Science.gov

Sample records for exposure biology centers

  1. Biological monitoring of mercury exposure in individuals referred to a toxicological center in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Maritza; Seijas, David; Agreda, Olga; Rodríguez, Maritza

    2006-02-01

    People in developing countries are often considered at greater risk of mercury (Hg) poisoning due to a variety of factors including a lack of awareness regarding their occupational risks. Individuals requiring urine mercury (U-Hg) analysis at the Center for Toxicological Investigations of the University of Carabobo (CITUC), between 1998 and 2002 were studied to identify demographic characteristics associated to U-Hg levels. The studied population included individuals with a history of exposure (or related exposures) to Hg processes, and was comprised of 1159 individuals (65 children, 1094 adults) ages 0.58-79 years old, mean 36.63+/-12.4. Children's geometric mean U-Hg levels were 2.73 microg/g Creatinine (Ct) and in adults 2.55 microg/g Ct. The highest frequency of adults' occupations were shipyard workers (35.47%), dentists (23.5%), lab technicians (11.43%), dental employees 10.42% and miners (10.2%). Chemical laboratory technicians had the highest mean U-Hg (4.46 microg/g Ct). Mean U-Hg levels in female adults (3.45 microg/g Ct) were statistically superior to levels in male adults (2.15 microg/g Ct). Two of the 172 women in reproductive age, had U-Hg levels higher than 78 microg/g Ct. Individuals from Falcon State were found to have the highest mean U-Hg (4.53 microg/g Ct). U-Hg levels higher than permissible limits were found in only 2 states (Carabobo and Bolivar) with a total of 24 cases. Although the results of this investigation were highly variable, the findings can be used to examine circumstances which influence mercury toxicity trends, and possibly used in future studies working to identify Hg exposures.

  2. Biological monitoring of radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    1998-11-01

    Complementary to physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry systems have been developed and applied which weight the different components of environmental radiation according to their biological efficacy. They generally give a record of the accumulated exposure of individuals with high sensitivity and specificity for the toxic agent under consideration. Basically three different types of biological detecting/monitoring systems are available: (i) intrinsic biological dosimeters that record the individual radiation exposure (humans, plants, animals) in measurable units. For monitoring ionizing radiation exposure, in situ biomarkers for genetic (e.g. chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes, germ line minisatellite mutation rates) or metabolic changes in serum, plasma and blood (e.g. serum lipids, lipoproteins, lipid peroxides, melatonin, antibody titer) have been used. (ii) Extrinsic biological dosimeters/indicators that record the accumulated dose in biological model systems. Their application includes long-term monitoring of changes in environmental UV radiation and its biological implications as well as dosimetry of personal UV exposure. (iii) Biological detectors/biosensors for genotoxic substances and agents such as bacterial assays (e.g. Ames test, SOS-type test) that are highly sensitive to genotoxins with high specificity. They may be applicable for different aspects in environmental monitoring including the International Space Station.

  3. Biological Resource Centers and Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Lilburn, Timothy G

    2009-02-11

    There are hundreds of Biological Resource Centers (BRCs) around the world, holding many little-studied microorganism. The proportion of bacterial strains that is well represented in the sequence and literature databases may be as low as 1%. This body of unexplored diversity represents an untapped source of useful strains and derived products. However, a modicum of phenotypic data is available for almost all the bacterial strains held by BRCs around the world. It is at the phenotypic level that our knowledge of the well-studied strains of bacteria and the many yet-to-be studied strains intersects. This suggests we might leverage the phenotypic data from the data-poor bacteria with the omics data from the data-rich bacteria, using our knowledge of their evolutionary relationships, to map the metabolic networks of the little-known bacteria. This systems biology-based approach is a new way to explore the diversity harbored in BRCs.

  4. Biological Response to SPE Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M.; Shinn, J. L.; Jones, T. D.; Chang, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that a single solar particle event (SPE) can produce, over a short period of time, exposures on the order of LD50 for humans under normal physiological conditions. It is further recognized that recovery from injury over the period of exposure would greatly increase the chances of survival (dose rate effects) although such effects were left unquantified. In the present report we use the bioresponse model derived from a broad range of animal and human exposure data for evaluation of troop readiness in tactical nuclear warfare to evaluate the biological risk posed by the solar event of 4 August 1972. The astronaut blood forming organ (BFO) exposure in deep space would have been 2.2 Sv (1.6 Gy) in a space suit, 1.8 Sv (1.3 Gy) in an aluminum pressure vessel, and 0.7 Sv (0.5 Gy) in an equipment room compared to an X-ray mortality threshold of 1.5 Gy (assuming high dose rate). We find BFO dose rate effectiveness factors for this SPE on the order of 3 to 4, greatly reducing the mortality risks for this event. There is an approximate 3 percent chance that an even larger event may occur for which exposures could be 2-4 times higher. Assured survival of the astronaut requires added shelter shielding and a warning system for this event. The required mass of the shelter shield can be greatly reduced by using hydrogenous materials such as polymers, water, food, and other biological materials in its construction. Limitations of the current bioresponse model arise from the exposures taking place in the microgravity environment wherein the immune system is already challenged and the effective mortality threshold may be reduced by a factor of two. Such microgravity effects could greatly affect astronaut risks.

  5. Xylazine Exposures Reported to Texas Poison Centers.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2016-10-01

    Xylazine is a sedative, analgesic, anesthetic, and central muscle relaxant approved for animals but not humans. Although xylazine is an emerging drug of abuse, there are limited data on potentially adverse exposures to the drug. The intent of this study was to describe potentially adverse xylazine exposures reported to a large poison center system. All xylazine exposures reported to Texas poison centers between 2000 and 2014 were included. The distribution of cases by select variables was determined. Of 76 total cases, 93% of the patients were ≥20 years of age, and 54% were male. Fifty-one percent of the exposures occurred by injection, 28% by ingestion, 16% were dermal, 14% were ocular, and 3% by inhalation. Sixty-four percent of the exposures were unintentional, 32% were intentional, and 1% each was related to malicious use and adverse reaction. Sixty-seven percent of the patients were already at or en route to a health care facility when the poison center was contacted, 21% were managed on-site, and 9% were referred to a health care facility. The most common clinical effects were drowsiness or lethargy (47%), bradycardia (20%), hypotension (11%), hypertension (9%), puncture or wound (8%), and slurred speech (8%). Xylazine exposures tended to involve patients who were adult males, exposures were typically unintentional; and most often occurred by injection. Most of the patients were already at or en route to a health care facility when a poison center was contacted. The most frequently reported adverse effects were cardiovascular or neurologic in nature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  7. Biological effects from electromagnetic field exposure and public exposure standards.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Sage, Cindy

    2008-02-01

    During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential health risks from power-frequency fields (extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields; ELF) and from radiofrequency/microwave radiation emissions (RF) from wireless communications. Non-thermal (low-intensity) biological effects have not been considered for regulation of microwave exposure, although numerous scientific reports indicate such effects. The BioInitiative Report is based on an international research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at low-intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. Health endpoints reported to be associated with ELF and/or RF include childhood leukaemia, brain tumours, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, breast cancer, miscarriage and some cardiovascular effects. The BioInitiative Report concluded that a reasonable suspicion of risk exists based on clear evidence of bioeffects at environmentally relevant levels, which, with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. Regarding ELF a new lower public safety limit for habitable space adjacent to all new or upgraded power lines and for all other new constructions should be applied. A new lower limit should also be used for existing habitable space for children and/or women who are pregnant. A precautionary limit should be adopted for outdoor, cumulative RF exposure and for cumulative indoor RF fields with considerably lower limits than existing guidelines, see the BioInitiative Report. The current guidelines for the US and European microwave exposure from mobile phones, for the brain are 1.6 W/Kg and 2 W/Kg, respectively. Since use of mobile phones is associated with an increased risk for brain tumour after 10 years, a new biologically based guideline is warranted. Other health impacts associated with exposure to

  8. Development of a postexposure biologic treatment algorithm on a medical center campus.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Cain, Kristine M; Smith, Stephen B; Paules, Catharine I; Smith, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    To describe the development of an easily accessible online biologic exposure algorithm to guide postexposure medical evaluation and treatment of medical research personnel and health care workers in a Midwest medical center campus. We describe the steps involved in the creation of a biologic exposure algorithm from design through implementation. One point of contact allows phone evaluation and immediate triage, providing effective and timely medical care for exposed employees as well as important guidance for clinicians. The algorithm and exposure response system achieved the goal of integrating clinical and research laboratory exposure response. Development of an integrated clinical and research exposure protocol may be an efficient way to maximize biosafety for workers.

  9. Systems biology of human benzene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Li, Guilan; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Hubbard, Alan E.; Ren, Xuefeng; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; North, Matthew; Skibola, Christine F.; Yin, Songnian; Vulpe, Christopher; Chanock, Stephen J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Toxicogenomic studies, including genome-wide analyses of susceptibility genes (genomics), gene expression (transcriptomics), protein expression (proteomics), and epigenetic modifications (epigenomics), of human populations exposed to benzene are crucial to understanding gene-environment interactions, providing the ability to develop biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility. Comprehensive analysis of these toxicogenomic and epigenomic profiles by bioinformatics in the context of phenotypic endpoints, comprises systems biology, which has the potential to comprehensively define the mechanisms by which benzene causes leukemia. We have applied this approach to a molecular epidemiology study of workers exposed to benzene. Hematotoxicity, a significant decrease in almost all blood cell counts, was identified as a phenotypic effect of benzene that occurred even below 1ppm benzene exposure. We found a significant decrease in the formation of progenitor colonies arising from bone marrow stem cells with increasing benzene exposure, showing that progenitor cells are more sensitive to the effects of benzene than mature blood cells, likely leading to the observed hematotoxicity. Analysis of transcriptomics by microarray in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of exposed workers, identified genes and pathways (apoptosis, immune response, and inflammatory response) altered at high (>10ppm) and low (<1ppm) benzene levels. Serum proteomics by SELDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins consistently down-regulated in exposed workers. Preliminary epigenomics data showed effects of benzene on the DNA methylation of specific genes. Genomic screens for candidate genes involved in susceptibility to benzene toxicity are being undertaken in yeast, with subsequent confirmation by RNAi in human cells, to expand upon the findings from candidate gene analyses. Data on these and future biomarkers will be used to populate a large toxicogenomics database, to which we will apply bioinformatic

  10. HUMAN BIOMONITORING TO LINK ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract and presentation on Human Biomonitoring to Link Environmental Exposure to Biologically Relevant Dose describes the use of biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers of current health state, and biomarker measurements. The abstract and presentation focuses on how biomarkers ...

  11. [Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to sevoflurane].

    PubMed

    Imbriani, M; Zadra, P; Negri, S; Alessio, A; Maestri, L; Ghittori, S

    2001-01-01

    conditions for the MSD were the following: ion mass monitored = 131 m/e; dwell time = 50 msec; selected ion monitoring window time = 0.1 amu; electromultiplier = 400 V. Urine samples were collected near the end of the shift and were analyzed for HFIP by head-space gas chromatography after glucuronide hydrolysis. 0.5 ml of urine and 1.5 ml of 10 M sulfuric acid were added to 21.8 ml headspace vials. The vials were immediately capped, vortexed, and loaded into the headspace autosampler. Samples were maintained at 100 degrees C for 30 min, after which glucuronide hydrolysis was 99% complete. Analyses were performed on a GC equipped with a MSD. The analytical conditions for urine analysis were as follows: cross-linked 5% phenylmethylsilicon column (internal diameter 0.2 mm, length 25 m); column temperature = 35 degrees C; carrier gas = helium. The analytical conditions for the MSD were: monitored ions = 51.05 and 99; dwell time = 100 ms; selected ion monitoring window time = 0.1 amu; electromultiplier voltage = 2000 Volt. With our analytical procedure, the detection limit of HFIP in urine was 20 micrograms/L. The variation coefficient (CV) for HFIP measurement in urine was 8.7% (on 10 determinations; mean value = 1000 micrograms/L). The median value of CI was 0.77 ppm (Geometric Standard Deviation = 4.08; range = 0.05-27.9 ppm). The correlation between CI and HFIP (Cu, microgram/L) was: Log Cu (microgram/L) = 0.813 x Log CI (ppm) + 2.517 (r = 0.79, n = 145, p < 0.0001). On the basis of the equation it was possible to establish tentatively the biological limit values corresponding to the respective occupational exposure limit values proposed for sevoflurane. According to our experimental results, HFIP values of 488 micrograms/L and 160 micrograms/L correspond to airborne sevoflurane concentrations of 2 and 0.5 ppm respectively.

  12. Tumor Biology and Immunology | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Tumor Biology and Immunology The Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium is collaborating with National Center for Advanced Translational Sciences to complete whole exome sequencing on canine meningioma samples. Results will be published and made publicly available.

  13. Integrating Biological Activity and Exposure in the US EPA's ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    presentation at the IUTOX meeting in Mexico on Oct. 3, 2016. on Integrating Biological Activity and Exposure in the US EPA's Toxcast Program. presentation at the IUTOX meeting in Mexico on Oct. 3, 2016.

  14. Daily animal exposure and children's biological concepts.

    PubMed

    Geerdts, Megan S; Van de Walle, Gretchen A; LoBue, Vanessa

    2015-02-01

    A large body of research has focused on the developmental trajectory of children's acquisition of a theoretically coherent naive biology. However, considerably less work has focused on how specific daily experiences shape the development of children's knowledge about living things. In the current research, we investigated one common experience that might contribute to biological knowledge development during early childhood-pet ownership. In Study 1, we investigated how children interact with pets by observing 24 preschool-aged children with their pet cats or dogs and asking parents about their children's daily involvement with the pets. We found that most of young children's observed and reported interactions with their pets are reciprocal social interactions. In Study 2, we tested whether children who have daily social experiences with animals are more likely to attribute biological properties to animals than children without pets. Both 3- and 5-year-olds with pets were more likely to attribute biological properties to animals than those without pets. Similarly, both older and younger children with pets showed less anthropocentric patterns of extension of novel biological information. The results suggest that having pets may facilitate the development of a more sophisticated, human-inclusive representation of animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron decreases biological effects of ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONTEXT: Ozone (0(3)) exposure is associated with a disruption of iron homeostasis and increased availability of this metal which potentially contributes to an oxidative stress and biologicaleffects. OBJECTIVE: We tested the postulate that increased concentrations of iron in c...

  16. Iron decreases biological effects of ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONTEXT: Ozone (0(3)) exposure is associated with a disruption of iron homeostasis and increased availability of this metal which potentially contributes to an oxidative stress and biologicaleffects. OBJECTIVE: We tested the postulate that increased concentrations of iron in c...

  17. UC Merced Center for Computational Biology Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Michael; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2010-11-30

    Final report for the UC Merced Center for Computational Biology. The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) was established to support multidisciplinary scientific research and academic programs in computational biology at the new University of California campus in Merced. In 2003, the growing gap between biology research and education was documented in a report from the National Academy of Sciences, Bio2010 Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. We believed that a new type of biological sciences undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasized biological concepts and considered biology as an information science would have a dramatic impact in enabling the transformation of biology. UC Merced as newest UC campus and the first new U.S. research university of the 21st century was ideally suited to adopt an alternate strategy - to create a new Biological Sciences majors and graduate group that incorporated the strong computational and mathematical vision articulated in the Bio2010 report. CCB aimed to leverage this strong commitment at UC Merced to develop a new educational program based on the principle of biology as a quantitative, model-driven science. Also we expected that the center would be enable the dissemination of computational biology course materials to other university and feeder institutions, and foster research projects that exemplify a mathematical and computations-based approach to the life sciences. As this report describes, the CCB has been successful in achieving these goals, and multidisciplinary computational biology is now an integral part of UC Merced undergraduate, graduate and research programs in the life sciences. The CCB began in fall 2004 with the aid of an award from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under its Genomes to Life program of support for the development of research and educational infrastructure in the modern biological sciences. This report to DOE describes the research and academic programs

  18. The Simbios National Center: Systems Biology in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jeanette P.; Delp, Scott L.; Sherman, Michael A.; Taylor, Charles A.; Pande, Vijay S.; Altman, Russ B.

    2010-01-01

    Physics-based simulation is needed to understand the function of biological structures and can be applied across a wide range of scales, from molecules to organisms. Simbios (the National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures, http://www.simbios.stanford.edu/) is one of seven NIH-supported National Centers for Biomedical Computation. This article provides an overview of the mission and achievements of Simbios, and describes its place within systems biology. Understanding the interactions between various parts of a biological system and integrating this information to understand how biological systems function is the goal of systems biology. Many important biological systems comprise complex structural systems whose components interact through the exchange of physical forces, and whose movement and function is dictated by those forces. In particular, systems that are made of multiple identifiable components that move relative to one another in a constrained manner are multibody systems. Simbios’ focus is creating methods for their simulation. Simbios is also investigating the biomechanical forces that govern fluid flow through deformable vessels, a central problem in cardiovascular dynamics. In this application, the system is governed by the interplay of classical forces, but the motion is distributed smoothly through the materials and fluids, requiring the use of continuum methods. In addition to the research aims, Simbios is working to disseminate information, software and other resources relevant to biological systems in motion. PMID:20107615

  19. The Simbios National Center: Systems Biology in Motion.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jeanette P; Delp, Scott L; Sherman, Michael A; Taylor, Charles A; Pande, Vijay S; Altman, Russ B

    2008-08-01

    Physics-based simulation is needed to understand the function of biological structures and can be applied across a wide range of scales, from molecules to organisms. Simbios (the National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures, http://www.simbios.stanford.edu/) is one of seven NIH-supported National Centers for Biomedical Computation. This article provides an overview of the mission and achievements of Simbios, and describes its place within systems biology. Understanding the interactions between various parts of a biological system and integrating this information to understand how biological systems function is the goal of systems biology. Many important biological systems comprise complex structural systems whose components interact through the exchange of physical forces, and whose movement and function is dictated by those forces. In particular, systems that are made of multiple identifiable components that move relative to one another in a constrained manner are multibody systems. Simbios' focus is creating methods for their simulation. Simbios is also investigating the biomechanical forces that govern fluid flow through deformable vessels, a central problem in cardiovascular dynamics. In this application, the system is governed by the interplay of classical forces, but the motion is distributed smoothly through the materials and fluids, requiring the use of continuum methods. In addition to the research aims, Simbios is working to disseminate information, software and other resources relevant to biological systems in motion.

  20. Biological versus ambient exposure monitoring of creosote facility workers.

    PubMed

    Borak, Jonathan; Sirianni, Greg; Cohen, Howard; Chemerynski, Susan; Jongeneelen, Frans

    2002-04-01

    Traditional methods for monitoring occupational creosote exposure have focused on inhalation. However, there is evidence that dermal exposure contributes importantly to total systemic dose, as measured by biological monitoring methods. This study was conducted to further characterize the relationships between inhalation and dermal exposures to creosote, and to compare traditional ambient exposure monitoring versus biological monitoring in 36 creosote-exposed wood treatment workers. Full-shift personal air samples were obtained, along with post-shift and next-day urine measurements for 1-hydroxypyrene. There was little or no correlation between airborne measures and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (r2 = 0.05 to 0.35). More than 90% of 1-hydroxypyrene could be attributed to dermal exposure. These data indicate that traditional monitoring methods may be inappropriate for creosote workers, raising concerns about the adequacy of methods currently mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  1. Occupational exposures during the World Trade Center disaster response.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, K M; Snyder, E M

    2001-06-01

    Upon the request of the New York City Department of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) monitored occupational exposures among emergency response workers during the rescue and recovery activities at the World Trade Center disaster site from September 18 through 4 October 2001. During this period, over 1,200 bulk and air samples were collected to estimate or characterize workers' occupational exposures. Samples were collected and analyzed for asbestos, carbon monoxide (CO), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), diesel exhaust, hydrogen sulfide, inorganic acids, mercury and other metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, respirable particulate not otherwise regulated (PNOR), respirable crystalline silica, total PNOR, and volatile organic compounds. Exposures to most of these potential hazards did not exceed NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limits or Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limits. However, one torch cutter was overexposed to cadmium and another worker (and possibly three others) was overexposed to CO. The elevated cadmium and CO levels were the result of workers using oxy-acetylene cutting torches and gasoline-powered cutting saws. Recommendations were made to ensure adequate ventilation and worker understanding when using these tools and, where possible, to substitute rechargeable, battery-powered cutting saws for gasoline-powered ones. Toxicology

  2. Granulomatous pneumonitis following exposure to the World Trade Center collapse.

    PubMed

    Safirstein, Benjamin H; Klukowicz, Alan; Miller, Richard; Teirstein, Alvin

    2003-01-01

    We describe a 37-year-old male engineer who presented with cough and dyspnea 3 weeks after exposure to dust resulting from the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC). Radiographs of the chest and high-resolution CT demonstrated diffuse miliary nodularity. Lung biopsy specimens confirmed the presence of diffuse, noncaseating granulomatous nodules. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive radiograph analysis revealed large quantities of silicates. Cellular immunologic studies showed normal response to beryllium, and results of Kveim testing were negative. We suspect that exposure to one or more materials resulting from the WTC catastrophe may be implicated in the development of granulomatous pulmonary disease.

  3. Biological air contamination in elderly care centers: geria project.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Lívia; Mendes, Ana; Pereira, Cristiana; Neves, Paula; Mendes, Diana; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) affects health particularly in susceptible individuals such as the elderly. It has been estimated that the older population spends approximately 19-20 h/d indoors, and the majority of the elderly spend all of their time indoors in elderly care centers (ECC). Older individuals may be particularly at risk of exposure to detrimental effects from pollutants, even at low concentrations, due to common and multiple underlying chronic diseases that increase susceptibility. This study, aimed to assess the impact of indoor biological agents in 22 ECC located in Porto, was conducted during summer and winter from November 2011 to August 2013 at a total of 141 areas within dining rooms, drawing rooms, medical offices, and bedrooms (including the bedridden). Air sampling was carried out with a microbiological air sampler (Merck MAS-100) and using tryptic soy agar for bacteria and malt extract agar for fungi. The results obtained were compared with the recently revised Portuguese standards. In winter, mean fungi concentration exceeded reference values, while bacteria concentrations were within the new standards in both seasons. The main fungi species found indoors were Cladosporium (73%) in summer and Penicillium (67%) in winter. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus, known potential pathogenic/toxigenic species, were also identified. Although the overall rate and mean values of bacteria and fungi found in ECC indoor air met Portuguese legislation, some concern is raised by the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Simple measures, like opening windows and doors to promote air exchange and renewal, may improve effectiveness in enhancing IAQ.

  4. Neonicotinoid insecticide exposures reported to six poison centers in Texas.

    PubMed

    Forrester, M B

    2014-06-01

    Neonicotinoids are a relatively newer class of insecticide. Used primarily in agriculture, neonicotinoids are also used for flea control in domestic animals. Information on human exposures to neonicotinoids is limited. Neonicotinoid exposures reported to Texas poison centers during 2000-2012 were identified and the distribution by selected factors examined. Of 1,142 total exposures, most products contained imidacloprid (77%) or dinotefuran (17%). The exposures were seasonal with half reported during May-August. The most common routes of exposure were ingestion (51%), dermal (44%), and ocular (11%). The distribution by patient age was 5 years or less (28%), 6-19 years (9%), 20 years or more (61%), and unknown (2%); and 64% of the patients were female. Of all, 97% of the exposures were unintentional and 97% occurred at the patient's own residence. The management site was on-site (92%), already at/en route to a health care facility (6%), and referred to a health care facility (2%). The medical outcomes included no effect (22%), minor effect (11%), moderate effect (1%), not followed judged nontoxic (14%), not followed minimal effects (46%), unable to follow potentially toxic (1%), and unrelated effect (4%). The most commonly reported adverse clinical effects were ocular irritation (6%), dermal irritation (5%), nausea (3%), vomiting (2%), oral irritation (2%), erythema (2%), and red eye (2%). The most frequently reported treatments were dilution/wash (85%) and food (6%). In summary, these data suggest that the majority of neonicotinoid exposures reported to the poison centers may be managed outside of health care facilities with few clinical effects expected. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. The poison center role in biological and chemical terrorism.

    PubMed

    Krenzelok, E P; Allswede, M P; Mrvos, R

    2000-10-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) terrorism countermeasures are a major priority with municipalities, healthcare providers, and the federal government. Significant resources are being invested to enhance civilian domestic preparedness by conducting education at every response level in anticipation of a NBC terroristic incident. The key to a successful response, in addition to education, is integration of efforts as well as thorough communication and understanding the role that each agency would play in an actual or impending NBC incident. In anticipation of a NBC event, a regional counter-terrorism task force was established to identify resources, establish responsibilities and coordinate the response to NBC terrorism. Members of the task force included first responders, hazmat, law enforcement (local, regional, national), government officials, the health department, and the regional poison information center. Response protocols were developed and education was conducted, culminating in all members of the response task force becoming certified NBC instructors. The poison center participated actively in 3 incidents of suspected biologic and chemical terrorism: an alleged anthrax-contaminated letter sent to a women's health clinic; a possible sarin gas release in a high school: and a potential anthrax/ebola contamination incident at an international airport. All incidents were determined hoaxes. The regional response plan establishes the poison information center as a common repository for all cases in a biological or chemical incident. The poison center is one of several critical components of a regional counterterrorism response force. It can conduct active and passive toxicosurveillance and identify sentinel events. To be responsive, the poison center staff must be knowledgeable about biological and chemical agents. The development of basic protocols and a standardized staff education program is essential. The use of the RaPiD-T (R-recognition, P

  6. The Center for Computational Biology: resources, achievements, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Toga, Arthur W; Dinov, Ivo D; Thompson, Paul M; Woods, Roger P; Van Horn, John D; Shattuck, David W; Parker, D Stott

    2012-01-01

    The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) is a multidisciplinary program where biomedical scientists, engineers, and clinicians work jointly to combine modern mathematical and computational techniques, to perform phenotypic and genotypic studies of biological structure, function, and physiology in health and disease. CCB has developed a computational framework built around the Manifold Atlas, an integrated biomedical computing environment that enables statistical inference on biological manifolds. These manifolds model biological structures, features, shapes, and flows, and support sophisticated morphometric and statistical analyses. The Manifold Atlas includes tools, workflows, and services for multimodal population-based modeling and analysis of biological manifolds. The broad spectrum of biomedical topics explored by CCB investigators include the study of normal and pathological brain development, maturation and aging, discovery of associations between neuroimaging and genetic biomarkers, and the modeling, analysis, and visualization of biological shape, form, and size. CCB supports a wide range of short-term and long-term collaborations with outside investigators, which drive the center's computational developments and focus the validation and dissemination of CCB resources to new areas and scientific domains.

  7. The Center for Computational Biology: resources, achievements, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D; Thompson, Paul M; Woods, Roger P; Van Horn, John D; Shattuck, David W; Parker, D Stott

    2011-01-01

    The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) is a multidisciplinary program where biomedical scientists, engineers, and clinicians work jointly to combine modern mathematical and computational techniques, to perform phenotypic and genotypic studies of biological structure, function, and physiology in health and disease. CCB has developed a computational framework built around the Manifold Atlas, an integrated biomedical computing environment that enables statistical inference on biological manifolds. These manifolds model biological structures, features, shapes, and flows, and support sophisticated morphometric and statistical analyses. The Manifold Atlas includes tools, workflows, and services for multimodal population-based modeling and analysis of biological manifolds. The broad spectrum of biomedical topics explored by CCB investigators include the study of normal and pathological brain development, maturation and aging, discovery of associations between neuroimaging and genetic biomarkers, and the modeling, analysis, and visualization of biological shape, form, and size. CCB supports a wide range of short-term and long-term collaborations with outside investigators, which drive the center's computational developments and focus the validation and dissemination of CCB resources to new areas and scientific domains. PMID:22081221

  8. Incidence of occupational exposures in a tertiary health care center.

    PubMed

    Shriyan, Amrita; Roche, R; Annamma

    2012-07-01

    Occupational exposure to Hepatitis B virus (HBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a cause of concern to all health care workers (HCWs), especially those, in hospitals. Among the HCWs, nurses, interns, technicians, resident doctors and housekeeping staff have the highest incidence of occupational exposure. To analyze the cases of needle stick injuries and other exposures to patient's blood or body fluids among health care workers. A detailed account of the exposure is documented which includes incidence of needle stick injuries (NSI) and implementation of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) as per the hospital guidelines. We report a two-year continuing surveillance study where 255 health care workers (HCWs) were included. PEP was given to HCWs sustaining NSI or exposures to blood and body fluids when the source is known sero-positive or even unknown where the risk of transmission is high. Follow-up of these HCW's was done after three and six months of exposure. Of the 255 HCWs, 59 sustained needle stick injuries and two were exposed to splashes. 31 of the NSI were from known sources and 28 from unknown sources. From known sources, thirteen were seropositive; seven for HIV, three for HCV and three for HBV. Nineteen of them sustained needle stick during needle re-capping, six of them during clean up, six of them while discarding into the container, 17 during administration of injection, eight of them during suturing, two occurred in restless patient, 17 during needle disposal. So far, no case of sero-conversion as a result of needle stick injuries was reported at our center.

  9. Strategies for use of biological markers of exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    A major public health concern is the degree to which environmental or occupational exposures to exogenous chemicals result in adverse health effects. Biological markers have the potential for helping to answer this important question by providing links between markers of exposures and markers of early stages of the development of disease. However, that potential requires in-depth, mechanistic research to be fully realized. Biological markers of exposure have been extensively investigated, and mathematical models of the toxicokinetics of agents have been developed to relate exposures to internal doses. The field of clinical medicine has long used clinical signs and symptoms to detect disease. However, the critical area of research needed to improve the application of biomarkers to environmental health research is mechanistic research to link dose to critical tissues to the development of early, pre-clinical signs of developing disease. Only if the mechanism of disease induction is known can one determine the ``biologically effective`` dose and the earliest biological changes leading to disease.

  10. Effective biological dose from occupational exposure during nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demou, Evangelia; Tran, Lang; Housiadas, Christos

    2009-02-01

    Nanomaterial and nanotechnology safety require the characterization of occupational exposure levels for completing a risk assessment. However, equally important is the estimation of the effective internal dose via lung deposition, transport and clearance mechanisms. An integrated source-to-biological dose assessment study is presented using real monitoring data collected during nanoparticle synthesis. Experimental monitoring data of airborne exposure levels during nanoparticle synthesis of CaSO4 and BiPO4 nanoparticles in a research laboratory is coupled with a human lung transport and deposition model, which solves in an Eulerian framework the general dynamic equation for polydisperse aerosols using particle specific physical-chemical properties. Subsequently, the lung deposition model is coupled with a mathematical particle clearance model providing the effective biological dose as well as the time course of the biological dose build-up after exposure. The results for the example of BiPO4 demonstrate that even short exposures throughout the day can lead to particle doses of 1.10·E+08#/(kg-bw·8h-shift), with the majority accumulating in the pulmonary region. Clearance of particles is slow and is not completed within a working shift following a 1 hour exposure. It mostly occurs via macrophage activity in the alveolar region, with small amounts transported to the interstitium and less to the lymph nodes.

  11. Experimental Data from the Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology

    DOE Data Explorer

    Smith, Richard D.

    The possible roles and importance of proteomics are rapidly growing across essentially all areas of biological research. The precise and comprehensive measurement of levels of expressed proteins and their modified forms can provide new insights into the molecular nature of cell-signaling pathways and networks, the cell cycle, cellular differentiation, and other processes relevant to understanding human health and the progression of various disease states. The ability to characterize protein complexes complements this capability, allowing hypotheses to be tested and the biological system operation to be defined. The Proteomics Research Center for Integrative Biology is a national user facility established and funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences component of the National Institutes of Health. This Center has been established to serve the biomedical research community by developing and integrating new proteomic technologies for collaborative and service studies, disseminating the new technologies, and training scientists in their use. The Center is housed in DOE’s William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Air and biological monitoring of solvent exposure during graffiti removal.

    PubMed

    Anundi, H; Langworth, S; Johanson, G; Lind, M L; Akesson, B; Friis, L; Itkes, N; Söderman, E; Jönsson, B A; Edling, C

    2000-11-01

    The principal aim of the study was to estimate the level of exposure to organic solvents of graffiti removers, and to identify the chemicals used in different cleaning agents. A secondary objective was to inform about the toxicity of various products and to optimise working procedures. Exposure to organic solvents was determined by active air sampling and biological monitoring among 38 graffiti removers during an 8-h work shift in the Stockholm underground system. The air samples and biological samples were analysed by gas chromatography. Exposure to organic solvents was also assessed by a questionnaire and interviews. Solvents identified were N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether (DPGME), propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME), diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DEGEE), toluene, xylene, pseudocumene, hemimellitine, mesitylene, ethylbenzene, limonene, nonane, decane, undecane, hexandecane and gamma-butyrolactone. The 8-h average exposures [time-weighted average (TWA)] were below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents identified. In poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators etc., the short-term exposures exceeded occasionally the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL). The blood and urine concentrations of NMP and its metabolites were low. Glycol ethers and their metabolites (2-methoxypropionic acid (MPA), ethoxy acetic acid (EAA), butoxy acetic acid (BAA), and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy) acetic acid (MEAA)) were found in low concentrations in urine. There were significant correlation between the concentrations of NMP in air and levels of NMP and its metabolites in blood and urine. The use of personal protective equipment, i.e. gloves and respirators, was generally high. Many different cleaning agents were used. The average exposure to solvents was low, but some working tasks included relatively high short-term exposure. To prevent adverse health effects, it is important to inform workers about the

  13. Cell phone radiation exposure on brain and associated biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Meena, Ramovatar; Verma, H N; Kumar, Shivendra

    2013-03-01

    Wireless technologies are ubiquitous today and the mobile phones are one of the prodigious output of this technology. Although the familiarization and dependency of mobile phones is growing at an alarming pace, the biological effects due to the exposure of radiations have become a subject of intense debate. The present evidence on mobile phone radiation exposure is based on scientific research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at radiofrequency (RF)/ electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. The conflict in conclusions is mainly because of difficulty in controlling the affecting parameters. Biological effects are dependent not only on the distance and size of the object (with respect to the object) but also on the environmental parameters. Health endpoints reported to be associated with RF include childhood leukemia, brain tumors, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, infertility and some cardiovascular effects. Most of the reports conclude a reasonable suspicion of mobile phone risk that exists based on clear evidence of bio-effects which with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. The present study summarizes the public issue based on mobile phone radiation exposure and their biological effects. This review concludes that the regular and long term use of microwave devices (mobile phone, microwave oven) at domestic level can have negative impact upon biological system especially on brain. It also suggests that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role by enhancing the effect of microwave radiations which may cause neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Chernobyl experience: biological indicators of exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Baranov, A E; Guskova, A K; Nadejina, N M; Nugis VYu

    1995-05-01

    Using the Chernobyl accident as an example, an attempt is made to consider the possibility of using the biological markers of exposure and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in relation to biology dosimetry, and to predict early and late nonstochastic and stochastic radiation consequences. The biological dosimetry was based on the three markers: chromosome aberrations of peripheral blood lymphocytes, dynamics of blood cell (lymphocytes, neutrophils) counts and electron spin resonance (ESR) of tooth enamel. The first two methods can be applied in a short period of time (days or weeks) after exposure and only after high doses (> 0.5-1 Gy) of acute total body irradiation (TBI). The ESR tooth enamel method possesses dosimetric value at all conditions of uniform gamma TBI (acute, prolonged, chronic and high as well as low level of doses) and at any time after exposure. The low limit of sensitivity of the ESR test is about 0.1 Gy. The use of biological markers of effects of radiation exposure as early diagnostic signs was limited to clinical significant disorders of hemopoietic, immune systems and skin in conditions of acute high-dose irradiation. In cases of acute or prolonged irradiation in low doses, many changes on the cellular as well as organism level were discovered. However, there were not enough data on radiation specificity or dose dependence of these changes. Hence they cannot be considered as the indicators of clinically significant early and late nonstochastic effects. The role of biological markers of stochastic effects in clinical practice is discussed herein.

