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Sample records for exposing dentinal tubules

  1. Ultramorphology and dentine permeability changes induced by prophylactic procedures on exposed dentinal tubules in middle dentine.

    PubMed

    Sauro, S; Watson, T-F; Thompson, I

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in dentinal permeability (i.e. hydraulic conductance) after prophylactic treatment performed using prophy-powders with air-polishing system or prophy-pastes applied on exposed middle dentine. The changes in dentine morphology were evaluate by SEM. Several prophylactic pastes or air-polishing powders were tested in this study. Dentine discs from human third molars were used to study the quantitative reduction of the dentine permeability under simulated pulpal pressure (20 cm H₂O). Further specimens were gold-coated and observed with the use of a SEM. The results of this study showed different reductions of dentin permeability effects based on the type of product employed (i.e. prophylactic paste or air-polishing powders). The use of Sylc bioactive glass and sodium bicarbonate were the most effective in reducing dentine permeability of the specimens etched with the phosphoric. The air-polishing procedures performed with Sylc bioactive glass created a dentine surface devoid of exposed dentinal tubules due to the presence of a compact multilayered smear layer. Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief and Nupro NU-Solution reduced the dentine permeability up to 69.8% and 66.9% respectively. Although all the tested products are able to statistically reduce dentine permeability, Sylc bioactive glass is an innovative and effective product suitable for the reducing of the dentine permeability during prophylactic procedures of air-polishing.

  2. Dentin tubule occluding ability of dentin desensitizers.

    PubMed

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    To compare the dentin tubule-occluding ability of fluoroaluminocalciumsilicate-based (Nanoseal), calcium phosphate-based (Teethmate Desensitizer), resin-containing oxalate (MS Coat ONE) and diamine silver fluoride (Saforide) dentin desensitizers using artificially demineralized bovine dentin. Simulated hypersensitive dentin was created using cervical dentin sections derived from bovine incisors using phosphoric acid etching followed by polishing with a paste containing hydroxyapatite. The test desensitizers were applied in one, two, or three cycles, where each cycle involved desensitizer application, brushing, and immersion in artificial saliva (n= 5 each). The dentin surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy, and the dentin tubule occlusion rate was calculated. The elemental composition of the deposits was analyzed with electron probe microanalysis. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant different test. Marked deposit formation was observed on the specimens treated with Nanoseal or Teethmate Desensitizer, and tags were detected in the specimens' dentin tubules. These findings became more prominent as the number of application cycles increased. The major elemental components of the tags were Ca, F, and Al (Nanoseal) and Ca and P (Teethmate Desensitizer). The tubule occlusion rates of MS Coat ONE and Saforide were significantly lower than those of Nanoseal and Teethmate Desensitizer (P< 0.05).

  3. In vitro disinfection of dentinal tubules by various endodontics irrigants.

    PubMed

    Buck, R; Eleazer, P D; Staat, R H

    1999-12-01

    Effectiveness of endodontic irrigants within dentinal tubules of human teeth was evaluated. Mid-sections of single-rooted teeth were prepared into dentin wedges. The pulpal sides of the sections were exposed to Micrococcus luteus or Bacillus megaterium that grew into the tubules. Irrigants used in the study included: 0.525% NaOCl, 0.12% chlorhexidine, RC Prep, 0.5% betadine iodine, and sterile H2O (as a control). Pulpal surfaces were exposed to an irrigant and then rinsed in sterile water. The samples were then cracked, exposing a fresh surface. Culture of the exposed dentin surfaces showed that selected irrigants reached to the far ends of the dentinal tubules in a concentration sufficient to kill 100% of the M. luteus. However B. megaterium was neither killed nor apparently inhibited by any irrigant. We conclude that endodontic irrigants permeate throughout dentinal tubules, but their effectiveness is dependent on the type of bacteria found within the tubules.

  4. Comparative Morphologic Evaluation and Occluding Effectiveness of Nd: YAG, CO2 and Diode Lasers on Exposed Human Dentinal Tubules: An Invitro SEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Choudhary, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dentinal hypersensitivity is one of the most common problem, encountered in dental practice but has least predictable treatment outcome. The advent of lasers in dentistry has provided an additional therapeutic option for treating dentinal hypersensitivity. Although various lasers have been tried over a period of time to treat dentinal hypersensitivity, but still the doubt persist as to which laser leads to maximum dentinal tubular occlusion and is most suitable with minimal hazardous effects. Aim To compare the effects of Nd: YAG, CO2 and 810-nm diode lasers on width of exposed dentinal tubule orifices and to evaluate the morphologic changes on dentinal surface of human tooth after laser irradiation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods Forty root specimens were obtained from ten freshly extracted human premolars, which were randomly divided into four groups of ten each. Group I: control group treated with only saline, Group II: Nd:YAG laser, Group III: CO2 laser and Group IV: 810-nm diode laser. The specimens were examined using SEM. After calculating mean tubular diameter for each group, the values were compared statistically using parametric one-way ANOVA test and Turkey’s post hoc multiple comparison test. Results All the three lased groups showed a highly statistical significant result with p-value of <0.001 as compared to non-lased group. On intergroup comparison within the lased groups, all the three groups showed statistically significant difference in the reduction of dentinal tubular diameter (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion Nd: YAG laser was found to be most effective, followed by the CO2 laser and 810-nm diode laser was found to be least effective. The morphologic changes like craters, cracks and charring effect of the dentine were seen maximum by the use of CO2 laser. PMID:27630957

  5. Dentin tubule numerical density variations below the CEJ

    PubMed Central

    Komabayashi, T.; Nonomura, G.; Watanabe, L.G.; Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To evaluate dentin tubule numerical density variations below the CEJ. Methodology Three human non-carious permanent canines were sectioned parallel to the CEJ to obtain dentin disks 1 mm thick whose surfaces were 1 mm and 2 mm below the CEJ. Each disk was sectioned into quarters resulting in four segment locations: facial, lingual, mesial, and distal. The outer (PDL side) and inner (pulp side) surfaces of the specimens were shaped to expose dentin with SiC papers and polished. Numerical tubule density was determined from SEM images. All data were statistically analyzed using a three-way ANOVA. Results The dentin tubule density (number/mm2) ranged from 13,700 to 32,300. Dentin tubule density was relatively uniform at 1 and 2 mm below the CEJ and increased by a factor of about two from the outer to the inner surface, which was significantly different (P<0.0001). Conclusions The tubule density variations at the cervical root did not present the marked changes. PMID:18786756

  6. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules

    PubMed Central

    BRITTAN, Jane L; SPRAGUE, Susan V; MACDONALD, Emma L; LOVE, Robert M; JENKINSON, Howard F; WEST, Nicola X

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF). DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0) to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine. PMID:27119760

  7. Effect of dentinal tubules and resin-based endodontic sealers on fracture properties of root dentin.

    PubMed

    Jainaen, Angsana; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the role of dentinal tubules in the fracture properties of human root dentin and whether resin-filled dentinal tubules can enhance fracture resistance. Crack propagation in human root dentin was investigated in 200 microm thick longitudinal samples and examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. 30 maxillary premolar teeth were prepared for work of fracture (Wf) test at different tubule orientations, one perpendicular and two parallel to dentinal tubules. Another 40 single canal premolars were randomly divided into four groups of 10 each: intact dentin, prepared but unobturated canal, canal obturated with epoxy rein (AH Plus/gutta percha), or with UDMA resin sealer (Resilon/RealSeal. The samples were prepared for Wf test parallel to dentinal tubules. Wf was compared under ANOVA with statistical significance set at p<0.05. Dentinal tubules influenced the path of cracks through dentin, with micro-cracks initiated in peritubular dentin of individual tubules ahead of the main crack tip. A significant difference (p<0.001) was found between Wf perpendicular to tubule direction (254.9 J/m(2)) vs. parallel to tubule direction from inner to outer dentin (479.4 J/m(2)). Neither canal preparation nor obturation using epoxy- or UDMA-based resins as sealer cements substantially influenced fracture properties of root dentin, despite extensive infiltration of dentinal tubules by both sealer cements.

  8. Determination of the functional space for fluid movement in the rat dentinal tubules using fluorescent microsphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Ikeda, Hideharu; Suda, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    The size of the functional space available for hydrodynamic fluid movement between cellular components and the walls of dentinal tubules has not yet been investigated. We attempted to measure the space using small diameter fluorescent microspheres. The coronal enamel of 144 rat molars was removed to expose the dentine, which was acid-etched. Fluorescent microspheres of different diameters (0.02-4.0μm) were applied to the exposed dentine for 60min before the rat jaws were cut into cryostat sections. The distribution and fluorescent intensities of the fluorescent microspheres were examined with confocal laser scanning microscope and analyzed using image analysis software. Microspheres with a diameter of 2.0-4.0μm were detected only on the surface of the cavities. A small number of microspheres with a diameter of 1.0μm accumulated primarily in the outer third of the dentine. Microspheres with a diameter of 0.2-0.5μm were found in the outer and middle thirds of the dentine. Microspheres with a diameter of 0.02-0.1μm accumulated in the middle and occasionally inner thirds of the dentine. Some of the microspheres measuring 0.02-0.04μm in diameter reached the dental pulp. The dentinal tubules in the inner third of the rat coronal dentine may have a space less than 0.1μm through which dentinal fluid can move, despite outward tapering of the dentinal tubules. Retrograde tapering may increase the pressure in the inner third of the dentine layer, and this elevated pressure may contribute to mechanical deformation of the content in the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of desensitizing dentifrices to occlude dentinal tubules.

    PubMed

    Davies, Maria; Paice, Elizabeth M; Jones, Sian B; Leary, Sam; Curtis, Andrew R; West, Nicola X

    2011-12-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity occurs when patent dentinal tubules are subjected to external stimuli, with pain being reduced by products that occlude tubules. This study compared the efficacy of a recently developed arginine-containing dentifrice, two established strontium-based products, and a fluoride control to occlude tubules when subjected to acid challenge. Dentine specimens with patent tubules were divided into four groups that were treated with a slurry consisting of one of the pastes mixed with stimulated human saliva. Treated specimens were further subdivided and soaked in 0.3% citric acid for 10 s, 30 s, 2 min, 5 min or 10 min. Tubule occlusion on representative scanning electron microscopy images was scored by blind review. All three desensitizing pastes offered good tubule occlusion, which was maintained to varying degrees following acidic challenge. After immersion in acid for 10 and 30 s, the strontium acetate- and arginine-containing pastes almost fully occluded tubules, but only the strontium acetate paste retained this level of occlusion after immersion in acid for 2 min, with strong statistical evidence that this paste occluded more tubules than the other pastes after immersion in acid for 2 or 5 min. This suggests that strontium acetate pastes may be the most effective at reducing dentine hypersensitivity. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Decreased dentin tubules density and reduced thickness of peritubular dentin in hyperbilirubinemia-related green teeth

    PubMed Central

    Neves-Silva, Rodrigo; Alves, Fabio-Abreu; Antunes, Alberto; Goes, Mario-Fernando; Giannini, Marcelo; Tenório, Maria-Dânia; Machado, José-Lécio; Paes-Leme, Adriana-Franco; Lopes, Marcio-Ajudarte

    2017-01-01

    Background It is stated anecdotally that patients with liver diseases in childhood who develop green teeth have increased risk for rampant caries, which may be secondary to changes in dental structure. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that hyperbilirubinemia affects the dentin morphology of green teeth. Material and Methods Sixteen primary teeth were prepared and divided into two groups (green teeth, n = 8 and control, n = 8), which were transversely fractured across the cervical third of the dental crowns; dentin was prepared and sputter-coated with gold, and examined under a scanning electron microscope. The mean density and mean diameter of dentin tubules, as well as the thickness of peritubular dentin, were compared. Results Hyperbilirubinemia was associated with a decrease in the density of the dentin tubules (p< .01) and the thickness of peritubular dentin of green teeth (p< .01). Conclusions There was a correlation between childhood hyperbilirubinemia and changes in the dentin morphology, including a decrease in the density of the dentin tubules and a reduction in the thickness of peritubular dentin in green teeth. Key words:Hyperbilirubinemia, liver disease, childhood, dentin tubules, human teeth, scanning electron microscopy. PMID:28512537

  11. An in situ study investigating dentine tubule occlusion of dentifrices following acid challenge.

    PubMed

    Olley, Ryan C; Pilecki, Peter; Hughes, Nathan; Jeffery, Peter; Austin, Rupert S; Moazzez, Rebecca; Bartlett, David

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the dentine occlusion and acid resistance of dentifrices developed to treat dentine hypersensitivity. This was a single centre, single blind, randomised, split mouth, four treatments, two period crossover, in situ study in healthy subjects. Subjects wore buccal intra-oral appliances each fitted with four dentine samples over four consecutive days with one study product applied per appliance; 8% strontium acetate in silica base, 1040 ppm sodium fluoride (Sensodyne(®) Rapid Relief), 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, 1450 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate (Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief(®)), 1450 ppm sodium fluoride (control paste) and water. On days 3 and 4, two agitated grapefruit juice challenges (ex vivo) occurred for 1 min. At the end of each treatment day 1 dentine sample was removed from each appliance for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The extent of tubule occlusion was measured using an examiner-based visual scoring index (three trained examiners). In total, 28 subjects ((12 males and 16 females with a mean age of 34.7 years (SD 8.41 years)) completed the study. On day 2, both test dentifrices demonstrated significantly better dentine tubule occlusion than water (p < 0.0001) and control paste (8% strontium p = 0.0003 and 8% arginine p = 0.0019). After 3 and 4 days of twice daily brushing with acid challenges on days 3 and 4 the strontium-based dentifrice demonstrated significantly better dentine occlusion than all other treatments (p < 0.0001). Strontium acetate and arginine-based dentifrice result in statistically significant dentine tubular occlusion compared to controls, but the arginine-based dentifrice is more susceptible to acid challenge. Erosive beverages are an important aetiology in DH by exposing dentine tubules. Their consumption has increased significantly over the past decade in the UK. This 4-day in situ study investigated the properties of commercially available dentifrices designed to occlude dentine tubules and their

  12. Use of Poly (Amidoamine) Dendrimer for Dentinal Tubule Occlusion: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianda; Yang, Sheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity, a significant health problem in dentistry and daily life. The in situ mineralization within dentinal tubules is a promising treatment for dentin hypersensitivity as it induces the formation of mineral on the sensitive regions and occludes the dentinal tubules. This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro effect of a whole generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (G3.0) on dentinal tubule occlusion by inducing mineralization within dentinal tubules. Dentin discs were treated with PAMAM dendrimers using two methods, followed by the in vitro characterization using Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). These results showed that G3.0 PAMAM dendrimers coated on dentin surface and infiltrated in dentinal tubules could induce hydroxyapatite formation and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, crosslinked PAMAM dendrimers could induce the remineralization of demineralized dentin and thus had the potential in dentinal tubule occlusion. In this in vitro study, dentinal tubules occlusion could be achieved by using PAMAM dendrimers. This could lead to the development of a new therapeutic technique for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:25885090

  13. Phosphorus Effects of Mesoporous Bioactive Glass on Occlude Exposed Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Cheng-Hwei; Kung, Jung-Chang; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Chi-Jen; Chien, Chi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In recent studies, sealing of exposed dentinal tubules is generally considered as one of the most effective strategies to treat dentin hypersensitivity. Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) is a potential material for treating dentin hypersensitivity due to its highly specific areas for dissolution and re-precipitated reaction for reduction in dentin permeability. The groups of commercial products of PerioGlas®, synthetic MBG and MBG without phosphorus (MBGNP) were compared. The MBG and MBGNP powders were prepared by the sol-gel method and mixed with different calculated ratios of phosphoric acid (PA) and then was brushed onto dentin surfaces. We used X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to investigate the physiochemistry and the occlusion ability of dentinal tubules. The results showed that MBG paste mixed with PA solution has a better ability for occluding dentinal tubules than MBGNP; it has a short reaction time and good operability. The major crystallite phase of MBG agents was monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H2PO4)2·H2O] in the early stages of the reactions. MBG pastes that were mixed with 30% and 40% PA had the ability to create excellent penetration depth greater than 80 μm. These agents have the potential to treat dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:28788393

  14. Hydromechanics in dentine: role of dentinal tubules and hydrostatic pressure on mechanical stress-strain distribution.

    PubMed

    Kishen, A; Vedantam, S

    2007-10-01

    This investigation is to understand the role of free water in the dentinal tubules on the mechanical integrity of bulk dentine. Three different experiments were conducted in this study. In experiment 1, three-dimensional models of dentine with gradient elastic modulus, homogenous elastic modulus, and with and without hydrostatic pressure were simulated using the finite element method. Static compressive loads of 15, 50 and 100 N were applied and the distribution of the principal stresses, von Mises stresses, and strains in loading direction were determined. In experiment 2, experimental compression testing of fully hydrated and partially dehydrated dentine (21 degrees C for 72 h) was conducted using a Universal testing machine. In experiment 3, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of hydrated and partially dehydrated dentine was carried out. The finite element analysis revealed that the dentine model with simulated hydrostatic pressure displayed residual tensile stresses and strains in the inner region adjacent to the root canal. When external compressive loads were applied to the model, the residual stresses and strains counteracted the applied loads. Similarly the hydrated specimens subjected to experimental compression loads showed greater toughness when compared to the partially dehydrated specimens. The stress at fracture was significantly higher in partially dehydrated specimens (p=0.014), while the strain at fracture was significantly higher in hydrated dentine specimens (p=0.037). These experiments highlighted the distinct role of free water in the dentinal tubules and hydrostatic pressure on the stress-strain distribution within the bulk dentine.

  15. Dentinal Tubule Penetration of Tricalcium Silicate Sealers.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Greer E; Primus, Carolyn M; Opperman, Lynne A

    2016-04-01

    The treatments for which mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based materials can be used in dentistry are expanding. Smaller particle size and easier handling properties have allowed the advent of tricalcium silicate sealers including EndoSequence BC Sealer (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), QuickSet2 (Avalon Biomed, Bradenton, FL), NeoMTA Plus (Avalon Biomed), and MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). The objective of this study was to measure the tubule penetration with these sealers using continuous wave (CW) and single-cone (SC) obturation techniques. Eighty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups of 10 and obturated with 1 of the previously mentioned sealers mixed with trace amounts of rhodamine using either the CW or SC technique. Teeth were sectioned at 1 mm and 5 mm from the apex and examined under a confocal laser microscope. The percentage of sealer penetration and the maximum sealer penetration were measured. The tricalcium silicate sealers penetrated tubules as deep as 2000 μm (2 mm). The percentage of sealer penetration was much higher 5 mm from the apex, with many specimens having 100% penetration for both SC and warm vertical techniques. MTA Fillapex, a resin-based sealer with less than 20% MTA particles, had significantly greater tubule penetration with a warm vertical technique versus the SC technique at the 1-mm level. Within the limitations of this study, the CW and SC techniques produced similar tubule penetration at both the 1-mm and the 5-mm level with the tricalcium silicate sealers BC Sealer, QuickSet2, and NeoMTA Plus. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Water-Cooled Nd:YAG Laser on Dentinal Tubule Occlusion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shimeng; Liang, Kunneng; Liu, Hongling; Zhang, Manling; Yang, Heng; Guo, Shujuan; Ding, Yi

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a new water-cooled Nd:YAG laser on dentinal tubule occlusion. The effect of water-cooled Nd:YAG laser on dentinal tubule occlusion has not been reported. Acid-etched dentin samples were randomly divided into three groups: (1) dentin control, (2) dentin treated by Nd:YAG laser, (3) dentin treated by water-cooled Nd:YAG laser. After laser irradiation, half of the samples were immersed in a 6 wt% citric acid (pH 1.5) solution for 1 min to evaluate the acid resistance. The morphologies of dentin surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The number and diameters of the open dentinal tubules were analyzed by one-way and two-way analyses of variance. Both the Nd:YAG laser and water-cooled Nd:YAG laser melted the superficial layer of dentin, which caused dentinal tubule occlusion in most areas and diameter reduction of the rest open tubules. Microcracks on the dentin surface were only observed in the Nd:YAG laser group. The tubule occlusion induced by the two lasers showed a good acid resistance. The effect of water-cooled Nd:YAG laser on dentinal tubule occlusion is similar to that of the Nd:YAG laser. The dentinal tubule occlusion induced by the two lasers could resist acid challenge to some extent.

  17. Effect of depth and tubule direction on ultimate tensile strength of human coronal dentin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoshi; Pereira, Patricia N R; Kawamoto, Chiharu; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Koshiro, Kenichi; Tagami, Junji; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H; Sano, Hidehiko

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentin depth and tubule direction on the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of human dentin. Dentin slabs of 0.5-mm thickness were trimmed either from the mesial and distal (for specimens with the tubules parallel to the tensile force; parallel group) or from the occlusal and pulpal surfaces (perpendicular group) to reduce the cross-sectional area of the superficial, middle, and deep regions to 0.25 mm2, and subjected to microtensile testing. From SEM photomicrographs of the fractured specimens of the parallel group, the tubule density was investigated. For both parallel and perpendicular groups, superficial dentin showed a significantly higher UTS than deep dentin. The tubule density of superficial dentin was significantly lower than that of middle and deep dentin. When performing the microtensile bond test to deep dentin, it is possible that cohesive failure of dentin can occur at relatively low tensile stresses.

  18. Endodontic pathogens: propagation of infection through patent dentinal tubules in traumatized monkey teeth.

    PubMed

    Ehnevid, H; Jansson, L; Lindskog, S; Weintraub, A; Blomlöf, L

    1995-10-01

    Periapical pathology indicating endodontic infection, when present in marginal periodontitis-affected teeth, has recently been shown to be an aggravating factor in progression of marginal destruction. This has been associated with patency of dentinal tubules in the tooth cervix, an area normally devoid of cementum following periodontal therapy. These studies are, however hampered by that only circumstantial evidence such as presence of periapical destruction have been applied as criteria of endodontic infection. The purpose of the present investigation was to study to what extent a predefined selection of endodontic pathogens inoculated in the root canal can influence periodontal pathology and healing in areas of the root covered by or devoid of cementum, using root resorption as a histomorphometric marker. Exposed dentine surfaces, in the present study showed significantly larger areas of resorption in infected roots compared to non-infected roots, while cementum surfaces showed an almost identical distribution of tissue reactions regardless of root canal infection or not. It was concluded that endodontic pathogens or their products were not able to penetrate the cementum barrier. The significantly larger areas of resorption on exposed dentine surfaces in infected roots compared to non-infected roots indicated that endodontic pathogens or their products could spread through dentinal tubules to a root surface void of cementum. Extrapolated to the marginal situation this indicated that endodontic pathogens in the root canal might be able to aggravate marginal infection in areas of root devoid of cementum.

  19. Antimicrobial effect of ozonated water on bacteria invading dentinal tubules.

    PubMed

    Nagayoshi, Masato; Kitamura, Chiaki; Fukuizumi, Takaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Terashita, Masamichi

    2004-11-01

    Ozone is known to act as a strong antimicrobial agent against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. In the present study, we examined the effect of ozonated water against Enterococcus faecalis and Streptcoccus mutans infections in vitro in bovine dentin. After irrigation with ozonated water, the viability of E. faecalis and S. mutans invading dentinal tubules significantly decreased. Notably, when the specimen was irrigated with sonication, ozonated water had nearly the same antimicrobial activity as 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). We also compared the cytotoxicity against L-929 mouse fibroblasts between ozonated water and NaOCl. The metabolic activity of fibroblasts was high when the cells were treated with ozonated water, whereas that of fibroblasts significantly decreased when the cells were treated with 2.5% NaOCl. These results suggest that ozonated water application may be useful for endodontic therapy.

  20. Displacement of the contents of dentinal tubules and sensory transduction in intradental nerves of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, D; Matthews, B

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed on anaesthetized cats to test the hypothesis that fluid flow through dentinal tubules is part of the mechanism involved in the transduction of pain-producing stimuli in teeth. In 11 animals, fluid flow through dentine and single- and multi-unit activity in intradental nerves were recorded simultaneously during the application of changes in hydrostatic pressure (-500 to +500 mmHg) to exposed dentine. Seventeen A-fibres (conduction velocity (CV), 10.6-55.1 m s−1) were isolated that were pressure sensitive. The thresholds of these units in terms of dentinal fluid flow were in the range 0.3-2.1 nl s−1 mm−2 during outward flow from the pulp and 2.0-3.5 nl s−1 mm−2 during inward flow. All the units were more sensitive to outward than inward flow. Twenty-eight units (CV, 0.6-48.8 m s−1) were not pressure sensitive, and 12 of these had conduction velocities in the C-fibre range (< 2.5 m s−1). The velocities of the tubular contents were calculated by estimating the number and diameters of dentinal tubules exposed. At the threshold of single-fibre responses these velocities were in the range 31.7-222.9 μm s−1 during outward flow, and 211.4-369.6 μm s−1 during inward flow. Repetitive pressure stimulation of dentine resulted in a progressive reduction in the evoked discharge, which was probably due to pulp damage. In seven animals, 10 single intradental nerve fibres were selected that responded to hydrostatic pressure stimuli and their responses to the application of hot, cold, osmotic, mechanical and drying stimuli to exposed dentine were investigated. With these stimuli dentinal fluid flow could not be recorded in vivo for technical reasons and was therefore recorded in vitro after completion of the electrophysiological recordings. With each form of stimulus, the discharge evoked in vivo was closely related to the flow predicted from the in vitro measurements. The results were therefore consistent with the hypothesis that the

  1. Dentin tubule occlusion and erosion protection effects of dentifrice containing bioadhesive PVM/MA copolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Kang, Yang; Barnes, Virginia; DeVizio, William; Kashi, Ajay; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2013-04-01

    To study the effectiveness of a dentifrice containing polyvinylmethyl ether-maleic acid (PVM/MA) copolymer in occluding dentin tubules and investigate the interaction between PVM/MA and type I collagen using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Fifteen volunteers brushed dentin discs in situ using dentifrices with and without PVM/MA copolymer in a cross-over design. Dentin tubule occlusion was evaluated after brushing, after overnight saliva challenge in vivo for 12 h and after drinking 250 ml of orange juice. Dentin tubule occlusion and tubule size were compared between the two groups using repeated ANOVA and before and after erosive challenges using paired t tests. SPR using type I collagen as ligand and PVM/MA as analyte was performed to evaluate the binding of the two macromolecules. A median of 91% of dentin tubules were occluded after a single brushing in the PVM/MA group, as compared to 9% in the controls. After overnight saliva challenge and 10 min of erosion by orange juice, a median of 73% of the dentin tubules remained fully occluded in the PVM/MA group as compared to zero in the controls. Dentin tubule size increased after orange juice erosion in the controls but not in the PVM/MA group. SPR study showed that PVM/MA bound readily to collagen molecules in a 4 to 1 ratio. Dentifrice containing PVM/MA could effectively occlude dentin tubules and prevent dentin erosion. PVM/MA may improve adhesive retention of intra-tubular dentifrice plugs through binding to dentin surface collagen. Brushing with dentifrice containing adhesive polymers has preventive effect against dentin erosion and dentin sensitivity.

  2. The effect of dentine location and tubule orientation on the bond strengths between resin and dentine.

    PubMed

    Phrukkanon, S; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    1999-05-01

    This study determined the influence of dentine structure on the micro-tensile bond strengths between resin and dentine of two different dentine adhesive systems (Single Bond, 3M Dental Products, St Paul, MN; MF-102 (experimental self-etching primer), GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). The study was separated into two main parts: bond strength measurement and investigation of the bonding interface. Twenty-two human premolars were used for the bond strength measurement. Each tooth was cut vertically, separating the tooth into mesio-distal halves. One half of the tooth was used to bond to a surface perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and other half to bond to a surface parallel to the tubules. For each half, six locations of dentine were bonded. Each material was used in accordance to the manufacturer's directions. Cylindrical hourglass-shaped specimens of 1.2 mm diameter at the bonded interface were manufactured. The bonds were stressed in tension at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean bond strengths were compared using LSD, one-way ANOVA, and Student's t-test. The fractured surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope, and the frequency of fracture modes was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. For the investigation of the bonded interface, four teeth were prepared by the same procedure used for the bond test specimens. The bonded interfaces were observed after an acid-base treatment or fracturing across the bonded interface, prior to investigation with a field-emission scanning electron microscope. For Single Bond, the bond strengths for mid-root dentine were significantly lower than for other locations (p < 0.05). For MF-102, there was no significant difference for all locations (p > 0.05). MF-102 bonded well to all locations of dentine while Single Bond showed a porous zone at the base of the hybrid layer. The bonds were not influenced by tubule orientation. The results indicate that the bond for Single Bond may be affected by

  3. Treatment of dentinal tubules by Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelíčkova, Hana; Zapletalova, Zdeňka; Peřina, Jan, Jr.; Novotný, Radko; Kubínek, Roman; Stranyánek, Martin

    2005-08-01

    Symptom of cervical dentine hypersensitivity attacks from 10% to 15% of population and causes an uncomfortable pain during contact with any matter. Sealing of open dentinal tubules is one of the methods to reach insensibility. Laser as a source of coherent radiation is used to melt dentine surface layers. Melted dentine turns to hard mass with a smooth, non-porous surface. Simulation of this therapy was made in vitro by means of LASAG Nd:YAG pulsed laser system KLS 246-102. Eighty human extracted teeth were cut horizontally to obtain samples from 2 mm to 3 mm thick. First experiments were done on cross section surfaces to find an optimal range of laser parameters. A wide range of energies from 30 mJ to 210 mJ embedded in 0,3 ms long pulse was tested. Motion in X and Y axes was ensured by a CNC driven table and the pulse frequency 15 Hz was chosen to have a suitable overlap of laser spots. Some color agents were examined with the aim to improve surface absorption. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to evaluate all samples and provided optimal values of energies around 50 J.cm-2. Next experiments were done with the beam oriented perpendicularly to a root surface, close to the real situation. Optical fibers with the diameter of 0,6 mm and 0,2 mm were used to guide a laser beam to teeth surfaces. Laser processing heads with lens F = 100 mm and F = 50 mm were used. The best samples were investigated by means of the Atomic Force Microscopy.

  4. Microorganism penetration in dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal walls. In vitro SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sulaiman, Alaa; Al-Rasheed, Fellwa; Alnajjar, Fatimah; Al-Abdulwahab, Bander; Al-Badah, Abdulhakeem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This in vitro study aimed to investigate the ability of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) to penetrate dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal surface of split human teeth. Materials and Methods Sixty intact extracted human single-rooted teeth were divided into 4 groups, negative control, positive control without canal instrumentation, instrumented, and retreated. Root canals in the instrumented group were enlarged with endodontic instruments, while root canals in the retreated group were enlarged, filled, and then removed the canal filling materials. The teeth were split longitudinally after canal preparation in 3 groups except the negative control group. The teeth were inoculated with both microorganisms separately and in combination. Teeth specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the depth of penetration into the dentinal tubules was assessed using the SMILE view software (JEOL Ltd). Results Penetration of C. albicans and E. faecalis into the dentinal tubules was observed in all 3 groups, although penetration was partially restricted by dentin debris of tubules in the instrumented group and remnants of canal filling materials in the retreated group. In all 3 groups, E. faecalis penetrated deeper into the dentinal tubules by way of cell division than C. albicans which built colonies and penetrated by means of hyphae. Conclusions Microorganisms can easily penetrate dentinal tubules of root canals with different appearance based on the microorganism size and status of dentinal tubules. PMID:25383343

  5. Optical properties of human radicular dentin: ATR-FTIR characterization and dentine tubule direction influence on radicular post adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Jose; Zamataro, Claudia B.; Benetti, Carolina; Dias, Derly A.; Blay, Alberto; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge of dental structures is essential for understanding of laser interaction and its consequences during adhesion processes. Tubule density in dentin ranges from 4.900 to 90.000 per mm2, for diameters from 1 to 3 μm. Light propagation inside the tubules is associated with tubules orientation. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous work in literature characterizing physical-chemical alterations in dentin. The dentin samples were irradiated with a Er,Cr:YSGG Laser at wavelength 2.78 μm, with an energy density of 9.46 J/cm2 , above the ablation threshold. ATRFTIR at wavenumbers 2000 to 700 cm-1 was used to evaluate the differences among third root region and tubules orientation.

  6. Resin Adaptation of Radicular Dentin Tubules after Endodontic Instrumentation and Acid Etching.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    the manuscript. DISCLAIMERS The statements, opinions, and advertisements in the Journal of Endodontics are solely those of the individual authors...I RD-Ai26 872 RESIN ADAPTATION OF RADICULAR DENTIN TUBULES AFTER / I ENDODONTIC INSTRUMENTATION AND ACID ETCHING(U) WALTER I REED ARMY INST OF...Adaptation to Radicular Dentin Tubules SbisoofpeAfter Endodontic Instrumentation and Acid Etching 1982-1983 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORTNUMBER -, AUTHOR(a) S

  7. Qualitative analysis of precipitate formation on the surface and in the tubules of dentin irrigated with sodium hypochlorite and a final rinse of chlorhexidine or QMiX.

    PubMed

    Kolosowski, Kamil P; Sodhi, Rana N S; Kishen, Anil; Basrani, Bettina R

    2014-12-01

    Interaction of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) mixed with chlorhexidine (CHX) produces a brown precipitate containing para-chloroaniline (PCA). When QMiX is mixed with NaOCl, no precipitate forms, but color change occurs. The aim of this study was to qualitatively assess the formation of precipitate and PCA on the surface and in the tubules of dentin irrigated with NaOCl, followed either by EDTA, NaOCl, and CHX or by saline and QMiX by using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Dentin blocks were obtained from human maxillary molars, embedded in resin, and cross-sectioned to expose dentin. Specimens in group 1 were immersed in 2.5% NaOCl, followed by 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl, and 2% CHX. Specimens in group 2 were immersed in 2.5% NaOCl, followed by saline and QMiX. The dentin surfaces were subjected to TOF-SIMS spectra analysis. Longitudinal sections of dentin blocks were then exposed and subjected to TOF-SIMS analysis. All samples and analysis were performed in triplicate for confirmation. TOF-SIMS analysis of group 1 revealed an irregular precipitate, containing PCA and CHX breakdown products, on the dentin surfaces, occluding and extending into the tubules. In TOF-SIMS analysis of group 2, no precipitates, including PCA, were detected on the dentin surface or in the tubules. Within the limitations of this study, precipitate containing PCA was formed in the tubules of dentin irrigated with NaOCl followed by CHX. No precipitates or PCA were detected in the tubules of dentin irrigated with NaOCl followed by saline and QMiX. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effect of an arginine-containing polishing paste on Streptococcus mutans adhesion to exposed dentin surfaces].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinchen; Fu, Dongiie; Huang, Cui; Pei, Dandan; Sun, Hualing

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of an arginine-containing antihypersensitivity polishing paste on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adhesion to treated dentin. Dentin discs were treated with acid to expose dentin tubules, and then polished with either pumice or a polishing paste containing arginine. The surface roughness of the treated dentin was measured. The effects of dentin treatment on S. mutans adhesion and glucosyltransferase (GTFs) gene expression were also evaluated. The surface roughness decreased after polishing with both pumice and arginine-containing polishing paste. Moreover, the polishing paste affected gtfB and gtfC expressions. The arginine-containing polishing paste affects S. mutans adhesion, as well as gtfB and gtfC expressions. The polishing paste may be used to prevent caries in exposed dentin areas.

  9. Delivery of antibacterial nanoparticles into dentinal tubules using high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Annie; Fong, Siew-Wan; Khoo, Boo-Cheong; Kishen, Anil

    2009-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) produces collapsing cavitation bubbles. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of collapsing cavitation bubbles to deliver antibacterial nanoparticles into dentinal tubules to improve root canal disinfection. In stage 1, experiments were performed to characterize the efficacy of collapsing cavitation bubbles to deliver the miniature plaster beads into a tubular channel model. In stage 2, experiments were conducted on root-dentin blocks to test the efficacy of HIFU applied at 27 kHz for 2 minutes to deliver antibacterial nanoparticles into dentinal tubules. After the stage 2 experiment, the samples were sectioned and analyzed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The stage 1 experiment showed that collapsing cavitation bubbles using HIFU delivered plaster beads along the entire length of the tubular channel. It was observed from the stage 2 experiments that the diffusion of fluids alone was not able to deliver antibacterial nanoparticles into dentinal tubules. The collapsing cavitation bubbles treatment using HIFU resulted in significant penetration up to 1,000 microm of antibacterial nanoparticles into the dentinal tubules. The statistical analysis showed a highly significant difference in the depth of penetration of antibacterial nanoparticles between the two groups (<0.005). The cavitation bubbles produced using HIFU can be used as a potential method to deliver antibacterial nanoparticles into the dentinal tubules to enhance root canal disinfection.

  10. Nerve-targeted desensitizing toothpastes occlude dentin tubules and induce mineral precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Tao; Sauro, Salvatore; Wang, Yining; Xing, Wenzhong; Liang, Shanshan; Sa, Yue; Zhang, Chengfei; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus

    2012-02-01

    To examine the laboratory dentin tubules occlusion and mineral precipitation capability of two potassium salts-containing desensitizing toothpastes. 40 dentin disks were obtained and divided into four groups, including artificial saliva (AS), distilled water (DW), Sensodyne Freshmint (SF) and Colgate Sensitive (CS). Dentin permeability measurement was performed after EDTA etching, initial brush, 3-day brush, 7-day brush and citric acid challenge, respectively. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to monitor the variation of mineral content before and after treatments. The ultra-morphology of dentin surface was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate tubule occlusion. The two potassium salts-containing desensitizing toothpastes significantly reduced dentin permeability to less than 40% after 7-day treatment (P<0.05). The ATR-FTIR analysis showed increase of the intensity of the phosphate peak after a 7-day brushing period using both of the tested toothpastes. However, the dentin permeability significantly increased and the intensity of phosphate peak decreased after acid etching for all groups. The SEM examination revealed partially occluded dentin tubules after toothpaste treatments, but after the acid challenge the tubules were opened again.

  11. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  12. Near tubule and intertubular bovine dentin mapped at the 250 nm level

    PubMed Central

    Stock, S. R.; Veis, A.; Telser, A.; Cai, Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, simultaneous diffraction and fluorescence mapping with a (250 nm)2, 10.1 keV synchrotron x-ray beam investigated the spatial distribution of carbonated apatite (cAp) mineral and elemental Ca (and other cations including Zn) around dentin tubules. In 1 μm thick sections of near-pulp root dentin, where peritubular dentin (PTD) is newly forming, high concentrations of Zn, relative to those in intertubular dentin (ITD), were observed adjacent to and surrounding the tubule lumens. Some but not all tubules exhibited hypercalcified collars (high Ca signal relative to the surrounding ITD), and, when present, the zone of high Ca did not extend around the tubule. Diffraction rings from cAp 00.2 and 11.2+21.1+30.0 reflections were observed, and cAp was the only crystal phase detected. Profiles of Ca, Zn and cAp diffracted intensities showed the same transitions from solid to tubule lumen, indicating the same cAp content and organization in ITD far from the tubules and adjacent to them. Further, the matching Ca and diffraction profiles demonstrated that all of the Ca is in cAp or that any noncrystalline Ca was uniformly distributed throughout the dentin. Variation of 00.2 and 11.2+21.1+30.0 diffracted intensity was consistent with the expected biaxial crystallographic texture. Extension of x-ray mapping from near 1 μm resolution to the 250 nm level, performed here for dentin and its tubules, will provide new understanding of other mineralized tissues. PMID:21821132

  13. In Vitro Evaluation of Dentin Tubule Occlusion for Novel Calcium Lactate Phosphate (CLP) Paste

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jen-Chang; Hu, Hsin-Tai; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Hsieh, Sung-Chih; Huang, Pei-Chi; Ma, Chen-Feng; Ji, Dian-Yu; Chang, Liang-Yu; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this in vitro study is to evaluate the effective and long-term occlusion of dentinal tubules using a novel calcium lactate phosphate (CLP) based desensitizing agent. Methods: Dentin disks (n = 9) were pre-etched using 1 M lactic acid for 30 s and individually treated with Colgate® Pro-Relief™ paste, CLP paste, and double distilled water (ddH2O) by a rubber-cupped handpiece. Dentin disks were analyzed under optical micrographs for pre-treatment, directly after treatment, and 14 days post-treatment. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey’s test were used to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences in dentinal tubule diameter. Results: A significant decrease occurred in the mean tubule diameter for dentin disks treated with CLP paste. A decrease was observed from 3.52 ± 0.83 µm to 2.62 ± 0.42 µm right after treatment, further decreasing to 1.71 ± 0.45 µm after immersion in artificial saliva for 14 days (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that the CLP based desensitizing paste has remineralization properties and provides instant and lasting effectiveness in dentinal tubule occlusion. PMID:28772594

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of Dentin Tubule Occlusion for Novel Calcium Lactate Phosphate (CLP) Paste.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Chang; Hu, Hsin-Tai; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Hsieh, Sung-Chih; Huang, Pei-Chi; Ma, Chen-Feng; Ji, Dian-Yu; Chang, Liang-Yu; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2017-02-27

    The objective of this in vitro study is to evaluate the effective and long-term occlusion of dentinal tubules using a novel calcium lactate phosphate (CLP) based desensitizing agent. Dentin disks (n = 9) were pre-etched using 1 M lactic acid for 30 s and individually treated with Colgate(®) Pro-Relief™ paste, CLP paste, and double distilled water (ddH₂O) by a rubber-cupped handpiece. Dentin disks were analyzed under optical micrographs for pre-treatment, directly after treatment, and 14 days post-treatment. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test were used to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences in dentinal tubule diameter. A significant decrease occurred in the mean tubule diameter for dentin disks treated with CLP paste. A decrease was observed from 3.52 ± 0.83 µm to 2.62 ± 0.42 µm right after treatment, further decreasing to 1.71 ± 0.45 µm after immersion in artificial saliva for 14 days (p < 0.05). The results suggest that the CLP based desensitizing paste has remineralization properties and provides instant and lasting effectiveness in dentinal tubule occlusion.

  15. Localization of sulfated sialic acids in the dentinal tubules during tooth formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Rajeswari M H; Basilrose, Rajam M

    2005-01-01

    Lectin-like properties of the major enamel protein amelogenin suggest that it binds to glycoconjugates in dentinal tubules released at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) during enamel formation. Therefore, a detailed mapping of glycosylation in dentinal tubules during tooth formation was undertaken using histochemistry and lectin-binding assays. The tubular content exhibited sialidase-susceptible gamma-metachromasia with Toluidine Blue (pH 2.5) and staining with Alcian Blue (pH 1.0). The presence of sulfate groups was confirmed by benzidine reactions (Bracco-Curti's and tetrazonium assays). Alpha2,3-, alpha2,6- and alpha2,8-sialidases entirely abolished staining with the benzidine reactions. The presence of sialic acids in dentinal tubules was confirmed with the Bial's reaction and sialidase-susceptible binding of Limax flavus lectin suggesting that sialic acids are the major sulfated sugars in the glycoconjguates. Immunostaining with the monoclonal antibody 5-D-4 before and after treatment with chondroitin-4- and chondroitin-6-sulfatase confirmed the presence of keratan sulfate (KS), a sialylated proteoglycan, in dentinal tubules. We suggest that sulfated sialic acids are part of the KSs. The sulfated glycoconjugates are also found in dentin and the DEJ but not in predentin suggesting that amelogenin binds to the sialoconjugate during enamel formation.

  16. An in vitro investigation of two currently marketed dentin tubule occlusion dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Charles R; Willson, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative level of dentin tubule occlusion afforded by two dentifrices specifically developed to occlude dentin tubules, following finger-applied dab-on application and by repeated brushing, in a longitudinal acid-challenge-based dentin disk model. The impact of a dietary acid alone (grapefruit juice) on the level of dentin tubule occlusion conferred by each product following dab-on application was also explored in a separate short-term stand-alone exploratory dentin disk-based in vitro study. For the longitudinal study, 120 bovine dentin discs, polished and etched in citric acid for two minutes to provide a smooth dentin surface with patent tubules, were divided into three treatment groups and subjected to a finger application of the dentifrice only, or a combination of finger application and brushing. Prior to and between treatments, the dentin samples were stored in saliva (for > 60 minutes). The test products were an 8% w/w strontium acetate dentifrice (currently marketed as Sensodyne Rapid Relief), an arginine-based dentifrice (marketed as Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief), and deionized water. For the exploratory acid resistance study, 24 dentin samples were divided into two treatment groups. Treatment consisted of a single dab-on application with the test dentifrices to the hydrated surface of dentin, followed by exposure to either a 30-second or 10-minute grapefruit juice acid challenge. For both models, at the end of each treatment period, the samples were removed for scanning electron microscopy analysis and graded on a categorical visual scale. All data were analyzed statistically by unpaired t-test comparison. In the longitudinal (four-day) model, the strontium acetate-based dentifrice occluded dentin tubules significantly better than the currently marketed arginine-based dentifrice post-dab-on treatment and grapefruit juice challenge (p < 0.0001). At all other time points, the strontium acetate dentifrice

  17. In Vitro Ability of a Novel Nanohydroxyapatite Oral Rinse to Occlude Dentine Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert G.; Chen, Xiaohui; Gillam, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of a novel nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) desensitizing oral rinse to occlude dentine tubules compared to selected commercially available desensitizing oral rinses. Methods. 25 caries-free extracted molars were sectioned into 1 mm thick dentine discs. The dentine discs (n = 25) were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed with distilled water, prior to a 30-second application of test and control oral rinses. Evaluation was by (1) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the dentine surface and (2) fluid flow measurements through a dentine disc. Results. Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse. However the hydroxyapatite, 1.4% potassium oxalate, and arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinses, appeared to be relatively more effective than the nHA test and negative control rinses (potassium nitrate) in relation to a reduction in fluid flow measurements. Conclusions. Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse. PMID:26161093

  18. Immediate and short-term effects of in-office desensitizing treatments for dentinal tubule occlusion.

    PubMed

    Palazon, Milena Traversa; Scaramucci, Tais; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Correa; Prates, Renato Araújo; Lachowski, Karina Monteleone; Hanashiro, Fernando S; Youssef, Michel Nicolau

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the immediate and short-term effects of laser neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) irradiation and in-office desensitizing treatment on dentin tubule occlusion. Literature shows a lack of long-lasting treatments for dentin hypersensitivity. Forty-eight dentin slabs (4×4×2 mm) were ground flat, polished, and treated with 27% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to open the dentinal tubules. Specimens were randomly divided into the following experimental groups (n=12): Group 1: Control (no treatment); Group 2: Nd:YAG laser irradiation (100 mJ, 85 J/cm(2) per pulse with a quartz fiber of 400 μm, in scanning movements); Group 3: In-office prophylaxis with pumice; Group 4: In-office Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief™ Desensitizing Paste. Treatments were performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. After treatment, the specimens were submitted to a sequence of erosive and abrasive challenges, twice a day for 5 days. The specimens were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by scanning electron microscopy immediately after treatment and after 4 and 5 days. The response variable was the amount of occluded dentin tubules per area, determined by three different examiners with the use of visual criteria, with a standardized grade created in the PowerPoint program. Data were compared with ANOVA and Tukey's test, considering a 5% significance level. Immediately after treatment, a reduction in the number of opened dentin tubules was observed for the laser group when compared with the control group (p<0.05). After the experimental procedures, there were no quantitative differences between the amount of opened dentin tubules for all groups; however, micrographs showed some qualitative tubule occlusion for the laser group after the erosive/abrasive challenge. only laser irradiation was capable of immediately sealing the dentinal tubules; however, none of the treatments showed efficacy in

  19. Influence of the direction of tubules on bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, M; Okuda, M; Nakajima, M; Pereira, P N; Sano, H; Tagami, J

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the direction of dentinal tubules on resin-dentin tensile bond strength (mu TBS) using four commercially available bonding systems and observed the resin-dentin interfaces with an SEM. The dentin bonding systems used in this study were Clearfil Liner Bond II (LB, Kuraray), Imperva Fluoro Bond (FB, Shofu), Single Bond (SB, 3M) and One-Step (OS, BISCO). Thirty-six extracted caries-free human molars were used for micro tensile bond testing and eight additional teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The teeth were divided into two groups according to the direction of the dentinal tubules at the resin-dentin interface: a perpendicular group, in which the occlusal enamel was removed perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and a parallel group, in which the mesial half of the tooth was removed parallel to the long axis of the tooth, and the coronal dentin surface was used for bonding. After the flat dentin surfaces were polished with #600 silicon carbide paper, each surface was treated with one of the four adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's recommendation, then covered with resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray) to provide sufficient bulk for micro-tensile bond testing. After 24 hours in 37 degrees C water, the resin-bonded teeth were serially sliced perpendicular to the adhesive surface, the adhesive interface trimmed to a cross sectional area of 1 mm2 and subjected to tensile forces at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis of the tensile bond strengths were performed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at 95% level of confidence. The tensile bond strength of the group with tubules parallel to the bonded interface was higher than that of tubules cut perpendicularly. This tendency reached statistical significance using SB and OS.

  20. The effect of desensitizing dentifrices on dentin wear and tubule occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Raquel Marianna; Turbino, Miriam Lacalle; Zezell, Denise Maria; Scaramucci, Tais; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of desensitizing dentifrices on dentin erosive wear, using a 5-day erosion-abrasion-remineralization cycling model. The effect of the dentifrices on dentin's tubule occlusion was also investigated. 30 samples of root dentin were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10): (1) Colgate Total 12 Clean Mint (control, 1,450 ppm F); (2) Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (1,450 ppm F, Pro-Argin); and (3) Sensodyne Repair&Protect (1,450 ppm F, Novamin). Erosion was performed with a cola drink, for 5 minutes, 4x/day. Toothbrushing with the slurry dentifrices (1:2) was performed 2x/day, with electric toothbrushes, using standard pressure for 15 seconds. Surface loss (SL) was determined with optical profilometry at baseline and after the first, third and fifth days of cycling. Before treatment and in the end of the cycling, the amount of opened dentin tubules per area was evaluated in three randomly selected specimens from each group, by environmental scanning electron microscopy. The relative dentin abrasitivity (RDA) of the dentifrices was also measured. Data were statistically analyzed (α = 0.05). All the dentifrices showed a progressive increase in SL over time. However, no significant differences in SL among the dentifrices were observed at any time studied. Sensodyne Repair&Protect significantly reduced the number of opened dentin tubules when compared to the other groups. Colgate Total 12 Clean Mint showed the highest RDA, followed by Sensodyne Repair&Protect and then by Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief. The desensitizing dentifrices tested produced a similar rate of erosive dentin wear to the conventional dentifrice; however, only Sensodyne Repair&Protect was able to promote tubule occlusion.

  1. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

    PubMed Central

    Vatkar, Niranjan Ashok; Hegde, Vivek; Sathe, Sucheta

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser, and diode laser. The effect of disinfection methods was assessed by LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain under the confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine the “zone of dead bacteria” (ZDB). Mean values were calculated for ZDB and the difference between groups was established. Results: Penetration of E. faecalis was seen to a depth of >1000 μm. Viable bacteria were detected with NS irrigation. NaOCl and CHX showed partial ZDB. When the root canals were disinfected with Nd: YAG and diode lasers, no viable bacteria were found. Conclusion: E. faecalis has the ability to colonize inside dentinal tubules to a depth of >1000 μm. In contrast to conventional irrigants, both Nd: YAG and diode lasers were effective in eliminating the vitality of E. faecalis. NS, NaOCl, and CHX showed viable bacteria remaining in dentinal tubules. PMID:27656064

  2. Stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate dentifrice increases dentin resistance to tubule exposure in vitro.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Lawless, Michelle A; Fatade, Ayowumi; Baig, Arif; von Koppenfels, Roxana; Duschner, Heinz; Götz, Hermann

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reactivity of three dentifrice formulations on smear layer-covered root dentin surfaces, and the effects of the formulation treatments on resistance to acid softening and dentinal tubuli disclosure. Commercial dentifrices, including Crest Cavity Protection Regular, Colgate Total, and a new dentifrice comprised of stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate (SnF2/HMP: Crest Pro-Health), were cycled through a pre-treatment period on smear layer-covered dentin surfaces, including intermittent soaking in dentifrice slurries and whole human saliva immersion. Following pre-treatments, the cycling treatments were modified to include dietary acid exposure, including soaks in an acidic soft drink. Vickers surface microhardness, variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflection mode (CLSM) were used to characterize dentin reactivity and smear layer protection. CLSM and SEM analyses showed that specimens treated with SnF2/HMP appeared to resist acid solubilization, evidenced by the absence of disclosed dentinal tubuli. The histo-tomographic observations in this study were in agreement with the hardness measurements. The superior surface protection of dentin with SnF2/HMP would suggest potential benefits in ameliorating dentinal hypersensitivity in the clinical situation. A stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate dentifrice prevents dietary acid softening and tubule exposure of smear layer dentin surfaces.

  3. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age < 40). Aged dentin, in which the dentinal tubules were occluded with calcified material, recorded the highest mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen. PMID:26797297

  4. Comprehensive analyses of how tubule occlusion and advanced glycation end-products diminish strength of aged dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinno, Yuko; Ishimoto, Takuya; Saito, Mitsuru; Uemura, Reo; Arino, Masumi; Marumo, Keishi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    In clinical dentistry, since fracture is a major cause of tooth loss, better understanding of mechanical properties of teeth structures is important. Dentin, the major hard tissue of teeth, has similar composition to bone. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of human dentin not only in terms of mineral density but also using structural and quality parameters as recently accepted in evaluating bone strength. Aged crown and root dentin (age ≥ 40) exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and toughness than young dentin (age < 40). Aged dentin, in which the dentinal tubules were occluded with calcified material, recorded the highest mineral density; but showed significantly lower flexural strength than young dentin. Dentin with strong alignment of the c-axis in hydroxyapatite exhibited high fracture strength, possibly because the aligned apatite along the collagen fibrils may reinforce the intertubular dentin. Aged dentin, showing a high advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) level in its collagen, recorded low flexural strength. We first comprehensively identified significant factors, which affected the inferior mechanical properties of aged dentin. The low mechanical strength of aged dentin is caused by the high mineral density resulting from occlusion of dentinal tubules and accumulation of AGEs in dentin collagen.

  5. Comparison of the Penetration Depth of Conventional and Nano-Particle Calcium Hydroxide into Dentinal Tubules.

    PubMed

    Zand, Vahid; Mokhtari, Hadi; Hasani, Aila; Jabbari, Golchin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the penetration depth of conventional (CH) and nano-particle calcium hydroxide (NCH) into dentinal tubules. Ninety human single-rooted teeth were instrumented by RaCe rotary system and after chemomechanical preparation were randomly divided in two equal groups (n=45). In the first group conventional CH and in the other NCH was used as intracanal medicament. After 2 weeks of incubation all roots were intentionally split at longitudinal axis and prepared for scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation. Three zones of each root, coronal, middle and apical were examined under SEM and the maximum penetration depth of the dressing material into dentinal tubules was recorded for each zone. Data were analyzed using the independent sample t test and the level of significance was set at 0.05. In all of the three zones, NCH group had greater penetration depth than CH (P<0.001). In both groups the penetration depth increased from the apical section to the coronal. The depth of penetration of nano-particle calcium hydroxide into the dentinal tubules was significantly higher than that of conventional calcium hydroxide. The lowest penetration depth was observed in apical zone in both groups.

  6. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    DOE PAGES

    He, Peng; Wei, Biao; Wang, Steve; ...

    2013-01-01

    Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin’s tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT) theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI) from truncated data in amore » theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV) minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen.« less

  7. Comparative evaluation of NovaMin desensitizer and Gluma desensitizer on dentinal tubule occlusion: a scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Surabhi; Gowda, Ashwini Shivananje

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the effect of calcium sodium phosphosilicate (NovaMin) desensitizing agent, which is a powder-based system, and hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glutaraldehyde (Gluma desensitizer), which is liquid-based system, on dentinal tubule occlusion was analyzed by scanning electron microscope. The effects of the above two along with one control group were compared to determine the more effective method of sealing the dentinal tubules after initial application. Methods Twenty specimens were allocated to each of 3 groups: Control, Gluma desensitizer, and NovaMin. Two additional samples were also prepared and treated with Gluma and NovaMin; these samples were longitudinally fractured. The specimens were prepared from extracted sound human premolars and were stored in 10% formalin at room temperature. The teeth were cleaned of gross debris and then sectioned to provide one to two dentin specimens. The dentin specimens were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed in distilled water. Control discs were dried, and the test discs were treated with the desensitizing agents as per the manufacturer's instructions. The discs as well as longitudinal sections were later analyzed under the scanning electron microscope. The proportions of completely occluded, partially occluded, and open tubules within each group were calculated. The ratios of completely and partially occluded tubules to the total tubules for all the groups was determined, and the data was statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests and statistical significance was calculated. Results NovaMin showed more completely occluded tubules (0.545±0.051) while Gluma desensitizer showed more partially occluded tubules (0.532±0.075). The differences among all the groups were statistically significant (P≤ 0.05). Conclusion Both materials were effective in occluding dentinal tubules but NovaMin appeared more promising in occluding tubules completely after initial application. PMID:24455439

  8. Ability of three desensitizing agents in dentinal tubule obliteration and durability: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pathan, Azher Banu; Bolla, Nagesh; Kavuri, Sarath Raj; Sunil, Chukka Ram; Damaraju, Bhargavi; Pattan, Sadhiq Khan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three desensitizing agents on dentinal tubule obliteration and their durability in use on the dentinal tubules. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens were obtained from 30 extracted sound human maxillary first premolars. Each tooth was mesiodistally sectioned to obtain 30 buccal and 30 lingual surfaces, and enamel was removed in order to simulate hypersensitive dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups with 15 specimens each. Group 1 samples were immersed in artificial saliva, Group 2 samples were coated with Vivasens, Group 3 samples were coated with VOCO Admira Protect, and Group 4 samples were coated with Neo Active Apatite suspension. These specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) to find out the occluding ability of the respective products. The specimens were brushed to find out their durability for 1 week and 1 month and were examined under SEM. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Results: Group 1 differed significantly from the Vivasens, Admira, and Neo Active Apatite groups at 5% level of significance (P < 0.05). The Vivasens group differed significantly from the Admira and Neo Active Apatite groups at 5% level of significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The Ormocer-based Admira Protect showed the best results. PMID:26957790

  9. Effect of silver diamine fluoride and potassium iodide on residual bacteria in dentinal tubules.

    PubMed

    Hamama, H H; Yiu, C K; Burrow, M F

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial effect of a silver diamine fluoride (SDF)/potassium iodide (KI) product (Riva Star) on the viability of intratubular bacteria. Forty-five dentine discs prepared from caries-free maxillary premolars were randomly divided into nine groups. Group 1 (negative control) contained non-infected sound dentine discs. The remaining discs were infected with Streptococcus mutans suspension and received dentine treatments as follows: Group 2 (positive control), discs were left untreated; Group 3 SDF/KI (Riva Star); Group 4 chlorhexidine (CHX); Group 5 CHX+SDF/KI; Group 6 Carisolv; Group 7 Carisolv+SDF/KI; Group 8 Papacarie, and Group 9 Papacarie+SDF/KI. The discs were then fractured into two halves, stained with fluorescent LIVE/DEAD stain and observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. SDF/KI exhibited a potent antibacterial effect, as represented by a significantly higher percentage of dead bacteria, in comparison with Carisolv and Papacarie (p<0.05). The application of SDF/KI following Carisolv and Papacarie chemomechanical caries removel gels significantly reduced the viability of intra-tubular bacteria in these groups. The use of the silver diamine fluoride/potassium iodide product is effective in reducing the numbers of S. mutans in dentinal tubules infected with this organism. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  10. [Occluding effects of three new calcium desensitizers on dentinal tubules in vitro].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zheng-hui; Xia, Lu; Mei, Lei; Han, Guang-zheng; Chen, Ya-ming

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the occluding effects of three new calcium desensitizers on dentinal tubules in vitro. Twenty-five dentin specimens of 1.00 mm thick from freshly extracted third molars were divided into five groups randomly. After treatment with 6% citric acid, group A was treated with distilled water, and group B-E were treated with NovaMin, Pro-Argin, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), and 75% NaF glycerin for 2 min respectively. Then the teeth were vertically cleaved into two sections. The surfaces and cross sections were observed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), which were analyzed by the Image-Pro Plus software. The percentage of dentin tubules sealed were (81.6 ± 6.1)%, (71.5 ± 6.3)%, (43.2 ± 2.6)%, (39.9 ± 4.1)% for groups B, C, D and E respectively, and the occluding depth were (30.33 ± 2.26), (24.55 ± 2.58), (16.10 ± 4.65) and (8.90 ± 1.51) µm respectively. The differences between these groups were statistically significant (P < 0.01) except for group B and C (P > 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between all the groups for the Ca/P ratios (P = 0.342). NovaMin may have better immediate occluding effects than other desensitizers and could deposit a dentin-like mineral.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of dendrimer-functionalized nano-hydroxyapatite and its application in dentin tubule occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuandong; Xie, Fangfang; Ma, Xueling; Hao, Yuhong; Qin, Hejia; Long, Jindong

    2017-03-31

    The occlusion of dentinal tubules is an effective method to alleviate the symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity. In this paper, we successfully modified nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) with carboxyl-terminated polyamidoamine dendrimers by an aqueous-based chemical method and verified by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then the demineralization dentin discs were randomly divided into 4 groups, corresponding to subsequent brushing experiments: deionized water and kept in artificial saliva (AS), dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP and stored in AS, n-HAP and saved in AS, dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP and stored in deionized water. After 7 days of simulated brushing, dentin discs followed the in vitro characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and microhardness test. These data suggested that dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP could crosslink with collagen fibers and resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. Moreover, the new material can induce the HAP formation with the help of superficial carboxyl and fill the spaces in dentinal tubules furtherly. The microhardness of dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP-treated specimens was significantly higher than others. In summary, dendrimer-functionalized n-HAP can be a new therapeutic material for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

  12. The effects of Pain-Free Desensitizer on dentine permeability and tubule occlusion over time, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Agee, K; Pashley, D H; Pashley, E L

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new resin emulsion (Pain-Free Desensitizer) treatment for dentine hypersensitivity, for its ability to decrease dentine permeability. Crown segments were prepared from extracted, unerupted human 3rd molars by horizontal sectioning to remove occlusal enamel and the roots. The specimens were allocated in one of two groups: In group 1, the dentine surface was acid-etched to simulate the patent tubules of hypersensitive dentine. In group 2, the mineralized dentine surface was polished free of smear layer using a hydroxyapatite paste and ultrasonication. The hydraulic conductance of each specimen was then measured to obtain a pretreatment of control value. After a single treatment with resin desensitizer, the permeability was remeasured at 5 min, 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. Between measurements, the specimens were stored in buffer solution to simulate the solubilizing effects of saliva. Parallel specimens were followed by SEM examination. The results showed that a single treatment with resin desensitizer produced large, immediate, reductions in dentine permeability in both acid-etched and mineralized surfaces. In the acid-etched (group 1) specimens, the permeability returned to control values within 7 days, while the permeability of the group 2 specimens remained low even after 30 days of soaking. This simple treatment for occluding dentinal tubules may provide sufficient temporary reduction in dentine permeability to permit the development of natural desensitization.

