40, 70, and 115 kDa bands. They stained turquoise with Stains All but did not stain with Coomassie Brilliant Blue. The core protein of the fifth PG appeared at about 45 kDa. This core protein stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue but not with Stains All. In all PGs, the glycosaminoglycans consisted mainly of chondroitin 4-sulfate. To investigate their incorporation into predentin (young dentin that is not yet mineralized) and dentin, rat dentin PGs were pulse-labeled by injecting rats with [35S]sulfate at 5, 28, 55, or 177 h before killing the animals. Radiolabeling of predentin PGs was highest after 5 h and decreased rapidly (76%) over the next 50 h. In dentin PGs, a large percentage (34%) of the final quantity of incorporated 35S (at 177 h) was already present at 5 h. C18 chromatography of dentin PGs for each of the four time intervals showed similar 35S distribution patterns representing all five PGs, whereas the predentin appeared to contain mainly the fifth PG. This study demonstrates the existence of several apparently novel PGs in dentin that can be resolved by the use of a new method. These PGs were found in mineralized dentin and are thought to be rapidly transported toward the mineralization front. Part of the predentin PGs, on the other hand, seems to be lost as mineralization proceeds.

  6. Astacin proteases cleave dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) to generate dentin phosphoprotein (Dpp).

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Simmer, James P; Hu, Jan C-C; Richardson, Amelia S; Yamakoshi, Fumiko; Yamakoshi, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) is critical for proper dentin biomineralization because genetic defects in DSPP cause dentin dysplasia type II and dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III. Dspp is processed by proteases into smaller subunits; the initial cleavage releases dentin phosphoprotein (Dpp). We incubated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides containing the amino acid context of the Dpp cleavage site (YEFDGKSMQGDDPN, designated Dspp-FRET) or a mutant version of that context (YEFDGKSIEGDDPN, designated mutDspp-FRET) with BMP-1, MEP1A, MEP1B, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, MT3-MMP, Klk4, MMP-20, plasmin, or porcine Dpp and characterized the peptide cleavage products. Only BMP-1, MEP1A, and MEP1B cleaved Dspp-FRET at the G-D peptide bond that releases Dpp from Dspp in vivo. We isolated Dspp proteoglycan from dentin power and incubated it with the three enzymes that cleaved Dspp-FRET at the G-D bond. In each case, the released Dpp domain was isolated, and its N-terminus was characterized by Edman degradation. BMP-1 and MEP1A both cleaved native Dspp at the correct site to generate Dpp, making both these enzymes prime candidates for the protease that cleaves Dspp in vivo. MEP1B was able to degrade Dpp when the Dpp was at sufficiently high concentration to deplete free calcium ion concentration. Immunohistochemistry of developing porcine molars demonstrated that astacins are expressed by odontoblasts, a result that is consistent with RT-PCR analyses. We conclude that during odontogenesis, astacins in the predentin matrix cleave Dspp before the DDPN sequence at the N-terminus of Dpp to release Dpp from the parent Dspp protein.

  7. A dynamic paracellular pathway serves diuresis in mosquito Malpighian tubules.

    PubMed

    Beyenbach, Klaus W

    2012-07-01

    Female mosquitoes gorge on vertebrate blood, a rich nutrient source for developing eggs, but gorging meals increase the risk of predation. Mosquitoes are quick to reduce the flight payload with a potent diuresis. Diuretic peptides of the insect kinin family induce a tenfold reduction in the paracellular resistance of Malpighian tubules and increase the paracellular permeation of Cl(-), the counterion of the transepithelial secretion of Na(+) and K(+). As a result, the transepithelial secretion of NaCl and KCl and water increases. Insect kinins signal the opening of the paracellular pathway via G protein-coupled receptors and the elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)], which leads to the reorganization of the cytoskeleton associated with the septate junction (SJ). The reorganization may affect the septate junctional proteins that control the barrier and permselectivity properties of the paracellular pathway. The proteins involved in the embryonic formation of the SJ and in epithelial polarization are largely known for ectodermal epithelia, but the proteins that form and mediate the dynamic functions of the SJ in Malpighian tubules remain to be determined.

  8. Adenosine, type 1 receptors: role in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Welch, William J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine type 1 receptor (A1-AR) antagonists induce diuresis and natriuresis in experimental animals and humans. Much of this effect is due to inhibition of A1-ARs in the proximal tubule, which is responsible for 60–70% of the reabsorption of filtered Na+ and fluid. Intratubular application of receptor antagonists indicates that A1-AR mediates a portion of Na+ uptake in PT and PT cells, via multiple transport systems, including Na+/H+ exchanger-3 (NHE3), Na+/PO4− co-transporter and Na+-dependent glucose transporter, SGLT. Renal microperfusion and recollection studies have shown that fluid reabsorption is reduced by A1-AR antagonists and is lower in A1-AR KO mice., compared to WT mice. Absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) measured by free-flow micropuncture is equivocal, with studies that show either lower APR or similar APR in A1-AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Inhibition of A1-ARs lowers elevated blood pressure in models of salt-sensitive hypertension, partially due to their effects in the proximal tubule. PMID:25345761

  9. Norepinephrines effect on adenosine transport in the proximal straight tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Barfuss, D.W.; McCann, W.P.; Katholi, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of norepinephrine on C/sup 14/-adenosine transport in the rabbit proximal tubule (S/sub 2/) was studied. The transepithelial transport of adenosine (0.02 mM0 from lumin to bathing solution was measured by its rate of appearance (J/sub A/) in the bathing solution and by its disappearances (J/sub D/) from the luminal fluid. Norepinephrine (0.24 ..mu..M) was added to the bathing solution after a control flux period. After three samples from the experiment period the tubules were quickly harvested and the cellular concentration of C/sup 14/-adenosine was determined. The high cellular adenosine concentration and th marked difference in adenosine appearance rate in the bathing solution compared to the luminal disappearance rate indicates the absorbed adenosine is trapped in the cells. This trapping may be due to adenosine metabolism or difficulty of crossing the basolateral membrane. Whichever is the case, norepinephrine appears to stimulate movement of adenosine or its metabolites into the bathing solution across the basolateral membrane.