  15. The biological effect of asbestos exposure is dependent on ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abstract Functional groups on the surface of fibrous silicates can complex iron. We tested the postulate that 1) asbestos complexes and sequesters host cell iron resulting in a disruption of metal homeostasis and 2) this loss of essential metal results in an oxidative stress and biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells. Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to 50 μg/mL chrysotile resulted in diminished concentrations of mitochondrial iron. Pre-incubation of these cells with 200 μM ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) prevented significant mitochondrial iron loss following the same exposure. The host response to chrysotile included increased expression of the importer divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) supporting a functional iron deficiency. Incubation of BEAS-2B cells with both 200 μM FAC and 50 μg/mL chrysotile was associated with a greater cell accumulation of iron relative to either iron or chrysotile alone reflecting increased import to correct metal deficiency immediately following fiber exposure. Cellular oxidant generation was elevated after chrysotile exposure and this signal was diminished by co-incubation with 200 μM FAC. Similarly, exposure of BEAS-2B cells to 50 µg/mL chrysotile was associated with release of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 and these changes were diminished by co-incubation with 200 μM FAC. We conclude that 1) the biological response following exposure to chrysotile is associated with complexation an

  16. Association between World Trade Center exposure and excess cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehui; Cone, James E; Kahn, Amy R; Brackbill, Robert M; Farfel, Mark R; Greene, Carolyn M; Hadler, James L; Stayner, Leslie T; Stellman, Steven D

    2012-12-19

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, resulted in the release of known and suspected carcinogens into the environment. There is public concern that exposures may have resulted in increased cancers. To evaluate cancer incidence among persons enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. Observational study of 55,778 New York State residents enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry in 2003-2004, including rescue/recovery workers (n = 21,850) and those not involved in rescue/recovery (n = 33,928), who were followed up from enrollment through December 31, 2008. Within-cohort comparisons using Cox proportional hazards models assessed the relationship between intensity of World Trade Center exposure and selected cancers. Cases were identified through linkage with 11 state cancer registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and sex were computed with 2003-2008 New York State rates as the reference, focusing on cancers diagnosed in 2007-2008 as being most likely to be related to exposure during September 11 and its aftermath. The total and site-specific incidence rate differences (RDs) per 100,000 person-years between the study population and the New York State population in 2007-2008 also were calculated. There were 1187 incident cancers diagnosed, with an accumulated 253,269 person-years (439 cancers among rescue/recovery workers and 748 among those not involved in rescue/recovery). The SIR for all cancer sites combined in 2007-2008 was not significantly elevated (SIR, 1.14 [95% CI, 0.99 to 1.30]; RD, 67 [95% CI, -6 to 126] per 100,000 person-years among rescue/recovery workers vs SIR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.83 to 1.03]; RD, -45 [95% CI, -106 to 15] per 100,000 person-years among those not involved in rescue/recovery). Among rescue/recovery workers, the SIRs had significantly increased by 2007-2008 for 3 cancer sites and were 1.43 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.82) for prostate cancer (n = 67; RD, 61 [95% CI, 20 to 91] per 100

  17. Testing systems for biologic markers of genotoxic exposure and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1986-11-19

    Societal interest in genotoxicity stems from two concerns: the fear of carcinogenesis secondary to somatic mutation; and the fear of birth defects and decreasing genetic fitness secondary to heritable mutation. There is a pressing need to identify agents that can cause these effects, to understand the underlying dose-response relationships, to identify exposed populations, and to estimate both the magnitude of exposure and the risk of adverse health effects in such populations. Biologic markers refer either to evidence in surrogate organisms, or to the expressions of exposure and effect in human populations. 21 refs.

  18. Altitude exposure in sports: the Athlete Biological Passport standpoint.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Brioche, Thomas; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) is principally founded on monitoring an athlete's biological variables over time, to identify abnormal biases on a longitudinal basis. Several factors are known to influence the results of these markers. However, the manner in which the altitude factor is taken into account still needs to be standardized. Causal relationships between haematological variables should be correctly integrated into ABP software. In particular, modifications of haematological parameters during and after exposure to different altitudes/hypoxic protocols need to be properly included within detection models. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Static fields: biological effects and mechanisms relevant to exposure limits.

    PubMed

    van Rongen, Eric; Saunders, Richard D; van Deventer, Emilie T; Repacholi, Michael H

    2007-06-01

    Recently, the International EMF Project of the World Health Organization (WHO) published an Environmental Health Criteria monograph on static electric and magnetic fields. In the present paper a short overview is given of the biological and health effects discussed in this document. The main conclusions are that no acute effects other than transient phenomena such as vertigo and nausea have been observed with exposure to static magnetic flux densities up to 8 T. There are no reports of long term or chronic adverse effects following prolonged static magnetic field exposure, but few data are available on which to base any judgment. The guidelines on static field exposure recommended by ICNIRP in 1994 are discussed in the light of current scientific knowledge.

  20. Dermal echogenicity: a biological indicator of individual cumulative UVR exposure?

    PubMed

    Sandby-Møller, Jane; Thieden, Elisabeth; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Schmidt, Grethe; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2004-04-01

    Dermal alterations due to chronic UVR exposure may influence dermal ultrasound echogenicity, and a subepidermal low-echogenic band has been proposed as a marker of photoaging. The aim of this study was to determine whether dermal echogenicity could be used as a biological UVR dosimeter. We included 201 subjects (138 healthy volunteers, 31 patients with basal cell carcinoma, and 32 patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma). The number of low-echogenic pixels in the upper dermis relative to the lower dermis (LEP(u/l)) was determined in sun-exposed and sun-protected skin. Individual UVR exposure data were collected retrospectively and prospectively using a questionnaire and electronic personal UVR dosimeters. Age, but not sex, skin type, constitutive pigmentation or smoking, correlated significantly with LEP(u/l) at all body sites. Different measures of individual UVR exposure were significantly positively correlated with LEP(u/l) (together r(2)=0.39, dorsal forearm), but separately the correlations were poor ( r(2)=0.04-0.19). LEP(u/l) was higher in the dorsal forearm in a group with high UVR exposure compared to a low-exposure group ( P=0.007). Skin cancer patients in general had a lower LEP(u/l) than healthy subjects. The results indicate that the age-related increase in LEP(u/l) might be attributed mainly to UVR exposure, and that the methods used to obtain the UVR exposure data might not be sufficiently sensitive or specific. Genetic factors might also influence LEP(u/l). We consider LEP(u/l) to be a sensitive and specific marker for UVR exposure at the dorsal aspect of the forearm in healthy subjects.

  1. Urinary concentration of solvents as a biological indicator of exposure: proposal for the biological equivalent exposure limit for nine solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghittori, S.; Imbriani, M.; Pezzagno, G.; Capodaglio, E.

    1987-09-01

    Organic solvents are generally volatile substances that are absorbed mainly through the lungs; they are eliminated chiefly through the lungs and kidneys. In urine they are present as metabolites and, in very little part, as parent compound. The urinary concentration of solvent (Cu) can be used for the biological monitoring of exposed subjects to evaluate their exposure and correlate with the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) during the working day. The authors report some results obtained with workers occupationally exposed to solvents. The results concern the correlation between urinary concentration (Cu, micrograms/L) vs. average environmental concentration (Ci, mg/m3) measured in the breathing zone. For each solvent studied (acetone, 2-cyclohexane, 1,2-dichloropropane, n-hexane, methyl ethyl ketone, perchloroethylene, styrene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane) the authors propose a Biological Equivalent Exposure Limit (BEEL) corresponding to the environmental TLV.

  2. Biological monitoring of exposure to tebuconazole in winegrowers.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Mercadante, Rosa; Polledri, Elisa; Rubino, Federico Maria; Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Vianello, Giorgio; Colosio, Claudio; Moretto, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Tebuconazole (TEB) is a fungicide widely used in vineyards and is a suspected teratogen for humans. The aim of this research was to identify urinary biomarkers and the best sampling time for the biological monitoring of exposure to TEB in agricultural workers. Seven vineyard workers of the Monferrato region, Piedemont, Italy, were investigated for a total of 12 workdays. They treated the vineyards with TEB for 1-2 consecutive days, one of them for 3 days. During each application coveralls, underwears, hand washing liquids and head coverings were used to estimate dermal exposure. For biomonitoring, spot samples of urine from each individual were collected starting from 24 h before the first application, continuing during the application, and again after the application for about 48 h. TEB and its metabolites TEB-OH and TEB-COOH were measured by liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. TEB contamination of coveralls and total dermal exposure showed median levels of 6180 and 1020 μg. Urinary TEB-OH was the most abundant metabolite; its excretion rate peaked within 24 h after product application (post 24 h). In this time frame, median levels of TEB-OH and TEB-COOH ranged from 8.0 to 387.8 μg/l and from 5.7 to 102.9 μg/l, respectively, with a ratio between the two metabolites of about 3.5. The total amount of urinary metabolites (U-TEBeq) post 24 h was significantly correlated with both TEB on coveralls and total dermal exposure (Pearson's r=0.756 and 0.577). The amount of metabolites excreted in urine represented about 17% of total dermal TEB exposure. Our results suggest that TEB-OH and TEB-COOH in post-exposure urine samples are promising candidates for biomonitoring TEB exposure in agricultural workers.

  3. Long-term ex situ conservation of biological resources and the role of biological resource centers.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Glyn N; Day, John G

    2007-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of biological resource centers (BRCs) requires careful attention to implementation of reliable preservation technologies and appropriate quality control to ensure that recovered cultures and other biological materials perform in the same way as the originally isolated culture or material. There are many types of BRC that vary both in the kinds of material they hold and in the purposes for which the materials are provided. All BRCs are expected to provide materials and information of an appropriate quality for their application and work to standards relevant to those applications. There are important industrial, biomedical, and conservation issues that can only be addressed through effective and efficient operation of BRCs in the long- term. This requires a high degree of expertise in the maintenance and management of collections of biological materials at ultra-low temperatures, or as freeze-dried material, to secure their long-term integrity and relevance for future research, development, and conservation.

  4. 2005 Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers' national poisoning and exposure database.

    PubMed

    Lai, Melisa W; Klein-Schwartz, Wendy; Rodgers, George C; Abrams, Joseph Y; Haber, Deborah A; Bronstein, Alvin C; Wruk, Kathleen M

    2006-01-01

    The American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC; http://www.aapcc.org) maintains the national database of information logged by the country's 61 Poison Control Centers (PCCs). Case records in this database are from self-reported calls: they reflect only information provided when the public or healthcare professionals report an actual or potential exposure to a substance (e.g., an ingestion, inhalation, or topical exposure.), or request information/educational materials. Exposures do not necessarily represent a poisoning or overdose. The AAPCC is not able to completely verify the accuracy of every report made to member centers. Additional exposures may go unreported to PCCs, and data referenced from the AAPCC should not be construed to represent the complete incidence of national exposures to any substance(s). U.S. Poison Centers make possible the compilation and reporting of this report through their staffs' meticulous documentation of each case using standardized definitions and compatible computer systems. The 61 participating poison centers in 2005 are: Regional Poison Control Center, Birmingham, AL; Alabama Poison Center, Tuscaloosa, AL; Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center, Tucson, AZ; Banner Poison Control Center, Phoenix, AZ; Arkansas Poison and Drug Information Center, Little Rock, AK; California Poison Control System-Fresno/Madera Division, CA; California Poison Control System-Sacramento Division, CA; California Poison Control System-San Diego Division, CA; California Poison Control System-San Francisco Division, CA; Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center, Denver, CO; Connecticut Poison Control Center, Farmington, CT; National Capital Poison Center, Washington, DC; Florida Poison Information Center, Tampa, FL; Florida Poison Information Center, Jacksonville, FL; Florida Poison Information Center, Miami, FL; Georgia Poison Center, Atlanta, GA; Illinois Poison Center, Chicago, IL; Indiana

  5. Environmental and biological monitoring for lead exposure in California workplaces.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, L; Sharp, D S; Samuels, S; Perkins, C; Rosenberg, J

    1990-01-01

    Patterns of environmental and biological monitoring for lead exposure were surveyed in lead-using industries in California. Employer self-reporting indicates a large proportion of potentially lead-exposed workers have never participated in a monitoring program. Only 2.6 percent of facilities have done environmental monitoring for lead, and only 1.4 percent have routine biological monitoring programs. Monitoring practices vary by size of facility, with higher proportions in industries in which larger facilities predominate. Almost 80 percent of battery manufacturing employees work in job classifications which have been monitored, versus only 1 percent of radiator-repair workers. These findings suggest that laboratory-based surveillance for occupational lead poisoning may seriously underestimate the true number of lead poisoned workers and raise serious questions regarding compliance with key elements of the OSHA Lead Standard. PMID:2368850

  6. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Truta-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-07

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival.To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  7. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TruÅ£ǎ-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-01

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival. To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  8. [Hair: a powerful biological marker for exposure to xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Goullé, J P; Kintz, P

    1997-01-01

    Human hair analysis is now recognized for evaluating someone exposure to xenobiotics: drugs of abuse, pharmaceuticals and polluants. This paper describes analytical methods than can be used by biologists. For drugs of abuse after decontamination, hydrolysis of hair, selective extraction and derivatization, determinations are performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Calibration uses deuterated standards. The cut-off value is 0.5 ng/mg for 6-monoacetylmorphine (heroin) and amphetamines and a benzoylecgonine/cocaine ratio > 0.05 for cocaine. Measurement of metabolites from endogenous metabolism sign the exposure (6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine for heroin, benzoylecgonine for cocaine, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic by-product for cannabis). For drugs, after selective extraction, determinations are performed by GC/MS or liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector. Main applications concern drug monitoring to complement blood determinations or when blood collection is missing, as evidence of hidden, illicit or criminal drug exposure. Finally it is a powerfull tool for clinical diagnosis especially when late biological investigations are performed.

  9. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Formica, Domenico; Silvestri, Sergio

    2004-01-01

    The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to allow the integration of the specific literature on the bio-effects produced by magnetic resonance systems with the vast literature concerning the bio-effects produced by electromagnetic fields. This work gives an overview of the findings about the safety concerns of exposure to static magnetic fields, radio-frequency fields, and time varying magnetic field gradients, focusing primarily on the physics of the interactions between these electromagnetic fields and biological matter. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts, international safety guidelines are also cited. PMID:15104797

  10. Integrity and Biological Activity of DNA after UV Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Delina Y.; Monier, Jean-Michel; Dupraz, Sébastien; Freissinet, Caroline; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2010-04-01

    The field of astrobiology lacks a universal marker with which to indicate the presence of life. This study supports the proposal to use nucleic acids, specifically DNA, as a signature of life (biosignature). In addition to its specificity to living organisms, DNA is a functional molecule that can confer new activities and characteristics to other organisms, following the molecular biology dogma, that is, DNA is transcribed to RNA, which is translated into proteins. Previous criticisms of the use of DNA as a biosignature have asserted that DNA molecules would be destroyed by UV radiation in space. To address this concern, DNA in plasmid form was deposited onto different surfaces and exposed to UVC radiation. The surviving DNA was quantified via the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results demonstrate increased survivability of DNA attached to surfaces versus non-adsorbed DNA. The DNA was also tested for biological activity via transformation into the bacterium Acinetobacter sp. and assaying for antibiotic resistance conferred by genes encoded by the plasmid. The success of these methods to detect DNA and its gene products after UV exposure (254 nm, 3.5 J/m2s) not only supports the use of the DNA molecule as a biosignature on mineral surfaces but also demonstrates that the DNA retained biological activity.

  11. Epidemiological trends in electronic cigarette exposures reported to U.S. Poison Centers.

    PubMed

    Vakkalanka, J P; Hardison, L S; Holstege, C P

    2014-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported an increase in electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in both adults and adolescents. Poison Center calls provide data on exposures pertaining to e-cigarette devices and components (including nicotine-refill cartridges), potentially identifying epidemiological trends in reported exposures over time. To characterize the trends in e-cigarette exposures reported to United States (U.S.) Poison Centers between 01 June 2010 and 30 September 2013. We obtained data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) for all exposures involving e-cigarettes reported to the National Poison Data System (NPDS) by U.S. Poison Centers and described trends in exposures over time, demographics, geographical characteristics, clinical effects and outcomes, management site, and exposure route. A total of 1,700 exposures were reported to Poison Centers during this time. The most frequent age groups were children 5 years or below with 717 (42.2%) exposures and adults ages 20-39 years with 466 (27.4%) exposures. Temporal trends showed an increase of 1.36 exposures per month [95% CI: 1.16-1.56] from June 2010 through December 2012, after which exposures increased by 9.60 per month [95% CI: 8.64-10.55] from January through September 2013. The majority of patients who were followed reported that they had only minor effects. The majority of exposures to e-cigarette devices and components occurred in children of 5 years or below due to accidental exposure. Based on the available data, the reported exposures have resulted in minimal toxicity. Calls to Poison Centers regarding these products have rapidly increased since 2010, and continued surveillance may show changes in the epidemiological trends surrounding e-cigarette exposures.

  12. Data acquisition and analysis at the Structural Biology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, M.L.; Coleman, T.A.; Daly, R.T.; Pflugrath, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC), a national user facility for macromolecular crystallography located at Argonne National Laboratory`s Advanced Photon Source, is currently being built and commissioned. SBC facilities include a bending-magnet beamline, an insertion-device beamline, laboratory and office space adjacent to the beamlines, and associated instrumentation, experimental apparatus, and facilities. SBC technical facilities will support anomalous dispersion phasing experiments, data collection from microcrystals, data collection from crystals with large molecular structures and rapid data collection from multiple related crystal structures for protein engineering and drug design. The SBC Computing Systems and Software Engineering Group is tasked with developing the SBC Control System, which includes computing systems, network, and software. The emphasis of SBC Control System development has been to provide efficient and convenient beamline control, data acquisition, and data analysis for maximal facility and experimenter productivity. This paper describes the SBC Control System development, specifically data acquisition and analysis at the SBC, and the development methods used to meet this goal.

  13. The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Guikema, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Life Sciences Division of NASA has initiated a NASA Specialized Centers of Research and Training (NSCORT) program. Three Centers were designated in late 1990, as the culmination of an in-depth peer review analysis of proposals from universities across the nation and around the world. Kansas State University was selected as the NSCORT in Gravitational Biology. This Center is headquartered in the KSU Division of Biology and has a research, training, and outreach function that focuses on cellular and developmental biology.

  14. The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Guikema, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Life Sciences Division of NASA has initiated a NASA Specialized Centers of Research and Training (NSCORT) program. Three Centers were designated in late 1990, as the culmination of an in-depth peer review analysis of proposals from universities across the nation and around the world. Kansas State University was selected as the NSCORT in Gravitational Biology. This Center is headquartered in the KSU Division of Biology and has a research, training, and outreach function that focuses on cellular and developmental biology.

  15. Daily activity and light exposure levels for five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mark S; Figueiro, Mariana G; Jones, Geoffrey E; Glander, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Light is the primary synchronizer of all biological rhythms, yet little is known about the role of the 24-hour luminous environment on nonhuman primate circadian patterns, making it difficult to understand the photic niche of the ancestral primate. Here we present the first data on proximate light-dark exposure and activity-rest patterns in free-ranging nonhuman primates. Four individuals each of five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center (Eulemur mongoz, Lemur catta, Propithecus coquereli, Varecia rubra, and Varecia variegata variegata) were fitted with a Daysimeter-D pendant that contained light and accelerometer sensors. Our results reveal common as well as species-specific light exposure and behavior patterns. As expected, all five species were more active between sunrise and sunset. All five species demonstrated an anticipatory increase in their pre-sunrise activity that peaked at sunrise with all but V. rubra showing a reduction within an hour. All five species reduced activity during mid-day. Four of the five stayed active after sunset, but P. coquereli began reducing their activity about 2 hours before sunset. Other subtle differences in the recorded light exposure and activity patterns suggest species-specific photic niches and behaviors. The eventual application of the Daysimeter-D in the wild may help to better understand the adaptive evolution of ancestral primates.

  16. Lead absorption in cows: biological indicators of ambient lead exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Karacic, V.; Prpic-Majic, D.; Skender, L.

    1984-03-01

    In order to determine actual lead exposure from residual amounts of lead in the environmental soil following the introduction of effective engineering emission controls in a lead smeltery, the absorption of lead in cows grazing in the vicinity was investigated. Four groups of cows were examined: two groups of cows exposed to different ambient lead concentration, compared with two normal groups of cows. In each cow aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) and blood lead (Pb-B) were determined, two years prior to and four years after the technical sanitation of the lead emission source. The results demonstrated normalization of ALAD, EP and Pb-B after the technical sanitation. In spite of normalization, biological indicators ALAD and Pb-B determined four years after the technical sanitation showed increased lead absorption in comparison with the results of the control group. This indirectly indicates lead contamination of the environment from residual amounts of lead in the soil.

  17. Biological monitoring IX: Concomitant exposure to medications and industrial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, J.

    1994-05-01

    A significant proportion of workers may be receiving prescription or nonprescription medications. In two surveys, one in the United States and the other in the Netherlands, 15 to 30 percent of workers reported current use of pharmaceuticals. In a viscose rayon factory in Belgium, 31 percent of 129 workers exposed to carbon disulfide and 19.8 percent of 81 control workers from other factories reported use of some medication. Some of the drugs may affect the relationship between the external exposure (dose) of a chemical and the concentration of that chemical or its metabolite(s) in a sampled biological medium (internal dose), and/or the relationship between external exposure and concentration at a receptor site. They may also modulate the response of the receptor, as suggested by the increased reports of neurological symptoms in carbon disulfide-exposed workers taking certain medications. There are two obvious differences between drugs and industrial chemicals: (1) The effects of drugs cover a wider spectrum and include effects not known to be the result of any industrial chemicals. Examples include selective destructive inhibition of hepatic enzymes (monoamine oxidase inhibitors, indomethacin) and alteration of hepatic blood flow (adrenergic agents, cimetidine). (2) Drugs are administered to produce specific therapeutic effects. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Bronchial Reactivity and Lung Function After World Trade Center Exposure.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Thomas K; Weakley, Jessica; Dhar, Sean; Hall, Charles B; Crosse, Tesha; Banauch, Gisela I; Weiden, Michael D; Izbicki, Gabriel; Cohen, Hillel W; Gupta, Aanchal; King, Camille; Christodoulou, Vasilios; Webber, Mayris P; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Moir, William; Nolan, Anna; Kelly, Kerry J; Prezant, David J

    2016-12-01

    World Trade Center (WTC)-exposed rescue/recovery workers endured massive respiratory insult from inhalation of particulate matter and gases, resulting in respiratory symptoms, loss of lung function, and, for many, bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). The persistence of respiratory symptoms and lung function abnormalities has been well-documented, whereas persistence of BHR has not been investigated. A total of 173 WTC-exposed firefighters with bronchial reactivity measured within 2 years after September 11, 2001 (9/11) (baseline methacholine challenge test), were reevaluated in 2013 and 2014 (follow-up methacholine challenge test). FEV1 measurements were obtained from the late pre-9/11, early post-9/11, and late post-9/11 periods. Respiratory symptoms and corticosteroid treatment were recorded. Bronchial reactivity remained stable (within 1 doubling dilution) for most (n = 101, 58%). Sixteen of 28 (57%) with BHR (provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decline in FEV1 <8 mg/mL) at baseline had BHR at follow-up, and an additional 27 of the 145 (19%) without BHR at baseline had BHR at follow-up. In multivariable models, we found that BHR baseline was strongly associated with BHR follow-up (OR, 6.46) and that BHR at follow-up was associated with an estimated 15.4 mL/y greater FEV1 decline than experienced by those without BHR at follow-up. Annual FEV1 decline was moderated by corticosteroid use. Persistent BHR and its deleterious influence on lung function suggest a role for airway inflammation in perpetuation of WTC-associated airway disease. In future massive occupational exposure to inorganic dust/gases, we recommend early and serial pulmonary function testing, including measurements of bronchial reactivity, when possible, and inhaled corticosteroid therapy for those with symptoms or pulmonary function tests consistent with airway disease. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biological indicators in response to radiofrequency/microwave exposure.

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Ana Marija; Pavičić, Ivan; Trošić, Ivančica

    2012-09-01

    Over the years, due to rapid technological progress, radiation from man-made sources exceeded that of natural origin. There is a general concern regarding a growing number of appliances that use radiofrequency/ microwave (RF/MW) radiation with particular emphasis on mobile communication systems. Since nonthermal biological effects and mechanisms of RF/MW radiation are still uncertain, laboratory studies on animal models, tissues, cells, and cell free system are of extraordinary importance in bioelectromagnetic research. We believe that such investigations play a supporting role in public risk assessment. Cellular systems with the potential for a clear response to RF/MW exposures should be used in those studies. It is known that organism is a complex electrochemical system where processes of oxidation and reduction regularly occur. One of the plausible mechanisms is connected with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Depending on concentration, ROS can have both beneficial and deleterious effects. Positive effects are connected with cell signalling, defence against infectious agents, and proliferative cell ability. On the other hand, excessive production, which overloads antioxidant defence mechanism, leads to cellular damage with serious potential for disease development. ROS concentration increase within the cell caused by RF/MW radiation seems to be a biologically relevant hypothesis to give clear insight into the RF/MW action at non-thermal level of radiation. In order to better understand the exact mechanism of action and its consequences, further research is needed in the field. We would like to present current knowledge on possible biological mechanisms of RF/MW actions.

  20. Impact of chronic lead exposure on selected biological markers.

    PubMed

    Jangid, Ambica P; John, P J; Yadav, D; Mishra, Sandhya; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Lead poisoning remains a major problem in India due to the lack of awareness of its ill effects among the clinical community. Blood lead, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentrations are widely used as biomarkers for lead toxicity The present study was designed to determine the impact of chronic lead exposure on selected biological markers. A total of 250 subjects, of both sexes, ranging in age from 20 to 70 years, were recruited. On the basis of BLLs, the subjects were categorized into four groups: Group A (BLL: 0-10 μg/dl), Group B (BLL: 10-20 μg/dl). Group C (BLL: 20-30 μg/dl) and Group D (BLL: 30-40 μg/dl) having BLLs of 3.60 ± 2.71 μg/dl, 15.21 ± 2.65 μg/dl, 26.82 ± 2.53 μg/dl and 36.38 ± 2.83 μg/dl, respectively. Significant changes in biological markers due to elevated BLLs were noted. The relation of BLL and biological markers to demographic characteristics such as sex, habits, diet and substances abuse (smoking effect) were also studied in the present investigation. Males, urban population, non-vegetarians, and smokers had higher blood lead levels. δ-ALAD activity was found to be significantly lower with increased BLL (P < 0.001), while the ZPP level was significantly higher with increased BLL (P < 0.001). Further, BLL showed a negative correlation with δ-ALAD (r = -0.425, P < 0.001, N = 250) and a positive correlations with ZPP (r = 0.669, P < 0.001, N = 250). Chronic lead exposure affects the prooxidant-antioxidant equilibrium leading to cellular oxidative stress.

  1. Cell biology: at the center of modern biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Budde, Priya Prakash; Williams, Elizabeth H; Misteli, Tom

    2012-10-01

    How does basic cell biology contribute to biomedicine? A new series of Features in JCB provides a cross section of compelling examples of how basic cell biology findings can lead to therapeutics. These articles highlight the fruitful, essential, and increasingly prominent bridge that exists between cell biology and the clinic.

  2. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Charles, M W

    2007-09-01

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range approximately 66 microm) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range approximately 44 microm). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 microm. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is

  3. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde in a medical center autopsy service

    SciTech Connect

    Coldiron, V.R.; Ward, J.B. Jr.; Trieff, N.M.; Janssen, H.E. Jr.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-07-01

    The formaldehyde exposures occurring in the autopsy service of a medical complex were evaluated as part of a study to detect genetically harmful effects of chemical exposures. Determination of time-weighted average (TWA) exposures and characterization of the patterns of exposure experienced by individuals with different work responsibilities in this occupational setting were sought. Both general area and breathing zone samples were evaluated. Estimated weekly time-weighted average exposures for pathologists, residents and technicians were determined to be between 0.61 and 1.32 parts per million with little difference between work roles. While the averages were similar, the patterns of exposure of technicians and physicians were different. Technicians were exposed to a baseline level of formaldehyde for a prolonged period of time. In contrast, physicians were exposed for shorter times but experienced higher levels during specific tasks, particularly tissue-sectioning and examination. Evaluations of work procedures and environmental conditions in autopsy services are recommended to reduce personnel exposure to formaldehyde vapor.

  4. Trends in analgesic exposures reported to Texas Poison Centers following increased regulation of hydrocodone.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Ashley; Kleinschmidt, Kurt; Forrester, Mathias B; Young, Amy

    2016-06-01

    In October 2014, the Drug Enforcement Administration reclassified hydrocodone to schedule II, increasing regulations on use. The impact of rescheduling hydrocodone on opioid exposures is unclear, especially in states with special restrictions required for prescribing schedule II agents. To assess whether changes in exposures to prescription opioid analgesics and heroin as reported to poison centers occurred in the 6 months after hydrocodone rescheduling. We hypothesized that hydrocodone exposures would decrease, while less tightly regulated opioids, such as codeine and tramadol, would increase. This study compares opioid analgesic exposures reported to Texas Poison Centers before and after this change in a state that requires special prescription pads for Schedule II agents. Cases included all opioid analgesic exposures reported to a statewide poison center network, comparing exposures from 6 months before to 6 months after heightened regulations. Specific opioids with large changes in reported exposures were further characterized by patient age and exposure intent. Hydrocodone exposures decreased from 1567 to 1135 (28%, p = 0.00017), decreasing for all ages. Codeine exposures increased significantly from 189 to 522 (176%, p = 0.00014), including a 263% increase for age >20 years. Codeine misuse increased 443% and adverse drug events 327%. Oxycodone exposures increased from 134 to 189 (39%, p = 0.0143), increasing only among patients age >20 years. Reported heroin exposures increased from 156 to 179 (15%, p = 0.2286) and tramadol from 666 to 708 (6%, p = 0.0193). Other opioid exposures changed little or had limited reports. The increased regulation of hydrocodone was followed temporally by a decrease in reported hydrocodone exposures, but also increases in codeine, oxycodone and tramadol exposures. This may reflect a shift in prescribing practices, changes in street availability of hydrocodone or decreased drug diversion. The increased

  5. 75 FR 6401 - Medical Devices Regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research; Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Devices Regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research; Availability of Summaries of Safety and Effectiveness Data for Premarket Approval... the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER). This list is intended to inform the public...

  6. 76 FR 59407 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... ``Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information on Non-Standardized Allergenic Extracts in the...

  7. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Apostoli, P.; Bartoli, D.; Alessio, L.; Buchet, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to assess reliable biological indicators for monitoring the occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs), taking into account the possible confounding role of arsenicals present in food and of the element present in drinking water. METHODS: 51 Glass workers exposed to As trioxide were monitored by measuring dust in the breathing zone, with personal air samplers. Urine samples at the end of work shift were analysed for biological monitoring. A control group of 39 subjects not exposed to As, and eight volunteers who drank water containing about 45 micrograms/l iAs for a week were also considered. Plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the analysis of total As in air and urine samples, whereas the urinary As species (trivalent, As3; pentavalent, As5; monomethyl arsonic acid, MMA; dimethyl arsinic acid, DMA; arsenobetaine, AsB) were measured by liquid chromatography coupled with plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) RESULTS: Environmental concentrations of As in air varied widely (mean 84 micrograms/m3, SD 61, median 40) and also the sum of urinary iAs MMA and DMA, varied among the groups of exposed subjects (mean 106 micrograms/l, SD 84, median 65). AsB was the most excreted species (34% of total As) followed by DMA (28%), MMA (26%), and As3 + As5 (12%). In the volunteers who drank As in the water the excretion of MMA and DMA increased (from a median of 0.5 to 5 micrograms/day for MMA and from 4 to 13 micrograms/day for DMA). The best correlations between As in air and its urinary species were found for total iAs and As3 + As5. CONCLUSIONS: To avoid the effect of As from sources other than occupation on urinary species of the element, in particular on DMA, it is proposed that urinary As3 + As5 may an indicator for monitoring the exposure to iAs. For concentrations of 10 micrograms/m3 the current environmental limit for iAs, the limit for urinary As3 + As5 was calculated to be around 5 micrograms/l, even if the wide

  8. NCI RNA Biology 2017 symposium recap | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The recent discovery of new classes of RNAs and the demonstration that alterations in RNA metabolism underlie numerous human cancers have resulted in enormous interest among CCR investigators in RNA biology. In order to share the latest research in this exciting field, the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology held its second international symposium April 23-24, 2017, in Natcher Auditorium. Learn more...

  9. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Exposure to respirable dust and crystalline silica in bricklaying education at Dutch vocational training centers.

    PubMed

    Huizer, Daan; Spee, Ton; Lumens, Mieke; Kromhout, Hans

    2010-06-01

    Construction workers are educated at vocational training centers before they begin their working lives. Future bricklayers and their instructors are exposed to respirable dust and possibly to hazardous respirable crystalline silica from trial mortar. Thirty-six personal air samples were collected at six training centers to estimate exposure to respirable dust for both students and teachers. A selection of 22 samples was analyzed for crystalline silica. Average respirable dust exposures ranged from 0.59 mg/m(3) for teachers to 1.45 mg/m(3) for students performing recycling and cleaning tasks. In 45% of the analyzed samples, respirable crystalline silica was detected. Exposure to silica remained below the Dutch OEL (75 microg/m(3)). Exposure was significantly less for teachers than for students. This effect was found in both types of vocational training centers present in the Netherlands. Dry sweeping, as performed at all locations in this study, contributed considerably to the exposure to respirable dust. A first step in reducing exposure to dust and silica at training centers would therefore be to avoid dry sweeping. The presence of a dust extraction system, although not optimally designed, also significantly lowered exposure. To assess a construction worker's lifetime exposure to respirable dust and crystalline silica, the vocational training period should also be taken into account. Several epidemiological studies have shown that time since first exposure can be an important risk factor for chronic health effects. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Exposure Science and the US EPA National Center for Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emerging field of computational toxicology applies mathematical and computer models and molecular biological and chemical approaches to explore both qualitative and quantitative relationships between sources of environmental pollutant exposure and adverse health outcomes. The...

  12. Exposure Science and the US EPA National Center for Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emerging field of computational toxicology applies mathematical and computer models and molecular biological and chemical approaches to explore both qualitative and quantitative relationships between sources of environmental pollutant exposure and adverse health outcomes. The...

  13. Engineered Biological Pacemakers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging's Cellular Biophysics Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological pacemakers.

  14. An Engineering Approach to Management of Occupational and Community Noise Exposure at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1997-01-01

    Workplace and environmental noise issues at NASA Lewis Research Center are effectively managed via a three-part program that addresses hearing conservation, community noise control, and noise control engineering. The Lewis Research Center Noise Exposure Management Program seeks to limit employee noise exposure and maintain community acceptance for critical research while actively pursuing engineered controls for noise generated by more than 100 separate research facilities and the associated services required for their operation.

  15. An Engineering Approach to Management of Occupational and Community Noise Exposure at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1997-01-01

    Workplace and environmental noise issues at NASA Lewis Research Center are effectively managed via a three-part program that addresses hearing conservation, community noise control, and noise control engineering. The Lewis Research Center Noise Exposure Management Program seeks to limit employee noise exposure and maintain community acceptance for critical research while actively pursuing engineered controls for noise generated by more than 100 separate research facilities and the associated services required for their operation.