  13. Epiphany sealer penetration into dentinal tubules: Confocal laser scanning microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ravi, S V; Nageswar, Rao; Swapna, Honwad; Sreekant, Puthalath; Ranjith, Madhavan; Mahidhar, Surabhi

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the following study was to evaluate the percentage and average depth of epiphany sealer penetration into dentinal tubules among the coronal, middle and apical thirds of the root using the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A total of 10 maxillary central incisors were prepared and obturated with Resilon-Epiphany system. Sealer was mixed with fluorescent rhodamine B isothiyocyanate dye for visibility under confocal microscope. Teeth were cross-sectioned into coronal, middle and apical sections-2 mm thick. Sections were observed under CLSM. Images were analyzed for percentage and average depth of sealer penetration into dentinal tubules using the lasso tool in Adobe Photoshop CS3 (Adobe systems incorporated, San jose, CA) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM 5) image analyzer. One-way analysis of variance with Student Neuman Keuls post hoc tests, Kruskal-Wallis test and Wilcoxon signed-rank post hoc tests. The results showed that a higher percentage of sealer penetration in coronal section-89.23%, followed by middle section-84.19% and the apical section-64.9%. Average depth of sealer penetration for coronal section was 526.02 μm, middle-385.26 μm and apical-193.49 μm. Study concluded that there was higher epiphany sealer penetration seen in coronal followed by middle and least at apical third of the roots.

  14. Preventive effect of a high fluoride toothpaste and arginine-carbonate toothpaste on dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge: a dentine permeability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; Pinheiro, Michele Carolina; Cavassim, Rodrigo; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Sampaio, José Eduardo Cezar

    2014-06-24

    Considering the current high use of high fluoride toothpastes, the aim of the study was to quantify alterations in the root dentine permeability submitted to treatment with a high fluoride toothpaste and 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste as a preventive treatment for dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge. Thirty-third molars were sectioned below the cementoenamel. The root segments were connected to a hydraulic pressure apparatus to measure dentine permeability after the following sequential steps (n = 10 per group): I) Baseline; II) treatment with phosphoric acid for 30 s (maximum permeability); III) Toothbrushing (1 min) according to the experimental groups (G1- control; G2- 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste; G3- 8% arginine-calcium carbonate toothpaste); IV) acid challenge for 5 min (orange juice). The data were converted into percentage, considering stage II as 100%. The results have shown a statistically significant decreasing on dentine permeability after treatment with toothpaste (Friedman test and Dunn's post hoc test). Comparison among groups demonstrated a high increasing on dentine permeability when acid challenge was performed after toothbrushing with distilled water (control group) (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post hoc test). The toothpaste treatment may provide sufficient resistance on dentine surface, preventing dentinal tubules exposure after acid challenge.

  15. Preventive effect of a high fluoride toothpaste and arginine-carbonate toothpaste on dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge: a dentine permeability evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Considering the current high use of high fluoride toothpastes, the aim of the study was to quantify alterations in the root dentine permeability submitted to treatment with a high fluoride toothpaste and 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste as a preventive treatment for dentinal tubules exposure followed by acid challenge. Methods Thirty-third molars were sectioned below the cementoenamel. The root segments were connected to a hydraulic pressure apparatus to measure dentine permeability after the following sequential steps (n = 10 per group): I) Baseline; II) treatment with phosphoric acid for 30 s (maximum permeability); III) Toothbrushing (1 min) according to the experimental groups (G1- control; G2- 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste; G3- 8% arginine-calcium carbonate toothpaste); IV) acid challenge for 5 min (orange juice). The data were converted into percentage, considering stage II as 100%. Results The results have shown a statistically significant decreasing on dentine permeability after treatment with toothpaste (Friedman test and Dunn’s post hoc test). Comparison among groups demonstrated a high increasing on dentine permeability when acid challenge was performed after toothbrushing with distilled water (control group) (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s post hoc test). Conclusion The toothpaste treatment may provide sufficient resistance on dentine surface, preventing dentinal tubules exposure after acid challenge. PMID:24958423

  16. Di-Calcium Phosphate and Phytosphingosine as an Innovative Acid-Resistant Treatment to Occlude Dentine Tubules.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Lin, Ching-Yang; Bikker, Floris J; Cama, Giuseppe; Dubruel, Peter; Soria, José M; D''Onofrio, Alessia; Gillam, David

    The present investigation evaluated the ability of an experimental di-calcium phosphate (DCP) desensitising agent used alone or combined with phytosphingosine (PHS) to occlude dentine tubules and resist a citric acid (CA) or artificial saliva (AS) challenge. Three groups of human dentine specimens (DS) were treated with the following: (1) PHS alone, (2) DCP or (3) a combination of PHS and DCP. Dentine hydraulic conductance of DS was evaluated using a digital flow sensor at 6.9 kPa. The average fluid volume for each of the treated DS was used to calculate the total dentine permeability reduction (%P) prior to and following CA immersion for 1 min or AS immersion for 4 weeks. The treated DS were subjected to both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis. Statistically significant differences (%P) were identified between the groups by ANOVA and Fisher's multiple comparison test (p < 0.05), respectively. Interestingly, both PHS and DCP appeared to work synergistically. DS treated with DCP or PHS/DCP demonstrated a significant reduction (%P) prior to and following CA or AS challenge (p < 0.05). Both the SEM and FTIR analyses showed consistent brushite crystals occluding the dentine tubules. Conversely, the application of PHS alone failed to demonstrate any significant reduction of dentine permeability (p > 0.05) or show any evidence of occlusion of the dentine tubules. DCP can be used alone or combined with PHS to decrease the dentine permeability as well as to resist a CA and AS challenge. These results would, therefore, suggest that DCP may be a suitable treatment option for dentine hypersensitivity. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Randomized in situ clinical study comparing the ability of two new desensitizing toothpaste technologies to occlude patent dentin tubules.

    PubMed

    West, N X; Macdonald, E L; Jones, S B; Claydon, N C A; Hughes, N; Jeffery, P

    2011-01-01

    To compare the ability of two new desensitizing toothpaste technologies (one a 5% NovaMin-based toothpaste and the other an 8% arginine-based toothpaste) to occlude patent dentin tubules in a clinical environment relative to a negative control of water and a control toothpaste after four days of twice-daily brushing and dietary acidic challenges. The study design was a single-center, single-blind, randomized, split-mouth, four-treatment, two-period, crossover, in situ clinical study. Healthy subjects wore two lower intra-oral appliances, retaining four dentin samples for four treatment days for each period of the clinical study. Samples were brushed twice daily with a test product (days 1-4), with an additional acidic challenge introduced on two selective days. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were taken of the dentin surface, and dentinal tubule occlusion assessed using a categorical scale. The results demonstrated that the 5% NovaMin toothpaste was statistically superior at occluding patent dentin tubules compared to water (p = 0.009) and the control toothpaste (p = 0.02) at day 4. In contrast, the treatment effect resulting from the 8% arginine toothpaste did not demonstrate the same degree of occlusive propensity, showing no significant difference to the water and control toothpaste at the day 4 time point. Application of the 5% NovaMin toothpaste to dentin showed better dentin tubule occlusion and retention abilities in an oral environment under dietary acid challenge conditions, more so than the 8% arginine toothpaste technology. Given modern dietary habits and practices, these results highlight differences in the acid resistance properties of occlusion technologies, and a potential impact on clinical performance.

  18. Effect of Erosion/Abrasion Challenge on the Dentin Tubule Occlusion Using Different Desensitizing Agents.

    PubMed

    Canali, Gabriela D; Rached, Rodrigo N; Mazur, Rui F; Souza, Evelise M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate dentinal tubule occlusion, measuring the dentin permeability (Lp) and using different desensitizing agents before and after abrasive/erosive challenge. Dentin discs from 42 healthy human third molars were obtained. Minimum Lp was measured after a smear layer simulation using #600 SiC paper and maximum Lp after an immersion in 0.5 M EDTA. The specimens were treated with different desensitizers: two varnishes (Clinpro XT Varnish-CV, Fluor Protector-FP), a paste (Desensibilize Nano P-NP) and a gel (Oxa Gel-OG). The Lp of each specimen was measured immediately after the desensitizers' application. The discs were subjected to erosion/abrasion cycles for 7 days, with 0.5% citric acid solution (6x/day) and tooth brushing (3x/day). Lp was measured after the first, fourth and seventh day of the challenge. The data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA with repeated measurements and by a Games-Howell test (α=5%). FP and CV did not show significant differences in Lp immediately after application until the 7th day (p<0.05). OG showed a significant increase in Lp after the 4th and 7th days. NP resulted in a significantly higher permeability compared to the other materials immediately after the application and after the 1st day of challenge. All the desensitizers reduced the dentin permeability immediately after application. However, only the varnishes were able to maintain the occlusive effect after the erosion/abrasion challenge.

  19. Dentinal Tubule Occluding Effect of Potassium Nitrate in Varied Forms, Frequencies and Duration: An In vitro SEM Analysis.

    PubMed

    James, Jesline Merly; Puranik, Manjunath P; Sowmya, K R

    2017-08-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is an exaggerated response to non-noxious sensory stimuli (osmotic, thermal or mechanical changes). An inverse relationship between occluding open tubules and the intensity of sensitivity has been reported. Studies on the efficacy of potassium nitrate used in different forms and frequencies to occlude dentinal tubules are scarce. To evaluate, in vitro the dentinal tubule occluding effect of potassium nitrate which differ in form, frequency and duration of application. In an in vitro study, 45 extracted human maxillary and mandibular premolars were sectioned using diamond disc to obtain 90 samples which were treated with 6% citric acid and were randomly assigned to three groups: Group 1 was treated with potassium nitrate toothpaste (once and twice daily for two minutes); Group 2 with potassium nitrate mouthwash (once and twice daily for two minutes) and Group 3 served as control (distilled water). Post-treatment, the samples were immersed in distilled water. The samples were subjected to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) at the end of 3, 7 and 14 days. SEM photographs were analysed based on extent of tubular occlusion. Chi-square test was applied to assess the significant difference between the groups. There was detectable difference in the dentinal tubule occlusion at the end of 3(rd), 7(th) and 14(th) day between three groups. When compared to the mouthwash, toothpaste yielded better results. Twice daily application for a period of two minutes each was better when compared to once daily for two minutes. Potassium nitrate is effective in occluding dentinal tubules when applied twice daily in toothpaste form than mouthwash form. However, randomised control trials are needed to confirm its efficacy in human subjects.

  20. Effect of generation 4.0 polyamidoamine dendrimer on the mineralization of demineralized dentinal tubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ru; Lu, Yi; Yang, Chang-Wei; Luo, Xiao; Han, Ying

    2014-10-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity is a type of clinical oral disease, which is highly prevalent worldwide. Although there are many materials to treat dentine hypersensitivity, their long-term therapeutic effects are not satisfactory. Therefore, the aim of this research was to observe and identify the biological mineralization of the generation 4.0 polyamidoamine dendrimer on the demineralized dentinal tubules at different time points. 2mm-thick slices were obtained from the cemento-enamel junction of 36 third molar teeth that simulated the condition of sensitivity with acid etching. Slices were treated with generation 4.0 polyamidoamine dendrimer and peptide bond condensing agent, while no treatment was applied on the slices of the control group. Following immersion in artificial saliva for 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks respectively, the mineralization condition of dentine slices was observed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, the differences in the samples of dental slices between the 2 groups were also detected using the microhardness test. SEM results showed that the average diameter and density of the dentinal tubules in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.001). The microhardness test exhibited a similar result, which suggested that the microhardness of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001). Generation 4.0 polyamidoamine dendrimer promotes the biomineralization of demineralized dentinal tubules. Moreover, this result also suggests that the 4.0th generation polyamidoamine dendrimer has the potential value for dentine hypersensitivity treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Ability of Triple Antibiotic Paste and Calcium Hydroxide in Disinfection of Dentinal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Adl, Alireza; Hamedi, Sabie; Sedigh Shams, Mahdi; Motamedifar, Mohamad; Sobhnamayan, Fereshte

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the ability of triple antibiotic paste (TAP) to calcium hydroxide (CH) in disinfecting dentinal tubules. Material and Methods: Sixty root blocks were obtained from extracted single-rooted human teeth. The root canals were enlarged with Gates-Glidden drills up to size 3 and were contaminated with Enterococcus. faecalis (E. faecalis), and then left for 21 days. The contaminated blocks were treated with saline (as negative control), CH or TAP. Dentin debris was obtained at the end of first and 7th days, using Gates-Glidden drills sizes 4 and 5 from two different depths of 100 and 200 µm. The vital bacterial load was assessed by counting the number of colony forming units (CFUs). The data was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis H and Dunn Post-Hoc tests. The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test was used to check for differences in bacterial growth at both depths (P<0.05). Results: In comparison with CH, the TAP significantly decreased the number of CFUs in both depths and time intervals (P<0.001), while the CH group showed a moderate antibacterial effect. Conclusion: TAP is more effective in disinfecting the canal against E. faecalis compared to CH. PMID:24688581

  2. Effects of dentifrice containing hydroxyapatite on dentinal tubule occlusion and aqueous hexavalent chromium cations sorption: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peiyan; Shen, Xiaoqing; Liu, Jing; Hou, Yarong; Zhu, Manqun; Huang, Jiansheng; Xu, Pingping

    2012-01-01

    In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr(6+)) solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr(6+) from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr(6+) from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution.

  3. Effects of Dentifrice Containing Hydroxyapatite on Dentinal Tubule Occlusion and Aqueous Hexavalent Chromium Cations Sorption: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Hou, Yarong; Zhu, Manqun; Huang, Jiansheng; Xu, Pingping

    2012-01-01

    In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr6+) solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr6+ from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr6+ from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution. PMID:23300511

  4. Influence of Ultrasonic Irrigation and Chloroform on Cleanliness of Dentinal Tubules During Endodontic Retreatment-An Invitro SEM Study

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Anurag; Gurtu, Anuraag; Vinayak, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic irrigation has been proved for its remarkable cleaning efficiency in the field of endodontics. But its role in endodontic re-treatment has been understated. There is not much data available to understand the effect of ultrasonic irrigation for the evaluation of cleanliness of dentinal tubules when it is used with or without chloroform, a gutta percha solvent during endodontic retreatment. Aim To compare the influence of ultrasonic irrigation with syringe irrigation on cleanliness of dentinal tubules after gutta perch removal for endodontic retreatment with or without the use of chloroform a gutta percha solvent using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods Freshly extracted 45 human mandibular premolar teeth for periodontal and orthodontic reasons were taken and were occlusally adjusted to a working length of 19 mm. The root canals of all teeth were prepared chemo mechanically to a master apical file size 40 and were divided in various groups. In Group 1 (n = 5; control group), the canals remained unfilled. In Groups 2 and 3 (n = 20 each), the canals were filled using lateral compaction with gutta-percha and AH plus sealer, removal of root fillings was undertaken after 2 weeks using Gates Glidden drills and H files without chloroform in Group 2 and with chloroform in group 3. The specimen of Group 2 and 3 were further divided into two subgroups I and II (n=10). In subgroup I, irrigation was done using side vented needles and sodium hypochlorite. In subgroup II irrigation was done using passive ultrasonic irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Thereafter, the roots were split and the sections were observed under SEM. The number of occluded dentinal tubules /total number of dentinal tubules were calculated for the coronal, middle and apical third of each root half. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test using standardized technique. Result Results indicated that the cleanest dentinal

  5. Influence of Ultrasonic Irrigation and Chloroform on Cleanliness of Dentinal Tubules During Endodontic Retreatment-An Invitro SEM Study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mahak; Singhal, Anurag; Gurtu, Anuraag; Vinayak, Vineet

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic irrigation has been proved for its remarkable cleaning efficiency in the field of endodontics. But its role in endodontic re-treatment has been understated. There is not much data available to understand the effect of ultrasonic irrigation for the evaluation of cleanliness of dentinal tubules when it is used with or without chloroform, a gutta percha solvent during endodontic retreatment. To compare the influence of ultrasonic irrigation with syringe irrigation on cleanliness of dentinal tubules after gutta perch removal for endodontic retreatment with or without the use of chloroform a gutta percha solvent using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Freshly extracted 45 human mandibular premolar teeth for periodontal and orthodontic reasons were taken and were occlusally adjusted to a working length of 19 mm. The root canals of all teeth were prepared chemo mechanically to a master apical file size 40 and were divided in various groups. In Group 1 (n = 5; control group), the canals remained unfilled. In Groups 2 and 3 (n = 20 each), the canals were filled using lateral compaction with gutta-percha and AH plus sealer, removal of root fillings was undertaken after 2 weeks using Gates Glidden drills and H files without chloroform in Group 2 and with chloroform in group 3. The specimen of Group 2 and 3 were further divided into two subgroups I and II (n=10). In subgroup I, irrigation was done using side vented needles and sodium hypochlorite. In subgroup II irrigation was done using passive ultrasonic irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Thereafter, the roots were split and the sections were observed under SEM. The number of occluded dentinal tubules /total number of dentinal tubules were calculated for the coronal, middle and apical third of each root half. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test using standardized technique. Results indicated that the cleanest dentinal tubules were found in the control group (Group 1

  6. Effect of desensitizing toothpastes on dentin.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Silveira, Camila Maggi Maia; Pochapski, Márcia Thaís; Pilatt, Gibson Luiz; Santos, Fábio André

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of toothbrushing with desensitizing toothpastes on dentin permeability and dentinal tubule occlusion. Fifty rats provided two hundred incisor teeth divided into five groups: DW, brushed with distilled water (control); FT, brushed with fluoride toothpaste; SCT, brushed with strontium chloride toothpaste; PCT, brushed with potassium citrate toothpaste; and PNT, brushed with potassium nitrate toothpaste. Cavities were prepared to expose the dentinal tubules, and the incisor teeth were brushed using the experimental agents. After each treatment, Evans blue dye solution was applied to the teeth. Dentin permeability was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-rays (EDX). There were significant differences (p < 0.0001, ANOVA) among the groups regarding dentin permeability, number of dentinal tubules, diameter of dentinal tubules, and opened tubular area. In the SCT, PCT and PNT groups, opened and partially occluded tubules, deposits, and a few smear layers were observed. In the DW and FT groups, most of the dentinal tubules were open, with no deposits or smear layers on the dentin. EDX revealed peaks of calcium and phosphorus in all of the groups, as well as traces of strontium in the SCT group and of potassium in the PCT and PNT groups. Desensitizing toothpaste decreased dentin permeability, although it produced only partial dentin tubule occlusion.

  7. Effects of tooth-brushing force with a desensitising dentifrice on dentine tubule patency and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Mullan, F; Paraskar, S; Bartlett, D W; Olley, R C

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of a 5% NovaMin containing dentifrice on dentine tubule patency and surface roughness at 100g and 400g tooth brush abrasion forces. 75 polished human dentine samples were prepared and randomly allocated into one of five groups; control (1), Na2PFO3 100g abrasion force (2), NovaMin 100g (3), Na2PFO3 400g (4) and NovaMin 400g (5). The control group underwent two 2-min cycles of artificial saliva (AS), one 2-min erosion cycle; the rest underwent two toothbrush abrasion cycles in an AS/dentifrice slurry and one 2-min erosion cycle. All samples were imaged at baseline and post intervention using Tandem Scanning Microscopy and Profilometry to analyse tubule patency and roughness. Mean tubule patency increased significantly between baseline and post intervention in groups 1,2 and 4 and decreased significantly post intervention in groups 3 and 5 (p<0.01). Post intervention, there were statistically significant differences in mean patent tubules between NovaMin and the Na2PFO3 and control groups (p<0.001). Surface roughness increased for all groups between baseline and post interventions (P<0.001); mean (SD) roughness increases for groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were 0.14 (0.05) μm, 0.18 (0.04) μm, 0.16 (0.06) μm, 0.19 (0.07) μm and 0.21 (0.02) μm respectively. Differences between group 1 and 5 were significant (p<0.01). Brushing with NovaMin resulted in significant dentine tubule occlusion at 100g and 400g, but brushing with Na2PFO3 resulted in increased tubule patency. Surface roughness increased significantly at 400g brushing with NovaMin. There was no correlation between tubule patency and surface roughness. A NovaMin desensitising dentifrice resulted in tubule occlusion even at high brushing forces. There was minimal increase in surface roughness at the lower (100g) brushing force. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects of CO2 Laser with or without Nanohydroxyapatite Paste in the Occlusion of Dentinal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Al-maliky, Mohammed Abbood; Mahmood, Ali Shukur; Al-karadaghi, Tamara Sardar; Kurzmann, Christoph; Laky, Markus; Franz, Alexander; Moritz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new treatment modality for the occlusion of dentinal tubules (DTs) via the combination of 10.6 µm carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and nanoparticle hydroxyapatite paste (n-HAp). Forty-six sound human molars were used in the current experiment. Ten of the molars were used to assess the temperature elevation during lasing. Thirty were evaluated for dentinal permeability test, subdivided into 3 groups: the control group (C), laser only (L−), and laser plus n-HAp (L+). Six samples, two per group, were used for surface and cross section morphology, evaluated through scanning electron microscope (SEM). The temperature measurement results showed that the maximum temperature increase was 3.2°C. Morphologically groups (L−) and (L+) presented narrower DTs, and almost a complete occlusion of the dentinal tubules for group (L+) was found. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test for permeability test data showed statistical differences between the groups (P < 0.05). For intergroup comparison all groups were statistically different from each other, with group (L+) showing significant less dye penetration than the control group. We concluded that CO2 laser in moderate power density combined with n-HAp seems to be a good treatment modality for reducing the permeability of dentin. PMID:25386616

  9. Dead Tracts in Dentine 1

    PubMed Central

    Fish, E. W.

    1928-01-01

    (1) When the dentinal tubules are opened or sufficiently irritated, their contents coagulate and die. (2) Following this, the pulp lays down an impermeable barrier of lime salts (secondary dentine) to protect itself from contact with the dead tubules. Alternatively the pulp itself dies. (3) The evidence that exposed dentine always dies is as follows: (a) Such dentine is insensitive right through to the secondary dentine. (b) The injured dentine is found experimentally to be shut off from the pulp in such a way that fluids cannot enter it. It thus lacks the necessary body fluids to support life. (c) Under an injury the primary dentine is seen to stop abruptly at the original pulp margin, and to be sealed off with a homogeneous barrier of lime salts before the tubules of the secondary dentine start. The tubules of the secondary dentine take origin below this homogeneous layer in fine branches and obviously have no connexion with the injured primary tubules. (d) The injured tubules although walled off from the pulp remain permeable from the mouth and have therefore not died by slow calcification. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:19986764

  10. Push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of different root canal sealers used with coated core materials.

    PubMed

    Deniz Sungur, Derya; Purali, Nuhan; Coşgun, Erdal; Calt, Semra

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of root canal sealers used with coated core materials and conventional gutta-percha. A total of 72 single-rooted human mandibular incisors were instrumented with NiTi rotary files with irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl. The smear layer was removed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Specimens were assigned into four groups according to the obturation system: Group 1, EndoRez (Ultradent Product Inc.); Group 2, Activ GP (Brasseler); Group 3, SmartSeal (DFRP Ltd. Villa Farm); Group 4, AH 26 (Dentsply de Trey)/gutta-percha (GP). For push-out bond strength measurement, two horizontal slices were obtained from each specimen (n = 20). To compare dentinal tubule penetration, remaining 32 roots assigned to 4 groups as above were obturated with 0.1% Rhodamine B labeled sealers. One horizontal slice was obtained from the middle third of each specimen (n = 8) and scanned under confocal laser scanning electron microscope. Tubule penetration area, depth, and percentage were measured. Kruskall-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. EndoRez showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than the others (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found amongst the groups in terms of percentage of sealer penetration. SmartSeal showed the least penetration than the others (p < 0.05). The bond strength and sealer penetration of resin-and glass ionomer-based sealers used with coated core was not superior to resin-based sealer used with conventional GP. Dentinal tubule penetration has limited effect on bond strength. The use of conventional GP with sealer seems to be sufficient in terms of push-out bond strength.

  11. Push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of different root canal sealers used with coated core materials

    PubMed Central

    Purali, Nuhan; Coşgun, Erdal; Calt, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of root canal sealers used with coated core materials and conventional gutta-percha. Materials and Methods A total of 72 single-rooted human mandibular incisors were instrumented with NiTi rotary files with irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl. The smear layer was removed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Specimens were assigned into four groups according to the obturation system: Group 1, EndoRez (Ultradent Product Inc.); Group 2, Activ GP (Brasseler); Group 3, SmartSeal (DFRP Ltd. Villa Farm); Group 4, AH 26 (Dentsply de Trey)/gutta-percha (GP). For push-out bond strength measurement, two horizontal slices were obtained from each specimen (n = 20). To compare dentinal tubule penetration, remaining 32 roots assigned to 4 groups as above were obturated with 0.1% Rhodamine B labeled sealers. One horizontal slice was obtained from the middle third of each specimen (n = 8) and scanned under confocal laser scanning electron microscope. Tubule penetration area, depth, and percentage were measured. Kruskall-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. Results EndoRez showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than the others (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found amongst the groups in terms of percentage of sealer penetration. SmartSeal showed the least penetration than the others (p < 0.05). Conclusions The bond strength and sealer penetration of resin-and glass ionomer-based sealers used with coated core was not superior to resin-based sealer used with conventional GP. Dentinal tubule penetration has limited effect on bond strength. The use of conventional GP with sealer seems to be sufficient in terms of push-out bond strength. PMID:27200279

  12. Transmission electron microscopic characterization of hypersensitive human radicular dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiyama, M.; Noiri, Y.; Ozaki, K.; Uchida, A.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ishida, H. )

    1990-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray microanalysis (XMA) were used for the study of the ultrastructure of the lumens of dentinal tubules in superficial layers of dentin specimens obtained by use of a new biopsy technique from both hypersensitive and naturally desensitized areas of exposed root surfaces, in vivo. The TEM images showed clearly that the lumens of most of the tubules were occluded with mineral crystals in naturally desensitized areas, but such lumens were empty and surrounded with peritubular and intertubular dentin in hypersensitive areas. Moreover, electron-dense structures that lined peritubular dentin were observed in the empty lumens of dentinal tubules.

  13. Effects of toothbrushing prior and/or subsequent to dietary acid application on smear layer formation and the patency of dentinal tubules: an SEM study.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, R; Kourkouta, S

    1995-06-01

    Dentine sensitivity is a quite common condition, associated with open dentinal tubules patent all the way to the pulp. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effects of toothbrushing preceded and/or followed by dietary acid application on the patency of dentinal tubules. Dentine sections were prepared from recently extracted human molars and, after removal of the smear layer, were treated as follows: 1) toothbrushing alone; 2) toothbrushing followed by exposure to orange juice; and 3) toothbrushing subsequent to orange juice exposure. All specimens were observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) at a standard magnification and the patency of the dentinal tubules estimated. Results showed that toothbrushing alone was the most effective in occluding the tubules, followed by toothbrushing subsequent to dietary acid application, and then by toothbrushing prior to dietary acid application. From the results of this study it may be that in cases of dentine sensitivity toothbrushing should not precede or follow dietary acid application but be separate from mealtimes. Clinical research is required to confirm the findings of this in vitro study.

  14. Assessment of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) in Disinfection of Deeper Dentinal Tubules in a Root Canal System: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Dara John; Agali, Chandan R; Punia, Himanshu; Gupta, Vipul; Singh, Vikas; Kadtane, Safalya; Chandra, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Context: The success of endodontic treatment therapy depends on how well we eliminate pathogenic microflora from the root canal system as micro organism as the major cause of root canal infection. Conventional root canal treatment can fail if microorganisms cannot be removed sufficiently by thorough cleaning, shaping of root canal. Newer modalities such as photodynamic therapy are being tried now a days for disinfection of root canals. Aim & Objectives: The basic aim of this study was assessment of the antimicrobial efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy in deeper dentinal tubules for effective disinfection of root canals using microbiological and scanning electron microscopic examination in vitro. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College & Research Centre. The teeth required for study was collected from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Only freshly extracted 20 intact, non carious single rooted teeth which were indicated for orthodontic treatment were taken for this study. Statistical analysis was done using Student’s Unpaired t-test were at (p<0.001) was found to be highly significant. Microbiological examination of samples were done and colony forming units were counted to assess the disinfection potential of photodynamic therapy. Scanning electron microscopic examination of samples was done to check penetration of bacteria’s into deeper dentinal tubules. Results: On examination, there was a marked reduction in microbial growth after use of photodynamic therapy. On scanning electron microscopic examination, it was observed that there were less number of bacteria’s in deeper dentinal tubules in case of PDT group as compared to control group. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that PDT can be effectively used during antimicrobial procedures along with conventional disinfection procedure for sterilization of root canals. PMID:25584321

  15. The evaluation of dentinal tubule occlusion by desensitizing agents: a real-time measurement of dentinal fluid flow rate and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S Y; Kim, E J; Kim, D S; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine changes in dentinal fluid flow (DFF) during the application of a desensitizing agent and to compare the permeability reduction levels among different types of desensitizing agents. A cervical cavity was prepared for the exposure of cervical dentin on an extracted human premolar connected to a subnanoliter fluid flow measuring device under 20 cm of water pressure. The cavity was acid-etched with 32% phosphoric acid to make dentin highly permeable. The different types of desensitizing agents that were applied on the cavity were Seal&Protect as the light-curing adhesive type, SuperSeal and BisBlock as oxalate types, Gluma Desensitizer as the protein-precipitation type, and Bi-Fluoride 12 as the fluoride type. DFF was measured from the time before the application of the desensitizing agent throughout the application procedure to five minutes after the application. The characteristics of dentinal tubule occlusion of each desensitizing agent were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The DFF rate after each desensitizing agent application was significantly reduced when compared to the initial DFF rate before application for all of the desensitizing agents (p<0.05). Seal&Protect showed a greater reduction in the DFF rate when compared to Gluma Desensitizer and Bi-Fluoride 12 (p<0.05). SuperSeal and BisBlock exhibited a greater reduction in DFF rate when compared to Bi-Fluoride 12 (p<0.05). The dentin hypersensitivity treatment effects of the employed desensitizing agents in this study were confirmed through real-time measurements of DFF changes. The light-curing adhesive and oxalate types showed greater reduction in the DFF rate than did the protein-precipitation and fluoride types.

  16. The deposition of AgCl into tubules of the human tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levstik, A.; Leskovec, J.; Filipic, C.; Kutnjak, Z.; Zeks, B.; Kordas, M.

    2001-03-01

    The deposition of AgCl in the human tooth dentine was studied as a function of the time and dc electrical field using a scanning electron microscope and by measurements of the frequency-dependent complex dielectric constant. Dielectric properties of the tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was recently developed for the dielectric response of hydrating porous cement paste. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by the electron microscopy and dielectric spectroscopy techniques.

  17. Influence of powder composition and morphology on penetration of gray and white ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide into dentin tubules

    PubMed Central

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Long, Leann; Ahn, Chul; Spears, Robert; Zhu, Qiang; Eberhart, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of powder composition and morphology on the penetration of Gray and White ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA, WMTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH) into open dentin tubules. GMTA, WMTA, and CH particle dimensions were analyzed by flow particle image analysis (FPIA). Penetration of open dentin tubules into dentin discs was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Five samples of each material were randomly selected and prepared for this study. The GMTA averages for length (μm), width (μm), perimeter (μm), and aspect ratio were 1.94 ± 1.65, 1.43 ± 1.19, 5.61 ± 4.27, and 0.76 ± 0.14, respectively. Corresponding averages for WMTA were 2.04 ± 1.87, 1.49 ± 1.33, 5.88 ± 4.81, and 0.76 ± 0.14, and for CH were 2.26 ± 1.99, 1.62 ± 1.46, 6.70 ± 5.60, and 0.74 ± 0.15, respectively. The rank order of the averages for particle length, width and perimeter from the largest to the smallest material was CH > WMTA > GMTA. The rank order of the averaged aspect ratios was GMTA > WMTA > CH. SEM showed that all three materials, when deposited and agitated on dentin discs, penetrated the open dentin tubules. Tubule occlusion occurred as particle surface concentrations increased. Significant differences in particle length, width, perimeter, and aspect ratio were observed for GMTA, WMTA, and CH (P < 0.0001 in all cases). All particle types penetrated into open tubules when agitated on dentin discs; all tubules were eventually occluded as particle concentrations grew. PMID:25500926

  18. Influence of powder composition and morphology on penetration of Gray and White ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide into dentin tubules.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Long, Leann; Ahn, Chul; Spears, Robert; Zhu, Qiang; C Eberhart, Robert

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the influence of powder composition and morphology on the penetration of Gray and White ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA, WMTA) and calcium hydroxide (CH) into open dentin tubules. GMTA, WMTA, and CH particle dimensions were analyzed by flow particle image analysis (FPIA). Penetration of open dentin tubules into dentin discs was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Five samples of each material were randomly selected and prepared for this study. The GMTA averages for length (μm), width (μm), perimeter (μm), and aspect ratio were 1.94 ± 1.65, 1.43 ± 1.19, 5.61 ± 4.27, and 0.76 ± 0.14, respectively. Corresponding averages for WMTA were 2.04 ± 1.87, 1.49 ± 1.33, 5.88 ± 4.81, and 0.76 ± 0.14, and for CH were 2.26 ± 1.99, 1.62 ± 1.46, 6.70 ± 5.60, and 0.74 ± 0.15, respectively. The rank order of the averages for particle length, width and perimeter from the largest to the smallest material was CH > WMTA > GMTA. The rank order of the averaged aspect ratios was GMTA > WMTA > CH. SEM showed that all three materials, when deposited and agitated on dentin discs, penetrated the open dentin tubules. Tubule occlusion occurred as particle surface concentrations increased. Significant differences in particle length, width, perimeter, and aspect ratio were observed for GMTA, WMTA, and CH (P < 0.0001 in all cases). All particle types penetrated into open tubules when agitated on dentin discs; all tubules were eventually occluded as particle concentrations grew. (J Oral Sci 56, 287-293, 2014).

  19. Bactericidal effect of Er:YAG laser combined with sodium hypochlorite irrigation against Enterococcus faecalis deep inside dentinal tubules in experimentally infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Chen, B; Qiu, J; He, W; Lv, H; Qu, T; Yu, Q; Tian, Y

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the bactericidal effect of Er:YAG laser radiation combined with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) irrigation in the treatment of Enterococcus faecalis deep inside dentinal tubules. The Er:YAG laser was activated, respectively, at 0.3, 0.5 and 1.0 W for either 20 or 30 s; 52.5 g l(-1) NaOCl and normal saline were used for the control groups. Root canals before and after treatments were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacterial reductions both on the root canal walls and at 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules were analysed using a one-way analysis of variance. SEM results showed that the Er:YAG laser combined with NaOCl disinfected the dentinal tubules from 200 to over 500 μm depth as irradiation power and time increased. This combination killed significantly more bacteria than both the negative control group at each level tested and the positive control group at 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules. It reached 100% in all experimental groups, both on the root canal walls and at 100 and 200 μm inside the dentinal tubules. However, at 300, 400 and 500 μm inside the dentinal tubules, only the groups treated with 0.5 and 1.0 W for 30s exhibited no bacterial growth. Of the two groups in which no bacteria were detected at all tested depths, Er:YAG laser irradiation at 0.5 W for 30 s combined with NaOCl irrigation was preferable because of the lower emission power and shorter irradiation time, and may serve as a new option for effective root canal disinfection.

  20. A decision tree for the management of exposed cervical dentin (ECD) and dentin hypersensitivity (DHS).

    PubMed

    Martens, Luc C

    2013-03-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity (DHS) is a problematic clinical entity that may become an increasing clinical problem for dentists to treat as a consequence of patients retaining their teeth throughout life and improved oral hygiene practices. The aim of this review was to develop a decision tree for the management of exposed cervical dentin (ECD) and DHS. A brief PUBMED literature search was performed on dentin hypersensitivity using "MeSH" terms, "review", and "management". In addition, some websites and local guidelines were screened. From this review, it became clear that all dentate patients should routinely be screened for ECD and DHS. In this respect, underdiagnosis of the condition will be avoided and the preventive management can be initiated early. A decision tree process and a flowchart for daily practice were designed which should be started up as soon as a patient present with ECD or suffers from DHS. This approach takes into account the possible improved quality of life of the patient and is further based on a hierarchy of treatment options. In this respect, active management of DHS will usually involve a combination of at-home and in-office therapies. Starting with the use of desensitizing toothpastes is strongly recommended.

  1. The effects of oxalate-containing products on the exposed dentine surface: an SEM investigation.

    PubMed

    Gillam, D G; Mordan, N J; Sinodinou, A D; Tang, J Y; Knowles, J C; Gibson, I R

    2001-11-01

    In-office products containing oxalates have been claimed to be clinically effective in reducing dentine sensitivity, although there has been limited supporting clinical data. The rationale for their use appears to be based on their potential to act as occluding and/or nerve desensitizing agents. Four commercially available oxalate-containing products were applied to etched dentine discs and the extent of tubule occlusion was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Tenure Quick (aluminium oxalate), Sensodyne Sealant (ferric oxalate) and MS Coat (oxalic acid) covered the dentine surface and occluded the tubules. However, Butler Protect (potassium oxalate) did not cover the surface to any great extent but provided some occlusion. The presence of oxalates after application to glass slides and dentine discs was examined using thin film X-ray diffraction. From samples on glass, only potassium oxalate could be clearly identified (JCPDS 14-0845). No oxalate was detected on dentine discs in either thin film geometry or standard theta two theta mode. We have demonstrated that professionally applied in-office products containing oxalate are capable of covering the dentine surface and/or occluding the tubules to varying degrees. However, X-ray diffraction analysis was unable to confirm the oxalate profile for all products as described in the available commercial literature.

  2. Efficacy of 4 Irrigation Protocols in Killing Bacteria Colonized in Dentinal Tubules Examined by a Novel Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Adham A.; Aksel, Hacer; Zhuang, Tingting; Mashtare, Terry; Babu, Jegdish P.; Huang, George T.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of 4 irrigation systems in eliminating bacteria in root canals, particularly in dentinal tubules. Methods Roots of human teeth were prepared to 25/04, autoclaved, and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks. Canals were then disinfected by (1) standard needle irrigation, (2) sonically agitating with EndoActivator, (3) XP Endo finisher, or (4) erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser (PIPS) (15 roots/group). The bacterial reduction in the canal was determined by MTT assays. For measuring live versus dead bacteria in the dentinal tubules (4 teeth/group), teeth were split open and stained with LIVE/DEAD BackLight. Coronal, middle, and apical thirds of the canal dentin were scanned by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to determine the ratio of dead/total bacteria in the dentinal tubules at various depths. Results All 4 irrigation protocols significantly eliminated bacteria in the canal, ranging from 89.6% to 98.2% reduction (P < .001). XP Endo had the greatest bacterial reduction compared with other 3 techniques (P < .05). CLSM analysis showed that XP Endo had the highest level of dead bacteria in the coronal, middle, and apical segments at 50-μm depth. On the other hand, PIPS had the greatest bacterial killing efficiency at the 150-μm depth in all 3 root segments. Conclusions XP Endo appears to be more efficient than other 3 techniques in disinfecting the main canal space and up to 50 μm deep into the dentinal tubules. PIPS appears to be most effective in killing the bacteria deep in the dentinal tubules. PMID:27130334

  3. Efficacy of 4 Irrigation Protocols in Killing Bacteria Colonized in Dentinal Tubules Examined by a Novel Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope Analysis.

    PubMed

    Azim, Adham A; Aksel, Hacer; Zhuang, Tingting; Mashtare, Terry; Babu, Jegdish P; Huang, George T-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficiency of 4 irrigation systems in eliminating bacteria in root canals, particularly in dentinal tubules. Roots of human teeth were prepared to 25/04, autoclaved, and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks. Canals were then disinfected by (1) standard needle irrigation, (2) sonically agitating with EndoActivator, (3) XP Endo finisher, or (4) erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser (PIPS) (15 roots/group). The bacterial reduction in the canal was determined by MTT assays. For measuring live versus dead bacteria in the dentinal tubules (4 teeth/group), teeth were split open and stained with LIVE/DEAD BackLight. Coronal, middle, and apical thirds of the canal dentin were scanned by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to determine the ratio of dead/total bacteria in the dentinal tubules at various depths. All 4 irrigation protocols significantly eliminated bacteria in the canal, ranging from 89.6% to 98.2% reduction (P < .001). XP Endo had the greatest bacterial reduction compared with other 3 techniques (P < .05). CLSM analysis showed that XP Endo had the highest level of dead bacteria in the coronal, middle, and apical segments at 50-μm depth. On the other hand, PIPS had the greatest bacterial killing efficiency at the 150-μm depth in all 3 root segments. XP Endo appears to be more efficient than other 3 techniques in disinfecting the main canal space and up to 50 μm deep into the dentinal tubules. PIPS appears to be most effective in killing the bacteria deep in the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Efficacy of Iontophoresis with 0.33% Sodium Fluoride Gel and Diode Laser Alone on Occlusion of Dentinal Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Siddhartha; Suragimath, Girish; Abbayya, Keshava; Zope, Sameer Anil; Kale, Vishwajeet

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dentinal Hypersensitivity (DH) is one of the most commonly encountered clinical problems. Literature reveals no specific therapy to satisfactorily eliminate dentinal hypersensitivity. Aim The aim of this study was to assess and compare the efficacy of iontophoresis with 0.33% Sodium Fluoride (NaF) gel and diode laser alone in dentinal tubule occlusion. Materials and Methods This in vitro study included 20 teeth with intact root surfaces unaltered by extraction procedure for specimen preparation. Each tooth was cleaned, air dried and cut into three sections. Total 60 sections were prepared (30 longitudinal and 30 transverse sections), which were acid etched. In control group, no treatment was carried. In iontophoresis treatment group, samples were inserted into a foam tray containing 0.33 % NaF Gel and subjected to 1.5 mA output current for three minutes. In laser treatment group, specimens were lased with 980 nm diode laser at 0.5 W/PW (62.2J /cm2) in a noncontact mode for 30 seconds. Specimens were evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at 10KV to 20KV under x 2000, x5000 magnification for surface characteristics and patency of dentinal tubules. Total number of tubules visible, open, completely and partially occluded were recorded in each microphotograph and compared. Results On comparison, laser group showed the least number of open tubules i.e., 130 (31.1%) followed by iontophoresis group, 155 (51.32%) and control group 417 (100%). Conclusion Diode laser application provided better results as compared to iontophoresis on occlusion of dentinal tubules. Hence, it can be used to treat the patients with DH. PMID:28969290

  5. The Dentin Tubule System: A Replica and Scanning Electron Microscope Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-20

    ultrason ica tor and washed for 2 addi tional 15 minute periods in distilled water. The speci- mens were then dehydrated in increasing concentrations of...branches , and the ease of penetration therein of endodontic reagents from the pulp. Intratubular network throughout the dentin may be a route of intra

  6. Comparisons of the Retreatment Efficacy of Calcium Silicate and Epoxy Resin-based Sealers and Residual Sealer in Dentinal Tubules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Kim, Euiseong; Lee, Seung-Jong; Shin, Su-Jung

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retreatment efficacy and amount of residual sealer in a single canal filled with either EndoSequence BC (Brasseler, Savannah, GA) or AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). Canal obturation with gutta-percha and sealer was performed in 28 human teeth using the continuous wave technique. Group 1 (n = 13) used AH Plus sealer, and group 2 (n = 15) used EndoSequence BC sealer. After 7 days, the root fillings were removed using Gates Glidden drills and a nickel-titanium rotary system. Retreatment time was measured in seconds. Canal cleanliness was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The remaining debris in the canal space and penetration into dentinal tubules were evaluated by confocal microscopy. Retreatment time was compared using the Student t test, and differences in sealer penetration and remaining debris between the groups were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the amount of dentin penetration, amount of debris, or retreatment time. With respect to penetration depth, the AH Plus group showed a slightly higher percentage than the BC group, with a significant difference only in the portion 6 mm from the apex (P < .05). Scanning electron microscopic images showed significant debris remaining on canal walls in both groups, whereas canal patency in retreatment was achieved in every specimen. The present study shows that EndoSequence BC sealer and AH Plus sealer have similar efficacy in dentin penetration and retreatment efficacy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effectiveness of an indicator gel in the detection of exposed dentine.

    PubMed

    van Gogswaardt, D C; Behrens, V G

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an indicator gel in revealing exposed dentine. Teeth prepared into dentine and then stained with the indicator gel were sectioned for histological examination. The indicator gel was found to stain dentine and thin layers of enamel. The gel is suggested to be an effective indicator as an aid to acid etching and in the preparation of teeth for resin-bonded restorations.

  8. Effect of Nd:YAG Laser Irradiation on the Number of Open Dentinal Tubules and Their Diameter with and without Smear of Graphite: An in Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Maleki-Pour, Mohammad Reza; Birang, Reza; Khoshayand, Maryam; Naghsh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by tooth pain arising from exposure of dental roots. In this study the efficiency of neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in association with graphite on dentinal surface changes as the alternative to the treatment of DH was evaluated. Sixteen noncarious human third molars were collected and sectioned into 5 parts from cementoenamel junction (CEJ) to the furcation area. The prepared samples were randomly assigned into five groups (Gs) of each 16: Control (G1), treated by Nd:YAG laser at 0.5 W (G2), irradiation of Nd:YAG with a 0.25 W output power(G3), smeared with graphite and then using Nd:YAG laser at output powers of 0.5 W (G4) and 0.25 W (G5). For all groups the parameters were 15 Hz, 60 s, at two stages and with a right angle irradiation. The number and diameter of dentinal tubules (DT) were compared and analyzed by SPSS software, One way ANOVA and Post hoc LSD tests. The number of open dentinal tubules varied significantly between all groups except among G1 with G3 and G2 with G5. Multiple comparison tests also exhibited significant differences regarding the diameter of tubules between the groups two by two except among G2 with G5. Nd:YAG laser used at 0.25 W and 0.5 W with application of graphite smear was able to reduce the number and diameter of dentinal tubules.

  9. Effect of Nd:YAG Laser Irradiation on the Number of Open Dentinal Tubules and Their Diameter with and without Smear of Graphite: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Maleki-pour, Mohammad Reza; Birang, Reza; Khoshayand, Maryam; Naghsh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dentin hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by tooth pain arising from exposure of dental roots. In this study the efficiency of neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in association with graphite on dentinal surface changes as the alternative to the treatment of DH was evaluated. Methods: Sixteen noncarious human third molars were collected and sectioned into 5 parts from cementoenamel junction (CEJ) to the furcation area. The prepared samples were randomly assigned into five groups (Gs) of each 16: Control (G1), treated by Nd:YAG laser at 0.5 W (G2), irradiation of Nd:YAG with a 0.25 W output power(G3), smeared with graphite and then using Nd:YAG laser at output powers of 0.5 W (G4) and 0.25 W (G5). For all groups the parameters were 15 Hz, 60 s, at two stages and with a right angle irradiation. The number and diameter of dentinal tubules (DT) were compared and analyzed by SPSS software, One way ANOVA and Post hoc LSD tests. Results:The number of open dentinal tubules varied significantly between all groups except among G1 with G3 and G2 with G5. Multiple comparison tests also exhibited significant differences regarding the diameter of tubules between the groups two by two except among G2 with G5. Conclusion: Nd:YAG laser used at 0.25 W and 0.5 W with application of graphite smear was able to reduce the number and diameter of dentinal tubules. PMID:25699166

  10. An in-vitro evaluation of the effect of 980 nm diode laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surface and dentinal tubule openings after biomechanical preparation: Scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Jhingan, Pulkit; Sandhu, Meera; Jindal, Garima; Goel, Deepti; Sachdev, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Context: Very recently, diode laser has been used for disinfecting the root canals in endodontic treatment and increasing its success rate and longevity utilizing the thermal effect of laser on surrounding tissues. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of 980 nm laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surface – scanning electron microscopic (SEM) - in-vitro study. Methods: A total of 40 single-rooted freshly extracted permanent teeth were collected. Teeth were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction using diamond disc. Root canals of all samples were prepared using hand ProTaper, which were randomly assigned into two groups (n = 20 each). Group 1: Receiving no treatment after biomechanical preparation; Group 2: 980 nm diode laser-treated root canals. Teeth were prepared for SEM analysis to check the size of intra-canal dentinal tubule openings. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using SPSS V.16 software and compared using Levene's and independent t-test. Results: On statistical analysis, width of intracanal dentinal tubule openings in Group 1 (control) was significantly higher than those observed in Group 2 (diode laser-treated) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that the application of 980 nm diode laser on intra-radicular dentin resulted in ultrastructural alterations resulting in melting of dentin. PMID:26097338

  11. Dentinal Tubule Disinfection with Propolis & Two Extracts of Azadirachta indica Against Candida albicans Biofilm Formed on Tooth Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Joy Sinha, Dakshita; Garg, Paridhi; Verma, Anurag; Malik, Vibha; Maccune, Edgar Richard; Vasudeva, Agrima

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluates the disinfection of dentinal tubules using Propolis, Azadirachta indica (alcoholic and aqueous extracts), 2% chlorhexidine gel and calcium hydroxide against Candida albicans biofilm formed on tooth substrate. Materials & Method: One hundred and five human teeth were infected with Candida albicans for 2 days. Samples were divided into 7 groups. Group I- Propolis, Group II- Alcoholic extract of Azadirachta indica, Group III- Aqueous extract of Azadirachta indica, Group IV- 2% Chlorhexidine, Group V- Calcium hydroxide, Group VI- Ethanol and Group VII- Saline (negative control). At the end of 1,3 and 5 days, the antimicrobial efficacy of medicaments against Candida albicans was assessed at the depths of 200 µm and 400 µm. Results: The overall percentage inhibition of fungal growth (at 200 µm and 400 µm depth) was 99.2% with 2% chlorhexidine gel. There was no statistical difference between propolis, alcoholic extract of Azadirachta indica (neem) and 2% chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Propolis and alcoholic extract of Azadirachta indica performed equally well as that of 2% Chlorhexidine. PMID:26962368

  12. Is diagnosing exposed dentine a suitable tool for grading erosive loss?

    PubMed

    Holbrook, W Peter; Ganss, Carolina

    2008-03-01

    Quantifying tooth wear in general and erosion in particular mostly is made by distinguishing between lesions restricted to enamel and lesions reaching the underlying dentine. Various scores for grading have been used, but in all systems, higher scores are given in cases of exposed dentine, thus, indicating a more severe stage of the condition. Clinical diagnosis of exposed dentine is made by assessing changes in colour or optical properties of the hard tissues. This paper aims to review the literature and discuss critically problems arising form this approach. It appears that classifying the severity of erosion by the area or depth of exposed dentine is difficult and poorly reproducible, and taking into account the variation of enamel thickness, the amount of tissue lost often is not related simply to the area of exposed dentine. There has still been very little longitudinal investigation of the significance of exposed dentine as a prognostic indicator. Further work and discussion is needed to reevaluate the explanative power of current grading procedures.

  13. Penetration Depth of Sodium Hypochlorite in Dentinal Tubules after Conventional Irrigation, Passive Ultrasonic Agitation and Nd:YAG Laser Activated Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Sohrabi, Khosro; Chiniforush, Nasim; Ghafari, Sarvenaz; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Noroozi, Niusha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The penetration depth of irrigating solutions in dentinal tubules is limited; consequently, bacteria can remain inside dentinal tubules after the cleaning and shaping of the root canal system. Therefore, new irrigation systems are required to increase the penetration depth of irrigating solutions in dentinal tubules. Methods: A comparative study regarding the penetration depth of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution in dentinal tubules using four methods, (1) conventional irrigation (CI), (2) smear layer removal plus conventional irrigation (gold standard), (3) passive ultrasonic agitation (PUA) and (4) Nd:YAG laser activated irrigation (LAI), took place on 144 extracted mandibular teeth with a single root canal. After decoronation with a diamond disc and working length determination, the apical foramen was sealed with wax. The canals were prepared up to #35 Mtwo rotary file and 5.25% NaOCl was used for irrigation during preparation. To study the penetration depth of NaOCl, smear layer was eliminated in all samples. Dentinal tubules were stained with crystal violet and after longitudinal sectioning of teeth, the two halves were reassembled and root canal preparation was performed up to #40 Mtwo rotary file. Then the samples were distributed into four experimental groups. Depth of the bleached zone was evaluated by stereomicroscope (20X). Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The highest and lowest average for NaOCl penetration depth in all three coronal, middle and apical sections belonged to CI + smear layer removal and CI. A statistically significant difference was seen when comparing the penetration depth of CI + smear layer removal group to CI and PUA groups in coronal and middle third, in which the average NaOCl penetration depth of the gold standard group was higher (P < 0.05). A statistically significant difference was seen between CI + smear layer removal group and the other three groups including CI, PUA and LAI in apical third

  14. An In vitro SEM Study on the Effect of Bleaching Gel Enriched with NovaMin on Whitening of Teeth and Dentinal Tubule Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kakodkar, Gaurangi; Lavania, Anuj; Ataide, Ida De Noronha De

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Tooth whitening products enjoy substantial popularity. However, tooth hypersensitivity is invariably an undesirable consequence. Desensitizing toothpastes may be used for alleviating the symptoms. NovaMin, as an active ingredient in many dentifrices, has been shown to deliver significant therapeutic desensitising benefits. Aim: To study the effect of NovaMin desensitising toothpaste mixed with 15% carbamide peroxide on tooth bleaching and tubule occlusion. Material and Methods: This study was carried out in vitro, on extracted premolars which were bleached, using the above mentioned mixture and shade change was evaluated. They were then sectioned to be observed under a scanning Electron Microscope. The number of completely and partially blocked tubules as well as open tubules were counted for each specimen. Statistical analysis for shade change was done by using paired t-test. Mean and Standard deviation were calculated for the tubule counts and they were analyzed statistically. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the addition of NovaMin to 15% Carbamide peroxide occluded the dentinal tubules and that it did not affect the bleaching procedure. They also emphasized its clinical relevance in a dual advantage of desensitizing and bleaching with a single paste system. PMID:24551720

  15. Stress-strain analysis for evaluating the effect of the orientation of dentin tubules on their mechanical properties and deformation behavior.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang-Fu; Wu, Bo-Hsiung; Chung, Chung-Jen; Chuang, Shu-Fen; Li, Wang-Long; Lin, Jen-Fin

    2012-08-01

    A model whose porosity does not vary with compression depth is developed for evaluating the mechanical properties of dentin tubules with various orientation angles from micro-pillar nanocompression tests. Experimental results for a range of loading rates indicate that the yielding parameters and the elastic modulus are little affected by the creep behavior. For a given compression depth, the hardness, elastic modulus, and yielding strength decrease with increasing orientation angle of dentin. The mechanical properties obtained using the proposed model are consistent with the reported data, and are actually more precise since they consider the orientation angle. The proposed testing method can be applied to materials that yield a negative value of the elastic modulus due to creep behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dentinal tubule penetration of AH Plus, iRoot SP, MTA fillapex, and guttaflow bioseal root canal sealers after different final irrigation procedures: A confocal microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Akcay, Merve; Arslan, Hakan; Durmus, Nazli; Mese, Merve; Capar, Ismail Davut

    2016-01-01

    Varied physical and chemical characteristic of root canal sealers and different irrigant agitation systems can influence the depth of penetration. The aim of this in vitro study was to use a laser scanning confocal microscope in order to assess the dentinal tubules penetration of various sealers after the application of different final irrigation techniques. A total of 156 single-rooted extracted mandibular premolars were prepared up to size 40 and randomly distributed into four groups according to the sealer type (n = 39): AH Plus, iRoot SP, MTA Fillapex, and GF Bioseal. Each group was randomly subdivided into three groups according to the final irrigation protocol (n = 13): conventional needle irrigation (CI), photon-induced-photoacoustic streaming activation (PIPS), and passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI). After the final irrigation procedures, the root canals were obturated with single gutta-percha and labeled sealer mixed with 0.1% fluorescent rhodamine B isothiocyanate. Specimens were sectioned at 2, 5, and 8 mm from the apex, and all the sections were examined under confocal microscope to calculate the dentinal tubule penetration area. Data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (P = 0.05). iRoot SP exhibited a significantly higher penetration area than the other groups (P < 0.001), although there were no statistically significant differences between AH Plus, MTA Fillapex, and GF Bioseal (P > 0.05). Er:YAG laser activation with PIPS and PUI had significantly higher penetration than CI (P < 0.001). Statistically significant differences were also determined at each root canal third (coronal > middle > apical; P < 0.001). The dentinal tubule penetration area was significantly affected by the selection of root canal sealer, final irrigation procedure, and root canal third. Use of iRoot with PIPS tip or PUI seems advantageous in dentinal tubule penetration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of Er:YAG laser and desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate, and their combinations on human dentine tubules: a scanning electron microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Tunar, Ogul L; Gürsoy, Hare; Çakar, Gökser; Kuru, Bahar; Ipci, Sebnem Dirikan; Yılmaz, Selçuk

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of Er:YAG laser and an in-office desensitizing paste alone or in combination by using scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. Various treatment modalities have been proposed for dentin hypersensitivity, but to date, no single agent or form of treatment has been found effective. Forty dentine specimens obtained from freshly extracted impacted third molars were included and divided into four groups. Group I served as the control, whereas Group II, Group III, and Group IV recieved Er:YAG laser (30 Hz, 60 mJ/pulse, 10 sec), a desensitizing paste (DP) containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate, and DP+Er:YAG laser in combination, respectively, evaluated under SEM. SEM analysis presented occlusion and narrowing of dentinal tubules in all treatment groups, but more prominent occlusion was observed in the combined treatment group. Intergroup comparisons regarding the tubule diameters and the number of the open dentinal tubules per 100 μm2 revealed statistically significant difference in favor of combined group (p<0.05). The difference between single effects of Er:YAG and DP in all parameters were found statistically nonsignificant. The present study has shown that all treatment procedures are effective in dentinal tubule occlusion. However, more prominent occlusion is observed in the combined treatment group.

  18. Micromorphological Evaluation of Dentin Treated with Different Desensitizing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Osmari, Deise; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana Carolina; de Carlo Bello, Mariana; Henrique Susin, Alexandre; Cecília Correa Aranha, Ana; Marquezan, Marcela; Lopes da Silveira, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of a desensitizing agent is a permanent coating or filling of dentin surface. Morphological analysis in vitro of this treated surface is essential to understand the interaction between desensitizing agent and hypersensitive dentin. The aim was to evaluate the morphology of four dentin surface treated with desensitizing agents. Methods: This was an in vitro laboratory study, where fifteen specimens from extracted human premolars were obtained. The enamel was removed to expose the dentin surface, polished with silicon carbide abrasive papers and etched with 6% citric acid for 2 min.The specimens were randomly divided into 5 groups: G1 - without treatment (control) (C), G2 - fluoride varnish (FV), G3 - potassium oxalate (PO), G4 - 2-step self-etching adhesive system (AS), G5 - diode laser (DL). The specimens were cleaved in the lingual buccaldirection, prepared for analysis by Scanning Electron Microscope and the surface and interior of the dentinal tubules were observed at 1500× magnification. Results: In the control group, the dentin etching promoted smear layer removal and exposure of dentinal tubules. In the group of fluoride varnish, a film was observed on the surface, with plugs of varnish into tubules. In the group of oxalate, partial obliteration of the tubular entrances was observed. In the group of the adhesive system, the tubules were obstructed through the formation of hybrid layer and a physical barrier on the surface. In the group of the diode laser, dentin melting and solidification with partial occlusion of dentinal tubules were observed. Conclusions: All desensitizing agents evaluated demonstrated ability to modify the surface of dentin, with partial or total occlusion of dentinal tubules. Thus, it is suggested to do more clinical studies to verify the effectiveness of the findings. PMID:25606322

  19. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Sodium hypochlorite, Chlorhexidine gluconate and Octenidine Dihydrochloride in elimination of microor- ganisms within dentinal tubules of primary and permanent teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bodur, Haluk; Ece, Gülden

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different irrigation solutions at different time intervals for the elimination of E.faecalis and C.albicans penetrated into the dentine tubules of primary and permanent teeth in vitro. The 4 mm primary and permanent teeth sections were sterilized and contaminated with a mixture of E.faecalis and C.albicans strains. After the application of different irrigation solutions (Sodium hypochlorite, Chlorhexidine gluconate, Octenidine Dihydrochloride, saline) to the contaminated tooth sections according to study groups, neutralizers were applied for inactivation of the solutions after 30 sec, 1 min and 5 min. Dentine shavings were placed into TSB and 10µL from each tube was inoculated on agar plates, followed by an incubation period of 24h at 37°C. The colonies were counted macroscopically. The results were compared by using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests, with a significance level at p<0.05. Among the irrigation solutions that were tested against E.faecalis on primary and permanent teeth, the most effective one was found as 5-minute application of 0.1% Octenidine Dihydrochloride. The antibacterial effects of the tested solutions on the same time periods against C.albicans revealed no significant difference. There were no statistically significant differences between primary and permanent teeth with respect to the antimicrobial activity of the tested solutions. Moreover, Octenidine Dihydrochloride may be used as an alternative endodontic irrigant. Key words:Chlorhexidine gluconate, dentine tubules, irrigation solutions, Octenidine Dihydrochloride, Sodium hypochlorite. PMID:22143724

  20. Dentine hypersensitivity. The effects in vitro of acids and dietary substances on root-planed and burred dentine.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; Absi, E G; Adams, D

    1987-05-01

    Evidence indicates that teeth exhibiting cervical dentine hypersensitivity have open dentinal tubules at the dentine surface. The identification of factors which render dentine exposed and tubules open is important both to the prevention and management of dentine hypersensitivity. In this study, recently extracted teeth were root planed or burred to expose the root dentine. Specimens were horizontally sectioned and then using the apical portion as control, the coronal portions placed in a variety of strong and weak acids and dietary fluids. Examination under the scanning electron microscope revealed a smear layer covering completely underlying tubules on the control root planed or burred portions. Test portions exposed to strong and weak acids showed loss of the smear layer and exposure of large numbers of tubules. Formic and tannic acids produced no changes. Some dietary fluids, in particular red and white wine, citrus fruit juices, apple juice and yogurt produced similar etching effects to the acids. The low pH carbonated drink, coca-cola, and a blackcurrent cordial produced no effects. The results of this study in vitro cannot necessarily be extrapolated to the clinical situation, but suggest that certain dietary factors could play a rôle in the aetiology of dentine hypersensitivity. Dietary advice to patients may prove important in the management of this often recurrent condition.