  10. Cell osmotic water permeability of isolated rabbit proximal convoluted tubules.

    PubMed

    Carpi-Medina, P; González, E; Whittembury, G

    1983-05-01

    Cell osmotic water permeability, Pcos, of the peritubular aspect of the proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) was measured from the time course of cell volume changes subsequent to the sudden imposition of an osmotic gradient, delta Cio, across the cell membrane of PCT that had been dissected and mounted in a chamber. The possibilities of artifact were minimized. The bath was vigorously stirred, the solutions could be 95% changed within 0.1 s, and small osmotic gradients (10-20 mosM) were used. Thus, the osmotically induced water flow was a linear function of delta Cio and the effect of the 70-microns-thick unstirred layers was negligible. In addition, data were extrapolated to delta Cio = 0. Pcos for PCT was 41.6 (+/- 3.5) X 10(-4) cm3 X s-1 X osM-1 per cm2 of peritubular basal area. The standing gradient osmotic theory for transcellular osmosis is incompatible with this value. Published values for Pcos of PST are 25.1 X 10(-4), and for the transepithelial permeability Peos values are 64 X 10(-4) for PCT and 94 X 10(-4) for PST, in the same units. These results indicate that there is room for paracellular water flow in both nephron segments and that the magnitude of the transcellular and paracellular water flows may vary from one segment of the proximal tubule to another. PMID:6846543

  11. Acid-base transport by the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Lara A.; Boron, Walter F.; Zhou, Yuehan

    2015-01-01

    Each day, the kidneys filter 180 L of blood plasma, equating to some 4,300 mmol of the major blood buffer, bicarbonate (HCO3−). The glomerular filtrate enters the lumen of the proximal tubule (PT), and the majority of filtered HCO3− is reclaimed along the early (S1) and convoluted (S2) portions of the PT in a manner coupled to the secretion of H+ into the lumen. The PT also uses the secreted H+ to titrate non-HCO3− buffers in the lumen, in the process creating “new HCO3−” for transport into the blood. Thus, the PT – along with more distal renal segments – is largely responsible for regulating plasma [HCO3−]. In this review we first focus on the milestone discoveries over the past 50+ years that define the mechanism and regulation of acid-base transport by the proximal tubule. Further on in the review, we will summarize research still in progress from our laboratory, work that addresses the problem of how the PT is able to finely adapt to acid–base disturbances by rapidly sensing changes in basolateral levels of HCO3− and CO2 (but not pH), and thereby to exert tight control over the acid–base composition of the blood plasma. PMID:21170887

  12. ADAM17 substrate release in proximal tubule drives kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Muthu, Muthu Lakshmi; Kaeppler, Jakob; Sun, Xiaoming; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Chalaris, Athena; Rose-John, Stefan; Wong, Eitan; Sagi, Irit; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Rennke, Helmut; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis following kidney injury is an unresolved health problem and causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In a study into its molecular mechanism, we identified essential causative features. Acute or chronic kidney injury causes sustained elevation of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17); of its cleavage-activated proligand substrates, in particular of pro-TNFα and the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (pro-AREG); and of the substrates’ receptors. As a consequence, EGFR is persistently activated and triggers the synthesis and release of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, resulting in macrophage/neutrophil ingress and fibrosis. ADAM17 hypomorphic mice, specific ADAM17 inhibitor–treated WT mice, or mice with inducible KO of ADAM17 in proximal tubule (Slc34a1-Cre) were significantly protected against these effects. In vitro, in proximal tubule cells, we show that AREG has unique profibrotic actions that are potentiated by TNFα-induced AREG cleavage. In vivo, in acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, fibrosis) patients, soluble AREG is indeed highly upregulated in human urine, and both ADAM17 and AREG expression show strong positive correlation with fibrosis markers in related kidney biopsies. Our results indicate that targeting of the ADAM17 pathway represents a therapeutic target for human kidney fibrosis. PMID:27642633

  13. ADAM17 substrate release in proximal tubule drives kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Muthu, Muthu Lakshmi; Kaeppler, Jakob; Sun, Xiaoming; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Chalaris, Athena; Rose-John, Stefan; Wong, Eitan; Sagi, Irit; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Rennke, Helmut; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis following kidney injury is an unresolved health problem and causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In a study into its molecular mechanism, we identified essential causative features. Acute or chronic kidney injury causes sustained elevation of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17); of its cleavage-activated proligand substrates, in particular of pro-TNFα and the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (pro-AREG); and of the substrates’ receptors. As a consequence, EGFR is persistently activated and triggers the synthesis and release of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors, resulting in macrophage/neutrophil ingress and fibrosis. ADAM17 hypomorphic mice, specific ADAM17 inhibitor–treated WT mice, or mice with inducible KO of ADAM17 in proximal tubule (Slc34a1-Cre) were significantly protected against these effects. In vitro, in proximal tubule cells, we show that AREG has unique profibrotic actions that are potentiated by TNFα-induced AREG cleavage. In vivo, in acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, fibrosis) patients, soluble AREG is indeed highly upregulated in human urine, and both ADAM17 and AREG expression show strong positive correlation with fibrosis markers in related kidney biopsies. Our results indicate that targeting of the ADAM17 pathway represents a therapeutic target for human kidney fibrosis.

  14. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  15. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima Anto Nia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2009-01-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 80x60 points with steps of 20 mum were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the CaP ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers.

  16. Effect of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with 405-nm diode laser irradiation on bonding of resin to pulp chamber dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, A.; Kato, J.; Kameyama, A.; Hirai, Y.; Oda, Y.

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide on bonding of resin to pulp chamber dentin. Extracted bovine anterior teeth were allocated to three groups of ten teeth each. The coronal labial pulp chamber dentin was exposed and bleached with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with titanium dioxide with 405-nm diode laser irradiation for 15 min (Group 1); 30% hydrogen peroxide with halogen lamp irradiation for 15 min (Group 2); and distilled water for 15 min (Group 3). After bleaching, the pulp chamber dentin was prepared for composite resin bonding and the interface between the resin and dentin was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and failure patterns were determined. The μTBS values (mean ± SD) were: 17.28 ± 5.79 MPa ( n = 36), 0 MPa, and 26.50 ± 9.83 MPa ( n = 36) in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The μTBS in Group 3 was significantly higher than that in Group 1 ( P < 0.05). Hybrid layers and resin tags were clearly observed at the interface in Groups 1 and 3, but not in Group 2. Adhesive failure was mainly observed in Group 1, whereas dentin failure was the main failure pattern in Group 3.