  16. Biological monitoring of exposure to organophosphorus insecticides in a group of horticultural greenhouse workers.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Michèle; Carrier, Gaétan; Brunet, Robert C; Dumas, Pierre; Noisel, Nolwenn

    2006-07-01

    Exposure to selected organophosphorus insecticides (OPs), malathion, diazinon and acephate, was evaluated in a group of horticultural greenhouse workers. This was achieved through measurements of the cumulative urinary excretion time courses of specific and non-specific biomarkers over a 24 h period following the onset of work exposure. For malathion, the absorbed daily doses were estimated from the 24 h cumulative urinary amounts of the specific mono- and di-carboxylic acid metabolites (the sum of MCA and DCA) through the use of a kinetic model. The observed 24 h urinary levels were also compared with a biological reference value (BRV) of 57 nmol kg(-1) of body weight established in a previous work on the basis of a human no-observed-effect level exposure dose. Excretion values were found to be 2.5% or less of the BRV, suggesting a negligible health risk. Both median and 95th percentile concentrations of DCA (n = 57 samples) were, however, slightly higher than the baseline values determined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US civilian population (MCA was not analyzed by the CDC). The cumulative urinary excretion time course of the methyl phosphoric (MP) derivatives, which are metabolites of malathion but also of several other OPs, was also determined. Though relatively low, the MP levels were from 3 to 31 times higher than would be expected on the basis of the malathion specific MCA and DCA excretions, indicating that MP excretions stem from sources other than malathion exposure. Accordingly, only the time courses of MCA and DCA excretion rate (nmol h(-1)) were compatible with the time of work exposure. Urinary biomarkers of exposure to diazinon and acephate were also measured. Urinary concentrations were essentially below or equal to the analytical limit of detection of 1 microg l(-1) for 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (n = 54) and of 0.8 microg l(-1) for acephate and methamidophos (n = 59): values within the baseline range

  17. The Importance of the Biological Impact of Exposure to the Concept of the Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Kristine K.; Auerbach, Scott S.; Balshaw, David M.; Cui, Yuxia; Fallin, Margaret Daniele; Smith, Martyn T.; Spira, Avrum; Sumner, Susan; Miller, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The term “exposome” was originally coined in 2005 and defined as the totality of exposures throughout the lifetime. The exposome provides an excellent scientific framework for studying human health and disease. Recently, it has been suggested that how exposures affect our biology and how our bodies respond to such exposures should be part of the exposome. Objectives: The authors describe the biological impact of the exposome and outline many of the targets and processes that can be assessed as part of a comprehensive analysis of the exposome. Discussion: The processes that occur downstream from the initial interactions with exogenous and endogenous compounds determine the biological impact of exposures. If the effects are not considered in the same context as the exposures, it will be difficult to determine cause and effect. The exposome and biology are interactive—changes in biology due to the environment change one’s vulnerability to subsequent exposures. Additionally, highly resilient individuals are able to withstand environmental exposures with minimal effects to their health. We expect that the vast majority of exposures are transient, and chemicals underlying exposures that occurred weeks, months, or years ago are long gone from the body. However, these past chemical exposures often leave molecular fingerprints that may be able to provide information on these past exposures. Conclusions: Through linking exposures to specific biological responses, exposome research could serve to improve understanding of the mechanistic connections between exposures and health to help mitigate adverse health outcomes across the lifespan. Citation: Dennis KK, Auerbach SS, Balshaw DM, Cui Y, Fallin MD, Smith MT, Spira A, Sumner S, Miller GW. 2016. The importance of the biological impact of exposure to the concept of the exposome. Environ Health Perspect 124:1504–1510; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP140 PMID:27258438

  18. Occupational Exposures to Ebola Virus in Ebola Treatment Center, Conakry, Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Janvier, Frédéric; Karkowski, Ludovic; Billhot, Magali; Aletti, Marc; Bordes, Julien; Koulibaly, Fassou; Cordier, Pierre-Yves; Cournac, Jean-Marie; Maugey, Nancy; Gagnon, Nicolas; Cotte, Jean; Cambon, Audrey; Mac Nab, Christine; Moroge, Sophie; Rousseau, Claire; Foissaud, Vincent; De Greslan, Thierry; Granier, Hervé; Cellarier, Gilles; Valade, Eric; Kraemer, Philippe; Alla, Philippe; Mérens, Audrey; Sagui, Emmanuel; Carmoi, Thierry; Rapp, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We report 77 cases of occupational exposures for 57 healthcare workers at the Ebola Treatment Center in Conakry, Guinea, during the Ebola virus disease outbreak in 2014−2015. Despite the high incidence of 3.5 occupational exposures/healthcare worker/year, only 18% of workers were at high risk for transmission, and no infections occurred. PMID:28726614

  19. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to isoflurane by measurement of isoflurane exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Tortosa, J A; Ibarra, I; Luna, A; Periago, J F

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between isoflurane environmental concentrations in operating rooms and the corresponding isoflurane concentration in the exhaled air of the operating personnel at the end of the exposure has been investigated. Isoflurane was retained in an adsorbent cartridge and after thermal desorption the concentration was estimated by gas chromatography. Significant correlation between environmental and exhaled air isoflurane concentrations allowed the establishment of a biological exposure index and biological exposure limits corresponding to proposed atmospheric threshold values.

  20. [Exposure to biological agents used in Polish enterprises: analysis of data derived from the National Register of Biological Agent].

    PubMed

    Kozajda, Anna; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2011-01-01

    The National Register of Biological Agents at Work and the National Information Centre for Biological Agents Present at Workplaces were established in the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in 2005. The National Information Centre carries out consultation and education activities concerning occupational exposure and risk assessment, development and implementation of preventive programs and accurate registration of reliable information about the use of biological agents. Educational materials on biological exposure are published on the website. The National Register of Biological Agents (database) collects and periodically analyzes the information obtained from employers about the use of biological agents for research, diagnostic or industrial purposes. As of 10 December 2010 there were 240 notifications from companies, which use biological agents for the following purposes: research--69, industrial--30 and diagnostic--321. Near 75% of all notifications were obtained from different diagnostic laboratories (public and private). In total, 3226 workers, including 2967 (92%) women and 256 (8%) men were exposed to biological agents. In general, occupational exposure to 209 biological agents (186 of risk group 2 and 23 of risk group 3, of which 16 are additionally marked by 3**) were registered in the data base.

  1. Exposure to BTEX and Ethers in Petrol Station Attendants and Proposal of Biological Exposure Equivalents for Urinary Benzene and MTBE.

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Rossella, Federica; Mercadante, Rosa; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    To assess exposure to benzene (BEN) and other aromatic compounds (toluene, ethylbenzene, m+p-xylene, o-xylene) (BTEX), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) in petrol station workers using air sampling and biological monitoring and to propose biological equivalents to occupational limit values. Eighty-nine petrol station workers and 90 control subjects were investigated. Personal exposure to airborne BTEX and ethers was assessed during a mid-week shift; urine samples were collected at the beginning of the work week, prior to and at the end of air sampling. Petrol station workers had median airborne exposures to benzene and MTBE of 59 and 408 µg m(-3), respectively, with urinary benzene (BEN-U) and MTBE (MTBE-U) of 339 and 780 ng l(-1), respectively. Concentrations in petrol station workers were higher than in control subjects. There were significant positive correlations between airborne exposure and the corresponding biological marker, with Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) values of 0.437 and 0.865 for benzene and MTBE, respectively. There was also a strong correlation between airborne benzene and urinary MTBE (r = 0.835). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the urinary levels of benzene were influenced by personal airborne exposure, urinary creatinine, and tobacco smoking [determination coefficient (R(2)) 0.572], while MTBE-U was influenced only by personal exposure (R(2) = 0.741). BEN-U and MTBE-U are sensitive and specific biomarkers of low occupational exposures. We propose using BEN-U as biomarker of exposure to benzene in nonsmokers and suggest 1457 ng l(-1) in end shift urine samples as biological exposure equivalent to the EU occupational limit value of 1 p.p.m.; for both smokers and nonsmokers, MTBE-U may be proposed as a surrogate biomarker of benzene exposure, with a biological exposure equivalent of 22 µg l(-1) in end shift samples. For MTBE exposure, we suggest the use of MTBE-U with a biological exposure

  2. Exposure to BTEX and Ethers in Petrol Station Attendants and Proposal of Biological Exposure Equivalents for Urinary Benzene and MTBE

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Laura; Rossella, Federica; Mercadante, Rosa; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess exposure to benzene (BEN) and other aromatic compounds (toluene, ethylbenzene, m+p-xylene, o-xylene) (BTEX), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) in petrol station workers using air sampling and biological monitoring and to propose biological equivalents to occupational limit values. Methods: Eighty-nine petrol station workers and 90 control subjects were investigated. Personal exposure to airborne BTEX and ethers was assessed during a mid-week shift; urine samples were collected at the beginning of the work week, prior to and at the end of air sampling. Results: Petrol station workers had median airborne exposures to benzene and MTBE of 59 and 408 µg m−3, respectively, with urinary benzene (BEN-U) and MTBE (MTBE-U) of 339 and 780ng l−1, respectively. Concentrations in petrol station workers were higher than in control subjects. There were significant positive correlations between airborne exposure and the corresponding biological marker, with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) values of 0.437 and 0.865 for benzene and MTBE, respectively. There was also a strong correlation between airborne benzene and urinary MTBE (r = 0.835). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the urinary levels of benzene were influenced by personal airborne exposure, urinary creatinine, and tobacco smoking [determination coefficient (R 2) 0.572], while MTBE-U was influenced only by personal exposure (R 2 = 0.741). Conclusions: BEN-U and MTBE-U are sensitive and specific biomarkers of low occupational exposures. We propose using BEN-U as biomarker of exposure to benzene in nonsmokers and suggest 1457ng l−1 in end shift urine samples as biological exposure equivalent to the EU occupational limit value of 1 p.p.m.; for both smokers and nonsmokers, MTBE-U may be proposed as a surrogate biomarker of benzene exposure, with a biological exposure equivalent of 22 µg l−1 in end shift samples. For MTBE exposure, we suggest the

  3. Adapting Concepts from Systems Biology to Develop Systems Exposure Event Networks for Exposure Science Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems exposure science has emerged from the traditional environmental exposure assessment framework and incorporates new concepts that link sources of human exposure to internal dose and metabolic processes. Because many human environmental studies are designed for retrospectiv...

  4. Redox Biology Final Examination 2016 | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Numerous registrants have requested a certificate upon completion of the Redox Biology (RB) course. In order to obtain a certificate, you must answer 8 of the 12 questions below correctly. In the final examination, 1 question is derived from each of the 1-hour lectures. It is highly recommended that you have a copy of each PowerPoint presentation prior to taking the examination.

  5. Redox Biology Course Evaluation Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    To improve the Redox Biology (RB) course in future years, we would appreciate your feedback by completing this course evaluation. Please score the course elements as poor, fair, average, good or excellent. Please type any comments that you have in response to the questions at the bottom of the form. Remember to include your name as you wish it to appear on the certificate. Thank you for your feedback.

  6. Redox Biology Course Registration Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Redox Biology class is open to all NIH/NCI fellows and staff and will be held Septhember 27 - November 8, 2016. The last day to register is: September 21, 2016. The first 100 registrants will be accepted for the class. Those who plan to participate by Video TeleConference should also register so that you can receive the speaker handouts in advance.

  7. Biological tests of lead absorption following a brief massive exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.K.

    1984-07-01

    A contractor's man suffered a brief, massive exposure to lead fume by contaminating and then smoking hand-rolled cigarettes. His blood lead concentration rose very rapidly to very high levels, but zinc erythrocyte protoporphyrin, urinary lead, and urinary coproporphyrin did not. It is possible that only the blood lead concentration is of value in detecting brief massive exposure.

  8. [Biological monitoring of PAH exposure among asphalt workers].

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Calisti, Roberto; Polledri, Elisa; Barretta, Francesco; Stopponi, Roberta; Massacesi, Stefania; Bertazzi, Pieralberto; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this work was the assessment of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr) in asphalt workers. Median levels of 1-OHPyr resulted higher in asphalt workers than in controls (184 vs. < 20 ng/L, p < 0.001). The determinants of exposure of 1-OHPyr resulted smoking habit, the number of consecutive days at work and the job task; 1-OHPyr was also associated to urinary creatinine. End of work week 1-OHPyr is suggested as an useful indicator of occupational exposure to PAHs in bitumen fumes.

  9. Learner-Centered Inquiry in Undergraduate Biology: Positive Relationships with Long-Term Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derting, Terry L.; Ebert-May, Diane

    2010-01-01

    We determined short- and long-term correlates of a revised introductory biology curriculum on understanding of biology as a process of inquiry and learning of content. In the original curriculum students completed two traditional lecture-based introductory courses. In the revised curriculum students completed two new learner-centered,…

  10. Learner-Centered Inquiry in Undergraduate Biology: Positive Relationships with Long-Term Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derting, Terry L.; Ebert-May, Diane

    2010-01-01

    We determined short- and long-term correlates of a revised introductory biology curriculum on understanding of biology as a process of inquiry and learning of content. In the original curriculum students completed two traditional lecture-based introductory courses. In the revised curriculum students completed two new learner-centered,…

  11. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Hunt Rietschel, Carly

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology instructors transition from teacher-centered (i.e., lecture-based) instruction to teaching that focuses on the students. Using the innovation-decision model for change, we explored the motivation, decision-making, and reflective processes of the two instructors through two consecutive, large-enrollment biology course offerings. Our data reveal that the change process is somewhat unpredictable, requiring patience and persistence during inevitable challenges that arise for instructors and students. For example, the change process requires instructors to adopt a teacher-facilitator role as opposed to an expert role, to cover fewer course topics in greater depth, and to give students a degree of control over their own learning. Students must adjust to taking responsibility for their own learning, working collaboratively, and relinquishing the anonymity afforded by lecture-based teaching. We suggest implications for instructors wishing to change their teaching and administrators wishing to encourage adoption of learner-centered teaching at their institutions. PMID:27856550

  12. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching.

    PubMed

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Hunt Rietschel, Carly

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology instructors transition from teacher-centered (i.e., lecture-based) instruction to teaching that focuses on the students. Using the innovation-decision model for change, we explored the motivation, decision-making, and reflective processes of the two instructors through two consecutive, large-enrollment biology course offerings. Our data reveal that the change process is somewhat unpredictable, requiring patience and persistence during inevitable challenges that arise for instructors and students. For example, the change process requires instructors to adopt a teacher-facilitator role as opposed to an expert role, to cover fewer course topics in greater depth, and to give students a degree of control over their own learning. Students must adjust to taking responsibility for their own learning, working collaboratively, and relinquishing the anonymity afforded by lecture-based teaching. We suggest implications for instructors wishing to change their teaching and administrators wishing to encourage adoption of learner-centered teaching at their institutions.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF NUTRIENT EXPOSURE AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE INDICATORS FOR LAKE MICHIGAN COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines how landscape-scale gradient affect sedimentation rates, nutrient exposure, and biological responses in Lake Michigan coastal wetlands, and assess indicators for these trends. Twenty riverine coastal wetlands in Lake Michigan (Herdendorf 1981) were selected t...

  14. A SIMPLE COLORIMETRIC METHOD TO DETECT BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MICROCYSTINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic cyanobacteria are contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins are some of the most commonly detected toxins. Biological evidence of human exposure may be difficult to obtain due to limitations associated with cost, laboratory capacity, analytic support, and exp...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF NUTRIENT EXPOSURE AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE INDICATORS FOR LAKE MICHIGAN COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines how landscape-scale gradient affect sedimentation rates, nutrient exposure, and biological responses in Lake Michigan coastal wetlands, and assess indicators for these trends. Twenty riverine coastal wetlands in Lake Michigan (Herdendorf 1981) were selected t...

  16. The biological exposure indices: a key component in protecting workers from toxic chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M S

    1997-01-01

    Biological monitoring of exposure to chemicals in the workplace is an important component of exposure assessment and prevention of adverse health effects. It should be employed in conjunction with ambient air monitoring to provide information on the absorbed dose of a chemical agent and the effect of all routes of exposure. Judgments regarding the acceptable level of a chemical or its metabolite in biological samples are facilitated by comparison to a reference value. The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists has established a series of recommended reference values called the Biological Exposure Indices (BEI). The history and characteristics of the BEI are reviewed, and their suitability for use by occupational health specialists is examined. A number of challenges and stimuli to the continued development and improvement of these reference values are described, and the impact of recent advances in macromolecular biology is assessed. PMID:9114280

  17. Regional variations in pediatric medication exposure: Spatial analysis of poison center utilization in western Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Margaret B; Pizon, Anthony F; Branas, Charles C; Fabio, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Medication drug exposures among young children continue to rise despite current poison prevention efforts. These exposures result in increased healthcare utilization and medical costs. New tactics are needed to reduce injuries related to pediatric drug exposures. We aimed to identify cluster patterns in: (1) calls for pediatric medication drug exposures and (2) a subset of calls that resulted in medical evaluation referrals. We identified and evaluated population characteristics associated with cluster patterns. We analyzed 26,685 pharmaceutical drug exposures involving children <5 years of age based on calls reported to the Pittsburgh Poison Center from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2010. We performed spatial statistics to assess for clustering. We used logistic regression to estimate population characteristics associated with clustering. Spatial analysis identified 22 exposure clusters and five referral clusters. Sixty-five percent of 89 ZIP codes in the clusters of drug exposure with healthcare facility (HCF) referral were not identified in the exposure clusters. ZIP codes in the HCF referral clusters were characterized as rural, impoverished, and with high rates of unemployment and school dropouts. Our principal findings demonstrate pediatric drug exposures do exist in discrete geographic clusters and with distinct socioeconomic characteristics. This study offers a starting point for subsequent investigations into the geographic and social context of pediatric medication drug exposures. This is an important step in revising pediatric poison prevention strategies.

  18. [Exposure to VHF and UHF electromagnetic fields among workers employed in radio and TV broadcast centers. I. Assessment of exposure].

    PubMed

    Zmyślony, M; Aniołczyk, H; Bortkiewicz, A

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, radio and television have become one of the areas of the human technical activity that develops most rapidly. Also ultra-short waves of VHF (30-300 MHz) and UHF (0.3-3 GHz) bands have proved to be the most important carriers of radio and TV-programs. In Poland, a network of radio and TV broadcast centers (RTCN) with high (over 200 m) masts was set up in the 1960s and 1970s. These centers concentrate the majority of stations broadcasting national and local programs (for areas within the RTCN range). At present, the RTCN established several decades ago are equally important. The assessment of the exposure to electromagnetic fields among workers of multi-program broadcast stations is complicated and feasible only to a certain degree of approximation because of changing conditions of exposure in individual stations during their long history, resulting from the changing numbers and types of transmitters installed. In this work, the method of retrospective estimation of exposure dose is described, and the results of the assessment carried out at three kinds of typical RTCN are discussed. The results of the analysis indicate that the workers of RTCN are exposed primarily to electromagnetic fields of VHF and UHF bands, but this exposure may be considered as admissible, hence it should not exert an adverse effect on the workers' health.

  19. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chi, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Kai; Liu, Ingrid Y.; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from five participants and each sample was subjected to 0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, 2.5 Gy, and 5 Gy of cobalt 60 radiation, followed by array-based expression profiling. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the immune system and cancer development pathways appeared to be the major affected targets by radiation exposure. Therefore, 1 Gy radioactive exposure seemed to be a critical threshold dosage. In fact, after 1 Gy radiation exposure, expression levels of several genes including FADD, TNFRSF10B, TNFRSF8, TNFRSF10A, TNFSF10, TNFSF8, CASP1, and CASP4 that are associated with carcinogenesis and metabolic disorders showed significant alterations. Our results suggest that exposure to low-dose radiation may elicit changes in metabolic and immune pathways, potentially increasing the risk of immune dysfunctions and metabolic disorders. PMID:25276823

  20. Improving the life science (biology) laboratory education experience: From an instructor-centered to a learner-centered educational environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Marcella Liffick

    The component parts of the educational experience in a freshman biology laboratory course could be improved if the knowledge, skills, and personality of the students could be integrated with the instructor's. Lack of integration of instruction with learning often results in students unwilling or unable to learn content and to transfer it to future courses. This research examined the component parts of instruction and learning for a freshman biology laboratory class and provided an alternative approach to the traditional experience in this lab. Outcome assessment revealed that students experiencing a learner-centered lab responded differently to instruction than students in the traditional lab did and expressed more of a learning orientation and awareness. Not all methods used were successful but course evaluations demonstrated an increased awareness of the learning process among students in the learner-centered lab. The alternative group indicated differences specifically directed toward learning, more often than the traditional group did.

  1. Biological markers in animals can provide information on exposure and bioavailability of environmental contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; Adams, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Talmage, S.S.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of agents present in the environment seek to identify the extent to which they contribute to the causation of a specific toxic, clinical, or pathological endpoint. The multifactorial nature of disease etiology, long latency periods and the complexity of exposure, all contribute to the difficulty of establishing associations and casual relationships between a specific exposure and an adverse outcome. These barriers to studies of exposures and subsequent risk assessment cannot generally be changed. However, the appropriate use of biological markers in animal species living in a contaminated habitat can provide a measure of potential damage from that exposure and, in some instances, act as a surrogate for human environmental exposures. Quantitative predictivity of the effect of exposure to environmental pollutants is being approached by employing an appropriate array of biological end points. 34 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  2. Biological Monitoring for Depleted Uranium Exposure in U.S. Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Carrie D.; Engelhardt, Susan M.; Squibb, Katherine S.; McDiarmid, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Background As part of an ongoing medical surveillance program for U.S. veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU), biological monitoring of urine uranium (U) concentrations is offered to any veteran of the Gulf War and those serving in more recent conflicts (post-Gulf War veterans). Objectives Since a previous report of surveillance findings in 2004, an improved methodology for determination of the isotopic ratio of U in urine (235U:238U) has been developed and allows for more definitive evaluation of DU exposure. This report updates previous findings. Methods Veterans provide a 24-hr urine specimen and complete a DU exposure questionnaire. Specimens are sent to the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center for processing. Uranium concentration and isotopic ratio are measured using ICP-MS at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. Results Between January 2003 and June 2008, we received 1,769 urine specimens for U analysis. The mean urine U measure was 0.009 μg U/g creatinine. Mean urine U concentrations for Gulf War and post-Gulf War veterans were 0.008 and 0.009 μg U/g creatinine, respectively. Only 3 of the 1,700 (0.01%) specimens for which we completed isotopic determination showed evidence of DU. Exposure histories confirmed that these three individuals had been involved in “friendly fire” incidents involving DU munitions or armored vehicles. Conclusions No urine U measure with a “depleted” isotopic signature has been detected in U.S. veterans without a history of retained DU embedded fragments from previous injury. These findings suggest that future DU-related health harm is unlikely in veterans without DU fragments. PMID:19590689

  3. Distribution of Facial Exposure to Non-melanoma Biologically Effective UV Irradiance Changes by Rotation Angles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia Ming; Yang, De Qi; Gao, Qian; Hua, Hui; Liu, Yang

    2017-02-01

    To show the distribution of facial exposure to non-melanoma biologically effective UV irradiance changes by rotation angles. This study selected the cheek, nose, and forehead as representative facial sites for UV irradiance measurements, which were performed using a rotating manikin and a spectroradiometer. The measured UV irradiance was weighted using action spectra to calculate the biologically effective UV irradiances that cause non-melanoma (UVBEnon-mel) skin cancer. The biologically effective UV radiant exposure (HBEnon-mel) was calculated by summing the UVBEnon-mel data collected over the exposure period. This study revealed the following: (1) the maximum cheek, nose and forehead exposure UVA and UVB irradiance times and solar elevation angles (SEA) differed from those of the ambient UV irradiance and were influenced by the rotation angles; (2) the UV irradiance exposure increased in the following order: cheek < nose < forehead; (3) the distribution of UVBEnon-mel irradiance differed from that of unweighted UV radiation (UVR) and was influenced by the rotation angles and exposure times; and (4) the maximum percentage decreases in the UVBEnon-mel radiant exposure for the cheek, nose and forehead from 0°to 180°were 48.41%, 69.48% and 71.71%, respectively. Rotation angles relative to the sun influence the face's exposure to non-melanoma biologically effective UV. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of Exposure to Formaldehyde from Preserved Biological Specimens. Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    This investigation of formaldehyde exposure in school laboratories, where its principal source is from preserved biological specimens, was undertaken because of concern over exposure levels reported in the literature. Information was obtained in two ways. A limited survey of schools was conducted to determine extent of students' use of preserved…

  5. Biologically Relevant Exposure Science for 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    High visibility efforts in toxicity testing and computational toxicology including the recent NRC report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: a Vision and Strategy (NRC, 2007), raise important research questions and opportunities for the field of exposure science. The authors ...

  6. Biological Exposure Metrics of Beryllium-Exposed Dental Technicians

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Moshe; Lerman, Yehuda; Kapel, Arik; Pardo, Asher; Schwarz, Yehuda; Newman, Lee; Maier, Lisa; Fireman, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is commonly used in the dental industry. This study investigates the association between particle size and shape in induced sputum (IS) with beryllium exposure and oxidative stress in 83 dental technicians. Particle size and shape were defined by laser and video, whereas beryllium exposure data came from self-reports and beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) results. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) gene expression in IS was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A high content of particles (92%) in IS > 5 µ in size is correlated to a positive BeLPT risk (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9–13). Use of masks, hoods, and type of exposure yielded differences in the transparency of IS particles (gray level) and modulate HO1 levels. These results indicate that parameters of size and shape of particles in IS are sensitive to workplace hygiene, affect the level of oxidative stress, and may be potential markers for monitoring hazardous dust exposures. PMID:24205960

  7. Biological exposure metrics of beryllium-exposed dental technicians.

    PubMed

    Stark, Moshe; Lerman, Yehuda; Kapel, Arik; Pardo, Asher; Schwarz, Yehuda; Newman, Lee; Maier, Lisa; Fireman, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Beryllium is commonly used in the dental industry. This study investigates the association between particle size and shape in induced sputum (IS) with beryllium exposure and oxidative stress in 83 dental technicians. Particle size and shape were defined by laser and video, whereas beryllium exposure data came from self-reports and beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) results. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) gene expression in IS was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A high content of particles (92%) in IS >5 μ in size is correlated to a positive BeLPT risk (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-13). Use of masks, hoods, and type of exposure yielded differences in the transparency of IS particles (gray level) and modulate HO1 levels. These results indicate that parameters of size and shape of particles in IS are sensitive to workplace hygiene, affect the level of oxidative stress, and may be potential markers for monitoring hazardous dust exposures.

  8. Biologically Relevant Exposure Science for 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    High visibility efforts in toxicity testing and computational toxicology including the recent NRC report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: a Vision and Strategy (NRC, 2007), raise important research questions and opportunities for the field of exposure science. The authors ...

  9. Biological monitoring of child lead exposure in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed Central

    Cikrt, M; Smerhovsky, Z; Blaha, K; Nerudova, J; Sediva, V; Fornuskova, H; Knotkova, J; Roth, Z; Kodl, M; Fitzgerald, E

    1997-01-01

    The area around the Pribram lead smelter has been recognized to be heavily contaminated by lead (Pb). In the early 1970s, several episodes of livestock lead intoxication were reported in this area; thereafter, several epidemiological and ecological studies focused on exposure of children. In contrast to earlier studies, the recent investigation (1992-1994) revealed significantly lower exposure to lead. From 1986-1990, recorded average blood lead levels were about 37.2 micrograms lead (Pb)/100 ml in an elementary school population living in a neighborhood close to the smelter (within 3 km of the plant). The present study, however, has found mean blood lead levels of 11.35 micrograms/100 ml (95% CI = 9.32; 13.82) among a comparable group of children. In addition to blood lead, tooth lead was used to assess exposure among children. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between the geometric mean tooth lead level of 6.44 micrograms Pb/g (n = 13; 95% CI = 3.95; 10.50) in the most contaminated zone and 1.43 micrograms Pb/g (n = 35; 95% CI = 1.11; 1.84) in zones farther away from the point source. Both biomarkers, blood and tooth lead levels, reflect a similar pattern of lead exposure in children. This study has attempted a quantitative assessment of risk factors associated with elevated lead exposure in the Czech Republic. Content of lead in soil, residential distance from the smelter, consumption of locally grown vegetables or fruits, drinking water from local wells, the mother's educational level, cigarette consumption among family members, and the number of children in the family were factors positively related (p < 0.05) to blood lead levels. The resulting blood lead level was found to be inversely proportional to the child's age. Images Figure 1. PMID:9189705

  10. Preparedness and response to chemical and biological threats: the role of exposure science.

    PubMed

    Lioy, Paul J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Georgopoulos, Panos G

    2016-08-01

    There are multiple components to emergency preparedness and the response to chemical and biological threat agents. The 5Rs framework (rescue, reentry, recovery, restoration, and rehabitation) outlines opportunities to apply exposure science in emergency events. Exposure science provides guidance and refined tools for characterizing, assessing, and reducing risks from catastrophic events, such as the release of hazardous airborne chemicals or biological agents. Important challenges to be met include deployment of assets, including medications, before and after an emergency response situation. Assessment of past studies demonstrates the value of integrating exposure science methods into risk analysis and the management of catastrophic events. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Comparison of Biological Responses in Rats Under Various Cigarette Smoke Exposure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Matsuura, Daiki; Nishino, Tomoki; Lee, K Monica; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A variety of exposure regimens of cigarette smoke have been used in animal models of lung diseases. In this study, we compared biological responses of smoke exposure in rats, using different smoke concentrations (wet total particulate matter [WTPM]), daily exposure durations, and total days of exposure. As a range-finding acute study, we first compared pulmonary responses between SD and F344 strains after a single nose-only exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke or LPS. Secondly, F344 rats were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 or 13 weeks under the comparable daily exposure dose (WTPM concentration x daily exposure duration; according to Haber’s rule) but at a different WTPM concentration or daily exposure duration. Blood carboxylhemoglobin was increased linearly to the WTPM concentration, while urinary nicotine plus cotinine value was higher for the longer daily exposure than the corresponding shorter exposure groups. Gamma glutamyl transferase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was increased dose dependently after 2 and 13 weeks of cigarette smoke exposure, while the neutrophil content in BALF was not increased notably. Smoke-exposed groups showed reduced body weight gain and increased relative lung and heart weights. While BALF parameters and the relative lung weights suggest pulmonary responses, histopathological examination showed epithelial lesions mainly in the upper respiratory organs (nose and larynx). Collectively, the results indicate that, under the employed study design, the equivalent daily exposure dose (exposure concentration x duration) induces equivalent pulmonary responses in rats. PMID:23914058

  12. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to toluene diisocyanate.

    PubMed

    Maître, A; Berode, M; Perdrix, A; Romazini, S; Savolainen, H

    1993-01-01

    The study validated the use of urinary toluene diamine (TDA) in postshift samples as an indicator of preceding 8-h exposure to toluene diisocyanate (TDI). Nine workers exposed in TDI-based polyurethane foam production were studied. Their exposure levels varied in 8-h time-averaged samples from 9.5 to 94 micrograms/m3. The urinary TDA concentrations varied from 6.5 to 31.7 micrograms/g creatinine and they were linearly related to the atmospheric TDI levels. Approximately 20% of TDI is metabolized to diamines but their specificity is remarkable to the extent that by analysis for the 2,4- and 2,6-diamino isomers an idea of the percutaneous absorption may be had.

  13. Urinary metallothionein as a biological indicator of occupational cadmium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tohyama, C.; Shaikh, Z.A.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay and neutron activation data indicate that the urinary metallothionein concentration is related to the liver Cd concentration in occupational Cd exposure. It is also related to the kidney Cd content - but only before the onset of renal dysfunction. Further epidemiological studies are needed to establish a dose-response relationship, which may be useful in minimizing the hazard of Cd-induced renal dysfunction.

  14. AN INTEGRATED NETWORK APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE INTERACTIONS IN COMPLEX DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    DARABOS, CHRISTIAN; QIU, JINGYA; MOORE, JASON H.

    2015-01-01

    Complex diseases are the result of intricate interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. In previous studies, we used epidemiological and genetic data linking environmental exposure or genetic variants to phenotypic disease to construct Human Phenotype Networks and separately analyze the effects of both environment and genetic factors on disease interactions. To better capture the intricacies of the interactions between environmental exposure and the biological pathways in complex disorders, we integrate both aspects into a single “tripartite” network. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms by which chemical agents disrupt biological pathways are still poorly understood. In this study, we use our integrated network model to identify specific biological pathway candidates possibly disrupted by environmental agents. We conjecture that a higher number of co-occurrences between an environmental substance and biological pathway pair can be associated with a higher likelihood that the substance is involved in disrupting that pathway. We validate our model by demonstrating its ability to detect known arsenic and signal transduction pathway interactions and speculate on candidate cell-cell junction organization pathways disrupted by cadmium. The validation was supported by distinct publications of cell biology and genetic studies that associated environmental exposure to pathway disruption. The integrated network approach is a novel method for detecting the biological effects of environmental exposures. A better understanding of the molecular processes associated with specific environmental exposures will help in developing targeted molecular therapies for patients who have been exposed to the toxicity of environmental chemicals. PMID:26776169

  15. Characteristics of novel psychoactive substance exposures reported to New York City Poison Center, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Su, Mark K.; Hoffman, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) are emerging at an unprecedented rate. Likewise, prevalence of use and poisonings has increased in recent years. Objective To compare characteristics of NPS exposures and non-NPS-drug-related exposures and to examine whether there are differences between exposures involving synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists (SCRAs) and other NPS. Methods Poison control center data from the five counties of New York City and Long Island were examined from2011–2014. We examined prevalence and characteristics of NPS exposures (classified as intentional abuse) and compared characteristics of cases involving SCRAs and other NPS. Results Prevalence of NPS exposures was 7.1% in 2011, rising to 12.6% in 2014. Most exposures (82.3%) involved SCRA use. The second and third most prevalent classes were phenethylamines/synthetic cathinones (“bath salts”; 10.2%) and psychedelic phenethylamines (4.3%). Compared to other drug-related exposures (i.e. involving licit and illicit drugs), those who used NPS were more likely to be younger, male, and to have not co-used other drugs (ps < 0.001). SCRA exposures increased sharply in 2014 and the mean age of users increased over time (p < 0.01). Females exposed to SCRAs were younger than males (p < 0.001), and in 2014, individuals exposed to SCRAs were more likely to report concomitant use of alcohol than users of other NPS (p = 0.010). Users of other NPS were more likely than SCRA users to report concomitant use of ecstasy/3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)/“Molly” (p < 0.001). Conclusion Exposures reported to the poison center that involve NPS are increasing and the majority involve SCRAs. These findings should inform prevention and harm reduction approaches. PMID:26678258

  16. The Center for Regenerative Biology and Medicine at Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    biology. While this capacity is limited only to the very distal tips of digits in mammals, adult teolost fish and urodele amphibians have championed...tips of digits in mammals, adult teleost fish and urodele amphibians have championed regeneration of entire appendages. The key feature of appendage

  17. Educational opportunities within the NASA specialized center of research and training in gravitational biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, James A.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology was established at Kansas State University, supported through NASA's Life Science Division, Office of Space Science and Applications. Educational opportunities, associated with each of the research projects which form the nucleus of the Center, are complemented by program enrichments such as scholar exchanges and linkages to other NASA and commercial programs. The focus of this training program, and a preliminary assessment of its successes, are described.

  18. Ayahuasca Exposure: Descriptive Analysis of Calls to US Poison Control Centers from 2005 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Heise, C William; Brooks, Daniel E

    2016-11-28

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic plant preparation which usually contains the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and the shrub Psychotria viridis. This tea originates from the Amazon Basin where it is used in religious ceremonies. Because interest in these religious groups spreading as well as awareness of use of ayahuasca for therapeutic and recreational purposes, its use is increasing. Banisteriopsis caapi is rich in β-carbolines, especially harmine, tetrahydroharmine and harmaline, which have monoamine oxidase inhibiting (MAOI) activity. Psychotria viridis contains the 5HT2A/2C/1A receptor agonist hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). Usual desired effects include hallucination, dissociation, mood alteration and perception change. Undesired findings previously reported are nausea, vomiting, hypertension, and tachycardia. All human exposure calls reported to the American Association of Poison Controls Centers' (AAPCC) National Poison Data System (NPDS) between September 1, 2005 and September 1, 2015 were reviewed. Cases were filtered for specific plant derived ayahuasca-related product codes. Abstracted data included the following: case age and gender, exposure reason, exposure route, clinical manifestations, treatments given, medical outcomes and fatality. Five hundred and thirty-eight exposures to ayahuasca botanical products were reported. The majority of the calls to poison control centers came from healthcare facilities (83%). The most common route of exposure was ingestion. Most cases were men (437, 81%, 95% CI 77.7% - 84.3%). The median age was 21 (IQR 18-29). Most exposures were acute. Three hundred thirty-seven (63%) were reported to have a major or moderate clinical effect. The most common clinical manifestations reported were hallucinations (35%), tachycardia (34%), agitation (34%), hypertension (16%), mydriasis (13%) and vomiting (6%). Benzodiazepines were commonly given (30%). There were 28 cases in the series who required endotracheal intubation (5

  19. Systemic Inflammation Associated With World Trade Center Dust Exposures and Airway Abnormalities in the Local Community.