  1. Evaluation of dentinal tubule occlusion and depth of penetration of nano-hydroxyapatite derived from chicken eggshell powder with and without addition of sodium fluoride: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kunam, Divya; Manimaran, Sujatha; Sampath, Vidhya; Sekar, Mahalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This in vitro study evaluated the degree of dentinal tubule occlusion and depth of penetration of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) derived from chicken eggshell powder with and without the addition of 2% sodium fluoride (NaF) using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Materials and Methods: nHAp was synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction and SEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy. Dentin discs were obtained from extracted teeth, pretreated with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid for 5 min and were divided into four groups based on the experimental agents as follows: Group 1: Untreated (control), Group 2: 2% NaF, Group 3: nHAp, Group 4: Combination of nHAp and 2% NaF. The treatment protocol was carried out for 7 days, after which the specimens were viewed under SEM and CLSM. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison tests (P < 0.05). Results: All the experimental agents occluded the dentinal tubules, but to varying degrees and depths. Specimens treated with the combination of nHAp and 2% NaF showed complete dentinal tubular occlusion and significantly greater depth of penetration than those treated with nHAp and 2% NaF alone. Conclusion: The combination of nHAp and 2% NaF was the most effective in occluding dentinal tubules. PMID:27217637

  2. In vitro evaluation of dentinal hydraulic conductance and tubule sealing by a novel calcium-phosphate desensitizer.

    PubMed

    Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2013-02-01

    In the current trend of materials used for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, calcium-phosphate-containing desensitizers are expected to have advantages in oral environment. A newly formulated desensitizer containing tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (CPD-100) was evaluated in comparison to oxalate containing desensitizer (SS) regarding permeability reduction (PR%) by measuring hydraulic conductance on the etched dentin discs in vitro. CPD-100 exhibited mean PR% of 91%, which significantly increased to 98% after immersion in artificial saliva (AS) for 4 weeks (p < 0.001), while SS showed a significant decrease from 99% to 93% (p < 0.01). SEM observation showed newly formed crystallites on CPD-100 treated dentin, which did not exist in SS treated dentin after AS immersion, suggesting that calcium oxalate inhibited formation of new calcium-phosphate minerals. Five-minute acid challenge did not significantly affect PR% of dentin treated by any of the desensitizers. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicated that the formed layer of CPD-100 were minerals with similar Ca/P ratio to hydroxyapatite. In conclusion, the newly developed calcium-phosphate desensitizer has the potential to exhibit long-term stability in the oral environment, owing to its chemical properties that promote the crystal growth in salivary fluid.

  3. In vitro antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine gluconate and octenidine dihydrochloride in elimination of microorganisms within dentinal tubules of primary and permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Tirali, Resmiye-Ebru; Bodur, Haluk; Ece, Gülden

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different irrigation solutions at different time intervals for the elimination of E. faecalis and C. albicans penetrated into the dentine tubules of primary and permanent teeth in vitro. The 4 mm primary and permanent teeth sections were sterilized and contaminated with a mixture of E. faecalis and C. albicans strains. After the application of different irrigation solutions (Sodium hypochlorite, Chlorhexidine gluconate, Octenidine Dihydrochloride, saline) to the contaminated tooth sections according to study groups, neutralizers were applied for inactivation of the solutions after 30 sec, 1 min and 5 min. Dentine shavings were placed into TSB and 10 µL from each tube was inoculated on agar plates, followed by an incubation period of 24 h at 37°C. The colonies were counted macroscopically. The results were compared by using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests, with a significance level at p<0.05. Among the irrigation solutions that were tested against E. faecalis on primary and permanent teeth, the most effective one was found as 5-minute application of 0.1% Octenidine Dihydrochloride. The antibacterial effects of the tested solutions on the same time periods against C. albicans revealed no significant difference. There were no statistically significant differences between primary and permanent teeth with respect to the antimicrobial activity of the tested solutions. Moreover, Octenidine Dihydrochloride may be used as an alternative endodontic irrigant.

  4. Dentinal tubule disinfection with 2% chlorhexidine, garlic extract, and calcium hydroxide against Enterococcus faecalis by using real-time polymerase chain reaction: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Eswar, Kandaswamy; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Rajeswari, Kalaiselvam; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacy of garlic extract with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 in disinfection of dentinal tubules contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: Agar diffusion test was done to evaluate the minimum inhibitory concentration of garlic extract against E. faecalis. Forty human extracted mandibular premolar teeth were selected for this study, access cavity was prepared and cleaning and shaping was done. Middle third of the root was cut using a rotary diamond disc. The teeth specimens were inoculated with E. faecalis for 21 days. Specimens were divided into four groups---Group 1: 2% CHX, Group 2: Garlic extract, Group 3: Ca(OH)2, and Group 4: Saline (negative control). The intracanal medicaments were packed inside the tooth specimens and incubated for 5 days. The dentinal chips were collected at 400 μm depth using a Gates-Glidden drill, following which DNA isolation was done. The specimens were analyzed using real-time PCR. The results were then statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) multiple comparison of means. Results: Threshold cycle (Ct) values of 2% CHX was found to be 32.4, garlic extract to be 27.5, and Ca(OH)2 to be 25.6. Conclusion: A total of 2% CHX showed the maximum efficacy against E. faecalis, followed by garlic extract and Ca(OH)2. PMID:23833449

  5. Dentinal permeation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunina, Natalia; Derbov, Vladimir; Tuchin, Valery; Altshuler, Gregory

    2008-06-01

    Dentinal permeation is of interest in a wide context of tooth care and treatment, in particular, tooth color improvement using combination of chemical whitening agents and light activation. A simple model of dentinal permeation accounting for the morphology of human tooth dentine and including dentinal tubules, more dense and homogeneous peritubular dentine, and less dense and less homogeneous intertubular dentin is proposed. Calculation of permeability of dentine layer is carried out for H IIO and H IIO II versus the tubule diameter and tubule density taken from the microphotograph analysis. This opens the possibility to calculate the distribution of permeability over the tooth surface taking into account the variations of tubule diameter and density as well as those of the diffusion coefficients and layer thickness

  6. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (p<0.01). EPB (25.6 ± 6.6) and DPB (20.2 ± 4.9) control groups showed significantly higher results than those of

  7. Dentin hypersensitivity: from diagnosis to a breakthrough therapy for everyday sensitivity relief.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge of diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity. It summarizes technical approaches to relieve sensitivity in professional and home-use products, with emphasis on the clinical evidence for the efficacy of desensitizing toothpaste, and introduces a new innovative dentifrice technology containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluoride. Dentin hypersensitivity is characterized by short, sharp pain arising from exposed dentin in response to external stimuli which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or disease. The hydrodynamic theory proposes that pain-producing stimuli cause a change in dentin fluid flow that activates intra-dental nerve fibers, via a mechanoreceptor response, to cause pain. To be hypersensitive, dentin must be exposed and dentin tubules must be open to external stimuli and patent at the pulp. Gingival recession is the primary cause of dentin exposure, and a major predisposing factor for dentin hypersensitivity. Dentin hypersensitivity is a prevalent condition. It has been reported to afflict 15-20% of the adult population, typically 20 to 50-year-olds, with peak incidence between 30 and 39 years. Some studies have reported higher prevalence levels of up to 57%. The incidence of dentin hypersensitivity is expected to rise with changing diets, and as caries and periodontal disease prevention result in improved oral health status, and retention and functionality of the dentition. Treatments to relieve dentin hypersensitivity are based on interruption of the neural response to pain stimuli or occlusion of open tubules to block the hydrodynamic mechanism. Effective and robust dentin occlusion offers the greatest prospect for instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity. In particular, materials which can coat exposed dentin surfaces, in addition to plugging and sealing open dentin tubules, offer the intriguing

  8. The effect of toothbrush abrasion force on dentine hypersensitivity in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Sehmi, Harminder; Olley, Ryan C

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of tooth brushing force on changes in dentine tubule patency in an erosion-toothbrush abrasion model. 60 dentine samples prepared with an artificial smear layer and divided randomly into control (no toothbrush), 100 g, 200 g or 400 g toothbrush groups. They were immersed in 3:1 artificial saliva/NaF 1450 ppm and either brushed (p35 soft tooth brush; 120 strokes) or not brushed. Then samples were subjected to agitated acid challenge (0.3% citric acid pH2.6 for 2 min). Finally, samples were re-brushed. Calibrated software calculated patent dentine tubules that cause DH in confocal microscopy images taken of samples at each stage. At baseline, mean patent tubules in all samples were 188 (SD54) with no significant inter-group differences. Following first brushing, mean patent tubules decreased using 100 g to 150 (SD32) (p<0.01) and increased using 400 g to 215 (SD45) (p=0.02). Following acid challenge, patent tubules increased to 218 (SD40) in all samples (p<0.01) with no significant inter-group differences. Following further brushing, mean patent tubules decreased using 100 g to 175 (SD72) (p<0.01), but increased with 400 g to 232 (SD52). At higher brushing forces (400 g), more tubules were exposed. At lower brushing forces (100 g), tubule patency decreased even post-acidic challenge. It is often recommended to our patients with DH to brush using lighter brushing forces but our understanding of this force on dentine tubule patency is unknown. The management of DH requires lighter brushing forces to reduce the numbers of patent dentine tubules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of toothpaste in the aetiology and treatment of dentine hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Addy, M; West, N X

    2013-01-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is a common, painful dental condition with a multi-factorial aetiology. The hydrodynamic mechanism theory to explain dentine sensitivity also appears to fit DH: lesions exhibiting large numbers of open dentinal tubules at the surface and patent to the pulp. By definition, DH can only occur when dentine becomes exposed (lesion localisation) and tubules opened (lesion initiation), thus permitting increased fluid flow in tubules on stimulation. Erosion, particularly from dietary acids appears to play a dominant role in both processes. Toothbrushing with most toothpaste products alone cause clinically insignificant wear of enamel but are additive, even synergistic, to erosive enamel loss. Additionally, toothbrushing with toothpaste is implicated in 'healthy' gingival recession. Toothbrushing with most toothpastes removes the smear layer to expose tubules and again can exacerbate erosive loss of dentine. These findings thereby implicate toothbrushing with toothpaste in the aetiology of DH. Management of the condition should have secondary prevention at the core of treatment and therefore, must consider first and foremost the aetiology. Fluoride toothpaste at present appears to provide little primary or secondary preventive benefits to DH; additional ingredients can provide therapeutic benefits. Potassium-based products to block pulpal nerve response have caused much debate and are considered by many as unproven, which should not translate to ineffective. Several toothpaste technologies formulated to block tubules are from studies in vitro, in situ and controlled clinical trials considered proven for the treatment of DH.

  10. The effects of desensitizing agents on the hydraulic conductance of human dentin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Greenhill, J D; Pashley, D H

    1981-03-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of dentin sensitivity states that a stimulus applied at the orifice of exposed dentinal tubules causes movement of tubular fluid which stimulates nerve receptors. The fluid should obey principles of fluid movement through capillary tubes. Any decrease in the functional radius of the dentinal tubules should greatly reduce the rate of fluid flow, thus reducing dentinal sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of agents that have been used previously for clinical dentin desensitization to reduce the rate of fluid flow through dentin in vitro. Dentin discs prepared from extracted human third molars were treated with 50% citric acid to remove debris from tubular orifices. After placing the discs in a split chamber device, the rate at which buffer solution could filter across the dentin under 240 cm of water pressure was measured. The occlusal side of the disc was then treated with an agent thought to desensitize dentin to determine if it reduced fluid flow rate. Discs that had more than a 50% reduction in flow rate were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine if those agents that decreased fluid flow also partially occluded tubular orifices. This in vitro model provided a useful quantitative method for screening a host of preparations that have been used in the past to decrease dentin sensitivity.

  11. Ternary Phase Diagram of Model Dentin Adhesive Exposed to Over-wet Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Q.; Park, J.; Laurence, J.S.; Parthasarathy, R.; Misra, A.; Spencer, P.

    2011-01-01

    When adhesives and/or composites are bonded to the tooth, water in the environment can interfere with proper interface formation. Formation of water blisters and phase separation at the adhesive/dentin interface have appeared as new types of bond defects. To better understand this problem, we determined the near-equilibrium partition of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic components when exposed to over-wet environments. Model methacrylate-based adhesives were mixed with different amounts of water to yield well-separated aqueous and resin phases. It was found that less than 0.1% BisGMA but nearly one-third of the HEMA diffused into the aqueous phase, leaving the remaining resin phase relatively hydrophobic. A partial phase diagram was created for the ternary BisGMA/HEMA/water system. All the experimental phase partitioning data were plotted, and the points lay on a binodal curve that separated the single-phase region from the two-phase region. We obtained the 3 tie lines by connecting the 2 points of each conjugate pair of the phase partitioning data from the 3 sets of tripartite mixtures. Information about solubility, water miscibility, distribution ratio, and phase partitioning behavior could be obtained quantitatively. This type of phase diagram will provide a more thorough understanding of current adhesive performance and elucidate directions for further improvement. PMID:21960682

  12. Ternary phase diagram of model dentin adhesive exposed to over-wet environments.

    PubMed

    Ye, Q; Park, J; Laurence, J S; Parthasarathy, R; Misra, A; Spencer, P

    2011-12-01

    When adhesives and/or composites are bonded to the tooth, water in the environment can interfere with proper interface formation. Formation of water blisters and phase separation at the adhesive/dentin interface have appeared as new types of bond defects. To better understand this problem, we determined the near-equilibrium partition of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic components when exposed to over-wet environments. Model methacrylate-based adhesives were mixed with different amounts of water to yield well-separated aqueous and resin phases. It was found that less than 0.1% BisGMA but nearly one-third of the HEMA diffused into the aqueous phase, leaving the remaining resin phase relatively hydrophobic. A partial phase diagram was created for the ternary BisGMA/HEMA/water system. All the experimental phase partitioning data were plotted, and the points lay on a binodal curve that separated the single-phase region from the two-phase region. We obtained the 3 tie lines by connecting the 2 points of each conjugate pair of the phase partitioning data from the 3 sets of tripartite mixtures. Information about solubility, water miscibility, distribution ratio, and phase partitioning behavior could be obtained quantitatively. This type of phase diagram will provide a more thorough understanding of current adhesive performance and elucidate directions for further improvement.

  13. Permeability of dentin to adhesive agents.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H; Ciucchi, B; Sano, H; Horner, J A

    1993-09-01

    The permeability of dentin to adhesive agents is of crucial importance in obtaining good dentinal bonding. In those systems that remove the smear layer, the opportunity exists for resin to infiltrate both tubules and intertubular dentin. Resin penetration into tubules can effectively seal the tubules and can contribute to bond strength if the resin bonds to the tubule wall. Resin infiltration into intertubular dentin can only occur if the mineral phase of dentin is removed by acidic conditioners or chelators. This is more easily accomplished in fractured dentin than in smear layer-covered dentin because of the residual collagen debris that remains on the surface following acid etching of smear layers. The channels for resin infiltration are the perifibrillar spaces created around the collagen fibers of dentin following removal of apatite mineral by acids. The diffusion of adhesive resins through these narrow, tortuous, long channels in 1 to 2 minutes offers a number of challenges that require further research.

  14. Dentin permeability: determinants of hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Reeder, O W; Walton, R E; Livingston, M J; Pashley, D H

    1978-02-01

    A technique is described which permits measurements of the ease with which fluid permeates dentin. This value, the hydraulic conductance of dentin, increased as surface area increases and/or as dentin thickness decreases. It increased 32-fold when dentin was acid etched due to removal of surface debris occluding the tubules.

  15. In vivo remineralization of dentin using an agarose hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Min; Li, Quan-Li; Cao, Ying; Fang, Hui; Xia, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Hong

    2017-02-01

    A novel agarose hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system loaded with calcium and phosphate was used to remineralize dentin and induce the oriented densely parallel packed HA layer on defective dentin surface in vivo in a rabbit model. Firstly, the enamel of the labial surface of rabbits’ incisor was removed and the dentin was exposed to oral environment. Secondly, the hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system was applied to the exposed dentin surface by using a custom tray. Finally, the teeth were extracted and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation test after a certain time of mineralization intervals. The regenerated tissue on the dentin surface was composed of highly organised HA crystals. Densely packed along the c axis, these newly precipitated HA crystals were perpendicular to the underlying dental surface with a tight bond. The demineralized dentin was remineralized and dentinal tubules were occluded by the grown HA crystals. The nanohardness and elastic modulus of the regenerated tissue were similar to natural dentin. The results indicated a potential clinical use for repairing dentin-exposed related diseases, such as erosion, wear, and dentin hypersensitivity.

  16. In vivo remineralization of dentin using an agarose hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min; Li, Quan-Li; Cao, Ying; Fang, Hui; Xia, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Hong

    2017-01-01

    A novel agarose hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system loaded with calcium and phosphate was used to remineralize dentin and induce the oriented densely parallel packed HA layer on defective dentin surface in vivo in a rabbit model. Firstly, the enamel of the labial surface of rabbits’ incisor was removed and the dentin was exposed to oral environment. Secondly, the hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system was applied to the exposed dentin surface by using a custom tray. Finally, the teeth were extracted and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation test after a certain time of mineralization intervals. The regenerated tissue on the dentin surface was composed of highly organised HA crystals. Densely packed along the c axis, these newly precipitated HA crystals were perpendicular to the underlying dental surface with a tight bond. The demineralized dentin was remineralized and dentinal tubules were occluded by the grown HA crystals. The nanohardness and elastic modulus of the regenerated tissue were similar to natural dentin. The results indicated a potential clinical use for repairing dentin-exposed related diseases, such as erosion, wear, and dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:28167823

  17. Cellular responses in the Malpighian tubules of Scaptotrigona postica (Latreille, 1807) exposed to low doses of fipronil and boric acid.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rafael Alexandre Costa; Silva Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias; Malaspina, Osmar; Bueno, Odair Correa; Tomotake, Maria Eliza Miyoko; Pereira, Andrigo Monroe

    2013-03-01

    Studies of sub-lethal effects of pesticide residues on stingless bees are scarce and morphological analysis of organs would add information to toxicological analysis in order to clarify the continuous exposure of Scaptotrigona postica to insecticides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology and histochemistry of the Malpighian tubules (excretory organ) of S. postica exposed to fipronil or boric acid to detect cellular responses that indicate toxicity or adaptative mechanisms to stress induced by exposure of worker bees to low doses of these chemical compounds. Newly emerged bees were submitted to toxicological bioassays and morphological analyses by optical microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy, as well as histochemical methods, were performed to detect proteins and glycoconjugates. Additionally, immunohistochemical detection of DNA fragmentation and HSP70 (70-kDa Heat shock protein) were performed to detect cell death and stress response, respectively. Statistical analysis, for the bioassays conducted with ingestion of contaminated diet with boric acid at 0.75% (w/w) or with fipronil at 0.1μg/kg of food, showed that the survival of bees that ingested the contaminated diets were significantly different to the survival rate presented by the control group (P<0.0001). Although some characteristics indicative of initiation of cell death were observed, the cells remained metabolically active in the processes of excretion and inactivation of chemical compounds. The data from this study reinforce the importance of research on sublethal effects of low doses of pesticides on bees in an attempt to assess a possible realistic dose and evaluate the risk assessment of stingless bee S. postica foraging in the vicinity of cultivated fields and/or in green urban areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrastructural evaluation of radicular dentin after Nd:YAG laser irradiation combined with different chemical substances.

    PubMed

    Faria, Maria Isabel Anastacio; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Marchesan, Melissa Andreia; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa

    2008-01-01

    This aticle sought to evaluate the dentin morphology after irradiation by a Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, using different chemical substances to irrigate radicular canals: distilled water, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plus Cetavlon (EDTAC), 1% sodium hypochlorite, and 2% chlorhexidine. Groups were subdivided according to the protocol of laser application (n=9). The specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). No differences were found in dentin morphology when different root thirds were examined. Regardless of the chemical substance used, alterations were more evident in groups in which the surfaces were dried before laser irradiation. Fusion areas, craters, carbonization, and partially exposed tubules were verified. When the irradiation was performed in water, the smear layer was incorporated into the laser-modified surface. Among the specimens irrigated with EDTAC and laser-treated, partial obliteration of dentin tubules due to the laser action was verified; in addition, there was no remaining smear layer on the surfaces. Samples irrigated with sodium hypochlorite followed by laser irradiation demonstrated similar morphology to the samples in the chlorhexidine group, with some fusion areas present and no exposed dentin tubules or fissures. The irradiation from an Nd:YAG laser in the presence of EDTAC solution provided a more favorable surface pattern compared to the other experimental conditions, due to the removal of the contaminated layer and the posterior sealing of dentin tubules.

  19. In Vitro Study of Dentin Hypersensitivity Treated by 980-nm Diode Laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Gao, Jie; Gao, Yan; XU, Shuaimei; Zhan, Xueling; Wu, Buling

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To investigate the ultrastructural changes of dentin irradiated with 980-nm diode laser under different parameters and to observe the morphological alterations of odontoblasts and pulp tissue to determine the safety parameters of 980-nm diode laser in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity (DH). Methods: Twenty extracted human third molars were selected to prepare dentin discs. Each dentin disc was divided into four areas and was irradiated by 980-nm diode laser under different parameters: Group A: control group, 0 J/cm2; Group B: 2 W/CW (continuous mode), 166 J/cm2; Group C: 3W/CW, 250 J/cm2; and Group D: 4W/CW, 333 J/cm2. Ten additional extracted human third molars were selected to prepare dentin discs. Each dentin disc was divided into two areas and was irradiated by 980-nm diode laser: Group E: control group, 0 J/cm2; and Group F: 2.0 W/CW, 166 J/cm2. The morphological alterations of the dentin surfaces and odontoblasts were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the morphological alterations of the dental pulp tissue irradiated by laser were observed with an upright microscope. Results: The study demonstrated that dentinal tubules can be entirely blocked after irradiation by 980-nm diode laser, regardless of the parameter setting. Diode laser with settings of 2.0 W and 980-nm sealed exposed dentin tubules effectively, and no significant morphological alterations of the pulp and odontoblasts were observed after irradiation. Conclusions: Irradiation with 980-nm diode laser could be effective for routine clinical treatment of DH, and 2.0W/CW (166 J/cm2) was a suitable energy parameter due to its rapid sealing of the exposed dentin tubules and its safety to the odontoblasts and pulp tissue. PMID:25606318

  20. SEM Analysis of Residual Dentin Surface in Primary Teeth Using Different Chemomechanical Caries Removal Agents.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Rachna; Patil, Sandya Devi S; Kush, Anil; Madhu, K

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the residual dentinal surfaces following caries removal using two chemomechanical methods (Papacarie Duo and Carie Care), by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty extracted primary molars with active occlusal carious lesions were randomly assigned two groups depending on the CMCR agent used for the caries excavation - Group 1 - with Papacarie Duo and Group - 2 with Carie Care. After the caries excavation, the specimens were subjected to SEM analysis. Though both the agents showed the minimal smear layer with the patent dentinal tubules, Carie care showed patent dentinal tubules with a clearly exposed peritubular and intertubular collagen network. Carie Care treated surface exhibited better surface morphology of residual dentin.

  1. Evaluation of the Morphological Characteristics of Laser-Irradiated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Lilaj, Bledar; Franz, Alexander; Degendorfer, Daniela; Moritz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different energy settings of Er:YAG laser irradiation on dentin surface morphology with respect to the number of opened dentinal tubules. Background data: An ideally prepared dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules is a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. No study, however, has yet compared the numbers of opened dentinal tubules with regard to statistical differences. Methods: Conventional preparations using a bur with or without additional acid etching acted as control groups. Dentin specimens were prepared from human third molars and randomly divided into eight groups according to the energy settings of the laser (1, 1.5, 4, 6, 7.5, and 8 W) and two controls (bur and bur plus acid etching). After surface preparation, dentin surfaces were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope, and the number of opened dentinal tubules in a defined area was counted. Results: The control groups showed smooth surfaces with (bur plus acid etching) and without opened dentinal tubules (bur), whereas all laser-irradiated surfaces showed rough surfaces. Using the energy setting of 4 W resulted in significantly more opened dentinal tubules than the conventional preparation technique using the bur with additional acid etching. In contrast, the energy setting of 8 W showed significantly fewer opened dentinal tubules, and also exhibited signs of thermal damage. Conclusions: The Er:YAG laser with an energy setting of 4 W generates a dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules, a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. PMID:26389986

  2. A Mechanistic study of Plasma Treatment Effects on Demineralized Dentin Surfaces for Improved Adhesive/Dentin Interface Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that non-thermal plasma treatment of demineralized dentin significantly (p<0.05) improved adhesive/dentin bonding strength for dental composite restoration as compared with the untreated controls. This study is to achieve mechanistic understanding of the plasma treatment effects on dentin surface through investigating the plasma treated dentin surfaces and their interaction with adhesive monomer, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The plasma treated dentin surfaces from human third molars were evaluated by water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that plasma-treated dentin surface with subsequent HEMA immersion (Plasma/HEMA Treated) had much lower water contact angle compared with only plasma-treated (Plasma Treated) or only HEMA immersed (HEMA Treated) dentin surfaces. With prolong water droplet deposition time, water droplets spread out completely on the Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces. SEM images of Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces verified that dentin tubules were opened-up and filled with HEMA monomers. Extracted type I collagen fibrils, which was used as simulation of the exposed dentinal collagen fibrils after acid etching step, were plasma treated and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. FT-IR spectra of the Plasma/HEMA Treated collage fibrils showed broadened amide I peak at 1660 cm−1 and amide II at 1550 cm−1, which indicate secondary structure changes of the collagen fibrils. CD spectra indicated that 67.4% collagen helix structures were denatured after plasma treatment. These experimental results demonstrate that non-thermal argon plasma treatment was very effective in loosing collagen structure and enhancing adhesive monomer penetration, which are beneficial to thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tag formation, and consequently enhance adhesive/dentin interface bonding. PMID:25267936

  3. A Mechanistic study of Plasma Treatment Effects on Demineralized Dentin Surfaces for Improved Adhesive/Dentin Interface Bonding.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-07-01

    Our previous work has shown that non-thermal plasma treatment of demineralized dentin significantly (p<0.05) improved adhesive/dentin bonding strength for dental composite restoration as compared with the untreated controls. This study is to achieve mechanistic understanding of the plasma treatment effects on dentin surface through investigating the plasma treated dentin surfaces and their interaction with adhesive monomer, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The plasma treated dentin surfaces from human third molars were evaluated by water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that plasma-treated dentin surface with subsequent HEMA immersion (Plasma/HEMA Treated) had much lower water contact angle compared with only plasma-treated (Plasma Treated) or only HEMA immersed (HEMA Treated) dentin surfaces. With prolong water droplet deposition time, water droplets spread out completely on the Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces. SEM images of Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces verified that dentin tubules were opened-up and filled with HEMA monomers. Extracted type I collagen fibrils, which was used as simulation of the exposed dentinal collagen fibrils after acid etching step, were plasma treated and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. FT-IR spectra of the Plasma/HEMA Treated collage fibrils showed broadened amide I peak at 1660 cm(-1) and amide II at 1550 cm(-1), which indicate secondary structure changes of the collagen fibrils. CD spectra indicated that 67.4% collagen helix structures were denatured after plasma treatment. These experimental results demonstrate that non-thermal argon plasma treatment was very effective in loosing collagen structure and enhancing adhesive monomer penetration, which are beneficial to thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tag formation, and consequently enhance adhesive/dentin interface bonding.

  4. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain.

  5. A Physiological Permeability Study of Third Molar Dentine with Odontoblasts Preserved and Odontoblasts Free Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Che

    2000-01-01

    Introduction Dentine a viable biological tissue forms an intimately related complex with the odontoblasts. Much has been question of the barrier properties of dentine within teeth and between teeth.. In human adults the odontoblasts are fully differentiated post-mitotic cells, which send its cytoplasmic processes into the dentinal tubules, yet various studies in the physic of fluid flow in dentine takes little recognition of its presence. The permeability of dentine has been implicated in a possible hydrodynamic mechanism by which rapid fluid movement in the tubules is thought to depolarise the nerve endings. Objective The innovative aim from this pilot investigation is to contribute to the understanding of the influence of odontoblasts on the permeability of human dentine. Methodology This study describes the permeability in odontoblast preserved and odontoblast free preparations in vitro i.e. comparing fluid flow across dentine in human third molars. The pulp tissues were removed from human third molars leaving the odontoblasts attached to the walls of the chamber. The specimens were then either fixed chemically (odontoblast-preserved specimens) or immersed in NaOH (odontoblast free specimens). Occlusal dentine was exposed by removing the enamel. The exposed dentine was placed in contact with water and the ingress of water into the pulp chamber was observed with a binocular microscope. A microlitre syringe was used to measure the volume of water accumulated at time intervals of several hours for up to 70 hours or more. Results The results showed that spontaneous flow continued in both preparations until equilibrium was reached. The relative final volumes were greater in the odontoblast free preparations than in the odontoblast preserved. Conclusion Water movement through odontoblast free dentine was believed to be driven by capillarity and through odontoblast preserved dentine by capillarity and osmotic pressure.

  6. Qualitative Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Root Dentin Irrigated with Sodium Hypochlorite, EDTA, or Chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Kolosowski, Kamil P; Sodhi, Rana N S; Kishen, Anil; Basrani, Bettina R

    2015-10-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chelating agents, and chlorhexidine (CHX), which are commonly used irrigants during endodontic treatment, have the potential to alter the physical and chemical properties of the dentin structure. The aim of this study was to use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to qualitatively evaluate the chemical characteristics of dentin surface and compare it with dentin exposed to NaOCl, EDTA, or CHX. Four blocks of dentin from a root of a human maxillary molar were embedded in resin and trimmed with a microtome to expose the dentin. Samples were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: (1) no irrigation treatment (sample A), (2) 2.5% NaOCl (sample B), (3) 17% EDTA (sample C), and (4) 2% CHX (sample D). Dentin surfaces were analyzed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, which allowed characterization of dentin surface chemistry by both imaging and mass spectroscopic analysis obtained in high mass and spatial resolution modes. Sample A revealed intense peaks characteristics of hydroxyapatite in addition to Na(+), K(+), CH4N(+), CN(-), CNO(-), Mg(+), F(-), and HCO2(-) peaks. Sample B showed severely decreased CH4N(+) and increased intensity of Cl(-). Sample C lacked Ca(+) and Mg(+) and showed decreased PO2(-) and PO3(-). Sample D exhibited a distinct presence of CHX. The spectral image of sample A displayed even distribution of Na(+) and Ca(+) on a smeared surface. The surfaces of samples B and D had patent dentinal tubules, whereas sample D showed an intense CHX signal. Sample C had some patent dentinal tubules and lacked Ca(+). NaOCl removed protein components from the dentin matrix, EDTA removed calcium and magnesium ions from the dentin, and CHX formed an adsorbed layer on the dentin surface. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  8. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-06-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch's t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality.

  9. How can sensitive dentine become hypersensitive and can it be reversed?

    PubMed Central

    Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews a number of studies in oral biology and endodontics that deal with the reactivity of the pulpo-dentine complex in response to mechanical and immunological stimuli. It can be hypothesized that these reactions could also apply to changes in dentine sensitivity following periodontal procedures. Some of these changes involve neurogenic inflammation of the pulp under exposed open tubules; this increases the rate of outward fluid flow through the tubules, making the overlying exposed dentine more sensitive. Other changes may be due to inflammation-related nerve sprouting of pulpal nerves, which can lead to innervation ofmore tubules than normal. Changes may also involve upregulation of new, more sensitive ion channels in the membranes of these nerves. The goal of the paper is to increase awareness of the issues involved in dentine sensitivity, so that future investigators may develop agents or techniques to stimulate mechanisms that mitigate dentine sensitivity or to block mechanisms that aggravate the condition, for therapeutic effect. PMID:23929645

  10. Aniso Tubule

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-03

    ISS043E087335 (04/03/2015) --- ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti works to retrieve samples for the Aniso Tubule experiment from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) on Apr. 3, 2015. Aniso Tubule examines growth modifications of Arabidopsis hypocotyls in space. Scientists will analyze the changes in dynamics of cortical microtubules and microtubule associated proteins with a fluorescence microscope.

  11. Dentin Topographic Features following Chemomechanical Caries Removal in Primary Teeth.

    PubMed

    Kotb, R M; Elkateb, M A; Ahmed, A M; Kawana, K Y; El Meligy, O A

    Study the topographic features of dentin after caries removal with a chemomechanical agent (Papacarie) compared with the conventional drilling method. The sample included 7 exfoliated and extracted primary teeth with carious dentin lesions, not reaching the pulp. Each tooth was sectioned longitudinally through the center of the carious lesions into two halves. The teeth were then divided into two groups according to the method of caries removal. Following caries removal, dentin topography and the cut section were examined using the scanning electron microscope. Papacarie produced an irregular, porous, rough and globular dentin appearance. The dentin surfaces were generally free of smear layer, visible bacteria and the dentinal tubules were opened. The dentin cut surfaces showed patent dentinal tubules with open orifices. The drilling method created a smooth and amorphous surface with a continuous smear layer occluding the dentinal tubules. Numerous bacteria were also observed. The cut dentin surfaces showed patent dentinal tubules with their orifices plugged with smear layer. Papacarie produced a rough and porous surface with partial or complete removal of the smear layer and opened dentinal tubules, while the drill produced a smooth surface with uniform smear layer occluding the dentinal tubules.

  12. The permeability of dentine from bovine incisors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tagami, J; Tao, L; Pashley, D H; Horner, J A

    1989-01-01

    The permeability of coronal dentine was investigated by measuring the hydraulic conductance of dentine discs. Reductions in dentine thickness from the enamel side of disc resulted in a greater increase in permeability than reductions from the pulpal side. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer dentinal tubules with smaller diameters in superficial dentine than in deep dentine. The permeability of coronal incisor bovine dentine is six to eight times less than that of unerupted coronal human third molar dentine but similar to that of human root dentine.

  13. A morphological in vitro study of the effects of Nd:YAG laser on irradiated cervical dentin.

    PubMed

    de Magalhães, Manoelita Figueiredo; Matson, Edmir; de Rossi, Wagner; Alves, José Bento

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to verify the efficacy of Nd:YAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm in sealing dentinal tubules in vitro, with its resulting morphological changes using clinical parameters applicable to the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Although many papers have been written on the subject, no rapid, efficient, and long-lasting treatment for this problem has been developed. Twenty healthy extracted human teeth were kept in saline solution. Cervical cement was removed with a no. 57FG bur to expose approximately 4 mm(2) of dentin. Two groups were in the buccal aspect (A and B-irradiated) and one group in the lingual aspect (C-control not irradiated) of the same tooth. Samples with a remaining dentinal thickness between 1 and 1.5 mm were selected. Irradiation parameters were 30 mJ, 0.3W(Group A) and 40 mJ, 0.4 W(Group B); 7 Hz was used in both groups in two 43-sec applications each, with a 10-sec interval. In 10 samples, the dentinal surface underwent SEM examination for study. The other 10 remaining irradiated samples were centrally cleaved to study laser penetration depth in dentin (SEM). Obliteration of dentinal tubule openings and solidification of the dentin surface were observed in all irradiated samples. Laser penetration depth in dentin (SEM) varied from 1 to 7 microm, depending on irradiation parameters used in each group. We concluded that the use of the Nd:YAG laser was a very effective measure for obliterating dentinal tubule openings.

  14. Evaluation of residual dentin after conventional and chemomechanical caries removal using SEM.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Fernanda Nahás Pires; Rodrigues Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Rodrigues, Célia Regina Martins Delgado

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the residual dentinal surfaces following caries removal using rotatory instruments and two chemomechanical methods (Papacárie and Carisolv), by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thirty primary incisors were divided into three groups, according to the caries removal method used, and their residual dentin was examined under SEM (15). After caries removal, 15 of these teeth were restored with Single Bond (3M) adhesive system and Z100 Filtek composite resin (3M). The tags of the replicas were observed under SEM. The chemomechanical caries removal methods (Papacárie and Carisolv) formed an amorphous layer, similar to the smear layer and few exposed dentinal tubules; the conventional caries removal method produced a smooth and regular dentinal surface, with typical smear layer and exposed dentinal tubules. All groups showed abundant tag formation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed a difference between dentin treated with rotatory instruments and that treated with chemomechanical methods in spite of the occurrence of a similar tag formation in both groups.

  15. Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-20

    Dentin hypersensitivity is sharp and unpleasant pains caused by exposed dentinal tubules when enamel outside of the tooth wears away. The occlusion of dentinal tubules via in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite is the best method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity. Commercially available dental desensitizers are generally effective only on a specific area and are relatively toxic, and their performance usually depends on the skill of the clinician. Here, a facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment with remarkable aesthetic improvement inspired by the tunicate-self-healing process is reported. As pyrogallol groups in tunicate proteins conjugate with metal ions to heal the torn body armor of a tunicate, the ingenious mechanism by introducing gallic acid (GA) as a cheap, abundant, and edible alternative to the pyrogallol groups of the tunicate combined with a varied daily intake of metal ion sources is mimicked. In particular, the GA/Fe(3+) complex exhibits the most promising results, to the instant ≈52% blockage in tubules within 4 min and ≈87% after 7 d of immersion in artificial saliva. Overall, the GA/metal ion complex-mediated coating is facile, instant, and effective, and is suggested as an aesthetic solution for treating dentin hypersensitivity.

  16. Effect of antioxidants on the dentin interface bond stability of adhesives exposed to hydrolytic degradation.

    PubMed

    Gotti, Valéria B; Feitosa, Victor P; Sauro, Salvatore; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Leal, Fernanda B; Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Correr, Américo B

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the effect of antioxidants vitamin C (Vit. C), vitamin E (Vit. E) and quercetin (Querc) on the dentin bonding performance, degree of conversion, and rate of polymerization of three commercial adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB], Clearfil SE Bond [CSE], Adper Easy Bond [EB]). Human premolars were restored using antioxidant-doped adhesives. The samples were stored for 24 h in distilled water or 6 months under simulated pulpal pressure. Teeth were cut into sticks and the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin was tested in a universal testing machine. Qualitative nanoleakage analysis was performed from a central stick of each restored tooth. Degree of conversion and rate of polymerization of adhesive systems were evaluated in triplicate using real-time FT-IR. Although the inclusion of the antioxidants negatively affected the μTBS over 24 h, the antioxidant-doped adhesives maintained (SB-Vit. C, SB-Vit. E, CSE-Vit. C, EB-Querc) or increased (SB-Querc, CSE-Vit. E, CSE-Querc, EB-Vit. E, and EB-Vit. C) their μTBS during 6 months of storage. Only the μTBS of Adper Single Bond 2 dropped significantly after 6 months among the control groups. Slight changes in the nanoleakage pattern after aging were observed in all groups, except for the EB-control group, which showed a noteworthy increase in nanoleakage after 6 months, and for EB-Vit. C, which presented a remarkable decrease. A lower degree of conversion was obtained with all antioxidants in SB and EB, except for the EB-Vit. E group. Similar degrees of conversion were attained in control and experimental groups for CSE. The rate of polymerization was reduced in antioxidant-doped adhesives. The performance of antioxidants changed according to the adhesive system to which they were added, and antioxidant-doped adhesives appear to have a positive effect on the adhesive interface durability, since their bond strength obtained after 24 h was maintained or increased over time.

  17. Short and long term gene expression variation and networking in human proximal tubule cells when exposed to cadmium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a known nephrotoxin causing tubular necrosis during acute exposure and potentially contributing to renal failure in chronic long-term exposure. To investigate changes in global gene expression elicited by cadmium, an in-vitro exposure system was developed from cultures of human renal epithelial cells derived from cortical tissue obtained from nephrectomies. These cultures exhibit many of the qualities of proximal tubule cells. Using these cells, a study was performed to determine the cadmium-induced global gene expression changes after short-term (1 day, 9, 27, and 45 μM) and long-term cadmium exposure (13 days, 4.5, 9, and 27 μM). These studies revealed fundamental differences in the types of genes expressed during each of these time points. The obtained data was further analyzed using regression to identify cadmium toxicity responsive genes. Regression analysis showed 403 genes were induced and 522 genes were repressed by Cd2+ within 1 day, and 366 and 517 genes were induced and repressed, respectively, after 13 days. We developed a gene set enrichment analysis method to identify the cadmium induced pathways that are unique in comparison to traditional approaches. The perturbation of global gene expression by various Cd2+ concentrations and multiple time points enabled us to study the transcriptional dynamics and gene interaction using a mutual information-based network model. The most prominent network module consisted of INHBA, KIF20A, DNAJA4, AKAP12, ZFAND2A, AKR1B10, SCL7A11, and AKR1C1. PMID:23369406

  18. Heat shock protein 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of CdCl2.

    PubMed Central

    Somji, S; Sens, D A; Garrett, S H; Sens, M A; Todd, J H

    1999-01-01

    The expression of hsp 27 mRNA and protein was determined in cultured human proximal tubule (HPT) cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cd2+ under both acute and extended conditions. Initial procedures demonstrated that HPT cells display the classic stress response following physical and chemical stress. Heat stress (42.5 degrees C for 1 hr) caused an increase in both hsp 27 mRNA and protein as well as a shift in the protein to a more phosphorylated state. Results were similar when the cells were subjected to chemical stress (exposure to 100 microM sodium arsenite for 4 hr). Acute exposure to 53 microM CdCl2 for 4 hr also resulted in an increase in hsp 27 mRNA and protein and a shift to the more phosphorylated protein isoform. Extended Cd2+ exposure involved continuous treatment with Cd2+ at both lethal and sublethal levels over a 16-day time course. The results of this treatment showed that chronic exposure to Cd2+ failed to increase either hsp 27 mRNA or protein expression in HPT cells, even at lethal Cd2+ concentrations. In fact, hsp 27 protein levels decreased as compared to controls at both lethal and sub-lethal exposure to Cd2+. These findings imply that hsp 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells may have two distinct modes depending on the nature (acute vs. chronic) of the stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10379001

  19. Treatment of Dentinal Hypersensitivity by means of Nd:YAP Laser: A Preliminary In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Namour, Amaury; Nammour, Samir; Peremans, André; Heysselaer, Daniel; De Moor, Roeland J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Nd:YAP laser to seal dentinal tubules at different parameters. Material and Methods. 24 caries-free human wisdom impacted molars were used. The crowns were sectioned transversally in order to totally expose the dentin. The smear layer was removed by a 1 min application of EDTA. Each surface was divided into four quadrants, but only three quadrants were irradiated at a different output power setting (irradiation speed: 1 mm/sec; optical fiber diameter: 320 µm; tangential incidence of beam and in noncontact mode). Samples were smeared with a graphite paste prior to laser irradiation. All specimens were sent for SEM analysis. Pulp temperature increases in additional twenty teeth were measured by a thermocouple. Results. Morphological changes in dentin surfaces depend on the value of used energy density. Higher energy densities (2 W–4 W; 200–400 mJ; pulse duration: 100 m sec.; and 10 Hz) induce higher dentin modifications. Our results confirmed that Nd:YAP laser irradiations can lead to total or partial occlusion of dentin tubules without provoking fissures or cracks. Measurements of pulp temperature increases showed that Nd:YAP laser beam can be considered as harmless for pulp vitality for following irradiation conditions: 2 W (200 mJ) to 4 W (400 mJ) with an irradiation speed of 1 mm/sec; fiber diameter: 320 micrometers; 10 Hz; pulse duration: 100 m sec; noncontact mode and in tangential incidence to exposed dentin. The perpendicular incidence of the laser beam on exposed dentin may injure pulp vitality even at low output power of 3 W. Conclusions. Nd:YAP laser beam was able to seal the dentin tubules without damaging dentinal surfaces and without harming pulp vitality. Nd:YAP laser is effective and may be safely used for future in vivo treatments of dentinal hypersensitivity under certain conditions. PMID:25383368

  20. Leeuwenhoek and the structure of dentine.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, R; Flannelly, M

    1990-01-01

    This short paper includes extracts from the original translations of Leeuwenhoek's descriptions of the histology of teeth, investigates his findings and demonstrates that in addition to describing dentinal tubules, he may have identified the presence of calcospherites within that tissue.

  1. Biomimetic mineralization: long-term observations in patients with dentin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Guentsch, Arndt; Seidler, Karin; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hefti, Arthur F; Preshaw, Philip M; Watts, David C; Jandt, Klaus D; Sigusch, Bernd W

    2012-04-01

    Cervical tooth erosion is increasingly observed among adults and frequently associated with dentin sensitivity (DS). This study evaluated the effectiveness on DS of a biomimetic mineralization system (BIMIN) in comparison to the current standard treatment (Gluma(®) Desensitizer, Gluma). In this single-blind, 2-arm study, 40 patients with confirmed cervical DS were randomized to either the test group or the positive control group. A Visual-Analog-Scale (VAS) was used to assess DS following stimulation of the exposed dentin with a 2-s air blast. Assessments were made at baseline (pre-treatment), 2 days, 4, 8 and 12 weeks, and 12 months after treatment. Two-stage replicas were obtained from the treated teeth and gold sputtered at baseline, and 2 days, 3 and 12 months after treatment. Surface topography of the treated cervical lesions and occlusion of dentinal tubules were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both treatments led to a statistically significant reduction (P<0.0001) in DS that persisted over the entire 12-month observation period. Differences in DS between the treatments were not statistically significant. SEM photomicrographs demonstrated that a mineral layer concealed the dentinal tubules in the test group. In contrast, numerous dentinal tubules remained visible in cervical defects that were treated with Gluma. A biomimetic mineralization kit was successfully used to treat patients exhibiting DS. The effect was similar to using Gluma, and was likely the result of the deposition of an enamel-like layer on the exposed cervical dentin. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of the constitutive and inducible forms of heat shock protein 70 in human proximal tubule cells exposed to heat, sodium arsenite, and CdCl(2).

    PubMed Central

    Somji, S; Todd, J H; Sens, M A; Garrett, S H; Sens, D A

    1999-01-01

    We determined the expression of the constitutive (hsc 70) and inducible (hsp 70) forms of heat shock protein 70 mRNA and protein in human proximal tubule (HPT) cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cd(+2) under both acute and extended conditions of exposure. The HPT cells exhibited the classic heat shock response when subjected to a physical (heat) or chemical stress (sodium arsenite); hsc 70 mRNA and protein levels were constant or slightly increased, whereas hsp 70 mRNA and protein were greatly elevated. Acute exposure to 53.4 microM CdCl(2) for 4 hr failed to increase either hsc 70 mRNA or protein, a finding similar to that observed under classic conditions of stress. However, under identical conditions of acute exposure to Cd(2+), the expected increase in hsp 70 protein level was suppressed as compared to that found under classic conditions of physical or chemical stress. The decrease in hsp 70 protein level correlated to the reduced expression of mRNA from the hsp 70B gene. The expression of mRNA from the hsp 70A and hsp 70C genes was similar to that found when the cells were treated with heat shock or sodium arsenite. We modeled an extended exposure to Cd(2+) by treating the cells continuously with Cd(2+) at both lethal and sublethal levels over a 16-day time course. Chronic exposure to Cd(2+) failed to increase either hsc 70 mRNA or protein levels in the HPT cells at a nonlethal dosage level and decreased hsc 70 mRNA and protein levels late in the time course of lethal exposure. Under identical conditions, the expression of hsp 70 protein remained at basal levels that were only marginally detectable throughout the time course. Hsp 70A and hsp 70C mRNA levels were unaltered by extended exposure to Cd(2+), and hsp 70B mRNA was not detected during the 16-day time course. Cd(2+) is a poor inducer of hsc 70 and hsp 70 in the proximal tubule under both acute and long-term exposure. These results reinforce the fact that the expression of hsp 70

  3. Dentine hypersensitivity: a review of its aetiology, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Sykes, L M

    2007-03-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is defined as pain arising from exposed dentine and represents a distinct clinical entity. Reported cases are increasing particularly among the younger age groups and are thought to be due to acidogenic diets, destructive habits, poor tooth brushing techniques, and the increased use of tooth whitening products. Dentine exposure may be due to a number of processes, both physical and chemical, that lead to either loss of enamel/ cementum or loss of gingival tissue. These causative factors seldom act in isolation and include erosion, abrasion, attrition, abfraction, bruxing, bleaching, medication, ageing, genetic conditions, gingival recession, and periodontal disease or procedures. There are diverse range of treatment products available, which aim at either occluding the dentinal tubules or blocking the neural transmission from the pulp. Most reversible options make use of chemical agents such as fluorides, oxalate, strontium or potassium salts, or dentine-bonding agents. Non-reversible options should only be employed after one or more of the reversible options have been attempted. These usually involve placement of permanent restorations, occlusal adjustments or periodontal flap surgery. Careful diagnosis, patient counseling and management strategies are crucial to the success of any intervention.

  4. Structural modifications induced in dentin by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-12-01

    The structural and chemical modifications induced in dentin by ultrafast laser ablation were studied. The laser experiments were performed with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560-fs pulse duration, 1030-nm radiation wavelength), fluences in the range 2 to 14 J/cm2, 1-kHz pulse repetition rate, and 5-mm/s scanning speed. The ablation surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ablation surfaces produced with 2 J/cm2 presented an irregular morphology with exposed dentinal tubules and no evidence of thermal effects. For 7 and 14 J/cm2, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of redeposited ablation debris, consisting mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate. This layer is weakly adherent to the underlying tissue and can be easily removed by ultrasonication, revealing a surface with a morphology similar to the one obtained with 2 J/cm2. The constitution of the dentin ablation surfaces is similar to the constitution of pristine dentin, showing that, within this fluence range, the laser treatment does not significantly modify the structure and constitution of dentin. The results achieved suggest an ablation mechanism where collagen is preferentially decomposed by the laser radiation, reducing the tissue cohesive strength and leading, ultimately, to its ablation.

  5. Lack of formic acid production in rat hepatocytes and human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to chloral hydrate or trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lock, Edward A; Reed, Celia J; McMillan, Joellyn M; Oatis, John E; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2007-02-12

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and its major metabolites have been shown to cause formic aciduria in male rats. We have examined whether chloral hydrate (CH) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), known metabolites of TCE, produce an increase in formic acid in vitro in cultures of rat hepatocytes or human renal proximal tubule cells (HRPTC). The metabolism and cytotoxicity of CH was also examined to establish that the cells were metabolically active and not compromised by toxicity. Rat hepatocytes and HRPTC were cultured in serum-free medium and then treated with 0.3-3mM CH for 3 days or 0.03-3mM CH for 10 days, respectively and formic acid production, metabolism to trichloroethanol (TCE-OH) and TCA and cytotoxicity determined. No increase in formic acid production in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to CH was observed over and above that due to chemical degradation, neither was formic acid production observed in rat hepatocytes exposed to TCA. HRPTC metabolized CH to TCE-OH and TCA with a 12-fold greater capacity to form TCE-OH versus TCA. Rat hepatocytes exhibited a 1.6-fold and three-fold greater capacity than HRPTC to form TCE-OH and TCA, respectively. CH and TCA were not cytotoxic to rat hepatocytes at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 3 days. With HRPTC, one sample showed no cytotoxicity to CH at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 10 days, while in another cytotoxicity was seen at 1mM/day for 3 days. In summary, increased formic acid production was not observed in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to TCE metabolites, suggesting that the in vivo response cannot be modelled in vitro. CH was toxic to HRPTC at millimolar concentrations/day over 10 days, while glutathione derived metabolites of TCE were toxic at micromolar concentrations/day over 10 days [Lock, E.A., Reed, C.J., 2006. Trichloroethylene: mechanisms of renal toxicity and renal cancer and relevance to risk assessment. Toxicol. Sci. 19, 313-331] supporting the view that glutathione derived

  6. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  7. Dentin hypersensitivity: Recent trends in management

    PubMed Central

    Miglani, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Vivek; Ahuja, Bhoomika

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity (DH) is a common clinical condition usually associated with exposed dentinal surfaces. It can affect patients of any age group and most commonly affects the canines and premolars of both the arches. This article concisely reviews the patho-physiology, mechanism and clinical management of the DH. Treatment of DH should start with an accurate diagnosis. Differential diagnosis should be made and all other probable causes should be excluded. An often neglected phase of clinical management of DH is the identification and treatment of the causative factors of DH. By removing the etiological factors, the condition can be even prevented from occurring or recurring. There are various treatment modalities available which can be used at home or may be professionally applied. The “at home” desensitizing agents include toothpastes, mouthwashes or chewing gums and they act by either occluding the dentinal tubules or blocking the neural transmission. This article also discusses the recent treatment options like bioglass, Portland cement, lasers and casein phosphopeptide. PMID:21217949

  8. Effects of distance from the pulp and thickness on the hydraulic conductance of human radicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Marshall, F J; Pashley, D H

    1988-11-01

    The purposes of this study were: (1) to measure the effect of distance from the pulp on the hydraulic conductance of human radicular dentin; (2) to determine the influence of dentin thickness on the rates of fluid flow; and (3) to attempt to correlate dentinal tubule densities and diameters with root dentin hydraulic conductance. Dentin slabs prepared from extracted, unerupted, human third molar teeth were placed in a split-chamber device to permit quantitation of fluid filtration rate (hydraulic conductance). In the SEM portion of the study, dentinal tubule numbers and diameters were recorded. The results indicated that radicular dentin hydraulic conductance decreased with distance from the pulp and with increasing dentin thickness. Tubule density and diameter correlated well with the measured hydraulic conductances. The relatively low hydraulic conductance of outer root dentin makes it a significant barrier to fluid movement across root structure.

  9. Morphology of the dentin structure of sloths Bradypus tridactylus: a light and scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Santana, L N S; Barbosa, L V M; Teixeira, F B; Costa, A M P; Fernandes, L M P; Lima, R R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dentine morphology of sloths (Bradypus tridactylus). The sloth teeth were removed and prepared for light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy analyses (SEM). LM revealed two patterns of tubular dentins: an outer with dentinary tubules over the all tooth length and one in the inner part with larger diameter and more spaced tubules, when compared to those present in the outer dentine. These findings were confirmed by SEM, which revealed a tubular pattern in the outer dentine like in humans. The inner dentine displayed pared grouped tubules that were characterized as vascular channels. It can be concluded that this sloth species present two types of dentins: an inner dentin (ortodentin) and an outer dentin characterized as a vascular dentin. This suggests a partial evolutive/adaptive process of this dental tissue, as compared to other mammalian species.

  10. The induction of dentin bridge-like structures by constructs of subcultured dental pulp-derived cells and porous HA/TCP in porcine teeth.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yusuke; Honda, Masaki J; Ohshima, Hayato; Tonomura, Akiko; Ohara, Takayuki; Itaya, Toshimitsu; Kagami, Hideaki; Ueda, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate dentin-bridge formation in teeth following the transplantation of dental pulp-derived cells seeded on hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) scaffolds. The dental pulp tissues were removed from the extracted first molar teeth of miniature pigs and single cell populations were subcultured. Second-passage cells that had alkaline phosphatase activity were combined with scaffolds. Cell-scaffold constructs were placed in contact with the exposed pulp tissue. The dimensions of the exposed pulp site were approximately 1-2.5 mm in diameter and 2-3 mm in depth from the tooth surface. After placing the constructs, the tooth was restored with composite resin. Six weeks after transplantation, hard tissue formation was observed on the pulp tissue in histology. Dentinal tubule-like structures were observed in most of the hard tissue generated, and columnar cells, which showed positive immunoreactions with dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and heat shock protein (HSP)-25, were aligned beneath the hard tissues. When only scaffolds were placed on the pulp tissues, particles of hard tissue were formed, however dentinal tubule-like structures and odontoblasts were not observed despite the formation of hard tissue. In conclusion, the implantation of dental pulp constructs into pulp exposed stimulates the formation of calcified dentin-like structures.

  11. Exposed Dentin: Influence of Cleaning Procedures and Simulated Pulpal Pressure on Bond Strength of a Universal Adhesive System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare various pre-treatments serving as cleaning procedures of dentin on the bond strength of resin composite promoted by a universal adhesive system applied either in the absence or presence of simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods Prior to application of the adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) and resin composite (Filtek Z250), ground dentin surfaces were given one of five pre-treatments either without or with simulated pulpal pressure: 1) no pre-treatment, adhesive system in “self-etch” mode, 2) phosphoric acid etching, adhesive system in “total-etch” mode, 3) polishing with pumice on prophylaxis cup, 4) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PLUS powder, 5) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PERIO powder; n = 20/group of pre-treatment. After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), micro shear bond strength was measured and data analyzed with parametric ANOVA including Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing followed by Student’s t tests (significance level: α = 0.05). Results The ANOVA found type of pre-treatment and simulated pulpal pressure to have no significant effect on dentin bond strength. The explorative post-hoc tests showed a negative effect of simulated pulpal pressure for phosphoric acid etching (adhesive system in “total-etch” mode; p = 0.020), but not for the other four pre-treatments (all p = 1.000). Conclusion Air abrasion with powders containing either erythritol and chlorhexidine (AIR-FLOW PLUS) or glycine (AIR-FLOW PERIO) yielded dentin bond strengths similar to no pre-treatment, phosphoric acid etching, or polishing with pumice. Simulated pulpal pressure reduced the bond strength only when the self-etch adhesive system was used in total-etch mode. PMID:28081572

  12. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A. Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin irradiation with Erbium: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Methods: Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces. PMID:23407579

  13. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin.

    PubMed

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    THE AIM OF THIS STUDY WAS TO EVALUATE THE MINERAL CONTENT OF DENTIN IRRADIATION WITH ERBIUM: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces.

  14. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin - a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear. PMID:24294356

  15. The effect of in-office in combination with intracoronal bleaching on enamel and dentin bond strength and dentin morphology.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristiane; Jorge, Ana; Veloso, Katia; Erhardt, Maria; Arias, Vanessa; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro effects of the combination of in-office and intracoronal bleaching on enamel and dentin bond strength and on dentin morphology. Bleaching treatment was performed on 128 bovine teeth for three weeks. Intracoronal bleaching was performed in groups G1 to G3, and in the other groups a combination of in-office and intracoronal bleaching was performed. The following agents and materials were used (n=16): G1- sodium perborate and water (SP); G2- 37% carbamide peroxide (CP); G3- 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP); G4- HP + cotton pellet soaked in water (CPW); G5- HP + SP; G6- HP + CP; G7- HP + HP; and G8- CPW (control). Seven days after bleaching treatment the teeth were sectioned into two halves. One half of each tooth was ground to obtain a flat dentin surface. Dentin and enamel fragments were treated with a dentin/enamel resin adhesive. Resin composite was inserted in two increments and polymerized for 20 seconds. Following the restorative procedures, specimens were sectioned into beams with a rectangular cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm2. Microtensile testing was performed in a universal testing machine. Bond strengths (in MPa) were calculated and the data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (a=0.05). For the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, the exposed pulp chambers (n=5) were fixed, dehydrated, dried in a Critical Point dryer, and gold-sputter coated for analysis at standardized magnifications (500X, 1000X, and 2000X). None of the bleaching techniques reduced the enamel bond strength, the best results observed were with the intracoronal treatments with SP and HP. In dentin all bleaching techniques reduced the bond strength with the exception of the in-office HP application technique. The SEM results demonstrated similar dentin surfaces for the G1, G3, G6, and G7 groups with more open dentin tubules found than in the other groups. None of the bleaching techniques tested

  16. Effects of air-drying in vitro on human dentine permeability.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H; Stewart, F P; Galloway, S E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of evaporation produced by air blasts of 0, 0.5, 2 or 5 min to dentine in vitro were evaluated by measuring dentine hydraulic conductance before and after each trial. When the tubules were filled with water, even prolonged evaporation had no effect on dentine permeability. Tubules filled with physiological salt solution produced a time-dependent decrease in dentine permeability. Tubules filled with 1.5 per cent albumin in water gave the largest reductions in dentine permeability. These effects were more marked in unetched as opposed to acid-etched dentine. The results suggest that part of the reduction in dentine sensitivity produced clinically by prolonged air blasts may be due to precipitation of organic and inorganic constituents of dentinal fluid at the surface.

  17. Inelastic deformation and microcracking process in human dentin.

    PubMed

    Eltit, Felipe; Ebacher, Vincent; Wang, Rizhi

    2013-08-01

    Dentin is a mineralized collagen tissue with robust mechanical performance. Understanding the mechanical behavior of dentin and its relations to the dentinal structure can provides insight into the design strategies to achieve tooth functions. This study focuses on the inelastic deformation of human dentin and its underlying mechanisms. By combining four-point bending tests with fluorescent staining and laser scanning confocal microscopy, it was found that human dentin, especially root dentin, exhibited significant inelastic deformation and developed extensive microdamage in the form of microcracks prior to fracture. Dense and wavy microcracks spread uniformly across the tensile surface of root dentin, while compressive microcracks formed cross-hatched patterns. The presence of peritubular dentin in coronal dentin dramatically decreased the extent of microcracking, reducing inelasticity. Dentinal tubules were found to be initiation sites of both tensile and compressive microcracks. A unique crack propagation process was observed in root dentin under tension: numerous ring-shaped cracks formed at each dentinal tubule ahead of a growing crack tip. The advance of the tensile microcracks occurred by the merging of those ring-shaped cracks. The current findings on the microcracking process associated with inelastic deformation helps to understand the nature of strength and toughness in dentin, as well as the mechanical significance for structural variations across the whole tooth.