  17. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Soares, Luís Eduardo; Do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima Antônia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abraha~O.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 80×60 points with steps of 20 μm were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the Ca/P ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers.

  18. Cyclic testing of porcelain laminiate veneers on superficial enamel and dentin: Pressed vs. conventional layered porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawde, Shweta

    Statement of Problem: Clinicians are inclined towards more aggressive teeth preparations to accommodate the thickness of the veneering material. The principle of conservative tooth preparation is compromised. Purpose: By using a conservative approach to treatment with porcelain veneers, long-lasting, esthetic and functional results may be achieved. Sacrificing as little tooth structure as possible and conserving the supporting tissues will facilitate prospective patients. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human maxillary and mandibular canines were selected. The teeth were divided into one of two groups (pressable and stackable) and further subdivided according to tooth substrate (all-enamel or mixed enamel-dentin exposure). Twenty canine teeth were allotted to the pressable veneer group and 20 were allotted to the stackable veneer group. Of the 20 teeth in the pressable group, all were pressed with a lithium disilicate ceramic system (IPS e.max Press), 10 with labial tooth reduction of 0.3-0.5 mm maintaining superficial enamel (PEN) and the remaining 10 teeth with labial veneer reduction of 0.8-1.0 mm exposing superficial dentin (PDN). Of the 20 teeth in the stackable group, all were stacked/ layered with conventional feldspathic porcelain (Fortune; Williams/ Ivoclar); with labial veneer reduction of 0.3-0.5 mm maintaining superficial enamel (SEN) and the remaining 10 teeth with labial veneer reduction of 0.8-1.0 mm exposing superficial dentin (SDN). Silicon putty matrix was fabricated prior to teeth preparation to estimate the teeth reduction. The prepared facial reduction was limited to the incisal edge. No incisal or palatal/lingual reduction was performed. Impressions of the prepared teeth were taken in medium/light-bodied PVS. Master casts were made in Resin Rock. The stackable group specimens were made with fabricating refractory dies and after following the recommended steps of laboratory procedure, stackable veneers were processed. The pressable group

  19. Evaluation of potassium binoxalate gel and Nd:YAG laser in the management of dentinal hypersensitivity: a split-mouth clinical and ESEM study.

    PubMed

    Talesara, Kamlesh; Kulloli, Anita; Shetty, Sharath; Kathariya, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is one of the oldest recorded complaints of discomfort to mankind and yet there appears to be no permanent treatment for this clinical condition. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of potassium binoxalate gel and neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser on dentin hypersensitivity for a period of 9 months. Eighty teeth (20 subjects, 25-55 years old, M = F) were evaluated in a split-mouth design to receive potassium binoxalate (group A, 40 teeth) and Nd:YAG (group B, 40 teeth: 1 W, 10 Hz, and 60 s, irradiated twice). The diameter of output beam was about 300 μm with a distance of 2 mm between laser fiber or tip and tooth surface. The clinical efficacy was evaluated by air-blast test and cold-water test using visual analog scale. Electron microscopy photomicrographs were taken to confirm the results. Analysis was done at baseline; immediately post-treatment; and at 3, 6, 9 months post-treatment. Student's paired and unpaired T tests were used to evaluate the statistical analysis. Both treatment modalities were effective in reducing dentine hypersensitivity. However, Nd:YAG laser was better when intragroup comparison was made at 9 months post-treatment. Nd:YAG lasers is better in long-term treatment (up to 9 months) owing to the melting of dentinal tubules. However, due to depth of penetration of microcrystals, gel was better when ease of the procedure is considered. Nevertheless, both treatment modalities resulted in recurrence. Hence, further studies are needed to discover an agent, which can be considered as a "gold standard". PMID:23184419

  20. Site specific properties of carious dentin matrices biomodified with collagen cross-linkers

    PubMed Central

    Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Karol, Sachin; Pashley, David H.; Viana, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess in non-cavitated carious teeth the mechanical properties of dentin matrix by measuring its reduced modulus of elasticity and the effect of dentin biomodification strategies on three dentin matrix zones: caries-affected, apparently normal dentin below caries-affected zone and sound dentin far from carious site. Methods Nano-indentations were performed on dentin matrices of carious molars before and after surface modification using known cross-linking agents (glutaraldehyde, proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract and carbodiimide). Results Statistically significant differences were observed between dentin zones of demineralized dentin prior to surface biomodification (P< 0.05). Following surface modification, there were no statistically significant differences between dentin zones (P< 0.05). An average increase of 30-fold, 2-fold and 2.2-fold of the reduced modulus of elasticity was observed following treatments of the three dentin zones with proanthocyanidin, carbodiimide and glutaraldehyde, respectively. PMID:24479274

  1. Micromechanical testing of the dentin hybrid zone formed by all-in-one adhesive system in sound human dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koytchev, E.; Datcheva, M.; Iankov, R.

    2015-10-01

    This study explored the spatial variations in mechanical behavior of the dentin hybrid layer formed by a single step (one bottle) dentin adhesive system. Objective. The objectives were to: (1) evaluate the mechanical behavior of the hybrid zone formed by a single sep dentin adhesive system using nanoindentation technique, (2) compare the indentation moduli (EIT) and indentation hardness (HIT) of human dentin and the hybrid zone, and (3) assess the importance of specimen hydration on the nanoindentation response. Methods. Specimens of human dentin, treated with commercial single step resin adhesive and restored with composite material were evaluated using a nanoindenter in a load-displacement control mode. The load and displacement responses were used to perform nanoindentation characterization of dentin and the hybrid layer and estimate EIT and HIT, using Oliver & Pharr approximation method. Results. In hydrated state, EIT for dentin and hybrid layer were 18.214 ± 1.30 GPa and 12.535 ± 0.19 GPa respectively. For HIT, also in hydrated state, the values in dentin and hybrid layer were 0.56 ± 0.06 GPa and 0.36 ± 0.005 GPa respectively. Viscoelastic deformation of the dentin hybrid zone exceeded that occuring in regions of uniform dentin tissue. The load displacement curves of the two zones were also estimated and analyzed. They generally follow the same pattern without any noticeable pop-ins or irregularities. Significance. The microstructure and hydration play critical roles on the mechanical behavior of the hybrid layer and nanoindentation provides a potent measurment tool for identifying the spatial variations.