    PubMed

    Kazeros, Angeliki; Zhang, Enhan; Cheng, Xin; Shao, Yongzhao; Liu, Mengling; Qian, Meng; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee; Berger, Kenneth I; Goldring, Roberta M; Ghumman, Muhammad; Chokshi, Neel P; Levy-Carrick, Nomi; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Parsia, Sam; Marmor, Michael; Reibman, Joan

    2015-06-01

    Destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers on September 11, 2001, released massive dust, gas, and fumes with environmental exposures for community members. Many community members have lower respiratory symptoms (LRSs) that began after September 11, 2001, and remain persistent. We evaluated whether systemic inflammation measured by C-reactive protein was associated with WTC dust exposures, persistent LRS, and lung function. Community members self-referred for the treatment of symptoms related to September 11, 2001. C-reactive protein and lung function measurements, including spirometry and forced oscillation tests (impulse oscillometry system), were included as routine analyses in patients (2007 to 2012). Increased C-reactive protein levels were associated with the type of WTC dust exposure, LRS, reduced spirometry, and increased forced oscillation measurements (n = 724). Ongoing systemic inflammation measured years after the event was associated with WTC dust exposures, persistent LRS, and abnormal lung function in a community cohort. These findings have implications for treatment and surveillance.

  20. Learner-Centered Inquiry in Undergraduate Biology: Positive Relationships with Long-Term Student Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Ebert-May, Diane

    2010-01-01

    We determined short- and long-term correlates of a revised introductory biology curriculum on understanding of biology as a process of inquiry and learning of content. In the original curriculum students completed two traditional lecture-based introductory courses. In the revised curriculum students completed two new learner-centered, inquiry-based courses. The new courses differed significantly from those of the original curriculum through emphases on critical thinking, collaborative work, and/or inquiry-based activities. Assessments were administered to compare student understanding of the process of biological science and content knowledge in the two curricula. More seniors who completed the revised curriculum had high-level profiles on the Views About Science Survey for Biology compared with seniors who completed the original curriculum. Also as seniors, students who completed the revised curriculum scored higher on the standardized Biology Field Test. Our results showed that an intense inquiry-based learner-centered learning experience early in the biology curriculum was associated with long-term improvements in learning. We propose that students learned to learn science in the new courses which, in turn, influenced their learning in subsequent courses. Studies that determine causal effects of learner-centered inquiry-based approaches, rather than correlative relationships, are needed to test our proposed explanation. PMID:21123693

  1. Learner-Centered Teaching in Nonmajors Introductory Biology: The Impact of Giving Students Choices

    PubMed Central

    Hurney, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Learner-centered teaching represents more than creating a course where students are actively engaged. Rather it is articulated by a shift in the balance of power, function of content, role of the instructor, purpose of assessment, and/or responsibility for learning in a course. To make the learning environment in a large-enrollment nonmajors Biology course more learner-centered, students were given the responsibility to: 1) select course topics, 2) determine the types and weights of course assignments used to assess learning, and 3) individually decide, prior to being assigned work, the weight of exams and projects. Combined survey results from two learner-centered sections of the course (n = 137) indicate that a majority of the students found that choosing the topics enhanced their learning of course material. Students also reported that they put more effort into the parts of the course that they had weighted more heavily. In addition, results support that students are reflective of the learner-centered environment, confident in their ability to learn biological topics and more interested in biology than they thought they would be. Finally, course averages from the learner-centered courses were significantly higher than course grades from instructor-centered versions of the course. PMID:23653800

  2. Biological monitoring of low-level exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Campagna, M; Satta, Giannina; Campo, Laura; Flore, Valeria; Ibba, A; Meloni, M; Tocco, Maria Giuseppina; Avataneo, G; Flore, C; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cocco, P

    2012-01-01

    Conflicting opinions exist about the reliability of biomarkers of low-level exposure to benzene. We compared the ability of the urinary excretion of trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), s-phenilmercapturic acid (s-PAMA) and urinary benzene (U-Benz) to detect low level occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. We monitored airborne benzene by personal air sampling, and U-Benz, s-PMAI, t,t-MA and cotinine (U-Cotinine) in spot urine samples, collected at 8 am and 8 pm, in 32 oil refinery workers and 65 subjects, randomly selected among the general population of urban and suburban Cagliari, Italy. Information on personal characteristics, diet and events during the sampling day was acquired through in person interviews. The median concentration of airborne benzene was 25.2 microg/m3 in oil refinery workers, and 8.5 microg/m3 in the general population subgroup. U-Benz in morning and evening samples was significantly more elevated among oil refinery workers than the general population subgroup (p = 0.012, and p = 7.4 x 10(-7), respectively) and among current smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 5.2 x 10(-8), and p = 5.2 x 10(-5) respectively). Benzene biomarkers and their readings in the two sampling phases were well correlated to each other. The Spearman's correlation coefficient with airborne benzene was significant for U-Benz in the evening sample, while no correlation was seen with t,t-MA and s-PMA readings in either samplings. The two benzene metabolites were frequently below limit of detection (LOD), particularly among the general population study subjects (17-9% and 39%, for t,t-MA and s-PMA respectively). Morning U-Cotinine excretion showed a good correlation with U-Benz in the morning and in the evening sampling (p < 0.001), and with s-PMA in the evening sample (p < 0.001), but not with t,t-MA in either samplings. t,t-MA in the evening sample was the only biomarker showing a moderate inverse correlation with BMI (p < 0.05). The multiple regression

  3. Biological markers in chromium exposure assessment: Confounding variables

    SciTech Connect

    Bukowski, J.A.; Goldstein, M.D.; Johnson, B.B. )

    1991-07-01

    An estimated two million tons of chromate production waste pollution has caused a major environmental and public health concern in Hudson County, New Jersey. As part of an occupational exposure assessment, urinary and red blood cell (RBC) chromium measurements were performed on 52 state employees who worked either near a contaminated site or elsewhere. Samples were collected so as to minimize contamination, and they were analyzed using sensitive techniques. These workers also completed a questionnaire that addressed potentially important third variables. Individual analyses suggested that exercise, drinking beer, past employment in chromium-related occupations, and diabetic status had an important effect on urinary chromium levels. These variables were entered into a regression model and were all found to be significant predictors of urinary chromium level (p less than .10). Some variables were also examined for their influence on RBC chromium level, but none had a measurable effect.

  4. Poison exposures in young Israeli military personnel: a National Poison Center Data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavon, Ophir; Bentur, Yedidia

    2017-06-01

    To characterize poison exposures in young Israeli military personnel as reported to the national poison center. Retrospective poison center chart review over a 14-year period. Cases included were Israeli soldiers aged 18-21 years, the compulsory military service age required by the Israeli law. 1770 records of poison exposures in young military personnel were identified. Most exposed individuals involved males (n = 1268, 71.6%). Main routes of exposure were ingestion (n = 854, 48.3%), inhalation (n = 328, 18.6%) and ocular (n = 211, 11.9%). Accidents or misuse (n = 712, 40.2%) were the most frequently reported circumstances, followed by suicide attempts (370, 20.9%), and bites and stings (161, 9.1%). More than half of the cases involved chemicals (n = 939, 53.1%); hydrocarbons, gases and corrosives were the main causative agents. Pharmaceuticals (mainly analgesics) were involved in 519 (29.3%) cases, venomous animals (mainly scorpions, centipedes, and snakes) in 79 (4.5%). Clinical manifestations were reported in 666 (37.6%) cases, mostly gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory. The vast majority of cases (1634, 92.3%) were asymptomatic or mildly affected; no fatalities were recorded. In 831 (46.9%) cases the clinical toxicologist recommended referral to an emergency department; ambulatory observation was recommended in 563 (31.8%) cases, and hospitalization in 86 (4.9%). Our data show that poison exposures among young soldiers involve mainly males, accidents, misuse and suicides, oral route and chemicals; most exposures were asymptomatic or with mild severity. Repeated evaluations of poison center data pertaining to military personnel is advised for identifying trends in poison exposure and characteristics in this particular population.

  5. RE: National Alliance of Forest Owner's Response to Center for Biological Diversity's Request for Correction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from the National Alliance of Forest Owners requesting the EPA consider its previous response to EPA's Call for Information on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources and consider the Center for Biological Diversity's assertions without merit.

  6. San Francisco Bay Area Endangered Species Litigation - Center for Biological Diversity v. EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA and the Center for Biological Diversity have agreed to a revised settlement agreement that amends a 2010 court order for effects determinations on 11 endangered or threatened (listed) species in the San Francisco Bay area. Find out about the new order.

  7. Referral of pediatric laundry detergent pack exposure reported to poison centers.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2014-11-01

    Concentrated laundry detergent packs are new products that may be more likely to cause adverse effects and serious medical outcomes among young children than traditional laundry detergent products. The intent of this study was to examine whether certain factors might be associated with the referral of pediatric laundry detergent pack exposures by poison centers. Cases were laundry detergent pack exposures involving patients age 5 years or younger reported to Texas poison centers during February 2012 to August 2013. The health care facility referral rate was calculated for selected factors. Of 912 exposures, 720 were managed on site and 192 were referred to a health care facility. The referral rate was 16.1% for patients with not serious outcomes and 71.6% for serious outcomes. The referral rate was 32.0% for patients age younger than 1 year and 14.3% to 22.1% for the older age groups. 31.0% of Purex(TM), 25.5% of All(TM), and 19.3% of Tide(TM) product exposures were referred. The referral rate was 33.3% for ocular exposures, 19.4% for dermal contact, and 20.2% for ingestions. The most common clinical effects and their referral rates were vomiting (30.5%), cough or choke (45.1%), ocular irritation (34.6%), red eye (25.4%), nausea (25.4%), drowsiness or lethargy (67.5%), oral irritation (16.7%), and dermal edema (68.4%). Pediatric exposures to laundry detergent packs were more likely to be referred to health care facilities if the laundry detergent pack brand was Purex(TM), the exposure was ocular, or particular ocular, respiratory, dermal, or neurologic clinical effects were present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposure to hazardous substances in a standard molecular biology laboratory environment: evaluation of exposures in IARC laboratories.

    PubMed

    Chapot, Brigitte; Secretan, Béatrice; Robert, Annie; Hainaut, Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Working in a molecular biology laboratory environment implies regular exposure to a wide range of hazardous substances. Several recent studies have shown that laboratory workers may have an elevated risk of certain cancers. Data on the nature and frequency of exposures in such settings are scanty. The frequency of use of 163 agents by staff working in molecular biology laboratories was evaluated over a period of 4 years by self-administered questionnaire. Of the agents listed, ethanol was used by the largest proportion of staff (70%), followed by ethidium bromide (55%). Individual patterns of use showed three patterns, namely (i) frequent use of a narrow range of products, (ii) occasional use of a wide range of products, and (iii) frequent and occasional use of an intermediate range of products. Among known or suspected carcinogens (International Agency for Research on Cancer Group 1 and 2A, respectively), those most frequently used included formaldehyde (17%), oncogenic viruses (4%), and acrylamide (32%). The type of exposure encountered in research laboratories is extremely diverse. Few carcinogenic agents are used frequently but many laboratory workers may be exposed occasionally to known human carcinogens. In addition, many of the chemicals handled by staff represent a health hazard. The results enabled the staff physician to develop an individual approach to medical surveillance and to draw a personal history of occupational exposures for laboratory staff.

  9. Lead Paint Exposure Assessment in High Bays of Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanch, Penney; Plaza, Angel; Keprta, Sean

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to assess the possibility of lead paint exposure in the high bays of some of the Johnson Space Center buildings. Some of the buildings in the Manned Space Flight Center (MSC) were built in 1962 and predate any considerations to reduce lead in paints and coatings. There are many of these older buildings that contain open shops and work areas that have open ceilings, These shops include those that had operations that use leaded gasoline, batteries, and lead based paints. Test were planned to be conducted in three phases: (1) Surface Dust sampling, (2) personal exposure montioring, and (3) Ceiling paint Sampling. The results of the first two phases were reviewed. After considering the results of the first two phases, and the problems associated with the retrieval of samples from high ceilings, it was determined that the evaluation of ceiling coatings would be done on a project by project and in response to a complaint.

  10. [Biological exposure-related injuries in workers in a health system of the health service of Galicia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Cores Calvo, Juan; Muñiz Saborido, José Ramón; González Iglesias, Marta Clara

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the factors involved in biological exposure-related injuries occurring in worker from a health system in Galicia, Spain. The study was conducted in a health system of the Health Service of Galicia, that included four hospitals and 72 primary care centers, with nearly 6000 workers. The study used occupational injury data available o in the injury registry of the Health Service of Galicia for the year 2011. We identified 194 biohazard-related injuries. Exposures, locations, devices, tasks and causes of these incidents were analysed. The majority of biological exposures occurred through needlestick injuries (82%). The areas where more injuries occurred were in inpatient wards (37%) and operating rooms (25%). The devices most frequently involved were suture needles (15%) and insulin needles (15%). The most frequently recorded causes were lack of training and information, together with lack of biosafety devices. Worker training and information should be promoted along with the implementation of biosafety devices, as the latter measure alone does not seem sufficient to reduce the number of injuries. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  11. Hurricane Sandy Exposure and the Mental Health of World Trade Center Responders.

    PubMed

    Bromet, Evelyn J; Clouston, Sean; Gonzalez, Adam; Kotov, Roman; Guerrera, Kathryn M; Luft, Benjamin J

    2017-04-01

    The psychological consequences of a second disaster on populations exposed to an earlier disaster have rarely been studied prospectively. Using a pre- and postdesign, we examined the effects of Hurricane Sandy on possible World Trade Center (WTC) related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD Checklist score of ≥ 50) and overall depression (major depressive disorder [MDD]; Patient Health Questionnaire depression score of ≥ 10) among 870 WTC responders with a follow-up monitoring visit at the Long Island WTC Health Program during the 6 months post-Hurricane Sandy. The Hurricane Sandy exposures evaluated were damage to home (8.3%) and to possessions (7.8%), gasoline shortage (24.1%), prolonged power outage (42.7%), and filing a Federal Emergency Management Agency claim (11.3%). A composite exposure score also was constructed. In unadjusted analyses, Hurricane Sandy exposures were associated with 1.77 to 5.38 increased likelihood of PTSD and 1.58 to 4.13 likelihood of MDD; odds ratios for ≥ 3 exposures were 6.47 for PTSD and 6.45 for MDD. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, WTC exposure, pre-Hurricane Sandy mental health status, and time between assessments, reporting ≥ 3 Hurricane Sandy exposures was associated with a 3.29 and 3.71 increased likelihood of PTSD and MDD, respectively. These findings underscore the importance of assessing the impact of a subsequent disaster in ongoing responder health surveillance programs. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  12. Telomere Length and Neighborhood Circumstances: Evaluating Biological Response to Unfavorable Exposures.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Shannon M; Mitra, Nandita; Ravichandran, Krithika; Mitchell, Jonathan; Spangler, Elaine; Zhou, Wenting; Paskett, Electra D; Gehlert, Sarah; DeGraffinreid, Cecilia; Stowe, Raymond; Dubowitz, Tamara; Riethman, Harold; Branas, Charles C; Peek, M K; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2017-04-01

    Background: Multilevel frameworks suggest neighborhood circumstances influence biology; however, this relationship is not well studied. Telomere length (TL) shortening has been associated with individual-level and neighborhood-level exposures and disease and may provide insights into underlying biologic mechanisms linking neighborhood with biology. To support neighborhood-biology investigations, we sought to determine the independent effect of neighborhood exposures on TL using standard multilevel linear regression models and quantile regression, a nonlinear, social science method applicable for testing the biologic hypothesis that extremes of the TL distribution are related to poor outcomes.Methods: In a multicenter, cross-sectional study, blood TL was measured in 1,488 individuals from 127 census tracts in three U.S. regions using terminal restriction fragment assays. Multilevel linear and quantile regression models were adjusted for individual-level race, education, perceived stress, and depression. Neighborhood exposures included population density, urban/residential crowding, residential stability/mobility, and socioeconomic status.Results: TL was not associated with any neighborhood variable using linear models, but quantile regression revealed inverse associations between population density and urban crowding at the lower tails of the TL distribution [5th (population density P = 0.03; urban crowding P = 0.002), 50th (both P < 0.001), 75th percentiles (both P < 0.001)]. TL was related to residential stability at the upper tail (95th percentile P = 0.006).Conclusions: Findings support the use of nonlinear statistical methods in TL research and suggest that neighborhood exposures can result in biological effects.Impact: TL may serve as an underlying example of a biologic mechanism that can link neighborhood with biology, thus supporting multilevel investigations in future studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(4); 553-60. ©2017 AACRSee all the articles

  13. Development and evaluation of intermediate frequency magnetic field exposure system for studies of in vitro biological effects.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Hirota, Izuo; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Omori, Hideki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed an intermediate frequency (IF) magnetic field exposure system for in vitro studies. Since there are no previous studies on exposure to heating-frequency magnetic fields generated from an induction heating (IH) cook top, there is a strong need for such an exposure system and for biological studies of IF magnetic fields. This system mainly consists of a magnetic-field-generating coil housed inside an incubator, inside which cultured cells can be exposed to magnetic field. Two systems were prepared to allow the experiment to be conducted in a double-blind manner. The level of the generated magnetic field was set to 532 microT rms in the exposure space, 23 kHz, 80 times the value in the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines, with a spatial field uniformity better than 3.8%. The waveforms were nearly sinusoidal. It was also confirmed that the parasitic electric field was 157 V/m rms and the induced electric field was 1.9 V/m rms. The temperature was maintained at 36.5 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 2 h. Furthermore, leaked magnetic flux density was 0.7 microT rms or lower at extremely low frequency (ELF) and IF in the stopped system when the other system was being operated, and the environmental magnetic flux density was 0.1 microT rms or lower at the center of the coils. As a result, it was confirmed that this system could be successfully used to evaluate the biological effects of exposure to IF magnetic fields.

  14. Biological Exposure Indices of Pyrrole Adducts in Serum and Urine for Hazard Assessment of n-Hexane Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongyin; Zhang, Chunling; Guo, Ying; Shao, Xiaoying; Zeng, Tao; Zhao, Xiulan; Xie, Keqin

    2014-01-01

    Background Pyrrole adducts might be used as a biomarker for monitoring occupational exposure to n-hexane, but the Biological Exposure Indices of pyrrole adducts in serum and urine are still unknown. The current study was designed to investigate the biological exposure limit of pyrrole adducts for hazard assessment of n-hexane. Methods Male Wistar rats were given daily dose of 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 4000 mg/kg bw n-hexane by gavage for 24 weeks. The levels of pyrrole adducts in serum and urine were determined at 8, 24 hours postdose once a week. The Biological Exposure Indices was evaluated by neurological evaluation and the levels of pyrrole adducts. The difference in pyrrole adducts formation between humans and rats were estimated by using in vitro test. Results Dose-dependent effects were observed between the doses of n-hexane and pyrrole adducts in serum and urine, and the levels of pyrrole adduct in serum and urine approached a plateau at week 4. There was a significantly negative correlation between the time to paralysis and the level of pyrrole adducts in serum and urine, while a positive correlation between gait score and levels of pyrrole adducts in serum and urine was observed. In vitro, pyrrole adducts formed in human serum was about two times more than those in rat serum at the same level of 2,5-HD. Conclusion It was concluded that the BEIs of pyrrole adducts in humans were 23.1±5.91 nmol/ml in serum 8 h postdose, 11.7±2.64 nmol/ml in serum 24 h postdose, 253.8±36.3 nmol/ml in urine 8 h postdose and 54.6±15.42 nmol/ml in urine 24 h postdose. PMID:24465904

  15. [Environmental and biological monitoring of occupational exposure to perchloroethylene in dry cleaning shops].

    PubMed

    Gobba, F; Rosa, P; Ghittori, S; Imbriani, M; Ferrari, G; Cavalleri, A

    1997-01-01

    Occupational exposure to perchloroethylene (PCE) was studied in a total of 106 workers in 78 dry cleaning shops in the province of Pavia, Northern, Italy. Environmental monitoring was performed by personal passive sampling. The median time weighted average (TWA) level of PCE was 57 mg/m3, i.e., about 30% of the current Threshold Limit Value (TLV) proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). However, in 12 workers exposure exceeded this limit. Biological monitoring was performed via measurement of urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCA), i.e. the exposure index currently used in Italy, and urinary excretion of unmodified perchloroethylene (PCE-U) in samples collected at the end of the half-shift. Median levels of TCA and PCE were 1.03 mg/l and 17.7 micrograms/l respectively. The correlation coefficient between environmental TWA concentrations of perchloroethylene and PCE-U was 0.755 (0.809 after logarithmic transformation), compared to 0.660 for TCA values. The subjects were then classified as "low exposed" and "heavily exposed" according to whether personal exposure was lower or higher than 57 mg/m3, the median TWA value of the whole group. PCE-U levels were significantly correlated to exposure in both subgroups whereas TCA was correlated only in the "heavily exposed subjects", but not in those with lower exposure. The results of the study show that in the majority of dry cleaning shops exposure to PCE was well below the current occupational limits. Nevertheless surveillance of dry cleaners is recommended as nearly 10% of the workers exceeded the environmental and biological limits. Urinary excretion of unmodified PCE appears to be a very reliable indicator for biological monitoring of PCE exposure in dry cleaning and is also significantly correlated to exposure at low levels. The estimated biological equivalent exposure level (BEEL) for PCE-U, corresponding to the current TLV-TWA proposed by the ACGIH, is 55 micrograms/l. Urinary

  16. Non-invasive biological fluid matrices analysed to assess exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Demkowska, Ilona; Polkowska, Zaneta; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Human biomonitoring (analysis of biological fluids) is increasingly being used for assessing exposure to environmental pollutants. Smoking tobacco is a significant source of indoor air pollution and is harmful to human health. The aim of this research was to find both the best non-invasive matrices (from among saliva, urine, semen and sweat) for evaluating environmental exposure to tobacco smoke and the relationships between thiocyanates (biomarkers of environmental tobacco smoke exposure) and other inorganic ions in these matrices collected from active and passive smokers and also non-smokers.

  17. [Chromium exposure biological indices and clinical findings in chromium plating industry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Franchini, I; Cavatorta, A; Mutti, A; Marcato, M; Bottazzi, D; Cigala, F

    1977-09-01

    According to the investigations carried out on workers of two chromium plating plants, the authors believe that chromium urinary excretion allows to determine the degree of its acute absorption. Moreover, the renal clearance of diffusible chromium allows the evaluation of chromium body burden and is related to the duration as well as to the severity of exposure. This interpretation is supported by the relation between the exposure biological indexes and the clinical and instrumental investigations which make possible the evaluation of lesions caused by chromium exposure, mostly concerning the respiratory system.

  18. An overview of biological markers of exposure to chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Black, Robin M

    2008-01-01

    An overview is given of biological markers of exposure to chemical warfare agents. Metabolites, protein, and/or DNA adducts have been identified for most nerve agents and vesicants and validated in experimental animals or in a small number of human exposures. For several agents, metabolites derived from hydrolysis are unsatisfactory biomarkers of exposure because of background levels in the human population. These are assumed to result from environmental exposure to commercial products that contain these hydrolysis products or chemicals that are metabolized to them. In these cases, metabolites derived from glutathione pathways, or covalent adducts with proteins or DNA, provide more definitive biomarkers. Biomarkers for cyanide and phosgene are unsatisfactory as indicators of chemical warfare exposure because of other sources of these chemicals or their metabolites.

  19. Evaluation of a fungal collection as certified reference material producer and as a biological resource center.

    PubMed

    Forti, Tatiana; Souto, Aline da S S; do Nascimento, Carlos Roberto S; Nishikawa, Marilia M; Hubner, Marise T W; Sabagh, Fernanda P; Temporal, Rosane Maria; Rodrigues, Janaína M; da Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Considering the absence of standards for culture collections and more specifically for biological resource centers in the world, in addition to the absence of certified biological material in Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate a Fungal Collection from Fiocruz, as a producer of certified reference material and as Biological Resource Center (BRC). For this evaluation, a checklist based on the requirements of ABNT ISO GUIA34:2012 correlated with the ABNT NBR ISO/IEC17025:2005, was designed and applied. Complementing the implementation of the checklist, an internal audit was performed. An evaluation of this Collection as a BRC was also conducted following the requirements of the NIT-DICLA-061, the Brazilian internal standard from Inmetro, based on ABNT NBR ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ABNT ISO GUIA 34:2012 and OECD Best Practice Guidelines for BRCs. This was the first time that the NIT DICLA-061 was applied in a culture collection during an internal audit. The assessments enabled the proposal for the adequacy of this Collection to assure the implementation of the management system for their future accreditation by Inmetro as a certified reference material producer as well as its future accreditation as a Biological Resource Center according to the NIT-DICLA-061.

  20. A biological approach to characterizing exposure to metalworking fluids and risk of prostate cancer (United States).

    PubMed

    Agalliu, Ilir; Eisen, Ellen A; Kriebel, David; Quinn, Margaret M; Wegman, David H

    2005-05-01

    Prostate cancer is hormone-related and chemicals that interfere with hormones may contribute to carcinogenesis. In a cohort of autoworkers we characterized exposure to metalworking fluids (MWF) into age windows with homogenous biological risk for prostate cancer, and examined exposure-response relationships using semi-parametric modeling. Incident cases (n=872) were identified via Michigan cancer registry from 1985 through 2000. Controls were selected using incidence-density sampling, 5:1 ratio. Using a hormonal-based model, exposure was accumulated in three windows: (1) late puberty, (2) adulthood, and (3) middle age. We used penalized splines to model risk as a smooth function of exposure, and controlled for race and calendar year of diagnosis in a Cox model. Risk of prostate cancer linearly increased with exposure to straight MWF in the first window, with a relative risk of 2.4 per 10 mg/m(3)-years. Autoworkers exposed to MWF at a young age also had an increased risk associated with MWF exposure incurred later in life. For soluble MWF there was a slightly increased risk in the third window. Exposure characterization based on a hormonal model identified heightened risk with early age of exposure to straight MWF. Results also support a long latency period for exposure related prostate cancer.

  1. Biological indicators of exposure to total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in a primary aluminium smelter.

    PubMed Central

    Röllin, H B; Theodorou, P; Cantrell, A C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study attempts to define biological indicators of aluminium uptake and excretion in workers exposed to airborne aluminium compounds in a primary aluminium smelter. Also, this study defines the total and respirable aluminium dust fractions in two different potrooms, and correlates their concentrations with biological indicators in this group of workers. METHODS: Air was sampled at defined work sites. Non-destructive and conventional techniques were used to find total and respirable aluminium content of the dust. Blood and urine was collected from 84 volunteers employed at various work stations throughout the smelter and from two different cohorts of controls matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. Aluminium in serum samples and urine specimens was measured by flameless atomic absorption with a PE 4100 ZL spectrometer. RESULTS: The correlation of aluminium concentrations in serum and urine samples with the degree of exposure was assessed for three arbitrary exposure categories; low (0.036 mg Al/m3), medium (0.35 mg Al/m3) and high (1.47 mg Al/m3) as found in different areas of the smelter. At medium and high exposure, the ratio of respirable to total aluminium in the dust samples varied significantly. At high exposure, serum aluminium, although significantly raised, was still within the normal range of an unexposed population. The workers with low exposure excreted aluminium in urine at levels significantly higher than the controls, but still within the normal range of the population. However, potroom workers with medium and high exposure had significantly higher urinary aluminium than the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that only urinary aluminium constitutes a practical index of occupational exposure at or above 0.35 mg Al/m3, and that the respirable fraction of the dust may play a major role in the biological response to exposure to aluminium in a smelter environment. PMID:8758038

  2. Epidemic parenteral exposure to volatile sulfur-containing compounds at a hemodialysis center.

    PubMed

    Selenic, Dejana; Alvarado-Ramy, Francisco; Arduino, Mathew; Holt, Stacey; Cardinali, Fred; Blount, Benjamin; Jarrett, Jeff; Smith, Forrest; Altman, Neil; Stahl, Charlotte; Panlilio, Adelisa; Pearson, Michele; Tokars, Jerome

    2004-03-01

    To determine the cause of acute illness on August 30, 2000, among patients at an outpatient dialysis center (center A). We performed a cohort study of all patients receiving dialysis on August 30, 2000; reviewed dialysis procedures; and analyzed dialysis water samples using microbiologic and chemical assays. Dialysis center (center A). A case-patient was defined as a patient who developed chills within 5 hours after starting hemodialysis at center A on August 30, 2000. Sixteen (36%) of 44 patients at center A met the case definition. All case-patients were hospitalized; 2 died. Besides chills, 15 (94%) of the case-patients experienced nausea; 12 (75%), vomiting; and 4 (25%), fever. Illness was more frequent on the second than the first dialysis shift (16 of 20 vs 0 of 24, P < .001); no other risk factors were identified. The center's water treatment system had received inadequate maintenance and disinfection and a sulfurous odor was noted during sampling of the water from the reverse osmosis (RO) unit. The water had elevated bacterial counts. Volatile sulfur-containing compounds (ie, methanethiol, carbon disulfide, dimethyldisulfide, and sulfur dioxide) were detected by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry in 8 of 12 water samples from the RO unit and in 0 of 28 samples from other areas (P < .001). Results of tests for heavy metals and chloramines were within normal limits. Parenteral exposure to volatile sulfur-containing compounds, produced under anaerobic conditions in the RO unit, could have caused the outbreak. This investigation demonstrates the importance of appropriate disinfection and maintenance of water treatment systems in hemodialysis centers.

  3. BILIARY PAH METABOLITES AS A BIOLOGICAL INDICATOR OF FISH EXPOSURE IN TRIBUTARIES OF LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biliary polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) metabolites have been studied as a biological indicator of fish exposure to PAHs since the mid 1980's. Brown bullheads were collected from the following Lake Erie tributaries: Buffalo River (BUF), Niagara River at Love Canal (NIA)...

  4. BILIARY PAH METABOLITES AS A BIOLOGICAL INDICATOR OF FISH EXPOSURE IN TRIBUTARIES OF LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biliary polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) metabolites have been studied as a biological indicator of fish exposure to PAHs since the mid 1980's. Brown bullheads were collected from the following Lake Erie tributaries: Buffalo River (BUF), Niagara River at Love Canal (NIA)...

  5. Measurement of the laser exposure levels for burn threshold in biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Laufer, G.; Joachims, H.Z.; Eliachar, I.; Mordechovitz, D.

    1984-08-01

    Experiments for the evaluation of the laser energy density required to induce burn threshold in biological tissue are presented. The results are compared with a theoretical model. The values obtained for soft tissue are higher than the pain threshold and the safety standards for the maximum permissible exposure. This is due to the different nature of injury associated with the surgical process.

  6. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  7. Global Biology: An Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, James G.; Colin, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  8. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  9. Variability in biological monitoring of solvent exposure. I. Development of a population physiological model.

    PubMed Central

    Droz, P O; Wu, M M; Cumberland, W G; Berode, M

    1989-01-01

    Biological indicators of exposure to solvents are often characterised by a high variability that may be due either to fluctuations in exposure or individual differences in the workers. To describe and understand this variability better a physiological model for differing workers under variable industrial environments has been developed. Standard statistical distributions are used to simulate variability in exposure concentration, physical workload, body build, liver function, and renal clearance. For groups of workers exposed daily, the model calculates air monitoring indicators and biological monitoring results (expired air, blood, and urine). The results obtained are discussed and compared with measured data, both physiological (body build, cardiac output, alveolar ventilation) and toxicokinetic for six solvents: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, toluene, styrene, and their main metabolites. Possible applications of this population physiological model are presented. PMID:2765418

  10. New biological insights on the link between radiation exposure and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2013-03-01

    Radiation exposure is a well-documented risk factor for breast cancer in women. Compelling epidemiological evidence in different exposed populations around the world demonstrate that excess breast cancer increases with radiation doses above 10 cGy. Both frequency and type of breast cancer are affected by prior radiation exposure. Many epidemiological studies suggest that radiation risk is inversely related to age at exposure; exposure during puberty poses the greatest risk while exposures past the menopause appear to carry very low risk. These observations are supported by experimental studies in mice and rats, which together provide the basis for the pubertal 'window of susceptibility' hypothesis for carcinogenic exposure. One line of experimental investigation suggests that the pubertal epithelium is more sensitive because DNA damage responses are less efficient, an other suggests that radiation affects stem cells self-renewal. A recent line of investigation suggests that the irradiated microenvironment mediates cancer risk. Studying the biological basis for radiation effects provides potential routes for protection in vulnerable populations, which include survivors of childhood cancers, as well as insights into the biology for certain types of sporadic cancer.

  11. Yellow fever vaccination centers: concurrent vaccinations and updates on mosquito biology.

    PubMed

    Arya, Subhash C; Agarwal, Nirmala

    2012-09-01

    Mandatory visits to immunization centers that offer pre-travel Yellow fever vaccine to prospective travelers would be useful for briefing the basics of the biology of the mosquito responsible for Yellow fever spread. Pre- travel knowledge on the day-time rather the nocturnal biting habit of the mosquitoes of Aedes species would prevent from bites of the mosquitoes responsible for the spread of viruses causing Yellow fever, dengue or Chikungunya infection.

  12. [Biological aspects of occupational exposure to cadmium and several other metals].

    PubMed

    Lauwerys, R; Buchet, J P; Roels, H; Bernard, A; Gennart, J P

    1986-01-01

    We have performed several cross-sectional epidemiological surveys among workers exposed to cadmium, mercury vapour or manganese in order to assess : their early biological or functional effects; the biological tests allowing an assessment of the amount of metal absorbed or stored in the body; the acceptable exposure levels. Studies have also been carried out among persons exposed to inorganic arsenic in order to define its inactivation mechanism and to develop a biological test of exposure. The kidney is the main critical organ following long-term exposure to cadmium. To prevent the occurrence of renal changes in the majority of male workers exposed to cadmium, its concentration in renal cortex should not exceed 215 micrograms/g (wet weight), and that in urine : 10 micrograms/g creatinine. A blood cadmium level of 1 microgram/100 ml has been suggested as maximum tolerable level for long-term exposure. Prolonged exposure to mercury vapour may lead to renal and neurological disturbances. The preclinical signs of nephrotoxicity are correlated with the amount of mercury absorbed which may be assessed by monitoring the mercury level in urine. The neurotoxic effects (particularly tremor) are mainly related to the integrated exposure (duration and intensity). A maximal permissible level of 50 micrograms Hg/g urinary creatinine is proposed to prevent the occurrence of these toxic effects. An exposure to manganese dust for 7 years on the average at a level below the maximum allowable airborne concentration (5 mg/m3) recommended by the ACGIH in the USA may still lead to a slight reduction in psychomotor and spirometric performances and interfere with calcium metabolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Assessing isocyanate exposures in polyurethane industry sectors using biological and air monitoring methods.