  18. Efficacy of a desensitizing toothpaste containing arginine and calcium carbonate on dentin surface pore structure and dentin morphology.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Li, YueHeng; Chen, Jiao; Zhou, Zhi; Morrison, Boyce M; Panagakos, Fotinos S

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the laboratory changes in dentin tubule occlusion morphology during short term use of desensitizing products as evaluated by electron microscopy and an image analysis. Freshly extracted human third molar teeth were collected at random and 40 dentin discs were prepared. These dentin samples were then divided in to four groups (n=10). The test treatment consisted of undiluted Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief Toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate that was applied on the dentin surface under a brushing cycle of 200 strokes, 2 times/day, for 10 days and then soaked in the filtrated human saliva. The two other test products were a commercial toothpaste, Sensodyne Original, containing 10% strontium chloride and a professional re-mineralizing treatment paste (GC Tooth Mousse). The negative control group was soaked in human saliva that had been sterilized by filtration. The occluding ability of the dentin tubules, using the dentin disc model, was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The degree of occlusion of the dentin tubules was quantified using an image analyzer and the results were analyzed by ANOVA and a Tukey's test. All test products created a smear layer on the dentin surface that significantly reduced the diameter of dentin tubules after treatment. Compared to the dentin tubule area on disks treated with the negative control (72.02 +/- 7.23 microm2), disks treated with Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief, Sensodyne Original, and GC Mousse had dentin tubule areas of 2.10 +/- 0.42 microm2, 10.11 +/- 2.83 microm2, and 30.40 +/- 4.04 microm2 respectively. These differences were statistically significant.

  19. Comparison of the Effect of Dentin Bonding, Dentin Sealing Agents on the Microleakage of Provisional Crowns Fabricated with Direct and Indirect Technique-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, B; Kumar, M Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative sensitivity after temporization is a common complaint in Fixed Partial Denture patients. It is caused by weak and ill fitting temporary restorations which results in microleakage. This can be controlled by providing good temporary restorations and by coating the exposed dentinal tubules of the prepared tooth with dentin bonding agent or dental varnish. Aim The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of dentin-bonding, dentin sealing agents on the microleakage of temporary crowns made by tooth colored auto polymerizing resin fabricated with direct and indirect technique. Materials and Methods Thirty premolar and molar human teeth were collected which were extracted recently was used for the study. The teeth were marked and divided into 3 groups each containing 10 nos. They were individually mounted with self-cure acrylic resin. It was then mounted on a milling machine and crown preparations done. Temporary crowns were fabricated by direct and indirect method with two types of materials. In group A (Control group), the temporary crowns fabricated with both direct and indirect method were cemented directly with temporary luting cement. In group B dentine-bonding agent (solobond M) was applied once to the prepared surface of each tooth specimen before the cementation of temporary crowns where as in case of group C a single layer of dental varnish is applied prior to crown cementation. The entire specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue and allowed to undergo thermal treatment. It was then sectioned in a hard tissue microtome. Each section was evaluated for dye penetration into the dentin tubules by comparing it with a visual scale. Statistical Analysis SPSS Version 13 software was used for non-parametric data analysis by a qualified statistician. P-values less than 0.05 (p-value<0.05) were considered to be statistically significant. Results Group B (Dentin Bonding Agent) specimens cemented with crowns fabricated in direct technique

  20. Dome formation and tubule morphogenesis by Xenopus kidney A6 cell cultures exposed to microgravity simulated with a 3D-clinostat and to hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Ichigi, J; Asashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Confluent high-density cell cultures of A6 cells derived from adult male Xenopus kidney exhibit spontaneous dome-formation at 1 g. To determine whether this morphogenetic property is altered by gravity, we used a three-dimensional (3D) clinostat to subject the cells to simulated microgravity, and a centrifuge to subject them to hypergravity. We used the generation orbit control method as the new rotation control system of the 3D-clinostat, not the random method. The growth of A6 cells was significantly enhanced by hypergravity, but significantly reduced by simulated microgravity. Dome formation by A6 cells at high confluence was inhibited under simulated microgravity conditions, whereas hypergravity promoted dome formation and induced tubule morphogenesis, compared to the control at 1 g. These results indicated that changes in gravity influence the morphogenetic properties of A6 cells, such as dome formation and tubule morphogenesis. When dome formation by A6 cells at high confluence was induced spontaneously in the control 1 g culture, the gene expression of the HGF family of pleiotropic factors, such as HGF-like protein (HLP) and growth factor-Livertine (GF-l.ivertine), an epithelial serine protease of channel activating protease 1 (CAP1), and Na+, K+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), increased. Simulated microgravity increased the gene expression of activin A and reduced the gene expression of HLP, GF-Livertine, CAP1, and Na+, K+-ATPase. Hypergravity, on the other hand, decreased the gene expression of activin A and increased the gene expression of HLP, GF-Livertine, CAP1, and Na+, K+-ATPase. These results suggest that the effects of gravitational changes on expression of the HGF family member gene, CAP1, and Na+, K+-ATPase gene may be important for the cell growth, tubule morphogenesis, and dome formation of A6 cells in altered

  1. Erosive potential of energy drinks on the dentine surface.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Shelon C S; Bandeca, Matheus C; Silva, Carolina N; Cavassim, Rodrigo; Borges, Alvaro H; Sampaio, José E C

    2013-02-19

    Considering the current high consumption of energy drinks, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of energy drinks in removing the smear layer and exposing dentinal tubules on root surface. Dentine root surfaces were exposed using a diamond bur. Forty movements of scaling were performed in the area prepared in order to create a smear layer. One hundred and thirty specimens were obtained from 35 teeth. Specimens were randomly distributed into 12 groups (n = 10) and divided into subgroups according to the application: topical (n = 5) and friction (n = 5). Twelve energy drinks were evaluated: RedBull, Burn, TNT, Flash Power, Flying Horse, Sports Drink, Ionic, Hot Power, Army Power, Gladiator and Bug. Distilled water was used as a control group. The specimens were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Topical application: a significant influence of energy drinks on smear layer removal was found for FlyingHorse and Bug when compared with the control group. Friction application: significant smear layer removal was found for Burn, FlyingHorse, Gladiator, SportsDrinks, when compared with the control group. Comparing the different application forms, a statistically significant difference was found for Army Power. Considering the significant smear layer removal, energy drinks can be an important etiological factor for cervical dentine hypersensitivity.

  2. Structure and microstructure of coronary dentin in non-erupted human deciduous incisor teeth.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciane R R S; Watanabe, Ii-Sei; Kronka, Márcia C; Silva, Marcelo C P

    2002-01-01

    The dentin structure of non-erupted human deciduous mandibular and maxillary central and lateral incisor teeth was studied employing light and scanning electron microscopy. For light microscopy, nitric-acid-demineralized and ground sections were used. The sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin, picrosirius and azo-carmine methods, and ground specimens were prepared using a carborundum disk mounted in a handpiece. For SEM study, teeth were frozen in liquid nitrogen and fractured at longitudinal and transversal directions. Structurally, demineralization and ground methods revealed tubules with primary and secondary curvatures, canaliculi, giant tubules, interglobular dentin, predentin, and intertubular dentin. Scanning electron microscopy showed three-dimensional aspects of dentinal tubules, canaliculi, peritubular dentin, intertubular dentin, and predentin. This study contributes to knowledge about dentin morphology showing characteristics of teeth not yet submitted to mastication stress.

  3. Distal Convoluted Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule is the nephron segment that lies immediately downstream of the macula densa. Although short in length, the distal convoluted tubule plays a critical role in sodium, potassium, and divalent cation homeostasis. Recent genetic and physiologic studies have greatly expanded our understanding of how the distal convoluted tubule regulates these processes at the molecular level. This article provides an update on the distal convoluted tubule, highlighting concepts and pathophysiology relevant to clinical practice. PMID:24855283

  4. Changes in gene expression in human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to low concentrations of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Edward A. . E-mail: e.lock@ljmu.ac.uk; Barth, Jeremy L.; Argraves, Scott W.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2006-10-15

    Epidemiology studies suggest that there may be a weak association between high level exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and renal tubule cell carcinoma. Laboratory animal studies have shown an increased incidence of renal tubule carcinoma in male rats but not mice. TCE can undergo metabolism via glutathione (GSH) conjugation to form metabolites that are known to be nephrotoxic. The GSH conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione (DCVG), is processed further to the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. We have cultured human renal tubule cells (HRPTC) in serum-free medium under a variety of different culture conditions and observed growth, respiratory control and glucose transport over a 20 day period in medium containing low glucose. Cell death was time- and concentration-dependent, with the EC{sub 5} for DCVG being about 3 {mu}M and for DCVC about 7.5 {mu}M over 10 days. Exposure of HRPTC to sub-cytotoxic doses of DCVC (0.1 {mu}M and 1 {mu}M for 10 days) led to a small number of changes in gene expression, as determined by transcript profiling with Affymetrix human genome chips. Using the criterion of a mean 2-fold change over control for the four samples examined, 3 genes at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC increased, namely, adenosine kinase, zinc finger protein X-linked and an enzyme with lyase activity. At 1 {mu}M DCVC, two genes showed a >2-fold decrease, N-acetyltransferase 8 and complement factor H. At a lower stringency (1.5-fold change), a total of 63 probe sets were altered at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC and 45 at 1 {mu}M DCVC. Genes associated with stress, apoptosis, cell proliferation and repair and DCVC metabolism were altered, as were a small number of genes that did not appear to be associated with the known mode of action of DCVC. Some of these genes may serve as molecular markers of TCE exposure and effects in the human kidney.

  5. Cytotoxicity of DP-bioglass paste used for treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tien-Chun; Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Kang, Shu-Han; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2007-04-01

    DP-bioglass mixed with 30% phosphoric acid has been suggested to treat dentin hypersensitivity because the material is able to produce homogeneous occlusion of exposed dentinal tubules and is able to provide a sealing depth of up to 60 microm. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative cytotoxic effect of the DP-bioglass paste, intermediate restorative material (IRM; DeTrey, Dentsply, Germany), and commercial desensitizing agent (Abmindent; Abmin Technologies Ltd, Turku, Finland) on human dental pulp cells by using a transwell insert model and a dentin-disc model. Cell viability was measured by means of a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results of this study indicated that cell viability for the DP-bioglass paste did not differ significantly from those of the IRM or Abmindent in the transwell insert model. In addition, MTT results of DP-bioglass paste were similar to the control group in the dentin-disc model. The results indicated that DP-bioglass paste was a highly biocompatible material and could potentially serve as an effective material for treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

  6. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  7. Biological effects of a root conditioning agent for dentin surface modification in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seol, Yang-Jo; Park, Jang-Ryul; Park, Yoon-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Connective tissue reattachment to periodontally damaged root surfaces is one of the most important goals of periodontal therapy. The aim of this study was to develop a root conditioning agent that can demineralize and detoxify the infected root surface. Methods Dentin slices obtained from human teeth were treated with a novel root planing agent for 2 minutes and then washed with phosphate-buffered saline. Smear layer removal and type I collagen exposure were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and type I collagen immunostaining, respectively. Cell attachment and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) removal demonstrated the efficiency of the root conditioning agent. Results SEM revealed that the smear layer was entirely removed and the dentinal tubules were opened by the experimental gel. Type I collagen was exposed on the surfaces of the dentin slices treated by the experimental gel, which were compared with dentin treated with other root planing agents. Dentin slices treated with the experimental gel showed the highest number of attached fibroblasts and flattened cell morphology. The agar diffusion assay demonstrated that the experimental gel also has effective antimicrobial activity. Escherichia coli LPS were effectively removed from well plates by the experimental gel. Conclusions These results demonstrated that this experimental gel is a useful tool for root conditioning of infected root surfaces and can also be applied for detoxification of ailing implant surface threads. PMID:21246015

  8. Penetration of Sodium Hypochlorite Modified with Surfactants into Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Palazzi, Flavio; Blasi, Andrea; Mohammadi, Zahed; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concentration, exposure time and temperature of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) added with surfactants on its penetration into dentinal tubules. Sixty-five extracted human permanent maxillary anterior teeth with single canals were prepared by ProTaper SX hand-operated instruments. The teeth were then sectioned perpendicular to the long axis. The crowns and apical thirds of all the teeth were removed. The remaining roots were processed into 4-mm-long blocks and stained overnight in crystal violet. One hundred and thirty stained blocks were further split into halves and treated by nine different types of NaOCl-based solutions. Three solutions were added with surfactants (Hypoclean, H6, Chlor-Xtra) and the others were regular hypochlorites at increasing concentrations (1%, 2%, 4%, 5.25%, <6%, 6% NaOCl) from different brands. The dentin blocks were exposed to the solutions for 2, 5, and 20 min at 20 °C, 37 °C and 45 °C, respectively. The depth of NaOCl penetration was determined by bleaching of the stain and measured by light microscopy at 20x and 40x. Statistical comparisons were made by using a generalized linear model with Bonferroni's post-hoc correction. The shortest penetration (81±6.6 μm) was obtained after incubation in 1% NaOCl for 2 min at 20 °C; the highest penetration (376.3±3.8 μm) was obtained with Chlor-Xtra for 20 min at 45 °C. Varying NaOCl concentration produced a minimal effect while temperature and exposure time had a significant direct relationship with NaOCl penetration into dentinal tubules, especially those with lowered surface tension. The exposure time and temperature of sodium hypochlorite as well as the addition of surfactants may influence the penetration depth of irrigants into dentinal tubules.

  9. Dentin permeability after toothbrushing with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Prati, C; Chersoni, S; Lucchese, A; Pashley, D H; Mongiorgi, R

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate the interaction of smear layer produced during brushing and dentifrice particles. Dentin disks were obtained from extracted human third molars. Dentin permeability was evaluated using a hydraulic pressure apparatus working at 1 psi of pressure. After preparation, each sample was connected to the hydraulic pressure apparatus to evaluate the permeability of dentin with the smear layer produced during specimen preparation. After 5 min of measurements dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 2 min, washed and gently dried with cotton to measure the permeability after smear layer removal. This was done to measure the maximum permeability of each specimen (expressed as 100%). Then a second smear layer was produced using a #400 carbide paper under water for 1 min. Dentin permeability of the smear layer covered dentin was then measured, and expressed as a percent of the maximum permeability of that specimen, permitting each specimen to serve as its own control. The three toothpastes used (Merfluan powder, Merfluan paste and Fluorigard) were applied on dentin surfaces using a small sponge to completely cover the dentin surface. After 5 s, each sample was connected to a mechanical device and brushed under water for 3 min with constant pressure of 250 gr using a Colgate medium toothbrush. After this treatment, each sample was gently washed with tap water, gently air dried for 3-5 s and connected with the pressure apparatus to remeasure the permeability after brushing. For SEM examination of dentin before and after treatment with toothpaste and brushing, each dentin and enamel sample was fixed in 2% buffered glutaraldehyde. Dentin permeability proved unaffected by dentifrice treatments. SEM observations demonstrated the presence of dentifrice particles on dentin surface and inside dentin tubules. Smear plugs produced during dentin brushing were not removed by dentifrices.

  10. Dentin bond strengths of simplified adhesives: effect of dentin depth.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Perdigão, Jorge; Lopes, Mariana de F; Vieira, Luiz Clovis Cardoso; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro, Sylvio

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of 3 simplified adhesive systems applied on shallow vs deep dentin. For superficial dentin, 30 human molars were sectioned with a diamond saw to expose dentin immediately below the dentoenamel junction. For deep dentin, 30 molars were sectioned 3 mm below the dentoenamel junction. The teeth were mounted, polished to 600-grit, and randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=10): Single Bonda and OptiBond Solo, total-etch adhesives, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, a self-etching primer adhesive. Adhesives were applied, the restorative material Filtek Z250 inserted in a No. 5 gelatin capsule, and light-cured. After 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C, shear bond strength was measured with an Instron at 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc test. The results showed the following shear bond strengths (mean +/- SD in MPa): Single Bond/superficial dentin = 22.1 +/- 2.8; Single Bond/deep dentin = 14.2 +/- 7.0; OptiBond Solo/superficial dentin = 18.9 +/- 4.1; OptiBond Solo/deep dentin = 18.4 +/- 4.8; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/superficial dentin = 21.0 +/- 7.4; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/deep dentin = 17.6 +/- 5.9. There were no significant differences between mean shear bond strength for the factor "adhesive system" (P>.822). The Duncan's test showed that Single Bond resulted in higher shear bond strength on superficial dentin than on deep dentin. The mean shear bond strength for Clearfil Liner Bond 2V and OptiBond Solo were not influenced by dentin depth. When data were pooled for dentin depth, deep dentin resulted in statistically lower bond strengths than superficial dentin (P<.01). The influence of dentin depth on shear bond strength depends on the specific composition of the dentin adhesive.

  11. Effects of chloramines and sodium hypochlorite on carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Tonami, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kouji; Mataki, Shiro; Kurosaki, Norimasa

    2003-06-01

    In chemo-mechanical caries removal procedures, chloramines are typically used for chemical softening of carious dentin. However, the specific effect of chloramines to be compared to sodium hypochlorite has not been sufficiently clarified. In present study, the effect of chloramines used in the Carisolv-system on carious dentin mechanical properties and morphology were investigated, using Vickers hardness test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sections of permanent teeth with dentin caries were treated with chloramines, prepared by mixing amino acids (glutamic acid, lysine, and leucine) with sodium hypochlorite or with sodium hypochlorite alone or with purified water. There was a tendency that the application of the sodium hypochlorite solution softened the sound dentin and/or inner layer of carious dentin more than the application of the chloramines solution did. In SEM observations, the application of chloramines resulted in opening dentinal tubules in the outer layer of carious dentin: Occluded dentinal tubules were seen after sodium hypochlorite application. There is a possibility that the amino acids in the Carisolv-system decrease the aggressive effect of sodium hypochlorite on sound dentin and/or inner layer of carious dentin and also would enhance the disrupting effect on degenerated collagen in carious dentin outer layer.

  12. Bovine and equine peritubular and intertubular dentin.

    PubMed

    Stock, S R; Deymier-Black, A C; Veis, A; Telser, A; Lux, E; Cai, Z

    2014-09-01

    Dentin contains 1-2μm diameter tubules extending from the pulp cavity to near the junction with enamel. Peritubular dentin (PTD) borders the tubule lumens and is surrounded by intertubular dentin (ITD). Differences in PTD and ITD composition and microstructure remain poorly understood. Here, a (∼200nm)(2), 10.1keV synchrotron X-ray beam maps X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction simultaneously around tubules in 15-30μm thick bovine and equine specimens. Increased Ca fluorescence surrounding tubule lumens confirms that PTD is present, and the relative intensities in PTD and ITD correspond to carbonated apatite (cAp) volume fraction of ∼0.8 in PTD vs. 0.65 assumed for ITD. In the PTD near the lumen edges, Zn intensity is strongly peaked, corresponding to a Zn content of ∼0.9mgg(-1) for an assumed concentration of ∼0.4mgg(-1) for ITD. In the equine specimen, the Zn K-edge position indicates that Zn(2+) is present, similar to bovine dentin (Deymier-Black et al., 2013), and the above edge structure is consistent with spectra from macromolecules related to biomineralization. Transmission X-ray diffraction shows only cAp, and the 00.2 diffraction peak (Miller-Bravais indices) width is constant from ITD to the lumen edge. The cAp 00.2 average preferred orientation is axisymmetric (about the tubule axis) in both bovine and equine dentin, and the axisymmetric preferred orientation continues from ITD through the PTD to the tubule lumen. These data indicate that cAp structure does not vary from PTD to ITD.

  13. Transmission of Curing Light through Moist, Air-Dried, and EDTA Treated Dentine and Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo, E.; Varrela, J.; Lassila, L.; Vallittu, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study measured light transmission through enamel and dentin and the effect of exposed dentinal tubules to light propagation. Methods. Light attenuation through enamel and dentin layers of various thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm) was measured using specimens that were (1) moist and (2) air-dried (n = 5). Measurements were repeated after the specimens were treated with EDTA. Specimens were transilluminated with a light curing unit (maximum power output 1869 mW/cm2), and the mean irradiance power of transmitting light was measured. The transmission of light through teeth was studied using 10 extracted intact human incisors and premolars. Results. Transmitted light irradiance through 1 mm thick moist discs was 500 mW/cm2 for enamel and 398 mW/cm2 for dentin (p < 0.05). The increase of the specimen thickness decreased light transmission in all groups (p < 0.005), and moist specimens attenuated light less than air-dried specimens in all thicknesses (p < 0.05). EDTA treatment increased light transmission from 398 mW/cm2 to 439 mW/cm2 (1 mm dentin specimen thickness) (p < 0.05). Light transmission through intact premolar was 6.2 mW/cm2 (average thickness 8.2 mm) and through incisor was 37.6 mW/cm2 (average thickness 5.6 mm). Conclusion. Light transmission through enamel is greater than that through dentin, probably reflecting differences in refractive indices and extinction coefficients. Light transmission through enamel, dentin, and extracted teeth seemed to follow Beer-Lambert's law. PMID:27446954

  14. In vitro photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy in dentine contaminated by cariogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, M. A. S.; de-Paula, D. M.; Lima, J. P. M.; Borges, F. M. C.; Steiner-Oliveira, C.; Nobre-Dos-Santos, M.; Zanin, I. C. J.; Barros, E. B.; Rodrigues, L. K. A.

    2010-06-01

    The development of a method to ensure bacterial-free substrates without extensive cavity preparation would be highly useful to dentistry, since there is no currently available effective method for killing residual bacteria in dentinal tissue. This randomized in vitro study determined parameters for using toluidine blue O (TBO) with a light-emitting diode (LED) for dentine caries disinfection and monitored intrapulpal/periodontal temperatures during irradiation. Occlusal human dentine slabs were immersed in Streptococcus mutans culture for demineralization induction. Slabs were allocated to 10 groups ( n = 15), which were treated with 0.1 mg ml-1 TBO with 5 min of incubation time or 0.9% NaCl solution for 5, 10 or 15 min, and submitted or not to irradiation for 5, 10 or 15 min (47, 94, and 144 J/cm2). Before and after treatments, dentine samples were analyzed with regard to S. mutans counts. In whole teeth, temperature in pulp and periodontium was measured by thermocouples during irradiation. Kruskal-Wallis/Student-Newman-Keuls, and ANOVA/Tukey test were respectively utilized to compare log reductions and temperature rises between groups. Bacterial reduction was observed when dentine was exposed to both TBO and LED at all irradiation times, as well as to LED alone for 10 and 15 min. Temperature increases lower than 2°C were observed for either pulp or periodontium. Concluding, LED combined with TBO is a safe and effective approach for dentine caries disinfection. Nevertheless, additional studies should be conducted to determine the influence of the irradiation in S. mutans viability in dentinal surface/tubules.

  15. Albumin Uptake in OK Cells Exposed to Rotenone: A Model for Studying the Effects of Mitochondrial Dysfunction on Endocytosis in the Proximal Tubule?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A.M.; Campanella, M.; Loesch, A.; Duchen, M.R.; Unwin, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The renal proximal tubule (PT) is clinically vulnerable to mitochondrial dysfunction; sub-lethal injury can lead to the Fanconi syndrome, with elevated urinary excretion of low-molecular-weight proteins. As the mechanism that couples mitochondrial dysfunction to impaired PT low-molecular weight protein uptake is unknown, we investigated the effect of respiratory chain (RC) inhibitors on endocytosis of FITC-albumin in PT-derived OK cells. Methods Uptake of FITC-albumin was quantified using confocal microscopy. Cytosolic ATP levels were measured in real time using both luciferin/luciferase assays and measurements of free [Mg2+]. Reactive oxygen species production was measured using mitosox. Results RC blockade produced only a small decrease in cytosolic ATP levels and had minimal effect on FITC-albumin uptake. Inhibition of glycolysis caused a much bigger decrease in both cytosolic ATP levels and FITC-albumin endocytosis. Rotenone led to higher rates of reactive oxygen species production than other RC inhibitors. Rotenone also caused widespread structural damage on electron microscopy, which was mimicked by colchicine and prevented by taxol; consistent with inhibition of microtubule polymerisation as the underlying mechanism. Conclusions Endocytosis of FITC-albumin is ATP-dependent in OK cells, but the cells are very glycolytic and therefore represent a poor metabolic model of the PT. Rotenone has toxic extra-mitochondrial structural effects. PMID:20484937

  16. Penetration of varnishes into demineralized root dentine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arends, J; Duschner, H; Ruben, J L

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the penetration of three different varnishes employed in caries prevention (Duraphat, Fluor Protector and Cervitec) into demineralized dentine is quantified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results show that the varnish penetration into lesions about 85 microns in depth if for Cervitec about 35 microns and considerably less for Duraphat and Fluor Protector. The penetration is into the dentinal tubules and is influenced by dentinal tubule direction. The drying procedure--pretreatment of the dentine--influences the penetration, though sizeably only for Cervitec applications. This paper shows that varnish penetration into the tissue and presumably 'sealing' tubules completely or partly is valuable with respect to root caries prevention and hypersensitivity.

  17. The peritubular reinforcement effect of porous dentine microstructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Niu, Lin; Li, Qun; Liu, Qida; Zuo, Hong

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluate the equivalent stiffness of peritubular reinforcement effect (PRE) of porous dentine optimized by the thickness of peritubular dentine (PTD). Few studies to date have evaluated or quantitated the effect of PRE on composite dentine. The miscrostructure of porous dentine is captured by scanning electron microscope images, and then finite element modeling is used to quantitate the deformation and stiffness of the porous dentine structure. By optimizing the radius of PTD and dentine tubule (DT), the proposed FE model is able to demonstrate the effect of peritubular reinforcement on porous dentine stiffness. It is concluded that the dentinal equivalent stiffness is reduced and degraded with the increase of the radius of DT (i.e., porosity) in the certain ratio value of Ep/Ei and certain radius of PTD, where Ep is the PTD modulus and Ei is the intertubular dentine modulus. So in order to ensure the whole dentinal equivalent stiffness is not loss, the porosity should get some value while the Ep/Ei is certain. Thus, PTD prevents the stress concentration around DTs and reduces the risk of DTs failure. Mechanically, the overall role of PTD appears to enhance the stiffness of the dentine composite structure. These results provide some new and significant insights into the biological evolution of the optimal design for the porous dentine microstructure. These findings on the biological microstructure design of dentine materials are applicable to other engineering structural designs aimed at increasing the overall structural strength.

  18. The peritubular reinforcement effect of porous dentine microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Lin; Li, Qun; Liu, Qida; Zuo, Hong

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluate the equivalent stiffness of peritubular reinforcement effect (PRE) of porous dentine optimized by the thickness of peritubular dentine (PTD). Few studies to date have evaluated or quantitated the effect of PRE on composite dentine. The miscrostructure of porous dentine is captured by scanning electron microscope images, and then finite element modeling is used to quantitate the deformation and stiffness of the porous dentine structure. By optimizing the radius of PTD and dentine tubule (DT), the proposed FE model is able to demonstrate the effect of peritubular reinforcement on porous dentine stiffness. It is concluded that the dentinal equivalent stiffness is reduced and degraded with the increase of the radius of DT (i.e., porosity) in the certain ratio value of Ep/Ei and certain radius of PTD, where Ep is the PTD modulus and Ei is the intertubular dentine modulus. So in order to ensure the whole dentinal equivalent stiffness is not loss, the porosity should get some value while the Ep/Ei is certain. Thus, PTD prevents the stress concentration around DTs and reduces the risk of DTs failure. Mechanically, the overall role of PTD appears to enhance the stiffness of the dentine composite structure. These results provide some new and significant insights into the biological evolution of the optimal design for the porous dentine microstructure. These findings on the biological microstructure design of dentine materials are applicable to other engineering structural designs aimed at increasing the overall structural strength. PMID:28859165

  19. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on ultrastructure and mineral content of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Ameri, Hamideh; Kianfar, Iman

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ultrastructural changes of dentin induced after exposure to different intracoronal tooth bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: Dental discs of 1 mm thickness were prepared from coronal dentin of sixty-four human maxillary premolars. Experimental specimens were divided into four subgroups: 45% carbamide peroxide, 35% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + water. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope to determine diameter of dentinal tubules and chemical analysis. Results: There was significant difference between dentinal tubule diameter of all test and control groups with the exception of sodium perborate + water. Chemical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between experimental subgroups regarding calcium and sulfur wt%. Conclusions: All bleaching agents increased dentinal tubule diameter and promote alterations in mineral content of dentin with the exception of Sodium perborate mixed with water. PMID:22557819

  20. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on ultrastructure and mineral content of dentin.

    PubMed

    Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Ameri, Hamideh; Kianfar, Iman

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ultrastructural changes of dentin induced after exposure to different intracoronal tooth bleaching agents. Dental discs of 1 mm thickness were prepared from coronal dentin of sixty-four human maxillary premolars. Experimental specimens were divided into four subgroups: 45% carbamide peroxide, 35% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + water. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope to determine diameter of dentinal tubules and chemical analysis. There was significant difference between dentinal tubule diameter of all test and control groups with the exception of sodium perborate + water. Chemical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between experimental subgroups regarding calcium and sulfur wt%. All bleaching agents increased dentinal tubule diameter and promote alterations in mineral content of dentin with the exception of Sodium perborate mixed with water.

  1. Effects of CO2 laser energy on dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Pashley, E L; Horner, J A; Liu, M; Kim, S; Pashley, D H

    1992-06-01

    The effect of a CO2 laser on the structure and permeability of smear layer-covered human dentin was evaluated in vitro. Three different energy levels were used (11, 113, and 566 J/cm2). The lowest exposure to the laser energy increased dentin permeability, measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial loss of the superficial smear layer and smear plugs. The intermediate energy level also increased dentin permeability by crater formation, making the dentin thinner. The lack of uniform glazing of the surface of the crater, leaving its surface porous and in communication with the underlying dentinal tubules also contributed to the increase in dentin permeability seen with the intermediate laser energy. The highest laser energy produced complete glazing of the crater surfaces and sealed the dentinal tubules beneath the crater. However, it also completely removed the smear layer in a halo zone about 100-microns wide around each crater which increased the permeability of the pericrater dentin at the same time it decreased the permeability of the dentin within the crater. The combined use of scanning electron microscopy and permeability measurements provides important complementary information that is essential in evaluating the effects of lasers on dentin.

  2. Evaluation of plasma treatment effects on improving adhesive/dentin bonding by using the same tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Ritts, Andy Charles; Staller, Corey; Yu, Qingsong; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and verify the effectiveness of plasma treatment for improving adhesive/dentin interfacial bonding by performing micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) test using the same-tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns to expose the dentin surface. For each dentin surface, one half of it was treated with a non-thermal argon plasma brush, while another half was shielded with glass slide and used as untreated control. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were then applied as directed. The teeth thus prepared were further cut into micro-bar specimens with cross-sectional size of 1×1 mm2, 1×2 mm2 and 1×3 mm2 for μTBS test. The test results showed that plasma treated specimens gave substantially stronger adhesive/dentin bonding than their corresponding same tooth controls. As compared with their untreated controls, plasma treatment gave statistically significant higher bonding strength for specimens having cross-sectional area of 1×1 mm2 and 1×2 mm2, with mean increases of 30.8% and 45.1%, respectively. Interface examination using optical and electron microscopy verified that plasma treatment improved the quality of the adhesive/dentin interface by reducing defects/voids and increasing the resin tag length in dentin tubules. PMID:23841788

  3. Infected Dentine Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Edwina; Fejerskov, Ole; Nyvad, Bente

    2015-11-01

    Dentine becomes infected as a result of caries lesion formation on root surfaces and when lesions progress following cavitation of enamel lesions. However, this infection is unimportant because the driving force for lesion formation and progression is the overlying biofilm. This explains why root surface caries can be controlled by mechanical plaque control and fluoride, and restorations are not needed to arrest these lesions. Similarly, the infected dentine in cavitated coronal lesions does not have to be removed to arrest the lesion. If the lesion is either accessible or opened for cleaning by the patient or parent, the lesion can be arrested. Sealing of infected dentine within the tooth, either by a Hall crown in the primary dentition or by partial caries removal prior to placing a well-sealed filling, will also arrest the lesion. When restoring deep lesions in symptomless, vital teeth, vigorous excavation of infected dentine is likely to expose the pulp and make root canal treatment necessary. Thus complete excavation'is not needed and should be avoided. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Root surface caries can be arrested by cleaning and fluoride application. Restorations are not essential. Vigorous excavation of softened dentine in deep cavities of symptomless, vital teeth is contra-indicated. It is not needed and increases the risk of pulp exposure.

  4. Effect of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) on the dentin-pulp complex: ex vivo histological analysis on human primary teeth and rat molars.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Glenda; Squassi, Aldo; Mandalunis, Patricia; Kaplan, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of SDF on the dentin-pulp complex using two models: teeth after SDF application (ex vivo) and experimental animal molars. A descriptive study was performed using two models. In the first model, primary teeth (ex vivo) with enamel-dentin caries, without pulp involvement and previously treated with 38% SDF, were evaluated by means of two techniques: (a) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDS) to determine qualitative and quantitative composition, and (b) brightfield optical microscopy (OM) after decalcification. The second model used laboratory animal molars from 12 male Wistar rats. Standardized enamel-dentin cavities approximately 0.5 mm deep were made the distal fossa of the occlusal face of both first lower molars, to one of which a 38% SDF solution was applied, while the other was used as a control. Histological sections were prepared and dental pulp was evaluated qualitatively in both groups. SEM on ex vivo teeth showed areas of hypermineralization in the intertubular dentin and few blocked tubules, while EDS detected Ag in the center of the lesion (7.34%), its concentration declining at the edges (1.71%), with none in the areas farthest from the lesion. OM showed SDF sealing the tubules only at the site where it had been placed, with limited penetration beneath, the tubules appeared normal and the pulp tissue associated to treated caries showed chronic inflammatory infiltrate and formation of tertiary dentin, with no Ag precipitate. In the experimental animal model, pulp histology was not significantly altered in the molar cavities exposed to SDF. The observations using the different techniques on dental tissues suggest that SDF causes minimal adverse effects. The results of this study may contribute to further studies on the suitability of SDF as a cost-effective strategy for treating caries. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  5. Bioinspired toughening mechanism: lesson from dentin.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-07-09

    Inspired by the unique microstructure of dentin, in which the hard peritubular dentin surrounding the dentin tubules is embedded in the soft intertubular dentin, we explore the crack propagation in the bioinspired materials with fracture process zone possessing a dentin-like microstructure, i.e. the composite structure consisting of a soft matrix and hard reinforcements with cylindrical voids. A micromechanical model under small-scale yielding conditions is developed, and numerical simulations are performed, showing that the rising resistant curve (R-curve) is observed for crack propagation caused by the plastic collapse of the intervoid ligaments in the fracture process zone. The dentin-like microstructure in the fracture process zone exhibits enhanced fracture toughness, compared with the case of voids embedded in the homogeneous soft matrix. Further computational simulations show that the dentin-like microstructure can retard void growth, thereby promoting fracture toughness. The typical fracture mechanism of the bioinspired materials with fracture process zone possessing the dentin-like structure is void by void growth, while it is the multiple void interaction in the case of voids in the homogeneous matrix. Based on the results, we propose a bioinspired material design principle, which is that the combination of a hard inner material encompassing voids and a soft outer material in the fracture process zone can give rise to exceptional fracture toughness, achieving damage tolerance. It is expected that the proposed design principle could shed new light on the development of novel man-made engineering materials.

  6. Near tubule and intertubular bovine detin mapped at the 250 nm level.

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, S.R.; Veis, A.; Telser, A.; Cai, Z.

    2011-11-01

    In this study, simultaneous diffraction and fluorescence mapping with a (250 nm){sup 2}, 10.1 keV synchrotron X-ray beam investigated the spatial distribution of carbonated apatite (cAp) mineral and elemental Ca (and other cations including Zn) around dentin tubules. In 1 {mu}m thick sections of near-pulp root dentin, where peritubular dentin (PTD) is newly forming, high concentrations of Zn, relative to those in intertubular dentin (ITD), were observed adjacent to and surrounding the tubule lumens. Some but not all tubules exhibited hypercalcified collars (high Ca signal relative to the surrounding ITD), and, when present, the zone of high Ca did not extend around the tubule. Diffraction rings from cAp 00.2 and 11.2 + 21.1 + 30.0 reflections were observed, and cAp was the only crystal phase detected. Profiles of Ca, Zn and cAp diffracted intensities showed the same transitions from solid to tubule lumen, indicating the same cAp content and organization in ITD far from the tubules and adjacent to them. Further, the matching Ca and diffraction profiles demonstrated that all of the Ca is in cAp or that any noncrystalline Ca was uniformly distributed throughout the dentin. Variation of 00.2 and 11.2 + 21.1 + 30.0 diffracted intensity was consistent with the expected biaxial crystallographic texture. Extension of X-ray mapping from near 1 {mu}m resolution to the 250 nm level, performed here for dentin and its tubules, will provide new understanding of other mineralized tissues.

  7. A description of chloride cell and kidney tubule alterations in the flatfish Solea senegalensis exposed to moderately contaminated sediments from the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro M.; Caeiro, Sandra; Diniz, Mário S.; Lobo, Jorge; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; DelValls, T. Ángel; Costa, M. Helena

    2010-11-01

    The effects of sediment-bound contaminants on kidney and gill chloride cells were surveyed in juvenile Solea senegalensis exposed to fresh sediments collected from three distinct sites of the Sado Estuary (Portugal) in a 28-day laboratorial assay. Sediments were analyzed for metallic contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorines as well as for total organic matter, redox potential and fine fraction. The potential for causing adverse biological effects of each surveyed sediment was assessed by comparison of contaminant levels to available guidelines for coastal sediments, namely the Threshold Effects Level ( TEL) and the Probable Effects Level ( PEL). The Sediment Quality Guideline Quotient indices ( SQGQ) were calculated to compare the overall contamination levels of the three stations. A qualitative approach was employed to analyze the histo/cytopathological traits in gill chloride cells and body kidney of fish exposed to each tested sediment for 0, 14 and 28 days. The results showed that sediment contamination can be considered low to moderate and that the least contaminated sediment (from a reference site, with the lowest SQGQ) caused lesser changes in the surveyed organs. However, the most contaminated sediment (by both metallic and organic xenobiotics, with highest SQGQ) was neither responsible for the highest mortality nor for the most pronounced lesions. Exposure to the sediment presenting an intermediate SQGQ, essentially contaminated by organic compounds, caused the highest mortality (48%) and the most severe damage to kidneys, up to full renal necrosis. Chloride cell alterations were similar in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments and consisted of a pronounced cellular hypertrophy, likely involving fluid retention and loss of mitochondria. It can be concluded that sediment contamination considered to be low or moderate may be responsible for severe injury to cells and parenchyma involved in the maintenance of osmotic

  8. Dentin matrix protein 1 and phosphate homeostasis are critical for postnatal pulp, dentin and enamel formation

    PubMed Central

    Rangiani, Afsaneh; Cao, Zheng-Guo; Liu, Ying; Voisey Rodgers, Anika; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chun-Lin; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Deletion or mutation of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) leads to hypophosphatemic rickets and defects within the dentin. However, it is largely unknown if this pathological change is a direct role of DMP1 or an indirect role of phosphate (Pi) or both. It has also been previously shown that Klotho-deficient mice, which displayed a high Pi level due to a failure of Pi excretion, causes mild defects in the dentinal structure. This study was to address the distinct roles of DMP1 and Pi homeostasis in cell differentiation, apoptosis and mineralization of dentin and enamel. Our working hypothesis was that a stable Pi homeostasis is critical for postnatal tooth formation, and that DMP1 has an antiapoptotic role in both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis. To test this hypothesis, Dmp1-null (Dmp1−/−), Klotho-deficient (kl/kl), Dmp1/Klotho-double-deficient (Dmp1−/−/kl/kl) and wild-type (WT) mice were killed at the age of 6 weeks. Combinations of X-ray, microcomputed tomography (μCT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), histology, apoptosis and immunohistochemical methods were used for characterization of dentin, enamel and pulp structures in these mutant mice. Our results showed that Dmp1−/− (a low Pi level) or kl/kl (a high Pi level) mice displayed mild dentin defects such as thin dentin and a reduction of dentin tubules. Neither deficient mouse line exhibited any apparent changes in enamel or pulp structure. However, the double-deficient mice (a high Pi level) displayed severe defects in dentin and enamel structures, including loss of dentinal tubules and enamel prisms, as well as unexpected ectopic ossification within the pulp root canal. TUNEL assay showed a sharp increase in apoptotic cells in ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Based on the above findings, we conclude that DMP1 has a protective role for odontoblasts and ameloblasts in a pro-apoptotic environment (a high Pi level). PMID:23258378

  9. Ultrastructural examination of one-step self-etch adhesive bonded primary sound and caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    HOSOYA, YUMIKO; TAY, FRANKLIN R.; GARCÍA-GODOY, FRANKLIN; PASHLEY, DAVID H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the ultrastructure and silver nanoleakage of the resin-dentin interfaces in sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin bonded with a 4-META one-step self-etch adhesive. Materials and Methods Each of five sound and carious primary molars was bonded with Hybrid Bond. Resin-dentin interfaces were observed with TEM micrographs obtained from silver-impregnated, unstained and undemineralized sections of bonded sound and caries-affected primary dentin, and stained and demineralized sections of bonded sound primary dentin with silver impregnation. Results For sound dentin, silver nanoleakage was observed extensively in the patent dentinal tubules, within the dentin beneath the hybrid layer, within the hybrid layer in some specimens, and as water trees that partially protruded into the overlying adhesive layer. The hybrid layer was about 1 μm thick. Smear plugs in the dentinal tubules and smear on the ground dentin protruded in the hybrid layer. Remnants of demineralized smear were observed overlying adhesive layer. For caries-affected dentin, the hybrid layer was obscure. Dentinal tubules were occluded with mineral deposits. There were no water trees or nanoleakage in the adhesive layer or hybrid layer. However, smear remnants were observed in adhesive layer and heavily silver deposits were observed in the highly porous underlying caries-affected dentin. PMID:19146129

  10. Dentin Matrix Protein 1 and Dentin Sialophosphoprotein in Human Sound and Carious Teeth: An Immunohistochemical and Colorimetric Assay

    PubMed Central

    Martini, D.; Trirè, A.; Breschi, L.; Mazzoni, A.; Orsini, G.; Teti, G.; Falconi, M.; Ruggeri, A.

    2013-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) are extracellular matrix proteins produced by odontoblasts involved in the dentin mineralization. The aim this study was to compare the distribution of DMP1 and DSPP in human sound dentin vs human sclerotic dentin. Sixteen sound and sixteen carious human molars were selected, fixed in paraformaldehyde and processed for immunohistochemical detection of DMP1 and DSPP by means of light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution field emission in-lens scanning electron microscopy (FEI-SEM). Specimens were submitted to a pre-embedding or a post-embedding immunolabeling technique using primary antibodies anti DMP1 and anti-DSPP and gold-conjugated secondary antibodies. Other samples were processed for the detection of DMP1 and DSPP levels. Dentin from these samples was mechanically fractured to powder, then a protein extraction and a protein level detection assay were performed. DMP1 and DSPP were more abundant in carious than in sound samples. Immunohistochemical analyses in sclerotic dentin disclosed a high expression of DMP1 and DSPP inside the tubules, suggesting an active biomineralization of dentin by odontoblasts. Furthermore, the detection of small amounts of these proteins inside the tubules far from the carious lesion, as shown in the present study, is consistent with the hypothesis of a preventive defense of all dentin after a noxious stimulus has undermined the tooth. PMID:24441185

  11. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm–Sidak test at P < 0.05. Results: EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Conclusions: Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD. PMID:27656059

  12. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm-Sidak test at P < 0.05. EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD.

  13. Interactions of dentine desensitisers with human dentine: morphology and composition.

    PubMed

    Eliades, George; Mantzourani, Maria; Labella, Roberto; Mutti, Bruna; Sharma, Deepak

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of desensitising agents on human dentine morphology and composition. Randomly assigned human coronal-dentine specimens were subjected to: (a) no treatment (smear-layer control, n=4); (b) acid etching with 6% citric acid (demineralised control, n=4); (c) treatment with desensitising agents (12 cycles of 60 s treatment with 60 s between-treatment rinsing, n=6 per agent); and (d) exposure to acidic challenge (pH 5.0 for 90 s, n=6 per agent). The tested products were: Listerine® Advanced Defence Sensitive (LADS; 1.4% potassium oxalate) mouthrinse, Colgate® Sensitive Pro-Relief™ mouthrinse, and toothpaste slurries (paste/water 1:2 wt/wt ratio) of Colgate® Sensitive Pro-Relief™ paste, Crest® Sensitive paste and Sensodyne® Repair and Protect paste. All dentine surfaces were studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman microscopy and high vacuum scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (HV-SEM/EDX). Desensitising slurry treatments occluded tubule orifices of acid-etched dentine, creating a randomly distributed surface pattern of particle aggregates. The greatest intratubular penetration of occluding particles was found in dentine treated with LADS. The atomic ratios of Ca/N and Ca/P, and the mineral/matrix ratios increased after toothpaste-slurry treatments compared with the acid-etched dentine. However, the acidic challenge removed most surface precipitates and further demineralised these substrates. Before the acidic challenge, the surface features were least affected in specimens treated with Sensodyne® Repair and Protect. After the acidic challenge, the sub-surface occlusion features were least affected in specimens treated with LADS. Although most tested products achieved occlusion of dentinal tubules and provided evidence of mineral deposits, the deposit formed by LADS demonstrated the greatest resistance to acidic challenge, which simulates intra

  14. Nanocapillarity in fullerene tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, Mark R.; Broughton, Jeremy Q.

    1992-11-01

    Fullerene tubules are shown to be highly polarizable ``molecular straws'' capable of ingesting dipolar molecules. Local-density-functional calculations on HF molecules within a finite-length tubule, of size 144 atoms, demonstrate this effect. The energy of incarceration is several times the thermal ambient at room temperature. These calculations, now feasible on desktop workstations, open the way to the study of nanoscale capillarity and to, perhaps, precise control over shielding of specific ``guest'' compounds from external electric and magnetic fields.

  15. Effect of a functional desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the microtensile bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesives to human dentin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongye; Pei, Dandan; Liu, Siying; Wang, Yake; Zhou, Liqun; Deng, Donglai; Huang, Cui

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate (1) the effect of a desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the microtensile bond strength between dentin and etch-and-rinse adhesive systems; and (2) to examine the dentin tubules occlusion quantitatively. 48 freshly extracted intact human mandibular third molars were divided randomly into three groups. The mid-coronal dentin of each tooth was exposed and treated. Group A: no treatment; Group B: specimens were polished with a desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate using a rotary cup operating at a low speed for 3 seconds, followed by an additional duration of 3 seconds (total operation time of 6 seconds), according to the manufacturer's instructions; Group C: specimens were handled in the same way with the exception of an increased operation time of 9 seconds, twice (total operation time of 18 seconds). Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups in order to evaluate the effectiveness of two different adhesive agents. A two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive agent (Adper SingleBond 2) and a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive agent (Adper ScotchBond Multi-purpose) were applied to dentin surfaces. Then, microtensile bond strengths of the six subgroups were tested. Dentin surfaces were analyzed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). There was no significant difference in microtensile bond strength between the control group and the experimental groups treated with the 8% arginine and calcium carbonate desensitizing paste during the application of etch-and-rinse adhesives. Both FESEM and LSCM showed that the desensitizing paste occluded dentin tubules effectively.

  16. Comparative evaluation of the effect of different bonding agents on the ultramorphology of primary tooth dentin and the resin dentin interface

    PubMed Central

    Vashisth, Pallavi; Goswami, Mousumi; Mittal, Mudit; Chaudhary, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To analyze and compare the changes in the ultramorphology of dentin in primary teeth using different bonding agents and to study the resin/dentin interface produced by them. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 50 extracted human deciduous teeth were grounded to expose the dentin. The teeth were divided into two groups (A) For viewing surface morphology- 18 teeth divided into four groups: (a) for viewing dentinal morphology (3 teeth), (b) Scotchbond multi-purpose (5 teeth), (c) Adhe SE (5 teeth), (d) Futurabond (5 teeth). (B) For viewing interfacial morphology- 32 teeth divided into four groups with 8 teeth each: (a) Scotch Bond Multipurpose (3M, ESPE),), (b) Adhe Se (Vivadent), (c) Optibond All-in-One (Kerr), (d) Futurabond NR (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany). The adhesives were applied to each group following the manufacturer's instruction. All the samples were then prepared for viewing under SEM. Results: The photographs were graded using a four-step (0-3) scale method proposed by Ferrari et al. For Scotchbond, 12 (75%) were graded as 2 Grade 3 was observed in only 1 observation in the entire lot of materials. The results obtained for Adhe SE and Optibond AIO were similar, i.e. in 5 (31.25%) observations each the scores were 0 and in 11 (68.75%) observations each the scores were 1. In case of Futurabond, 3 (18.75%) observations were graded as 0 and 13 (81.25%) were graded as 1, thus showing a mean score of 0.81±0.40. Conclusion: Three- step bonding agent results in the complete removal of smear layer. While the self- etch approach is not efficient in removing the smear layer and opening of the dentinal tubules. The longest resin tags with lateral branches were seen in two groups- Scotch bond multipurpose and Optibond FL. PMID:23112484

  17. Effect of aging on the microstructure, hardness and chemical composition of dentin.

    PubMed

    Montoya, C; Arango-Santander, S; Peláez-Vargas, A; Arola, D; Ossa, E A

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the effects of biological aging on human tissues has been a topic of extensive research. With the increase in healthy seniors and quality of life that topic is becoming increasingly important. In this investigation the effects of aging on the microstructure, chemical composition and hardness of human coronal dentin was studied from a comparison of teeth within "young" and "old" age groups. The microstructure of dentin within three regions (i.e., inner, middle and outer) was analyzed using electron and optical microscopy. The mineral-to-collagen ratio in these three regions was estimated using Raman spectroscopy and the hardness was evaluated using microindentation. Results showed that there were significant differences in tubule density, tubule diameter and peritubular cuff diameter with depth. Although there was no difference in tubule density and diameter of the tubules between the age groups, there was a significant difference in the occlusion ratio. A significant increase in hardness between young and old patients was found for middle and outer dentin. An increase in mineral-to-collagen ratio from inner to outer dentin was also found for both groups. In old patients, an increase in mineral content was found in outer coronal dentin as a consequence of tubule occlusion. An increase in occlusion ratio, hardness, and mineral content was found in the dentin of adult patients with age. This increase is most evident in the outer coronal dentin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanism of action of a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate ingredients in the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Part III: Prevention of dye penetration through dentin vs a calcium- and phosphate-free control.

    PubMed

    Winston, Anthony E; Charig, Andrew J; Thong, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the pain of dental hypersensitivity resulting from gum recession is from the movement of fluid within the exposed tubules of dentin, causing changes in pressure on the nerve within the pulpal cavity. One method of treating hypersensitivity is to occlude the tubules, preventing fluid movement. This article discusses the use of a dye penetration technique, which establishes this mechanism of action for a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste containing calcium and phosphate. Two groups of intact teeth were perfectly sealed with enamel paint. Windows 100-micro to 200-micro deep were opened on opposite sides of each tooth at the dentin-enamel junction and briefly etched using 20% polyacrylic acid. One batch of teeth was treated eight times for 30 mins each with a 1:3 slurry of the desensitizing toothpaste and another set with a similar slurry prepared from a calcium- and phosphate-free control. A 0.85% aqueous solution of acid red fuchsin dye was applied to each window and allowed to dry. After a brief rinse, the teeth were sectioned across the windows. Almost no dye penetration was seen in teeth treated with the desensitizing toothpaste; however, extensive penetration through the dentin was visible in the control-treated teeth. The differences in dye penetration for the two sets of teeth were significant by both subjective (P < .001) and objective (P < .01) measures. Tubule occlusion because of calcium and phosphate ions from the desensitizing toothpaste accounts for its tooth desensitizing efficacy.

  19. A scanning electron microscopic study of different caries removal techniques on human dentin.

    PubMed

    Yazici, A Rüya; Ozgünaltay, Gül; Dayangaç, Berrin

    2002-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluated the effect of different caries removal techniques on human dentin topography. Thirty-six extracted human carious mandibular molars were randomly assigned to six groups according to caries removal technique. Carious tissue was removed by hand excavation, bur excavation, air-abrasion, laser ablation, chemomechanical methods and sono-abrasion. The remaining dentin surfaces were replicated and gold-coated. The surfaces were examined using SEM and distinct differences in appearance were observed among specimens treated with different caries removal techniques. While hand-excavated, bur-excavated and air-abraded carious dentin surfaces were covered with a residual smear layer, sono-abrasion with patent dentinal tubules completely removed the smear layer. A few patent orifices of dentinal tubules were observed in dentin subjected to laser ablation and chemo-mechanical caries removal.

  20. Structural modifications of dentinal microcracks with human aging.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Mizuho; Miura, Jiro; Sakata, Takao; Nishi, Ryuji; Takeshige, Fumio

    2013-12-01

    Several studies have reported the mechanism of crack propagation with aging. Although structural modifications of dentinal microcracks with aging have been evaluated by observing the cracked surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM), very few attempts have been made at sectional observation of the microcracks inside dentine using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the process of dentinal microcrack formation using TEM and (2) to morphologically evaluate the relation between dentinal microcrack propagation and human aging. Molars from 'young' (16-28 years) and 'aged' (62-76 years) subjects were evaluated. Dentine blocks were cracked with an indenter and sectioned using a diamond knife and ultramicrotome after embedding in epoxy resin. Microcracks were observed by TEM and ultra-high-voltage electron microscope tomography to determine the characteristics of crack propagation in the young and aged teeth. The results show that, in young teeth, crack propagation tended to pass through the dentinal tubules, while in aged teeth, it tended to deflect to the outer side of peritubular dentine (PTD), especially in coronal dentine. The advantage of this method is that it allows visualization and evaluation of the ultrastructural propagation of microcracks in dentine. The differences in crack propagation between young and aged dentine could be explained by differences in PTD thickness.

  1. Dentin conditioning codetermines cell fate in regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Galler, Kerstin M; D'Souza, Rena N; Federlin, Marianne; Cavender, Adriana C; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D; Hecker, Stephanie; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2011-11-01

    Recent successes in dental pulp engineering indicate that regenerative treatment strategies in endodontics are feasible. Clinically, revascularization procedures render completion of root formation in immature teeth. The generation of a pulp-like tissue after seeding of dental pulp stem cells into dentin discs or cylinders and transplantation in vivo is possible. In this experimental setup, which mimics the situation in the root canal, the pretreatment of dentin might influence cellular behavior at the cell-dentin interface. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate whether dentin conditioning can determine cell fate. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were seeded into a growth factor-laden peptide hydrogel, transferred into dentin cylinders, and transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. Before cell seeding, dentin cylinders were either pretreated with sodium hypochloride (NaOCl) or conditioned with EDTA. The constructs were explanted after 6 weeks and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical analysis. In dentin treated with NaOCl, resorption lacunae were found at the cell-dentin interface created by multinucleated cells with clastic activity. After conditioning with EDTA, DPSCs adjacent to the dentin formed an intimate association with the surface, differentiated into odontoblasts-like cells that expressed dentin sialoprotein, and extended cellular processes into the dentinal tubules. A vascularized soft connective tissue similar to dental pulp was observed inside the dentin cylinder. Dentin conditioning considerably influences DPSC fate when seeded in close proximity to dentin. This information might be critical for optimized strategic planning for future regenerative endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Current status of dentin adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, K F

    1998-12-01

    Undoubtedly, dentin bonding agents have undergone a major evolution during the last several years. The shear bond strength of composite resin to the surface of dentin is actually greater than the inherent strength of the dentin itself under well-controlled conditions. No longer must the clinician depend only upon the bonding to enamel as the sole bonding mechanism. Bonding to both types of dental structure permits even better reinforcement of the tooth itself. Perhaps even more important than the high level of bonding exhibited by the current dentin adhesives is their ability to seal the dentin. So effective is this sealing capability that it is now possible to protect the pulpal tissue from microbial invasion through the dentinal tubules. Further, by enclosing the odontoblastic processes and preventing fluid flow, the potential for postoperative sensitivity is diminished considerably. In fact, so evolutionary is the concept of bonding that the procedures associated with the restoration of teeth has changed dramatically. Undoubtedly, far greater improvements can be anticipated in the future.

  3. SEM evaluation of resin-carious dentin interfaces formed by two dentin adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Marshall, Sally J.; Pinzon, Lilliam M.; Watanabe, Larry; Saiz, Eduardo; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the influence of dentin tubule direction and identifiable zone of carious dentin on the microstructure and the thickness of the hybrid-like layer (HL) formed by self-etch and etch-rinse adhesive systems. Methods An etch-rinse and a self-etching adhesive were bonded to dentin carious zones divided into groups with parallel or perpendicular orientation relative to the dentin tubules at the resin-carious dentin interface (N = 5/variable). Bonds were prepared to each of the four zones of carious dentin apparent after staining with Caries Detector: pink, light pink, transparent and apparently normal Six non-carious third molars were controls. The microstructure and thickness of the HL were determined by SEM.and compared using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons (p<0.05). Results Etch-rinse controls gave thicker HLs than self-etching systems; ; orientation did not affect thickness for the self-etch system. Perpendicular orientations gave thicker HLs than parallel for the pink zone bonded with the etch-rinse system. For both adhesives, HL thickness in the pink zone were significantly greater than in light pink for the perpendicular group, but no significant differences were found among other variables. HL microstructure was more granular and rougher for the etch rinse than for the self etching system. Pores and cracks were obvious in the more demineralized zones, Resin tags were shorter and irregular in the transparent zone and often were completely absent in the outer demineralized zones (pink, light pink). Significance Microstructure of bonded interfaces varies markedly depending on adhesive system, tubule orientation and carious zone. PMID:18155289

  4. Contributions of Aging to the Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, Juliana; Majd, Hessam; Bajaj, Devendra; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the fatigue crack resistance of human dentin was conducted to identify the degree of degradation that arises with aging and the dependency on tubule orientation. Fatigue crack growth was achieved in specimens of coronal dentin through application of Mode I cyclic loading and over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤ 2 mm). The study considered two directions of cyclic crack growth in which the crack was either in-plane (0°) or perpendicular (90°) to the dentin tubules. Results showed that regardless of tubule orientation, aging of dentin is accompanied by a significant reduction in the resistance to the initiation of fatigue crack growth, as well as a significant increase in the rate of incremental extension. Perpendicular to the tubules, the fatigue crack exponent increased significantly (from m=14.2±1.5 to 24.1±5.0), suggesting an increase in brittleness of the tissue with age. For cracks extending in plane with the tubules, the fatigue crack growth exponent does not change significantly with patient age (from m=25.4±3.03 to 22.9±5.3), but there is a significant increase in the incremental crack growth rate. Regardless of age, coronal dentin exhibits the lowest resistance to fatigue crack growth perpendicular to the tubules. While there are changes in the cyclic crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension with aging, this tissue maintains its anisotropy. PMID:22484693

  5. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Chiba, Ayaka; Scheffel, Debora L. S.; Hebling, Josimeri; Agee, Kelli; Niu, Li-na; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM) and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA) and VanishTM (VAN), after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001) and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001). VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents. PMID:27359118

  6. Penetration Potential of a Silver Diamine Fluoride Solution on Dentin Surfaces. An Ex Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Willershausen, Ines; Schulte, Daniel; Azaripour, Adriano; Weyer, Veronica; Briseño, Benjamin; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-01-01

    Occurrence of open dentinal tubules as a cause of dental hypersensitivity is a very common pnenomenon in patients. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of a silver diamine fluoride solution (Ag(NH3)2 F) on human dentin samples. A total of five fully retained wisdom teeth were selected for this study. The crowns of the teeth were separated from the roots and the occlusal enamel surface was removed. All dentin samples were treated for 60 seconds with phosphoric acid (36%) and rinsed thoroughly to remove the smear layer. Then the desensitizing agent (Riva Star, SDI; 38% Ag(NH3)2 F) was placed according to the manufacturer's instruction. Three dentin samples were prepared for element analysis using an electron beam microprobe analyzer (JEOL JXA 8900RL). The Ag concentrations in the dentin samples were measured in depths ranging from 5 to 40 μm. The other two dentin samples were vertically fractured and accordingly prepared for visualization with SEM (Zeiss DSM). The application of the desensitizing agent on the dentin areas demonstrated an increased Ag concentration (JEOL JXA 8900RL). On the dentin surface an Ag concentration of 1.7 weight % (? 0.7) was measured, but at a depth of 20 μm only 0.3 weight % (± 0.1) were detected. In depths greater than 40 μm the Ag concentration was below the detection limit. The SEM results showed that deposits could be found in a covering on the dentin layer and in the dentinal tubules to a depth of 20 μm. In this ex vivo study, the effect of silver diamine fluoride on dentin surfaces could be demonstrated. The desensitizing agent formed a film on the dentin surface and in some dentinal tubules deposits were detected. These findings can explain a certain desensitizing effect, but a direct translation to in vivo conditions can only be done with caution.

  7. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Chiba, Ayaka; Scheffel, Debora L S; Hebling, Josimeri; Agee, Kelli; Niu, Li-Na; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM) and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA) and VanishTM (VAN), after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001) and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001). VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents.

  8. Effect of periodontal root planing on dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Pashley, D H

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate the effects of root planing on the permeability of human root dentin in vitro. Unerupted 3rd molars were used. The crowns were removed and longitudinal slices made of the root. The hydraulic conductance of the root dentin was measured before and after root planing, acid etching and potassium oxalate application using a fluid filtration method. The results showed that root planing creates a smear layer that reduces the permeability of the underlying dentin. However, this smear layer is acid labile. Thus, root planing may ultimately cause increased dentin permeability and the associated sequelae of sensitive dentin, bacterial invasion of tubules, reduced periodontal reattachment and pulpal irritation.