  2. The adverse effect of commercial dentine-bonding systems on the skin of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Katsuno, K; Manabe, A; Kurihara, A; Itoh, K; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S; Yoshida, T

    1998-03-01

    It was widely known that 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) can cause contact dermatitis. Commercially available dentine primers and dentine bonding agents that contain 2-HEMA are widely used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cumulative irritation and delayed hypersensitivity caused by commercial dentine bonding systems when applied to the skin of guinea pigs. We have concluded that almost no dentine bonding systems cause cumulative irritation, but some commercially available dentine bonding systems may produce delayed hypersensitivity.

  3. Shear bond strength of Dyract compomer material to dentin of primary molars.

    PubMed

    Megid, F Y; Salama, F S

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of Dyract compomer material with and without use of PSA prime/adhesive as well as 35% phosphoric acid etching to the buccal dentin of primary first and second molars. In addition, micromorphology of the restorative surfaces opposing the tooth structure following these different surface treatments was evaluated. For shear bond strength measurement and fracture pattern evaluation, 36 extracted non-restored human primary molars with mild to moderate caries divided into 3 groups of 12 teeth each were used. Dyract with and without use of PSA prime/adhesive as well as 35% phosphoric acid etching for 15 seconds prior to placement of PSA prime/adhesive was applied to the buccal surface of exposed dentin. A standardized tube of Dyract was placed on each dentin surface and polymerized. The tubes were sheared off with a Universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 12.7 mm/min. For evaluation of the restorative surfaces opposing the tooth structure, 9 teeth divided into 3 groups of 3 teeth each were used to prepare the specimens, which were then demineralized in 10% hydrochloric acid for 24 hours. Fitting surfaces of these specimens were prepared and examined using scanning electron microscope. Tukey's multiple range test showed that the shear bond strength of Dyract with PSA prime/adhesive (group 1) was statistically significantly higher than Dyract without PSA prime/adhesive (group 2) and phosphoric acid etching (group 3). The shear bond strength in group 1 averaged 5.89 +/- 1.40 (X + SD MPa) while for groups 2 and averaged 1.49 +/- 0.69 and 3.69 +/- 0.89 respectively. Pretreatment of dentin surface with 35% phosphoric acid increased resin tags formation but it did significantly lower shear bond strength of Dyract with PSA prime/adhesive to dentin of primary molars. Bond failure patterns for all groups were only adhesive and mixed type failures. PMID:9484116

  4. Tooth desensitization with an Er:YAG laser: in vitro microscopical observation and a case report.

    PubMed

    Badran, Zahi; Boutigny, Hervé; Struillou, Xavier; Baroth, Serge; Laboux, Olivier; Soueidan, Assem

    2011-01-01

    Tooth hypersensitivity is a frequent condition that causes discomfort and sometimes severe pain. It is caused by exposure of spots of dentinal tubules to the oral environment. Conventional desensitizing agents (professional pastes, toothpastes, mouthwashes) aim to obliterate the exposed dentinal tubules. Laser desensitization was introduced as an alternative efficient tool for the immediate treatment of tooth hypersensitivity. We explored in vitro the microscopical occluding effects of the Er:YAG laser on exposed dentinal tubules. The clinical application of this technique is also described. PMID:20809079

  5. Proanthocyanidins Rapidly Stabilize the Demineralized Dentin Layer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Dusevich, V.; Wang, Y.

    2013-01-01

    While proanthocyanidins (PA) are effective in improving collagen’s resistance to collagenolytic degradation, the direct incorporation of PA into an adhesive system is detrimental to the light-curing thereof. Conversely, the use of PA as a primer could circumvent this issue, but little is known about the efficacy of PA in stabilizing collagen when applied in a clinically relevant manner. This study investigated the pre- and post-digestion morphology of an acid-etched dentin collagen layer that underwent PA treatment for time periods on a scale of seconds. The null hypothesis, that there is no difference between the PA-treated and untreated control group, had to be rejected, since it was revealed that the untreated control could not survive 1 hr of exogenous collagenase digestion, while the PA-treated collagen could sustain at least 16 hrs of digestion with no perceptible changes in collagen structure. In addition, the stabilizing effect of the gold-standard cross-linker glutaraldehyde at comparable experimental conditions was found to be almost non-existent within the 5, 15, or 30 sec of cross-linking permitted. Therefore, PA have been proven to be extraordinarily efficient in stabilizing demineralized dentin collagen against enzymatic challenges in a clinically relevant setting, likely due to the non-covalent nature of their interaction with collagen molecules. PMID:23723381

  6. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  7. The distribution of magnesium in developing rat incisor dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfort, J.; Driessens, F.C.; Heijligers, H.J.; Beertsen, W. )

    1991-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that rat incisor dentin contains a considerable amount of magnesium that is distributed heterogeneously. The cementum-related dentin, especially its incisal portion, is richest in magnesium. It was the purpose of the present study to investigate the changes that occur in the magnesium content during dentin maturation. Cross-sections were prepared from rat incisors at the apical, middle, and incisal levels. By means of an electron microprobe, tracings were made of the Ca-, Mg-, and P- signal frequencies. Comparison of corresponding dentin layers within and between the cross-sections showed that the Mg/P molar ratio was always higher in the cementum-related dentin (CRD) than in the enamel-related dentin (ERD) and increased from the apex toward the incisal edge. Especially in the incisal cross-section, an increase in Mg/P was found from the older (peripheral) toward the younger (central) dentin layers. As the Mg/P ratio varied from 0.07 to 0.33, the Ca/P ratio was found to fluctuate from 1.48 to 1.15. The two ratios appeared to be highly correlated (r = -0.97; p less than 0.001), suggesting that Mg replaces Ca and is bound to phosphate.