    PubMed

    Creely, K S; Hughson, G W; Cocker, J; Jones, K

    2006-08-01

    Isocyanates, as a chemical group, are considered to be the biggest cause of occupational asthma in the UK. Monitoring of airborne exposures to total isocyanate is costly, requiring considerable expertise, both in terms of sample collection and chemical analysis and cannot be used to assess the effectiveness of protection from wearing respiratory protective equipment (RPE). Biological monitoring by analysis of metabolites in urine can be a relatively simple and inexpensive way to assess exposure to isocyanates. It may also be a useful way to evaluate the effectiveness of control measures in place. In this study biological and inhalation monitoring were undertaken to assess exposure in a variety of workplaces in the non-motor vehicle repair sector. Companies selected to participate in the survey included only those judged to be using good working practices when using isocyanate formulations. This included companies that used isocyanates to produce moulded polyurethane products, insulation material and those involved in industrial painting. Air samples were collected by personal monitoring and were analysed for total isocyanate content. Urine samples were collected soon after exposure and analysed for the metabolites of different isocyanate species, allowing calculation of the total metabolite concentration. Details of the control measures used and observed contamination of exposed skin were also recorded. A total of 21 companies agreed to participate in the study, with exposure measurements being collected from 22 sites. The airborne isocyanate concentrations were generally very low (range 0.0005-0.066 mg m(-3)). A total of 50 of the 70 samples were <0.001 mg m(-3), the limit of quantification (LOQ), therefore samples below the LOQ were assigned a value of 1/2 LOQ (0.0005 mg m(-3)). Of the 70 samples, 67 were below the current workplace exposure limit of 0.02 mg m(-3). The highest inhalation exposures occurred during spray painting activities in a truck manufacturing

  14. L p -Adaptation: Simultaneous Design Centering and Robustness Estimation of Electronic and Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Asmus, Josefine; Müller, Christian L; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2017-07-27

    The design of systems or models that work robustly under uncertainty and environmental fluctuations is a key challenge in both engineering and science. This is formalized in the design-centering problem, which is defined as finding a design that fulfills given specifications and has a high probability of still doing so if the system parameters or the specifications fluctuate randomly. Design centering is often accompanied by the problem of quantifying the robustness of a system. Here we present a novel adaptive statistical method to simultaneously address both problems. Our method, L p -Adaptation, is inspired by the evolution of robustness in biological systems and by randomized schemes for convex volume computation. It is able to address both problems in the general, non-convex case and at low computational cost. We describe the concept and the algorithm, test it on known benchmarks, and demonstrate its real-world applicability in electronic and biological systems. In all cases, the present method outperforms the previous state of the art. This enables re-formulating optimization problems in engineering and biology as design centering problems, taking global system robustness into account.

  15. Biomonitoring of chemical exposure among New York City firefighters responding to the World Trade Center fire and collapse.

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Philip; Osterloh, John; Pirkle, James; Caudill, Sam P; Grainger, James; Jones, Robert; Blount, Ben; Calafat, Antonia; Turner, Wayman; Feldman, Debra; Baron, Sherry; Bernard, Bruce; Lushniak, Boris D; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David

    2003-01-01

    The collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 exposed New York City firefighters to smoke and dust of unprecedented magnitude and duration. The chemicals and the concentrations produced from any fire are difficult to predict, but estimates of internal dose exposures can be assessed by the biological monitoring of blood and urine. We analyzed blood and urine specimens obtained from 321 firefighters responding to the WTC fires and collapse for 110 potentially fire-related chemicals. Controls consisted of 47 firefighters not present at the WTC. Sampling occurred 3 weeks after 11 September, while fires were still burning. When reference or background ranges were available, most chemical concentrations were found to be generally low and not outside these ranges. Compared with controls, the exposed firefighters showed significant differences in adjusted geometric means for six of the chemicals and significantly greater detection rates for an additional three. Arrival time was a significant predictor variable for four chemicals. Special Operations Command firefighters (n = 95), compared with other responding WTC firefighters (n = 226), had differences in concentrations or detection rate for 14 of the chemicals. Values for the Special Operations Command firefighters were also significantly different from the control group values for these same chemicals and for two additional chemicals. Generally, the chemical concentrations in the other firefighter group were not different from those of controls. Biomonitoring was used to characterize firefighter exposure at the WTC disaster. Although some of the chemicals analyzed showed statistically significant differences, these differences were generally small. PMID:14644665

  16. Biomonitoring of chemical exposure among New York City firefighters responding to the World Trade Center fire and collapse.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Philip; Osterloh, John; Pirkle, James; Caudill, Sam P; Grainger, James; Jones, Robert; Blount, Ben; Calafat, Antonia; Turner, Wayman; Feldman, Debra; Baron, Sherry; Bernard, Bruce; Lushniak, Boris D; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David

    2003-12-01

    The collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 exposed New York City firefighters to smoke and dust of unprecedented magnitude and duration. The chemicals and the concentrations produced from any fire are difficult to predict, but estimates of internal dose exposures can be assessed by the biological monitoring of blood and urine. We analyzed blood and urine specimens obtained from 321 firefighters responding to the WTC fires and collapse for 110 potentially fire-related chemicals. Controls consisted of 47 firefighters not present at the WTC. Sampling occurred 3 weeks after 11 September, while fires were still burning. When reference or background ranges were available, most chemical concentrations were found to be generally low and not outside these ranges. Compared with controls, the exposed firefighters showed significant differences in adjusted geometric means for six of the chemicals and significantly greater detection rates for an additional three. Arrival time was a significant predictor variable for four chemicals. Special Operations Command firefighters (n = 95), compared with other responding WTC firefighters (n = 226), had differences in concentrations or detection rate for 14 of the chemicals. Values for the Special Operations Command firefighters were also significantly different from the control group values for these same chemicals and for two additional chemicals. Generally, the chemical concentrations in the other firefighter group were not different from those of controls. Biomonitoring was used to characterize firefighter exposure at the WTC disaster. Although some of the chemicals analyzed showed statistically significant differences, these differences were generally small.

  17. [Investigation of air pollution in a shopping center and employees' personal exposure level].

    PubMed

    Manabe, Ryuji; Kunugita, Naoki; Katoh, Takahiko; Kuroda, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Yukio; Yamano, Yuko; Uchiyama, Iwao; Arashidani, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the concentrations of chemicals found inside a shopping center (SC), we investigated the condition of air pollution in a SC and the personal exposure level of SC employees. The survey was performed in June 2006 in Kyushu. The chemicals studied were volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes. The chemicals were collected by a personal passive sampler. Thirty-one VOCs and aldehydes were detected inside the SC. The results showed that the concentrations of all the chemicals detected in indoor air were less than those specified in the indoor air quality guideline of Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, Japan. The chemical concentrations in the SC decreased in the order of food corner > electric, clothing corner > outdoor and were clearly higher than those outdoors. Therefore, it is thought that the source of chemicals is indoors. The high indoor concentration of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol may be due to diffusion from the walls and floors. In addition, it is suggested that the personal exposure condition of the employees reflected the indoor concentration of each sales floor. The exposure level to formaldehyde was higher at nonworking time than at working time, suggesting that a larger exposure source exists in the place of residence than in the work place. We found that indoor air quality in SC is maintained at good levels. This might be because of the Japanese strict regulations that require administrations of large-scale buildings to provide adequate ventilation and perform regular measurement of indoor air quality.

  18. Relating calls to US poison centers for potential exposures to medications to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting of influenza-like illness.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Gillian A; McKeown, Nathanael J; Rodriguez, Sergio; Spyker, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) monitors influenza like illness (ILI) and the National Poison Data System (NPDS) warehouses call data uploaded by US poison centers regarding reported exposures to medication. We examined the relationship between calls to poison centers regarding reported exposures to medications commonly used to treat ILI and weekly reports of ILI. The CDC reports ILI, by age group, for each of 10 Health and Human Services (HHS) regions. We examined NPDS summary data from calls reported to poison centers regarding reported exposures to acetaminophen, cough/cold medications, and promethazine, for the same weeks, age groups, and HHS regions for influenza seasons 2000-2013. ILI and NPDS exposures were examined using graphical plots, descriptive statistics, stepwise regression analysis, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). About 5,101,841 influenza-like illness cases were reported to the CDC, and 2,122,940 calls regarding reported exposures to medications commonly used to treat ILI, were reported by poison centers to the NPDS over the 13 flu seasons. Analysis of stepwise models of the linear untransformed data involving 24 NPDS data groups and for 60 ILI measures, over the 13 influenza seasons, demonstrated that reported exposures to medications used to treat ILI correlated with reported cases of ILI with a median R(2 )=( )0.489 (min R(2 )=( )0.248, max R(2 )=( )0.717), with mean ± SD of R(2 )=( )0.494 ± 0.121. Median number of parameters used (degrees of freedom - 1) was 7. NPDS data regarding poison center calls for selected ILI medication exposures were highly correlated with CDC ILI data. Since NPDS data are available in real time, it provides complimentary ILI monitoring. This approach may provide public health value in predicting other illnesses which are not currently as thoroughly monitored.

  19. Rate of serious infection in patients who are prescribed systemic biologic or nonbiologic agents for psoriasis: A large, single center, retrospective, observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Chantelle; Bloom, Romi; Ibler, Erin; Majewski, Sara; Sable, Kimberly A; Guido, Nicholas J; Day, Jennifer; Nocadello, Salvatore; Florek, Aleksandra G; West, Dennis P; Nardone, Beatrice

    2017-08-10

    Systemic biologic and nonbiologic agents used to treat psoriasis may or may not contribute to serious infection (SI) risk. Safety data, particularly for biologic agents, and associated risk for SI, are scarce. The study's aim was to explore the risk for SI in psoriasis patients exposed to systemic biologic or nonbiologic agents. A large, single-center electronic medical record repository was searched between January 2010 and December 2014. Records for patients prescribed a systemic agent for psoriasis (SAP) with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis diagnoses were included (ICD-9 codes 696.1 and 696.0, respectively). SIs were those who required hospitalization, and/or injectable antibacterial, antiviral or antifungal therapy. SIs occurring within 120 days after exposure to a SAP, were included for study. A total of 1,346 patients were exposed to a SAP between January 2010 and December 2014; 27 (2%) had a SI. Comparing biologic and nonbiologic agent exposure, no statistically significant difference for risk of SI was detectable (p = .83). In this population, the SI rate for biologic and nonbiologic systemic agents was clinically indistinguishable, thereby supporting consideration of the entire spectrum of available systemic therapeutic agents, both biologic and nonbiologic agents, for management of moderate to severe psoriasis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: Clinical intervention science and stress biology research join forces

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child’s body, alterations which may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathology and for society, and we recommend that stress-biology research and intervention science join forces to tackle the problem. We examine the evidence base in relation to stress-sensitive measures for the body (inflammatory reactions, telomere erosion, epigenetic methylation, and gene expression) and brain (mental disorders, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological testing). We also review promising interventions for families, couples, and children that have been designed to reduce the effects of childhood violence exposure. We invite intervention scientists and stress-biology researchers to collaborate in adding stress-biology measures to randomized clinical trials of interventions intended to reduce effects of violence exposure and other traumas on young people. PMID:24342859

  1. A regional poison center's experience with poisoning exposures occurring in schools.

    PubMed

    Perry, P A; Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1992-04-01

    The nature of and response to poisonings in the school setting has not been characterized. To define these problems a retrospective review of calls to a Regional Poison Information Center (RPIC) involving school exposures was done for the 1988-89 academic year. 362 cases were reported; 74% were reported by school nurses, 10% by other school employees, 10% by parents, 5% by health care facilities, and 1% by students themselves. Ingestions accounted for 45% of exposures, dermal 24%, ocular 19%, inhalation 7%, with the remainder being combinations of routes. Correct treatment prior to RPIC consultation occurred in only 40% of the cases. None developed major symptoms, 23% had minor and 10% had moderate symptoms. High school students accounted for the greatest number (20) of suicide gestures, while middle schools reported more cases of substance abuse. School nurses often were unaware of situations until several hours later. 61% of suicide gestures were referred to an HCF; 7 of these developed moderate symptoms. Exposures to chemicals in science or vo-tech classes accounted for 102 cases; 28% were referred to a HCF and 15% had moderate symptoms. There was often a delay in evaluation by the school nurse and initial decontamination was inadequate or absent. Parents were often instructed by school personnel to contact the RPIC for information and then relay it to the school. These delays could have resulted in greater toxicity. School nurses should be targeted for educational programs by poison centers, but teachers and other school employees must also be included since often they are the first at the scene. Students should be instructed to report exposures to a teacher immediately.

  2. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERSONAL PM EXPOSURES FOR ELDERLY POPULATIONS AND INDOOR AND OUTDOOR CONCENTRATIONS FOR THREE RETIREMENT CENTER SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure, indoor and outdoor concentration, "physical factor", and questionnaire data were collected in three retirement center settings, supporting broader PM-health studies of elderly populations. The studies varied geographically and temporally, with popul...

  3. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERSONAL PM EXPOSURES FOR ELDERLY POPULATIONS AND INDOOR AND OUTDOOR CONCENTRATIONS FOR THREE RETIREMENT CENTER SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures, indoor and outdoor concentrations, and questionnaire data were collected in three retirement center settings, supporting broader PM-health studies of elderly populations. The studies varied geographically and temporally, with populations studied in Baltimor...

  4. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERSONAL PM EXPOSURES FOR ELDERLY POPULATIONS AND INDOOR AND OUTDOOR CONCENTRATIONS FOR THREE RETIREMENT CENTER SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures, indoor and outdoor concentrations, and questionnaire data were collected in three retirement center settings, supporting broader PM-health studies of elderly populations. The studies varied geographically and temporally, with populations studied in Baltimor...

  5. Rapid Release of Tissue Enzymes into Blood after Blast Exposure: Potential Use as Biological Dosimeters

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Peethambaran; Oguntayo, Samuel; Alamneh, Yonas; Honnold, Cary; Wang, Ying; Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Long, Joseph B.; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.

    2012-01-01

    Explosive blast results in multiple organ injury and polytrauma, the intensity of which varies with the nature of the exposure, orientation, environment and individual resilience. Blast overpressure alone may not precisely indicate the level of body or brain injury after blast exposure. Assessment of the extent of body injury after blast exposure is important, since polytrauma and systemic factors significantly contribute to blast-induced traumatic brain injury. We evaluated the activity of plasma enzymes including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) at different time points after blast exposure using a mouse model of single and repeated blast exposures to assess the severity of injury. Our data show that activities of all the enzymes in the plasma were significantly increased as early as 1 h after blast exposure. The elevated enzyme activity remained up to 6 h in an overpressure dose-dependent manner and returned close to normal levels at 24 h. Head-only blast exposure with body protection showed no increase in the enzyme activities suggesting that brain injury alone does not contribute to the systemic increase. In contrast to plasma increase, AST, ALT and LDH activity in the liver and CK in the skeletal muscle showed drastic decrease at 6 h after blast exposures. Histopathology showed mild necrosis at 6 h and severe necrosis at 24 h after blast exposures in liver and no changes in the skeletal muscle suggesting that the enzyme release from the tissue to plasma is probably triggered by transient cell membrane disruption from shockwave and not due to necrosis. Overpressure dependent transient release of tissue enzymes and elevation in the plasma after blast exposure suggest that elevated enzyme activities in the blood can be potentially used as a biological dosimeter to assess the severity of blast injury. PMID:22493674

  6. Evaluating measurement error in estimates of worker exposure assessed in parallel by personal and biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Symanski, Elaine; Greeson, Nicole M H; Chan, Wenyaw

    2007-02-01

    While studies indicate that the attenuating effects of imperfectly measured exposure can be substantial, they have not had the requisite data to compare methods of assessing exposure for the same individuals monitored over common time periods. We examined measurement error in multiple exposure measures collected in parallel on 32 groups of workers. Random-effects models were applied under both compound symmetric and exponential correlation structures. Estimates of the within- and between-worker variances were used to contrast the attenuation bias in an exposure-response relationship that would be expected using an individual-based exposure assessment for different exposure measures on the basis of the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). ICC estimates ranged widely, indicative of a great deal of measurement error in some exposure measures while others contained very little. There was generally less attenuation in the biomarker data as compared to measurements obtained by personal sampling and, among biomarkers, for those with longer half-lives. The interval ICC estimates were often-times wide, suggesting a fair amount of imprecision in the point estimates. Ignoring serial correlation tended to over estimate the ICC values. Although personal sampling results were typically characterized by more intra-individual variability than inter-individual variability when compared to biological measurements, both types of data provided examples of exposure measures fraught with error. Our results also indicated substantial imprecision in the estimates of exposure measurement error, suggesting that greater emphasis needs to be given to studies that collect sufficient data to better characterize the attenuating effects of an error-prone exposure measure.

  7. Isocyanate exposure control in motor vehicle paint spraying: evidence from biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kate; Cocker, John; Piney, Mark

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the changes in control of exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate based paints used in vehicle spraying after a Health & Safety Executive (HSE) national project. Paint sprayers and managers from motor vehicle repair (MVR) bodyshops across the UK, were invited to one of 32 Safety and Health Awareness Days (SHADs) to increase their understanding of the hazards, and practical ways of controlling of exposure to isocyanate based paints. Exposure measurement based on biological monitoring was offered, free of charge, to each of the roughly 4000 participants and used to assess the effectiveness of controls and methods of working. Results are compared with pre and post SHAD measurements. Urine samples were received from 995 paint sprayers. Hexamethylene diamine (HDA) levels in urine, indicative of exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), were significantly lower (Mann-Whitney, p<0.0001) than had been seen in a wider population from previous HSE inspections and routine sampling. Where a sprayer's urinary HDA was above the quantification limit they were asked to send another sample after reviewing and improving exposure control measures. The results from these repeat samples were significantly lower than the original results. There was no difference in the exposures of sprayers using air-fed half-mask face-pieces compared with visor type air-fed breathing apparatus, or between spray booths and rooms. The analysis of HDA in urine is a useful technique for assessing exposure to isocyanates in paint sprayers. The simplicity of this approach has allowed wide-scale use of biological monitoring in an industry dominated by small and micro businesses. Biological monitoring of exposure has enabled individual companies, and sprayers, to check that their control measures are working. This study showed overall lower levels of HDA in paint sprayers following SHADs. These lower levels have been maintained across a wider population of UK paint

  8. Long-term exposure to air pollution is associated with biological aging

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K.; Nwanaji-Enwerem, Jamaji C.; Wolf, Kathrin; Wahl, Simone; Colicino, Elena; Trevisi, Letizia; Kloog, Itai; Just, Allan C.; Vokonas, Pantel; Cyrys, Josef; Gieger, Christian; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Schneider, Alexandra; Peters, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Long-term exposure to air pollution is associated with age-related diseases. We explored the association between accelerated biological aging and air pollution, a potential mechanism linking air pollution and health. We estimated long-term exposure to PM10, PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance/black carbon (BC), and NOx via land-use regression models in individuals from the KORA F4 cohort. Accelerated biological aging was assessed using telomere length (TeloAA) and three epigenetic measures: DNA methylation age acceleration (DNAmAA), extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration (correlated with immune cell counts, EEAA), and intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration (independent of immune cell counts, IEAA). We also investigated sex-specific associations between air pollution and biological aging, given the published association between sex and aging measures. In KORA an interquartile range (0.97 μg/m3) increase in PM2.5 was associated with a 0.33 y increase in EEAA (CI = 0.01, 0.64; P = 0.04). BC and NOx (indicators or traffic exposure) were associated with DNAmAA and IEAA in women, while TeloAA was inversely associated with BC in men. We replicated this inverse BC-TeloAA association in the Normative Aging Study, a male cohort based in the USA. A multiple phenotype analysis in KORA F4 combining all aging measures showed that BC and PM10 were broadly associated with biological aging in men. Thus, we conclude that long-term exposure to air pollution is associated with biological aging measures, potentially in a sex-specific manner. However, many of the associations were relatively weak and further replication of overall and sex-specific associations is warranted. PMID:27793020

  9. The biological importance of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin backup systems in bivalves during peroxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Delapedra, Gabriel; Arl, Miriam; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-10-01

    Organic peroxide elimination in eukaryotes essentially depends on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes, which are supported by their respective electron donors, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx). This system depends on the ancillary enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to maintain GSH and Trx in their reduced state. This study discusses the biological importance of GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx during cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) exposure in brown mussel Perna perna. ZnCl2 or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenze (CDNB) was used to decrease GR and TrxR activities in gills, as already reported with mammals and bivalves. ZnCl2 exposure lowered GR activity (28%), impaired the in vivo CHP decomposition and decreased the survival rates under CHP exposure. CDNB decreased GR (54%) and TrxR (73%) activities and induced glutathione depletion (99%), promoting diminished peroxide elimination and survival rates at a greater extent than ZnCl2. CDNB also increased the susceptibility of hemocytes to CHP toxicity. Despite being toxic and causing mortality at longer exposures, short (2 h) exposure to CHP promoted an up regulation of GSH (50 and 100 μM CHP) and protein-thiol (100 μM CHP) levels, which was blocked by ZnCl2 or CDNB pre-exposure. Results highlight the biological importance of GSH, GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx activities, contributing to organic peroxides elimination and mussel survival under oxidative challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates, albeit indirectly, the biological importance of GPx/GR/GSH and Prx/TrxR/Trx systems on in vivo organic peroxide elimination in bivalves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biological exposure assessment to tetrachloroethylene for workers in the dry cleaning industry.

    PubMed

    McKernan, Lauralynn T; Ruder, Avima M; Petersen, Martin R; Hein, Misty J; Forrester, Christy L; Sanderson, Wayne T; Ashley, David L; Butler, Mary A

    2008-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting biological tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) exposure assessments of dry cleaning employees in conjunction with evaluation of possible PCE health effects. Eighteen women from four dry cleaning facilities in southwestern Ohio were monitored in a pilot study of workers with PCE exposure. Personal breathing zone samples were collected from each employee on two consecutive work days. Biological monitoring included a single measurement of PCE in blood and multiple measurements of pre- and post-shift PCE in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in urine. Post-shift PCE in exhaled breath gradually increased throughout the work week. Statistically significant correlations were observed among the exposure indices. Decreases in PCE in exhaled breath and TCA in urine were observed after two days without exposure to PCE. A mixed-effects model identified statistically significant associations between PCE in exhaled breath and airborne PCE time weighted average (TWA) after adjusting for a random participant effect and fixed effects of time and body mass index. Although comprehensive, our sampling strategy was challenging to implement due to fluctuating work schedules and the number (pre- and post-shift on three consecutive days) and multiplicity (air, blood, exhaled breath, and urine) of samples collected. PCE in blood is the preferred biological index to monitor exposures, but may make recruitment difficult. PCE TWA sampling is an appropriate surrogate, although more field intensive. Repeated measures of exposure and mixed-effects modeling may be required for future studies due to high within-subject variability. Workers should be monitored over a long enough period of time to allow the use of a lag term.

  11. Biological exposure assessment to tetrachloroethylene for workers in the dry cleaning industry

    PubMed Central

    McKernan, Lauralynn T; Ruder, Avima M; Petersen, Martin R; Hein, Misty J; Forrester, Christy L; Sanderson, Wayne T; Ashley, David L; Butler, Mary A

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting biological tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) exposure assessments of dry cleaning employees in conjunction with evaluation of possible PCE health effects. Methods Eighteen women from four dry cleaning facilities in southwestern Ohio were monitored in a pilot study of workers with PCE exposure. Personal breathing zone samples were collected from each employee on two consecutive work days. Biological monitoring included a single measurement of PCE in blood and multiple measurements of pre- and post-shift PCE in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in urine. Results Post-shift PCE in exhaled breath gradually increased throughout the work week. Statistically significant correlations were observed among the exposure indices. Decreases in PCE in exhaled breath and TCA in urine were observed after two days without exposure to PCE. A mixed-effects model identified statistically significant associations between PCE in exhaled breath and airborne PCE time weighted average (TWA) after adjusting for a random participant effect and fixed effects of time and body mass index. Conclusion Although comprehensive, our sampling strategy was challenging to implement due to fluctuating work schedules and the number (pre- and post-shift on three consecutive days) and multiplicity (air, blood, exhaled breath, and urine) of samples collected. PCE in blood is the preferred biological index to monitor exposures, but may make recruitment difficult. PCE TWA sampling is an appropriate surrogate, although more field intensive. Repeated measures of exposure and mixed-effects modeling may be required for future studies due to high within-subject variability. Workers should be monitored over a long enough period of time to allow the use of a lag term. PMID:18412959

  12. Occurrence of 210Po and Biological Effects of Low-Level Exposure: The Need for Research

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polonium-210 (210Po) concentrations that exceed 1 Bq/L in drinking-water supplies have been reported from four widely separated U.S. states where exposure to it went unnoticed for decades. The radionuclide grandparents of 210Po are common in sediments, and segments of the public may be chronically exposed to low levels of 210Po in drinking water or in food products from animals raised in contaminated areas. Objectives: We summarized information on the environmental behavior, biokinetics, and toxicology of 210Po and identified the need for future research. Methods: Potential linkages between environmental exposure to 210Po and human health effects were identified in a literature review. Discussion: 210Po accumulates in the ovaries where it kills primary oocytes at low doses. Because of its radiosensitivity and tendency to concentrate 210Po, the ovary may be the critical organ in determining the lowest injurious dose for 210Po. 210Po also accumulates in the yolk sac of the embryo and in the fetal and placental tissues. Low-level exposure to 210Po may have subtle, long-term biological effects because of its tropism towards reproductive and embryonic and fetal tissues where exposure to a single alpha particle may kill or damage critical cells. 210Po is present in cigarettes and maternal smoking has several effects that appear consistent with the toxicology of 210Po. Conclusions: Much of the important biological and toxicological research on 210Po is more than four decades old. New research is needed to evaluate environmental exposure to 210Po and the biological effects of low-dose exposure to it so that public health officials can develop appropriate mitigation measures where necessary. PMID:22538346

  13. Characterization of edible marijuana product exposures reported to United States poison centers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dazhe; Srisuma, Sahaphume; Bronstein, Alvin C; Hoyte, Christopher O

    2016-11-01

    Edible marijuana products are sold as brownies, cookies, and candies, which may be indistinguishable from counterparts without marijuana and are palatable to children and adults. The consumption of an entire product containing multiple dose-units may result in overdose. To characterize edible marijuana exposures reported to US poison centers with subgroup analysis by age. We analyzed single substance, human exposure calls coded to marijuana brownies, candies, cookies, beverages, or other foods reported to the National Poison Data System from January 2013 to December 2015. Calls were analyzed by state, age, gender, exposure route, clinical effect, therapies, and level of healthcare facility utilization. Four-hundred and thirty calls were reported: Colorado (N = 166, 1.05/100,000 population/year) and Washington (96, 0.46) yielded the highest number of exposures. Three hundred and eighty-one (91%) calls occurred in states with decriminalized medical/recreational marijuana. The number of calls increased every year of the study. The most common age groups were: ≤5 years (N = 109, 0.15/100,000 population/year) and 13-19 (78, 0.09). The most frequent clinical effects were drowsiness/lethargy (N = 118, percentage = 43%), tachycardia (84, 31%), agitated/irritable (37, 14%), and confusion (37, 14%). Children ≤5 years have more drowsiness/lethargy, ataxia, and red eye/conjunctivitis. No deaths were reported. The most common therapies administered were intravenous fluids (85, 20%), dilute/irrigate/wash (48, 11 %), and benzodiazepines (47, 11%). Three patients (ages 4, 10, and 57 years) received intubation. 97 (23%), 217 (50%), and 12 (3%) calls were managed at home, treated/released, admitted to a critical care unit, respectively. Although most clinical effects are minor, ventilatory support may be necessary for children and adults. We speculate the increasing exposures may be related to a combination of delayed absorption kinetics of Δ9

  14. Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: II. Biological consequences of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, Mark E.; Choy, Steven J.; Moore, Jeremy N.; Banda, Jo A.; Gefell, Daniel J.; Minarik, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes contain one fifth of the world’s surface freshwater and have been impacted by human activity since the Industrial Revolution. In addition to legacy contaminants, nitrification and invasive species, this aquatic ecosystem is also the recipient of Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) with poorly understood biological consequences. In the current study, we documented the presence, concentrations, and biological effects of CECs across 27 field sites in six Great Lakes tributaries by examining over 2250 resident and caged sunfish (Lepomis ssp.) for a variety of morphological and physiological endpoints and related these results to CEC occurrence. CEC were ubiquitous across studies sites and their presence and concentrations in water and sediment were highest in effluent dominated rivers and downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges. However, even putative upstream reference sites were not free of CEC presence and fish at these sites exhibited biological effects consistent with CEC exposure. Only the Fox River exhibited consistent adverse biological effects, including increased relative liver size, greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles and increased plasma glucose concentrations. Canonical Redundancy Analysis revealed consistent patterns of biological consequences of CEC exposure across all six tributaries. Increasing plasma glucose concentrations, likely as a result of pollutant-induced metabolic stress, were associated with increased relative liver size and greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles. These indicators of pollutant exposure were inversely correlated with indicators of reproductive potential including smaller gonad size and less mature gametes. The current study highlights the need for greater integration of chemical and biological studies and suggests that CECs in the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin may adversely affect the reproductive potential of exposed fish populations. PMID:28953953

  15. Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: II. Biological consequences of exposure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Linnea M; Jorgenson, Zachary G; Brigham, Mark E; Choy, Steven J; Moore, Jeremy N; Banda, Jo A; Gefell, Daniel J; Minarik, Thomas A; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2017-01-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes contain one fifth of the world's surface freshwater and have been impacted by human activity since the Industrial Revolution. In addition to legacy contaminants, nitrification and invasive species, this aquatic ecosystem is also the recipient of Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) with poorly understood biological consequences. In the current study, we documented the presence, concentrations, and biological effects of CECs across 27 field sites in six Great Lakes tributaries by examining over 2250 resident and caged sunfish (Lepomis ssp.) for a variety of morphological and physiological endpoints and related these results to CEC occurrence. CEC were ubiquitous across studies sites and their presence and concentrations in water and sediment were highest in effluent dominated rivers and downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges. However, even putative upstream reference sites were not free of CEC presence and fish at these sites exhibited biological effects consistent with CEC exposure. Only the Fox River exhibited consistent adverse biological effects, including increased relative liver size, greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles and increased plasma glucose concentrations. Canonical Redundancy Analysis revealed consistent patterns of biological consequences of CEC exposure across all six tributaries. Increasing plasma glucose concentrations, likely as a result of pollutant-induced metabolic stress, were associated with increased relative liver size and greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles. These indicators of pollutant exposure were inversely correlated with indicators of reproductive potential including smaller gonad size and less mature gametes. The current study highlights the need for greater integration of chemical and biological studies and suggests that CECs in the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin may adversely affect the reproductive potential of exposed fish populations.

  16. Simbios: an NIH national center for physics-based simulation of biological structures.

    PubMed

    Delp, Scott L; Ku, Joy P; Pande, Vijay S; Sherman, Michael A; Altman, Russ B

    2012-01-01

    Physics-based simulation provides a powerful framework for understanding biological form and function. Simulations can be used by biologists to study macromolecular assemblies and by clinicians to design treatments for diseases. Simulations help biomedical researchers understand the physical constraints on biological systems as they engineer novel drugs, synthetic tissues, medical devices, and surgical interventions. Although individual biomedical investigators make outstanding contributions to physics-based simulation, the field has been fragmented. Applications are typically limited to a single physical scale, and individual investigators usually must create their own software. These conditions created a major barrier to advancing simulation capabilities. In 2004, we established a National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures (Simbios) to help integrate the field and accelerate biomedical research. In 6 years, Simbios has become a vibrant national center, with collaborators in 16 states and eight countries. Simbios focuses on problems at both the molecular scale and the organismal level, with a long-term goal of uniting these in accurate multiscale simulations.

  17. Pesticide-related poison center exposures in children and adolescents aged ≤19 years in Texas, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Amber B; Forrester, Mathias B; Han, Daikwon; Shipp, Eva M; Cizmas, Leslie H

    2016-11-01

    Although national poison center data show that pesticides were the 8th most commonly reported substance category (3.27%) for children aged ≤5 years in 2014, there is limited information on childhood and adolescent pesticide exposures. This study assessed pesticide-related poison center exposures in children and adolescents aged ≤19 years from 2000-2013 in Texas to characterize the potential burden of pesticides. Pesticide-related poison center exposures among children and adolescents aged ≤19 years reported to Texas poison centers were identified. The distribution of exposures was estimated by gender, age category, medical outcome, management site, exposure route, and pesticide category. From 2000 to 2013, there were 61,147 pesticide-related poison center exposures in children and adolescents aged ≤19 years. The prevalence was highest among males at 864.24 per 100,000 population. The prevalence of unintentional exposures was highest among children aged ≤5 years at 2310.69 per 100,000 population, whereas the prevalence of intentional exposures was highest among adolescents aged 13-19 years at 13.82 per 100,000 population. A majority of medical outcomes reported were classified as having no effect (30.24%) and not followed, but minimal clinical effects possible (42.74%). Of all the exposures, 81.24% were managed on site. However, 57% of intentional exposures were referred to or treated at a health-care facility. The most common routes of exposure were ingestion (80.83%) and dermal (17.21%). The most common pesticide categories included rodenticides (30.02%), pyrethrins/pyrethroids (20.69%), and other and unspecified insecticides (18.14%). The study found differences in the frequency of exposures by intent for sex and age categories, and identified the most common medical outcomes, management site, exposure route, and pesticide category. Through characterizing pesticide-related poison center exposures, future interventions can be designed to address groups

  18. Biological monitoring to assess dermal exposure to ethylene oxide vapours during an incidental release.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Peter J; van Puijvelde, Mathieu J P; Urbanus, Jan H

    2014-12-15

    During a short incident in an ethylene oxide (EO) producing plant, EO vapour was released under high pressure. Operators wore full respiratory protection during repairs to fix the leak. To check the adequacy of the applied personal protective equipment and to address concerns about potential dermal exposure and subsequent uptake of EO, biological monitoring was applied by determination of the haemoglobin adducts of EO in blood. Based on the results of the biomonitoring, a risk assessment of dermal exposure to EO vapour was made. Calculations to estimate dermal exposure, based on two recently published models and using the relevant physical-chemical properties of EO, indicate that the dermal contribution to total exposure is expected to be negligible under normal operating circumstances. However, the models indicate that under accidental circumstances of product spillage, when high air concentrations can build up quickly and where incident response is conducted under respiratory protection with independently supplied air, the systemic exposure resulting from dermal absorption may reach levels of concern. The model estimates were compared to the actual biomonitoring data in the operators involved in the accidental release of EO vapour. The results suggest that when incidental exposures to high EO vapour concentrations (several thousand ppm) occur during periods in excess of 20-30 min, additional risk management measures, such as wearing chemical impervious suits, should be considered to control dermal uptake of EO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Indoor fungal exposure: What impact on clinical and biological status regarding Aspergillus during cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Pricope, D; Deneuville, E; Frain, S; Chevrier, S; Belaz, S; Roussey, M; Gangneux, J-P

    2015-06-01

    The sources of exposure during diseases due to Aspergillus fungi in cystic fibrosis patients are still poorly explored. We assessed home fungal exposure in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis and analysed its impact on the presence of Aspergillus biological markers, the colonisation of airways, as well as the sensitization and Aspergillus serology. Between March 2012 and August 2012, 34 patients benefited from a visit performed by a home environment medical adviser including sampling for mycological analysis. The number of colonies of Aspergillus was not significantly different in the various sampling sites (P=0.251), but the number of non-Aspergillus colonies was much higher in the kitchen (P=0.0045). Subsequently, home fungal exposure was compared between the groups "absence of Aspergillus-related markers" and "presence of Aspergillus-related markers". Home exposure to Aspergillus (P=0.453) and non-Aspergillus (P=0.972) flora was not significant between the 2 groups. Within this series of 34 patients that should be expanded, we note an absence of clear relationship between home exposure and the Aspergillus-linked markers in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. This result should be taken into account regarding too restrictive hygiene advices provided to families, given the fact that fungal exposure can also results from activities performed away from home. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Indicative and complementary effects of human biological indicators for heavy metal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ruiya; Li, Yonghua; Zhang, Biao; Li, Hairong; Liao, Xiaoyong

    2016-09-06

    Although human biological indicators have been widely utilized for biomonitoring environmental pollutants in health exposure assessment, the relationship between internal and external exposure has not yet been adequately established. In this study, we collected and analyzed 61 rice, 56 pepper, and 58 soil samples, together with 107 hair, 107 blood, and 107 urine samples from residents living in selected intensive mining areas in China. Concentrations of most of the four elements considered (Pb, Cd, Hg, and Se) exceeded national standards, implying high exposure risk in the study areas. Regression analysis also revealed a correlation (0.33, P < 0.001) between the concentration of Pb in soil and that in human hair (as well as in human blood); to some extent, Pb content in hair and blood could therefore be used to characterize external Pb exposure. The correlation between Hg in rice and in human hair (up to 0.5, P < 0.001) further confirmed a significant indicative effect of human hair for Hg exposure. A significant correlation was also noted between concentrations of some elements in different human samples, for example, between Hg in hair and blood (0.641, P < 0.01) and between Cd in urine and blood (0.339, P < 0.01). To some extent, there could thus be mutual reflectance of the same heavy metal in different samples, with the possibility for complementary use in assessing heavy metal exposure.