  9. The Effect of Energy Densities on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite to Er:YAG Pretreated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Corbani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable resin composite, to dentin, after exposing it to Er:YAG laser radiation, at different energy densities. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human third molars were randomly divided into five groups (n = 12). In the control group, dentin was left unirradiated, whereas, in the other four groups, dentin was irradiated with Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (MSP mode = 100 µs; 10 Hz; beam diameter: 1.3 mm; speed of 1 mm/second; air 6 mL/min; and water 4 mL/min), and respectively, with the following level of energy (50 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, and 100 mJ). Then, self-adhering flowable resin composite was bonded to all prepared dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was applied and fractured surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results. SBS values showed significant differences in 60 mJ (P < 0.05) compared to other groups. Morphological evaluation revealed tags or plugs in dentinal tubules, especially when 60 mJ and 80 mJ were used. All four groups tended to leave more residues on the dentin surface, than the control group. Conclusion. Er:YAG dentin irradiation may enhance SBS of the self-adhering flowable resin composite when it is used at the appropriate low level of energy density. PMID:27830151

  10. The Effect of Energy Densities on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhering Flowable Composite to Er:YAG Pretreated Dentin.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Paul; Zeinoun, Toni; Majzoub, Zeina; Corbani, Karim; Nammour, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable resin composite, to dentin, after exposing it to Er:YAG laser radiation, at different energy densities. Materials and Methods. Sixty freshly extracted human third molars were randomly divided into five groups (n = 12). In the control group, dentin was left unirradiated, whereas, in the other four groups, dentin was irradiated with Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (MSP mode = 100 µs; 10 Hz; beam diameter: 1.3 mm; speed of 1 mm/second; air 6 mL/min; and water 4 mL/min), and respectively, with the following level of energy (50 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, and 100 mJ). Then, self-adhering flowable resin composite was bonded to all prepared dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was applied and fractured surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Results. SBS values showed significant differences in 60 mJ (P < 0.05) compared to other groups. Morphological evaluation revealed tags or plugs in dentinal tubules, especially when 60 mJ and 80 mJ were used. All four groups tended to leave more residues on the dentin surface, than the control group. Conclusion. Er:YAG dentin irradiation may enhance SBS of the self-adhering flowable resin composite when it is used at the appropriate low level of energy density.

  11. Dentin bonding-variables related to the clinical situation and the substrate treatment.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Jorge

    2010-02-01

    The wetness of dentin surfaces, the presence of pulpal pressure, and the thickness of dentin are extremely important variables during bonding procedures, especially when testing bond strength of adhesive materials in vitro with the intention of simulating in vivo conditions. The ultimate goal of a bonded restoration is to attain an intimate adaptation of the restorative material with the dental substrate. This task is difficult to achieve as the bonding process is different for enamel and for dentin-dentin is more humid and more organic than enamel. While enamel is predominantly mineral, dentin contains a significant amount of water and organic material, mainly type I collagen. This humid and organic nature of dentin makes this hard tissue very challenging to bond to. Several other substrate-related variables may affect the clinical outcome of bonded restorations. Bonding to caries-affected dentin is hampered by its lower hardness and presence of mineral deposits in the tubules. Non-carious cervical areas contain hypermineralized dentin and denatured collagen, which is not the ideal combination for a bonding substrate. Physiological transparent root dentin forms without trauma or caries lesion as a natural part of aging. Similar to the transparent dentin observed underneath caries lesions, the tubule lumina become filled with mineral from passive chemical precipitation, making resin hybridization difficult. An increase in number of tubules with depth and, consequently, increase in dentin wetness, make bonding to deeper dentin more difficult than to superficial dentin. While the application of acidic agents open the pathway for the diffusion of monomers into the collagen network, it also facilitates the outward seepage of tubular fluid from the pulp to the dentin surface, deteriorating the bonding for some of the current adhesives. Some dentin desensitizers have shown some promise as they can block dentinal tubules to treat and prevent sensitivity and simultaneously

  12. Sodium hypochlorite alterations of dentin and dentin collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, G. W.; Yücel, N.; Balooch, M.; Kinney, J. H.; Habelitz, S.; Marshall, S. J.

    2001-10-01

    NaOCl aq is used as a cleansing and non-specific deproteinizing agent in endodontic treatment, as a component of new chemomechanical caries treatment, and is under study for its alterations of dentin bonding characteristics. We sought to determine the microstructural and nanomechanical changes with such treatments and to test if NaOCl aq removed dentin collagen without microstructural or nanomechanical alteration of underlying mineralized dentin. Polished human dentin disks were prepared with a double reference technique that allowed changes to be determined following 10% citric acid etching for 15 s and subsequent treatment of the etched and unetched portions of the sample with 6.5% NaOCl aq, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Nanoscope III, Digital Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA). Images and measurements were made at intervals up to 1800 s. A Triboscope (Hysitron, Minneapolis, MN) on the AFM was used to measure nanohardness and the reduced elastic modulus. The double reference method allowed measurements immediately following etching and at intervals during deproteinization. Etching caused deep peritubular dentin removal and a small depth change of hydrated intertubular dentin as mineral was removed and left a remnant collagen matrix. NaOCl aq removed collagen over time, during which individual fibrils could be resolved; the underlying mineralized dentin was left with a unique porous surface containing numerous channels that are not normally observed in etched or fractured dentin. This could provide an attractive bonding substrate because of the increased surface area and high mineral content, if toughness is not reduced too much. Nanomechanical measurements showed that the reduced elastic modulus and hardness were 75% of original values after removal of the exposed collagen. Current dentin bonding systems rely on hybrid layer formation in which hydrophilic primers/polymers penetrate the opened collagen matrix exposed by etching. However some research suggests

  13. Essential role of Osterix for tooth root but not crown dentin formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chunlin; Liu, Ying; Ho, Sunita P.; Feng, Jian Q.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth is made of crown and root. It is widely believed that dentin formation in crown and root uses the same regulatory mechanism. However, identification of NFIC’s unique function in determining root but not crown dentin formation challenges the old thought. In searching for the target molecules downstream of NFIC, we unexpectedly found a sharp reduction of OSX (osterix), the key transcription factor in skeleton formation, in the Nfic knockout (KO) tooth root. We then demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of Osx in the odontoblast cell line due to a transient transfection of Nfic expression plasmid. Studies of global and conditional Osx KO mice revealed no apparent changes in the crown dentin tubules and dentin matrix. However, the OSX conditional KO mice (crossed to the 2.3 kb Col 1-Cre) displayed an increase in cell proliferation but great decreases in expressions of root dentin matrix proteins (DMP1 and DSPP), leading to an inhibition in odontoblast differentiation, and short thin root dentin with few dentin tubules. Compared to the Nfic KO tooth, which contains essentially no dentin tubules and remains in a “root-less” status at adult stages, the Osx cKO root phenotype had partially improved at the late stage, indicating that other factors can compensate for OSX function. Thus, we conclude that OSX, one of the key downstream molecules of NFIC, plays a critical role in root, but not crown, formation. PMID:25349111

  14. Dentin permeability: the basis for understanding pulp reactions and adhesive technology.

    PubMed

    Mjör, Ivar A

    2009-01-01

    Permeability involves the passage of fluids, ions, molecules, particulate matter and bacteria into and through a substance or tissue under different and varying conditions. The permeability of the dentin is essential to support the physiology and reaction patterns of the pulp-dentin organ. Nutrients and impulses are transported from the pulp via the odontoblast process and the contents of its tubules maintain the dentin as a vital tissue. However, the main interest of this paper focuses on penetration from the outside towards the pulp rather than from the pulp towards the outside. The present overview centers on the dentinal tubules; how they are formed and how they change as a result of normal and abnormal function, age, and pathological processes and the effect of these processes on the permeability of dentin. Particular attention is focused on the patency of the dentinal tubules.This overview is largely based on the authors own research, clinical insights and active participation in continuing dental education over the last 50 years. It is not a review of the literature related to the permeability of dentin. Rather it presents interpretation of results related to the permeability of dentin based on experience and opinions acquired over a lifetime in dental research.

  15. Age-related ransparent root dentin: mineral concentration,crystallite size and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, John H.; Nalla, Ravi K.; Pople, John A.; Breunig, Tom M.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2004-12-29

    Many fractures occur in teeth that have been altered, forexample restored or endodontically repaired. It is therefore essential toevaluate the structure and mechanical properties of these altereddentins. One such altered form of dentin is transparent (sometimes calledsclerotic) dentin, which forms gradually with aging. The present studyfocuses on differences in the structure and mechanical properties ofnormal versus transparent dentin. The mineral concentration, as measuredby X-ray computed microtomography, was signifcantly higher in transparentdentin, the elevated concentration being consistent with the closure ofthe tubule lumens. Crystallite size, as measured by small angle X-rayscattering, was slightly smaller in transparent dentin, although theimportance of this ending requires further study. The elastic propertieswere unchanged by transparency; however, transparent dentin, unlikenormal dentin, exhibited almost no yielding before failure. In addition,the fracture toughness was lowered by roughly 20 percent while thefatigue lifetime was deleteriously affected at high stress levels. Theseresults are discussed in terms of the altered microstructure oftransparent dentin.

  16. Growth Factor Liberation and DPSC Response Following Dentine Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Sadaghiani, L; Gleeson, H B; Youde, S; Waddington, R J; Lynch, C D; Sloan, A J

    2016-10-01

    Liberation of the sequestrated bioactive molecules from dentine by the action of applied dental materials has been proposed as an important mechanism in inducing a dentinogenic response in teeth with viable pulps. Although adhesive restorations and dentine-bonding procedures are routinely practiced, clinical protocols to improve pulp protection and dentine regeneration are not currently driven by biological knowledge. This study investigated the effect of dentine (powder and slice) conditioning by etchants/conditioners relevant to adhesive restorative systems on growth factor solubilization and odontoblast-like cell differentiation of human dental pulp progenitor cells (DPSCs). The agents included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; 10%, pH 7.2), phosphoric acid (37%, pH <1), citric acid (10%, pH 1.5), and polyacrylic acid (25%, pH 3.9). Growth factors were detected in dentine matrix extracts drawn by EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid from powdered dentine. The dentine matrix extracts were shown to be bioactive, capable of stimulating odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation as observed by gene expression and phenotypic changes in DPSCs cultured in monolayer on plastic. Polyacrylic acid failed to solubilize proteins from powdered dentine and was therefore considered ineffective in triggering a growth factor-mediated response in cells. The study went on to investigate the effect of conditioning dentine slices on growth factor liberation and DPSC behavior. Conditioning by EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid exposed growth factors on dentine and triggered an upregulation in genes associated with mineralized differentiation, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase in DPSCs cultured on dentine. The cells demonstrated odontoblast-like appearances with elongated bodies and long extracellular processes extending on dentine surface. However, phosphoric acid-treated dentine appeared strikingly less populated with cells, suggesting a detrimental impact on cell

  17. Effects of different desensitizing treatments on root dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Raydsa Raíssa Moura; Calazans, Francielle Karoline Santos; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Lancellotti, Ailla Carla Rocha Acosta; Gonçalves, Luciano de Sousa; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2016-10-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of diode laser and a desensitizing dentifrice on dentin permeability. Fifty-two root dentin fragments were obtained (5 × 5mm) and treated with 24% EDTA gel. The samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 13): G1, control (no treatment); G2, diode laser (λ = 908 nm, 1.5 W, continuous mode, 20s); G3, application of abrasive dentifrice for 1 minute (Elmex Sensitive Professional (International Gaba); and G4, application of abrasive dentifrice for 1 minute followed by irradiation with diode laser. Ten samples per group were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 4h. The specimens were washed, longitudinally sectioned, observed under optical microscopy, photographed and assessed based on the degree of dye leakage. The remaining samples were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The leakage data were subjected to ANOVA test, followed by Tukey's t-test (α = 5%). Groups 2, 3 and 4 showed less dye penetration than the control group (p < 0.05), but were similar among each other. SEM images showed that dentinal tubules were open in G1, and fused and occluded in G2. Group 3 showed dentinal tubules that were occluded by the metal ions from the toothpaste. G4 presented similar characteristics to G3, and the presence of fused dentin. The diode laser and the dentifrice were effective in reducing dentinal permeability, and the combination of the two treatments did not show better results than either one used alone.

  18. Interaction between bioactive glasses and human dentin.

    PubMed

    Efflandt, S E; Magne, P; Douglas, W H; Francis, L F

    2002-06-01

    This study explores the interaction between bioactive glasses and dentin from extracted human teeth in simulated oral conditions. Bioactive glasses in the Na(2)O-CaO-P(2)O(5)-SiO(2) and MgO-CaO-P(2)O(5)-SiO(2) systems were prepared as polished disks. Teeth were prepared by grinding to expose dentin and etching with phosphoric acid. A layer of saliva was placed between the two, and the pair was secured with an elastic band and immersed in saliva at 37 degrees C for 5, 21 or 42 days. The bioactive glasses adhered to dentin, while controls showed no such interaction. A continuous interface between the bioactive glass and dentin was imaged using cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, after alcohol dehydration and critical point drying, fracture occurred due to stresses from dentin shrinkage. SEM investigations showed a microstructurally different material at the fractured interface. Chemical analyses revealed that ions from the glass penetrated into the dentin and that the surface of the glass in contact with the dentin was modified. Microdiffractometry showed the presence of apatite at the interface. Bonding appears to be due to an affinity of collagen for the glass surface and chemical interaction between the dentin and glass, leading to apatite formation at the interface.

  19. Crystallographic Texture and Elemental Composition Mapped in Bovine Root Dentin at the 200 nm Level

    PubMed Central

    Deymier-Black, A. C.; Veis, A.; Cai, Z.; Stock, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The relationship between the mineralization of peritubular dentin (PTD) and intertubular dentin (ITD) is not well understood. Tubules are quite small, diameter ~2 μm, and this makes the near-tubule region of dentin difficult to study. Here, advanced characterization techniques are applied in a novel way to examine what organic or nanostructural signatures may indicate the end of ITD or the beginning of PTD mineralization. X-ray fluorescence intensity (Ca, P, and Zn) and X-ray diffraction patterns from carbonated apatite (cAp) were mapped around dentintubules at resolutions ten times smaller than the feature size (200 nm pixels), representing a 36% increase in resolution over earlier work. In the near tubule volumes of near-pulp, root dentin, Zn intensity was higher than in ITD remote from the tubules. This increase in Zn2+, as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis, may indicate the presence of metalloenzymes or transcription factors important to ITD or PTD mineralization. The profiles of the cAp 00.2 X-ray diffraction rings were fitted with a pseudo-Voigt function, and the spatial and azimuthal distribution of these rings’ integrated intensities indicated that the cAp platelets were arranged with their c-axes aligned tangential to the edge of the tubule lumen. This texture was continuous throughout the dentin indicating a lack of structural difference between in the Zn rich near-tubular region and the remote ITD. PMID:23630059

  20. Evaluation Of The Shear Bond Strength Between Dentin And Dental Luting Cement Following Dentin Surface Treatment By 980 Nm Diode Laser And Desensitizing Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, T.; Gheith, M.

    2011-09-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is described clinically as an exaggerated response to non-noxious sensory stimuli. Current treatment is concentrating on two approaches; to occlude the dentinal tubules or to block neural transmission. This is achieved through using dentin desensitizers and low power lasers. Forty eight freshly extracted human molar teeth were used in this study and divided equally into three groups. Group 1) control group, group 2) laser treated dentin surface group, and group 3) desensitizing agent dentin surface group. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of laser treated group showed melted globules, no carbonization, recrystalization and crystal growth of the apatite in some areas. In diode laser dentin surface treated group showed the highest shear bond strength mean value.

  1. [Effect of different irrigants on radicular dentin cleansing and resin tag formation after post space preparation].

    PubMed

    Mao, Cai-Yun; Gu, Xin-Hua

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of different root canal irrigants on smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening of root canal surfaces after post space preparation. Thirty maxillary anteriors were endodontically treated. After post space preparation, the teeth were assigned to three groups with ten teeth each: group A, B, C. 3% H2O2, 15% ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid(EDTA), 15% EDTA and 3% NaClO were used as irrigant of group A, B, C. After post space irrigation, eight teeth of each group were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) for smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening. The left two specimens were restored with fiber posts and prepared for evaluation of resin tag formation. The cleansing effectiveness of group A, B and C was respectively 3.89 +/- 0.36, 1.77 +/- 0.30, 1.25 +/- 0.21. The dentinal tubule opening of group A, B and C was respectively (2.53 +/- 0.19), (3 11 +/- 023) (3.83 +/- 0.52) microm. The cleansing effectiveness and dentinal tubule opening of root canal surfaces were significantly affected by different root canal irrigants (P < 0.05). Excessive erosion of the dentin was observed in group C. Resin tag formation differed between the three irrigant groups, and group B showed excellent resin tag formation. Irrigation with 15% EDTA after post space preparation can excellently remove the smear layer and improve dentinal tubule opening, permitting well penetration of resin adhesive into the dentinal tubules and collagen fibrillar structure.

  2. Chemical and morphological changes in human dentin after Er:YAGlaser irradiation: EDS and SEM analysis.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Arriaga, Belinda; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Olea-Mejìa, Oscar Fernando; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio José; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    Sixty samples of human dentin were divided into six groups (n = 10) and were irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ-19.9 J/cm(2), 150 mJ-29.8 J/cm(2), 100 mJ-35.3 J/cm(2), 150 mJ-53.0 J/cm(2), 200 mJ-70.7 J/cm(2), and 250 mJ-88.5 J/cm(2), respectively, at 7 Hz under a water spray. The atomic percentages of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus and the Ca-to-P molar ratio on the dentin were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The morphological changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy. A paired t-test was used in statistical analysis before and after irradiation, and a one-way ANOVA was performed (P ≤ 0.05). The atomic percent of C tended to decrease in all of the groups after irradiation with statistically significant differences, O and Mg increased with significant differences in all of the groups, and the Ca-to-P molar ratio increased in groups IV, V, and VI, with statistically significant differences between groups II and VI. All the irradiated samples showed morphological changes. Major changes in the chemical composition of dentin were observed in trace elements. A significant increase in the Ca-to-P ratio was observed in the higher energy density groups. Morphological changes included loss of smear layer with exposed dentinal tubules. The changes produced by the different energy densities employed could have clinical implications, additional studies are required to clarify them. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dentin hypersensitivity induces anxiety and increases corticosterone serum levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Marcelo R; Bernardi, Maria M; Sufredini, Ivana B; Ciaramicoli, Marcia T; Kodama, Ricardo M; Kabadayan, Fernanda; Saraceni, Cintia H C

    2014-03-11

    Investigate the relationships between experimentally induced dentin hypersensitivity (DH) with behavioral, endocrine and dentin erosion data. Male Wistar rats divided into four groups, two controls and two experimental, received tap water or isotonic solution (Gatorade®, lemon, pH2.7) for 30 or 45 days. The DH test was performed by a cold water stimulus on molars. A score (0-3) was given to the rats' pain response. Anxiety was evaluated by the elevated plus maze model and by serum corticosterone levels. The dentin erosion was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Anatomopathological studies were performed on the stomach, adrenal, kidney, and liver. Relative to control groups, experimental rats showed: 1) increased hypersensitivity scores (control group, 0; experimental groups, 2 (limits 0.5-3) on the 30th day and 2 (limits 1-3) on the 45th day); 2) reduced percentage of time and entries in the open arms and in serum corticosterone levels; 3) totally exposed dentinal tubules on the 30th day in SEM analysis of the teeth; and 4) no alterations in the anatomopathological and histological evaluations. The treatment with isotonic solution for 30 days was able to induce DH after erosive challenge and severe DH was observed after isotonic solution treatment for 45 days. The pain induced by cold stimuli was consistent with the grade of DH. The close relationships between dental erosion, response to pain, serum levels of corticosterone and the EPM behavior responses reveal the effects of DH at several levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity influence on dentine bond strength.

    PubMed

    Niem, Thomas; Schmidt, Alexander; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine tubule penetration, blister formation and consequently on dentine bond strength as a function of air-blowing pressure (air-bp) intensity. Two HEMA-free, acetone-based, one-bottle self-etch adhesives with similar composition except disparate silica filler contents and different bonding resin viscosities were investigated. The high-filler-containing adhesive (G-Bond) featured a lower viscous bonding resin with inherent thixotropic resin (TR) properties compared to the low-filler-containing adhesive (iBond) exhibiting a higher viscous bonding resin with non-thixotropic resin (NTR) properties. Shear bond strength tests for each adhesive with low (1.5bar; 0.15MPa; n=16) and high (3.0bar; 0.30MPa; n=16) air-bp application were performed after specimen storage in distilled water (24h; 37.0±1.0°C). Results were analysed using a Student's t-test to identify statistically significant differences (p<0.05). Fracture surfaces of TR adhesive specimens were morphologically characterised by SEM. Statistically significant bond strength differences were obtained for the thixotropic resin adhesive (high-pressure: 24.6MPa, low-pressure: 9.6MPa). While high air-bp specimens provided SEM images revealing resin-plugged dentine tubules, resin tags and only marginally blister structures, low air-bp left copious droplets and open dentine tubules. In contrast, the non-thixotropic resin adhesive showed no significant bond strength differences (high-pressure: 9.3MPa, low-pressure: 7.6MPa). A pressure-dependent distinct influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine bond strength has been demonstrated. Stronger adhesion with high air-bp application is explained by improved resin fluidity and facilitated resin penetration into dentine tubules. Filler particles used in adhesive systems may induce thixotropic effects in bonding resin layers, accounting for improved free-flowing resin properties. In

  5. Effect of propolis gel on the in vitro reduction of dentin permeability

    PubMed Central

    SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; de CARVALHO, Flávia Negreiros; MARSICANO, Juliane Avansini; MATTOS, Maria Cecília; PEREIRA, José Carlos; FORIM, Moacir Rossi; da SILVA, Maria Fatima das Graças Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of potassium oxalate, fluoride gel and two kinds of propolis gel to reduce the hydraulic conductance of dentin, in vitro. Material and Methods The methodology used for the measurement of hydraulic conductance of dentin in the present study was based on a model proposed in literature. Thirty-six 1-mm-thick dentin discs, obtained from extracted human third molars were divided into 4 groups (n=9). The groups corresponded to the following experimental materials: GI-10% propolis gel, pH 4.1; GII-30% propolis gel; GIII-3% potassium oxalate gel, pH 4,1; and GIV-1.23% fluoride gel, pH 4.1, applied to the dentin under the following surface conditions: after 37% phosphoric acid and before 6% citric acid application. The occluding capacity of the dentin tubules was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at ×500, ×1,000 and ×2,000 magnifications. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Results Groups I, II, III, IV did not differ significantly from the others in any conditions by reducing in hydraulic conductance. The active agents reduced dentin permeability; however they produced the smallest reduction in hydraulic conductance when compared to the presence of smear layer (P<0.05). The effectiveness in reducing dentin permeability did not differ significantly from 10% or 30% propolis gels. SEM micrographs revealed that dentin tubules were partially occluded after treatment with propolis. Conclusions Under the conditions of this study, the application of 10% and 30% propolis gels did not seem to reduce the hydraulic conductance of dentin in vitro, but it showed capacity of partially obliterating the dentin tubules. Propolis is used in the treatment of different oral problems without causing significant great collateral effects, and can be a good option in the treatment of patients with dentin sensitivity. PMID:21956588

  6. Visualization of initial bacterial colonization on dentine and enamel in situ.

    PubMed

    Jung, David Jonathan; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Follo, Marie; Spitzmüller, Bettina; Hoth-Hannig, Wiebke; Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Bacterial colonization of dentine is of high relevance in cariology, endodontology and periodontology. The aim of the present in situ study was to establish recent methods for visualization and quantification of initial bacterial adherence to dentine in comparison to enamel. For this purpose, bovine enamel and dentine slabs were fixed on buccal sites of individual upper jaw splints worn by 6 subjects for 30min, 120min and 360min, respectively. Adherent bacteria on the slabs were visualized and quantified with DAPI-staining (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of streptococci and eubacteria using the CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) as well as an epifluorescence microscope. In addition, the number of colony forming units was quantified after desorption. Representative samples were processed for SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). All methods clearly indicated that a significantly higher number of bacteria adhered to dentine than to enamel. Furthermore, the amount of bacteria on the dentine increased with increasing oral exposure time, but remained rather constant on the enamel. The CLSM allowed visualization of bacteria in the dentinal tubules. Bacteria were found preferentially at the openings of the dentine tubules, but were distributed randomly on the enamel. In conclusion, the adopted methods are suitable for visualization and quantification of bacterial adhesion to dentine. Even the initial bacterial colonization of dentine is much more pronounced than bacterial adherence to the enamel. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of host-derived dentinal matrix metalloproteinases in reducing dentin bonding of resin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modem self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability.

  8. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modern self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability. PMID:20690420

  9. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Fernanda Brandão; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Gonçalves, Sergio Eduardo de Paiva; Mancini, Maria Nadir Gasparoto

    2012-01-01

    There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10), according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7 ± 105.0; a), Caries-detector dye (370.5 ± 78.3; ab), Tactile method (322.8 ± 51.5; bc). Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2 ± 10.5; bc), Caries-detector dye (44.6 ± 11.8; abc), Tactile method (24.3 ± 9.0; d). DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values.

  10. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Centofanti, Antonio; Artemisia, Alessandro; Bramanti, Ennio; Militi, Angela; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Irrera, Alessia; Lo Giudice, Roberto; Cicciù, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm) than the middle zone (3.74 μm) and the apical zone (1.73 μm). The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2) was similar in coronal zone (46,798 ± 10,644) and apical zone (45,192 ± 10,888), while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940 ± 7,651). However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system. PMID:26413504

  11. ON THE STIFFNESS OF DEMINERALIZED DENTIN MATRICES

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Turco, Gianluca; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Resin bonding to dentin requires the use of self-etching primers or acid etching to decalcify the surface and expose a layer of collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix. Acid-etching reduces the stiffness of demineralized dentin from approximately 19 GPa to 1 MPa, requiring that it floats in water to prevent it from collapsing during bonding procedures. Several publications show that crosslinking agents like gluteraladehyde, carbodiimide or grape seed extract can stiffen collagen and improve resin-dentin bond strength. Objective The objective was to assess a new approach for evaluating the changes in stiffness of decalcified dentin by polar solvents and a collagen cross-linker. Methods Fully demineralized dentin beams and sections of etched coronal dentin were subjected to indentation loading using a cylindrical flat indenter in water, and after treatment with ethanol or ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). The stiffness was measured as a function of strain and as a function of loading rate from 1 to 50 µm/sec. Results At a strain of 0.25% the elastic modulus of the fully demineralized dentin was approximately 0.20 MPa. It increased to over 0.90 MPa at strains of 1%. Exposure to ethanol caused an increase in elastic modulus of up to four times. Increasing the loading rate from 1 to 50 µm/sec caused an increase in the apparent modulus of up to three times in both water and ethanol. EDC treatment caused increases in the stiffness in fully demineralized samples and in acid-etched demineralized dentin surfaces in situ. Significance Changes in the mechanical behavior of demineralized collagen matrices can be measured effectively under hydration via indentation with cylindrical flat indenters. This approach can be used for quantifying the effects of bonding treatments on the properties of decalcified dentin after acid etching, as well as to follow the loss of stiffness over time due to enzymatic degradation. PMID:26747822

  12. Bacterial invasion into radicular dentine-an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Stauffacher, Simone; Lussi, Adrian; Nietzsche, Sandor; Neuhaus, Klaus W; Eick, Sigrun

    2017-06-01

    We wanted to investigate differences in invasiveness into radicular dentinal tubules by monocultured and co-cultured bacteria frequently found in infected root canals. Fifty-one human roots were incubated for 8 weeks with monocultured Streptococcus gordonii ATCC 10558, Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556, and with five capnophiles/anaerobes as well as with capnophiles/anaerobes co-cultured with a streptococcal species. Thereafter, bacterial samples were cultured from the inner, middle, and outer third of the root dentine of longitudinally broken teeth (n = 5). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were obtained. Single gram-positive species were able to penetrate into the middle and outer third of the root dentine. Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 was not found in any of the dentine specimens. Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611 and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 were found in the inner and middle third. The bacterial load of streptococci was higher in all thirds in co-cultures compared to single infections. In co-cultures with streptococci, Actinomyces oris ATCC 43146 was found in the outer third in 9/10 samples, whereas P. intermedia ATCC 25611 was not detectable inside dentine. Co-culture with S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 enabled F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 to invade dentine; SEM images showed that F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 had a swollen shape. Invasiveness of bacteria into dentinal tubules is species-specific and may change depending on culturing as a single species or co-culturing with other bacteria. Oral streptococci may promote or inhibit invasion of capnophiles/anaerobes into radicular dentine.

  13. Comparison of depth of dentin etching and resin infiltration with single-step adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mitsuo; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2005-07-01

    Adhesion of resin composites to dentin is currently believed to result from impregnation of adhesive resin into superficially demineralized dentin. The purpose of this study was to use micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the extent of resin penetration into etched dentin with single-step adhesive systems. Adhesive systems used were One-Up Bond F (Tokuyama Dental) and Reactmer Bond (Shofu, Inc.). A self-etching primer system Mac Bond II (Tokuyama Dental) was employed as a control. Resin composites were bonded to bovine dentin with the adhesive systems, and specimens were sectioned parallel to dentinal tubules. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the dentin-adhesive interface in steps of 0.2 microm and the spectra were obtained. SEM observations of the resin-dentin interface were also conducted. The dentin-resin interface of single-step adhesive systems showed a gradual transition in the relative amount of adhesive from the resin side to dentin side. The widths of resin penetration into demineralized dentin detected by Raman microscopy were greater than those obtained by the morphological analysis using SEM. From the results of this study, a gradual variation in the composition of the dentin-resin interface was detected, and the degree of resin impregnation observed with SEM observation was less than that detected with the Raman microscopy.

  14. Effects of common dental materials used in preventive or operative dentistry on dentin permeability and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Thompson, Ian; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dentin remineralization induced by bioactive substances contained in common dental materials used in preventive and operative dentistry. Several materials were applied on human dentin segments. Dentin permeability was quantified using a fluid filtration system working at 20 cm H(2)O. Micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, and microhardness calculation were used to evaluate changes in the mineralization of dentin. Dentin treated with the prophylactic materials showed different dentin permeability values, in particular subsequent to immersion in remineralizing solutions (RSS). The bioactive glass (Sylc) was the only substance able to reduce dentin permeability after immersion in remineralizing solution and to show hydroxyapatite precipitation as a sign of dentin remineralization. The reduction in dentin permeability obtained after the application of the other prophylactic materials used in this study was due to the presence of the remnant material in the dentinal tubules, with no remineralization effect after storage in remineralizing solution. In conclusion, the results indicated that bioactive glass prophy powder may induce immediate remineralization of dentin.

  15. Proanthocyanidins-Loaded Nanoparticles Enhance Dentin Degradation Resistance.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, A S; Priyadarshini, B M; Selvan, S T; Lu, T B; Neo, J

    2017-07-01

    dentinal tubules' main and lateral branches. SEM revealed the formation of a uniform hybrid layer and well-formed resin tags with the presence of numerous nanoparticles located within the dentinal tubules and/or attached to the resin tag. This study demonstrated the potential significance of delivering collagen crosslinkers loaded into biodegradable polymer nanoparticles through the dentinal tubules of demineralized dentin on the biodegradation resistance.

  16. Osmosis in Cortical Collecting Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, James A.; Patlak, Clifford S.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reports a theoretical analysis of osmotic transients and an experimental evaluation both of rapid time resolution of lumen to bath osmosis and of bidirectional steady-state osmosis in isolated rabbit cortical collecting tubules exposed to antidiuretic hormone (ADH). For the case of a membrane in series with unstirred layers, there may be considerable differences between initial and steady-state osmotic flows (i.e., the osmotic transient phenomenon), because the solute concentrations at the interfaces between membrane and unstirred layers may vary with time. A numerical solution of the equation of continuity provided a means for computing these time-dependent values, and, accordingly, the variation of osmotic flow with time for a given set of parameters including: Pf (cm s–1), the osmotic water permeability coefficient, the bulk phase solute concentrations, the unstirred layer thickness on either side of the membrane, and the fractional areas available for volume flow in the unstirred layers. The analyses provide a quantitative frame of reference for evaluating osmotic transients observed in epithelia in series with asymmetrical unstirred layers and indicate that, for such epithelia, Pf determinations from steady-state osmotic flows may result in gross underestimates of osmotic water permeability. In earlier studies, we suggested that the discrepancy between the ADH-dependent values of Pf and PDDw (cm s–1, diffusional water permeability coefficient) was the consequence of cellular constraints to diffusion. In the present experiments, no transients were detectable 20–30 s after initiating ADH-dependent lumen to bath osmosis; and steady-state ADH-dependent osmotic flows from bath to lumen and lumen to bath were linear and symmetrical. An evaluation of these data in terms of the analytical model indicates: First, cellular constraints to diffusion in cortical collecting tubules could be rationalized in terms of a 25-fold reduction in the area of the

  17. Essential role of osterix for tooth root but not crown dentin formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chunlin; Liu, Ying; Ho, Sunita P; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-04-01

    Tooth is made of crown and root. It is widely believed that dentin formation in crown and root uses the same regulatory mechanism. However, identification of nuclear factor 1 C (NFIC)'s unique function in determining root but not crown dentin formation challenges the old thinking. In searching for the target molecules downstream of NFIC, we unexpectedly found a sharp reduction of osterix (OSX), the key transcription factor in skeleton formation, in the Nfic knockout (Nfic-KO) tooth root. We then demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of Osx in the odontoblast cell line due to a transient transfection of Nfic expression plasmid. Studies of global and conditional Osx-KO mice revealed no apparent changes in the crown dentin tubules and dentin matrix. However, the OSX conditional KO (cKO) mice (crossed to the 2.3-kb collagen type 1 [Col1]-Cre) displayed an increase in cell proliferation but great decreases in expressions of root dentin matrix proteins (dentin matrix protein 1 [DMP1] and dentin sialophosphoprotein [DSPP]), leading to an inhibition in odontoblast differentiation, and short, thin root dentin with few dentin tubules. Compared to the Nfic-KO tooth, which contains essentially no dentin tubules and remains in a "root-less" status at adult stages, the Osx-cKO root phenotype had partially improved at the late stage, indicating that other factors can compensate for OSX function. Thus, we conclude that OSX, one of the key downstream molecules of NFIC, plays a critical role in root, but not crown, formation.

  18. Evaluation of Five Different Desensitizers: A Comparative Dentin Permeability and SEM Investigation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Nasibe Aycan; Ertas, Ertan; Orucoğlu, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and durability of five different dentin desensitizers (Gluma Desensitizer Powergel, Bifluorid 12, Gluma Self Etch Bond, D/Sense Crystal, Nupro Sensodyne Prophylaxis Paste with Novamin) on tubule occlusion and dentin permeability reduction in vitro. Method: The quantitative changes in permeability of 100 dentin discs were measured after desensitizer treatments and following post-treatments of 6% citric acid challenge for 1 min or immersion in artificial saliva for 24 hours under hydrostatic pressure generated by a computerised fluid filtration meter. Qualitative SEM analyses were also carried out. Results: Dentin permeability decreased after desensitizer application in all groups. Nevertheless, only the difference between ‘Gluma Self Etch Bond’ and ‘Nupro Sensodyne Prophylaxis Paste with Novamin’ groups was significantly different (p<0.05). Dentin permeability increased significantly after post-treatments (p<0.05). There was no statistically difference among the citric acid-subgroups (p>0.05). Of all the artificial saliva-subgroups, only the difference between ‘D/Sense Crystal’ and ‘Bifluorid 12’ was significantly different (p<0.05). In SEM analysis, morphological changes were detected on the dentin surface and within the tubules following desensitizer treatments and post-treatments. Conclusion: All the desensitizers significantly reduced dentin permeability by changing the morphology of the dentin surface and/or dentinal tubules. Following post-treatments, there was some reduction in the efficacy of the desensitizers which was represented by the reduction in permeability values. SEM analysis revealed some physical changes in the dentin structure which can partly give an explanation to the reduced efficacy of tested desensitizers. PMID:28484578

  19. Effect of pulsed Nd:YAG on dentin morphological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Zangaro, Renato A.; Villaverde, Antonio G. J. B.; Watanabe-Sei, Ii; Munin, Egberto; Sasaki, Luis H.; Otsuka, Daniel K.; Lobo, Paulo D. d. C.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Junior, Durval R.

    2002-06-01

    Infrared lasers have been used for several clinical applications in dentistry, including laser ablation, oral surgeries and dentin hypersensitivity treatment. Despite of dentin low absorption coefficient in the near infrared spectrum, Nd:YAG laser radiation ((lambda) = 1064 nm) is able to melt the human dentin surface resulting in dentin tubules closure that can suppress the symptoms of dentin hypersensitivity pathology. Objectives: This study aims to analyze, through SEM technique, the morphological changes in dentin surface after Nd:YAG laser irradiation using different parameters in energy distribution. Materials and Methods: In this study sixteen human dentin samples were submitted to Nd:YAG laser radiation using a total energy of 900mJ distributed in one, two, three or six laser pulses with energy for each pulse of 900, 450, 300 or 150 mJ respectively. All the samples were irradiated with laser pulse width of 90ms, pulse intervals of 300 ms and spot size area of 0,005 cm2. Results: SEM analysis suggests that differences in energy distribution results in morphological differences even though the same energy is used for all the samples.

  20. A clinical perspective on dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, F C

    1993-01-01

    The newer generation of dentin adhesives has changed the practice of restorative dentistry. Two features common to most of the bonding restorative materials are the ability to alter, through the use of acidic etching agents, the surface of the dentin and the ability to completely wet and re-infiltrate the altered dentin surface with a hydrophilic polymerizable monomer. The acidic etchants remove or break up the smear layer, partially demineralize and/or alter the mineral in the first few microns of the dentin surface, and expose the collagen fibril network. The hydrophilic adhesive monomers that contain both acidic and methacrylate groups on the same molecule are bifunctional in nature. These monomers are able to infiltrate the demineralized dentin due to their hydrophilic nature and polymerize to encapsulate the exposed collagen fibers. Available products can be divided into two broad categories: systems that contain a low concentration of adhesive monomer diluted in a volatile solvent and systems that use adhesive resins of moderate to high viscosity. Knowledge of the features and properties of dentin adhesives provides the needed rationale for the protocol of application and the proper choice of materials in restorative dentistry.

  1. Clinical, mineral and ultrastructural changes in carious dentin of primary molars after restoration.

    PubMed

    Chibinski, Ana Claudia Rodrigues; Wambier, Letícia; Reis, Alessandra; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2016-06-01

    Partial caries removal has been shown to be an effective method to treat deep carious lesions in deciduous teeth. Nevertheless, the possibility of keeping infected dentin in the cavity still requires additional investigation. The objective of this research was to describe changes in primary infected dentin after restoration with glass ionomer cement. Dentin from 45 primary molars with deep and active carious lesions was evaluated using clinical and laboratory criteria, before and 60 days after restoration. The clinical analysis evaluated dentin colour (CO), dentin consistency (COS) and laser fluorescence (LF). The laboratory procedures assessed bacterial contamination and mineral content (MC), and evaluated the dentin ultrastructure and collagen content. Data on CO, COS, LF and colony forming units were analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test; MC, bacterial counts and collagen evaluations were evaluated using the Student's t-test. After 60 days, lower values of LF were observed, together with a lower bacterial count, and a higher COS was found, with an increase in calcium, phosphorus and collagen contents. Differences were not detected for CO or for fluorine content. Baseline samples showed enlarged tubules with bacterial invasion; 60-day samples showed better organised tissue, with a more compact intertubular dentin and narrower tubules. It is concluded that appropriate cavity sealing can promote beneficial changes in deep carious lesions of primary teeth, even in the presence of infected dentin. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  2. Permeability of Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it. PMID:23365497

  3. [Dentin adhesives. An update].

    PubMed

    Grandini, R; Novelli, C; Pierleoni, P

    1991-11-01

    Even if mechanical bonding to enamel utilizing the acid-etch technique has been very successful, adhesion to dentin is still a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Dentin is a vital tissue and differs in composition from enamel: acid-etching does not enhance the bond strength of composite resins to dentin and may elicit a severe pulpal response. For an effective bond to occur, a dentin bonding system has to be used. The first generation of methacrylate-based dentin adhesives was capable of chemical bonding to the inorganic phase of dentin. The chemical basis for this resin-dentin adhesive was the interaction between a phosphate group attached to the methacrylate and the calcium ions on the dentin surface. This system yielded rather low bond strengths which were clinically unsatisfying. The second generation of dentin adhesives became available to the profession recently. Each of these new bonding systems use similar chemical composition for the same purpose of bonding with physicochemical interaction to the hard tooth tissues. All these systems contain a mild acid dentin conditioner to remove the smear layer and an aqueous resin containing primer to improve monomer penetration into the hydrophilic dentin surface. The second generation dentin bonding systems are extremely sensitive to variations upon the completeness of instructions and how accurately these are followed by dental practitioners.

  4. Permeability of dentine.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it.

  5. Prevention of water-contamination of ethanol-saturated dentin and hydrophobic hybrid layers

    PubMed Central

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Mannocci, Francesco; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose This in vitro study evaluated the amount and the distribution of outward fluid flow that occurred when an experimental etch-and-rinse hydrophobic adhesive was applied to ethanol-saturated dentin before and after oxalate pretreatment. Materials and methods Measurements of dentin permeability were performed under a constant pulpal pressure of 20 cm H2O in deep and middle dentin. A lucifer yellow solution was placed in the pulp chamber to determine the distribution of the water contamination of the hybrid layers. Results The distribution of fluorescence in dentin specimens that were not pretreated with oxalate revealed that the dye permeated around the resin tags and filled the hybrid layer. Dentin specimens pretreated with oxalate prior to resin bonding, showed 80–83% less (p<0.05) water contamination compared to controls. The dentin permeability results obtained before and after oxalate pretreatment showed that oxalate decreased dentin permeability by 98% (p<0.05) compared to acid-etched controls. This prevented outward fluid movement during bonding resulting in better resin sealing of dentin due to the formation of a double seal of resin tags over calcium oxalate crystals in the tubules. Conclusion Outward dentinal fluid flow may contaminate hybrid layers during adhesive bonding procedures. Pretreatment of acid-etched dentin with 3% oxalic acid prior to bonding procedures can prevent outward fluid flow during bonding and water contamination of the hydrophobic hybrid layers. PMID:19701507

  6. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin

    PubMed Central

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Results: Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. Conclusion: This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples. PMID:28348614

  7. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples.

  8. Crystallographic texture and elemental composition mapped in bovine root dentin at the 200 nm level.

    PubMed

    Deymier-Black, A C; Veis, A; Cai, Z; Stock, S R

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the mineralization of peritubular dentin (PTD) and intertubular dentin (ITD) is not well understood. Tubules are quite small, diameter ∼2 µm, and this makes the near-tubule region of dentin difficult to study. Here, advanced characterization techniques are applied in a novel way to examine what organic or nanostructural signatures may indicate the end of ITD or the beginning of PTD mineralization. X-ray fluorescence intensity (Ca, P, and Zn) and X-ray diffraction patterns from carbonated apatite (cAp) were mapped around dentintubules at resolutions ten times smaller than the feature size (200 nm pixels), representing a 36% increase in resolution over earlier work. In the near tubule volumes of near-pulp, root dentin, Zn intensity was higher than in ITD remote from the tubules. This increase in Zn(2+), as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis, may indicate the presence of metalloenzymes or transcription factors important to ITD or PTD mineralization. The profiles of the cAp 00.2 X-ray diffraction rings were fitted with a pseudo-Voigt function, and the spatial and azimuthal distribution of these rings' integrated intensities indicated that the cAp platelets were arranged with their c-axes aligned tangential to the edge of the tubule lumen. This texture was continuous throughout the dentin indicating a lack of structural difference between in the Zn rich near-tubular region and the remote ITD.

  9. [Influence of different dentin depths on microtensile bond strength of two dentin adhesive systems].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tie-li; Huang, Cui; Zheng, Zhi-xing

    2009-10-01

    To determine the microtensile bond strength of two adhesives systems to either superficial or deep dentin. The crowns extracted human premolars were transversally sectioned next to the occlusal DEJ to expose flat dentin surfaces. The surfaces were bonded with: (1)two-step, total-etch adhesive Prime&Bond NT (PB),(2)wo-step, self-etching adhesive FL-Bond (FB), according to manufacturers' directions. Composite build-ups were constructed incrementally. After storage for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees, the teeth were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks with a cross-sectional area of 0.81mm(2) with a slow-speed diamond saw. The remaining dentin thickness (RDT) was measured to assess the superficial dentin group (RDT> or =3mm) and the deep dentin group (RDT< or =2mm). Microtensile bond strength measurements were evaluated. Fractured specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope at 60 magnification to determine the mode of failure. SPSS11.5 software package was used for analysis of the bond strengths. The results showed the bond strength of Prime&Bond NT were significantly higher either to superficial or deep dentin(P<0.05). Different dentin depths had no effect on the microtensile bond strengths of dentin bonding agent (P>0.05). No cohesive failure was observed in either superficial or deep dentin. Most of the failure was adhesive failure. From this study, it can be concluded that different dentin depths can not influence the microtensile bond strengths of Prime&Bond NT and FL-Bond adhesive systems.

  10. Differences in the Microstructure and Fatigue Properties of Dentin Between Residents of North and South America

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Naranjo, M.; Correa, S.; Ossa, A.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial variations in the microstructure of dentin contribute to its mechanical behavior. Objective The objective of this investigation was to compare the microstructure and fatigue behavior of dentin from donors of two different countries. Methods Caries-free third molars were obtained from dental practices in Colombia, South America and the US to assemble two age-matched samples. The microstructure of the coronal dentin was evaluated at three characteristic depths (i.e. deep, middle and superficial dentin) using scanning electron microscopy and image processing techniques. The mechanical behavior of dentin in these three regions was evaluated by the fatigue crack growth resistance. Cyclic crack growth was achieved in-plane with the dentin tubules and the fatigue crack growth behavior was characterized in terms of the stress intensity threshold and the Paris Law parameters. Results There was no difference in the tubule density between the dentin of patients from the two countries. However, there were significant differences (p≤0.05) in the tubule lumen diameters between the two groups in the deep and peripheral regions. In regards to the fatigue resistance, there was a significant increase (p≤0.05) in threshold stress intensity range, and a significant decrease in fatigue crack growth coefficient with increasing distance from the pulp in teeth from the US donors. In contrast, these properties were independent of location for the dentin of teeth from the Colombian donors. Conclusions The microstructure of dentin and its mechanical behavior appear to be a function of patient background, which may include environmental factors and/or ethnicity. PMID:24960115

  11. Dentinal hypersensitivity: A comparative clinical evaluation of CPP-ACP F, sodium fluoride, propolis, and placebo

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Souparna; Nayak, Moksha; Shenoy, Amarnath; Shetty, Rajesh; Prasad, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dentine hypersensitivity is a transient condition that often resolves with the natural sclerotic obturation of dentinal tubules. A potent topically applied in-office desensitizing treatment is indicated as the choice of treatment when dentine hypersensitivity is localized to one or two teeth. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate and compare the clinical efficiency of CPP-ACP F, sodium fluoride, propolis, and distilled water that was used as placebo in treating dentinal hypersensitivity. Materials and Methods: 120 patients aged 20–40 years reporting with dentinal hypersensitivity in relation to canine, premolar and molars with erosion, abrasion, and gingival recession were randomly assigned to four groups of 30 patients each. Response to air jet and tactile stimuli were measured using visual analogue scale initially on 1st, 7th, 15th, 28th, 60th, and final assessment was done on the 90th day. Statistical Analysis: A statistical analysis was done using Anova test (Fischer's test) and Tukey HSD test for multicomparison. Results: The teeth treated with the test group showed decrease in the mean hypersensitivity values compared to control group, over a period of three months. The results showed propolis to be most efficient in treating dentinal hypersensitivity and CPP- ACPF showed to be the least efficient. Conclusion: All test groups were effective in reducing dentinal hypersensitivity, although they differed in rapidity of action over the period of 3 months. Further studies can be done using advanced materials and techniques. Multiple therapeutic modalities have been developed to treat dentinal hypersensitivity including products that impede nerve conduction of pain stimulus, products that mechanically occlude dentinal tubules, and calcium containing products designed to create plugs in the tubules utilizing a demineralization mechanism. PMID:23112475

  12. Effect of QMix irrigant on bond strength of glass fibre posts to root dentine.

    PubMed

    Elnaghy, A M

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effect of QMix irrigant compared with several other irrigating solutions on the bond strength of glass fibre posts to root dentine and on smear layer removal after post space preparation. One hundred and fifty single-rooted teeth were used. The specimens were divided into six groups in each test according to the irrigation regimen used: group 1, distilled water; group 2, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); group 3, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX); group 4, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); group 5, 17% EDTA followed by 2% CHX; and group 6, QMix. Dual-cure self-adhesive resin cement (i CEM; Heraeus Kulzer, Hanau, Germany) was used for testing the adhesion of glass fibre post (Reblida; VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany) to root dentine using a micropush-out test. Debonding specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to examine and score the treated specimens for debris removal and dentinal tubule opening. Micropush-out data were analysed using anova and Tukey's test. Debris and dentinal tubule opening scores were analysed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. QMix and 17% EDTA/2% CHX demonstrated the highest mean bond strength values in all root levels amongst the groups. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between post and luting material (42.6%). QMix, 17% EDTA and 17% EDTA/2% CHX performed significantly better than the other groups on smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening. QMix is an effective irrigant that can remove smear layer, open dentinal tubules and simplify the irrigation protocol, without compromising the bonding strength of glass fibre posts cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement to root dentine. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Root Dentin Morphology and Structure of Human Versus Bovine Primary Teeth.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bruna M; Iwamoto, Alexsandra S; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M; Pascon, Fernanda M

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the structural and morphological differences between human and bovine primary root canals. Primary human maxillary central incisors (H) (n=9) and primary bovine incisors (B) (n=9) were selected. The roots were sectioned in the vestibular-lingual direction, planed and delimited in cervical, middle, and apical thirds. Tubule density (number of tubules per mm2) and diameter were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (1,000 and 5,000×) using Image J 1.47 software. Data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The highest tubule density was observed for B (28.527±1.717 mm2) compared with H (15.931±0.170 mm2) (p<0.01). Regarding root thirds, the cervical third presented a greater tubule density (26.417±11.654 mm2) than the apical third (17.999±5.873 mm2). The diameter of the dentin tubules was not different for cervical (3.50±0.08 µm), middle (3.45±0.30 µm) and apical thirds (3.42±0.33 µm) and substrate (H-3.29±0.14 µm; B-3.63±0.06 µm). It could be concluded that: (1) the radicular dentin structure of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds differ in terms of the tubule density; (2) the radicular dentin morphology of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds are similar in terms of the diameter of the dentin tubules.

  14. Visualization and quantification of healthy and carious dentin structure using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Matsumoto, Koukichi; Berns, Michael W.

    1996-04-01

    In this study, a fluorescence technique was developed for visualization of dentin using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Eighteen extracted human teeth were used: 13 showing no clinical signs of caries and 5 with visually apparent decay. Preliminary study: All teeth were horizontally sectioned to approx. 200 micrometers thickness and pre-treated as follows: no pretreatment; vacuum only; ultrasonication only; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) only; vacuum and NaOCl; ultrasonication and NaOCl; or vacuum, ultrasonication and NaOCl. Samples were stained with Rhodamine 123 fluorescent dye at a concentration of 10-5 M in phosphate buffer saline for 1 to 24 hours. Caries study: Dentin surfaces, some with pre-existing caries, were visualized using CLSM. Most dentin tubules in sound dentin appeared open using CLSM, but most dentin tubules in carious dentin appeared closed or narrowed. Surface images obtained using CLSM were similar to those seen by SEM, but additional subsurface imaging was possible using CLSM at depth intervals of 1 micrometers to a depth of 30 - 50 micrometers . This technique shows good potential for non-invasive surface and subsurface imaging of dentin structures.

  15. Biomimetic remineralization of dentin

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-na; Zhang, Wei; Pashley, David H.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mao, Jing; Chen, Ji-hua; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Remineralization of demineralized dentin is important for improving dentin bonding stability and controlling primary and secondary caries. Nevertheless, conventional dentin remineralization strategy is not suitable for remineralizing completely-demineralized dentin within hybrid layers created by etch-and-rinse and moderately aggressive self-etch adhesive systems, or the superficial part of a caries-affected dentin lesion left behind after minimally invasive caries removal. Biomimetic remineralization represents a different approach to this problem by attempting to backfill the demineralized dentin collagen with liquid-like amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor particles that are stabilized by biomimetic analogs of noncollagenous proteins. Methods This paper reviewed the changing concepts in calcium phosphate mineralization of fibrillar collagen, including the recently discovered, non-classical particle-based crystallization concept, formation of polymer-induced liquid- precursors (PILP), experimental collagen models for mineralization, and the need for using phosphate-containing biomimetic analogs for biomimetic mineralization of collagen. Published work on the remineralization of resin-dentin bonds and artificial caries-like lesions by various research groups was then reviewed. Finally, the problems and progress associated with the translation of a scientifically-sound concept into a clinically-applicable approach are discussed. Results and Significance The particle-based biomimetic remineralization strategy based on the PILP process demonstrates great potential in remineralizing faulty hybrid layers or caries-like dentin. Based on this concept, research in the development of more clinically feasible dentin remineralization strategy, such as incorporating poly(anionic) acid-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor-containing mesoporous silica nanofillers in dentin adhesives, may provide a promising strategy for increasing of the

  16. Effect of UVA-activated Riboflavin on Dentin Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Cova, A.; Breschi, L.; Nato, F.; Ruggeri, A.; Carrilho, M.; Tjäderhane, L.; Prati, C.; Di Lenarda, R.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Mazzoni, A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have reported collagen cross-linking after exposure to riboflavin followed by ultraviolet-A (UVA) exposure. This study is the first to investigate the effect of a riboflavin-containing primer on adhesive interface stability and dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity. Human dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid, treated with 0.1% riboflavin, exposed to UVA for 2 min, and bonded with a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. Adhesive was applied to control specimens without riboflavin/UVA. Specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength tests and pulled to failure after storage for 24 hrs, 6 mos, or 1 yr. Interfacial nanoleakage was evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity, we performed correlative zymographic assays on protein extracts obtained from phosphoric-acid-etched dentin powder with or without riboflavin/UVA treatment and XP Bond. Ultraviolet-activated riboflavin treatment increased the immediate bond strength to dentin at all aging intervals (p < 0.05 vs. control) and decreased interfacial nanoleakage in aged specimens (1 yr; p < 0.05). Zymograms revealed that riboflavin/UVA pre-treatment inhibited dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity (especially MMP-9). In conclusion, dentinal collagen cross-linking induced by riboflavin/UVA increased immediate bond strength, stabilized the adhesive interface, and inhibited dentin matrix metalloproteinases, thereby increasing the durability of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:21940521

  17. Effect of UVA-activated riboflavin on dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Cova, A; Breschi, L; Nato, F; Ruggeri, A; Carrilho, M; Tjäderhane, L; Prati, C; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Mazzoni, A

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have reported collagen cross-linking after exposure to riboflavin followed by ultraviolet-A (UVA) exposure. This study is the first to investigate the effect of a riboflavin-containing primer on adhesive interface stability and dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity. Human dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid, treated with 0.1% riboflavin, exposed to UVA for 2 min, and bonded with a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. Adhesive was applied to control specimens without riboflavin/UVA. Specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength tests and pulled to failure after storage for 24 hrs, 6 mos, or 1 yr. Interfacial nanoleakage was evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity, we performed correlative zymographic assays on protein extracts obtained from phosphoric-acid-etched dentin powder with or without riboflavin/UVA treatment and XP Bond. Ultraviolet-activated riboflavin treatment increased the immediate bond strength to dentin at all aging intervals (p < 0.05 vs. control) and decreased interfacial nanoleakage in aged specimens (1 yr; p < 0.05). Zymograms revealed that riboflavin/UVA pre-treatment inhibited dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity (especially MMP-9). In conclusion, dentinal collagen cross-linking induced by riboflavin/UVA increased immediate bond strength, stabilized the adhesive interface, and inhibited dentin matrix metalloproteinases, thereby increasing the durability of resin-dentin bonds.

  18. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review.

    PubMed

    Nawareg, Manar M Abu; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2015-12-01

    This review describes the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementation of full crowns. The evolution of these "immediate dentin sealants" follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7-10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than 1 month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin- covered dentin allows dentin fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purpose or OptiBond FL or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SE, Unifil Bond or AdheSE.

  19. Dentin sensitivity, odontoblasts and nerves under desiccated or infected experimental cavities. A clinical, light microscopic and ultrastructural investigation.

    PubMed

    Lilja, J; Nordenvall, K J; Bränström, M

    1982-01-01

    Cavities were prepared in 35 pairs of young human premolars. One tooth in each pair served as a control. In one Series the test cavity was desiccated with compressed air for one minute. LM and TEM examination of the dentin and the adjacent pulp revealed an extensive aspiration of odontoblasts. Nerve fibers had moved 0.1 to 0.2 mm outward in the tubules. It is suggested that a streching or disruption of the nerve had occurred during desiccation. In a second Series, the test cavity was infected for 1 to 2 weeks. No nerve fibers were seen in the dentinal tubules under the cavities, only cellular remnants and some microorganisms. Despite the absence of nerves the dentin in the bottom of the infected cavities was highly sensitive to stimulation. It was concluded that the nociceptive nerves present in the adjacent inflamed pulp may be terminals, mechanosensitive in nature and that they activated by rapid outward movements of the tubules fluid.

  20. Digital moiré interferometric analysis on the effect of nanoparticle conditioning on the mechanical deformation in dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang Chi; Kishen, Anil

    2016-02-01

    Dentin is a biological composite that forms the major bulk of tooth structure. Understanding the biomechanical response of dentin structure to forces is essential to restore the loss of mechanical integrity associated with dentin loss during disease or treatment procedures. Moiré interferometry is an optical interferometry based method, which allows wholefield, real-time analysis of dental structures with high-sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the deformation gradients in dentin during function and subsequent to surface conditioning with bioactive biopolymeric nanoparticle. Slab shaped dentin specimens were prepared and a customized loading jig was used to compressively load the specimens from 10 N to 50 N. Specific regions of interest was chosen on the dentin specimens for strain analysis. The digital moiré interferometry experiments showed a distinct deformation pattern in dentin in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules, which increased with increase in dentin loss. The dentin conditioned with nanoparticles did not display marked increase in strain gradients with loads. The current photomechanical experiment highlighted the impact of nanoparticle treatment to improve the mechanical integrity of dentin.

  1. [Effect of Pinus massoniana needle extract on root dentin demineralization in vitro].

    PubMed

    Chengfang, Tang; Jianping, Ruan; Yong, Zhu; Zixia, Li; Yanping, Zuo; Hongyan, Xu

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of Pinus massoniana needle extract (PMNE) on inhibiting demineralization of root dentin. Root dentin blocks were randomly divided into distilled deionized water (DDW) group, fluoride sodium (NaF) group, and 4%, 8% and 12% PMNE groups according to the experimental solution used in the process of pH cycling in each group. All specimens in each group experienced pH cycling for 8 d. The dentin mineral density (DMD) of the normal dentin and demineralized dentin and their D-value (ΔDMD) were determined using micro computed tomography. The morphology of dentin surface after pH cycling was also observed using a scanning electron microscope. The ΔDMD values in all PMNE groups and the NaF group were considerably lower than the ΔDMD in the DDW group (P<0.05). The ΔDMD values of the 8% and 12% PMNE groups had no difference (P>0.05), both of which were lower than the ΔDMD in the 4% PMNE group and higher than that in the NaF group (P<0.05). The dentin tubules were partly opened in the PMNE groups. The opening degrees of the dentin tubule in PMNE groups were significantly less and smaller than the opening degree in the DDW group and were larger than that in the NaF group. PMNE can inhibit the deminera-lization of root dentin and can slow down the reduction in DMD. PMNE has the potential to prevent caries, and 8% PMNE can effectively inhibit dentin demineralization.

  2. Nanomechanical properties of biochemically modified dentin bonded interfaces

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Paulo H; Karol, Sachin; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B

    2014-01-01

    Summary The effect of biomodification of dentin matrices using collagen cross-linkers, glutaraldehyde (GD) and grape seed extract (GSE), on the reduced modulus of elasticity (Er) and nanohardness (H) of the hybrid layer and underlying dentin was investigated at the dentin-resin bonded interface. The coronal dentin of nine molars were exposed and divided into groups: 5% GD, 6.5% GSE and control. Control samples were etched, bonded with Adper Single Bond Plus and Premise composite. GD and GSE were applied for 1 hour prior to bonding procedures. After 24 hours, samples were sectioned, and resin-dentin beams were either kept in distilled water or exposed to collagenase treatment for 24 hours. Nano-indentations were performed at the hybrid layer and underlying dentin. GD and GSE treatment increased the Er and H of resin-dentin interface structures when compared to the control group (p < 0.05), particularly the hybrid layer, and may be a promising novel approach to strengthen the dentin-resin bonded interface structures when using these adhesive system and resin-based composite. PMID:21058972

  3. Analysis of the dentin-resin interface by use of laser Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, M; Onose, H; Moore, B K

    2002-12-01

    Adhesion of resin-bonding agents to dentin is currently believed to result from impregnation of adhesive resin into superficially demineralized dentin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of the resin-impregnated dentin (hybrid) layer using a micro-Raman spectroscopy. Resin composites were bonded to bovine dentin with the two-step bonding systems, and specimens were sectioned parallel to dentinal tubules. These surfaces were then polished down to 1 microm diamond pastes. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the dentin-adhesive interface by steps of 0.2 microm on a computer controlled X-Y stage. The relative amounts of hydroxyapatite (960 cm(-1), P-O), adhesive resin (640 cm(-1), aromatic ring), and organic substrate (1450 cm(-1), C-H) in the dentin-adhesive bonding area were calculated. From the Raman spectroscopy results, the hybrid layer represents a gradual transition in the relative amount of adhesive from the resin side to dentin side. Evidence of poor saturation of the adhesive resin in the demineralized dentin with the one-bottle adhesive system was detected. From the results of this study, inhomogeneity of the hybrid layer composition was detected, and the degree of resin impregnation was found to be different between the bonding systems tested.