  8. Dentin Biomodification: Strategies, Renewable Resources and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Pauli, Guido F.; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James; Castellan, Carina S.; Phansalkar, Rasika S; Aguiar, Thaiane R.; Vidal, Cristina M.P.; Napotilano, José; Nam, Joo-Won; Leme, Ariene A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The biomodification of dentin is a biomimetic approach, mediated by bioactive agents, to enhance and reinforce the dentin by locally altering the biochemistry and biomechanical properties. This review provides an overview of key dentin matrix components, targeting effects of biomodification strategies, the chemistry of renewable natural sources, and current research on their potential clinical applications. Methods The PubMed database and collected literature were used as a resource for peer-reviewed articles to highlight the topics of dentin hierarchical structure, biomodification agents, and laboratorial investigations of their clinical applications. In addition, new data is presented on laboratorial methods for the standardization of proanthocyanidin-rich preparations as a renewable source of plant-derived biomodification agents. Results Biomodification agents can be categorized as physical methods and chemical agents. Synthetic and naturally occurring chemical strategies present distinctive mechanism of interaction with the tissue. Initially thought to be driven only by inter- or intra-molecular collagen induced non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking, multiple interactions with other dentin components are fundamental for the long-term biomechanics and biostability of the tissue. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins show promising bioactivity, and their chemical complexity requires systematic evaluation of the active compounds to produce a fully standardized intervention material from renewable resource, prior to their detailed clinical evaluation. Significance Understanding the hierarchical structure of dentin and the targeting effect of the bioactive compounds will establish their use in both dentin-biomaterials interface and caries management. PMID:24309436

  9. Carbodiimide inactivation of MMPs and effect on dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, A; Apolonio, F M; Saboia, V P A; Santi, S; Angeloni, V; Checchi, V; Curci, R; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Breschi, L

    2014-03-01

    The use of protein cross-linking agents during bonding procedures has been recently proposed to improve bond durability. This study aimed to use zymography and in situ zymography techniques to evaluate the ability of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) cross-linker to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The hypotheses tested were that: (1) bonding procedures increase dentin gelatinolytic activity and (2) EDC pre-treatment prevents this enzymatic activity. The zymographic assay was performed on protein extracts obtained from dentin powder treated with Optibond FL or Scotchbond 1XT with or without 0.3M EDC pre-treatment. For in situ zymography, adhesive/dentin interfaces were created with the same adhesives applied to acid-etched dentin slabs pre-treated or not with EDC conditioner. Zymograms revealed increased expression of dentin endogenous MMP-2 and -9 after adhesive application, while the use of EDC as a primer inactivated dentin gelatinases. Results of in situ zymograpy showed that hybrid layers of tested adhesives exhibited intense collagenolytic activity, while almost no fluorescence signal was detected when specimens were pre-treated with EDC. The correlative analysis used in this study demonstrated that EDC could contribute to inactivate endogenous dentin MMPs within the hybrid layer created by etch-and-rinse adhesives.

  10. Metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate in rat kidney tubules

    SciTech Connect

    De La Rosa, J.; Stipanuk, M.H.

    1986-05-01

    In studies with rat hepatocytes, hypotaurine plus taurine production accounted for less than 5% of the total amount of cysteine (CYS) catabolized, whereas more than 90% of the metabolized cysteinesulfinate (CSA) was converted to taurine plus hypotaurine. Similar studies have been carried out with kidney tubules isolated from fed rats and incubated with 2 mM (1-/sup 14/C)CYS or 25 mM (1-/sup 14/C)CSA at 37/sup 0/C for up to 40 min. The production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from CSA (3.1 +/- 1.3 nmol/sup ./ min/sup -1//sup ./ mg dry wt/sup -1/) was equivalent to the accumulation of N in NH/sub 4//sup +/ plus glutamate. Substantial oxidation of CYS was observed (16 +/- 11 nmol CO/sub 2/ x min/sup -1/ x mg dry wt/sup -1/), but only 12% of the expected amount of N was recovered as NH/sub 4//sup +/ plus glutamate. Accumulation of hypotaurine plus taurine was equivalent to 20% of the observed rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from CSA but accounted for only 2% of the observed rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from CYS. Addition of unlabeled CSA to incubations with varying levels of CYS had no effect on production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Addition of 2 mM ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate to the incubation mixtures resulted in an increased in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from CSA to 290% of the control level but had no effect on CYS oxidation. In agreement with the authors findings for rat hepatocytes, these data suggest that most metabolism of CYS by the rat kidney tubule occurs by a CSA-independent pathway. However, in contrast to the metabolism of CSA almost entirely to taurine in the hepatocyte, kidney tubules appeared to metabolize CSA primarily by the transamination pathway.

  11. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser at Different Output Powers on the Micromorphology and the Bond Property of Non-Carious Sclerotic Dentin to Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguo; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Wanshan; Yang, Yanwei; Wei, Jingjing; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiated at different powers on the micromorphology and the bonding property of non-carious sclerotic dentin to resin composites. Methods Two hundred bovine incisors characterized by non-carious sclerotic dentin were selected, and the seventy-two teeth of which for surface morphological analysis were divided into nine groups according to various treatments (A: the control group, B: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, C: diamond bur polishing followed by Adper Easy One, D-I: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, 5W, 6W output power, respectively, followed by Adper Easy One). The surface roughness values were measured by the non-contact three-dimensional morphology scanner, then the surface micromorphologies of surfaces in all groups were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); meanwhile, Image Pro-Plus 6.0 software was used to measure the relative percentage of open tubules on SEM images. The rest, one hundred twenty-eight teeth for bond strength test, were divided into eight groups according to the different treatments (A: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, B: diamond bur polishing followed by the above adhesive, C-H: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1 W, 2 W, 3 W, 4 W, 5 W, 6 W output power, respectively, followed by the above adhesive), and each group was subsequently divided into two subgroups according to whether aging is performed (immediately tested and after thermocycling). Micro-shear bond strength test was used to evaluate the bond strength. Results The 4W laser group showed the highest roughness value (30.84±1.93μm), which was statistically higher than the control group and the diamond bur groups (p<0.05). The mean percentages ((27.8±1.8)%, (28.0±2.2)%, (30.0±1.9)%) of open tubules area in the 4W, 5W, 6W group were higher than other groups (p<0.05). The 4W laser group showed the highest micro-shear bond strength not