  1. [Two-step exposure of biological objects to infrared laser and microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Kol'tsov, Iu V; Korolev, V N; Kusakin, S A

    1999-01-01

    The effect of two-step exposure of bacterial objects to infrared laser and microwave pulse radiations was studied. The effect is determined by the time interval between two excitation steps and pulse duration. It was shown that the biologically active dose of microwave radiation is much lower than that of infrared laser radiation; however, laser radiation induces a stronger cellular response. It was found that microwaves enhance the efficiency of infrared laser radiation.

  2. A Study to Interpret the Biological Significance of Behavior Associated with 3S Experimental Sonar Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    J. O. (submitted). Biological significance of sperm whale responses to sonar: comparison with anti-predator responses. Submitted to Endangered Species Research. ... species ; 2.) quantitative comparison of behavior, and behavioral changes, during sonar presentation and playback of killer whale sounds across the 3S... species ; and 3.) quantification of the possible impacts of sonar exposure on energy expenditure by linking respiration behavior and underwater activity

  3. Small airway-centered granulomatosis caused by long-term exposure to polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jung, Hye Ra; Shehu, Esmeralda; Rho, Byung Hak; Lee, Mi-Young; Kwon, Kun Young

    2014-06-01

    To date, there have been no reports of chronic pulmonary granulomatosis associated with exposure to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Here, we report three cases of small airway-centered granulomatous lesions in workers employed at facilities that apply coatings to pans and other utensils. The workers were repeatedly exposed to PTFE particles that were probably generated by the drying process when PTFE coatings are dried in a convection oven at high temperatures (380-420 °C). The duration of inhalational PTFE exposure was between 7 and 20 years. We found granulomatous lung lesions around the small airways in lung biopsy specimens obtained from the workers. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis was performed focusing on areas where the PTFE particles were suspected to be located in macrophages. The scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses revealed fluorine in the particles. Lung tissue samples from all cases were analyzed using a fully automated Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Analysis of the spectrum extracted from the position of the foreign particles enabled precise identification of the foreign bodies as PTFE. Fourier transform infrared revealed that all of the lung tissue samples had bands at 1,202 to 1,148 cm(-1) and 1,202 to 1,146 cm(-1), which are characteristic of the asymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of the C-F bonds of PTFE. These cases suggest that recurrent inhalational exposure to PTFE particles causes chronic pulmonary granulomatosis.

  4. Advanced Exposure Metrics For Chemical Risk Analysis: Systems Biology and 'Omic-based Biomarkers for Exposure Reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct measurement of human exposure to environmental contaminants in real time (when the exposure is actually occurring) is rare and difficult to obtain. This frustrates both exposure assessments and investigations into the linkage between chemical exposure and human disease. ...

  5. Organizational influence on the occurrence of work accidents involving exposure to biological material.

    PubMed

    Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz; Cenzi, Camila Maria; dos Santos, Heloisa Ehmke Cardoso; Trovó, Marli Elisa Mendes

    2013-01-01

    to analyze work accidents involving exposure to biological materials which took place among personnel working in nursing and to evaluate the influence of the organizational culture on the occurrence of these accidents. a retrospective, analytical study, carried out in two stages in a hospital that was part of the Network for the Prevention of Work Accidents. The first stage involved the analysis of the characteristics of the work accidents involving exposure to biological materials as recorded over a seven-year period by the nursing staff in the hospital studied, and registered in the Network databank. The second stage involved the analysis of 122 nursing staff members' perception of the institutional culture, who were allocated to the control group (workers who had not had an accident) and the case group (workers who had had an accident). 386 accidents had been recorded: percutaneous lesions occurred in 79% of the cases, needles were the materials involved in 69.7% of the accidents, and in 81.9% of the accident there was contact with blood. Regarding the influence of the organizational culture on the occurrence of accidents, the results obtained through the analysis of the two groups did not demonstrate significant differences between the average scores attributed by the workers in each organizational value or practice category. It is concluded that accidents involving exposure to biological material need to be avoided, however, it was not possible to confirm the influence of organizational values or practices on workers' behavior concerning the occurrence of these accidents.

  6. Mass Spectrometry Data from the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Anderson, Gordon

    The mass spectrometry capabilities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are primarily applied to biological research, with an emphasis on proteomics and metabolomics. Many of these cutting-edge mass spectrometry capabilities and bioinformatics methods are housed in the Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility operated by PNNL. These capabilities have been developed and acquired through cooperation between the EMSL national scientific user program and PNNL programmatic research. At the website of the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center, the following resources are made available: PNNL-developed software tools and source code, PNNL-generated raw data and processed results, links to publications that used the data and results available on this site, and tutorials and user manuals. [taken from http://omics.pnl.gov/

  7. Improving performance of HVAC systems to reduce exposure to aerosolized infectious agents in buildings; recommendations to reduce risks posed by biological attacks.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Penny J; Mair, Michael; Inglesby, Thomas V; Gross, Jonathan; Henderson, D A; O'Toole, Tara; Ahern-Seronde, Joa; Bahnfleth, William P; Brennan, Terry; Burroughs, H E Barney; Davidson, Cliff; Delp, William; Ensor, David S; Gomory, Ralph; Olsiewski, Paula; Samet, Jonathan M; Smith, William M; Streifel, Andrew J; White, Ronald H; Woods, James E

    2006-01-01

    The prospect of biological attacks is a growing strategic threat. Covert aerosol attacks inside a building are of particular concern. In the summer of 2005, the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center convened a Working Group to determine what steps could be taken to reduce the risk of exposure of building occupants after an aerosol release of a biological weapon. The Working Group was composed of subject matter experts in air filtration, building ventilation and pressurization, air conditioning and air distribution, biosecurity, building design and operation, building decontamination and restoration, economics, medicine, public health, and public policy. The group focused on functions of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems in commercial or public buildings that could reduce the risk of exposure to deleterious aerosols following biological attacks. The Working Group's recommendations for building owners are based on the use of currently available, off-the-shelf technologies. These recommendations are modest in expense and could be implemented immediately. It is also the Working Group's judgment that the commitment and stewardship of a lead government agency is essential to secure the necessary financial and human resources and to plan and build a comprehensive, effective program to reduce exposure to aerosolized infectious agents in buildings.

  8. Chronic and acute exposures to the world trade center disaster and lower respiratory symptoms: area residents and workers.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Carey B; Friedman, Stephen M; Pillai, Parul S; Reibman, Joan; Berger, Kenneth I; Goldring, Roberta; Stellman, Steven D; Farfel, Mark

    2012-06-01

    We assessed associations between new-onset (post-September 11, 2001 [9/11]) lower respiratory symptoms reported on 2 surveys, administered 3 years apart, and acute and chronic 9/11-related exposures among New York City World Trade Center-area residents and workers enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. World Trade Center-area residents and workers were categorized as case participants or control participants on the basis of lower respiratory symptoms reported in surveys administered 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 years after 9/11. We created composite exposure scales after principal components analyses of detailed exposure histories obtained during face-to-face interviews. We used multivariate logistic regression models to determine associations between lower respiratory symptoms and composite exposure scales. Both acute and chronic exposures to the events of 9/11 were independently associated, often in a dose-dependent manner, with lower respiratory symptoms among individuals who lived and worked in the area of the World Trade Center. Study findings argue for detailed assessments of exposure during and after events in the future from which potentially toxic materials may be released and for rapid interventions to minimize exposures and screen for potential adverse health effects.

  9. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Morakinyo, Oyewale Mayowa; Mokgobu, Matlou Ingrid; Mukhola, Murembiwa Stanley; Hunter, Raymond Paul

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or) keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality. PMID:27314370

  10. Buprenorphine prescribing practices and exposures reported to a poison center--Utah, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-12-14

    Buprenorphine is an effective medication for the treatment of opioid dependence. Its use has increased in the United States as a result of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000, which allowed physicians to prescribe certain medications as part of office-based treatment for opioid addiction. In France, widespread use of medication-assisted therapy, primarily buprenorphine treatment, was associated with an 80% decrease in overdose deaths from heroin or cocaine from 465 in 1996 to 89 in 2003. With the expanded use of buprenorphine, an increase in exposures among children and adults has been reported in the United States. These exposures (including unintentional and intentional, therapeutic and nontherapeutic) have resulted in adverse effects and, in a small number of cases, death. To assess statewide increases in buprenorphine use and the number of reported exposures, the Utah Department of Health analyzed data from the Utah Controlled Substance Database (CSD) and the Utah Poison Control Center (PCC). The results of that analysis indicated a statewide increase in the annual number of patients prescribed buprenorphine from 22 in 2002 to 9,793 in 2011, and a concurrent increase in the annual number of prescribers writing buprenorphine prescriptions from 16 to 1,088. Over the same period, the number of exposures to buprenorphine reported annually to the PCC increased from six to 81. However, comparison of the ratios of buprenorphine exposures to patients and prescribers in 2002 with data for 2011 indicated substantial decreases from 6/22 for patients and 6/16 for prescribers in 2002 to 81/9,793 for patients and 81/1,088 for prescribers in 2011. Three of the total 462 buprenorphine exposures reported during 2002-2011 in Utah, in a teen and two adults, were associated with fatal outcomes. Increased buprenorphine prescribing in Utah during 2002-2011 likely represents expanded access to critically needed opioid addiction treatment; however, safeguards should be in place

  11. Exposures among Pregnant Women near the World Trade Center Site on 11 September 2001

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Mary S.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Lioy, Paul J.; Santella, Regina M.; Wang, Richard Y.; Jones, Robert L.; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman E.; Li, Wei; Georgopoulos, Panos; Berkowitz, Gertrud S.

    2005-01-01

    We have characterized environmental exposures among 187 women who were pregnant, were at or near the World Trade Center (WTC) on or soon after 11 September 2001, and are enrolled in a prospective cohort study of health effects. Exposures were assessed by estimating time spent in five zones around the WTC and by developing an exposure index (EI) based on plume reconstruction modeling. The daily reconstructed dust levels were correlated with levels of particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5; r = 0.68) or PM10 (r = 0.73–0.93) reported from 26 September through 8 October 2001 at four of six sites near the WTC whose data we examined. Biomarkers were measured in a subset. Most (71%) of these women were located within eight blocks of the WTC at 0900 hr on 11 September, and 12 women were in one of the two WTC towers. Daily EIs were determined to be highest immediately after 11 September and became much lower but remained highly variable over the next 4 weeks. The weekly summary EI was associated strongly with women’s perception of air quality from week 2 to week 4 after the collapse (p < 0.0001). The highest levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon–deoxyribonucleic acid (PAH-DNA) adducts were seen among women whose blood was collected sooner after 11 September, but levels showed no significant associations with EI or other potential WTC exposure sources. Lead and cobalt in urine were weakly correlated with ∑EI, but not among samples collected closest to 11 September. Plasma OC levels were low. The median polychlorinated biphenyl level (sum of congeners 118, 138, 153, 180) was 84 ng/g lipid and had a nonsignificant positive association with ∑EI (p > 0.05). 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-Heptachlorodibenzodioxin levels (median, 30 pg/g lipid) were similar to levels reported in WTC-exposed firefighters but were not associated with EI. This report indicates intense bystander exposure after the WTC collapse and provides information about nonoccupational

  12. Exposures among pregnant women near the World Trade Center site on 11 September 2001.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Mary S; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Lioy, Paul J; Santella, Regina M; Wang, Richard Y; Jones, Robert L; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman E; Li, Wei; Georgopoulos, Panos; Berkowitz, Gertrud S

    2005-06-01

    We have characterized environmental exposures among 187 women who were pregnant, were at or near the World Trade Center (WTC) on or soon after 11 September 2001, and are enrolled in a prospective cohort study of health effects. Exposures were assessed by estimating time spent in five zones around the WTC and by developing an exposure index (EI) based on plume reconstruction modeling. The daily reconstructed dust levels were correlated with levels of particulate matter < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5; r = 0.68) or PM10 (r = 0.73-0.93) reported from 26 September through 8 October 2001 at four of six sites near the WTC whose data we examined. Biomarkers were measured in a subset. Most (71%) of these women were located within eight blocks of the WTC at 0900 hr on 11 September, and 12 women were in one of the two WTC towers. Daily EIs were determined to be highest immediately after 11 September and became much lower but remained highly variable over the next 4 weeks. The weekly summary EI was associated strongly with women's perception of air quality from week 2 to week 4 after the collapse (p < 0.0001). The highest levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-deoxyribonucleic acid (PAH-DNA) adducts were seen among women whose blood was collected sooner after 11 September, but levels showed no significant associations with EI or other potential WTC exposure sources. Lead and cobalt in urine were weakly correlated with sigmaEI, but not among samples collected closest to 11 September. Plasma OC levels were low. The median polychlorinated biphenyl level (sum of congeners 118, 138, 153, 180) was 84 ng/g lipid and had a nonsignificant positive association with sigmaEI (p > 0.05). 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-Heptachlorodibenzodioxin levels (median, 30 pg/g lipid) were similar to levels reported in WTC-exposed firefighters but were not associated with EI. This report indicates intense bystander exposure after the WTC collapse and provides information about nonoccupational

  13. Time of farmers' exposure to biological factors in agricultural working environment.

    PubMed

    Mołocznik, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Working time in conditions of exposure to hazardous factors is an important element indispensable for the evaluation of human exposure in the working environment. Agricultural work is accompanied by co-occurrence of many risk factors threatening farmers' health, e.g. dust, elements of the thermal environment, noise, vibration, chemical and biological agents. Biological factors cause diseases with contagious, allergic or immuno-toxic backgrounds which constitute the majority of farmers' occupational diseases registered in Poland. Exposure to hazardous factors in agricultural working environment is due to contact with plants, animals and organic wastes, more precisely--with microbes, plant and animal particles present in aerogenic agricultural dust, as well as pathogens of contagious and invasive diseases present in contaminated soil, water and plants. Data concerning the duration of farmers' exposure to biological and other factors of the working environment were obtained with the use of the Private Farmer Work Chart. Time-schedule observations concerned an annual work cycle. The study covered 30 farms with the following production profiles: plant (Group A), animal (Group B) and mixed production (Group C). The total working time was: in Group A - from 106-163 % of the legal working time; in Group B - from 75-147 %; in Group C - from 136-167 %. Among 48 work activities contributing to the full working cycle among the farmers examined, 15 activities were accompanied by 5 factors. These were mainly field activities which covered plant harvesting and fertilizing, chemical plant protection, as well as cultivation activities. Agricultural dust and elements of the thermal environment were the environmental factors most frequently accompanying agricultural work, followed by contact with biological factors, noise, vibration, and chemical agents. Biological factors are a specific element associated with 19 work activities, mainly the spreading of manure, animal breeding and

  14. Biological monitoring in occupational exposure to low levels of 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, S; Perbellini, L; Soleo, L; Manno, M; Foà, V

    2004-04-01

    Exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD), a probable carcinogen to humans, was investigated in two groups of subjects working in a petrochemical plant where BD is produced and used to prepare polymers: 42 occupationally exposed workers and 43 internal non-occupationally exposed controls. BD personal exposure was very low but significantly different in the two groups (median airborne BD 1.5 and 0.4 microg/m(3) in exposed and controls, respectively). Similarly, BD in blood and urine, but not in exhaled air, was higher in the exposed workers than in controls (blood BD 3.7 ng/l versus <1.8 ng/l, urinary BD 2.4 ng/l versus <1.0 ng/l). These three biomarkers correlated significantly with personal exposure ( 0.283 < or = Pearson's r < or = 0.383) and between them (0.780 < or = r < or = 0.896). Excretion of urinary mercapturic acids N-acetyl-S-(3,4-hydroxybutyl)-l-cysteine (MI), N-acetyl-S-(1-hydroxymethyl-2-propenyl)-l-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxy-3-butenyl)-l-cysteine (MII), chromosomal aberrations (CA), and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral blood lymphocytes were not influenced by occupational exposure. Our results show that unmetabolised BD in biological fluids, and particularly urinary BD, represents the biomarker of choice for assessing occupational exposure to low airborne concentrations of BD.

  15. Biologically based modeling of multimedia, multipathway, multiroute population exposures to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Panos G.; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Yu-Ching; Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G.; Mccurdy, Thomas; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an integrated, biologically based, source-to-dose assessment framework for modeling multimedia/multipathway/multiroute exposures to arsenic. Case studies demonstrating this framework are presented for three US counties (Hunderton County, NJ; Pima County, AZ; and Franklin County, OH), representing substantially different conditions of exposure. The approach taken utilizes the Modeling ENvironment for TOtal Risk studies (MENTOR) in an implementation that incorporates and extends the approach pioneered by Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS), in conjunction with a number of available databases, including NATA, NHEXAS, CSFII, and CHAD, and extends modeling techniques that have been developed in recent years. Model results indicate that, in most cases, the food intake pathway is the dominant contributor to total exposure and dose to arsenic. Model predictions are evaluated qualitatively by comparing distributions of predicted total arsenic amounts in urine with those derived using biomarker measurements from the NHEXAS — Region V study: the population distributions of urinary total arsenic levels calculated through MENTOR and from the NHEXAS measurements are in general qualitative agreement. Observed differences are due to various factors, such as interindividual variation in arsenic metabolism in humans, that are not fully accounted for in the current model implementation but can be incorporated in the future, in the open framework of MENTOR. The present study demonstrates that integrated source-to-dose modeling for arsenic can not only provide estimates of the relative contributions of multipathway exposure routes to the total exposure estimates, but can also estimate internal target tissue doses for speciated organic and inorganic arsenic, which can eventually be used to improve evaluation of health risks associated with exposures to arsenic from multiple sources, routes, and pathways. PMID:18073786

  16. Biologically based modeling of multimedia, multipathway, multiroute population exposures to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Panos G; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Yu-Ching; Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; McCurdy, Thomas; Ozkaynak, Halûk

    2008-09-01

    This article presents an integrated, biologically based, source-to-dose assessment framework for modeling multimedia/multipathway/multiroute exposures to arsenic. Case studies demonstrating this framework are presented for three US counties (Hunderton County, NJ; Pima County, AZ; and Franklin County, OH), representing substantially different conditions of exposure. The approach taken utilizes the Modeling ENvironment for TOtal Risk studies (MENTOR) in an implementation that incorporates and extends the approach pioneered by Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS), in conjunction with a number of available databases, including NATA, NHEXAS, CSFII, and CHAD, and extends modeling techniques that have been developed in recent years. Model results indicate that, in most cases, the food intake pathway is the dominant contributor to total exposure and dose to arsenic. Model predictions are evaluated qualitatively by comparing distributions of predicted total arsenic amounts in urine with those derived using biomarker measurements from the NHEXAS--Region V study: the population distributions of urinary total arsenic levels calculated through MENTOR and from the NHEXAS measurements are in general qualitative agreement. Observed differences are due to various factors, such as interindividual variation in arsenic metabolism in humans, that are not fully accounted for in the current model implementation but can be incorporated in the future, in the open framework of MENTOR. The present study demonstrates that integrated source-to-dose modeling for arsenic can not only provide estimates of the relative contributions of multipathway exposure routes to the total exposure estimates, but can also estimate internal target tissue doses for speciated organic and inorganic arsenic, which can eventually be used to improve evaluation of health risks associated with exposures to arsenic from multiple sources, routes, and pathways.

  17. The role of public biological resource centers in providing a basic infrastructure for microbial research.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Danielle; Arahal, David R; Bizet, Chantal; Garay, Esperanza

    2010-01-01

    Public collections of microorganisms have been established since the late 19th century, and currently 573 service collections are registered at the World Data Center for Microorganisms (www.wdcm.org). All together, they hold more than 1.5 million microorganisms. By implementing guidelines compiled by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), many public service collections evolve into professional ex situ repositories of biodiversity and distribution nodes for known, validated and precisely identified microbial resources and associated information to legitimate end-users. These Biological Resource Centers (BRCs) may be the preferred mechanism for the appropriate exploitation of microbial resources by offering the guarantee of accessibility and of transparency of supply, taking into account all relevant regulations and stakeholders' rights, as required by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Scientists are encouraged to deposit researched microbial material at public BRCs to contribute to the Science (semi-) Commons and maximize the impact of prior knowledge. BRCs are essential infrastructures supporting the future of life sciences and biotechnology.

  18. Biological and health effects of exposure to kerosene-based jet fuels and performance additives.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Glenn; Still, Kenneth; Rossi, John; Bekkedal, Marni; Bobb, Andrew; Arfsten, Darryl

    2003-01-01

    performance additives, and other environmental exposure factors may result in unpredicted toxicity. While there is little epidemiological evidence for fuel-induced death, cancer, or other serious organic disease in fuel-exposed workers, large numbers of self-reported health complaints in this cohort appear to justify study of more subtle health consequences. A number of recently published studies reported acute or persisting biological or health effects from acute, subchronic, or chronic exposure of humans or animals to kerosene-based hydrocarbon fuels, to constituent chemicals of these fuels, or to fuel combustion products. This review provides an in-depth summary of human, animal, and in vitro studies of biological or health effects from exposure to JP-8, JP-8 +100, JP-5, Jet A, Jet A-1, or kerosene.

  19. Biological and behavioral factors modify biomarkers of arsenic exposure in a U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Rebecca L; Hudgens, Edward E; Carty, Cara; He, Bin; Le, X Chris; Rogers, John; Thomas, David J

    2013-10-01

    Although consumption of drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is usually considered the primary exposure route, aggregate exposure to arsenic depends on direct consumption of water, use of water in food preparation, and the presence in arsenicals in foods. To gain insight into the effects of biological and behavioral factors on arsenic exposure, we determined arsenic concentrations in urine and toenails in a U.S. population that uses public or private water supplies containing inorganic arsenic. Study participants were 904 adult residents of Churchill County, Nevada, whose home tap water supplies contained <3 to about 1200 µg of arsenic per liter. Biomarkers of exposure for this study were summed urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites (speciated arsenical), of all urinary arsenicals (total arsenical), and of all toenail arsenicals (total arsenical). Increased tap water arsenic concentration and consumption were associated with significant upward trends for urinary speciated and total and toenail total arsenical concentrations. Significant gender differences in concentrations of speciated and total arsenicals in urine and toenails reflected male-female difference in water intake. Both recent and higher habitual seafood consumption significantly increased urinary total but not speciated arsenical concentration. In a stepwise general linear model, seafood consumption significantly predicted urinary total arsenical but not urinary speciated or toenail total arsenical concentrations. Smoking behavior significantly predicted urinary speciated or total arsenical concentration. Gender, tap water arsenic concentration, and primary drinking water source significantly predicted urinary speciated and total concentrations and toenail total arsenical concentrations. These findings confirm the primacy of home tap water as a determinant of arsenic concentration in urine and toenails. However, biological and behavioral factors can

  20. Comparison of Unintentional Exposures to Codeine and Hydrocodone Reported to Texas Poison Centers.

    PubMed

    Day, Lindsay; Kleinschmidt, Kurt; Forrester, Mathias B; Feng, Sing-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Hydrocodone has recently been reclassified as a Schedule II drug by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration and Food and Drug Administration in order to curtail prescription drug abuse. There is concern that analgesic substitutes, such as codeine, will not be as safe or effective. The purpose of this study is to compare the demographics, adverse events, and medical outcomes of patients who had unintentional hydrocodone or codeine exposures through the use of a state's poison center database. The Texas Poison Center Network's database was utilized to find all reported unintentional ingestions or adverse reactions of products containing codeine or hydrocodone. Comparisons were made between the two medications by calculating the rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Children aged 5 years or younger were more exposed to codeine (51.6%). Hydrocodone exposures had more serious outcomes (11% vs. 9%; RR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.73-0.91) and had more nausea (7.1% vs. 2.8%; RR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.32-0.48) and vomiting (6.5% vs. 3.3%; RR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.43-0.62). Hydrocodone had a higher rate of intravenous fluids administration (2.4% vs. 1.7%; RR = 0.71; 95% CI 0.54-0.92) and antiemetics (0.4% vs. 0.1%; RR = 0.23; 95% CI 0.08-0.64). Codeine was more closely associated with dermal reactions and patients were given antihistamines (2.5% vs. 1.3%; RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.46-2.41) more frequently. Cardiovascular side effects, ataxia, and headache occurred equally between the groups. Both drugs had a wide array of reported side effects, but the overall incidence of serious outcomes was low. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Report from the Third Annual Symposium of the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Brunschweiger, Andreas

    2014-08-15

    The third Annual Symposium of the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology was held at Ringberg castle, May 21-24, 2014. At this meeting 45 scientists from Japan and Germany presented the latest results from their research spanning a broad range of topics in chemical biology and glycobiology.

  2. Asthma control in adolescents 10 to 11 y after exposure to the World Trade Center disaster.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Lisa M; Thomas, Pauline A; Stellman, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about asthma control in adolescents who were exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks of 11 September 2001 and diagnosed with asthma after 9/11. This report examines asthma and asthma control 10-11 y after 9/11 among exposed adolescents. The WTC Health Registry adolescent Wave 3 survey (2011-2012) collected data on asthma diagnosed by a physician after 11 September 2001, extent of asthma control based on modified National Asthma Education and Prevention Program criteria, probable mental health conditions, and behavior problems. Parents reported healthcare needs and 9/11-exposures. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between asthma and level of asthma control and 9/11-exposure, mental health and behavioral problems, and unmet healthcare needs. Poorly/very poorly controlled asthma was significantly associated with a household income of ≤$75,000 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-8.8), having unmet healthcare needs (AOR: 6.2; 95% CI: 1.4-27.1), and screening positive for at least one mental health condition (AOR: 5.0; 95% CI: 1.4-17.7), but not with behavioral problems. The impact of having at least one mental health condition on the level of asthma control was substantially greater in females than in males. Comprehensive care of post-9/11 asthma in adolescents should include management of mental health-related comorbidities.

  3. ONE AIRWAY: BIOMARKERS OF PROTECTION FROM UPPER AND LOWER AIRWAY INJURY AFTER WORLD TRADE CENTER EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soo Jung; Echevarria, Ghislaine C.; Kwon, Sophia; Naveed, Bushra; Schenck, Edward J; Tsukiji, Jun; Rom, William N.; Prezant, David J.; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Firefighters exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust have developed chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and abnormal forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Overlapping but distinct immune responses may be responsible for the clinical manifestations of upper and lower airway injury. We investigated whether a panel of inflammatory cytokines, either associated or not associated with WTC-LI, can predict future chronic rhinosinusitis disease and its severity. Methods Serum obtained within six months of 9/11/2001 from 179 WTC exposed firefighters presenting for subspecialty evaluation prior to 3/2008 was assayed for 39 cytokines. The main outcomes were medically managed CRS (N=62) and more severe CRS cases requiring sinus surgery (N=14). We tested biomarker-CRS severity association using ordinal logistic regression analysis. Results Increasing serum IL-6, IL-8, GRO and neutrophil concentration reduced the risk of CRS progression. Conversely, increasing TNF-α increased the risk of progression. In a multivariable model adjusted for exposure intensity, increasing IL-6, TNF-α and neutrophil concentration remained significant predictors of progression. Elevated IL-6 levels and neutrophil counts also reduced the risk of abnormal FEV1 but in contrast to CRS, increased TNF-α did not increase the risk of abnormal FEV1. Conclusions Our study demonstrates both independent and overlapping biomarker associations with upper and lower respiratory injury, and suggests that the innate immune response may play a protective role against CRS and abnormal lung function in those with WTC exposure. PMID:24290899

  4. Cosmic radiation exposure of biological test systems during the EXPOSE-E mission.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Körner, Christine; Vanhavere, Filip; Reitz, Günther

    2012-05-01

    In the frame of the EXPOSE-E mission on the Columbus external payload facility EuTEF on board the International Space Station, passive thermoluminescence dosimeters were applied to measure the radiation exposure of biological samples. The detectors were located either as stacks next to biological specimens to determine the depth dose distribution or beneath the sample carriers to determine the dose levels for maximum shielding. The maximum mission dose measured in the upper layer of the depth dose part of the experiment amounted to 238±10 mGy, which relates to an average dose rate of 408±16 μGy/d. In these stacks of about 8 mm height, the dose decreased by 5-12% with depth. The maximum dose measured beneath the sample carriers was 215±16 mGy, which amounts to an average dose rate of 368±27 μGy/d. These values are close to those assessed for the interior of the Columbus module and demonstrate the high shielding of the biological experiments within the EXPOSE-E facility. Besides the shielding by the EXPOSE-E hardware itself, additional shielding was experienced by the external structures adjacent to EXPOSE-E, such as EuTEF and Columbus. This led to a dose gradient over the entire exposure area, from 215±16 mGy for the lowest to 121±6 mGy for maximum shielding. Hence, the doses perceived by the biological samples inside EXPOSE-E varied by 70% (from lowest to highest dose). As a consequence of the high shielding, the biological samples were predominantly exposed to galactic cosmic heavy ions, while electrons and a significant fraction of protons of the radiation belts and solar wind did not reach the samples.

  5. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ''biological Bragg curve'' is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta, et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called "overkill".

  6. Cosmic Radiation Exposure of Biological Test Systems During the EXPOSE-E Mission

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Körner, Christine; Vanhavere, Filip; Reitz, Günther

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the frame of the EXPOSE-E mission on the Columbus external payload facility EuTEF on board the International Space Station, passive thermoluminescence dosimeters were applied to measure the radiation exposure of biological samples. The detectors were located either as stacks next to biological specimens to determine the depth dose distribution or beneath the sample carriers to determine the dose levels for maximum shielding. The maximum mission dose measured in the upper layer of the depth dose part of the experiment amounted to 238±10 mGy, which relates to an average dose rate of 408±16 μGy/d. In these stacks of about 8 mm height, the dose decreased by 5–12% with depth. The maximum dose measured beneath the sample carriers was 215±16 mGy, which amounts to an average dose rate of 368±27 μGy/d. These values are close to those assessed for the interior of the Columbus module and demonstrate the high shielding of the biological experiments within the EXPOSE-E facility. Besides the shielding by the EXPOSE-E hardware itself, additional shielding was experienced by the external structures adjacent to EXPOSE-E, such as EuTEF and Columbus. This led to a dose gradient over the entire exposure area, from 215±16 mGy for the lowest to 121±6 mGy for maximum shielding. Hence, the doses perceived by the biological samples inside EXPOSE-E varied by 70% (from lowest to highest dose). As a consequence of the high shielding, the biological samples were predominantly exposed to galactic cosmic heavy ions, while electrons and a significant fraction of protons of the radiation belts and solar wind did not reach the samples. Key Words: Space radiation—Dosimetry—Passive radiation detectors—Thermoluminescence—EXPOSE-E. Astrobiology 12, 387–392. PMID:22680685

  7. Previous exposure to the World Trade Center terrorist attack and posttraumatic symptoms among older adults following Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Shrira, Amit; Palgi, Yuval; Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Goodwin, Robin; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2014-01-01

    The present study tested the maturation and inoculation hypotheses by examining whether age and previous exposure to the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) terrorist attack moderated the relationship between degree of exposure to Hurricane Sandy and related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. An online sample of 1,000 participants from affected states completed self-report questionnaires one month after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast. Participants reported their degree of exposure to the WTC terrorist attack and to Hurricane Sandy, and their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following Hurricane Sandy. The positive relationship between degree of exposure to Hurricane Sandy and level of PTSD symptoms was weaker among older adults. An additional significant three-way interaction suggested that both age and previous exposure to the WTC terrorist attack moderated the relationship between degree of exposure to Hurricane Sandy and level of PTSD symptoms. Previous high degree of exposure to the WTC terrorist attack was related to a weaker effect of current exposure to Hurricane Sandy on PTSD symptoms among older adults. However, among younger adults, previous high degree of exposure to the WTC terrorist attack was related to a stronger effect of current exposure on PTSD symptoms. When confronted by a natural disaster, American older adults are generally resilient. Supporting the inoculation hypothesis, resilience of older adults may be partly related to the strength successfully extracted from previous exposure to adverse events.

  8. [Exposure of ventilation system cleaning workers to harmful biological and chemical agents].

    PubMed

    Gołofit-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Jezewska, Anna; Ławniczek-Wałczyk, Anna; Górny, Rafał L

    2012-01-01

    Regular checking on the cleanliness of the ventilation systems, as well as their periodic cleaning and, if necessary, disinfection are for the proper maintenance of each system. During maintenance operations (repairs, cleaning, filter replacement), workers are at risks associated with exposure to hazardous chemicals and harmful biological agents. In ventilation systems there are usually favorable conditions for the development of microorganisms, mainly bacteria and fungi, due to surfaces contaminated with dust particles or increased humidity caused by ventilation ducts, air filters, thermal insulation, noise dampers, air coolers, etc. Workers who perform cleaning and disinfection operations on ventilation systems are exposed to chemical agents through contacts with contaminants released from sealing materials, adhesives, fireproof lining and insulating materials, volatile organic compounds present in air filters, noise dampers and insulating materials, as well as with cleaning agents and disinfectants. Exposure to harmful chemical and biological agents may induce adverse health effects ranging from allergic reactions and irritation through infections to toxic reactions and other non-specific symptoms. Due to lack of studies on the exposure of this group of workers, employers face great difficulties in identifying hazards, which prevent them from performing an occupational risk assessment.

  9. Climate change and occupational allergies: an overview on biological pollution, exposure and prevention.

    PubMed

    D'Ovidio, Maria Concetta; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; D'Amato, Gennaro; Cecchi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Climate change, air pollution, temperature increase and other environmental variables are modifying air quality, contributing to the increase of prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases. Allergies are complex diseases characterized by multilevel interactions between individual susceptibility, response to immune modulation and environmental exposures to physical, chemical and biological agents. Occupational allergies introduce a further complexity to these relationships by adding occupational exposure to both the indoor and outdoor ones in the living environment. The aim of this paper is to overview climate-related allergy affecting environmental and occupational health, as literature data are scanty in this regard, and to suggest a management model of this risk based on a multidisciplinary approach, taking the case of biological pollution, with details on exposure and prevention. The management of climate-related occupational allergy should take into account preventive health strategies, environmental, public and occupational interventions, as well as to develop, implement, evaluate, and improve guidelines and standards protecting workers health under changing climatic conditions; new tools and strategies based on local conditions will have to be developed. Experimental studies and acquisition of environmental and personal data have to be matched to derive useful information for the scope of occupational health and safety.

  10. Excretion of lead and its biological activity several years after termination of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Přerovská, I.; Teisinger, J.