  4. Lipid tubule growth by osmotic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Padmini; Zhang, Di; Orster, George; Shen, Amy

    2013-11-01

    We present here a procedure for growing lipid tubules in vitro. This method allows us to grow tubules of consistent shape and structure and thus can be a useful tool for nano-engineering applications. There are three stages during the tubule growth process: initiation, elongation and termination. Balancing the forces that act on the tubule head shows that the growth of tubules during the elongation phase depends on the balance between osmotic pressure and the viscous drag exerted on the membrane from the substrate and the external fluid. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiment, we identify the key forces that control tubule growth during the elongation phase.

  5. Presence of matrix vesicles in the body of odontoblasts and in the inner third of dentinal tissue: A scanning electron microscopyc study

    PubMed Central

    Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Reyes-Gasga, José

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this report is to present the results of a scanning electron microscopic study on the presence of matrix vesicles (MVs) found in human dentine. Study Design: Dentin tissue from 20 human bicuspids was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy. Results: MVs were found as outgrowths of the cellular membrane of the odontoblastic body, the more proximal portion of the odontoblastic process before entering the dentinal tubule and in the odontoblastic process within the inner third of the dentin. Size of MVs varied depending on location. In the inner third of dentin, they were seen in diverse positions; as membranal outgrowths, deriving from the odontoblastic process, lying free in the intratubular space and attached to the dentinal wall. Sometimes, they were seen organized forming groups of different sizes and shapes or as multivesicular chains running from the surface of the odontoblastic process to the tubular wall. MVs were present in places never considered: 1) the body of odontoblasts; 2) the most proximal part of the odontoblastic processes before entering the circumpulpal dentine and also: 3) in the inner third of dentinal tissue. Conclusions: According to our results, MVs not only participate during mantle dentin mineralization during early dentinogenesis, they also contribute during the mineralization process of the inner dentin. Key words:Dentin, microvesicles, secretory vesicles, dentin formation, dentin secretion. PMID:23385510

  6. Morphological analysis and chemical content of natural dentin carious lesion zones.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W H; Konopka, S; Kriwalsky, M S; Gaengler, P

    2003-10-01

    unique mineralization pattern of the translucent zone is a biological reaction to the carious attack. Because active dentin lesions exhibit many non-occluded open dentin tubules, further bacterial invasion or, in case of dentin treatment, the penetration of bonding agents towards the pulp is morphologically not prevented and therefore of clinical importance.

  7. Indirect pulp capping in young patients: immunohistological study of pulp-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Ţuculină, Mihaela Jana; Răescu, Mihaela; Dascălu, Ionela Teodora; Popescu, Mihaela; Andreescu, Claudia Florina; Dăguci, C; Cumpătă, C N; Nimigean, Vanda Roxana; Baniţă, Ileana Monica

    2013-01-01

    Indirect capping is a complex therapy exclusively needed in deep cavities that provides, using biomaterials, a disinfection of the dentinary sore and seals the dentinary tubules, protects the pulp of physical mechanisms and chemical agents and stimulates the mechanisms that produce new dentin. Following this idea, we studied the histological changes in the dental pulp tissue and also the specific immunohistochemical response in various structures when an indirect capping technique was used. We used special histological techniques followed by classical staining or by immunohistochemical reaction in order to assess the odontoblastic, and the vascular reaction. The immunohistochemical study allows us to evaluate the changes in the pulp-dentin complex, as the result of the changes in the dentinal tubules permeability and the biological reactions at this level.

  8. Effects of a novel fluoride-containing aluminocalciumsilicate-based tooth coating material (Nanoseal) on enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effect of a fluoride-containing aluminocalciumsilicate nanoparticle glass dispersed aqueous solution (Nanoseal) on enamel and dentin, under the hypothesis that this material can form insoluble mineral deposits that confer acid resistance to the tooth structure and occlude open dentin tubules. Labial enamel and dentin of human extracted incisors were used. Morphology of the enamel and dentin artificially demineralized with a lactic acid solution that before and/or after coated with the test material were analyzed with a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy electron probe microanalyzer with an image observation function (SEM-EPMA). Moreover, incorporation of the calcium and silicon by enamel and dentin were also detected with SEM-EPMA. Application of the fluoroaluminocalciumsilicate-based tooth coating material resulted in the deposition of substances (nanoparticles) onto the enamel surface porosities and open dentin tubules on the artificial lesions. Prior coating with the test material reduced the demineralization-induced loss of enamel and dentin. Moreover, Ca and Si incorporation into superficial enamel and dentin was detected.

  9. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    PubMed Central

    MOLLICA, Fernanda Brandão; TORRES, Carlos Rocha Gomes; GONÇALVES, Sergio Eduardo de Paiva; MANCINI, †Maria Nadir Gasparoto

    2012-01-01

    There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. Objectives The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. Material and methods The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10), according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. Results ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a), Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab), Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc). Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc), Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc), Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d). Conclusions DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values. PMID:23032207

  10. A breakthrough therapy for dentin hypersensitivity: how dental products containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate work to deliver effective relief of sensitive teeth.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Irene; Heu, Rod; Stranick, Mike; Lavender, Stacey; Zaidel, Lynette; Cummins, Diane; Sullivan, Richard J; Hsueh, Carlin; Gimzewski, James K

    2009-01-01

    These studies have utilized a range of state-of-the-art surface techniques to gain insight into the mechanism of action of a new technology for dentin hypersensitivity relief based upon arginine and calcium carbonate and, in particular, to address important questions regarding the nature and extent of dentin tubule occlusion. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to assess tubule occlusion. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) have been used to identify the composition of the dentin plug. CLSM has also been used to compare the mechanism of action of the toothpaste and the desensitizing prophylaxis paste, to address whether both the arginine and the calcium carbonate components are essential to occlusion, to identify the location of the arginine within the occluded dentin, and to demonstrate resistance of the occlusion to acid challenge. Hydraulic conductance has been used to assess the effectiveness of the arginine-calcium carbonate technology in arresting dentin fluid movement, to evaluate the effects of pulpal pressure on the robustness of the occlusion, and to confirm the resistance of the occlusion to an acid challenge. The CLSM, SEM, and AFM studies demonstrate that the arginine-calcium carbonate technology is highly effective in rapidly and completely occluding dentin tubules. The EDX and ESCA studies show that the dentin surface deposit and occluded tubule plug contain high levels of calcium and phosphate, as well as carbonate. CLSM has confirmed that the toothpaste and the desensitizing prophylaxis paste have the same mechanism of action, that the arginine and calcium carbonate components are both essential to the effectiveness of these products, and that the arginine becomes incorporated into the dentin plug. The hydraulic conductance studies demonstrate that the occlusion provided by the arginine-calcium carbonate

  11. Combined Antibacterial Effect of Sodium Hypochlorite and Root Canal Sealers against Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms in Dentin Canals.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianfeng; Wang, Zhejun; Shen, Ya; Ma, Jingzhi; Cao, Yingguang; Haapasalo, Markus

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the antibacterial effect of the combined use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and root canal sealers on Enterococcus faecalis biofilms using a dentin infection model. Cells of E. faecalis were introduced into the dentinal tubules by centrifugation and incubated in brain-heart infusion for 3 weeks. The biofilms in dentin were first subjected to 5% NaOCl or sterile water for 10 minutes followed by an equal thickness of AH Plus (Dentsply International Inc, York, PA), Endosequence BC Sealer (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), or MTA Fillapex (Angelus Indústria de Produtos Odontológicos S/A, Londrina, Brazil) placed on the root canal wall of the dentin specimens for 7, 30, and 60 days. Gutta-percha and water were used in a similar manner as controls. The proportions of dead and live bacteria inside the dentinal tubules were assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and viability staining. The combined use of NaOCl and sealers (30 and 60 days) killed significantly more bacteria than NaOCl or sealers alone (P < .05). NaOCl + MTA Fillapex was the most effective antibacterial combination by killing 83% bacteria in dentin tubules in 60 days. Thirty and 60 days of exposure to the sealers resulted in significantly more dead bacteria in dentin biofilms than 7-day exposures (P < .05). The placement of root canal sealer after NaOCl treatment enhanced antibacterial effects against E. faecalis in the dentinal tubules. Little additional effect was obtained after 30 days of exposure to sealers. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dentinal sensitivity: concept and methodology for its objective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ricarte, José; Faus-Matoses, Vicente; Faus-Llácer, Vicente José; Flichy-Fernández, Antonio Juan; Mateos-Moreno, Bibiana

    2008-03-01

    Dentinal sensitivity is a clinical condition of some importance, particularly in periodontal patients. Symptoms appear on applying a triggering stimulus to the exposed dentine - the particularity being that the pain is similar to that of other dental disorders of different etiology and treatment. Hence the importance of a correct differential diagnosis. The main problem not only in clinical practice when treating the disorder, but also in designing studies for the objective evaluation of dentinal sensitivity, is the difficulty of standardizing, evaluating and interpreting the clinical condition in its different degrees. Thus, consensus in designing and evaluating studies of dentinal sensitivity would facilitate our understanding of its etiology, and the assessment of possible treatments. Such studies may center their methodology on individual patient response or on the nature of the triggering stimulus. The present study provides an updated and global view of the disorder, and reviews the basic protocol for the objective assessment of dentinal sensitivity.

  13. Nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems. The dentin bonding systems used in this study were: Single Bond, One Coat Bond, Prime & Bond NT/Non Rinse Conditioner (NRC), and PermaQuik. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces from extracted human molars were finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper, and bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems. After 24 h storage at 37 degrees C in water, margins were finished with polishing discs and the surrounding tooth surfaces coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in a 50% (w/v) solution of silver nitrate for 24 h, and exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 h. The samples were cut longitudinally, polished, and mounted on stubs, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using backscattered electron mode. Different nanoleakage patterns were observed with the different adhesive systems. However, accumulations of silver particles were often noted at the base of the hybrid layer for all materials. Single Bond and One Coat Bond demonstrated uptake of silver particles both within the hybrid layer and the adhesive resin. Prime & Bond NT/NRC showed silver staining throughout almost the entire thickness of the hybrid layer. The leakage pattern of PermaQuik revealed loose silver deposition within the hybrid layer. The composition of each adhesive system may play a role in forming the different leakage patterns. The current dentin bonding systems used in this study do not achieve perfect sealing at the restoration/dentin interface, which may influence the durability of the bond to dentin.

  14. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; MacKie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  15. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus) adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003). Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064). Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant. PMID:25984475

  16. Chlorhexidine Nanocapsule Drug Delivery Approach to the Resin-Dentin Interface.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, B M; Selvan, S T; Lu, T B; Xie, H; Neo, J; Fawzy, A S

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we are introducing a new drug-delivery approach to demineralized dentin substrates through microsized dentinal tubules in the form of drug-loaded nanocapsules. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is widely used in adhesive dentistry due to its nonspecific matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory effect and antibacterial activities. Poly(ε-caprolactone) nanocapsules (nano-PCL) loaded with CHX were fabricated by interfacial polymer deposition at PCL/CHX ratios of 125:10, 125:25, and 125:50. Unloaded nanocapsules (blank) were fabricated as control. The fabricated nanocapsules were characterized in vitro in terms of particle size, surface charges, particle recovery, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading. Nanocapsule morphology, drug inclusion, structural properties, and crystallinity were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Initial screening of the antibacterial activities and the cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules were also conducted. Nanocapsules, as carried on ethanol/water solution, were delivered to demineralized dentin specimens connected to an ex vivo model setup simulating the pulpal pressure to study their infiltration, penetration depth, and retention inside the dentinal tubules by SEM/TEM. Nanocapsules were Ag labeled and delivered to demineralized dentin, followed by the application of a 2-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive. CHX-release profiles were characterized in vitro and ex vivo up to 25 d. Spherical nanocapsules were fabricated with a CHX core coated with a thin PCL shell. The blank nanocapsules exhibited the largest z-average diameter with negatively charged ζ-potential. With CHX incorporation, the nanocapsule size was decreased with a positive shift in ζ-potential. Nano-PCL/CHX at 125:50 showed the highest drug loading, antibacterial effect, and CHX release both in vitro and ex vivo. SEM and TEM revealed the deep

  17. Analysis of surfaces and adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin after different treatments.

    PubMed

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Ribeiro, Lilian Faria; Rocha, Renata Andréa Salvitti de Sá; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze, by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), the surface topography and the morphology of the adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin after different treatments. The enamel-dentin discs were randomly assigned into three groups according to the surface treatment: I-37% phosphoric acid; II-air-abrasion; III-air-abrasion followed by 37% phosphoric acid. After surface treatment, discs were divided in two: one hemi-disc was separated for surface analysis; the other hemi-disc received the Single Bond/Filtek Z-250 restorative system. The restored sections were bisected perpendicularly to the surface and prepared for interface analysis. Results disclosed that when the surface treatment was performed by air-abrasion, irregularities were observed at the enamel surface; microcracks and occluded tubules at dentin surface and lack of hybrid layer at adhesive/dentin interface. The air-abrasion treatment followed by acid etching provided an enamel etching pattern similar to the acid etching; microfissures and open tubules at dentin surface, and formation of hybrid layer at adhesive-dentin interface. It may be concluded that the treatment with air-abrasion followed by acid etching is an effective procedure to obtain an adequate surface for resin adhesion.

  18. Quantitative analysis of the effect of irrigant solution sequences on dentin erosion.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the level of erosion on root canal wall dentin caused by immersion in different irrigant solutions in alternative sequences. Dentin specimens from teeth with one root canal were instrumented and randomly divided into five groups. Each group was subjected to 17% EDTA, 17% ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid (EGTA), or 10% citric acid (CA) and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) varying the time of irrigant exposure and the order of the irrigants. The specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and randomized digital images of the dentin surface were taken. The area of tubule openings was measured by a semiautomatic method. No erosion was detected when demineralizing agents were used as a final rinse after NaOCl. However, the erosion of peritubular and intertubular dentin was detected when EDTA, EGTA, or CA were used first followed by 5.25% NaOCl (P < .05), and an increase over 100% in the area of dentin tubule openings was measured (P < .01). NaOCl used as a final irrigant solution after demineralization agents causes marked erosion of root canal dentin. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduction in dentin permeability using a slurry containing dicalcium phosphate and calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Cherng, Aishuan Maria; Takagi, Shozo; Chow, Laurence

    2006-08-01

    Treatments that obdurate dentin tubules have been used for reducing dentin hypersensitivity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a treatment with a slurry of micron sized calcium phosphate on the hydraulic conductance (L(p)) of etched dentin discs in vitro. The treatment slurry was prepared by mixing a powder mixture of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous and calcium hydroxide with a solution that contained sodium fluoride and carboxymethyl cellulose. The mean baseline L(p) (in mL cm(-2) s(-1) H(2)O cm(-1)) was 2.07 +/- 1.45 (mean +/- SD; n = 13)). After one treatment and 2, 4, and 7 days of incubation in a protein-free saliva-like solution (SLS), the mean relative L(p), presented as % of baseline, were 65 +/- 16, 42 +/- 27, 36 +/- 26, and 33 +/- 27 (n = 13), respectively. The L(p) values of the baseline and treatment after incubation in the SLS were significantly (p < 0.05) different. Scanning electron microscopic examination showed partial obturation of dentin tubules in the treated dentin. X-ray diffraction and chemical analyses indicated the major product formed from the slurry was a fluoride-containing hydroxyapatite. Treatment appeared effective in further reducing L(p) of dentin discs after incubation in the SLS.

  20. Effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Baldasso, Flávia Emi Razera; Roleto, Luana; Silva, Vinicius Duval da; Morgental, Renata Dornelles; Kopper, Patrícia Maria Poli

    2017-05-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin. Sixty root canals from mandibular incisors were instrumented and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10) according to the irrigant used: QMiX, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid (CA), 1% peracetic acid (PA), 2.5% NaOCl (solution control), and distilled water (negative control). The chelating solutions were used to irrigate the canal followed by 2.5% NaOCl as a final flush. After the irrigation protocols, all specimens were rinsed with 10 mL of distilled water to remove any residue of the chemical solutions. Before and after the final irrigation protocols, dentin microhardness was measured with a Knoop indenter. Three indentations were made at 100 µm and 500 µm from the root canal lumen. Afterwards, the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopic analysis and the amount of dentin erosion was examined. Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the results with a significance level set at 5%. At 100 µm, all protocols significantly reduced dentin microhardness (p < .05), while at 500 µm, this effect was detected only in the EDTA and QMiX groups (p < .05). CA was the irrigant that caused more extensive erosion in dentinal tubules, followed by PA and EDTA. QMiX opened dentinal tubules, but did not cause dentin erosion. Results suggest that QMiX and 17% EDTA reduced dentin microhardness at a greater depth. Additionally, QMiX did not cause dentin erosion.

  1. Nanostructure evaluation of healthy and fluorotic dentin by atomic force microscopy before and after phosphoric acid etching.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Alonso, Veronica; Aguilera-Flores, Rafael; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Martinez-Castañon, Gabriel A; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to characterize by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the nanostructure of human dentin surfaces affected by dental fluorosis (DF) before and after phosphoric acid etching. This study included 240 human dentin samples classified according to the severity of DF, which were divided into four groups using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI). Samples were analyzed by AFM before and after acid etching for 15, 30, and 60 s. The roughness (R(a)) for healthy dentin, and dentin with mild, moderate, and severe fluorosis were 440 nm, 442 nm, 445 nm, and 449 nm, respectively. After 15, 30, and 60 s of acid etching, all healthy and fluorotic dentin samples increased in roughness (p<0.05). The diameter of dentinal tubule orifices (D(t)) in healthy human dentin increased after acid etching for 60 s. We conclude that effective etching times are 15 s for healthy and mild dentin fluorosis, 30-s for moderately fluorosed dentin, and 45-60 s for severe fluorotic dentin.

  2. Tensile bond strength of composite to air-abraded dentin.

    PubMed

    Geitel, Birgit; Wischnewski, Regine; Jahn, Klaus-Roland; Barthel, R Claudia; Zimmer, Stefan; Roulet, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of air abrasive treatment of dentin surfaces on the tensile bond strength between dentin and two different composite-adhesive-systems Multi-Purpose/Z100 and OptiBond FL/Herculite XR). The crowns of 200 maxillary central incisors were embedded in resin and then ground to expose a dentin surface 5 mm in diameter. The surfaces were etched or abraded by using a KCP 1000 device with different treatment conditions. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite cylinders were bonded to the conditioned dentinal surface using a split mold. Tensile bond strength values and failure modes were then determined. Tensile bond strength values of the acid-etched dentin-composite-interface were significantly higher than for the interface between air-abraded dentin and composite, independent of the composite-adhesive-system used. The light microscopic evaluation showed mainly adhesive and combined adhesive-cohesive fractures. Significantly more adhesive fractures could be observed between abraded dentin and composite than between etched dentin and composite.

  3. Young's modulus of peritubular and intertubular human dentin by nano-indentation tests.

    PubMed

    Ziskind, Daniel; Hasday, Moran; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2011-04-01

    The local Young modulus of dry dentin viewed as a hierarchical composite was measured by nano-indentation using two types of experiments, both in a continuous stiffness measurement mode. First, tests were performed radially along straight lines running across highly mineralized peritubular dentin sections and through less mineralized intertubular dentin areas. These tests revealed a gradual decrease in Young's modulus from the bulk of the peritubular dentin region where modulus values of up to ∼40-42GPa were observed, down to approximately constant values of ∼17GPa in the intertubular dentin region. A second set of nano-indentation experiments was performed on the facets of an irregular polyhedron specimen cut from the intertubular dentin region, so as to probe the modulus of intertubular dentin specimens at different orientations relative to the tubular direction. The results demonstrated that the intertubular dentin region may be considered to be quasi-isotropic, with a slightly higher modulus value (∼22GPa) when the indenting tip axis is parallel to the tubular direction, compared to the values (∼18GPa) obtained when the indenting tip axis is perpendicular to the tubule direction.

  4. Characterization of biomodified dentin matrices for potential preventive and reparative therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B.; Castellan, Carina. S.; Shinohara, Mirela S.; Hassan, Lina; Antunes, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Biomodification of existing hard tissue structures, specifically tooth dentin, is an innovative approach proposed to improve the biomechanical and biochemical properties of tissue for potential preventive or reparative/regenerative therapies. The objectives of the study were to systematically characterize dentin matrices biomodified by proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract (GSE) and glutaraldehyde (GD). Changes to the biochemistry and biomechanical properties were assessed by several assays to investigate the degree of interactions, biodegradation rates, proteoglycans interaction, and effect of collagen fibril orientation and environmental conditions on the tensile properties. The highest degree of agent-dentin interaction was observed with GSE which exhibited the highest denaturation temperature, regardless of the agent concentration. Biodegradation rates remarkably decreased following biomodification of dentin matrices after 24hs collagenase digestion. A significant decreased in the proteoglycans content of GSE treated samples was observed using a micro-assay for glycosaminoglycans and histological electron microscopy, while no changes were observed for GD and control. Tensile strength properties of GD biomodified dentin matrices were affected by dentin tubule orientation, most likely due to the orientation of the collagen fibrils. Higher and/or increased stability of the tensile properties of GD and GSE-treated samples were observed following exposure to collagenase and 8 month water storage. Biomodification of dentin matrices using chemical agents not only affects the collagen biochemistry; it also involves interaction with proteoglycans. Tissue biomodifiers interact differently with dentin matrices and may provide the tissue with enhanced preventive and restorative/reparative abilities. PMID:21167964

  5. Aging and the reduction in fracture toughness of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Nazari, A; Bajaj, D; Zhang, D; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2009-10-01

    An evaluation of the crack growth resistance of human coronal dentin was performed on tissue obtained from patients between ages 18 and 83. Stable crack extension was achieved over clinically relevant lengths (0< or = a < or =1mm) under Mode I quasi-static loading and perpendicular to the nominal tubule direction. Results distinguished that human dentin exhibits an increase in crack growth resistance with extension (i.e. rising R-curve) and that there is a significant reduction in both the initiation (K(o)) and plateau (K(p)) components of toughness with patient age. In the young dentin (18< or =age< or =35) there was a 25% increase in the crack growth resistance from the onset of extension (K(o)=1.34 MPa m(0.5)) to the maximum or "plateau" toughness (K(p)=1.65 MPa m(0.5)). In comparison, the crack growth resistance of the old dentin (55< or =age) increased with extension by less than 10% from K(o)=1.08 MPa m(0.5) to K(p)=1.17 MPa m(0.5). In young dentin toughening was achieved by a combination of inelastic deformation of the mineralized collagen matrix and microcracking of the peritubular cuffs. These mechanisms facilitated further toughening via the development of unbroken ligaments of tissue and posterior crack-bridging. Microstructural changes with aging decreased the capacity for near-tip inelastic deformation and microcracking of the tubules, which in turn suppressed the formation of unbroken ligaments and the degree of extrinsic toughening.

  6. AGING AND THE REDUCTION IN FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, A.; Bajaj, D.; Zhang, D.; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of the crack growth resistance of human coronal dentin was performed on tissue obtained from patients between ages 18 and 83. Stable crack extension was achieved over clinically relevant lengths (0 ≤ a ≤1 mm) under Mode I quasi-static loading and perpendicular to the nominal tubule direction. Results distinguished that human dentin exhibits an increase in crack growth resistance with extension (i.e. rising R-curve) and that there is a significant reduction in both the initiation (Ko) and plateau (Kp) components of toughness with patient age. In the young dentin (18≤age≤35) there was a 25 % increase in the crack growth resistance from the onset of extension (Ko =1.34 MPa·m0.5) to the maximum or “plateau” toughness (Kp = 1.65 MPa·m0.5). In comparison, the crack growth resistance of the old dentin (55≤age) increased with extension by less than 10 % from Ko = 1.08 MPa·m0.5 to Kp = 1.17 MPa·m0.5. In young dentin toughening was achieved by a combination of inelastic deformation of the mineralized collagen matrix and microcracking of the peritubular cuffs. These mechanisms facilitated further toughening via the development of unbroken ligaments of tissue and posterior crack-bridging. Microstructural changes with aging decreased the capacity for near-tip inelastic deformation and microcracking of the tubules, which in turn suppressed the formation of unbroken ligaments and the degree of extrinsic toughening. PMID:19627862

  7. Bond durability of self-adhesive composite cements to dentine.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; de Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Yamada, Toshimoto; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Clinically, the most easy-to-use composite cements are the so-called self-adhesive composite cements (SAC's). Hardly any data is however today available on the long-term bonding effectiveness of such luting composites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond durability of different composite cements used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks onto dentine. Four SAC's (Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray; G-CEM, GC; SmartCem2, Dentsply; Unicem 3M ESPE), one 'self-etch' (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) and one 'etch-and-rinse' (Variolink ll, Ivoclar-Vivadent) multi-step composite cement were used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita) onto dentine surfaces. Teeth were distributed randomly in 24 experimental groups according to two different surface-preparation techniques ('SMEAR-COVERED' versus 'SMEAR-FREE') and storage conditions ('IMMEDIATE' versus 'AGED'). Failure patterns were evaluated with a stereomicroscope, and afterwards imaged using Feg-SEM. Two additional specimens were processed for cement-dentine interfacial analysis using TEM. A linear mixed effects statistical model revealed significant differences for the variables 'composite cement', 'surface preparation' and 'ageing'. All self-adhesive composite cements, except Unicem (3M ESPE), did bond less favourably to fractured dentine. TEM revealed an ultra-structurally different interaction of the composite cements with 'SMEAR-COVERED' and 'SMEAR-FREE' dentine. All SAC's suffered most when luted to 'SMEAR-FREE' (fractured) dentine, fortunately of no clinical relevance and most likely due to enhanced water sorption through the open tubules. When luted to 'SMEAR-COVERED' dentine, all SACs appeared equally effective and durable as the 'etch-and-rinse' and 'self-etch' multi-step composite cements. Solely the SAC SmartCem2 (Dentsply) appeared clearly less favourable and consistent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of dentin demineralization by fluoride in vitro.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, J M; Damen, J J; Buijs, M J

    1998-01-01

    Compared with the knowledge accumulated on enamel-fluoride interactions, relatively little data is available regarding fluoride effects on dentin. This applies to both laboratory and clinical studies into the efficacy of fluoride schemes for the prevention of root surface caries. This study aimed to determine the effects of fluoride and pH on the demineralization of dentin, such as to provide information necessary to develop preventive programmes. Bovine dentin blocks were subjected to undersaturated calcium- and phosphate-containing solutions in the pH range 4.0-6.0 with fluoride added at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 ppm. Non-fluoride solutions served as controls. Mineral loss was assessed chemically and by transversal microradiography. Comparisons were made with similar studies on enamel demineralization. The results showed that demineralization of dentin depends on both pH and fluoride concentration in the demineralizing solution. Inhibition of demineralization that could be relevant from a clinical point of view was found at fluoride values 5-10 times the corresponding values for enamel. Also rapid depletion of fluoride from the solutions was observed, indicating the high uptake capacity of dentin for fluoride. Lesion depth depended on pH of the solution while the fluoride levels were associated with the surface layer, both in mineral content and depth. For dentin we propose a demineralization mechanism where acid penetrates rapidly into the tissue, presumably through the tubules, after which the released calcium and phosphate is partly trapped by the inward diffusing fluoride. This leads to the formation of a surface layer, which may even be hypermineralized compared to sound dentin.

  9. TEM interfacial characterization of an experimental self-adhesive filling material bonded to enamel/dentin.

    PubMed

    Hanabusa, Masao; Mine, Atsushi; Kuboki, Takuo; Momoi, Yasuko; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2011-08-01

    A great challenge regarding the ease-of-use of composites involves the development of 'self-adhesive' composites that no longer require a separate adhesive to bond to tooth enamel/dentin. To characterize the interfacial ultra-structure of an experimental self-adhesive filling material bonded to enamel and dentin using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental self-adhesive material was bonded to bur-cut human enamel and dentin, and to fractured (smear-free) dentin, strictly according to the manufacturers' instructions. The specimens were stored for 1 day in distilled water (37 °C) prior to further common specimen processing for TEM. The experimental self-adhesive filling material revealed a typical micro-hybrid filler distribution. At bur-cut enamel, a tight interface was formed, mostly exhibiting only tiny micro-tags without distinct surface demineralization. At bur-cut dentin, the experimental self-adhesive filling material interacted superficially, with the surface structure being more irregular because of the bur preparation. No clear resin tags were formed due to the obstruction of dentin tubules with smear plugs. At fractured dentin, the formation of a relatively thin hybrid layer of maximum a few hundreds of nanometer was disclosed without clear surface demineralization. Distinct resin tags were formed due to the absence of smear plugs. Silver-nitrate infiltration showed a pattern of spot-like appearance of nano-leakage. Ag deposition was observed more along the dentin-adhesive interface of bur-cut dentin, as compared to that of fractured dentin. The obtained tight interface at both enamel and dentin demonstrates the self-adhesive capacity of the experimental self-adhesive filling material. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cryopreserved dentin matrix as a scaffold material for dentin-pulp tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Liang; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Zongting; Feng, Lian; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2014-06-01

    Cryopreservation has been identified as an efficient approach to preserve tissue engineered products for a long term. Our prior studies have suggested that the treated dentin matrix (TDM) could be an ideal bioactive scaffold for dental tissue regeneration. In this study, we hypothesize that the cryopreservation could effectively maintain the survival and viability of dentinogenesis-related proteins of TDM and the cryopreserved dentin matrix (CDM) would provide the suitable biological scaffold and inductive microenvironment for the regeneration of dentin-pulp like tissue. CDM-3 and CDM-6 were prepared by cryopreserving TDM in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C) with cryoprotectant for 3 months and 6 months, respectively. Various biological characteristics of CDM, including mechanical properties, cell proliferation, and odontogenesis ability, were investigated. To further evaluate the inductive capacity of CDM, human dental follicle cells were encapsulated within CDM, and implanted the scaffold into a mouse model for 8 weeks, and the grafts were harvested and assessed histologically. The CDM showed superior mechanical properties than TDM. Compared to TDM, CDM can release more dentinogenesis-related proteins due to the larger pore diameter. Cell proliferation with the addition of CDM extract liquid was similar to that of TDM in the first five days. Human dental follicle cells, under the effect of CDM extract liquid, highly expressed bone sialoprotein, collagen-1, alkaline phosphatase, indicating that CDM, regarded as the inductive microenvironment, plays an important role in odontogenesis. Most importantly, in vivo, CDM could induce dental follicle cells to regenerate new dentin-pulp like tissues, such as dentinal tubules, predentin, collagen fibers, nerves, and blood vessels which were positive for dentin sialophosphoprotein, dental matrix protein-1, Tubulin, and collagen-1. In conclusion, CDM is an ideal biological scaffold material for human dentin-pulp like tissue

  11. Effect of Citric Acid and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid on the Surface Morphology of Young and Old Root Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Scelza, Miriam Zaccaro; de Noronha, Fernando; da Silva, Licinio Esmeraldo; Maurício, Marcos; Gallito, Marco Antonio; Scelza, Pantaleo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of 10% citric acid and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) irrigating solutions on the surface morphology of young and old root dentin by determining the number and diameter of dentinal tubules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: Fifty healthy human teeth collected from young (≤30 years) and old (≥60 years) individuals (n=25) were first prepared with a Largo bur #2 to produce smear layer on the root canal surface. Subsequently, the crowns and the root middle and apical thirds were sectioned and removed, and the cervical thirds were sectioned vertically in the buccal-lingual direction into two equal halves. The obtained samples were then immersed in 2.5% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min and randomly separated into two treatment groups for each age group. In each age group, ten samples were selected as controls and did not receive any type of treatment. The rest of the specimens were then rinsed, dried and treated for 4 min with 10% citric acid or 17% EDTA. The samples were then assessed with SEM regarding the number and diameter of dentinal tubules. All data were assessed using Student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Regardless of the type of treatment, no significant differences were observed in the number of open tubules between the young and old root dentin (P>0.05). Nonetheless, the diameter of the tubules in the old root dentin was larger when 17% EDTA was used (P<0.05). Both, young and old root dentin did not differ with the 10% citric acid treatment (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that 17% EDTA treatment induced a significant demineralization in old root dentin. PMID:27471529

  12. CO2 laser improves 45S5 bioglass interaction with dentin.

    PubMed

    Bakry, A S; Takahashi, H; Otsuki, M; Sadr, A; Yamashita, K; Tagami, J

    2011-02-01

    Bioglass 45S5 is a bioactive glass that can create a layer of calcium-phosphate crystals on mineralized hard tissues. In this study, 45S5 bioglass was mixed with phosphoric acid and irradiated with CO(2) laser and examined as a possible aid in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. The dentinal surface modified by the aforementioned technique was chemically and micro-morphologically examined with a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscope (EDS), and the crystalline structures of the examined dentinal surfaces were examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Moreover, the mechanical properties of the newly formed layer were examined by nanoindentation. The results showed that 45S5 bioglass could occlude the dentinal tubule orifices with calcium-phosphate crystals. The application of CO(2) laser potentially improved the mechanical organization of these crystals.

  13. Effect of radiologic contrast media on cell volume regulation in rabbit proximal renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Galtung, H K; Løken, M; Sakariassen, K S

    2001-05-01

    Most radiographic contrast media are hyperosmotic and able to shrink cells with which they are in contact. The authors studied cell volume control in rabbit proximal renal tubules after incubation with three contrast media: iohexol, ioxaglate, and iodixanol. Proximal renal tubules were isolated from rabbit kidneys. The tubules were exposed to Ringer solutions containing 5% vol/vol iohexol (final osmolality, 330 mOsm), ioxaglate (323 mOsm), iodixanol (305 mOsm), or mannitol (control solutions with identical osmolalities), and tubule volumes were monitored. After 2 hours of incubation, the tubules were stimulated with a hyposmotic Ringer solution (165 mOsm). Three groups of 10 experiments were performed. All solutions induced cell shrinkage (8.3%+/-3.8 [standard error] to 15.4%+/-0.5), which was completely or partly reversible in most experiments (volume increase, 44.8%+/-14.7 to 149.9%+/-107.3) but not those with iohexol and iodixanol. With exposure to the hyposmotic solution, the cells swelled by 11.0%+/-1.8 to 39.7%+/-4.8. In general, the tubules that had been exposed to the most hyperosmotic solution swelled the most. Those exposed to contrast media showed less swelling than the mannitol-exposed controls. In all control experiments, the cells exhibited a gradual shrinkage (43.6%+/-28.5 to 87.0%+/-13). This regulatory response was partly inhibited in tubules exposed to iohexol (39.9%+/-15.8 shrinkage) or iodixanol (8.9%+/-15.8) and completely inhibited in those exposed to ioxaglate. Iohexol and ioxaglate exposure also led to a decrease in water permeability. Exposure to hyperosmotic contrast medium tends to induce prolonged cell shrinkage, decrease the water permeability of the cellular plasma membranes, and compromise the ability to regulate cellular volume. These changes seem to reflect both the hyperosmolality of the solutions and their inherent chemical properties.

  14. Comparative evaluation of self-etching primers with fourth and fifth generation dentin-bonding systems on carious and normal dentin substrates: An in vitro shear bond strength analysis

    PubMed Central

    Giriyappa, Ramesh H; Chandra, B Suresh

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that bonding to caries-affected dentin would yield strengths that are lower than bond strengths achievable when bonded to normal dentin. Dentin-bonding systems used in this study were fourth and fifth generation as well as self-etching primers. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight freshly extracted mandibular and maxillary molars were selected of which 24 were caries-affected teeth and the remaining were noncarious teeth. Random sampling was done with eight teeth in each group based on the bonding system used. In caries-affected teeth, the soft, stainable, caries-infected dentin was excavated using a caries detector dye whereas the hard, caries-affected, nonstainable dentin was retained. All the teeth were subsequently mounted in a suitable acrylic mould. Prepared teeth were restored with a single composite resin, using three different dentin bonding systems. These prepared specimens were transferred to a Hounsfield tensometer to measure the shear bond strength. The results obtained were analyzed using Anova, Student's unpaired t-test, and Student Neuman Keulis test. Results: The results showed that the self-etching primer required the highest mean shear load compared to the fifth and fourth generation dentin-bonding systems in both normal dentin and caries-affected dentin. Conclusion: Bond strength to dentin depends on whether the dentinal tubule is open or occluded. Within the limitations of this study, it was observed that bond strength to caries-affected dentin was low compared to normal dentin. PMID:20351973

  15. Assessment of ion diffusion from a calcium hydroxide-propolis paste through dentin.

    PubMed

    Montero, Janaina Corazza; Mori, Graziela Garrido

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of ions from a non-alcoholic calcium hydroxide-propolis paste to diffuse through dentinal tubules. Thirty-six single-rooted bovine teeth were used. The tooth crowns were removed, and the root canals were instrumented and divided into 3 groups: Group 1 - calcium hydroxide-propylene glycol paste; Group 2 - calcium hydroxide-saline solution paste; Group 3 - calcium hydroxide-propolis paste. After the root canal dressings were applied, the teeth were sealed and placed in containers with deionized water. The pH of the water was measured after 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours to determine the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. All of the pastes studied promoted the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. Associating propolis to calcium hydroxide resulted in a pH increase, which occurred with greater intensity after 72 hours. The calcium hydroxide-propolis paste was able to diffuse in dentin.

  16. Structural analysis of reactionary dentin formed in response to polymicrobial invasion

    PubMed Central

    Charadram, Nattida; Austin, Christine; Trimby, Patrick; Simonian, Mary; Swain, Michael V.; Hunter, Neil

    2013-01-01

    In response to microbial invasion of dentin odontoblasts secrete an altered calcified matrix termed reactionary dentin (Rd). 3D reconstruction of focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) image slices revealed helical tubular structures in Rd that contrasted with regular cylindrical tubules characteristic of dentin from healthy teeth and affected so-called physiological dentin (Pd) lying exterior to Rd. This helical structure in Rd provided effective constriction of tubule lumen diameter that formed a barrier to bacterial advance towards the dental pulp. SEM of resin cast preparations revealed altered extension of odontoblast processes through Rd. The distribution of key mineral elements was studied by combination of 3D reconstruction of focused-ion-beam based X-ray microanalysis (FIB-EDS), laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). There was a marked redistribution of calcium and phosphorous in Rd together with an increase of diffusely deposited magnesium compatible with the mineral deposition phase of synthesis of this altered matrix. Changes in tubule structure and mineral content characteristic of Rd are consistent with reduced hardness and lower elastic modulus reported for this matrix. Findings provide insight into the unique structure of Rd synthesised as a primary response to infection. PMID:23261402

  17. Treating dentin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Wataha, John C.; Zhou, Lingmei; Manning, Walter; Trantow, Michael; Bettendorf, Meishan M.; Heaton, Lisa J.; Berg, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Background Methods used by dental practitioners to diagnose and treat dentin hypersensitivity are not well documented. The authors conducted a survey of dentists in the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) to ascertain the treatment methods they used. Methods Via an Internet survey, the authors collected data regarding methods used for diagnosis and treatment of dentin hypersensitivity from 209 Northwest PRECEDENT dentists. Results The PRECEDENT dentists indicated that they most often used fluoride varnishes and gels, advice regarding toothbrushing and diet, bonding agents, restorative materials and glutaraldehyde/2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) to treat dentin hypersensitivity. They reported that the most successful treatments were fluorides, glutaraldehyde/HEMA, bonding agents, potassium nitrates and restorative treatments; they considered observation, advice regarding toothbrushing and diet and laser therapy to be the least successful. Dentists listed fluorides, calcium phosphates, glutaraldehyde/HEMA and bonding agents as the treatments most desirable for inclusion in a future randomized clinical trial of dental hypersensitivity treatments. Conclusions Dentists rely on patients to assess the severity of dentin hypersensitivity. Modalities for the diagnosis and treatment of hypersensitivity are diverse. Methods used to diagnose and treat dentin hypersensitivity in practice are challenging to justify. Clinical Implications Practitioners should be aware of the diversity of methods available for diagnosing and treating dentin hypersensitivity as they manage the care of their patients with this condition. PMID:20807910

  18. Isolation of surface tubules of fowlpox virus.

    PubMed

    Carter, J K; Cheville, N F

    1981-01-01

    Surface tubules of fowlpox virus were isolated using chemical and physical methods. Suspensions of lipid cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were obtained by treating infected chorioallantoic membranes with 1% trypsin. Inclusions were treated with ultrasonic sound, detergents, and enzymes and were examined by electron microscopy. Although lipase treatment altered the morphology of lipid inclusions, no viral surface tubules were recovered. Treatment with the detergent Nonidet-P40 followed by 2-mercaptoethanol disrupted virions without allowing surface tubules to be recovered. Disruption of lipid inclusions by ultrasonic sound or manual grinding of chorioallantoic membranes produced free virions but only small numbers of tubules. These results indicate that surface tubules can be recovered, but that the lipid nature of cytoplasmic inclusions interferes with procedures commonly used in tubule purification.

  19. Elemental analysis of caries-affected root dentin and artificially demineralized dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young-Hye; Son, Ho-Hyun; Yi, Keewook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to analyze the mineral composition of naturally- and artificially-produced caries-affected root dentin and to determine the elemental incorporation of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) into the demineralized dentin. Materials and Methods Box-formed cavities were prepared on buccal and lingual root surfaces of sound human premolars (n = 15). One cavity was exposed to a microbial caries model using a strain of Streptococcus mutans. The other cavity was subjected to a chemical model under pH cycling. Premolars and molars with root surface caries were used as a natural caries model (n = 15). Outer caries lesion was removed using a carbide bur and a hand excavator under a dyeing technique and restored with RMGI (FujiII LC, GC Corp.). The weight percentages of calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), and strontium (Sr) and the widths of demineralized dentin were determined by electron probe microanalysis and compared among the groups using ANOVA and Tukey test (p < 0.05). Results There was a pattern of demineralization in all models, as visualized with scanning electron microscopy. Artificial models induced greater losses of Ca and P and larger widths of demineralized dentin than did a natural caries model (p < 0.05). Sr was diffused into the demineralized dentin layer from RMGI. Conclusions Both microbial and chemical caries models produced similar patterns of mineral composition on the caries-affected dentin. However, the artificial lesions had a relatively larger extent of demineralization than did the natural lesions. RMGI was incorporated into the superficial layer of the caries-affected dentin. PMID:27847746

  20. Enamel and dentin bond strength and bonding mechanism to dentin of Gluma CPS to primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Fritz, U; García-Godoy, F; Finger, W J

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin and bonding mechanism to dentin of Gluma CPS bonding system to primary teeth enamel and dentin. Pekafill hybrid composite was used. Ten specimens were immersed in deionized water at 37 degrees C for twenty-four hours and ten other specimens were subjected to a thermocycling procedure (2000 cycles between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, dwell time fifteen seconds). After water storage or thermocycling, the bonded cylinders were sheared and the bond strength calculated. After debonding, the failure sites of all samples were evaluated microscopically. The data were analyzed with an ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test. In ten other primary molars, the buccal surfaces were ground flat on wet SiC papers to expose peripheral dentin. Cylindrical buttjoint cavities were prepared with a cylindrical diamond bur. The cavities were treated with Gluma CPS and filled with pekafill as described above. After fifteen-minute water storage, filling excess was removed and marginal integrity and bonding mechanism of five restorations was examined with a light microscope. Five other restorations were evaluated after storage in water at 37 degrees C for twenty-four hours. Maximal gap widths and hybrid layer thickness were determined. The results showed that thermocycling did not affect the shear bond strength to enamel or dentin. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the shear bond strength values obtained in enamel and dentin. The maximal gap width was not significantly different between specimens that were stored in water for fifteen minutes or twenty-four hours. The average hybrid layer thickness was 11.7 +/- 1.1 micrograms. All specimens revealed a resin cohesive failure very close to enamel or dentin surface. The etch patterns produced on the abraded enamel surface were uniform and deeper as compared to the sample that was pumiced. This was also confirmed in the epoxy replicas.

  1. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  2. Influence of environmental conditions on dentin bond strengths of recently developed dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, M; Rikuta, A; Tsubota, K; Yunoki, I; Onose, H

    2001-03-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the influence of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on the bond strengths of several recently developed dentin bonding systems. Six environmental conditions, (A) 25+/-0.5 degrees C, 50+/-5% RH, (B) 25+/-0.5 degrees C, 80+/-5% RH, (C) 25+/-0.5 degrees C, 95+/-5 % RH, (D) 37+/-0.5 degrees C, 50 +/-5 % RH, (E) 37+/-0.5 degrees C, 80+/-5% RH, (F) 37+/-0.5 degrees C, 95+/-5 % RH were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial surfaces were ground on wet #600 SiC paper to expose the dentin. After the tooth surface had been treated according to each manufacturer's instructions, adhesives were applied, followed by condensation of resin composites into a mold placed on the dentin surface. Fifteen specimens per group were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and then shear-tested at a cross-head speed of 1.0 mm/min. Statistical analysis was carried out with two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (P<0.05). Dentin bond strengths decreased with increasing relative humidity but were not influenced by environmental temperature. Even though one-bottle adhesive systems require a wet dentin surface, their bond strengths are affected by an increase in environmental humidity.

  3. Bonding of crown and bridge adhesive resins to dentine.

    PubMed

    Osman, Saad A; McCabe, John F; Walls, Angus W G

    2008-12-01

    The shear bond strength of three adhesives, Panavia 21, Superbond, All Bond C&B Cement, and Variolink (a dual cure resin) to various dentine depths were determined. Fifteen human fully erupted permanent first and second molars were wet ground using 500 and then 800 grit abrasive papers to expose the superficial, middle and the deep dentine, for each adhesive tested. Five samples were prepared for each dentine depth. The adhesives were bonded to the samples using gelatine capsules and were matured for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C. The samples were debonded in shear using tensile testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey test. The fracture surfaces were examined by optical microscopy. The bond strength of Superbond to dentine was significantly higher (P<0.05) than any of the materials tested. The bond strength of all materials tested was shown to be affected by dentine depth, except for Superbond. Fractured dentine specimens showed that the samples of Superbond are almost cohesive (>90%), and the samples of other adhesives are mostly adhesive (>70%). These results confirm that Superbond is capable of forming a bond at various dentine depths.

  4. Spectroscopic and morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemor, R. M.; Kruger, Michael B.; Wieliczka, David M.; Swafford, Jim R.; Spencer, Paulette

    1999-01-01

    The potential environmental risks associated with mercury release have forced many European countries to ban the use of dental amalgam. Alternative materials such as composite resins do not provide the clinical function for the length of time characteristically associated with dental amalgam. The weak link in the composite restoration is the dentin/adhesive bond. The purpose of this study was to correlate morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive bond with chemical analyses using micro- Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A commercial dental adhesive was placed on dentin substrates cut from extracted, unerupted human third molars. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface were investigated using infrared radiation produced at the Aladdin synchrotron source; visible radiation from a Kr+ laser was used for the micro-Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface, differentially stained to identify protein, mineral, and adhesive, were examined using light microscopy. Due to its limited spatial resolution and the unknown sample thickness the infrared results cannot be used quantitatively in determining the extent of diffusion. The results from the micro-Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy indicate exposed protein at the dentin/adhesive interface. Using a laser that reduces background fluorescence, the micro-Raman spectroscopy provides quantitative chemical and morphologic information on the dentin/adhesive interface. The staining procedure is sensitive to sites of pure protein and thus, complements the Raman results.

  5. Abrasion of eroded root dentine brushed with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    De Menezes, Márcio; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness change and wear provided by different dentifrices on root dentine previously exposed to erosive challenges. According to a randomized complete block design, 150 slabs of bovine root dentine (6 x 3 x 2 mm) were ground flat and polished. In an area of 4 x 3 mm on the dentine surface, specimens were submitted to five erosive/abrasive events, each one composed by: exposure to Sprite Diet or distilled water for 5 min, then to a remineralizing solution for 1 min, and simulation of 5,000 brushing strokes. Four dentifrices--regular (RE), baking soda (BS), whitening (WT) and tartar control (TC)--and distilled water (CO), used as control, were compared. Final texture and the wear depth were evaluated using a profilometer. ANOVA did not show significant interaction, indicating that the effect of dentifrices on both surface roughness change and wear did not depend on whether or not the dentine was eroded ( p>0.05). There was no difference between abrasion of eroded and sound dentine. The Tukey's test revealed that WT, BS and TC provided the highest increase in surface roughness differing from RE and CO. TC yielded the deepest wear of root dentine, whereas RE and CO, the shallowest. No significant difference in wear among BS, TC and WT were observed. Within the limitations of this study, the data showed that abrasion of both eroded and sound root dentine was dependent on the dentifrice used.

  6. Importance of age on the dynamic mechanical behavior of intertubular and peritubular dentin.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Heonjune; Romberg, Elaine; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-02-01

    An experimental evaluation of human coronal dentin was performed using nanoscopic dynamic mechanical analysis (nanoDMA). The primary objectives were to quantify any unique changes in mechanical behavior of intertubular and peritubular dentin with age, and to evaluate the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the mineral deposited within the lumens. Specimens of coronal dentin were evaluated by nanoDMA using single indents and in scanning mode via scanning probe microscopy. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the storage modulus or complex modulus between the two age groups (18-25 versus 54-83 yrs) for either the intertubular or peritubular tissue. However, there were significant differences in the dampening behavior between the young and old dentin, as represented in the loss modulus and tanδ responses. For both the intertubular and peritubular components, the capacity for dampening was significantly lower in the old group. Scanning based nanoDMA showed that the tubules of old dentin exhibit a gradient in elastic behavior, with decrease in elastic modulus from the cuff to the center of tubules filled with newly deposited mineral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Importance of Age on the Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Intertubular and Peritubular Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Romberg, Elaine; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.; Arola, Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of human coronal dentin was performed using nanoscopic Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (nanoDMA). The primary objectives were to quantify any unique changes in mechanical behavior of intertubular and peritubular dentin with age, and to evaluate the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the mineral deposited within the lumens. Specimens of coronal dentin were evaluated by nanoDMA using single indents and in scanning mode via scanning probe microscopy. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the storage modulus or complex modulus between the two age groups (18–25 versus 54–83 yrs) for either the intertubular or peritubular tissue. However, there were significant differences in the dampening behavior between the young and old dentin, as represented in the loss modulus and tanδ responses. For both the intertubular and peritubular components, the capacity for dampening was significantly lower in the old group. Scanning based nanoDMA showed that the tubules of old dentin exhibit a gradient in elastic behavior, with decrease in elastic modulus from the cuff to the center of tubules filled with newly deposited mineral. PMID:25498296

  8. Mineral density, morphology and bond strength of natural versus artificial caries-affected dentin.

    PubMed

    Joves, Gerardo José; Inoue, Go; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate an artificial caries-affected dentin (ACAD) model for in vitro bonding studies in comparison to natural caries-affected dentin (NCAD) of human teeth. ACAD was created over 7 days in a demineralizing solution. Mineral density (MD) at different depth levels (0-150 µm) was compared between NCAD and ACAD by transverse microradiography. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBS) of two two-step self-etch adhesives to sound dentin, NCAD and ACAD were evaluated. Caries-affected dentin type was not a significant factor when comparing MD at different lesion levels (p>0.05). Under SEM, the dentinal tubules appeared occluded with crystal logs 1-2 µm in thickness in the NCAD; whereas they remained open in the ACAD. The µTBS to caries-affected dentin was lower than sound dentin, but was not affected by the type of caries (p>0.05). In spite of their different morphologies, the ACAD model showed similar MD and µTBS compared to NCAD.

  9. Remineralization of artificial dentinal caries lesions by biomimetically modified Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yi-pin; Li, Nan; Niu, Li-na; Primus, Carolyn M.; Ling, Jun-Qi; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride-releasing restorative materials are available for remineralization of enamel and root caries. However, dentin remineralization is more difficult than enamel remineralization due to the paucity of apatite seed crystallites along the lesion surface for heterogeneous crystal growth. Extracellular matrix proteins play critical roles in controlling apatite nucleation/growth in collagenous tissues. This study examined the remineralization efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in phosphate-containing simulated body fluid (SBF) by incorporating polyacrylic acid and sodium tripolyphosphate as biomimetic analogs of matrix proteins for remineralizing caries-like dentin. Artificial caries-like dentin lesions incubated in SBF were remineralized over a 6-week period using MTA or MTA containing biomimetic analogs in the absence or presence of dentin adhesive application. Lesion depths and integrated mineral loss were monitored with micro-computed tomography. Ultrastructure of baseline and remineralized lesions were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dentin remineralization was best achieved using MTA containing biomimetic analogs regardless of whether an adhesive was applied; dentinal tubules within the remineralized dentin were occluded by apatite. It is concluded that the MTA version employed in the study may be doped with biomimetic analogs for remineralization of unbonded and bonded artificial caries-like lesions in the presence of SBF. PMID:22085925

  10. Apoptosis Activation in Human Carious Dentin. An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, C.; Psaila, A.; Musumeci, G.; Castorina, S.; Leonardi, R.

    2015-01-01

    The exact mechanisms and enzymes involved in caries progression are largely unclear. Apoptosis plays a key role in dentin remodelling related to damage repair; however, it is unclear whether apoptosis in decayed teeth is activated through the extrinsic or the intrinsic pathway. This ex vivo immunohistochemical study explored the localization of TRAIL, DR5, Bcl-2 and Bax, the main proteins involved in apoptosis, in teeth with advanced caries. To evaluate TRAIL, DR5, Bcl-2 and Bax immunoexpressions twelve permanent carious premolars were embedded in paraffin and processed for immunohistochemistry. The results showed that TRAIL and DR5 were overexpressed in dentin and in pulp vessels and mononuclear cells; strong Bax immunostaining was detected in dilated dentinal tubules close to the lesion, and Bcl-2 staining was weak in some dentin areas under the cavity or altogether absent. These findings suggest that both apoptosis pathways are activated in dental caries. Further studies are required to gain insights into its biomolecular mechanisms. PMID:26428882

  11. Porcine Dentin Sialophosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Lu, Yuhe; Hu, Jan C.-C.; Kim, Jung-Wook; Iwata, Takanori; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Nagano, Takatoshi; Yamakoshi, Fumiko; Hu, Yuanyuan; Fukae, Makoto; Simmer, James P.

    2008-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is critical for proper mineralization of tooth dentin, and mutations in DSPP cause inherited dentin defects. Dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) is the C-terminal cleavage product of DSPP that binds collagen and induces intrafibrillar mineralization. We isolated DPP from individual pigs and determined that its N-terminal and C-terminal domains are glycosylated and that DPP averages 155 phosphates per molecule. Porcine DPP is unstable at low pH and high temperatures, and complexing with collagen improves its stability. Surprisingly, we observed DPP size variations on SDS-PAGE for DPP isolated from individual pigs. These variations are not caused by differences in proteolytic processing or degrees of phosphorylation or glycosylation, but rather to allelic variations in Dspp. Characterization of the DPP coding region identified 4 allelic variants. Among the 4 alleles, 27 sequence variations were identified, including 16 length polymorphisms ranging from 3 to 63 nucleotides. None of the length variations shifted the reading frame, and all localized to the highly redundant region of the DPP code. The 4 alleles encode DPP domains having 551, 575, 589, or 594 amino acids and completely explain the DPP size variations. DPP length variations are polymorphic and are not associated with dentin defects. PMID:18359767

  12. Dentin Caries Zones

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, M.K.; Strother, J.; Darling, C.L.; Fried, D.; Gansky, S.A.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-01-01

    Caries Detector staining reveals 4 zones in dentin containing caries lesions, but characteristics of each zone are not well-defined. We therefore investigated the physical and microstructural properties of carious dentin in the 4 different zones to determine important differences revealed by Caries Detector staining. Six arrested dentin caries lesions and 2 normal controls were Caries-Detector-stained, each zone (pink, light pink, transparent, apparently normal) being analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging for microstructure, by AFM nano-indentation for mechanical properties, and by transverse digital microradiography (TMR) for mineral content. Microstructure changes, and nanomechanical properties and mineral content significantly decreased across zones. Hydrated elastic modulus and mineral content from normal dentin to pink Caries-Detector-stained dentin ranged from 19.5 [10.6-25.3] GPa to 1.6 [0.0-5.0] GPa and from 42.9 [39.8-44.6] vol% to 12.4 [9.1-14.2] vol%, respectively. Even the most demineralized pink zone contained considerable residual mineral. PMID:19131321

  13. The effect of 30% ethanolic extract of Indian propolis on replica of human dentin compared against commercially available desensitizing agent: A methodological SEM study in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hongal, Sudhir; Torwane, Nilesh Arjun; Goel, Pankaj; Chandrashekar, Byarakele

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the ability of 30% ethanolic extract of Indian propolis on dentinal tubule occlusion comparatively against CPP-ACP containing desensitizing agent GC tooth mousse. Methodology: The specimens were prepared from 30 freshly extracted sound human third molars stored in 10% formalin (pH 7.0) at a room temperature. From each specimen, a sectioned sample (5 mm length × 5 mm width × 3.5 mm depth) was obtained including the cervical area. Samples were smoothened and wet-polished with 1000- and 1200-grit aluminum oxide abrasive paper and diamond pastes, in order to stimulate the clinical aspect of hypersensitive dentin cervical surfaces. All the specimens were randomly assigned to three groups (n = 10), according to dentin surface treatments. Negative control: Untreated specimens (n = 4) and pretreated with 6% citric acid (n = 6); Test Group: 30% ethanolic extract of Indian propolis (n = 10); Positive Group: GC Tooth Mousse (n =10). All the specimens were prepared for SEM analysis. Results: GC tooth mousse promoted tubule occlusion by crystal-like deposits in the lumen of the tubules. While propolis created a thin, smooth layer over dentin surface. Conclusion: According to the SEM analysis, both desensitizing agent were able to occlude the dentinal tubules. PMID:24761114

  14. Lack of detectable metabolism for solubilized 2,3,4-trimethylpentane by rat kidney proximal tubules.

    PubMed

    DelRaso, N J; Mattie, D R; Godin, C S

    1990-12-01

    Primary proximal tubule suspension cultures exposed to solubilized 2,3,4-trimethylpentane (2,3,4-TMP) resulted in a linear dose response, as determined by cellular lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The EC50 for 2,3,4-TMP was 16.3 mM. Metabolite analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of supernate and cell extracts from cultures exposed to 2,3,4-TMP (12.0 mM) failed to detect the presence of metabolites. Electron-microscopic examination of proximal tubules exposed to 2,3,4-TMP indicated ultrastructural changes that included increased mitochondrial swelling, increased vesiculation, decreased microvilli and pyknotic nuclei. This study indicates that kidney proximal tubules do not appear to metabolize 2,3,4-TMP.

  15. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  16. Dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein have distinct roles in dentin mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Sreenath, Taduru; Haruyama, Naoto; Honeycutt, Cherlita; Terse, Anita; Cho, Andrew; Kohler, Thomas; Müller, Ralph; Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2009-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a major non-collagenous matrix protein of odontoblasts, is proteolytically cleaved into dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Our previous studies revealed that DSPP null mice display a phenotype similar to human autosomal dominant dentinogenesis imperfecta, in which teeth have widened predentin and irregular dentin mineralization resulting in sporadic unmineralized areas in dentin and frequent pulp exposure. Earlier in vitro studies suggested that DPP, but not DSP, plays a significant role in initiation and maturation of dentin mineralization. However, the precise in vivo roles of DSP and DPP are far from clear. Here we report the generation of DPPcKO mice, in which only DSP is expressed in a DSPP null background, resulting in a conditional DPP knockout. DPPcKO teeth show a partial rescue of the DSPP null phenotype with the restored predentin width, an absence of irregular unmineralized areas in dentin, and less frequent pulp exposure. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of DPPcKO molars further confirmed this partial rescue with a significant recovery in the dentin volume, but not in the dentin mineral density. These results indicate distinct roles of DSP and DPP in dentin mineralization, with DSP regulating initiation of dentin mineralization, and DPP being involved in the maturation of mineralized dentin. PMID:19348940

  17. Matrix metalloproteinases and other matrix proteinases in relation to cariology: the era of 'dentin degradomics'.

    PubMed

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Carrilho, Marcela; Chaussain, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Dentin organic matrix, with type I collagen as the main component, is exposed after demineralization in dentinal caries, erosion or acidic conditioning during adhesive composite restorative treatment. This exposed matrix is prone to slow hydrolytic degradation by host collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. Here we review the recent findings demonstrating that inhibition of salivary or dentin endogenous collagenolytic enzymes may provide preventive means against progression of caries or erosion, just as they have been shown to retain the integrity and improve the longevity of resin composite filling bonding to dentin. This paper also presents the case that the organic matrix in caries-affected dentin may not be preserved as intact as previously considered. In partially demineralized dentin, MMPs and cysteine cathepsins with the ability to cleave off the terminal non-helical ends of collagen molecules (telopeptides) may lead to the gradual loss of intramolecular gap areas. This would seriously compromise the matrix ability for intrafibrillar remineralization, which is considered essential in restoring the dentin's mechanical properties. More detailed data of the enzymes responsible and their detailed function in dentin-destructive conditions may not only help to find new and better preventive means, but better preservation of demineralized dentin collagenous matrix may also facilitate true biological remineralization for the better restoration of tooth structural and mechanical integrity and mechanical properties.

  18. Laser scanning confocal microscopy coupled with hydraulic permeability measurements for elucidating fluid flow across porous materials: application to human dentine.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cara G; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R; Parkinson, Charles

    2008-04-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) coupled to a constant volume flow-pressure measuring system is introduced as a new technique for the quantitative measurement of fluid flow across porous materials. Such processes are ubiquitous from the life sciences to materials science and the methodology herein could find widespread application. The methodology has been applied to the detection of fluid flow through human dentine, in-vitro, and in the assessment of occlusion actives. Dentine is a calcareous material sandwiched between the pulp and enamel in the tooth structure that contains tubules which traverse dentine in the pulp to enamel direction. The tubules become patent during enamel erosion or gum recession, leading to dentinal hypersensitivity. Understanding the nature of fluid flow is important, as a pressure gradient exists across dentine in-vivo and this has implications for the development of suitable treatments. The methodology described herein firstly allows a ready assessment of the general efficacy of treatments via hydraulic permeability measurements. Second, LSCM images allow the nature of the flow process and the mode of action of the treatments to be revealed at high spatial resolution. For the particular case of dentine, we demonstrate how the method allows candidate treatments to be compared and assessed.