  12. Role of Dentin MMPs in Caries Progression and Bond Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, A.; Tjäderhane, L.; Checchi, V.; Di Lenarda, R.; Salo, T.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin can be described as a biological composite with collagen matrix embedded with nanosized hydroxyapatite mineral crystallites. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins are families of endopeptidases. Enzymes of both families are present in dentin and collectively capable of degrading virtually all extracellular matrix components. This review describes these enzymes and their presence in dentin, mainly focusing on their role in dentin caries pathogenesis and loss of collagen in the adhesive hybrid layer under composite restorations. MMPs and cysteine cathepsins present in saliva, mineralized dentin, and/or dentinal fluid may affect the dentin caries process at the early phases of demineralization. Changes in collagen and noncollagenous protein structure may participate in observed decreases in mechanical properties of caries-affected dentin and reduce the ability of caries-affected dentin to remineralize. These endogenous enzymes also remain entrapped within the hybrid layer during the resin infiltration process, and the acidic bonding agents themselves (irrespective of whether they are etch-and-rinse or self-etch) can activate these endogenous protease proforms. Since resin impregnation is frequently incomplete, denuded collagen matrices associated with free water (which serves as a collagen cleavage reagent for these endogenous hydrolase enzymes) can be enzymatically disrupted, finally contributing to the degradation of the hybrid layer. There are multiple in vitro and in vivo reports showing that the longevity of the adhesive interface is increased when nonspecific enzyme-inhibiting strategies are used. Different chemicals (i.e., chlorhexidine, galardin, and benzalkonium chloride) or collagen cross-linker agents have been successfully employed as therapeutic primers in the bonding procedure. In addition, the incorporation of enzyme inhibitors (i.e., quaternary ammonium methacrylates) into the resin blends has been recently promoted. This

  13. In vitro biofilm formation on the surface of resin-based dentine adhesives.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Sarah L; McCabe, John F; Robinson, Colin; Walls, Angus W G

    2006-06-01

    Prevention of root caries on exposed root surfaces in the aging population is a significant challenge. Bonding resins can be applied to exposed root surfaces as sealants; however, minimal data exists regarding biofilm formation on the surface of these resins. We hypothesized that an antibacterial dentine-bonding resin containing methacryloxydodecyl-pyridiniumbromide (MDPB) may reduce biofilm formation. Biofilms were produced in pooled stimulated natural whole saliva, supplemented with 1% sucrose, on the surface of 5 dentine-bonding resins (Clearfil SE, OptiBond Solo, Protect Bond, Protect Bond Primer, and Xeno III) using untreated root surfaces as controls. Biofilms were stained using the Live:Dead Baclight bacterial viability stain, viewed with confocal microscopy, and analyzed using ImageJ image-analysis software. Resin surfaces encouraged attachment of live bacteria compared with root surfaces. All resins showed similar bacterial colonization in sections adjacent to the resin surface, but in the central and outer portions of biofilms, Xeno III and Protect Bond Primer showed a viable bacterial load similar to that of the root surface. Fluoride-releasing resins (OptiBond Solo/Protect Bond) did not show reduced biofilm formation. Thus, antibacterial agents within the resins have a minimal effect on biofilm formation, particularly when directly adjacent to the root surface.

  14. Transepithelial transport of salicylate by the Malpighian tubules of insects from different orders.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sanchez, Esau; Van Walderveen, Maria C; Livingston, Alexandra; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    The organic anion salicylate is a plant secondary metabolite that protects plants against phytophagous insects. In this study, a combination of salicylate-selective microelectrodes and a radioisotope tracer technique was used to study the transepithelial transport of salicylate by the Malpighian tubules of 10 species of insects from five orders. Our results show that salicylate is transported into the lumen of the Malpighian tubules in all the species evaluated, except Rhodnius prolixus. The transepithelial transport of salicylate by the Malpighian tubules of Drosophila simulans, Drosophila erecta, Drosophila sechellia, and Acheta domesticus was saturable, Na(+)-dependent and inhibited by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. This transport system resembles that previously found in tubules of Drosophila melanogaster. In contrast, transepithelial transport of salicylate by Malpighian tubules of Tenebrio molitor, Plagiodera versicolora, Aedes aegypti, and Trichoplusia ni was unaffected by Na(+)-free bathing saline. The presence of both salicylate and salicylate metabolites in the secreted fluid samples from the Malpighian tubules of A. domesticus, R. prolixus, T. molitor, and T. ni indicates that insect Malpighian tubules may both transport and metabolize salicylate. The highest capacities to rid the hemolymph of salicylate were found in T. molitor, P. versicolora and Drosphila spp. Our results suggest that transport of salicylate by the Malpighian tubules might contribute to elimination of this organic anion from the hemolymph, particularly in some species that encounter high levels of organic anion in the diet.

  15. Wetting-mediated collective tubulation and pearling in confined vesicular drops of DDAB solutions.

    PubMed

    Haidara, Hamidou

    2014-12-21

    Whether driven by external mechanical stresses (shear flow) or induced by membrane-active peptides and/or proteins, the collective growth of tubules in membranous fluids has seldom been reported. The pearling destabilization of these membranous tubules which requires an activation of the shape distortion, often induced by optical tweezers, membrane-active biomolecules or an electrical field, has also rarely been observed under mild experimental conditions. Here we report such events of collective tubulation and pearling destabilization in sessile drops of a didodecyl-dimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) vesicular solution that are confined by a surrounding oil medium. Based on the wetting dynamics and the features of the tubulation process, we show that the growth of the tubules here relies on a mechanism of "pinning-induced pulling" from the retracting drop, rather than the classical hydrodynamic fingering instability. We show that the whole tubulation process is driven by a strong coupling between the bulk properties of the ternary (DAAB/water/oil) system and the dynamics of wetting. Finally, we discuss the pearling destabilization of these tubules under vanishing static interface tension and quite mild tensile force arising from their pulling. We show that under those mild conditions, shape disturbances readily grow, either as pearling waves moving toward the drop-reservoir or as Rayleigh-type peristaltic modulations. Besides revealing singular non-Rayleigh pearling modes, this work also brings new insights into the flow dynamics in membranous tubules anchored to an infinite reservoir.