    1970-01-01

    Přerovská, and Teisinger, J. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 352-355. Excretion of lead and its biological activity several years after termination of exposure. A group of 27 persons who had been treated some years previously for chronic lead poisoning at our clinic, and who had not come into occupational contact with lead since, was examined. Half of them had had no occupational exposure to lead for 3 to 5 years and the others for 8 to 17 years. In most of these persons there is still an increased lead excretion, originating from an increased deposit in the bones. The mobilization test after calcium versenate (CaEDTA) injection was greater than 0·350 mg/24 hours. The values found for haemoglobin, punctate basophilia, coproporphyrin and ALA in urine were normal, but there was, in all cases, a decreased ALA-D activity. This finding suggests biological activity of such negligible lead flow many years after termination of exposure. PMID:5488694

  11. Investigation of human exposure to triclocarban after showering and preliminary evaluation of its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Inceoglu, Bora; Ahn, Ki Chang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-04-01

    The antibacterial soap additive triclocarban (TCC) is widely used in personal care products. TCC has a high environmental persistence. We developed and validated a sensitive online solid-phase extraction-LC-MS/MS method to rapidly analyze TCC and its major metabolites in urine and other biological samples to assess human exposure. We measured human urine concentrations 0-72 h after showering with a commercial bar soap containing 0.6% TCC. The major route of renal elimination was excretion as N-glucuronides. The absorption was estimated at 0.6% of the 70±15 mg of TCC in the soap used. The TCC-N-glucuronide urine concentration varied widely among the subjects, and continuous daily use of the soap led to steady state levels of excretion. In order to assess potential biological effects arising from this exposure, we screened TCC for the inhibition of human enzymes in vitro. We demonstrate that TCC is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), whereas TCC's major metabolites lack strong inhibitory activity. Topical administration of TCC at similar levels to rats in a preliminary in vivo study, however, failed to alter plasma biomarkers of sEH activity. Overall the analytical strategy described here revealed that use of TCC soap causes exposure levels that warrant further evaluation.

  12. Influence of exposure to pesticides on telomere length in tobacco farmers: A biology system approach.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Vivian Francília Silva; da Silva, Juliana; da Silva, Fernanda Rabaioli

    Various pesticides in the form of mixtures must be used to keep tobacco crops pest-free. Recent studies have shown a link between occupational exposure to pesticides in tobacco crops and increased damage to the DNA, mononuclei, nuclear buds and binucleated cells in buccal cells as well as micronuclei in lymphocytes. Furthermore, pesticides used specifically for tobacco crops shorten telomere length (TL) significantly. However, the molecular mechanism of pesticide action on telomere length is not fully understood. Our study evaluated the interaction between a complex mixture of chemical compounds (tobacco cultivation pesticides plus nicotine) and proteins associated with maintaining TL, as well as the biological processes involved in this exposure by System Biology tools to provide insight regarding the influence of pesticide exposure on TL maintenance in tobacco farmers. Our analysis showed that one cluster was associated with TL proteins that act in bioprocesses such as (i) telomere maintenance via telomere lengthening; (ii) senescence; (iii) age-dependent telomere shortening; (iv) DNA repair (v) cellular response to stress and (vi) regulation of proteasome ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process. We also describe how pesticides and nicotine regulate telomere length. In addition, pesticides inhibit the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and consequently increase proteins of the shelterin complex, avoiding the access of telomerase in telomere and, nicotine activates UPS mechanisms and promotes the degradation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), decreasing telomerase activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of surface wipe sampling compared to biologic monitoring for occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kibby, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The potential for adverse health effects from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) is well known. Control measures recommended by the NIOSH Alert ([3]) include medical and biologic monitoring, and environmental monitoring where available. At present no guidelines or published best practices exist to guide EHS managers on how to carry out this biologic or environmental monitoring. Studies investigating surface wipe sampling for AD have been numerous in the past decade, but very limited research exists to correlate surface contamination with actual absorption by pharmacists and nurses. This article reviews the studies with concurrent surface wipe sampling and urine monitoring for the same AD, and tests their correlation. Methodologic limitations are reviewed. Twenty-one studies were identified that concurrently measured surface contamination by AD by wipe sampling and AD absorption by urine monitoring. Two studies directly evaluated the AD by wipe sampling and urine levels and neither found a statistically significant correlation. Six studies reported a decrease in both surface and urine levels following interventions to reduce contamination or exposure. Only one study directly evaluated the personal protective equipment and handling techniques employed by the studied workers, which can be viewed as a major confounder of absorption. While no statistically significant correlation was found between wipe sampling and urine monitoring for AD, decreases in urine and wipe levels following interventions to reduce exposure were noted. Limitations in the data and recommendations for future research are reviewed.

  14. Respirable dust and silica exposure among World Trade Center cleanup workers.

    PubMed

    Pavilonis, Brian T; Mirer, Franklin E

    2017-03-01

    The cleanup effort following the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) was unprecedented and involved removal of 1.8 million tons of rubble over a nine-month period. Work at the site occurred 24 hr a day, 7 days a week and involved thousands of workers during the process. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) conducted personal and area exposure sampling during the cleanup of the site. Secondary data analysis was performed on OSHA air sampling data for respirable dust and silica from September 2001 to June 2002 at the WTC recovery site to characterize workers' exposure. Results for silica and respirable particulate were stratified by area and personal samples as well as job task for analysis. Of 1108 samples included in the analysis, 693 were personal and 415 were area. The mean result for personal silica samples was 42 μg/m(3) (Range: 4.2-1800 μg/m(3)). Workers identified as drillers had the highest mean silica exposure (72 μg/m(3); range: 5.8-800 μg/m(3)) followed by workers identified as dock builders (67 μg/m(3); range: 5.8-670 μg/m(3)). The mean result for personal samples for respirable particulate was 0.44 mg/m(3) (range: 0.00010-13 mg/m(3)). There were no discernable trends in personal respirable dust and silica concentrations with date.

  15. The role of molecular biology in the biomonitoring of human exposure to chemicals.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Balam; Albores, Arnulfo

    2010-11-12

    Exposure to different substances in an occupational environment is of utmost concern to global agencies such as the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization. Interest in improving work health conditions, particularly of those employees exposed to noxious chemicals, has increased considerably and has stimulated the search for new, more specific and selective tests. Recently, the field of molecular biology has been indicated as an alternative technique for monitoring personnel while evaluating work-related pathologies. Originally, occupational exposure to environmental toxicants was assessed using biochemical techniques to determine the presence of higher concentrations of toxic compounds in blood, urine, or other fluids or tissues; results were used to evaluate potential health risk. However, this approach only estimates the presence of a noxious chemical and its effects, but does not prevent or diminish the risk. Molecular biology methods have become very useful in occupational medicine to provide more accurate and opportune diagnostics. In this review, we discuss the role of the following common techniques: (1) Use of cell cultures; (2) evaluation of gene expression; (3) the "omic" sciences (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) and (4) bioinformatics. We suggest that molecular biology has many applications in occupational health where the data can be applied to general environmental conditions.

  16. Airborne exposure limits for chemical and biological warfare agents: is everything set and clear?

    PubMed

    Sabelnikov, Alex; Zhukov, Vladimir; Kempf, C Ruth

    2006-08-01

    Emergency response strategies (guidelines) for biological, chemical, nuclear, or radiological terrorist events should be based on scientifically established exposure limits for all the agents or materials involved. In the case of a radiological terrorist event, emergency response guidelines (ERG) have been worked out. In the case of a terrorist event with the use of chemical warfare (CW) agents the situation is not that clear, though the new guidelines and clean-up values are being generated based on re-evaluation of toxicological and risk data. For biological warfare (BW) agents, such guidelines do not yet exist. In this paper the current status of airborne exposure limits (AELs) for chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents are reviewed. Particular emphasis is put on BW agents that lack such data. An efficient, temporary solution to bridge the gap in experimental infectious data and to set provisional AELs for BW agents is suggested. It is based on mathematically generated risks of infection for BW agents grouped by their alleged ID50 values in three categories: with low, intermediate and high ID50 values.

  17. The Role of Molecular Biology in the Biomonitoring of Human Exposure to Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Balam; Albores, Arnulfo

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to different substances in an occupational environment is of utmost concern to global agencies such as the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization. Interest in improving work health conditions, particularly of those employees exposed to noxious chemicals, has increased considerably and has stimulated the search for new, more specific and selective tests. Recently, the field of molecular biology has been indicated as an alternative technique for monitoring personnel while evaluating work-related pathologies. Originally, occupational exposure to environmental toxicants was assessed using biochemical techniques to determine the presence of higher concentrations of toxic compounds in blood, urine, or other fluids or tissues; results were used to evaluate potential health risk. However, this approach only estimates the presence of a noxious chemical and its effects, but does not prevent or diminish the risk. Molecular biology methods have become very useful in occupational medicine to provide more accurate and opportune diagnostics. In this review, we discuss the role of the following common techniques: (1) Use of cell cultures; (2) evaluation of gene expression; (3) the “omic” sciences (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) and (4) bioinformatics. We suggest that molecular biology has many applications in occupational health where the data can be applied to general environmental conditions. PMID:21151453

  18. NCI Symposium on Chromosome Biology to bring together internationally renowned experts in the fields of chromosome structure and function | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research’s Center of Excellence in Chromosome Biology is hosting the “Nuclear Structure, Genome Integrity and Cancer Symposium“ on November 30 - December 1, 2016 at the Natcher Conference Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Learn more ...

  19. Formate in urine as a biological indicator of formaldehyde exposure: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Boeniger, M.F.

    1987-11-01

    The presence of a small amount of endogenously derived formate in human urine is normal; however, formate derived from the metabolism of formaldehyde, several other industrial compounds and some pharmaceuticals may elevate the urine formate concentration above the normally expected values. This elevation in the urine formate concentration presents the possibility of using this as a tool for monitoring exposure to chemicals. Unfortunately, the use of urine formate as a technique for monitoring personal chemical exposure has yet to be evaluated. This review identifies several potentially important variables that could alter the extent to which formate is eliminated through the urine and that could affect the accuracy of using urine formate concentration as an indicator of chemical exposure. Some potentially important confounders that have been identified, but not evaluated adequately, include dietary intake, nutritional status and exposure to cigarette smoke. Furthermore, the metabolism and elimination kinetics have yet to be adequately demonstrated in humans. Without having controlled for potential confounders in previous pharmacokinetic studies, it is unknown whether or not the large range and variation observed in human studies is due to the confounders or to innate individual variability. Given the poor understanding of the normal variation of formate concentration in the urine, the use of it as a biological indicator of chemical exposure becomes questionable. Without appreciable skin penetration, as in this case, the reliance upon air monitoring alone may be more practical. The evidence at this time suggests that the use of urine formate to monitor chemical exposure offers a broad opportunity for investigative research. 82 references.

  20. Biological monitoring and questionnaire for assessing exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates in a multicenter European field study.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Liesivuori, J; Pennanen, S; Vergieva, T; van Amelsvoort, Lgpm; Bosetti, C; Van Loveren, H; Colosio, C

    2008-09-01

    This study deals with pesticide exposure profile in some European countries with a specific focus on ethylenebisdithiocarbamates (EBDC). In all, 55 Bulgarian greenhouse workers, 51 Finnish potato farmers, 48 Italian vineyard workers, 42 Dutch floriculture farmers, and 52 Bulgarian zineb producers entered the study. Each group was matched with a group of not occupationally exposed subjects. Exposure data were gained through self-administered questionnaires and measuring ethylenethiourea (ETU) in two spot urine samples collected, respectively, before the beginning of seasonal exposure (T0), and after 30 days, at the end of the exposure period (T30). Controls underwent a similar protocol. Study agriculture workers were involved in mixing and loading pesticides, application of pesticide mixture with mechanical or manual equipments, re-entry activities, and cleaning equipments. Chemical workers were involved in synthesis, quality controls, and packing activities. The number of pesticides to whom these subjects were exposed varied from one (zineb production) to eight (potato farmers). The use of personal protective devices was variegate and regarded both aerial and dermal penetration routes. EBDC exposure, assessed by T30 urinary ETU, was found to follow the order: greenhouse workers, zineb producers, vineyard workers, potato farmers, floriculture farmers with median levels of 49.6, 23.0, 11.8, 7.5, and 0.9 microg/g creatinine; the last group having ETU at the same level of controls (approximately 0.5 microg/g creatinine). Among agriculture workers, pesticide application, especially using manual equipment, seems to be the major determinant in explaining internal dose. Although the analysis of self-administered questionnaires evidenced difficulties especially related to lack and/or poor quality of reported data, biological monitoring confirms to be a powerful tool in assessing pesticide exposure.

  1. Biological and environmental hazards associated with exposure to chemical warfare agents: arsenicals.

    PubMed

    Li, Changzhao; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Arsenicals are highly reactive inorganic and organic derivatives of arsenic. These chemicals are very toxic and produce both acute and chronic tissue damage. On the basis of these observations, and considering the low cost and simple methods of their bulk syntheses, these agents were thought to be appropriate for chemical warfare. Among these, the best-known agent that was synthesized and weaponized during World War I (WWI) is Lewisite. Exposure to Lewisite causes painful inflammatory and blistering responses in the skin, lung, and eye. These chemicals also manifest systemic tissue injury following their cutaneous exposure. Although largely discontinued after WWI, stockpiles are still known to exist in the former Soviet Union, Germany, Italy, the United States, and Asia. Thus, access by terrorists or accidental exposure could be highly dangerous for humans and the environment. This review summarizes studies that describe the biological, pathophysiological, toxicological, and environmental effects of exposure to arsenicals, with a major focus on cutaneous injury. Studies related to the development of novel molecular pathobiology-based antidotes against these agents are also described.

  2. Biological and environmental hazards associated with exposure to chemical warfare agents: arsenicals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changzhao; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Arsenicals are highly reactive inorganic and organic derivatives of arsenic. These chemicals are very toxic and produce both acute and chronic tissue damage. Based on these observations, and considering the low cost and simple methods of their bulk syntheses, these agents were thought to be appropriate for chemical warfare. Among these, the most known agent synthesized and weaponized during World War I (WWI) is Lewisite. Exposure to Lewisite causes painful inflammatory and blistering responses in the skin, lung, and eye. These chemicals also manifest systemic tissue injury following their cutaneous exposure. Although largely discontinued after WWI, their stockpiles are still known to exist in the former Soviet Union, Germany, Italy, the United States, and Asia. Thus, their access by terrorists or accidental exposure could be highly dangerous for humans and the environment. This review summarizes studies which describe the biological, pathophysiological, toxicological, and environmental effects of exposure to arsenicals, with a major focus on cutaneous injury. Studies related to the development of novel molecular pathobiology–based antidotes against these agents are also described. PMID:27636894

  3. Structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants for strategies against metal and metalloid exposure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of exposure to heavy metals/metalloid. Beneficial renal effects of some medications, such as chelation therapy depend at least partially on the ability to alleviate oxidative stress. The administration of various natural or synthetic antioxidants has been shown to be of benefit in the prevention and attenuation of metal induced biochemical alterations. These include vitamins, N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid, melatonin, dietary flavonoids and many others. Human studies are limited in this regard. Under certain conditions, surprisingly, the antioxidant supplements may exhibit pro-oxidant properties and even worsen metal induced toxic damage. To date, the evidence is insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements in subject with exposure to metals. Prospective, controlled clinical trials on safety and effectiveness of different therapeutic antioxidant strategies either individually or in combination with chelating agent are indispensable. The present review focuses on structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants particularly related to their chelating properties. PMID:20716905

  4. Evaluation of 1-hydroxypyrene as a biological marker of industrial exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Francisco M.

    1993-03-01

    One hundred twenty-two workers (sixteen from a coke production plant and 106 from a graphite electrode manufacturing plant) agreed to participate in this study evaluating the relationship between exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HOP), the main metabolite of pyrene. The results show that the concentration of pyrene in air is highly correlated with total PAHs (r equals 0.83, P < 0.0001). The correlation coefficient between pyrene in air and 1-HOP is (r equals 0.69, P < 0.0001) and between 1-HOP and total PAHs is (r equals 0.77, P < 0.0001). The biological half life of the 1-HOP was determined (18 hrs) and the noninterference of smoking habits in relation to 1-HOP urinary excretion was established, concluding that 1-HOP is a suitable bioindicator of the occupational exposure to PAHs.

  5. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Laura; Barbieri, Anna; Lodi, V; Violante, F S

    2012-01-01

    In view of the evidence of cytotoxicity of chemotherapic antineoplastic drugs (AD), current guidelines recommend the evaluation of the health risks of hospital personnel exposed to these compounds. Biological monitoring is the main tool to evaluate all possible drug intake and measure workers' real risk. The aim of this study was to assess occupational exposure toAD in a large hospital in Northern Italy in order to verify the effectiveness of the structural and procedural improvements carried out over the last decade. Three biological monitoring campaigns were performed using LC-MS/MS analysis of cyclophosphamide (CP) and metotrexate (MTX) as biomarkers of internal dose in the urine of hospital workers. In the first two campaigns, 50 and 81 workers respectively were monitored during AD preparation operations. The last campaign, concerning AD administration activity, was performed after a centralized preparation unit had been set up. Two environmental monitoring campaigns were carried out as well, to complete AD exposure assessment. During the first monitoring campaign we found positive urinary samples in all the wards studied (total positivity 36%), whereas in the second campaign 11% of the samples were positive and four departments showed negative results in all urine samples. The last campaign showed all urinary CP and MTX levels below the detection limit of the analytical method Exposure of oncology ward nurses considerably decreased due to the centralization of AD preparation operations together with training and education of workers. The last biological monitoring results were reassuring; nevertheless, surface contamination still occurred and safety measures should be further improved in order to achieve the lowest reasonably possible contamination levels.

  6. A convenient first aid kit for chemical and biological agents and for radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Bhaskar, A S B; Gautam, Anshoo; Gopalan, N; Singh, A K; Singh, Beer; Flora, S J S

    2012-05-01

    The chemical and biological warfare agents are extremely toxic in nature. They act rapidly even in very small quantities and death may occur in minutes. Hence, physical and medical protection must be provided immediately to save life or avoid serious injury. A first aid kit has thus been developed for providing immediate relief from chemical and biological warfare agents (FAKCBW) with the objective of easy detection, personal decontamination, antidote for chemical warfare agents (like nerve agents, sulphur mustard, phosgene, cyanide, radiation exposure and bacterial agents), along with basic medication aid for pain, fever and inflammation. The kit box also includes a user friendly handbook with a simple standard operating procedure. In addition, the kit is rugged to withstand normal jerks, vibration and is water-proof.

  7. Designing a biological monitoring program to assess community exposure to chromium: conclusions of an expert panel.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R A; Colton, T; Doull, J; Marks, J G; Smith, R G; Bruce, G M; Finley, B L; Paustenbach, D J

    1993-12-01

    The possible benefits of biological monitoring of large groups of people potentially exposed to environmental contaminants has become an area of much interest in recent years. Because chromite-ore processing residue has been found in some soils in northern New Jersey, urinary chromium monitoring of people in the community was evaluated as a potentially useful tool. In an attempt to identify those who could be exposed and to quantify the magnitude of exposure to the chromium in these soils, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) initiated a public health screening project. In 1992, the NJDOH proposed to evaluate over 4000 people who lived or worked near these sites. Volunteers were administered a questionnaire and were given a limited physical examination, and a single spot urine sample was collected. Because of the difficulties in using urinary chromium to assess low-level exposure and the potential implications of any regulatory decisions that could be based on the results of this project, a panel of experts was convened to evaluate the protocol. The panel consisted of five scientists and physicians with expertise in toxicology, dermatology, epidemiology, biological monitoring, and analytical chemistry. Like a World Health Organization group, the panel concluded that although urine biomonitoring can be useful in evaluating high levels of exposure to chromium, it is not reliable for assessing low-level exposure similar to that which may have occurred in northern New Jersey. The panel also noted that when urinary biomonitoring is to be used to assess the public's possible exposure, a large number of precautions must be taken to ensure the accuracy and usefulness of the results. The single most important recommendation was to collect a second, and perhaps a third, spot urine (or 24-h urine) sample before concluding that a person may be routinely overexposed. These suggestions are applicable to designing a biomonitoring program for nearly any environmental

  8. Biological effects of exposure to static electric fields in humans and vertebrates: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Petri, Anne-Kathrin; Schmiedchen, Kristina; Stunder, Dominik; Dechent, Dagmar; Kraus, Thomas; Bailey, William H; Driessen, Sarah

    2017-04-17

    High-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines are the technology of choice for the transport of large amounts of energy over long distances. The operation of these lines produces static electric fields (EF), but the data reviewed in previous assessments were not sufficient to assess the need for any environmental limit. The aim of this systematic review was to update the current state of research and to evaluate biological effects of static EF. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) recommendations, we collected and evaluated experimental and epidemiological studies examining biological effects of exposure to static EF in humans (n = 8) and vertebrates (n = 40). There is good evidence that humans and animals are able to perceive the presence of static EF at sufficiently high levels. Hair movements caused by electrostatic forces may play a major role in this perception. A large number of studies reported responses of animals (e.g., altered metabolic, immunologic or developmental parameters) to a broad range of static EF strengths as well, but these responses are likely secondary physiological responses to sensory stimulation. Furthermore, the quality of many of the studies reporting physiological responses is poor, which raises concerns about confounding. The weight of the evidence from the literature reviewed did not indicate that static EF have adverse biological effects in humans or animals. The evidence strongly supported the role of superficial sensory stimulation of hair and skin as the basis for perception of the field, as well as reported indirect behavioral and physiological responses. Physical considerations also preclude any direct effect of static EF on internal physiology, and reports that some physiological processes are affected in minor ways may be explained by other factors. While this literature does not support a level of concern about biological effects of exposure to static EF, the conditions

  9. Systems Biology and Biomarkers of Early Effects for Occupational Exposure Limit Setting.

    PubMed

    DeBord, D Gayle; Burgoon, Lyle; Edwards, Stephen W; Haber, Lynne T; Kanitz, M Helen; Kuempel, Eileen; Thomas, Russell S; Yucesoy, Berran

    2015-01-01

    In a recent National Research Council document, new strategies for risk assessment were described to enable more accurate and quicker assessments. This report suggested that evaluating individual responses through increased use of bio-monitoring could improve dose-response estimations. Identification of specific biomarkers may be useful for diagnostics or risk prediction as they have the potential to improve exposure assessments. This paper discusses systems biology, biomarkers of effect, and computational toxicology approaches and their relevance to the occupational exposure limit setting process. The systems biology approach evaluates the integration of biological processes and how disruption of these processes by chemicals or other hazards affects disease outcomes. This type of approach could provide information used in delineating the mode of action of the response or toxicity, and may be useful to define the low adverse and no adverse effect levels. Biomarkers of effect are changes measured in biological systems and are considered to be preclinical in nature. Advances in computational methods and experimental -omics methods that allow the simultaneous measurement of families of macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins in a single analysis have made these systems approaches feasible for broad application. The utility of the information for risk assessments from -omics approaches has shown promise and can provide information on mode of action and dose-response relationships. As these techniques evolve, estimation of internal dose and response biomarkers will be a critical test of these new technologies for application in risk assessment strategies. While proof of concept studies have been conducted that provide evidence of their value, challenges with standardization and harmonization still need to be overcome before these methods are used routinely.

  10. Systems Biology and Biomarkers of Early Effects for Occupational Exposure Limit Setting

    PubMed Central

    DeBord, D. Gayle; Burgoon, Lyle; Edwards, Stephen W.; Haber, Lynne T.; Kanitz, M. Helen; Kuempel, Eileen; Thomas, Russell S.; Yucesoy, Berran

    2015-01-01

    In a recent National Research Council document, new strategies for risk assessment were described to enable more accurate and quicker assessments.( 1 ) This report suggested that evaluating individual responses through increased use of bio-monitoring could improve dose-response estimations. Identi-fication of specific biomarkers may be useful for diagnostics or risk prediction as they have the potential to improve exposure assessments. This paper discusses systems biology, biomarkers of effect, and computational toxicology approaches and their relevance to the occupational exposure limit setting process. The systems biology approach evaluates the integration of biological processes and how disruption of these processes by chemicals or other hazards affects disease outcomes. This type of approach could provide information used in delineating the mode of action of the response or toxicity, and may be useful to define the low adverse and no adverse effect levels. Biomarkers of effect are changes measured in biological systems and are considered to be preclinical in nature. Advances in computational methods and experimental -omics methods that allow the simultaneous measurement of families of macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins in a single analysis have made these systems approaches feasible for broad application. The utility of the information for risk assessments from -omics approaches has shown promise and can provide information on mode of action and dose-response relationships. As these techniques evolve, estimation of internal dose and response biomarkers will be a critical test of these new technologies for application in risk assessment strategies. While proof of concept studies have been conducted that provide evidence of their value, challenges with standardization and harmonization still need to be overcome before these methods are used routinely. PMID:26132979

  11. The effect of student-centered and teacher-centered instruction with and without conceptual advocacy on biology students' misconceptions, achievement, attitudes toward science, and cognitive retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallop, Roger Graham

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of student-centered and teacher-centered instructional strategies with and without conceptual advocacy (CA) on ninth-grade biology students' misconceptions (MIS), biology achievement (ACH), attitudes toward science (ATT), and cognitive retention of scientific method and measurement, spontaneous generation, and characteristics of living things. Students were purposively selected using intact classes and assigned to one of four treatment groups (i.e., student-centered instruction without CA, student-centered instruction with CA, teacher-centered instruction with CA, and teacher-centered instruction without CA). A modified quasi-experimental design was used in which students were not matched in the conventional sense but instead, groups were shown to be equivalent on the dependent measure via a pretest. A 5-day treatment implementation period addressed science conceptions under investigation. The treatment period was based on the number of class periods teachers at the target school actually spend teaching the biological concepts under investigation using traditional instruction. At the end of the treatment period, students were posttested using the Concepts in Biology instrument and Science Questionnaire. Eight weeks after the posttest, these instruments were administered again as a delayed posttest to determine cognitive retention of the correct biological conceptions and attitudes toward science. MANCOVA and follow-up univariate ANCOVA results indicated that student-centered instruction without CA (i.e., Group 1) did not have a significant effect on students' MIS, ACH, and ATT (F = .029, p = .8658; F = .002, p =.9688, F = .292, p = .5897, respectively). On the other hand, student-centered instruction with CA (i.e., Group 2) had a significant effect on students' MIS and ACH (F =10.33, p = .0016 and F = 10.17, p = .0017, respectively), but did not on ATT (F = .433, p = .5117). Teacher-centered instruction with

  12. Uncertainty analysis of relative biological effectiveness of alpha-radiation for human lung exposure.

    PubMed

    Yarmoshenko, Ilia; Kirdin, Ivan; Zhukovsky, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Assessment of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for a radiation in the cases of inhalation of radon progeny and incorporation of plutonium in lung is based on simulation of lung cancer radiation risk for alpha and external reference types of radiation. Specific radiation risk models developed on the results of direct epidemiological studies are used for simulation. These include published risk models for nuclear workers of the Mayak facilities in the former Soviet Union exposed to incorporated plutonium (Kreisheimer et al., 2003; Gilbert et al., 2004) and underground miners exposed to radon progenies (BEIR VI, 1999). Additionally, a lung cancer risk model is developed for a case of population indoor radon exposure. Lung cancer risk related to external exposure is estimated using the risk model developed for the analyses of Japanese atomic bomb survivors (Preston et al., 2003). Uncertainties of risk models parameters are considered and the uncertainties of RBE are estimated using the results of lifetime lung cancer risk simulation, which is done implementing a Monte Carlo approach. Estimated median value of RBE in case of indoor radon exposure is 1.5 with 90% range 0.4-7. In the case of the two models developed by BEIR VI for lung cancer risk due to radon exposure in underground miners, the median values of RBE are 2.1 and 4.4 with 90% ranges 0.3-17 and 0.7-45, respectively. The two different models for lung cancer risk related to plutonium exposure resulted in close estimates of RBE: median value of 12 and 13 with 90% range 4-104 and 4-136, respectively.

  13. Air-liquid interface exposure to aerosols of poorly soluble nanomaterials induces different biological activation levels compared to exposure to suspensions.

    PubMed

    Loret, Thomas; Peyret, Emmanuel; Dubreuil, Marielle; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Bressot, Christophe; le Bihan, Olivier; Amodeo, Tanguy; Trouiller, Bénédicte; Braun, Anne; Egles, Christophe; Lacroix, Ghislaine

    2016-11-03

    Recently, much progress has been made to develop more physiologic in vitro models of the respiratory system and improve in vitro simulation of particle exposure through inhalation. Nevertheless, the field of nanotoxicology still suffers from a lack of relevant in vitro models and exposure methods to predict accurately the effects observed in vivo, especially after respiratory exposure. In this context, the aim of our study was to evaluate if exposing pulmonary cells at the air-liquid interface to aerosols of inhalable and poorly soluble nanomaterials generates different toxicity patterns and/or biological activation levels compared to classic submerged exposures to suspensions. Three nano-TiO2 and one nano-CeO2 were used. An exposure system was set up using VitroCell® devices to expose pulmonary cells at the air-liquid interface to aerosols. A549 alveolar cells in monocultures or in co-cultures with THP-1 macrophages were exposed to aerosols in inserts or to suspensions in inserts and in plates. Submerged exposures in inserts were performed, using similar culture conditions and exposure kinetics to the air-liquid interface, to provide accurate comparisons between the methods. Exposure in plates using classical culture and exposure conditions was performed to provide comparable results with classical submerged exposure studies. The biological activity of the cells (inflammation, cell viability, oxidative stress) was assessed at 24 h and comparisons of the nanomaterial toxicities between exposure methods were performed. Deposited doses of nanomaterials achieved using our aerosol exposure system were sufficient to observe adverse effects. Co-cultures were more sensitive than monocultures and biological responses were usually observed at lower doses at the air-liquid interface than in submerged conditions. Nevertheless, the general ranking of the nanomaterials according to their toxicity was similar across the different exposure methods used. We showed that exposure

  14. One airway: Biomarkers of protection from upper and lower airway injury after World Trade Center exposure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo Jung; Echevarria, Ghislaine C; Kwon, Sophia; Naveed, Bushra; Schenck, Edward J; Tsukiji, Jun; Rom, William N; Prezant, David J; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Firefighters exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust have developed chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and abnormal forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Overlapping but distinct immune responses may be responsible for the clinical manifestations of upper and lower airway injury. We investigated whether a panel of inflammatory cytokines, either associated or not associated with WTC-LI, can predict future chronic rhinosinusitis disease and its severity. Serum obtained within six months of 9/11/2001 from 179 WTC exposed firefighters presenting for subspecialty evaluation prior to 3/2008 was assayed for 39 cytokines. The main outcomes were medically managed CRS (N = 62) and more severe CRS cases requiring sinus surgery (N = 14). We tested biomarker-CRS severity association using ordinal logistic regression analysis. Increasing serum IL-6, IL-8, GRO and neutrophil concentration reduced the risk of CRS progression. Conversely, increasing TNF-α increased the risk of progression. In a multivariable model adjusted for exposure intensity, increasing IL-6, TNF-α and neutrophil concentration remained significant predictors of progression. Elevated IL-6 levels and neutrophil counts also reduced the risk of abnormal FEV1 but in contrast to CRS, increased TNF-α did not increase the risk of abnormal FEV1. Our study demonstrates both independent and overlapping biomarker associations with upper and lower respiratory injury, and suggests that the innate immune response may play a protective role against CRS and abnormal lung function in those with WTC exposure. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Asthma control in adolescents 10 to 11 y after exposure to the World Trade Center disaster

    PubMed Central

    Gargano, Lisa M.; Thomas, Pauline A.; Stellman, Steven D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about asthma control in adolescents who were exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks of 11 September 2001 and diagnosed with asthma after 9/11. This report examines asthma and asthma control 10–11 y after 9/11 among exposed adolescents. Methods: The WTC Health Registry adolescent Wave 3 survey (2011–2012) collected data on asthma diagnosed by a physician after 11 September 2001, extent of asthma control based on modified National Asthma Education and Prevention Program criteria, probable mental health conditions, and behavior problems. Parents reported healthcare needs and 9/11-exposures. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between asthma and level of asthma control and 9/11-exposure, mental health and behavioral problems, and unmet healthcare needs. Results: Poorly/very poorly controlled asthma was significantly associated with a household income of ≤$75,000 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1–8.8), having unmet healthcare needs (AOR: 6.2; 95% CI: 1.4–27.1), and screening positive for at least one mental health condition (AOR: 5.0; 95% CI: 1.4–17.7), but not with behavioral problems. The impact of having at least one mental health condition on the level of asthma control was substantially greater in females than in males. Conclusions: Comprehensive care of post-9/11 asthma in adolescents should include management of mental health-related comorbidities. PMID:27656769

  16. Chronic and Acute Exposures to the World Trade Center Disaster and Lower Respiratory Symptoms: Area Residents and Workers

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Stephen M.; Pillai, Parul S.; Reibman, Joan; Berger, Kenneth I.; Goldring, Roberta; Stellman, Steven D.; Farfel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed associations between new-onset (post–September 11, 2001 [9/11]) lower respiratory symptoms reported on 2 surveys, administered 3 years apart, and acute and chronic 9/11-related exposures among New York City World Trade Center–area residents and workers enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. Methods. World Trade Center–area residents and workers were categorized as case participants or control participants on the basis of lower respiratory symptoms reported in surveys administered 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 years after 9/11. We created composite exposure scales after principal components analyses of detailed exposure histories obtained during face-to-face interviews. We used multivariate logistic regression models to determine associations between lower respiratory symptoms and composite exposure scales. Results. Both acute and chronic exposures to the events of 9/11 were independently associated, often in a dose-dependent manner, with lower respiratory symptoms among individuals who lived and worked in the area of the World Trade Center. Conclusions. Study findings argue for detailed assessments of exposure during and after events in the future from which potentially toxic materials may be released and for rapid interventions to minimize exposures and screen for potential adverse health effects. PMID:22515865

  17. Active Learning and Student-centered Pedagogy Improve Student Attitudes and Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years—1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change. PMID:19723815

  18. Anthropogenic climate change and allergen exposure: The role of plant biology.

    PubMed

    Ziska, Lewis H; Beggs, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of anthropogenic gases, particularly CO(2), is likely to have 2 fundamental effects on plant biology. The first is an indirect effect through Earth's increasing average surface temperatures, with subsequent effects on other aspects of climate, such as rainfall and extreme weather events. The second is a direct effect caused by CO(2)-induced stimulation of photosynthesis and plant growth. Both effects are likely to alter a number of fundamental aspects of plant biology and human health, including aerobiology and allergic diseases, respectively. This review highlights the current and projected effect of increasing CO(2) and climate change in the context of plants and allergen exposure, emphasizing direct effects on plant physiologic parameters (eg, pollen production) and indirect effects (eg, fungal sporulation) related to diverse biotic and abiotic interactions. Overall, the review assumes that future global mitigation efforts will be limited and suggests a number of key research areas that will assist in adapting to the ongoing challenges to public health associated with increased allergen exposure.

  19. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to toxic chemicals. Collection, processing, and storage of specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Aitio, A.; Jaervisalo, J.

    1985-03-01

    Exposure to at least 100 different chemicals may be estimated on an individual basis from their concentrations in blood or urine. The present document reviews sources of error in the collection, processing and storage of specimens for this biological monitoring. Physiological factors cause variation in the concentration of chemicals in the body fluids. Distribution of water depends on posture. Exercise and meals cause changes in blood constituents. The urine output varies and, thus, the concentrations of dissolved chemicals change. Many toxic chemicals show short half times in the blood; thus, their concentrations depend on the timing of the specimen collection. Skin absorption may result in dramatically different chemical concentrations in different parts of the circulation. The stability of chemicals in the collected specimens is generally limited: chemical deterioration, adsorption, precipitation, and evaporation are the main causes of losses. For many chemicals, especially for trace elements, contamination of the specimen is the overwhelmingly most important source of error. As the range of the chemicals measured is wide, the relative importance of the sources of error is different for different chemicals. Information on most chemicals is at present very limited. Thus, before commencing a program on biological exposure monitoring, it is advisable to search the optimal conditions for specimen collection, processing, and storage.

  20. [Workers' exposure to selected biological agents in libraries of Upper Silesia].