  19. Dysferlin mediates membrane tubulation and links T-tubule biogenesis to muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hofhuis, Julia; Bersch, Kristina; Büssenschütt, Ronja; Drzymalski, Marzena; Liebetanz, David; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Wagner, Stefan; Maier, Lars S; Gärtner, Jutta; Klinge, Lars; Thoms, Sven

    2017-03-01

    The multi-C2 domain protein dysferlin localizes to the plasma membrane and the T-tubule system in skeletal muscle; however, its physiological mode of action is unknown. Mutations in the DYSF gene lead to autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. Here, we show that dysferlin has membrane tubulating capacity and that it shapes the T-tubule system. Dysferlin tubulates liposomes, generates a T-tubule-like membrane system in non-muscle cells, and links the recruitment of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to the biogenesis of the T-tubule system. Pathogenic mutant forms interfere with all of these functions, indicating that muscular wasting and dystrophy are caused by the dysferlin mutants' inability to form a functional T-tubule membrane system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm below the dentine-enamel junction). Resin cements were applied on dentin surfaces and composite blocks were luted under constant seating pressure. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to time intervals. Specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of 1 mm(2) in diameter and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min. Both resin cements showed higher micro-tensile bond strength to superficial dentin than that to deep or cervical dentin (P < 0.001). Micro-tensile bond strengths of Panavia F2.0 were higher than those of Multilink Sprint at different dentin regions (P < 0.001). Immediate micro-tensile bond strengths were higher than those of delayed micro-tensile bond strengths for both resin cements (P < 0.001). It was concluded that resin cements with different chemical formulations and applications yield significantly different micro-tensile bond strengths to different dentin regions.

  1. Influence of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of pressed ceramic luted to dentin with self-etch resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P < 0.05) applied for multiple paired comparisons. Results. The shear bond strength results for group A to E ranged from 6.94 ± 1.53 to 10.03 ± 3.50 MPa. One-way ANOVA demonstrated a difference (P < 0.05) between the groups tested and the Tukey HSD demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) difference between the shear bond strength (SBS) of Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A-D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  2. Primer containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate kills bacteria impregnated in human dentin blocks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D; Lin, Nancy J; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Xu, Hockin HK

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) was recently synthesized. The objectives of this study were to: (1) investigate antibacterial activity of DMADDM-containing primer on Streptococcus mutans impregnated into dentin blocks for the first time, and (2) compare the antibacterial efficacy of DMADDM with a previous quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM). Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) bonding agent was used. DMADDM and QADM were mixed into SBMP primer. Six primers were tested: SBMP control primer P, P+2.5% DMADDM, P+5% DMADDM, P+7.5% DMADDM, P+10% DMADDM, and P+10% QADM. S. mutans were impregnated into human dentin blocks, and each primer was applied to dentin to test its ability to kill bacteria in dentinal tubules. Bacteria in dentin were collected via a sonication method, and the colony-forming units (CFU) and inhibition zones were measured. The bacterial inhibition zone of P+10% DMADDM was 10 times that of control primer (P<0.05). CFU in dentin with P+10% DMADDM was reduced by three orders of magnitude, compared with control. DMADDM had a much stronger antibacterial effect than QADM, and antibacterial efficacy increased with increasing DMADDM concentration. Dentin shear bond strengths were similar among all groups (P>0.1). In conclusion, antibacterial DMADDM-containing primer was validated to kill bacteria inside dentin blocks, possessing a much stronger antibacterial potency than the previous QADM. DMADDM-containing bonding agent was effective in eradicating bacteria in dentin, and its efficacy was directly proportional to DMADDM mass fraction. Therefore, DMADDM may be promising for use in bonding agents as well as in other restorative and preventive materials to inhibit bacteria. PMID:27811846

  3. Antibacterial Efficacy of Pastes Against E Faecalis in Primary Root Dentin: A Confocal Microscope Study.

    PubMed

    Verma, R; Sharma, D S; Pathak, A K

    2015-01-01

    Management of abscessed primary teeth often present endodontic failure owing to questioned efficiency of dressings or obturating pastes to eliminate Enterococcus faecalis, a resistant bacterium, residing in depth of dentinal tubules. The present study evaluates the antimicrobial efficacy of two antibacterial and two obturating pastes in dentinal tubules of primary teeth infected with Enterococcus faecalis using viability stain and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Total 28 samples were prepared.Four groups with 6 samples each were made according to antibacterial pastes i.e. 1% or 2%Chlorhexidine (CHX) + calcium hydroxide (CH), CH + iodoform (Metapex) and Zinc Oxide Eugenol (ZOE). Dentinal tubules from the root canal side were infected with E. faecalis by centrifugation of the bacterial suspension. Two specimens from each group were subjected to 1, 7 and 15 days antibacterial pastes exposure. Viability staining followed by CLSM were used to quantitatively analyze the dead cell count directly inside dentin. Univariate analysis showed that all medicaments were significantly effective (p<.05). Kruskal wallis ANOVA test did not show significant difference among four medicaments at day 1 while it was significantly different at day 7 & 15. Paired sample student's t-test revealed significant difference in efficacy between 1& 15 days for 1%CHX+CH; between 1&15,and 7&15 days; between all days for ZOE. Ranking of antimicrobial efficacy of tested medicament was (most effective to the least): 1%CHX+CH(15)> ZOE(15)> Metapex(15)> 2%CHX+CH(15)> 2%CHX+CH(7)> 2%CHX+CH(1)> 1%CHX+CH(7)> 2%CHX+CH(15)> Metapex(1)> ZOE(1)> ZOE(7). All medicaments were effective against E. faecalis in dentine of primary teeth and their efficacy increased with longer contact with 1%CHX+CH being most effective at day 15. Inclusion of 1% CHX in dressings or obturating pastes might minimize the endodontic relapse and maximize the tooth retention in functional state in pediatric dentistry.

  4. Identification of collagen encapsulation at the dentin/adhesive interface.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong; Katz, J Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dentin/adhesive interfacial characteristics of three current commercial adhesives with different relative hydrophilic/hydrophobic composition, using a nondestructive staining technique. Dentin surfaces of 18 unerupted human third molars were randomly selected for treatment with one of three commercial dentin bonding agents according to manufacturers' instructions for the "wet" bonding technique. The adhesives were ranked based on hydrophilic/hydrophobic component ratios (ie, ability to dissolve in water), highest to lowest, as follows: Uno (Pulpdent) > Prime&Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply Caulk) > Single Bond (SB, 3M ESPE). Dentin/adhesive (d/a) interface sections were stained with Goldner's trichrome, a classical bone stain, and examined using light microscopy. The extent and degree to which the adhesive encapsulates the demineralized dentin matrix is reflected in the color differences in the stained sections. The depth of demineralization appeared comparable among these bonding systems, but adhesive infiltration varied from highest to lowest as follows: Uno > PBNT > SB. The differential staining technique provided a clear representation of the depth of dentin demineralization and extent/degree of adhesive encapsulation of the exposed collagen at the d/a interface. This technique provides a mechanism for readily identifying vulnerable sites at the d/a interface. The composition of the one-bottle adhesive systems has a substantial effect on the interfacial structure of the d/a bond.

  5. In vitro efficacy of a novel potassium oxalate hydrogel for dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Varoni, Elena M; Zuccheri, Tommaso; Carletta, Andrea; Palazzo, Barbara; Cochis, Andrea; Colonna, Martino; Rimondini, Lia

    2017-04-01

    A novel potassium oxalate-based hydrogel is proposed for treating dentin hypersensitivity and this study evaluates its in vitro performance as a remineralizing, desensitizing agent. Etched disks of human dentin were treated for 10 or 20 min using the test hydrogel, to mimic a professional application with dental mouth guards. Dentin disks were evaluated in terms of permeability indexes in a fluid-filled system, the surface morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy, and the structural properties were studied using X-ray diffraction analysis. The potassium oxalate hydrogel significantly reduced dentin permeability, in a time-dependent manner, and occluded most of the patent dentinal tubules via crystal precipitation, forming a remineralized layer. After hydrogel treatments, an acid solution (pH 4.2) was applied to the disks for 30 s, or 1, 2, or 5 min, in order to reproduce a plaque-like oral acidity, and further analysis showed a good resistance of the remineralized layer to the acid challenge. The potassium oxalate-based hydrogel showed a better performance over commercially available products and artificial saliva, appearing a promising candidate for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

  6. In situ study of the gelatinase activity in demineralized dentin from rat molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Juliana Isabelita Cyrino; Guimarães, Gustavo Narvaes; Viola, Naiana Viana; da Silva, Wander José; de Souza, Ana Paula; Tjäderhane, Leo; Line, Sergio Roberto; Marques, Marcelo Rocha

    2013-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in dentin are believed to participate in various physiological and pathological events in coronal dentin, but their exact source and location is not clear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activity of gelatinases in decalcified rat molars crowns by in situ zymography. Hemi-mandibles of five male Wistar rats were fixed in paraformaldehyde, decalcified in EDTA and glycerol solution and embedded in paraffin. Sections from the region of molar teeth were incubated with or without DQ gelatin in 50mM Tris-CaCl2 at 37°C for 2h and observed by means of confocal microscopy. Gelatinolytic activity was observed throughout the coronal dentin with varying intensities in different locations. High gelatinase activity was observed in the dentinal tubules, dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) and predentin, and it was weaker and less uniform in the intertubular dentin. This study shows that the location of gelatinase and relative activity can be detected by means of in situ zymography and confocal microcopy, and this methodology may provide a useful tool in studies on the role of gelatinases in tooth development, maturation and in pathological conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel experimental method for the local mechanical testing of human coronal dentin.

    PubMed

    Ziskind, Daniel; Fleischer, Sharly; Zhang, Kaiyin; Cohen, Sidney R; Daniel Wagner, H

    2010-02-01

    The small volume of human dentin available for sample preparation and the local variations in its microstructure present a real challenge in the determination of their mechanical properties. The main purpose of the present study was to develop a new procedure for the preparation and mechanical testing of small-scale specimens of biomaterials such as dentin, so as to probe local mechanical properties as a function of microstructure. Ultra short laser pulses were used to mill a block of dentin into an array of 16 microm size dentin pillars. These could then be individually tested in compression with an instrumented nanoindenter fitted with a 30 microm wide flat punch. The laser-based pillar preparation procedure proved effective and reliable. Data was produced for the mechanical properties of a first set of dry dentin micro-pillars. This novel experimental approach enables the preparation and compression of micron-scale samples with well-defined microstructure. For dentin, this means samples containing a relatively small number of well-defined parallel tubules, with a distinct orientation relative to the applied load. The ability to isolate the separate effects of microstructural parameters on the mechanical properties is of major significance for future substantiation of theoretical models. Copyright 2009 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Brajkovic, Denis; Ilic, Dragan; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Rakocevic, Zlatko; Djuric, Marija; Busse, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples' microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  9. THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROSTRUCTURAL VARIATIONS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF HUMAN DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Ivancik, J.; Arola, D.

    2012-01-01

    The crack growth resistance of human dentin was characterized as a function of relative distance from the DEJ and the corresponding microstructure. Compact tension specimens were prepared from the coronal dentin of caries-free 3rd molars. The specimens were sectioned from either the outer, middle or inner dentin. Stable crack extension was achieved under Mode I quasi-static loading, with the crack oriented in-plane with the tubules, and the crack growth resistance was characterized in terms of the initiation (Ko), growth (Kg) and plateau (Kp) toughness. A hybrid approach was also used to quantify the contribution of dominant mechanisms to the overall toughness. Results showed that human dentin exhibits increasing crack growth resistance with crack extension in all regions, and that the fracture toughness of inner dentin (2.2±0.5 MPa•m0.5) was significantly lower than that of middle (2.7±0.2 MPa•m0.5) and outer regions (3.4±0.3 MPa•m0.5). Extrinsic toughening, composed mostly of crack bridging, was estimated to cause an average increase in the fracture energy of 26% in all three regions. Based on these findings, dental restorations extended into deep dentin are much more likely to cause tooth fracture due to the greater potential for introduction of flaws and decrease in fracture toughness with depth. PMID:23131531

  10. Comparative evaluation of effects of chemo-mechanical and conventional caries removal on dentinal morphology and its bonding characteristics - an SEM study.

    PubMed

    Arora, R; Goswami, M; Chaudhary, S; Chaitra, T R; Kishor, A; Rallan, M

    2012-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of three caries removal techniques namely: Papacarie(®), calcium hydroxide and rotary instruments by SEM analyses of the micro-morphology of residual dentine and resin tags at resin-dentine interface. 45 extracted human permanent molar teeth, with occlusal caries extending up to dentine, were divided into two groups (Group 1 and 2) and each group was subdivided into three subgroups: subgroup A included teeth treated with conventional rotary method, subgroup B and C included those treated with calcium hydroxide and Papacarie(®) respectively. Group 1 samples were prepared for viewing the micro-morphology of residual dentine (2000x and 5000x) and Group 2 samples were filled with composite resin and analysed for resin tag formation (1000x) under SEM. Papacarie(®) showed minimal smear layer and open dentinal tubules. Calcium hydroxide and rotary instruments showed a typical smear layer and occluded dentinal tubules. Resin tags obtained with Papacarie(®) were the longest and significantly superior to those obtained with rotary and calcium hydroxide. Papacarie(®) exhibited better bonding characteristics of residual dentine than calcium hydroxide and rotary method of caries removal. Thus, Papacarie(®) is a suitable alternative to conventional method of caries removal, especially in paediatric patients.

  11. The long persistence length of model tubules.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Mark J

    2017-07-28

    Young's elastic modulus and the persistence length are calculated for a coarse-grained model of tubule forming polymers. The model uses a wedge shaped composite of particles that previously has been shown to self-assemble into tubules. These calculations demonstrate that the model yields very large persistence lengths (corresponding to 78-126 μm) that are comparable to that observed in experiments for the microtubule lengths accessible to the calculations. The source for the stiffness is the restricted rotation of the monomer due to the excluded volume interactions between bonded macromolecular monomers as well as the binding between monomers. For this reason, large persistence lengths are common in tubule systems with a macromolecule as the monomer. The persistence length increases linearly with increased binding strength in the filament direction. No dependence in the persistence length is found for varying the tubule pitch for geometries with the protofilaments remaining straight.

  12. The long persistence length of model tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Mark J.

    2017-07-01

    Young's elastic modulus and the persistence length are calculated for a coarse-grained model of tubule forming polymers. The model uses a wedge shaped composite of particles that previously has been shown to self-assemble into tubules. These calculations demonstrate that the model yields very large persistence lengths (corresponding to 78-126 μ m) that are comparable to that observed in experiments for the microtubule lengths accessible to the calculations. The source for the stiffness is the restricted rotation of the monomer due to the excluded volume interactions between bonded macromolecular monomers as well as the binding between monomers. For this reason, large persistence lengths are common in tubule systems with a macromolecule as the monomer. The persistence length increases linearly with increased binding strength in the filament direction. No dependence in the persistence length is found for varying the tubule pitch for geometries with the protofilaments remaining straight.

  13. Chemical, morphological and microhardness changes of dentine after chemomechanical caries removal.

    PubMed

    Hamama, H H; Yiu, C K Y; Burrow, M F; King, N M

    2013-09-01

    This study compared the chemical, morphological and microhardness changes in carious dentine following application of NaOCl-based (Carisolv), papain-based (Papacarie) chemomechanical caries removal agents with conventional rotary method. Thirty-two carious and eight non-carious human permanent molars were used. The carious molars were randomly distributed into four groups: Group 1 (positive control) - molars were left without caries removal; Group 2 - caries excavated with rotary method; Group 3 - caries excavated with Carisolv; Group 4 - caries excavated with Papacarie. Group 5 (negative control) consisted of eight sound molars. After caries excavation, all specimens were prepared for chemical, morphological analysis and Vickers hardness testing. EDX analysis showed no significant difference in Ca wt%, P wt% and Ca/P ratio among Groups 2 to 5. Vickers hardness of dentine from Groups 3 and 4 was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than for Groups 2 and 5. The use of Papacarie resulted in a dentine surface without smear layer and patent tubules, while Carisolv resulted in a dentine surface exhibiting two patterns: (1) the presence of smear layer or (2) patent tubules with partial smear layer formation. Papain-based (Papacarie) chemomechanical caries removal method is a reliable alternative to conventional rotary and NaOCl-based (Carisolv) caries removal. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Morphological alterations in dentine after mechanical treatment and ultrashort pulse laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Portillo Muñoz, María; Lorenzo Luengo, María Cruz; Sánchez Llorente, José Miguel; Peix Sánchez, Manuel; Albaladejo, Alberto; García, Ana; Moreno Pedraz, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the morphological changes that occur in dentine after femtosecond laser irradiation and after mechanical treatment. The duration of the laser pulse is an important parameter, because within the time frame of the pulse heat diffusion plays a very important role in the mechanism of interaction between the light and the tissue. Six totally impacted human third molars were sectioned into sheets approximately 1 mm thick with an Accutom-50 precision cutting machine. The samples were randomly divided into two groups according to their cavity preparation: mechanical cavity preparation and laser cavity preparation. The samples were then examined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. There were clear differences in the results obtained with the two techniques. Cavities prepared with the laser with pulses of <1 ps showed no microcracks, and the treated surface displayed a rough and irregular aspect with no smear layer and exhibited open dentinal tubules. On the contrary, cavities made with a rotatory instrument had a smooth surface and microcracks, a broad area of carbonization and merging, occluded dentinal tubules and a smear layer. This study showed that human dentine can be successfully ablated with the ultrashort pulse laser.

  15. [Effect of different dentin cleaning agents on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jilan; Zeng, Liwei; Zhou, Hao; Deng, Lu; Zhou, Niangou; Chen, Ping; Jiang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to dentin by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and NaClO. Twenty-seven freshly extracted non-carious human premolars were prepared to expose the buccal dentin and randomly divided into three groups: control group (A group), EDTA group (B group) and NaClO group (C group). All teeth were bonded to dentin using a self-adhesive resin cement after the teeth in the A group were processed with distilled water. The B and C group were processed with 3%EDTA and 1%NaClO, respectively. After 24 hours at 37 °C water, the shear bond strengths of the twenty-four specimens were measured. All statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 software package. Each fractured specimen was examined under dental microscope. Three new specimens were cut, and the morphologies of the cement-dentin interface were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The shear bond strength in the A group, B group and C group was (8.55±0.63), (8.47±0.56) and (12.97± 0.59) MPa, respectively. The difference between A group and B group was no statistically significant (P>0.05), whereas the difference between C group and B group (or A group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). SEM observation of the cement-dentin interface in the C group showed good adaptation, but resin tags were not observed. The other two groups showed poor bonding interface. Most of the fractured adhesive dentin surfaces exhibited cohesive failure in the A group and B group. All the fractured adhesive dentin surfaces exhibited cohesive failure in the C group. 1% NaClO can increase the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin, but 3%EDTA has no effect.

  16. BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT TO PRIMARY DENTIN AFTER CUTTING WITH DIFFERENT BUR TYPES AND DENTIN CONDITIONING

    PubMed Central

    Nicoló, Rebeca Di; Shintome, Luciana Keiko; Myaki, Silvio Issáo; Nagayassu, Marcos Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12). In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer – 3M/ESPE) prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5%) and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence. PMID:19089179

  17. Effects of dentin depth and cavity configuration on bond strength.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, T; Sano, H; Burrow, M F; Tagami, J; Pashley, D H

    1999-04-01

    During polymerization of resin composites, shrinkage stresses compete with resin-dentin bonds in a manner that can cause failure of the bond, depending upon the configuration of the cavity, its depth, and the restorative technique. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the effect of cavity configuration (C) and remaining dentin thickness (RDT) influence resin bond strength to the dentin of Class I cavity floors. The occlusal enamel was ground to expose a flat superficial dentin surface as a control (superficial dentin, C-factor = 1) in human extracted third molars. Cavities 3 mm long x 4 mm wide were prepared to a depth 2 mm below the ground dentin surfaces (deep dentin within cavity floor, C-factor = 3). To assess the relationship between C-factor and RDT, we removed the walls of cavities, making a deep flat surface for bonding (deep dentin, C-factor = 1). The teeth were restored with either Clearfil Liner Bond II (LB II), One-Step (OS), or Super-Bond D Liner (DL), followed by Clearfil Photo Posterior resin composite. After 24 hrs' storage in water, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 3 or 4 slabs (0.7 mm thick) and trimmed for the micro-tensile bond test so that we could determine the strength of the resin bonds to the pulpal floor. All groups gave high bond strengths to superficial dentin, but OS and DL gave significantly lower bond strengths to flat deep dentin when the C-factor was 1. When the C-factor was increased to 3 by the creation of a three-dimensional cavity preparation, the bond strengths of all materials fell (range, 21 to 35%), but the difference was significant (p < 0.05) only with DL. SEM observations of failure patterns showed that specimens with high bond strengths tended to exhibit cohesive failures within the hybrid layer, while specimens exhibiting low bond strengths showed failures at the top of the hybrid layer. Some adhesives do not bond well to deep dentin, making them more susceptible to polymerization shrinkage stress that

  18. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration

    PubMed Central

    Ritts, Andy Charles; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated by using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various durations. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using FTIR/ATR and an increase in carbonyl groups on dentin surfaces was detected with plasma treated dentin. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for tensile test. Student Newman Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of peripheral dentin surface up to 100 s gave an increase in interfacial bonding strength, while a prolong plasma treatment of dentin surfaces, e.g., 5 min treatments, showed a decrease in interfacial bonding strength. PMID:20831586

  19. Morphological evaluation of rat incisor enamel and dentin induced by pregnancy and lactation using a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Murat; Dural, Sema; Kanli, Aydan; Tuncel, Murvet; Orhan, Kaan

    2009-10-01

    This study assessed the effects of pregnancy and lactation on the morphology of the dentine tubules and external enamel surface of rat incisor teeth using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) system. Twenty-four female Wistar rats were divided into three groups; group A rats were at the end of pregnancy, group B rats were in the post-lactation period and group C rats, the control group, were unmated. The outer enamel surface and openings of the dentine tubules at the neck regions of the incisors were observed under the SEM and photographed. Examination of the incisor teeth of pregnant and post-lactation rats revealed scratches on the enamel surface. There were few eroded areas and slight changes and the dentine tubules of the pregnant group were fully or partially occluded on the entire surface of the enamel in the lactating rats. Almost all dentine tubules of the rats in this group were open. During the study, EDX analysis of calcium, phosphate and magnesium was also performed at 20 kV and 0 degree tilt. The results of EDX analyses of magnesium were significantly lower in the pregnant group compared with the lactation and control groups for the dentine in the neck region (p<0.05). The calcium values increased in the lactation group compared with those of the rats in the other two groups (p<0.05). These results might indicate that changes during pregnancy and lactation affect the content and morphology of mineralized dental hard tissue.

  20. Effect of dentin etching and chlorhexidine application on metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Raquel, Osorio; Mónica, Yamauti; Estrella, Osorio; Estrella, Ruiz-Requena María; David, Pashley; Franklin, Tay; Manuel, Toledano

    2013-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in collagen degradation of resin-dentin interfaces. This study evaluated if collagen degradation can be prevented by chlorhexidine after different dentin demineralization procedures. Human dentin demineralization was performed with phosphoric acid (PA), EDTA, or acidic monomers (ClearfilSEBond and XENOV). Specimens were stored (24 h, 1 wk or 3 wk) in the presence or absence of chlorhexidine. In half of the groups, active MMP-2 was incorporated into the storing solution. C-terminal telopeptide determination (ICTP) was performed in the supernatants. Collagen degradation was higher in PA and EDTA-demineralized dentin. Chlorhexidine reduced collagen degradation in these groups only for 24 h. When dentin was demineralized with SEBond or Xeno, collagen degradation was reduced up to 30%, but addition of exogenous MMP-2 significantly increased collagen degradation. In self-etchant treated dentin the inhibitory effect of chlorhexidine on MMPs lasted up to 3 wk. Treating dentin with EDTA, PA or self-etching agents produces enough demineralization to permit cleavage of the exposed collagen. Monomers infiltration may exert protection on demineralized collagen, probably through immobilization of MMPs. The partial inhibitory action of CHX on MMP activity produced by self-etching adhesives was prolonged compared to the short-acting in PA or EDTA-treated dentin. PMID:21244516

  1. Effect of dentin etching and chlorhexidine application on metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Raquel; Yamauti, Mónica; Osorio, Estrella; Ruiz-Requena, María E; Pashley, David; Tay, Franklin; Toledano, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in the degradation of collagen in resin-dentin interfaces. This study evaluated whether collagen degradation can be prevented by chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) after different dentin demineralization procedures. The demineralization of human dentin was performed with phosphoric acid (PA), EDTA or acidic monomers (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno V). Specimens were stored (for 24 h, or for 1 or 3 wk) in the presence or absence of CHX. In half of the groups, active MMP-2 was incorporated into the storage solution. At the end of each storage period, the C-terminal telopeptide (ICTP) concentration (which indicates the amount of collagen degradation) was measured in the storage solution. Collagen degradation was higher in PA- and EDTA-demineralized dentin. Chlorhexidine digluconate reduced collagen degradation in these groups only for 24 h. When dentin was demineralized with Clearfil SE Bond or Xeno V, collagen degradation was reduced by up to 30%, but the addition of exogenous MMP-2 significantly increased collagen degradation. In self-etchant-treated dentin, the inhibitory effect of CHX on MMPs lasted for up to 3 wk. Treating dentin with EDTA, PA or self-etching agents produces enough demineralization to permit cleavage of the exposed collagen. Monomer infiltration may exert protection on demineralized collagen, probably through immobilization of MMPs. The partial inhibitory action of CHX on MMP activity produced by self-etching adhesives was prolonged compared with the short-acting PA- or EDTA-treated dentin.

  2. Calcium Oxalate Accumulation in Malpighian Tubules of Silkworm (Bombyx mori)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Aaron J.; Webb, Mary Alice

    2007-04-01

    Silkworm provides an ideal model system for study of calcium oxalate crystallization in kidney-like organs, called Malpighian tubules. During their growth and development, silkworm larvae accumulate massive amounts of calcium oxalate crystals in their Malpighian tubules with no apparent harm to the organism. This manuscript reports studies of crystal structure in the tubules along with analyses identifying molecular constituents of tubule exudate.

  3. Antimicrobial efficacy of 3.8% silver diamine fluoride and its effect on root dentin.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Noriko; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; King, Nigel M; Tagami, Junji; Tay, Franklin R

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the use of 3.8% silver diamine fluoride (Ag[NH3]2F) as an antibacterial agent against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms and its ability to penetrate dentinal tubules by the formation of silver salts. Biofilms were generated on membrane filter discs and subjected to 15-minute and 60-minute exposure times with 3.8% Ag(NH3)2F, saturated Ca(OH)2, 5.25% NaOCl (negative control), and 0.9% NaCl (positive control). Cleaned and shaped radicular dentin were applied with Ag(NH3)2F for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The presence of silver salts on the dentin surface was examined using low-pressure scanning electron microscopy. Both NaOCl and Ag(NH3)2F were effective against E. faecalis biofilms, with no significant difference in reduction of microorganisms for both exposure times. Silver deposits were present on 66.5% of the radicular dentin surfaces after 72-hour application of Ag(NH3)2F as simulated interappointment dressings. Penetration of the silver deposits was observed at most 40 microm into dentinal tubules after smear layer removal. Ag(NH3)2F has potential to be used as an antimicrobial root canal irrigant or interappointment dressing, especially in locations in which potential browning/blackening of dentin by metallic silver is not a major concern. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase activity in human dentin via novel antibacterial monomer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Majd, Hessam; Weir, Michael D.; Arola, Dwayne D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Dentin-composite bond failure is caused by factors including hybrid layer degradation, which in turn can be caused by hydrolysis and enzymatic degradation of the exposed collagen in the dentin. The objectives of this study were to investigate a new antibacterial monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) as an inhibitor for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and to determine the effects of DMADDM on both soluble recombinant human MMPs (rhMMPs) and dentin matrix-bound endogenous MMPs. Methods Inhibitory effects of DMADDM at six mass% (0.1% to 10%) on soluble rhMMP-8 and rhMMP-9 were measured using a colorimetic assay. Matrix-bound endogenous MMP activity was evaluated in demineralized human dentin. Dentin beams were divided into four groups (n = 10) and incubated in calcium- and zinc-containing media (control medium); or control medium + 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX); 5% 12-methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB); or 5% DMADDM. Dissolution of dentin collagen peptides was evaluated by mechanical testing in three-point flexure, loss of dentin mass, and a hydroxyproline assay. Results Use of 0.1% to 10% DMADDM exhibited a strong concentration-dependent anti-MMP effect, reaching 90% of inhibition on rhMMP-8 and rhMMP-9 at 5% DMADDM concentration. Dentin beams in medium with 5% DMADDM showed 34% decrease in elastic modulus (vs. 73% decrease for control), 3% loss of dry dentin mass (vs. 28% loss for control), and significantly less solubilized hydroxyproline when compared with control (p < 0.05). Significance The new antibacterial monomer DMADDM was effective in inhibiting both soluble rhMMPs and matrix-bound human dentin MMPs. These results, together with previous studies showing that adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited biofilms without compromising dentin bond strength, suggest that DMADDM is promising for use in adhesives to prevent collagen degradation in hybrid layer and protect the resin-dentin bond. PMID:25595564

  5. Fluoride treatment and microhardness of dentin.

    PubMed

    Seaman, F; Shannon, I L

    1979-05-01

    Effects of various fluoride treatments on the microhardness of human dentin were determined. Treatment with acidulated phosphate-fluoride at pH 3.0 induced a significant (p less than .05) softening when compared to treatment with water. APF at pH 4.0 did not bring about a significant change. Response to treatment with 0.4% SnF2 did not differ significantly from water treatment. Sequential treatment with APF (pH 4.0) followed by SnF2 produced significant (p less than .05) hardening of dentin. This hardening with APF-SnF2 differed at a high level of significance (p less than .001) from the softening produced by the pH 3.0 APF. A similarly significant difference was found between this single APF treatment and the single SnF2 treatment. When hardening of exposed dentin surfaces is desired, the sequential treatment method should be employed.

  6. Randomized, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of a calcium phosphate containing paste on dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Deepak; Gowda, Vishwas; Finger, Werner J; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of non-carious cervical lesions (DH) is a frequently encountered disease. This randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover study evaluated the effectiveness of a calcium phosphate containing desensitizer paste (TAP) on DH in comparison to water as placebo (PLA). In this clinical trial 35 patients were randomly assigned to the test and the negative control group. Using a 10cm long VAS (visual analog scale) patients should respond with DH score >6 on one tooth in each of two quadrants for allocation. Pain stimuli were a 2-seconds air blast (AB) and probe scratching (PS) of the exposed dentin. VAS scores were determined pre-operatively (PRE), immediately after treatment (POST), at 1 week, 1, 3 and finally after 6 months. Both TAP and PLA applications decreased DH significantly at POST and throughout the 6-months recalls (p<0.001). Pain reductions upon AB stimulation of TAP treated teeth, assessed at POST and 6 months were 35 and 55%, upon PS stimuli 21 and 54%, respectively. PLA treated lesions responded to AB at POST and after 6 months with 20 and 36% pain reduction, to PS with 11 and 30% pain reduction, respectively. Differences between TAP and PLA pain scores were statistically significant at all recalls (p<0.05). TAP paste reduced DH successfully during this 6-months trial. The calcium phosphate crystallites included in the paste and the presumed hydroxyapatite precipitates upon exposure to saliva were hypothetically able to occlude open dentinal tubules, at least to some extent. TAP is considered a biocompatible desensitizer paste. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pulp tissue reactions to a dentin bonding agent as a direct capping agent.

    PubMed

    Sübay, Rüstem Kemal; Demirci, Mustafa

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of human pulp tissue to a dentin bonding agent, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (SMPP), in exposed class V cavities. Sixteen human premolar teeth were mechanically exposed. Ten pulps were capped with SMPP and six teeth were capped with Dycal. The cavities were filled with a composite. After 40 days, the teeth were extracted and processed for histologic evaluation. Of the 10 teeth capped with SMPP, eight showed moderate chronic inflammation, one was severely inflamed, and one pulp had no to slight inflammation. None of the teeth capped with SMPP showed dentin bridge formation. Of the six teeth capped with Dycal, three exhibited incomplete dentin bridges associated with no to slight inflammation, and three showed no to slight inflammation, without formation of dentin bridges. Direct capping with Dycal with subsequent sealing with SMPP may show favorable results in pulp tissue. SMPP may cause inflammatory changes when applied directly to exposed pulp tissue.

  8. Ablation rate and morphology of superficial and deep dentin irradiated with different Er:YAG laser energy levels.

    PubMed

    Raucci-Neto, Walter; Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2008-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the ablation rate of superficial and deep dentin irradiated with different Er:YAG laser energy levels, and observed the micromorphological aspects of the lased substrates with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Little is known about the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on different dentin depths. Sixty molar crowns were bisected, providing 120 specimens, which were randomly assigned into two groups (superficial or deep dentin), and later into five subgroups (160, 200, 260, 300, or 360 mJ). Initial masses of the specimens were obtained. After laser irradiation, the final masses were obtained and mass losses were calculated followed by the preparation of specimens for SEM examination. Mass-loss values were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Fisher's least significant difference multiple-comparison tests (p > 0.05). There was no difference between superficial and deep dentin. A significant and gradual increase in the mass-loss values was reached when energies were raised, regardless of the dentin depth. The energy level of 360 mJ showed the highest values and was statistically significantly different from the other energy levels. The SEM images showed that deep dentin was more selectively ablated, especially intertubular dentin, promoting tubule protrusion. At 360 mJ the micromorphological features were similar for both dentin depths. The ablation rate did not depend on the depth of the dentin, and an energy level lower than 360 mJ is recommended to ablate both superficial and deep dentin effectively without causing tissue damage.

  9. Osmosis in Cortical Collecting Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, James A.; Troutman, Susan L.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1974-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of varying the osmolality of luminal solutions on the antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-independent water and solute permeability properties of isolated rabbit cortical collecting tubules. In the absence of ADH, the osmotic water permeability coefficient (cm s–1) Pfl→b, computed from volume flows from hypotonic lumen to isotonic bath, was 20 ± 4 x 10–4 (SEM); the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, computed from volume flows from isotonic bath to hypertonic lumen, was 88 ± 15 x 10–4 cm s–1. We also measured apparent urea permeability coefficients (cm s–1) from 14C-urea fluxes from lumen to bath (PDDureal→b) and from bath to lumen (PDDureab→l). For hypotonic luminal solutions and isotonic bathing solutions, PDDureal→b was 0.045 ± 0.004 x 10–4 and was unaffected by ADH. The ADH-independent values of PDDureal→b and Pureab→l were, respectively, 0.216 ± 0.022 x 10–4 cm s–1 and 0.033 ± 0.002 x 10–4 cm s–1 for isotonic bathing solutions and luminal solutions made hypertonic with urea, i.e., there was an absolute increase in urea permeability and asymmetry of urea fluxes. Significantly, PDDureal→b did not rise when luminal hypertonicity was produced by sucrose; and, bathing fluid hypertonicity did not alter tubular permeability to water or to urea. We interpret these data to indicate that luminal hypertonicity increased the leakiness of tight junctions to water and urea but not sucrose. Since the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, when tight junctions were open to urea, was approximately half of the value of Pfl→b in the presence of ADH, when tight junctions were closed to urea, we conclude that tight junctions are negligible paracellular shunts for lumen to bath osmosis with ADH. These findings, together with those in the preceding paper, are discussed in terms of a solubility-diffusion model for water permeation in which ADH increases water solubility in luminal

  10. Influence of Smear Layer on the Antimicrobial Activity of a Sodium Hypochlorite/Etidronic Acid Irrigating Solution in Infected Dentin.

    PubMed

    Morago, Ana; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Ferrer-Luque, Carmen María; Baca, Pilar; Ruiz-Linares, Matilde; Arias-Moliz, María Teresa

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the smear layer on the antimicrobial activity of a 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)/9% etidronic acid (HEBP) irrigating solution against bacteria growing inside dentin tubules. Dentin tubules were infected with Enterococcus faecalis by centrifugation. After 5 days of incubation, the smear layer had formed in half of the samples, which were then treated with 2.5% NaOCl either alone or combined with 9% HEBP for 3 minutes. The percentage of dead cells in infected dentinal tubules was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the live/dead technique. The smear layer on the surface of the root canal wall was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Results of the percentage of dead cells were compared using parametric tests after subjecting data to the normalized Anscombe transformation. The level of significance was P < .05. In the absence of the smear layer, 2.5% NaOCl alone and combined with 9% HEBP showed high antimicrobial activity without significant differences between the 2. The smear layer reduced the antimicrobial activity of 2.5% NaOCl significantly, whereas the solution with HEBP was not affected. No dentin tubules free of the smear layer were obtained in the 2.5% NaOCl group. In the case of 2.5% NaOCl/9% HEBP, 95.40% ± 3.63% of dentin tubules were cleaned. The presence of the smear layer reduced the antimicrobial activity of 2.5% NaOCl. The combination of 2.5% NaOCl/9% HEBP exerted antimicrobial activity that was not reduced by the smear layer. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Insights into the structure and composition of the peritubular dentin organic matrix and the lamina limitans.

    PubMed

    Bertassoni, Luiz Eduardo; Stankoska, Katerina; Swain, Michael Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Dentin is a mineralized dental tissue underlying the outer enamel that has a peculiar micro morphology. It is composed of micrometer sized tubules that are surrounded by a highly mineralized structure, called peritubular dentin (PTD), and embedded in a collagen-rich matrix, named intertubular dentin. The PTD has been thought to be composed of a highly mineralized collagen-free organic matrix with unknown composition. Here we tested the hypothesis that proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, two important organic structural features found in dentin, are key participants in the microstructure and composition of the PTD. To test this hypothesis dentin blocks were demineralized with 10 vol% citric acid for 2 min and either digested with 1mg/ml TPCK-treated trypsin with 0.2 ammonium bicarbonate at pH 7.9 (TRY) or 0.1 U/mL C-ABC with 50mM Tris, 60mM sodium acetate and 0.02% bovine serum albumin at pH 8.0 (C-ABC). TRY is known to cleave the protein core of dentin proteoglycans, whereas C-ABC is expected to selectively remove glycosaminoglycans. All specimens were digested for 48 h in 37°C, dehydrated in ascending grades of acetone, immersed in HMDS, platinum coated and imaged using an FE-SEM. Images of demineralized dentin revealed a meshwork of noncollagenous fibrils protruding towards the tubule lumen following removal of the peritubular mineral and confirmed the lack of collagen in the peritubular matrix. Further, images revealed that the peritubular organic network originates from a sheet-like membrane covering the entire visible length of tubule, called lamina limitans. Confirming our initial hypothesis, after the digestion with C-ABC the organic network appeared to vanish, while the lamina limitans was preserved. This suggests that glycosaminoglycans are the main component of the PTD organic network. Following digestion with TRY, both the organic network and the lamina limitans disappeared, thus suggesting that the lamina limitans may be primarily composed of

  12. Adhesion of different resin cements to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Ella A; Ernst, Saskia; Schaper, Katharina; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of five different resin cements to human enamel and dentin under different storage conditions. Five resin cements and their dedicated systems were tested. Teeth were embedded, ground flat to expose enamel or dentin and polished with sandpaper. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturers'instructions. V2A steel cylinders with were silicated, coated, and cemented onto the teeth. Specimens were stored at three different conditions and subsequently thermocycled. SBS was measured. Significant differences were observed between the tested resin cements depending on the tooth surface. Different storage conditions influenced the bond strength, independent of the tooth surface, in all test cements. The bond strength of all experimental materials to enamel is higher than that to dentin surfaces. Furthermore, the adhesiveness decreases after wetness (hydro-) and hydrothermal stress, regardless of the tooth surface.

  13. X-ray microanalysis of dentin: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Hals, E.; Tveit, A.B.; Totdal, B.

    1988-03-01

    The aim of this review was to present a condensed summary of the literature on X-ray microanalysis of dentin, including both energy-dispersive (EDS) and wavelength-dispersive (WDS) analysis. Estimations of concentrations by XMA of dentin should be regarded as semiquantitative values. The Ca level in rat odontoblasts was elevated in the secreting end of the cell body. In predentin Ca accumulated at a concentration of 2% that of mineralized dentin. In coronal dentin the peritubular areas were hypermineralized (Ca, P, Mg). Primary caries lesions showed a decrease of Ca, P, Mg and Cl, and usually an increase of S and Zn. The mineralized surface often present contained especially high concentrations of F and K. Considerable uptake of various ions in cavity walls exposed to filling materials was assessed: from silver amalgam, Zn and Sn, from silicate cement and glassionomer cement F, Al and Zn, and from zinc oxide-eugenol cement, Zn. The highest F concentrations following topical application were found with solutions of TiF4 and with the varnishes Duraphat and Fluor Protector. Dentin wall lesions adjacent to amalgam fillings exhibited considerably reduced Ca and P values, but concomitantly considerable amounts of Zn and Sn, that explained the increased radiopacity seen in some microradiographs. 84 references.

  14. Shear bond strength of dental amalgam bonded to dentin.

    PubMed

    Covey, D A; Moon, P C

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the shear bond strength of dental amalgam bonded to dentin with adhesives. Four groups of 15 permanent posterior teeth were used in this study. The occlusal enamel of the teeth was removed to produce a flat dentin surface. The teeth were embedded in phenolic rings with acrylic resin. Vinyl polysiloxane ring molds 4 mm thick with 4.5 mm circular openings were attached to the exposed dentin surface. Adhesives applied to the dentin surfaces prior to amalgam placement and condensation included: Amalgambond, a 4-META/TBB-MMA, HEMA based system (A), Panavia EX, a modified phosphate ester of Bis-GMA luting system (P), and Ketac-Cem, a glass ionomer luting cement (K). A dentin bonding agent and composite resin restoration system (Scotchbond 2/Silux Plus) was included for comparison. The specimens were stored in 37 degrees C water for 7 days prior to testing. Shear bond tests were done in an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 0.02 inches per minute. The data were analyzed by ANOVA at 5% level of significance. The differences in shear bond strengths of the four test groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.115). Fracture patterns of the bonded amalgams, examined by SEM, were adhesive in appearance for Groups A and K and cohesive for Group P.

  15. Spectroscopic and morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemor, R. M.; Kruger, Michael B.; Wieliczka, David M.; Swafford, Jim R.; Spencer, Paulette

    1999-04-01

    The potential environmental risks associated with dental amalgams have forced many European countries to ban their use and turn to alternative materials, composite resins. The purpose of this study was to correlate morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive bond with chemical analyses using micro-FTIR and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A commercial dental adhesive was placed on dentin substrates cut from extracted, unerupted human third molars. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface were investigated using IR radiation produced at the Aladdin synchrotron source; visible radiation from Kr+ laser was used for the micro-Raman spectroscopy and through the use of differentially staining in conjunction with light microscopy. Due to its limited spatial resolution and the unknown samples thickness the IR results cannot be used quantitatively in determining the extent of diffusion. The result from the micro-Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy indicate exposed protein at the dentin/adhesive interface. Using a laser that reduces background fluorescence, the micro-Raman spectroscopy provides quantitative chemical and morphologic information on the dentin/adhesive interface. The staining procedure is sensitive to sites of pure protein and complements the Raman results.

  16. The effect of air thinning on dentin adhesive bond strength.

    PubMed

    Hilton, T J; Schwartz, R S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if air thinning three dentin adhesives would affect bond strength to dentin. Ninety human molars were mounted in acrylic and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose a flat dentin surface. Thirty teeth were randomly assigned to one of the following dentin bonding agent/composite combinations: A) Universal Bond 3/TPH (Caulk), B) All-Bond 2/Bis-Fil-P (Bisco), and C) Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z-100 (3m). The primers were applied following the manufacturers' instructions. The adhesives were applied by two methods. A thin layer of adhesive was applied with a brush to 15 specimens in each group and light cured. Adhesive was brushed on to the remaining 15 teeth in the group, air thinned for 3 seconds, and then polymerized. The appropriate composite was applied in 2 mm increments and light cured utilizing a 5 mm-in-diameter split Teflon mold. Following 3 months of water storage, all groups were shear tested to failure on an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Bond strength was significantly higher in all groups when the dentin bonding agent was painted on without being air thinned. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose had significantly higher bond strength than All-Bond 2, which had significantly higher bond strength than Universal Bond 3.

  17. Molecular Insights into Covalently Stained Carious Dentine Using Solid-State NMR and ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Almhöjd, Ulrica S; Lingström, Peter; Nilsson, Åke; Norén, Jörgen G; Siljeström, Sandra; Östlund, Åsa; Bernin, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Dyes currently used to stain carious dentine have a limited capacity to discriminate normal dentine from carious dentine, which may result in overexcavation. Consequently, finding a selective dye is still a challenge. However, there is evidence that hydrazine-based dyes, via covalent bonds to functional groups, bind specifically to carious dentine. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible formation of covalent bonds between carious dentine and 15N2-hydrazine and the hydrazine-based dye, 15N2-labelled Lucifer Yellow, respectively. Powdered dentine from extracted carious and normal teeth was exposed to the dyes, and the staining reactions were analysed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), solid-state 13C-labelled nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 15N-NMR spectroscopy. The results showed that 15N2-hydrazine and 15N2-labelled Lucifer Yellow both bind to carious dentine but not to normal dentine. It can thus be concluded that hydrazine-based dyes can be used to stain carious dentine and leave normal dentine unstained. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Dentin wear after simulated toothbrushing with water, a liquid dentifrice or a standard toothpaste.

    PubMed

    Jang, Youngjune; Ihm, Jung-joon; Baik, Su-jin; Yoo, Kyung-jin; Jang, Da-hyun; Roh, Byoung-duck; Seo, Deog-gyu

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the influence of dentifrices with and without abrasives on the wear and surface topography of human dentin following simulated toothbrushing in vitro. 24 dentin specimens were prepared and randomly allocated to a liquid dentifrice (Garglin Gum-Guard), conventional dentifrice (333 Clinic Total Care), and control (distilled water) groups. Specimens were subjected to simulated toothbrushing of 50,000 repeated strokes under a 150 g-load. The dentin surface was profiled in each specimen using a profilometer before and after toothbrushing. The mean surface roughness (Ra) of the specimens was calculated and compared by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). The dentin surfaces were further examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Ra values were similar between the liquid dentifrice and control groups (P > 0.05), and was significantly higher in the conventional dentifrice group (P < 0.001). On SEM examination, patent dentin tubules were observed in the conventional dentifrice and liquid dentifrice groups, but were not observed in the control group.

  19. Enamel and dentine of deciduous teeth Er:YAG laser prepared. A SEM study.

    PubMed

    Kornblit, R; Bossù, M; Mari, D; Rocca, J P; Polimeni, A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to observe dentine and enamel surfaces of deciduous teeth under SEM after cavity preparation with Er:YAG laser using different fluences. The results showed that when using Er:YAG laser for cavity preparation in deciduous teeth, no carbonisation or cracks were observed on the enamel and dentine surfaces using energy output between 150-250 Mj, and frequency 15 Hz. The SEM images of the dentine and enamel surfaces were similar to previous studies on permanent teeth: enamel with a typical "lava flow" appearance as a result of an open core of the prism that has lost its typical hexagonal aspect and the dentine with opened tubules plus a difference in the mineral thickness between peritubular and intertubular. The difference between the SEM images of deciduous enamel and dentine when using three different energies (150-200-250 mJ) is not significant in order to recommend the use of one type of output energy. In addition, the SEM images are similar TO those of permanent teeth.

  20. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fracture resistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled, there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. The present study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel set of in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving a double-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whether the critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locally stress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used to characterize the notion of ''plasticity'' in dentin and the interaction of cracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed that fracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that the presence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this process of crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to be critical steps in the development of a micromechanical model for the fracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence of both the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  1. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fractureresistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information inarchival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. Infact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralizedtissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled,there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. Thepresent study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel setof in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving adouble-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whetherthe critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locallystress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used tocharacterize the notion of "plasticity" in dentin and the interaction ofcracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed thatfracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that thepresence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this processof crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to becritical steps in the development ofa micromechanical model for thefracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence ofboth the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  2. Collagen Orientation and Crystallite Size in Human Dentin: A Small Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A.

    2001-03-29

    The mechanical properties of dentin are largely determined by the intertubular dentin matrix, which is a complex composite of type I collagen fibers and a carbonate-rich apatite mineral phase. The authors perform a small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) study on fully mineralized human dentin to quantify this fiber/mineral composite architecture from the nanoscopic through continuum length scales. The SAXS results were consistent with nucleation and growth of the apatite phase within periodic gaps in the collagen fibers. These mineralized fibers were perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and parallel with the mineralization growth front. Within the plane of the mineralization front, the mineralized collagen fibers were isotropic near the pulp, but became mildly anisotropic in the mid-dentin. Analysis of the data also indicated that near the pulp the mineral crystallites were approximately needle-like, and progressed to a more plate-like shape near the dentino-enamel junction. The thickness of these crystallites, {approx} 5 nm, did not vary significantly with position in the tooth. These results were considered within the context of dentinogenesis and maturation.

  3. The effect of antidiuretic hormone on solute flows in mammalian collecting tubules

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, James A.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1972-01-01

    These experiments were intended to evaluate the antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-dependent reflection coefficients of urea, sucrose, and NaCl in cortical and outer medullary collecting tubules isolated from mammalian kidney. In one group of experiments, the ADH-dependent osmotic water flows, when the perfusing solutions contained hypotonic NaCl solutions, were indistinguishable from control observations when either urea or sucrose replaced, in part, NaCl in isotonic bathing solutions (cortical collecting tubules). Similarly, both in cortical and outer medullary collecting tubules exposed to ADH, there was zero net osmotic volume flow when a portion of the NaCl in the bathing and/or perfusing solutions was replaced by either sucrose or urea, so long as the perfusing and bathing solutions were isosmolal. Taken together, these observations suggest that the ADH-dependent reflection coefficients of NaCl, urea, and sucrose, in these tubules, were identical. Since the effective hydrodynamic radii of urea and sucrose are, respectively, 1.8 and 5.2 A, it is likely that σi, for urea, sucrose, and NaCl, was unity. In support of this, the diffusion permeability coefficient (PDi cm sec-1) of urea was indistinguishable from zero. Since the limiting sites for urea penetration were the luminal interfaces of the tubules, these data are consistent with the view that ADH increases diffusional water flow across such interfaces. Images PMID:5057132

  4. Papain-based gel for biochemical caries removal: influence on microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Piva, Evandro; Ogliari, Fabrício Aulo; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de; Corá, Felipe; Henn, Sandrina; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of a papain-based gel (Papacárie) for chemo-mechanical caries removal on bond strength to dentin. Human molars were assigned to the following groups: Group 1: sound teeth were flattened to expose dentin; Group 2: after flattening of surfaces, the papain-based gel was applied on the sound dentin; Group 3: overlying enamel from carious teeth was removed and mechanical excavation of dentin was conducted; Group 4: chemo-mechanical excavation of carious dentin was conducted using the papain-based gel. The Prime&Bond NT or Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems were used for restorative procedures. A microtensile bond strength test was performed, and the modes of failure were determined under SEM. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < or = 0.05). No significant differences were observed between the sound dentin groups. For both excavation methods, Clearfil presented a significantly higher bond strength than Prime&Bond NT. Also, for Clearfil, the mechanically excavated samples disclosed a significantly higher bond strength than the chemo-mechanically ones. For Prime&Bond NT, no significant differences were detected between the excavation methods. Predominance of mixed failures for the sound substrate and of adhesive failures for the carious dentin one was detected. The bond strength to carious dentin of the self-etching system was negatively affected by chemo-mechanical excavation using the papain-based gel.

  5. Analysis of carious dentine using FTIR and ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Almhöjd, Ulrica S; Norén, Jörgen G; Arvidsson, Anna; Nilsson, Åke; Lingström, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Apart from the Maillard reaction, other processes, such as esterification, take place in carious tissue. The aim of the present study was to analyse sound and carious dentine in terms of ester groups and their reaction with hydrazine derivate using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Carious and sound dentine from human premolars were excavated in three series (Experimental Parts I-III) and separated into inner and outer layers of carious dentine. The excavated tooth material was analysed with FTIR (Part I). Carious and sound dentine were also exposed to different chemical treatments and analysed with FTIR-Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR; Part II) and ToF-SIMS (Part III). The FTIR absorption spectra showed that the carious tissue contained ester groups, not detected in sound dentine. The results also indicated a higher occurrence of ester groups in the inner dental caries layer than in the outer ones. Potential binding to these ester groups by hydrazine derivative was observed after different chemical treatments with both FTIR-ATR and ToF-SIMS. The results of the present study revealed ester groups unique to the carious dentine which, after reaction with hydrazine derivative, form a covalent bond not found in sound dentine. The staining of carious unique groups would be clinically helpful in detection and prevention unnecessary removal of sound dentine.

  6. Effect of Er:YAG laser on dentin bonding durability under simulated pulpal pressure.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Ahmed Samir; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of Er:YAG laser ablation on the microtensile bond strength and the nanoleakage of Er:YAG-lased dentin bonded to a self-etching adhesive system with and without pulpal pressure. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were obtained from extracted molars. Ten specimens were irradiated by Er:YAG laser, other specimens (control group) were ground using #600 SiC paper. Direct communication to the pulp chamber was created by cutting at a level approximately 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction and parallel to the occlusal surface. The experimental groups were exposed to a simulated pulpal pressure of 15 cm H2O. Each specimen was restored using an adhesive and a photocured composite. The specimens were then sectioned vertically to obtain dentin/adhesive slabs. Ninety-six slabs were prepared for microtensile bond testing. Sixty-four slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate tracer solution for 18 h, then rinsed thoroughly, and immersed in photodeveloping solution for 6 h prior to their examination by FE-SEM. The method of dentin preparation and the pulpal pressure storage condition significantly affected the microTBS, while the storage duration did not (p < 0.05). The nanoleakage patterns observed in the dentin/bond interface differed depending on whether the dentin was conventionally prepared or ablated by Er:YAG laser. Er:YAG laser ablation to dentin adversely affected the microTBS and the sealing ability of SE Bond bonded to dentin under simulated pulpal condition.

  7. Effect of chitosan/riboflavin modification on resin/dentin interface: spectroscopic and microscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Daood, Umer; Iqbal, Kulsum; Nitisusanta, Lorraine I; Fawzy, Amr S

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the morphological and chemical changes of demineralized dentin collagen-matrix and resin/dentin interface associated with chitosan/riboflavin modification. Dentin disc specimens were prepared from sound molars, acid-etched with 35% phosphoric acid and modified with either 0.1% riboflavin or chitosan/riboflavin (Ch/RF ratios 1:4 or 1:1) and photo-activated by UVA. Morphological and chemical changes associated with surface modification were characterized by SEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Dentin surfaces of sound molars were exposed, acid-etched, and modified as described before. Etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive was applied, light-cured, and layered with resin-restorative composite. The resin infiltration and resin/dentin interface were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM. An open-intact collagen network-structure, formation of uniform hybrid-layer and higher resin infiltration were found with 0.1%RF and Ch/RF 1:4 modifications. Raman analysis revealed chemical changes and shifts in Amide bands with the modification of dentin collagen-matrix. The use of riboflavin and chitosan/riboflavin formulations to modify dentin-collagen matrix, with the defined ratios, stabilizes the collagen fibrillar network and enhances resin infiltration and hybrid layer formation. These preliminary results are encouraging for subsequent consideration of chitosan/riboflavin modification in adhesive dentistry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Morphologic evaluation of the bonding between adhesive/composite resin and dentin irradiated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers: comparative study using scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Oda, M; Oliveira, D C; Liberti, E A

    2001-01-01

    Since bonding systems were introduced in the restorative procedures carried out with esthetic materials, the treatment of dentin surfaces has been widely studied in order to establish the ideal technique. The application of 37% phosphoric acid on dentin is still the best known method. However, alternative methods for treating the dentin surface have been discussed in the literature, including the utilization of some kinds of laser irradiation. The purpose of this research was to morphologically evaluate the bond between adhesive materials and the dentin treated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers, in a comparative study by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Irradiation either substituted acid etching, or was associated to it. Recently extracted bovine incisors were utilized. They received class V cavity preparations and were restored with a bonding system and a light-cured composite resin. Meanwhile, some of the teeth underwent irradiation with Er:YAG laser or Nd:YAG laser before the application of the bonding agent and the composite resin. The samples were selected, prepared for SEM and submitted to morphological analysis. Data were registered in photomicrographs. Based on the microscopic observations, we concluded that only in the dentin surfaces submitted to irradiation with Er:YAG laser and to acid conditioning there was penetration of resin into the dentine. With the Nd:YAG laser treatment, there was only visual superposition of resin over the dentin surface, which suggests that there was only occlusion of the tubules, with characteristics of fusion in the superficial dentine.

  9. Comparative effects of the water accommodated fraction of three oils on mussels. 2. Quantitative alterations in the structure of the digestive tubules.

    PubMed

    Cajaraville, M P; Marigómez, J A; Díez, G; Angulo, E

    1992-05-01

    1. Mussels have been exposed to the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of Ural and Maya crude oils and of a lubricant oil for 91 days and the digestive gland structure has been studied (a) by planimetry, to calculate the mean epithelial thickness (MET), the mean diverticular radius (MDR) and the mean luminal radius (MLR) of the digestive tubules and (b) by subjective tubule grading, to determine the relative (%) occurrence of the different tubule types found in the digestive gland (holding, absorpting, disintegrating, reconstituting and necrotic tubules). 2. Exposure to the 3 types of WAF leads to lowered MET and MET/MDR values, and concomitant higher MLR/MET values. In the case of lubricant- and Ural-WAF exposures, MDR decreases significantly at increasing exposure-doses. 3. Exposure to oil WAFs leads to decreased percentages of holding and absorpting tubules. This decrease is concomitant with an increase of disintegrating tubules in lubricant- and Ural-WAF exposures, and with an increase of regenerating tubules in the Maya-WAF exposure. 4. The statistical significance of the differences found between control and exposed mussels is better at Day 21 than at any other further sampling day (35, 77 and 91). 5. Multiple correlation coefficients between all the percentages of tubule types and each planimetric parameter present an excellent statistical significance.

  10. Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) in Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Monica; Butler, William T.; Qin, Chunlin

    2010-01-01

    Two of the proteins found in significant quantity in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of dentin are dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). DPP, the most abundant of the non-collagenous proteins in dentin is an unusually polyanionic protein, containing a large number of aspartic acids (Asp) and phosphoserines (Pse) in the repeating sequences of (Asp-Pse)n. and (Asp-Pse-Pse)n. The many negatively charged regions of DPP are thought to promote mineralization by binding calcium and presenting it to collagen fibers at the mineralization front during the formation of dentin. This purported role of DPP is supported by a sizeable pool of in vitro mineralization data showing that DPP is an important initiator and modulator for the formation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals. Quite differently, DSP is a glycoprotein, with little or no phosphate. DPP and DSP are the cleavage products of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Human and mouse genetic studies have demonstrated that mutations in, or knockout of, the Dspp gene result in mineralization defects in dentin and/or bone. The discoveries in the past 40 years with regard to DPP, DSP and DSPP have greatly enhanced our understanding of biomineralization and set a new stage for future studies. In this review, we summarize the important and new developments made in the past four decades regarding the structure and regulation of the DSPP gene, the biochemical characteristics of DSPP, DPP and DSP, as well as the cell/tissue localizations and functions of these molecules. PMID:20367116

  11. A photochemical method for in vitro evaluation of fluid flow in human dentine.

    PubMed

    Boreak, Nezar; Ishihata, Hiroshi; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the flow dynamics of dentine fluid using a chemiluminescence method in vitro. Horizontally sliced coronal dentine specimens with thicknesses of 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0mm (n=10 each) were prepared from extracted human third molars. After cleaning with EDTA, a mounted specimen was clamped between 2 acrylic chambers attached to both the occlusal and pulpal sides. The occlusal chamber, which was closed with a glass coverslip, was filled with a chemiluminescent solution (0.02% luminol and 1% sodium hydroxide in water). A trigger solution of 1% hydrogen peroxide and 1% potassium ferricyanide was injected into the pulpal chamber at a constant pressure of 2.5 kPa, and allowed to immediately flow into the patent dentinal tubules. Four consecutive measurements (T1-T4) were performed on each sample by recording the emission of chemiluminescence with a photodetector. The relationship between the crossing time of the liquid through the slice and dentine thickness was examined. An apparent time delay was detected between the starting points of the trigger solution run and photochemical emission at T1. Dt (Dt, s) values of each thickness group were 13.6 ± 4.25 for 1.4mm, 18.1 ± 2.38 for 1.6mm, 28.0 ± 2.46 for 1.8mm, and 39.2 ± 8.61 for 2.0mm, respectively. Dt significantly decreased as dentine became thinner towards the pulp chamber (P<0.001). The velocity of fluid flow increased both with increasing dentine depth or reduction of remaining dentine thickness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Discerning the role of mechanosensors in regulating proximal tubule function.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Venkatesan; Weisz, Ora A

    2016-01-01

    All cells in the body experience external mechanical forces such as shear stress and stretch. These forces are sensed by specialized structures in the cell known as mechanosensors. Cells lining the proximal tubule (PT) of the kidney are continuously exposed to variations in flow rates of the glomerular ultrafiltrate, which manifest as changes in axial shear stress and radial stretch. Studies suggest that these cells respond acutely to variations in flow by modulating their ion transport and endocytic functions to maintain glomerulotubular balance. Conceptually, changes in the axial shear stress in the PT could be sensed by three known structures, namely, the microvilli, the glycocalyx, and primary cilia. The orthogonal component of the force produced by flow exhibits as radial stretch and can cause expansion of the tubule. Forces of stretch are transduced by integrins, by stretch-activated channels, and by cell-cell contacts. This review summarizes our current understanding of flow sensing in PT epithelia, discusses challenges in dissecting the role of individual flow sensors in the mechanosensitive responses, and identifies potential areas of opportunity for new study.