  16. Cardiac BIN1 folds T-tubule membrane, controlling ion flux and limiting arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Hong, TingTing; Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cho, Hee Cheol; Kalashnikova, Mariya; Sun, Baiming; Zhang, Hao; Bhargava, Anamika; Grabe, Michael; Olgin, Jeffrey; Gorelik, Julia; Marbán, Eduardo; Jan, Lily Y; Shaw, Robin M

    2014-06-01

    Cardiomyocyte T tubules are important for regulating ion flux. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a T-tubule protein associated with calcium channel trafficking that is downregulated in failing hearts. Here we find that cardiac T tubules normally contain dense protective inner membrane folds that are formed by a cardiac isoform of BIN1. In mice with cardiac Bin1 deletion, T-tubule folding is decreased, which does not change overall cardiomyocyte morphology but leads to free diffusion of local extracellular calcium and potassium ions, prolonging action-potential duration and increasing susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also found that T-tubule inner folds are rescued by expression of the BIN1 isoform BIN1+13+17, which promotes N-WASP-dependent actin polymerization to stabilize the T-tubule membrane at cardiac Z discs. BIN1+13+17 recruits actin to fold the T-tubule membrane, creating a 'fuzzy space' that protectively restricts ion flux. When the amount of the BIN1+13+17 isoform is decreased, as occurs in acquired cardiomyopathy, T-tubule morphology is altered, and arrhythmia can result. PMID:24836577

  17. Mathematical study on robust tissue pattern formation in growing epididymal tubule.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-21

    Tissue pattern formation during development is a reproducible morphogenetic process organized by a series of kinetic cellular activities, leading to the building of functional and stable organs. Recent studies focusing on mechanical aspects have revealed physical mechanisms on how the cellular activities contribute to the formation of reproducible tissue patterns; however, the understanding for what factors achieve the reproducibility of such patterning and how it occurs is far from complete. Here, I focus on a tube pattern formation during murine epididymal development, and show that two factors influencing physical design for the patterning, the proliferative zone within the tubule and the viscosity of tissues surrounding to the tubule, control the reproducibility of epididymal tubule pattern, using a mathematical model based on experimental data. Extensive numerical simulation of the simple mathematical model revealed that a spatially localized proliferative zone within the tubule, observed in experiments, results in more reproducible tubule pattern. Moreover, I found that the viscosity of tissues surrounding to the tubule imposes a trade-off regarding pattern reproducibility and spatial accuracy relating to the region where the tubule pattern is formed. This indicates an existence of optimality in material properties of tissues for the robust patterning of epididymal tubule. The results obtained by numerical analysis based on experimental observations provide a general insight on how physical design realizes robust tissue pattern formation. PMID:27396360

  18. Dentin hypersensitivity: etiology, diagnosis and treatment; a literature review.

    PubMed

    Davari, Ar; Ataei, E; Assarzadeh, H

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this review is to inform practitioners about dentin hypersensitivity (DH); to provide a brief overview of the diagnosis, etiology and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity and to discuss technical approaches to relieve sensitivity. This clinical information is described in the context of the underlying biology. The author used PUBMED to find relevant English-language literature published in the period 1999 to 2010. The author used combinations of the search terms "dentin*", "tooth", "teeth", "hypersensit*", "desensitiz*". Abstracts and also full text articles to identify studies describing etiology, prevalence, clinical features, controlled clinical trials of treatments and relevant laboratory research on mechanisms of action were used. PMID:24724135

  19. Immunocytochemical study of the ultimobranchial tubule in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Conde, E; Moreno, A M; Martin-Lacave, I; Fernandez, A; Galera, H

    1992-03-01

    A systematic immunohistochemical study of the ultimobranchial tubule (UBT) has been carried out in 45 Wistar rats of different ages (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 60 and 120 days). The existence of calcitonin immunoreactive cells in the UBT wall has been demonstrated in a 5-days old rat. In addition, immunohistochemical studies for thyroglobulin revealed positive staining in follicular cells connected to the UBT and, occasionally, in isolated cells lying within solid clusters from the UBT. These last results together with the continued and repeated existence of numerous mitosis and PAS (+) microfollicles, apparently rising from the UBT, support the hypothesis that the ultimobranchial body (UBB) may contribute partially to the formation of a part of the follicular component.

  20. Isovolumetric regulation of renal proximal tubules in hypotonic medium.

    PubMed

    Lohr, J W

    1990-01-01

    Isolated nonperfused proximal tubules maintained their cell volume at a constant level (isovolumetric regulation, IVR), when osmolality of the bathing medium was gradually decreased from 290 to 190 mosm at 1.5 and 5.0 mosm/min. Hypotonic IVR was blocked by inhibiting the Na(+)-K+ pump with ouabain (10(-4) M) when osmolality was decreased at 1.5 or 5 mosm/min. Concentration-dependent inhibition of cell volume maintenance was observed in the presence of the K+ channel blocker barium (10(-3)-10(-2) M) when osmolality decreased at 5 mosm/min. Quinine (10(-3) M), another K+ channel blocker, also inhibited IVR at osmolality decreases of 1.5 and 5 mosm/min. These results suggest that the maintenance of constant cell volume during gradual hypoosmotic exposure involves mechanisms that depend on intact Na-K-ATPase and the controlled loss of intracellular K+.