  13. Bioengineered kidney tubules efficiently excrete uremic toxins

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; Fedecostante, M.; Wilmer, M. J.; Peters, J. G.; Kreuser, U. M.; van den Broek, P. H.; Mensink, R. A.; Boltje, T. J.; Stamatialis, D.; Wetzels, J. F.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Masereeuw, R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biotechnological platform for the removal of waste products (e.g. uremic toxins), often bound to proteins in plasma, is a prerequisite to improve current treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Here, we present a newly designed bioengineered renal tubule capable of active uremic toxin secretion through the concerted action of essential renal transporters, viz. organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4). Three-dimensional cell monolayer formation of human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC) on biofunctionalized hollow fibers with maintained barrier function was demonstrated. Using a tailor made flow system, the secretory clearance of human serum albumin-bound uremic toxins, indoxyl sulfate and kynurenic acid, as well as albumin reabsorption across the renal tubule was confirmed. These functional bioengineered renal tubules are promising entities in renal replacement therapies and regenerative medicine, as well as in drug development programs. PMID:27242131

  14. Rescue of odontogenesis in Dmp1-deficient mice by targeted re-expression of DMP1 reveals roles for DMP1 in early odontogenesis and dentin apposition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongbo; Ye, Ling; Yu, Shibin; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; McKee, Marc D; Li, Yan Chun; Kong, Juan; Eick, J David; Dallas, Sarah L; Feng, Jian Q

    2007-03-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is expressed in both pulp and odontoblast cells and deletion of the Dmp1 gene leads to defects in odontogenesis and mineralization. The goals of this study were to examine how DMP1 controls dentin mineralization and odontogenesis in vivo. Fluorochrome labeling of dentin in Dmp1-null mice showed a diffuse labeling pattern with a 3-fold reduction in dentin appositional rate compared to controls. Deletion of DMP1 was also associated with abnormalities in the dentinal tubule system and delayed formation of the third molar. Unlike the mineralization defect in Vitamin D receptor-null mice, the mineralization defect in Dmp1-null mice was not rescued by a high calcium and phosphate diet, suggesting a different effect of DMP1 on mineralization. Re-expression of Dmp1 in early and late odontoblasts under control of the Col1a1 promoter rescued the defects in mineralization as well as the defects in the dentinal tubules and third molar development. In contrast, re-expression of Dmp1 in mature odontoblasts, using the Dspp promoter, produced only a partial rescue of the mineralization defects. These data suggest that DMP1 is a key regulator of odontoblast differentiation, formation of the dentin tubular system and mineralization and its expression is required in both early and late odontoblasts for normal odontogenesis to proceed.

  15. Rescue of Odontogenesis in Dmp1-deficient Mice by Targeted Re-expression of DMP1 Reveals Roles for DMP1 in Early Odontogenesis and Dentin Apposition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongbo; Ye, Ling; Yu, Shibin; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; McKee, Marc D.; Li, Yanchun; Kong, Juan; Eick, David; Dallas, Sarah L.; Feng, Jian Q.

    2007-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is expressed in both pulp and odontoblast cells and deletion of the Dmp1 gene leads to defects in odontogenesis and mineralization. The goals of this study were to examine how DMP1 controls dentin mineralization and odontogenesis in vivo. Fluorochrome labeling of dentin in Dmp1-null mice showed a diffuse labeling pattern with a three-fold reduction in dentin appositional rate compared to controls. Deletion of DMP1 was also associated with abnormalities in the dentinal tubule system and delayed formation of the third molar. Unlike the mineralization defect in Vitamin D receptor null mice, the mineralization defect in Dmp1-null mice was not rescued by a high calcium and phosphate diet, suggesting that the effects of DMP1 on mineralization are locally mediated. Re-expression of Dmp1 in early and late odontoblasts under control of the Col1a1 promoter rescued the defects mineralization as well as the defects in the dentinal tubules and third molar development. In contrast, re-expression in mature odontoblasts, using the Dspp promoter, produced only a partial rescue of the mineralization defects. These data suggest that DMP1 is a key regulator of odontoblast differentiation, formation of the dentin tubular system and mineralization and its expression is required in both early and late odontoblasts for normal odontogenesis to proceed. PMID:17196192

  16. Enamel and dentine demineralization by a combination of starch and sucrose in a biofilm - caries model.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Juliana Nunes; Villegas-Salinas, Mario; Troncoso-Gajardo, Pía; Giacaman, Rodrigo Andrés; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2016-05-20

    Sucrose is the most cariogenic dietary carbohydrate and starch is considered non-cariogenic for enamel and moderately cariogenic for dentine. However, the cariogenicity of the combination of starch and sucrose remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this combination on Streptococcus mutans biofilm composition and enamel and dentine demineralization. Biofilms of S. mutans UA159 were grown on saliva-coated enamel and dentine slabs in culture medium containing 10% saliva. They were exposed (8 times/day) to one of the following treatments: 0.9% NaCl (negative control), 1% starch, 10% sucrose, or 1% starch and 10% sucrose (starch + sucrose). To simulate the effect of human salivary amylase on the starch metabolization, the biofilms were pretreated with saliva before each treatment and saliva was also added to the culture medium. Acidogenicity of the biofilm was estimated by evaluating (2 times/day) the culture medium pH. After 4 (dentine) or 5 (enamel) days of growth, biofilms (n = 9) were individually collected, and the biomass, viable microorganism count, and polysaccharide content were quantified. Dentine and enamel demineralization was assessed by determining the percentage of surface hardness loss. Biofilms exposed to starch + sucrose were more acidogenic and caused higher demineralization (p < 0.0001) on either enamel or dentine than those exposed to each carbohydrate alone. The findings suggest that starch increases the cariogenic potential of sucrose.

  17. Tubules of plant reoviruses exploit tropomodulin to regulate actin-based tubule motility in insect vector

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Zhang, Linghua; Zhang, Yanshuang; Mao, Qianzhuo; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-01-01

    Plant reoviruses are known to exploit virion-packaging tubules formed by virus-encoding non-structural proteins for viral spread in insect vectors. Tubules are propelled by actin-based tubule motility (ABTM) to overcome membrane or tissue barriers in insect vectors. To further understand which insect factors mediate ABTM, we utilized yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to test interactions between tubule protein Pns10 of rice dwarf virus (RDV), a plant reovirus, and proteins of its insect vector, the leafhopper Nephotettix cincticeps. Tropomodulin (Tmod), vitellogenin, and lipophorin precursor of N. cincticep displayed positive and strong interaction with Pns10, and actin-associated protein Tmod interacted with Pns10 in pull-down assay and the co-immunoprecipitation system. Further, we determined Pns10 tubules associated with Tmod in cultured cells and midgut of N. cincticep. The expression dynamic of Tmod was consistent with that of Pns10 and the fluctuation of RDV accumulation. Knockdown of Tmod inhibited the Pns10 expression and viral accumulation, thus decreasing the viruliferous rates of leafhopper. These results suggested that Tmod was involved in viral spread by directly interacting with Pns10 tubules, finally promoting RDV infection. This study provided direct evidence of plant reoviruses utilizing an actin-associated protein to manipulate ABTM in insect vectors, thus facilitating viral spread. PMID:28067229

  18. Functional remineralization of carious dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugach, Megan Kardon

    A primary goal of dental tissue engineering is the biological reconstruction of tooth substrate destroyed by caries or other diseases affecting tooth mineralization. Traditionally, dentists treat caries by using invasive techniques to remove the diseased dental tissue and restore the lesion, ideally preventing further progression of decay. Success in strategies associated with remineralization of enamel and root caries have contributed to the less invasive prospect of remineralization of dentinal carious lesions. The central hypothesis of this dissertation is that carious dentin lesions can be remineralized if the lesions contain residual mineral. Caries Detector (CD) stained zones (pink, light pink, transparent and normal) of arrested carious dentin lesions were characterized according to microstructure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, mineral content by digital transverse microradiography, and nanomechanical properties by AFM-based nanoindentation. CD-stained and unstained zones had significantly different microstructure, mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Furthermore, the most demineralized carious zone contained residual mineral. To obtain reproducible, standardized dentin caries lesions, we characterized the lesions from an artificial carious dentin lesion model using a 0.05M acetate demineralization buffer. The artificial caries-like lesions produced by the buffer had similar mineral content and nanomechanical properties in the stained and unstained zones as natural dentin lesions. Both natural and artificial lesions had significant correlations between mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Mineral crystallite size and shape was examined by small angle x-ray scattering. Both natural and artificial carious dentin had different mineral sizes than normal dentin. Collagen in natural and artificial carious dentin lesions was examined by trichrome stain, AFM high-resolution imaging, and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy, to determine if

  19. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  20. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  1. Nanoleakage of cervical restorations of four dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of nanoleakage of restorations placed in cervical preparations with dentin bonding systems. The dentin bonding systems used were Single Bond, One Coat Bond, Prime & Bond NT/NRC, and PermaQuik. Ten saucer-shaped cervical preparations were bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems and restored with Silux Plus resin composite in each group. After 24 hours storage in 37 degrees C water, restorations were finished and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in 50% w/v solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours, and exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 hours. The samples were cut longitudinally through the center, polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission SEM using backscattered electron mode. The degree of silver penetration along the preparation wall was observed and calculated as a percentage of the total preparation wall length. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and LSD tests. PermaQuik demonstrated the lowest leakage score and the least silver deposition within the hybrid layer, while Prime & Bond NT/NRC showed the greatest leakage scores and the most silver deposition within the hybrid layer. Different nanoleakage patterns were observed for the different adhesive systems. First, the composition of each adhesive system may play a role in the different leakage patterns. Second, the current dentin bonding systems used in this study did not achieve perfect sealing at the restoration-dentin interface. This may influence the durability of the bond to dentin.

  2. Anacardic acid from brazilian cashew nut trees reduces dentine erosion.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Cintia; Oliveira, Flávia; Dos Santos, Maria Lucilia; de Freitas, Thiago; Imparato, José Carlos; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of solutions containing saturated anacardic acid (AA) on dentine erosion in vitro. AA was chemically isolated from natural cashew nutshell liquid obtained by continuous extraction in a Soxhlet extractor and was fully saturated by catalytic hydrogenation. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity, when exposed to buffers containing 100 µmol/l AA, was analyzed using zymography. Bovine root samples were subjected to erosive demineralization (Sprite Zero™, 4 × 90 s/day) and remineralization with artificial saliva between the erosive cycles for 5 days. The samples were treated as follows, after the first and the last acid exposure (1 min; n = 12/group): (1) 100 µmol/l epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (positive control); (2) 0.05% NaF; (3) 100 µmol/l saturated AA; (4) saturated AA and EGCG; (5) saturated AA, EGCG and NaF; (6) untreated (negative control). Dentine erosion was measured using a contact profilometer. Two dentine samples from each group were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Saturated AA reduced the activity of MMP-2. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed that all treatments significantly reduced dentine loss compared to the negative control (6.03 ± 0.98 µm). Solutions containing saturated AA (1.97 ± 1.02 µm) showed the greatest reduction in dentine erosion compared to the NaF (3.93 ± 1.54 µm) and EGCG (3.79 ± 0.83 µm) solutions. Therefore, it may be concluded that AA significantly reduces dentine erosion in vitro, possibly by acting as an MMP-2 inhibitor.

  3. The induction of reparative dentine by enamel proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Hammarström, L; Matsumoto, K; Lyngstadaas, S P

    2002-05-01

    This study was designed to examine whether enamel matrix derivative (EMD) could induce reparative dentine formation without eliciting adverse side-effects in pulpotomized teeth in the miniature swine. Pulpotomy was performed in 36 mandibular incisor teeth from 11 adult miniature swine. Following the surgical procedure, the exposed pulp tissue was treated with EMD or covered with a calcium hydroxide preparation (Dycal). Following an observation period of 3, 4 and 8 weeks, the experimental teeth were extracted and examined using light microscopy and histometric analysis. The total amount of reparative dentine formed in the EMD-treated teeth was calculated as total area using digital histomorphometry analysis of the five central-most sections from each experimental tooth. In the EMD-treated teeth, substantial amounts of dentine-like tissue formation consistently led to a complete hard-tissue bridging of the defects. The onset of hard tissue formation could be observed after 2 weeks and was located only on the pulpal wound. More limited dentine formation was also observed in Dycal-treated teeth. However, in these teeth the new hard tissue formed at the expense of pulp chamber width, causing narrowing of root canals. The total amount of reparative dentine formed in the EMD-treated teeth was significantly higher (P<0.005) than in the Dycal-treated specimens. These results demonstrate the potential of EMD as a biologically active pulp-dressing agent that specifically induces pulpal wound healing and dentine formation in the pulpotomized teeth without affecting the normal function of the remaining pulp.

  4. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  5. Micro-tensile bond strength of three luting resins to human regional dentin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Ludwig, Klaus; Adelung, Rainer; Kern, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the micro-tensile bonding strength (muTBS) of three luting resins to human regional dentin. Dentin disks from non-carious third molars were prepared from different regions (s, superficial dentin; d, deep dentin; c, cervical dentin), and divided into groups based on anatomical locations and luting resins (Super-Bond C&B: SB; Panavia F 2.0: PF; RelyX Unicem: RU): SB-s, SB-d, SB-c; PF-s, PF-d, PF-c; RU-s, RU-d, RU-c. Luting resins were used according to the manufacturers' instructions, to bond 1-mm-diameter PMMA or composite rods to the exposed dentin specimens under a load of 7.5 N, in the self-curing mode. After storage for 1 or 3 days, muTBS was tested at a cross-head speed of 1mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test. The bonding interface and fractography analyses were performed with SEM and TEM. ANOVA results showed that muTBS to superficial dentin was significantly higher than to deep or cervical dentin for all three luting resins. SB-s and PF-s, with the highest muTBS, failed primarily cohesively in luting resin. muTBS of SB-d and SB-c were significantly higher than those of PF and RU. RU, with the lowest regional muTBS, failed mostly within demineralized dentin. SEM and TEM showed that adhesive failures in SB and PF occurred at the top of the hybrid layer (HL), but no obvious HL was observed in RU. Luting resins with different chemical formulations and applications yield significantly different bond strengths to different regions in human dentin.

  6. Effect of two different chemomechanical caries removal agents on dentin microhardness: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthi, Surendar; Nivedhitha, Malli Sureshbabu; Vanajassun, P Pranav

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two different chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR) agents on dentin microhardness. In this study, the crown portion of ten carious-free and ten caries-affected teeth were selected. In carious-free samples, the teeth were decoronated at the level of cemento - enamel junction. Only the crown portion of the teeth was selected. Occlusal one-third of the crowns were cross-sectioned and discarded to expose the dentin, and it was divided into two groups, five teeth in each group. Then, they were further sectioned longitudinally through the centre. In one group, no agent was applied on one half and Carisolv was applied on other half. In another group, no agent was applied on one-half and Carie-Care was applied on the other half for 1 min. In carious samples, the crowns were sectioned through the centre of carious lesion. Carisolv was applied on one-half and Carie-Care was applied on the other half. After using CMCR agents, surface hardness of dentin was examined using Vickers hardness number (VHN). The data were analyzed using t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant difference among normal dentin (62.91 ± 2.76), Carisolv-treated normal dentin (61.72 ± 2.89), and Carie-Care-treated normal dentin (61.90 ± 3.19). In carious samples, the results of Carisolv-treated dentin (58.57 ± 2.62) was not statistically significantly different from those of the Carie-Care-treated dentin (56.77 ± 4.41). In conclusion, neither of the CMCR methods caused a significant change in the microhardness of normal dentin and the treated carious dentin.

  7. The effect of dentine surface preparation and reduced application time of adhesive on bonding strength.

    PubMed

    Saikaew, Pipop; Chowdhury, A F M Almas; Fukuyama, Mai; Kakuda, Shinichi; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Sano, Hidehiko

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of surface preparation and the application time of adhesives on the resin-dentine bond strengths with universal adhesives. Sixty molars were cut to exposed mid-coronal dentine and divided into 12 groups (n=5) based on three factors; (1) adhesive: G-Premio Bond (GP, GC Corp., Tokyo, Japan), Clearfil Universal Bond (CU, Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc., Okayama, Japan) and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SB, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); (2) smear layer preparation: SiC paper ground dentine or bur-cut dentine; (3) application time: shortened time or as manufacturer's instruction. Fifteen resin-dentine sticks per group were processed for microtensile bond strength test (μTBS) according to non-trimming technique (1mm(2)) after storage in distilled water (37 °C) for 24h. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 tests (α=0.05). Fractured surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Another 12 teeth were prepared and cut into slices for SEM examination of bonded interfaces. μTBS were higher when bonded to SiC-ground dentine according to manufacturer's instruction. Bonding to bur-cut dentine resulted in significantly lower μTBS (p<0.000). Shortening the application time resulted in significantly lower bond strength for CU on SiC and GP on bur-cut dentine. SEM of fractured surfaces revealed areas with a large amount of porosities at the adhesive resin interface. This was more pronounced when adhesives were bonded with a reduced application time and on bur cut dentine. The performance of universal adhesives can be compromised on bur cut dentine and when applied with a reduced application time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resin-dentin bond strength as related to different surface preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Sattabanasuk, Vanthana; Vachiramon, Viracha; Qian, Fang; Armstrong, Steven R

    2007-06-01

    To determine the microtensile bond strength and micromorphological structures on bonding of two adhesives (OptiBond FL and Clearfil SE Bond) to dentin surfaces ground with different preparation methods. Extracted human molars were ground flat to expose mid-coronal occlusal dentin surface with one of six preparation methods--P120 grit SiC paper, P400 grit SiC paper, P1200 grit SiC paper, medium grit diamond bur, fine grit diamond bur, and carbide bur. Each of the adhesives was used to bond resin-based composite to the dentin surface. Dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated and microtensile bond strengths were determined. The subsequent debond pathway and micromorphological structures of representative dentin surfaces were examined under scanning electron microscopy. ANOVA and survival analyses were performed both assuming independence from and accommodating for within-tooth correlation between specimens. By ignoring the correlations between specimens, statistical analyses revealed no surface preparation effect on microtensile bond strength for each adhesive system. However, effects of surface preparation method on dentin adhesion of both adhesives were detected when accommodating for any within-tooth specimen correlations. Overall, carbide bur group showed the lowest bond strength for both OptiBond FL and Clearfil SE Bond. Dentin surfaces ground with diamond burs tended to present more compact smear layer than those ground with SiC papers and, subsequently, produced an effect on resin-dentin bond strengths. The dentin surface preparation method affects smear layer characteristics and dentin surface topography and, therefore affects resin-dentin bond strength. Smear layer denseness, more so than thickness, may compromise bonding efficacy of adhesives, especially of the self-etch systems.

  9. Effect of two different chemomechanical caries removal agents on dentin microhardness: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthi, Surendar; Nivedhitha, Malli SureshBabu; Vanajassun, P Pranav

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two different chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR) agents on dentin microhardness. Materials and Methods: In this study, the crown portion of ten carious-free and ten caries-affected teeth were selected. In carious-free samples, the teeth were decoronated at the level of cemento – enamel junction. Only the crown portion of the teeth was selected. Occlusal one-third of the crowns were cross-sectioned and discarded to expose the dentin, and it was divided into two groups, five teeth in each group. Then, they were further sectioned longitudinally through the centre. In one group, no agent was applied on one half and Carisolv was applied on other half. In another group, no agent was applied on one-half and Carie-Care was applied on the other half for 1 min. In carious samples, the crowns were sectioned through the centre of carious lesion. Carisolv was applied on one-half and Carie-Care was applied on the other half. After using CMCR agents, surface hardness of dentin was examined using Vickers hardness number (VHN). Statistical Analysis and Results: The data were analyzed using t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant difference among normal dentin (62.91 ± 2.76), Carisolv-treated normal dentin (61.72 ± 2.89), and Carie-Care-treated normal dentin (61.90 ± 3.19). In carious samples, the results of Carisolv-treated dentin (58.57 ± 2.62) was not statistically significantly different from those of the Carie-Care-treated dentin (56.77 ± 4.41). Conclusion: In conclusion, neither of the CMCR methods caused a significant change in the microhardness of normal dentin and the treated carious dentin. PMID:24082572

  10. Bond strength of adhesive systems to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-irradiated dentin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Adriana Oliveira; Reis, Andr Figueiredo; de Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; de Freitas, Patr Cia Moreira; Aranha, Ana Cec Lia Corr A; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Giannini, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and different adhesive procedures on bond strength of two bonding agents to dentin. Studies have shown that laser-irradiated dentinal tissue yields lower bond strengths than does nonirradiated dentin. In this study, different treatment methods of laser irradiating dentin were studied to enhance the bond strength of bonding agents to nonirradiated dentin. Third molars were wet ground with SiC until the occlusal flat dentin surface was exposed, and the teeth were randomly assigned to six groups (n=5). A two-step self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond, G1) and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Single Bond Plus, G2) were applied to the nonirradiated dentin surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups. In G3 and G4, the same adhesives were applied after Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation, whereas in G5 and G6 adhesives were applied after Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation, phosphoric acid etching, and NaOCl deproteinization of etched dentin. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser worked at 2.78??m and the repetition rate was fixed at 20?Hz. Composite blocks were built on bonded surfaces and the teeth were stored for 24?h at 37?C. Restored teeth were vertically and serially sectioned to obtain bonded specimens for the bond strength test. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (?=5%). Laser irradiation reduced bond strengths for the two adhesives, regardless of acid etching and deproteinization of dentin post-irradiation (p<0.05). The self-etching primer system showed higher bond strengths to laser irradiated dentin than did Single Bond Plus (p<0.05). The adhesive systems applied to normal dentin yielded higher bond strengths than when they were applied to laser irradiated dentin (p<0.05). The self-etching primer seemed to be less affected by dentin irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. The additional etching and NaOCl solution did not overcome the effects of laser irradiation on

  11. Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of a self-etching adhesive system to caries-affected dentin on the gingival wall.

    PubMed

    Sengun, Abdulkadir; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Sener, Yagmur; Ozer, Fusun

    2005-01-01

    A self-etching dentin adhesive was evaluated for its ability to bond to caries-affected and sound dentin after applying three desensitizers to the gingival walls. Sixty extracted human molars, with approximal dentin caries, were cut horizontally on the long axis of the tooth through caries-affected gingival walls. Carious dentin was removed with SiC paper by means of a caries detector to expose caries-affected dentin. The molars were randomly assigned to four groups: control and three experimental groups-Micro Prime, Glauma Desentizer and Cervitec. Desensitizers were applied to the dentinal surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. A resin composite was bonded to both the caries-affected and sound dentin of each tooth using a bonding system and plastic rings. The restoration was debonded by shear bond strength. The application of Micro Prime and Gluma Desensitizer to caries-affected dentin did not show any effect on bond strength testing. However, Cervitec caused a decrease in bond strength to caries-affected dentin. The effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of the self-etch bonding agent to caries-affected dentin changed according to the chemical composition of the materials. Desensitizer application on sound dentin is recommended with self-etch bonding systems.

  12. An In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength of Composite to Superficial and Deep Dentin, Treated With Er:YAG Laser Irradiation or Acid-Etching

    PubMed Central

    Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Nezhad Nasrollah, Fatemeh; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Fekrazad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin on superficial and deep dentin after conditioning with phosphoric acid and Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Methods: Thirty human molars were selected, roots were removed and crowns were bisected to provide a total of 60 half-crowns. Specimens were ground to expose superficial and deep dentin. Samples were assigned to six groups: (1) AS (acid etching of superficial dentin); (2) AD (acid etching of deep dentin); (3) LS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin); (4) LD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin); (5) LAS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin followed by acid etching); (6) LAD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin followed by acid etching) The adhesive protocol was performed. Samples were thermocycled and micro-shear bond strength was tested to failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results: The AS group, demonstrated the greatest amount of micro-shear bond strength. Statistical analysis showed a decrease in bond strength in laser-treated groups which was more significant for deep dentin. Conclusion: Preparation of dentin with laser did not improve bonding to superficial and deep dentin. PMID:28144437

  13. An In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength of Composite to Superficial and Deep Dentin, Treated With Er:YAG Laser Irradiation or Acid-Etching.

    PubMed

    Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Nezhad Nasrollah, Fatemeh; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Fekrazad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin on superficial and deep dentin after conditioning with phosphoric acid and Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Methods: Thirty human molars were selected, roots were removed and crowns were bisected to provide a total of 60 half-crowns. Specimens were ground to expose superficial and deep dentin. Samples were assigned to six groups: (1) AS (acid etching of superficial dentin); (2) AD (acid etching of deep dentin); (3) LS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin); (4) LD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin); (5) LAS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin followed by acid etching); (6) LAD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin followed by acid etching) The adhesive protocol was performed. Samples were thermocycled and micro-shear bond strength was tested to failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results: The AS group, demonstrated the greatest amount of micro-shear bond strength. Statistical analysis showed a decrease in bond strength in laser-treated groups which was more significant for deep dentin. Conclusion: Preparation of dentin with laser did not improve bonding to superficial and deep dentin.

  14. Effect of smear layer against disinfection protocols on Enterococcus faecalis-infected dentin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhejun; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the effect of the smear layer on the antibacterial effect of different disinfecting solutions in infected dentinal tubules. Cells of Enterococcus faecalis were forced into dentinal tubules according to a previously established protocol. After a 3-week incubation period of infected dentin blocks, a uniform smear layer was produced. Forty infected dentin specimens were prepared and subjected to 3 and 10 minutes of exposure to disinfecting solutions including sterile water, 2% and 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), 17% EDTA, and QMiX (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK). The following combinations were also included: 2% NaOCl + 2% CHX, 2% NaOCl + QMiX, 6% NaOCl + QMiX, and 6% NaOCl + 17% EDTA + 2% CHX. Four other dentin specimens similarly infected but with no smear layer were subjected to 3 minutes of exposure to 2% CHX and 6% NaOCl for comparison. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and viability staining were used to analyze the proportions of dead and live bacteria inside the dentin. In the presence of a smear layer, 10 minutes of exposure to QMiX, 2% NaOCl + QMiX, 6% NaOCl + QMiX, and 6% NaOCl + 17% EDTA + 2% CHX resulted in significantly more dead bacteria than 3 minutes of exposure to these same disinfecting solutions (P < .05). No statistically significant difference between 3 and 10 minutes was found in other groups (P > .05); 6% NaOCl + QMiX and 6% NaOCl + 17% EDTA + 2% CHX showed the strongest antibacterial effect. In the absence of a smear layer, 2% CHX and 6% NaOCl killed significantly more bacteria than they did in the presence of a smear layer (P < .05). The smear layer reduces the effectiveness of disinfecting agents against E. faecalis in infected dentin. Solutions containing 6% NaOCl and/or QMiX showed the highest antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of detergents on the antibacterial activity of disinfecting solutions in dentin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhejun; Shen, Ya; Ma, Jingzhi; Haapasalo, Markus

    2012-07-01

    Detergents have been added into different disinfecting solutions to lower their surface tension and to enhance their antibacterial effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dentin disinfection by different antibacterial solutions in the presence and absence of detergents using a novel dentin infection model and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Semicylindrical dentin specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis by centrifugation according to a previously described protocol. After 1 day of incubation, the infected dentin specimens were subjected to 1 and 3 minutes of exposure to sterile water, 0.1% cetrimide (CTR), 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% NaOCl + 0.1% CTR, 6% NaOCl, 6% NaOCl + 0.1% CTR, Chlor-Xtra (Vista Dental, Racine, WI), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), CHX-Plus (Vista Dental, Racine, WI), 2/4% iodine potassium iodide (IPI), and IPI + 0.1% CTR. The specimens were then stained for bacterial viability and examined by CLSM to analyze the proportions of dead and live bacteria inside dentinal tubules. More bacteria in dentin were killed after 3 minutes of exposure than after 1 minute of exposure to the disinfecting solutions in all experimental groups (P < .05). The antibacterial solutions with detergents (0.1% CTR, 2% NaOCl + 0.1% CTR, CHX-Plus, and IPI + 0.1% CTR) showed a statistically higher proportion of dead bacteria than the corresponding solutions without detergents (sterile water, 2% NaOCl, 2% CHX, and IPI) (P < .05) except for the 6% NaOCl group (6% NaOCl, 6% NaOCl + 0.1% CTR, and Chlor-Xtra) (P > .05). Six percent NaOCl, 6% NaOCl + 0.1% CTR, and Chlor-Xtra were the most effective solutions, killing over 45% and 65% of the bacteria after 1 and 3 minutes of exposure, respectively. Only 3% to 4% of the bacteria were dead in the sterile water group, whereas 0.1% CTR alone was able to kill 24% to 36% of the E. faecalis cells. The addition of detergents in the disinfecting solutions used in the present study

  16. Effect of direct peroxide bleach application to bovine dentin on flexural strength and modulus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tam, Laura E; Lim, Mindy; Khanna, Swati

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of carbamide peroxide (CP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on the flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) of dentin. 2x2x20mm bovine dentin specimens were immersed in the bleaching agents to simulate overnight (10 or 15% CP, 6h daily, 2 weeks), exaggerated overnight (10% CP, 6h/day, 5 days/week, 2 months), daytime (6.5 or 7.5% HP, 1h daily, 3 weeks) and in-office (35% HP, 1h/day, 2 days/week, 3 weeks) treatment protocols. Distilled water (DW) and a placebo gel acted as control immersion materials. After immersion, the specimens were rinsed and stored in DW. Mechanical testing was performed 24h after the last treatment using an Instron Universal Testing Machine with a crosshead speed of 0.75 mm/min. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p<0.05). There were significant reductions in the FS and FM of dentin after 2-week and 2-month exposures to CP. There were no significant differences in the FS or the FM of the dentin among the HP treatment and control groups. Direct in vitro application of CP bleaches caused significant decreases in dentin FS and FM. Similar decreases were not observed among the HP-treated dentin groups, which were exposed to shorter treatment times. Further research is needed to determine the effect of CP and HP on dentin in vivo.

  17. In vitro evaluation of the effect of dietary acids and toothbrushing on human root dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Zandim, Daniela Leal; Leite, Fabio Renato Manzolli; Sampaio, José Eduardo Cezar

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to quantify the alterations in human root dentin permeability after exposure to dietary acids and to evaluate the effect of toothbrushing after acid application. Extracted human third molars had their crowns sectioned above the CEJ, pulp tissue removed, and cervical root dentin exposed using a high-speed bur (approximately 1 mm in depth of substance loss). From each root fragment, one specimen was prepared. A total of 25 specimens were used and distributed randomly into five groups. The specimens were attached to a hydraulic pressure apparatus to evaluate the alterations of root dentin permeability after exposure to different acids. Dentin permeability was measured after the following sequential steps: (1) treatment with EDTA for 3 minutes to obtain the maximum permeability; (2) root planing to create a smear layer; (3) exposure to different acidic substances for 5 minutes (vinegar, cola drink, lemon juice, white wine, and orange juice); and (4) brushing for 3 minutes. All acidic substances increased dentin permeability after root planing. Lemon juice produced higher values for permeability when compared to the other substances (P = .009); moreover, orange juice showed similar results (P < .02) except when compared to vinegar (P = .12). Brushing right after acid exposure significantly reduced dentin permeability except in the vinegar group (P = .07). Under the experimental conditions, dietary acids increased root dentin permeability, and immediate brushing reduced permeability levels.

  18. Comparative assessment of hardening of demineralized dentin under lining materials using an ultramicroindentation system.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Zehnder, Matthias; Imfeld, Thomas; Swain, Michael V

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the current in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of three lining materials with a reported mineralizing capacity on hardness and elasticity of demineralized dentin. Four standardized microcavities were prepared in exposed dentin surfaces of 16 extracted human molars each. Dentin was demineralized in 0.5M EDTA for 2 h. One microcavity was left empty. The others were filled with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), a bioactive glass S53P4 suspension, and a prototype Ca-PO(4) cement. Teeth were then immersed in deionized water or simulated oral fluid. After 3 weeks, hardness and composite elastic modulus of the dentin subjacent to the microcavities were assessed under wet conditions using the ultramicroindentation system (UMIS). After immersion in deionized water, there was no significant improvement of the mechanical properties of dentin irrespective of the material applied beforehand, indicating a lack of direct material effects. Exposure to simulated oral fluid resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) higher hardness and composite elastic modulus values of the dentin subjacent to empty microcavities and counterparts lined with bioactive glass compared to corresponding dentin under the RMGIC. UMIS profiles showed little variance.

  19. Influence of previous acid etching on bond strength of universal adhesives to enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Silva, Tatiane Josefa; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acid pretreatment on the bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin with 2 different universal self-etching adhesives. The null hypothesis was that the acid treatment performed prior to adhesive application would not significantly change the bond strength to enamel or dentin for either universal adhesive tested. A sample of 112 bovine incisors were selected and embedded in acrylic resin. Half were ground until a flat enamel surface was obtained, and the other half were polished until a 6 × 6-mm area of dentin was exposed, resulting into 2 groups (n = 56). The enamel and dentin groups were divided into 2 subgroups according to the adhesive system applied: Futurabond U or Scotchbond Universal. Each of these subgroups was divided into 2 additional subgroups (n = 14); 1 subgroup received phosphoric acid pretreatment, and 1 subgroup did not. The bond strength was assessed with a microtensile test. Data from enamel and dentin specimens were analyzed separately using 1-way analysis of variance. The acid pretreatment did not significantly change the bond strength of the adhesives tested, either to enamel (P = 0.4161) or to dentin (P = 0.4857). The acid etching pretreatment did not affect the bond strength to dentin and enamel when the tested universal multipurpose adhesive systems were used.

  20. Interpretation of male rat renal tubule tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, I S; Baetcke, K P

    1993-01-01

    Based on an analysis of recent scientific studies, a Technical Panel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Risk Assessment Forum recently advised EPA risk assessors against using information on certain male rat renal tubule tumors to assess human risk under conditions specified in a new Forum report. Risk assessment approaches generally assume that chemicals producing tumors in laboratory animals are a potential cancer hazard to humans. For most chemicals, including classical rodent kidney carcinogens such as N-ethyl-N-hydroxyethylnitrosamine, this extrapolation remains appropriate. Some chemicals, however, induce accumulation of alpha 2u-globulin (alpha 2u-g), a low molecular weight protein, in the male rat kidney. The alpha 2u-g accumulation initiates a sequence of events that appears to lead to renal tubule tumor formation. Female rats and other laboratory mammals administered the same chemicals do not accumulate low molecular weight protein in the kidney, and they do not develop renal tubule tumors. Because humans appear to be more like other laboratory animals than like the male rat, in this special situation, the male rat is not a good model for assessing human risk. The Forum report stresses the need for full scrutiny of a substantial set of data to determine when it is reasonable to presume that renal tumors in male rats are linked to a process involving alpha 2u-g accumulation and to select appropriate procedures for estimating human risks under such circumstances. PMID:7517352

  1. Role of proximal tubules in the pathogenesis of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Nazih; Batuman, Vecihi

    2011-01-01

    The proximal tubules make up a significant portion of the kidneys; proximal tubule epithelial cells are the most populous cell type in the kidney, and carry out diverse regulatory and endocrine functions where numerous transporters are located. Under normal circumstances, more than two thirds of filtered salt and water, and all filtered bicarbonate is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule. A number of inherited and acquired acid-base and tubule disorders are linked to impaired transporters in the proximal tubule cells. Equally important is the intrinsic immune characteristics of proximal tubule cells that give them the ability to also function as immune responders to a wide range of immunologic, ischemic or toxic injury. It is therefore not surprising that proximal tubule-related phenomena are closely related to the pathogenesis of a vast array of kidney diseases. Many kidney diseases, acute and chronic, first manifest with proximal tubule disorders. Recent insight into molecular characteristics of transport functions in the proximal tubules, and the recognition that proximal tubule cells possess intrinsic immune responses have contributed to an improved understanding of important areas in nephrology, such as Fanconi's syndrome, renal tubular acidosis, phosphate wasting syndromes, Dent's disease, cystinuria and other amino acid transport disorders, acute kidney injury, and the role of proximal tubules in progressive kidney disease. Megalin/ cubilin-mediated endocytosis by proximal tubule cells of increased quantities of filtered proteins (protein overloading) in glomerular diseases appears to evoke cell stress responses resulting in increased inflammatory cytokines leading to tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Finally, the proximal tubule may be the site of both active vitamin D synthesis through the action of 1-α-hydroxylase, and the site where erythropoietin synthesis takes place. Thus, proximal tubule injury also contributes to two distressing

  2. Effectiveness of simplified dentin bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Itoh, K; Tani, C; Manabe, A; Yamashita, T; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1998-03-01

    The effectiveness of newly developed commercial dentin bonding systems (SB, MB II and KB) was evaluated by measuring the contraction gap width of a resin composite restored into a cylindrical dentin cavity prepared in an extracted human molar and by measuring the tensile bond strength to the flat dentin surface. In addition, calcium loss during dentin conditioning was analyzed using electron microanalyses. An experimental dentin bonding system composed of EDTA conditioning, GM solution priming and a bonding agent containing 10-MDP was employed as a control in which it was presumed that contraction gap formation was prevented completely. However, gap formation was observed using the three commercial simplified dentin bonding systems. SEM observation showed that the gap was formed between the resin composite and the top surface of the dentin cavity wall indicating that the fracture occurred at the adhesive interface, but never inside the dentin nor inside the resin composite.

  3. Dentin-like tissue formation and biomineralization by multicellular human pulp cell spheres in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Maintaining or regenerating a vital pulp is a preferable goal in current endodontic research. In this study, human dental pulp cell aggregates (spheres) were applied onto bovine and human root canal models to evaluate their potential use as pre-differentiated tissue units for dental pulp tissue regeneration. Methods Human dental pulp cells (DPC) were derived from wisdom teeth, cultivated into three-dimensional cell spheres and seeded onto bovine and into human root canals. Sphere formation, tissue-like and mineralization properties as well as growth behavior of cells on dentin structure were evaluated by light microscopy (LM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Results Spheres and outgrown cells showed tissue-like properties, the ability to merge with other cell spheres and extra cellular matrix formation; CLSM investigation revealed a dense network of actin and focal adhesion contacts (FAC) inside the spheres and a pronounced actin structure of cells outgrown from the spheres. A dentin-structure-orientated migration of the cells was shown by SEM investigation. Besides the direct extension of the cells into dentinal tubules, the coverage of the tubular walls with cell matrix was detected. Moreover, an emulation of dentin-like structures with tubuli-like and biomineral formation was detected by SEM- and EDX-investigation. Conclusions The results of the present study show tissue-like behavior, the replication of tubular structures and the mineralization of human dental pulp spheres when colonized on root dentin. The application of cells in form of pulp spheres on root dentin reveals their beneficial potential for dental tissue regeneration. PMID:24946771

  4. Bonding mechanism of three "one-bottle" systems to conditioned and unconditioned enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Goracci, G; García-Godoy, F

    1997-10-01

    This in vivo study investigated the formation of hybrid layer, resin tags and adhesive lateral branches, by use of the latest generation of enamel-dentin bonding systems ("one-bottle" systems) on conditioned and unconditioned enamel and dentin. The dentin adhesives were tested on 24 flat dentin preparations made on facial surfaces of vital, periodontally compromised teeth. The experimental teeth were randomly divided in six groups of four samples each. Group 1: Prime & Bond 2.1 (conditioned dentin, CD); Group 2: Single Bond (CD); Group 3: Syntac Sprint (CD); Group 4: Prime & Bond 2.1 (unconditioned dentin, UD); Group 5: Single Bond (UD); Group 6: Syntac Sprint (UD). In the first three groups, the "one-bottle" systems were applied following the manufacturers' instructions, while in the other three groups the dentin and the enamel were not treated with phosphoric acid and the primer was applied directly on the prepared surfaces. On top of the primer-adhesive, a thin layer of resin was applied and light-cured for 20 seconds. The sample teeth were extracted immediately after the adhesive material was light-cured. All the samples were split-fractured along their long axis. Half of the samples were deproteinized and decalcified at the interface in order to visualize the hybrid layer and the other halves were completely dissolved in order to observe the morphology of resin tags by use of scanning electron microscopy. Groups 1-3: All the tested products showed the same micromechanical bonding mechanism to conditioned dentin with phosphoric acid: they formed hybrid layer, resin tags and adhesive lateral branches. In the samples of the first three groups, characteristic reverse cone-shaped tags with their corresponding adhesive lateral branches were evident. At the enamel site, traditional pattern of etch enamel was always observed. Groups 4-6: When the bonding systems were applied on unconditioned dentin, hybrid layer was not formed, resin tags were rarely noted and their

  5. Effects of ammonium hexafluorosilicate application on demineralized enamel and dentin of primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Watanabe, Eiko; Tadokoro, Katsumi; Inoue, Takashi; Miyazaki, Masashi; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-09-01

    Silver diamine fluoride (Ag(NH(3))(2)F) arrests caries but stains teeth black. To overcome this drawback, we applied ammonium hexafluorosilicate (AHF; (NH(4))(2)SiF(6)) and observed changes in the color and structure of demineralized enamel and dentin of extracted primary teeth. Enamel and dentin were demineralized in 10% EDTA solution for 90 s followed by 35% phosphoric acid gel for 60 s, then soaked in AHF solution for 60 s. Before analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), enamel and dentin were demineralized in 10% EDTA for 90 s. Teeth were divided into 4 groups according to AHF application and artificial saliva immersion status and then examined. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at a significance level of P < 0.05. AHF treatment did not cause visible discoloration. Enamel prisms and dental tubules appeared by demineralization were covered with precipitates by AHF application. A sphere-filled membranous structure was observed in the saliva immersion groups. EDS analysis showed that AHF application had no effect on enamel; however, F% and Ca/P ratio were significantly higher on dentin surfaces after AHF application without artificial saliva immersion. Further study on arresting caries treatment is required.

  6. Study on the potential inhibition of root dentine wear adjacent to fluoride-containing restorations.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Domiciano, Silvia Jorge; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the vicinity of root dentine that had been restored with fluoride-releasing materials was at reduced risk for erosive/abrasive wear compared to root dentine restored with a non-fluoride-containing material. According to a randomized complete block design, standardized cavities prepared on the surface of 150 bovine root dentine slabs were restored with glass-ionomer cement, resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified resin composite, fluoride-containing or conventional composite. Specimens were coated with two layers of an acid-resistant nail varnish exposing half of the dentine surface and half of the restoration. Subsequently, specimens were either eroded in an acidic drink or left uneroded, then exposed to artificial saliva and abraded in a toothbrushing machine. Wear depth in the vicinity of restorations was quantified by a stylus profilometer, based on the nonabraded areas surrounding the erosion/abrasion region. Two-way ANOVA did not demonstrate significant interaction between restoratives and eroded-uneroded dentine (p=0.5549) nor significant difference among restorative materials (p=0.8639). Tukey's test ascertained that the wear depth was higher for eroded than for uneroded groups. Fluoride-releasing materials seemed to negligibly inhibit wear in the vicinity of restored root dentine subjected to erosive/abrasive challenges.

  7. Effect of Phosphoric Acid on the Degradation of Human Dentin Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Mutluay, M.; Seseogullari-Dirihan, R.; Agee, K.A.; Key, W.O.; Scheffel, D.L.S.; Breschi, L.; Mazzoni, A.; Tjäderhane, L.; Nishitani, Y.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    This study determined if dentin proteases are denatured by phosphoric acid (PA) used in etch-and-rinse dentin adhesives. Dentin beams were completely demineralized with EDTA for 30 days. We “acid-etched” experimental groups by exposing the demineralized dentin beams to 1, 10, or 37 mass% PA for 15 sec or 15 min. Control beams were not exposed to PA but were incubated in simulated body fluid for 3 days to assay their total endogenous telopeptidase activity, by their ability to solubilize C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides ICTP and CTX from insoluble dentin collagen. Control beams released 6.1 ± 0.8 ng ICTP and 0.6 ± 0.1 ng CTX/mg dry-wt/3 days. Positive control beams pre-incubated in p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, a compound known to activate proMMPs, released about the same amount of ICTP peptides, but released significantly less CTX. Beams immersed in 1, 10, or 37 mass% PA for 15 sec or 15 min released amounts of ICTP and CTX similar to that released by the controls (p > 0.05). Beams incubated in galardin, an MMP inhibitor, or E-64, a cathepsin inhibitor, blocked most of the release of ICTP and CTX, respectively. It is concluded that PA does not denature endogenous MMP and cathepsin activities of dentin matrices. PMID:23103634

  8. Immunohistochemical and biochemical assay of versican in human sound predentine/dentine matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, A.; Orsini, G.; Mazzoni, A.; Nato, F.; Papa, V.; Piccirilli, M.; Putignano, A.; Mazzotti, G.; De Stefano Dorigo, E.; Breschi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of versican proteoglycan within the human dentine organic matrix by means of a correlative immunohistochemical analysis with field emission in-lens scanning electron microscope (FEI-SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), fluorescence microscope (FM) and biochemical assay. Specimens containing dentine and predentine were obtained from non carious human teeth and divided in three groups: 1) FEI-SEM group: sections were exposed to a pre-embedding immunohistochemical procedure; 2) TEM group: specimens were fixed, demineralised, embedded and submitted to a post-embedding immunohistochemical procedure; 3) FM group: sections mineralised and submitted to a pre-embedding immunohistochemical procedure with fluorescence labelling. Specimens were exposed to two different antibodies to assay distribution of versican fragments and whole versican molecule. Western Blotting analysis of dentine and pulp extracts was also performed. The correlative FEI-SEM,TEM and FM analysis revealed positive immunoreaction for versican fragments both in predentine and dentine, while few gold particles identifying the whole versican molecule were found in predentine only under TEM. No labelling of versican whole molecule was detected by FEI-SEM and FM analysis. The immunoblotting analysis confirmed the morphological findings. This study suggests that in fully developed human teeth versican fragments are significant constituents of the human dentine and predentine organic matrix, while versican whole molecule can be visualised in scarce amount within predentine only. The role of versican fragments within human dentine organic matrix should be further elucidated.

  9. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Glucotoxicity and Tumorigenesis Downstream the Renal Proximal Tubule?

    PubMed

    Bertinat, Romina; Nualart, Francisco; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-08-01

    At present, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end-stage renal disease. Effective glycaemic management is the most powerful tool to delay the establishment of diabetic complications, such as diabetic kidney disease. Together with reducing blood glucose levels, new anti-diabetic agents are expected not only to control the progression but also to restore known defects of the diabetic kidney. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are promising anti-diabetic agents that reduce hyperglycaemia by impairing glucose reabsorption in proximal tubule of the kidney and increasing glucosuria. SGLT2 inhibitors have shown to reduce glucotoxicity in isolated proximal tubule cells and also to attenuate expression of markers of overall kidney damage in experimental animal models of diabetes, but the actual renoprotective effect for downstream nephron segments is still unknown and deserves further attention. Here, we briefly discuss possible undesired effects of enhanced glucosuria and albuminuria in nephron segments beyond the proximal tubule after SGLT2 inhibitor treatment, offering new lines of research to further understand the renoprotective action of these anti-diabetic agents. Strategies blocking glucose reabsorption by renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) may be protective for RPTEC, but downstream nephron segments will still be exposed to high glucose and albumin levels through the luminal face. The actual effect of constant enhanced glucosuria over distal nephron segments remains to be established. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1635-1637, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Multiscale modelling and diffraction-based characterization of elastic behaviour of human dentine.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P; Walmsley, Anthony; Lumley, Philip J; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2013-08-01

    Human dentine is a hierarchical mineralized tissue with a two-level composite structure, with tubules being the prominent structural feature at a microlevel, and collagen fibres decorated with hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystallite platelets dominating the nanoscale. Few studies have focused on this two-level structure of human dentine, where the response to mechanical loading is thought to be affected not only by the tubule volume fraction at the microscale, but also by the shape and orientation distribution of mineral crystallites, and their nanoscale spatial arrangement and alignment. In this paper, in situ elastic strain evolution within HAp in dentine subjected to uniaxial compressive loading along both longitudinal and transverse directions was characterized simultaneously by two synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques: small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively). WAXS allows the evaluation of the apparent modulus linking the external load to the internal HAp crystallite strain, while the nanoscale HAp distribution and arrangement can be quantified by SAXS. We proposed an improved multiscale Eshelby inclusion model that takes into account the two-level hierarchical structure, and validated it with a multidirectional experimental strain evaluation. The agreement between the simulation and measurement indicates that the multiscale hierarchical model developed here accurately reflects the structural arrangement and mechanical response of human dentine. This study benefits the comprehensive understanding of the mechanical behaviour of hierarchical biomaterials. The knowledge of the mechanical properties related to the hierarchical structure is essential for the understanding and predicting the effects of structural alterations that may occur due to disease or treatment on the performance of dental tissues and their artificial replacements. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of surface treatment and joint shape on microtensile bond strength of reattached root dentin segments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    An effective bonding technique for reattaching vertical root fracture segments has not yet been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of surface treatment and joint shape on bond strength of reattached root dentin segments. Microtensile dentin specimens (n=120, cross-sectional area=1.5 mm2) were obtained from 12 bovine teeth roots, and fractured under a tensile force. The segments of each group (n=6) were reattached by a 4-META/MMA-TBB adhesive resin after different treatments (etching or polishing, a 50-microm or 500-microm gap space, butt or wedge joint). The group with a 50-microm gap space and butt joint, which was not etched or polished, served as the control. After 24 hours of storage in 0.9% normal saline solution or thermal cycling (3000 cycles, 4 degrees C and 60 degrees C), the specimens were fractured in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The microtensile bond strengths (MPa) were recorded. The bonded interface and fractured surface were observed by SEM (original magnification x 1000). The results were analyzed by a 2-way analysis of variance and the Fisher protected least significant difference post-hoc test (alpha=.05). Significantly higher bond strengths (P=.0001) were shown for the nonpolished group (9.78 +/- 4.44 MPa) and the etched group (9.31 +/- 1.23 MPa) than for the polished group (fractured before test). The wedge-shaped joint exhibited the highest bond strength (18.57 +/- 3.40 MPa, P=.0017). SEM observations showed that the penetration of resin tags along the oblique dentinal tubules was within the wedge joint. Etching and oblique tubule orientation contributed to significantly high bond strength of reattached segments to dentin after vertical root fracture.

  12. Exosomal Transfer From Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells To Distal Tubule And Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, John J.; Seaton, Joscelyn E.; Victor, Ken G.; Reyes, Camellia M.; Wang, Dora Bigler; Pettigrew, Abigail C.; Courtner, Crystal E.; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh T.; Van Sciver, Robert E.; Carlson, Julia M.; Felder, Robin A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Exosomes are 50-90 nm extracellular membrane particles that may mediate trans-cellular communication between cells and tissues. We have reported that human urinary exosomes contain miRNA that are biomarkers for salt sensitivity and inverse salt sensitivity of blood pressure. This study examines exosomal transfer between cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) and from RPTCs to human distal tubule and collecting duct cells. Design and methods For RPTC-to-RPTC exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 RPTC lines producing exosomes that were fluorescently labeled with exosomal-specific markers CD63-EGFP or CD9-RFP. Transfer between RPTCs was demonstrated by co-culturing CD63-EGFP and CD9-RFP stable clones and performing live confocal microscopy. For RPTC-to-distal segment exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 distal tubule and 3 collecting duct immortalized cell lines. Results Time-lapse videos revealed unique proximal tubule cellular uptake patterns for exosomes and eventual accumulation into the multi-vesicular body. Using culture supernatant containing exosomes from 3 CD9-RFP and 2 CD63-EGFP RPTC cell lines, all 5 distal tubule cell lines and all 3 collecting duct cell lines showed exosomal uptake as measured by microplate fluorometry. Furthermore, we found that RPTCs stimulated with fenoldopam (dopamine receptor agonist) had increased production of exosomes, which upon transfer to distal tubule and collecting duct cells, reduced the basal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates in those recipient cells. Conclusion Due to the complex diversity of exosomal contents, this proximal-to-distal vesicular inter-nephron transfer may represent a previously unrecognized trans-renal communication system. PMID:24976626

  13. Exosomal transfer from human renal proximal tubule cells to distal tubule and collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Seaton, Joscelyn E; Victor, Ken G; Reyes, Camellia M; Bigler Wang, Dora; Pettigrew, Abigail C; Courtner, Crystal E; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh T; Van Sciver, Robert E; Carlson, Julia M; Felder, Robin A

    2014-10-01

    Exosomes are 50-90nm extracellular membrane particles that may mediate trans-cellular communication between cells and tissues. We have reported that human urinary exosomes contain miRNA that are biomarkers for salt sensitivity and inverse salt sensitivity of blood pressure. This study examines exosomal transfer between cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs) and from RPTCs to human distal tubule and collecting duct cells. For RPTC-to-RPTC exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 RPTC lines producing exosomes that were fluorescently labeled with exosomal-specific markers CD63-EGFP or CD9-RFP. Transfer between RPTCs was demonstrated by co-culturing CD63-EGFP and CD9-RFP stable clones and performing live confocal microscopy. For RPTC-to-distal segment exosomal transfer, we utilized 5 distal tubule and 3 collecting duct immortalized cell lines. Time-lapse videos revealed unique proximal tubule cellular uptake patterns for exosomes and eventual accumulation into the multivesicular body. Using culture supernatant containing exosomes from 3 CD9-RFP and 2 CD63-EGFP RPTC cell lines, all 5 distal tubule cell lines and all 3 collecting duct cell lines showed exosomal uptake as measured by microplate fluorometry. Furthermore, we found that RPTCs stimulated with fenoldopam (dopamine receptor agonist) had increased production of exosomes, which upon transfer to distal tubule and collecting duct cells, reduced the basal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates in those recipient cells. Due to the complex diversity of exosomal contents, this proximal-to-distal vesicular inter-nephron transfer may represent a previously unrecognized trans-renal communication system. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Dentin Pretreatment on Bond Strength Stability of Self-etching and Etch-and-Rinse Adhesives to Intracoronally Bleached Dentin.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ilzes Marianne Borges de; Araújo, Camila Silva; Soares, Carlos José; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    To evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine or glutaraldehyde pretreatment on the bonding stability of selfetching and etch-and-rinse adhesives to bleached dentin. The occlusal surface of 80 third molars was abraded to expose a flat mid-dentin surface, which was then subjected to a bleaching procedure using 20% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate for 14 days. Afterwards, the specimens were kept in distilled water, followed by application of either a three-step etchand- rinse (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, SBMP) or a two-step self-etching (Clearfil SE Bond, CSE) adhesive system. For each approach, the bleached dentin was treated with chlorhexidine or glutaraldehyde, or left untreated, prior to the adhesive procedure. Unbleached dentin was used as a control. Composite cylinders were built up over the adhesive-covered dentin followed by parallel sectioning of specimens to obtain 1-mm slices. The slices were trimmed to obtain hourglass-shaped specimens with approximately 1.0 mm2 of bonding interface. Half of the specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing after 24 h, while the other half were stored in distilled water for 3 months prior to the μTBS test. The mode of failure was analyzed using optical microscopy. For the SBMP protocol, the highest μTBS was achieved with glutaraldehyde-treated dentin, and the same μTBS values were maintained after 3 months of storage. For the CSE protocol, the highest μTBS was obtained with chlorhexidine-treated dentin. Glutaraldehyde and chlorhexidine pretreatment should be considered to improve the μTBS of adhesives to bleached dentin, while the pretreatment effect was adhesive dependent.

  15. Bonding efficacy of an acetone/based etch-and-rinse adhesive after dentin deproteinization

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Fátima S.; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Moura, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: to evaluate the effect of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) treatment on dentin bonding by means of shear bond strength (SBS) measurements when using Prime&Bond NT (PB NT) adhesive. Ultrastructure of the interfaces was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Study design: Extracted human third molars were sectioned and ground to expose flat surfaces of superficial or deep dentin. Specimens were randomly assigned to two equal groups, and bonded as follows: (1) according to the manufacturers’ directions, after 35% H3PO4 etching, (2) 5% NaOCl treated for 2 minutes, after 35% H3PO4 etching. Each sample was embedded in a Watanabe shear test assembly for a single plane lap shear. After PB NT bonding, specimens were stored in water for 24 h at 37ºC and thermocycled (500x). Samples were tested in shear to failure using a universal testing machine at 0.75 mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test procedures. Two samples of each group were randomly selected to investigate the morphologic aspect of the resin/dentin interface with SEM. Results: After etching and after aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOClaq) application, SBS values were similar on superficial than deep dentin (p>0.05). SEM findings shows for H3PO4 etching conditioned samples a detectable hybrid layer and long resin tags; for NaOCl treated specimens, it may be observed a non apparent hybrid layer, and the adhesive contact directly with the neck of the cylindrical resin tags. Conclusions: The use of 5% NaOCl for 2 min after dentin demineralization when PB NT was employed did not improve the bond strength to dentin, probably due to nanofiller content and/or oxidative changes on collagen-depleted dentin. Key words:Sodium hypochlorite, shear bond strength, SEM, Prime&Bond NT, superficial dentin, deep dentin. PMID:22322501

  16. Effect of application mode on interfacial morphology and chemistry between dentine and self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the influence of application mode on the interfacial morphology and chemistry between dentine and self-etch adhesives with different aggressiveness. The occlusal one-third of the crown was removed from un-erupted human third molars, followed by abrading with 600 grit SiC under water. Rectangular dentine slabs were prepared by sectioning the tooth specimens perpendicular to the abraded surfaces. The obtained dentine slabs were treated with one of the two one-step self-etch adhesives: Adper Easy Bond (AEB, pH∼2.5) and Adper Prompt L-Pop (APLP, pH∼0.8) with (15s, active application) or without (15s, inactive application) agitation. The dentine slabs were fractured and the exposed adhesive/dentine (A/D) interfaces were examined with micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfacial morphology, degree of dentine demineralization (DD) and degree of conversion (DC) of the strong self-etch adhesive APLP showed more significant dependence on the application mode than the mild AEB. APLP exhibited inferior bonding at the A/D interface if applied without agitation, evidenced by debonding from the dentine substrate. The DDs and DCs of the APLP with agitation were higher than those of without agitation in the interface, in contrast to the comparable DD and DC values of two AEB specimen groups with different application modes. Raman spectral analysis revealed the important role of chemical interaction between acid monomers of self-etch adhesives and dentine in the above observations. The chemical interaction with dentine is especially important for improving the DC of the strong self-etching adhesive at the A/D interface. Agitation could benefit polymerization efficacy of the strong self-etch adhesive through enhancing the chemical interaction with tooth substrate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of eugenol-containing temporary cement on efficacy of dentin-bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1999-02-01

    Zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cements are widely used as temporary filling materials. However, eugenol has earlier been shown to have a detrimental effect on both resin composites and dentin-bonding systems. The aim of the present in vitro study was to examine whether ZOE cement would also reduce the efficacy of relatively new dentin-bonding systems. This was done by determination of gap formation around resin composite fillings in dentin cavities and of bond strength of resin composite to enamel and dentin. The tooth surfaces involved were either freshly cut, or had been exposed to a ZOE cement (IRM) or to a non-ZOE cement (Cavit) for 7 d before application of a dentin-bonding system (Gluma CPS or Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) and a resin composite (Z100). Gap formation was assessed in a light microscope on 20-min-old fillings and expressed as wall-to-wall contraction (the width of the maximum marginal gap in % of the cavity diameter). Bond strength was measured in shear on 1-d-old specimens. The mean values of wall-to-wall contraction were 0.06-0.09% with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 0.20-0.24% with Gluma CPS. The mean values of bond strength to enamel were 22-25 MPa for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 20-23 MPa for Gluma CPS, and to dentin were 20-22 MPa for Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 13-14 MPa for Gluma CPS. The use of Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus resulted in higher bond strength to dentin and less wall-to-wall contraction than did Gluma CPS. No differences were found in either wall-to-wall contraction or in bond strength between the three groups for either dentin-bonding system. Thus, the ZOE cement did not influence the efficacy of two relatively new dentin-bonding systems.

  18. Detection and measurement of tubulitis in renal allograft rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, John B.; Chen, Qi; Jin, Jesse S.; Wang, Yung; Yong, James L. C.

    1997-04-01

    Tubulitis is one of the most reliable signs of acute renal allograft rejection. It occurs when mononuclear cells are localized between the lining tubular epithelial cells with or without disruption of the tubular basement membrane. It has been found that tubulitis takes place predominantly in the regions of the distal convoluted tubules and the cortical collecting system. The image processing tasks are to find the tubule boundaries and to find the relative location of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells and tubule boundaries. The requirement for accuracy applies to determining the relative locations of the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries. This paper will show how the different sizes and grey values of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells simplify their identification and location. Difficulties in finding the tubule boundaries image processing will be illustrated. It will be shown how proximate location of epithelial cells and the tubule boundary leads to distortion in determination of the calculated boundary. However, in tubulitis the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries are proximate.In these cases the tubule boundary is adequately resolved and the image processing is satisfactory to determining relativity in location. An adaptive non-linear anisotropic diffusion process is presented for image filtering and segmentation. Multi-layer analysis is used to extract lymphocytes and tubulitis from images. This paper will discuss grading of tissue using the Banff system. The ability to use computer to use computer processing will be argued as obviating problems of reproducability of values for this classification. This paper will also feature discussion of alternative approaches to image processing and provide an assessment of their capability for improving the identification of the tubule boundaries.

  19. The effects of extracts of chewing sticks (Salvadora persica) on healthy and periodontally involved human dentine: a SEM study.

    PubMed

    Almas, K

    2001-01-01

    The popularity and availability of chewing sticks (Salvadora persica) in the Asia, Middle East and Africa make them a commonly used oral hygiene tool in those societies. Salvador persica chewing stick called miswak is frequently used in Saudi Arabia. The antimicrobial effects of miswak has been well documented. The aim of this study is to find our the effect of aqueous extracts of miswak on healthy and periodontally involved human dentine with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in vitro. 25% aqueous extract of freshly prepared miswak solution was used for the study. Twelve human premolars teeth (6 healthy and 6 with periodontal disease) recently extracted for orthodontic and periodontal reasons were used. 24 SEM specimens were prepared and treated with miswak extract with different conditions e.g. soaking and burnishing with miswak extract. Soaking the healthy and periodontally diseased root dentine in miswak extract resulted in partial removal of smear layer and occlusion of dentinal tubules was observed in dentine specimens burnished wit