  1. Nonequilibrium thermodynamic model of the rat proximal tubule epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, A M

    1983-11-01

    The rat proximal tubule epithelium is represented as well-stirred, compliant cellular and paracellular compartments bounded by mucosal and serosal bathing solutions. With a uniform pCO2 throughout the epithelium, the model variables include the concentrations of Na, K, Cl, HCO3, H2PO4, HPO4, and H, as well as hydrostatic pressure and electrical potential. Except for a metabolically driven Na-K exchanger at the basolateral cell membrane, all membrane transport within the epithelium is passive and is represented by the linear equations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In particular, this includes the cotransport of Na-Cl and Na-H2PO4 and countertransport of Na-H at the apical cell membrane. Experimental constraints on the choice of ionic conductivities are satisfied by allowing K-Cl cotransport at the basolateral membrane. The model equations include those for mass balance of the nonreacting species, as well as chemical equilibrium for the acidification reactions. Time-dependent terms are retained to permit the study of transient phenomena. In the steady state the energy dissipation is computed and verified equal to the sum of input from the Na-K exchanger plus the Gibbs free energy of mass addition to the system. The parameter dependence of coupled water transport is studied and shown to be consistent with the predictions of previous analytical models of the lateral intercellular space. Water transport in the presence of an end-proximal (HCO3-depleted) luminal solution is investigated. Here the lower permeability and higher reflection coefficient of HCO3 enhance net sodium and water transport. Due to enhanced flux across the tight junction, this process may permit proximal tubule Na transport to proceed with diminished energy dissipation.

  2. Connecting tubule glomerular feedback antagonizes tubuloglomerular feedback in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Garvin, J L; D'Ambrosio, M A; Ren, Y; Carretero, O A

    2010-12-01

    In vitro experiments showed that the connecting tubule (CNT) sends a signal that dilates the afferent arteriole (Af-Art) when Na(+) reabsorption in the CNT lumen increases. We call this process CNT glomerular feedback (CTGF) to differentiate it from tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), which is a cross talk between the macula densa (MD) and the Af-Art. In TGF, the MD signals the Af-Art to constrict when NaCl transport by the MD is enhanced by increased luminal NaCl. CTGF is mediated by CNT Na(+) transport via epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC). However, we do not know whether CTGF occurs in vivo or whether it opposes the increase in Af-Art resistance caused by TGF. We hypothesized that CTGF occurs in vivo and opposes TGF. To test our hypothesis, we conducted in vivo micropuncture of individual rat nephrons, measuring stop-flow pressure (P(SF)) as an index of glomerular filtration pressure. To test whether activation of CTGF opposes TGF, we used benzamil to block CNT Na(+) transport and thus CTGF. CTGF inhibition with the ENaC blocker benzamil (1 μM) potentiated the decrease in P(SF) at 40 and 80 nl/min. Next, we tested whether we could augment CTGF by inhibiting NaCl reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, 1 mM) to enhance NaCl delivery to the CNT. In the presence of HCTZ, benzamil potentiated the decrease in P(SF) at 20, 40, and 80 nl/min. We concluded that in vivo CTGF occurs and opposes the vasoconstrictor effect of TGF. PMID:20826574

  3. Cadmium transport and toxicity in isolated perfused renal proximal tubules

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.E.K.

    1991-01-01

    Cadmium is a potent toxicant preferentially accumulated in the renal cortex of humans and other animals. To assess the renal toxicity of inorganic cadmium, isolated segments (S1, S2, and S3) of rabbit renal proximal tubules were perfused with various concentrations of unlabeled cadmium chloride (CdCl[sub 2]) and a vital dye (FD C green). The tubular epithelial cells were observed under the light microscope for cellular injury and necrosis. Cellular swelling, luminal membrane blebbing, and cellular vacuolization were indicators of cellular injury, and dye uptake was indicative of cellular necrosis. To determine lumen-to-bath transport rates for cadmium, the segments were perfused with a mixture of [sup 109]CdCl[sub 2] and [sup 3]H-L-glucose; unlabeled CdCl[sub 2] was added when necessary to vary the total cadmium concentration from 1.5 [mu]M to 2000 [mu]M. Immediately after perfusion the tubules were extracted with 3% trichoroacetic acid (TCA) or with a modified Ringer's buffer of reduced osmolality to determine the fate of the cadmium removed from the lumen. Based on the toxicant indicators, increased dye uptake, increased luminal membrane blebbing, and increased vacuole formation, as the cadmium concentration was increased, cadmium was found to show toxicity to renal tubular cells at concentrations greater than 500 [mu]M. In transport experiments, increasing the cadmium concentration causes an increase in the leak of L-glucose, also indicating toxicity. A clear imbalance exists between the rate of disappearance of cadmium from the lumen and the rate of appearance in the bath for all three tubular segments. Cadmium appears to bind cellular membrane proteins, but it is extractable with 3% TCA. Cadmium, like mercury, is taken up at the luminal membrane, but very little is transported through the basolateral membrane.

  4. The molecular correlates of organ loss: the case of insect Malpighian tubules

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xiangfeng; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Xiaowei; Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    Malpighian tubules play an essential role in excretion, osmoregulation and immunity of most insects. Exceptionally, aphids lack Malpighian tubules, providing the opportunity to investigate the fate of genes expressed in an organ that has undergone evolutionary reduction and loss. Making use of the sequenced genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we demonstrated that more than 50% of Drosophila genes expressed specifically in the Malpighian tubules had orthologues in the pea aphid genome and that most of the pea aphid orthologues with detectable expression were identified in the gut transcriptome. Relative to the whole genome, genes functioning in amino acid metabolism are significantly over-represented among the pea aphid orthologues of Malpighian tubule genes, likely reflecting the central importance of amino acid acquisition and metabolism in aphids. This study demonstrates that the evolutionary loss of a key insect organ, the Malpighian tubules, has not been associated with the coupled loss of molecular functions. PMID:25972400

  5. Methods for analyzing the role of phospholipase A2 enzymes in endosome membrane tubule formation

    PubMed Central

    Kalkofen, Danielle N.; de Figueiredo, Paul; Brown, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Cargo export from mammalian endosomal compartments often involves membrane tubules, into which soluble and membrane-bound cargos are segregated for subsequent intracellular transport. These membrane tubules are highly dynamic and their formation is mediated by a variety of endosome-associated proteins. However, little is known about how these membrane tubules are temporally or spatially regulated, so other tubule-associated proteins are likely to be discovered and analyzed. Therefore, methods to examine the biogenesis and regulation of endosome membrane tubules will prove to be valuable for cell biologists. In this chapter, we describe methods for studying this process using both cell-free, in vitro reconstitution assays, and in vivo image analysis tools. PMID:26360034