    PubMed

    Wlazło, Agnieszka; Górny, Rafał L; Złotkowska, Renata; Lawniczek, Anna; Ludzeń-Izbińska, Beata; Harkawy, Aleksander S; Anczyk, Edmund

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the exposure of library workers to biological agents based on quantitative and qualitative characteristics of airborne and settled dust microflora supplemented with the analysis of dust mite allergens. The bioaerosol sampling was carried out using a 6-stage Andersen impactor. The settled dust samples were collected from book covers using cotton swabs and vacuum cleaner. Isolated microbial colonies were identified to the genus and/or species level. Moreover, the concentration of guanine as a predictor of dust mite allergen content was determined with the semi-quantitative Acarex test. The bioaerosol concentrations were low and they did not exceed the proposed Polish reference limits. The presence of air-conditioning or ventilating system resulted in the decreased biological contamination in libraries. The identification ofmicroorganisms in bioaerosol and settled dust samples revealed the presence of strains classified into group 2 according to their risk of infection. The level of dust mite allergens was elevated. Inhalation exposure to molds and dust mite allergens may result in the occurrence of allergic reactions and SBS symptoms.

  1. Biological monitoring of exposure to benzene in the production of benzene and in a cokery.

    PubMed

    Kivistö, H; Pekari, K; Peltonen, K; Svinhufvud, J; Veidebaum, T; Sorsa, M; Aitio, A

    1997-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to compare different biological methods in current use to assess benzene exposure. The methods involved in the study were: benzene in blood, urine and exhaled air, and the urinary metabolites t,t-muconic acid (MA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA). Blood, urine and exhaled air samples were collected from workers in a benzene plant (pure benzene exposure) and cokery (mixed exposure, e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons--PAHs) in an Estonian shale oil petrochemical plant. The benzene in these samples was analysed with a head-space gas chromatograph, and the metabolites MA and S-PMA with a liquid chromatograph using methods developed from published procedures. Some of the values measured in the Estonian shale oil area were high in comparison with those published during the last few years, whereas the values measured in the control group did not show any exposure to benzene except in the smokers group. The highest median exposure was in the benzene factory, 0.9 cm3/m3 TWA (2.9 mg/m3) and the highest individual value was 15 cm3/m3 TWA (49 mg/m3). All biological measurements in this study gave the same assessment about exposure to benzene and correlated highly significantly with each other and with the air measurements (r = 0.8 or more). In the benzene factory the correlation was good even when calculated from samples with air concentration < 1 cm3/m3 (3.2 mg/m3) in the case of blood benzene and urinary MA. However, for S-PMA it was weak (r = 0.4) and for benzene in urine and exhaled air it did not exist any more. In the cokery, with mixed exposure, the correlation at low levels was weaker even for blood benzene and urinary MA (r = 0.6). According to the results in the benzene factory the exposure to pure benzene at the level 1 cm3/m3 (3.25 mg/m3) TWA gave: the blood benzene value about 110 nmol/l (8.6 micrograms/l), MA 23 mumol/l (3.3 micrograms/l) or 2.0 mg/g creatinine, S-PMA 58 micrograms/g creatinine or 0.4 mumol/l (95.7 micrograms

  2. Human urinary biomarkers of dioxin exposure: analysis by metabolomics and biologically driven data dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Jeanneret, Fabienne; Boccard, Julien; Badoud, Flavia; Sorg, Olivier; Tonoli, David; Pelclova, Daniela; Vlckova, Stepanka; Rutledge, Douglas N; Samer, Caroline F; Hochstrasser, Denis; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Rudaz, Serge

    2014-10-15

    Untargeted metabolomic approaches offer new opportunities for a deeper understanding of the molecular events related to toxic exposure. This study proposes a metabolomic investigation of biochemical alterations occurring in urine as a result of dioxin toxicity. Urine samples were collected from Czech chemical workers submitted to severe dioxin occupational exposure in a herbicide production plant in the late 1960s. Experiments were carried out with ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry. A chemistry-driven feature selection was applied to focus on steroid-related metabolites. Supervised multivariate data analysis allowed biomarkers, mainly related to bile acids, to be highlighted. These results supported the hypothesis of liver damage and oxidative stress for long-term dioxin toxicity. As a second step of data analysis, the information gained from the urine analysis of Victor Yushchenko after his poisoning was examined. A subset of relevant urinary markers of acute dioxin toxicity from this extreme phenotype, including glucuro- and sulfo-conjugated endogenous steroid metabolites and bile acids, was assessed for its ability to detect long-term effects of exposure. The metabolomic strategy presented in this work allowed the determination of metabolic patterns related to dioxin effects in human and the discovery of highly predictive subsets of biologically meaningful and clinically relevant compounds. These results are expected to provide valuable information for a deeper understanding of the molecular events related to dioxin toxicity. Furthermore, it presents an original methodology of data dimensionality reduction by using extreme phenotype as a guide to select relevant features prior to data modeling (biologically driven data reduction). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Acceleration of cardiovascular-biological age by amphetamine exposure is a power function of chronological age

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Amanda; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphetamine abuse is becoming more widespread internationally. The possibility that its many cardiovascular complications are associated with a prematurely aged cardiovascular system, and indeed biological organism systemically, has not been addressed. Methods Radial arterial pulse tonometry was performed using the SphygmoCor system (Sydney). 55 amphetamine exposed patients were compared with 107 tobacco smokers, 483 non-smokers and 68 methadone patients (total=713 patients) from 2006 to 2011. A cardiovascular-biological age (VA) was determined. Results The age of the patient groups was 30.03±0.51–40.45±1.15 years. This was controlled for with linear regression. The sex ratio was the same in all groups. 94% of amphetamine exposed patients had used amphetamine in the previous week. When the (log) VA was regressed against the chronological age (CA) and a substance-type group in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, models quadratic in CA were superior to linear models (both p<0.02). When log VA/CA was regressed in a mixed effects model against time, body mass index, CA and drug type, the cubic model was superior to the linear model (p=0.001). Interactions between CA, (CA)2 and (CA)3 on the one hand and exposure type were significant from p=0.0120. The effects of amphetamine exposure persisted after adjustment for all known cardiovascular risk factors (p<0.0001). Conclusions These results show that subacute exposure to amphetamines is associated with an advancement of cardiovascular-organismal age both over age and over time, and is robust to adjustment. That this is associated with power functions of age implies a feed-forward positively reinforcing exacerbation of the underlying ageing process. PMID:28243315

  4. Comparative biology approaches for charged particle exposures and cancer development processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Sudo, Hiroko; Wiese, Claudia; Dan, Cristian; Turker, Mitchell

    Comparative biology studies can provide useful information for the extrapolation of results be-tween cells in culture and the more complex environment of the tissue. In other circumstances, they provide a method to guide the interpretation of results obtained for cells from differ-ent species. We have considered several key cancer development processes following charged particle exposures using comparative biology approaches. Our particular emphases have been mutagenesis and genomic instability. Carcinogenesis requires the accumulation of mutations and most of htese mutations occur on autosomes. Two loci provide the greatest avenue for the consideration of charged particle-induced mutation involving autosomes: the TK1 locus in human cells and the APRT locus in mouse cells. Each locus can provide information on a wide variety of mutational changes, from small intragenic mutations through multilocus dele-tions and extensive tracts of mitotic recombination. In addition, the mouse model can provide a direct measurement of chromosome loss which cannot be accomplished in the human cell system. Another feature of the mouse APRT model is the ability to examine effects for cells exposed in vitro with those obtained for cells exposed in situ. We will provide a comparison of the results obtained for the TK1 locus following 1 GeV/amu Fe ion exposures to the human lymphoid cells with those obtained for the APRT locus for mouse kidney epithelial cells (in vitro or in situ). Substantial conservation of mechanisms is found amongst these three exposure scenarios, with some differences attributable to the specific conditions of exposure. A similar approach will be applied to the consideraiton of proton-induced autosomal mutations in the three model systems. A comparison of the results obtained for Fe ions vs. protons in each case will highlight LET-specificc differences in response. Another cancer development process that is receiving considerable interest is genomic instability. We

  5. Biological monitoring to assess exposure from use of isocyanates in motor vehicle repair

    PubMed Central

    Williams, N. R.; Jones, K.; Cocker, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a method for the measurement of a metabolite of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), an isocyanate, and use it to assess the exposure of sprayers employed in motor vehicle repair shops. METHODS: Urine samples were taken from sprayers wearing personal protective equipment and spraying in booths or with local exhaust ventilation, from bystanders, and from unexposed subjects. Samples were analyzed for a metabolite of HDI, hexamethylene diamine (HDA), by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). RESULTS: HDA was detected in four sprayers and one bystander out of 22 workers. No HDA was detected in the urine of unexposed subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to isocyanates still occurs despite the use of personal protective equipment and the use of a booth or extracted space. Health surveillance is likely to be required to provide feedback on the adequacy of controls even if such precautions are used and to identify cases of early asthma. Biological monitoring can provide a useful additional tool to assess exposure and the adequacy of controls in this group of exposed workers.   PMID:10615291

  6. Therapeutic Alliance during Prolonged Exposure Versus Client-Centered Therapy for Adolescent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Capaldi, Sandra; Asnaani, Anu; Zandberg, Laurie J; Carpenter, Joseph K; Foa, Edna B

    2016-10-01

    To examine the relationship between improvements in adolescent ratings of therapeutic alliance and reductions in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity over time among adolescent girls during prolonged exposure therapy for adolescents (PE-A) versus client-centered therapy (CCT), as well as to examine differences in changes in alliance between treatment groups. A total of 61 adolescent girls (aged 13-18 years) with sexual assault-related PTSD received PE-A or CCT in a randomized controlled trial. Participants rated alliance at session 3, midtreatment, and posttreatment. The rate of improvement in adolescent-rated alliance was greater in PE-A than CCT over the course of treatment. In addition, improvement in adolescent-rated alliance significantly contributed to improvements in PTSD (regardless of treatment condition), but not vice versa. Contrary to beliefs that trauma-focused treatments fail to establish strong therapeutic alliance in sexually abused adolescents, improvement in adolescent ratings of alliance were greater in PE-A compared to CCT, and improvements in adolescent-rated alliance were significantly associated with better treatment outcome across both types of treatments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET g or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ‘‘biological Bragg curve’’ is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called “overkill”. F. A. Cucinotta, I. Plante, A. L. Ponomarev, and M. Y. Kim, Nuclear Interactions in Heavy Ion Transport and Event

  8. Annual solar UV exposure and biological effective dose rates on the Martian surface.

    PubMed

    Patel, M R; Bérces, A; Kerékgyárto, T; Rontó, Gy; Lammer, H; Zarnecki, J C

    2004-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) environment of Mars has been investigated to gain an understanding of the variation of exposure throughout a Martian year, and link this flux to biological effects and possible survival of organisms at the Martian surface. To gain an idea of how the solar UV radiation varies between different regions, including planned landing sites of two future Mars surface missions, we modelled the total solar UV surface flux throughout one Martian year for two different dust scenarios. To understand the degree of solar UV stress on micro-organisms and/or molecules essential for life on the surface of Mars, we also calculated the biologically effective dose (BED) for T7 and Uracil in relevant wavelength regions at the Martian surface as a function of season and latitude, and discuss the biological survival rates in the presence of Martian solar UV radiation. High T7/Uracil BED ratios indicate that even at high latitudes where the UV flux is significantly reduced, the radiation environment is still hostile for life due to the persisting UV-C component of the flux.

  9. Characteristics of a residential and working community with diverse exposure to World Trade Center dust, gas, and fumes.

    PubMed

    Reibman, Joan; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Qinyi; Liautaud, Sybille; Rogers, Linda; Lau, Stephanie; Berger, Kenneth I; Goldring, Roberta M; Marmor, Michael; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Tonorezos, Emily S; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee E; Gonzalez, Jaime; Filner, Joshua; Walter, Dawn; Kyng, Kymara; Rom, William N

    2009-05-01

    To describe physical symptoms in those local residents, local workers, and cleanup workers who were enrolled in a treatment program and had reported symptoms and exposure to the dust, gas, and fumes released with the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001. Symptomatic individuals underwent standardized evaluation and subsequent treatment. One thousand eight hundred ninety-eight individuals participated in the WTC Environmental Health Center between September 2005 and May 2008. Upper and lower respiratory symptoms that began after September 11, 2001 and persisted at the time of examination were common in each exposure population. Many (31%) had spirometry measurements below the lower limit of normal. Residents and local workers as well as those with work-associated exposure to WTC dust have new and persistent respiratory symptoms with lung function abnormalities 5 or more years after the WTC destruction.

  10. Characteristics of a Residential and Working Community With Diverse Exposure to World Trade Center Dust, Gas, and Fumes

    PubMed Central

    Reibman, Joan; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Qinyi; Liautaud, Sybille; Rogers, Linda; Lau, Stephanie; Berger, Kenneth I.; Goldring, Roberta M.; Marmor, Michael; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Tonorezos, Emily S.; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee E.; Gonzalez, Jaime; Filner, Joshua; Walter, Dawn; Kyng, Kymara; Rom, William N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe physical symptoms in those local residents, local workers, and cleanup workers who were enrolled in a treatment program and had reported symptoms and exposure to the dust, gas, and fumes released with the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001. Methods Symptomatic individuals underwent standardized evaluation and subsequent treatment. Results One thousand eight hundred ninety-eight individuals participated in the WTC Environmental Health Center between September 2005 and May 2008. Upper and lower respiratory symptoms that began after September 11, 2001 and persisted at the time of examination were common in each exposure population. Many (31%) had spirometry measurements below the lower limit of normal. Conclusions Residents and local workers as well as those with work-associated exposure to WTC dust have new and persistent respiratory symptoms with lung function abnormalities 5 or more years after the WTC destruction. PMID:19365288

  11. A Retrospective Study of Clinical Effects of Powdered Caffeine Exposures Reported to Three US Poison Control Centers.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Gillian A; Johnson, Amberly R; Crouch, Barbara I; Valento, Matthew; Horowitz, B Zane; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Anhydrous caffeine, often sold on the Internet as a powdered caffeine product, is sold as "pure caffeine" to be used as an additive to beverages and has also been used as an ingredient in energy supplement products. This is a retrospective multiple-poison center chart review of calls regarding powdered caffeine to poison centers covering Oregon, Alaska, Guam, Washington, and Utah between January 1, 2013 and June 30, 2015. There were 40 calls to three poison centers over 30 months for powdered caffeine exposure. The majority of patients were over age 19 (52.5 %; 21/40) and male (70 %; 28/40). Sixty percent (24/40) of the patients were symptomatic but only 10 % (4/40) required admission; 52.5 % (21/40) of the patient calls were for inadvertent overdose of powdered caffeine; one patient overdosed in a self-harm attempt. Powdered caffeine calls to three poison centers during a 30-month study period were rare, and severe caffeine toxicity due to exposure was found in few patients. The majority of symptoms were reported after an inadvertent powdered caffeine overdose. An analysis of calls to three poison centers for powdered caffeine found that exposures were uncommon, but did result in toxicity, and highlighted that the lack of clear dosing instructions on product packaging may place patients at risk of inadvertent overdose.

  12. Review of Experience of a Statewide Poison Control Center With Pediatric Exposures to Oral Antineoplastic Drugs in the Nonmedical Setting.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Stephen L; Liu, Jehnan; Soleymani, Kamyar; Romasco, Rebecca L; Farid, Hanieh; Clark, Richard F; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-01-01

    The use of oral antineoplastic agents in nonmedical settings continues to increase. There are limited data available on pediatric exposures to these agents. We sought to identify characteristics of such exposures. We performed a retrospective review of database of a statewide poison system from 2000 to 2009 for all cases of pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic agents, which took place in a nonmedical setting. Data collected include gender, age, agent of exposure, dose, drug concentration, reason for exposure, symptoms, outcomes, interventions, and length of hospital stay. There were a total of 328 patients. The mean average age was 4.1 years. Eighty-nine percentage (n = 293) was unintentional. Exposures to 21 different antineoplastic agents were identified. Methotrexate (n = 91) and 6-mercaptopurine (n = 47) were the most common agents encountered. Two hundred ninety-nine (91%) cases had no symptoms reported. When reported, gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 17) and central nervous system sedation (n = 6) were most common. One case of pancytopenia was reported. No deaths were reported in this series. Sixty-seven percent (n = 220) were managed at home, whereas 19 (6%) were admitted to a health care facility. Cases were followed by the poison control center for 0.34 days (SD = 1.40). In this study, exposures to oral antineoplastics were primarily unintentional, asymptomatic, and managed at home. Study limitations include possible reporting bias, inability to objectively confirm exposures, and limited duration of monitoring by the poison control center. In this retrospective review, no significant morbidity or mortality was reported from pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic drugs in the nonmedical setting.

  13. Biomarkers of World Trade Center Particulate Matter Exposure: Physiology of distal airway and blood biomarkers that predict FEV1 decline

    PubMed Central

    Weiden, Michael D.; Kwon, Sophia; Caraher, Erin; Berger, Kenneth I.; Reibman, Joan; Rom, William N.; Prezant, David J.; Nolan, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers can be important predictors of disease severity and progression. The intense exposure to particulates and other toxins from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) overwhelmed the lung’s normal protective barriers. The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) cohort not only had baseline pre-exposure lung function measures but also had serum samples banked soon after their WTC exposure. This well phenotyped group of highly exposed first responders is an ideal cohort for biomarker discovery and eventual validation. Disease progression was heterogeneous in this group in that some individuals subsequently developed abnormal lung function while others recovered. Airflow obstruction predominated in WTC exposed patients who were symptomatic. Multiple independent disease pathways may cause this abnormal FEV1 after irritant exposure. WTC exposure activates one or more of these pathways causing abnormal FEV1 in an individual. Our hypothesis was that serum biomarkers expressed within 6 months after World Trade Center (WTC) exposure reflect active disease pathways and predict subsequent development or protection from abnormal FEV1exposure that were predictive of their FEV1 up to 7 years after their WTC exposure. Predicting future risk of airway injury after particulate exposures can focus monitoring and early treatment on a subset of patients in greatest need of these services. PMID:26024341

  14. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies.

  15. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting: “Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic”, held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13–15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 micrograms per liter (10 μg/L) in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry and educators at the local, state, national and international levels to: (1) Establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) Work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry and others; (3) Develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) Develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods, and (5) Develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  16. Effect of a radical exposure nitridation surface on the charge stability of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageura, Taisuke; Kato, Kanami; Yamano, Hayate; Suaebah, Evi; Kajiya, Miki; Kawai, Sora; Inaba, Masafumi; Tanii, Takashi; Haruyama, Moriyoshi; Yamada, Keisuke; Onoda, Shinobu; Kada, Wataru; Hanaizumi, Osamu; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Isoya, Junichi; Kono, Shozo; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    A nitridation process of a diamond surface with nitrogen radical exposure far from the radio-frequency plasma for the stabilization of a negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centers near the surface is presented. At a nitrogen coverage of as high as 0.9 monolayers, high average Rabi contrasts of 0.40 ± 0.06 and 0.46 ± 0.03 have been obtained for single NV- centers formed by shallow nitrogen implantation with acceleration voltages of 1 and 2 keV, respectively. This indicates that nitrogen termination by a radical exposure process produces an electric charge state suitable for single NV- centers near the surface compared with the states obtained for alternatively terminated surfaces.

  17. The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS): Risk assessment and real-time toxicovigilance across United States poison centers

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, William A.; Litovitz, Toby L. . E-mail: toby@poison.org; Belson, Martin G.; Kilbourne, Edwin

    2005-09-01

    The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) is a uniform data set of US poison centers cases. Categories of information include the patient, the caller, the exposure, the substance(s), clinical toxicity, treatment, and medical outcome. The TESS database was initiated in 1985, and provides a baseline of more than 36.2 million cases through 2003. The database has been utilized for a number of safety evaluations. Consideration of the strengths and limitations of TESS data must be incorporated into data interpretation. Real-time toxicovigilance was initiated in 2003 with continuous uploading of new cases from all poison centers to a central database. Real-time toxicovigilance utilizing general and specific approaches is systematically run against TESS, further increasing the potential utility of poison center experiences as a means of early identification of potential public health threats.

  18. Occupational chemical exposures: a collaboration between the Georgia Poison Center and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Tustin, Aaron W; Jones, Alison; Lopez, Gaylord P; Ketcham, Glenn R; Hodgson, Michael J

    2017-06-26

    In the United States, regional poison centers frequently receive calls about toxic workplace exposures. Most poison centers do not share call details routinely with governmental regulatory agencies. Worker health and safety could be enhanced if regulators such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) had the ability to investigate these events and prevent similar incidents. With this goal in mind, the Georgia Poison Center (GPC) began referring occupational exposures to OSHA in July 2014. GPC began collecting additional employer details when handling occupational exposure calls. When workers granted permission, GPC forwarded call details to the OSHA Regional Office in Atlanta. These referrals enabled OSHA to initiate several investigations. We also analyzed all occupational exposures reported to GPC during the study period to characterize the events, detect violations of OSHA reporting requirements, and identify hazardous scenarios that could form the basis for future OSHA rulemaking or guidance. GPC was informed about 953 occupational exposures between 1 July, 2014 and 7 January, 2016. Workers were exposed to 217 unique substances, and 70.3% of victims received treatment in a healthcare facility. Hydrogen sulfide was responsible for the largest number of severe clinical effects. GPC obtained permission to refer 89 (9.3%) calls to OSHA. As a result of these referrals, OSHA conducted 39 investigations and cited 15 employers for "serious" violations. OSHA forwarded several other referrals to other regulatory agencies when OSHA did not have jurisdiction. At least one employer failed to comply with OSHA's new rule that mandates reporting of all work-related hospitalizations. This collaboration increased OSHA's awareness of dangerous job tasks including hydrofluoric acid exposure among auto detailers and carbon monoxide poisoning with indoor use of gasoline-powered tools. Collaboration with the GPC generated a useful source of referrals to OSHA. OSHA

  19. Exposure pathways and biological receptors: baseline data for the canyon uranium mine, Coconino County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo E.; Linder, Greg L.; Darrah, Abigail J.; Drost, Charles A.; Duniway, Michael C.; Johnson, Matthew J.; Méndez-Harclerode, Francisca M.; Nowak, Erika M.; Valdez, Ernest W.; Van Riper, Charles; Wolff, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent restrictions on uranium mining within the Grand Canyon watershed have drawn attention to scientific data gaps in evaluating the possible effects of ore extraction to human populations as well as wildlife communities in the area. Tissue contaminant concentrations, one of the most basic data requirements to determine exposure, are not available for biota from any historical or active uranium mines in the region. The Canyon Uranium Mine is under development, providing a unique opportunity to characterize concentrations of uranium and other trace elements, as well as radiation levels in biota, found in the vicinity of the mine before ore extraction begins. Our study objectives were to identify contaminants of potential concern and critical contaminant exposure pathways for ecological receptors; conduct biological surveys to understand the local food web and refine the list of target species (ecological receptors) for contaminant analysis; and collect target species for contaminant analysis prior to the initiation of active mining. Contaminants of potential concern were identified as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, thallium, uranium, and zinc for chemical toxicity and uranium and associated radionuclides for radiation. The conceptual exposure model identified ingestion, inhalation, absorption, and dietary transfer (bioaccumulation or bioconcentration) as critical contaminant exposure pathways. The biological survey of plants, invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and small mammals is the first to document and provide ecological information on .200 species in and around the mine site; this study also provides critical baseline information about the local food web. Most of the species documented at the mine are common to ponderosa pine Pinus ponderosa and pinyon–juniper Pinus–Juniperus spp. forests in northern Arizona and are not considered to have special conservation status by state or federal agencies; exceptions

  20. Removing the center from computing: biology's new mode of digital knowledge production.

    PubMed

    November, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    This article shows how the USA's National Institutes of Health (NIH) helped to bring about a major shift in the way computers are used to produce knowledge and in the design of computers themselves as a consequence of its early 1960s efforts to introduce information technology to biologists. Starting in 1960 the NIH sought to reform the life sciences by encouraging researchers to make use of digital electronic computers, but despite generous federal support biologists generally did not embrace the new technology. Initially the blame fell on biologists' lack of appropriate (i.e. digital) data for computers to process. However, when the NIH consulted MIT computer architect Wesley Clark about this problem, he argued that the computer's quality as a device that was centralized posed an even greater challenge to potential biologist users than did the computer's need for digital data. Clark convinced the NIH that if the agency hoped to effectively computerize biology, it would need to satisfy biologists' experimental and institutional needs by providing them the means to use a computer without going to a computing center. With NIH support, Clark developed the 1963 Laboratory Instrument Computer (LINC), a small, real-time interactive computer intended to be used inside the laboratory and controlled entirely by its biologist users. Once built, the LINC provided a viable alternative to the 1960s norm of large computers housed in computing centers. As such, the LINC not only became popular among biologists, but also served in later decades as an important precursor of today's computing norm in the sciences and far beyond, the personal computer.

  1. Whack-A-Mole Model: Towards a Unified Description of Biological Effects Caused by Radiation Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Wada, Takahiro; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakamura, Issei; Bando, Masako

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel model to for estimating biological effects caused by artificial radiation exposure, i.e., the Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model. It is important to take into account the recovery effects during the time course of cellular reactions. The inclusion of dose-rate dependence is essential in the risk estimation of low-dose radiation, while nearly all the existing theoretical models rely on the total dose dependence only. By analyzing experimental data of the relationship between the radiation dose and the induced mutation frequency of five organisms, namely, mouse, Drosophila, chrysanthemum, maize, Tradescantia, we found that all the data can be reproduced by the WAM model. Most remarkably, a scaling function, which is derived from the WAM model, consistently accounts for the observed mutation frequencies of the five organisms. This is the first rationale to account for the dose rate dependence as well as to provide a unified understanding of a general feature of organisms.

  2. Computed Tomography-Related Radiation Exposure in Children Transferred to a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Adam S.; Gill, Kara G.; Leys, Charles M.; Gosain, Ankush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pediatric trauma patients presenting to Referring Facilities (RF) often undergo computed tomography scans (CT) to identify injuries before transfer to a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center (PTC). The purpose of our study was to evaluate RF compliance with the American College of Radiology (ACR) guidelines to minimize ionizing radiation exposure in pediatric trauma patients and to determine the frequency of additional or repeat CT imaging after transfer to a PTC. Methods After IRB approval, a retrospective review of all pediatric trauma admissions from January 2010-December 2011 at our American College of Surgeons (ACS) Level 1 PTC was performed. Patient demographics, means of arrival, injury severity score and disposition were analyzed. Patients who underwent CT were grouped by means of arrival: those that were transferred from a RF versus those that presented primarily to the PTC. Compliance with ACR guidelines and need for additional or repeat CT scans were assessed for both groups. Results 697 children (<18yo) were identified with a mean age of 10.6 years. 321 (46%) patients presented primarily to the PTC. 376 (54%) were transferred from a RF, of which 90 (24%) patients underwent CT imaging prior to transfer. CT radiation dosing information was available for 79/90 patients (88%). After transfer, 8/90 (9%) of children imaged at a RF required additional CT scans. In comparison, 314/321 (98%) of patients who presented primarily to the PTC and underwent CT received appropriate pediatric radiation dosing. Mean radiation dose at PTC was approximately half of that at RF for CT scans of the head, chest and abdomen/pelvis (p<0.01). Conclusions Pediatric trauma patients transferred from RF often undergo CT scanning with higher than recommended radiation doses, potentially placing them at increased carcinogenic risk. Fortunately, few RF patients required additional CT scans after PTC transfer. Finally, compliance with ACR radiation dose limit guidelines is better

  3. World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Vayas, Kinal N; Fang, Mingzhu; Zarbl, Helmut; Massa, Christopher; Gow, Andrew J; Cervelli, Jessica A; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert J; Lioy, Paul J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to World Trade Center (WTC) dust has been linked to respiratory disease in humans. In the present studies we developed a rodent model of WTC dust exposure to analyze lung oxidative stress and inflammation, with the goal of elucidating potential epigenetic mechanisms underlying these responses. Exposure of mice to WTC dust (20μg, i.t.) was associated with upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 within 3days, a response which persisted for at least 21days. Whereas matrix metalloproteinase was upregulated 7days post-WTC dust exposure, IL-6RA1 was increased at 21days; conversely, expression of mannose receptor, a scavenger receptor important in particle clearance, decreased. After WTC dust exposure, increases in methylation of histone H3 lysine K4 at 3days, lysine K27 at 7days and lysine K36, were observed in the lung, along with hypermethylation of Line-1 element at 21days. Alterations in pulmonary mechanics were also observed following WTC dust exposure. Thus, 3days post-exposure, lung resistance and tissue damping were decreased. In contrast at 21days, lung resistance, central airway resistance, tissue damping and tissue elastance were increased. These data demonstrate that WTC dust-induced inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with epigenetic modifications in the lung and altered pulmonary mechanics. These changes may contribute to the development of WTC dust pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. World Trade Center (WTC) dust exposure in mice is associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and epigenetic changes in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Vayas, Kinal N.; Fang, Mingzhu; Zarbl, Helmut; Massa, Christopher; Gow, Andrew J.; Cervelli, Jessica A.; Kipen, Howard; Laumbach, Robert J.; Lioy, Paul J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to World Trade Center (WTC) dust has been linked to respiratory disease in humans. In the present studies we developed a rodent model of WTC dust exposure to analyze lung oxidative stress and inflammation, with the goal of elucidating potential epigenetic mechanisms underlying these responses. Exposure of mice to WTC dust (20 μg, i.t.) was associated with upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 within 3 days, a response which persisted for at least 21 days. Whereas matrix metalloproteinase was upregulated 7 days post-WTC dust exposure, IL-6RA1 was increased at 21 days; conversely, expression of mannose receptor, a scavenger receptor important in particle clearance, decreased. After WTC dust exposure, increases in methylation of histone H3 lysine K4 at 3 days, lysine K27 at 7 days and lysine K36, were observed in the lung, along with hypermethylation of Line-1 element at 21 days. Alterations in pulmonary mechanics were also observed following WTC dust exposure. Thus, 3 days post-exposure, lung resistance and tissue damping were decreased. In contrast at 21 days, lung resistance, central airway resistance, tissue damping and tissue elastance were increased. These data demonstrate that WTC dust-induced inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with epigenetic modifications in the lung and altered pulmonary mechanics. These changes may contribute to the development of WTC dust pathologies. PMID:27986442

  5. Design of the Structural Biology Center beamlines at the APS (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Westrbrook, Edwin M.

    1996-09-01

    The Structural Biology Center-CAT will develop and operate a sector of the APS as a user facility for studies in macromolecular crystallography. The techniques applied will include multiple-energy anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing and polychromatic (Laue) data collection. Data will be recorded on a high resolution CCD-area detector. The SBC is constructing two beamlines, one for radiation from an undulator and one for radiation from a bending magnet. The x ray optics of both beamlines are designed to produce a highly demagnified image of the source in order to match the focal size with the sizes of the sample and the resolution element of the detector. Vertical focusing is achieved by a flat, cylindrically bent mirror. Horizontal focusing is achieved by sagittally bending the second crystal of a double crystal-monochromator. The double-crystal monochromators of both beamlines have a constant exit height output beam. On the undulator beamline, two double-crystal monochromators are installed in series—one with Si-111 crystals and the second with Si-220 crystals—in order to facilitate quick change between high flux and narrow bandwidth. For the heat-loaded first crystals, the liquid-nitrogen-cooled, thin-web design being developed by the APS has been adopted. On the bending magnet beamline, three crystals (Si-111, Si-220, Si-400) are mounted side-by-side on the first crystal stage and translated into the beam is required.

  6. The Structural Biology Center 19ID undulator beamline: facility specifications and protein crystallographic results.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Alkire, Randy W; Evans, Gwyndaf; Rotella, Frank J; Lazarski, Krzystof; Zhang, Rong Guang; Ginell, Stephan L; Duke, Norma; Naday, Istvan; Lazarz, Jack; Molitsky, Michael J; Keefe, Lisa; Gonczy, John; Rock, Larry; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Walsh, Martin A; Westbrook, Edwin; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The 19ID undulator beamline of the Structure Biology Center has been designed and built to take full advantage of the high flux, brilliance and quality of X-ray beams delivered by the Advanced Photon Source. The beamline optics are capable of delivering monochromatic X-rays with photon energies from 3.5 to 20 keV (3.5-0.6 A wavelength) with fluxes up to 8-18 x 10(12) photons s(-1) (depending on photon energy) onto cryogenically cooled crystal samples. The size of the beam (full width at half-maximum) at the sample position can be varied from 2.2 mm x 1.0 mm (horizontal x vertical, unfocused) to 0.083 mm x 0.020 mm in its fully focused configuration. Specimen-to-detector distances of between 100 mm and 1500 mm can be used. The high flexibility, inherent in the design of the optics, coupled with a kappa-geometry goniometer and beamline control software allows optimal strategies to be adopted in protein crystallographic experiments, thus maximizing the chances of their success. A large-area mosaic 3 x 3 CCD detector allows high-quality diffraction data to be measured rapidly to the crystal diffraction limits. The beamline layout and the X-ray optical and endstation components are described in detail, and the results of representative crystallographic experiments are presented.

  7. The Structural Biology Center 19ID undulator beamline: facility specifications and protein crystallographic results

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Alkire, Randy W.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Rotella, Frank J.; Lazarski, Krzystof; Zhang, Rong-Guang; Ginell, Stephan L.; Duke, Norma; Naday, Istvan; Lazarz, Jack; Molitsky, Michael J.; Keefe, Lisa; Gonczy, John; Rock, Larry; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Walsh, Martin A.; Westbrook, Edwin; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The 19ID undulator beamline of the Structure Biology Center has been designed and built to take full advantage of the high flux, brilliance and quality of X-ray beams delivered by the Advanced Photon Source. The beamline optics are capable of delivering monochromatic X-rays with photon energies from 3.5 to 20 keV (3.5–0.6 Å wavelength) with fluxes up to 8–18 × 1012 photons s−1 (depending on photon energy) onto cryogenically cooled crystal samples. The size of the beam (full width at half-maximum) at the sample position can be varied from 2.2 mm × 1.0 mm (horizontal × vertical, unfocused) to 0.083 mm × 0.020 mm in its fully focused configuration. Specimen-to-detector distances of between 100 mm and 1500 mm can be used. The high flexibility, inherent in the design of the optics, coupled with a κ-geometry goniometer and beamline control software allows optimal strategies to be adopted in protein crystallographic experiments, thus maximizing the chances of their success. A large-area mosaic 3 × 3 CCD detector allows high-quality diffraction data to be measured rapidly to the crystal diffraction limits. The beamline layout and the X-ray optical and endstation components are described in detail, and the results of representative crystallographic experiments are presented. PMID:16371706

  8. Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats tabletop exercise: foodborne toxoplasmosis outbreak on college campuses.

    PubMed

    Morris, J Glenn; Greenspan, Allison; Howell, Kelly; Gargano, Lisa M; Mitchell, Joanne; Jones, Jeffrey L; Potter, Morris; Isakov, Alexander; Woods, Christopher; Hughes, James M

    2012-03-01

    The use of tabletop exercises as a tool in emergency preparedness and response has proven to be an effective means of assessing readiness for unexpected events. Whereas most exercise developers target a population in a defined space (eg, state, county, metropolitan area, hospital), the Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats (SECEBT) conducted an innovative tabletop exercise involving an unusual foodborne outbreak pathogen, targeting public health agencies and academic institutions in 7 southeastern states. The exercise tested the ability of participants to respond to a simulated foodborne disease outbreak affecting the region. The attendees represented 4 federal agencies, 9 state agencies, 6 universities, 1 nonprofit organization, and 1 private corporation. The goals were to promote collaborative relationships among the players, identify gaps in plans and policies, and identify the unique contributions of each organization-and notably academic institutions-to outbreak recognition, investigation, and control. Participants discussed issues and roles related to outbreak detection and management, risk communication, and coordination of policies and responsibilities before, during, and after an emergency, with emphasis on assets of universities that could be mobilized during an outbreak response. The exercise generated several lessons and recommendations identified by participants and evaluators. Key recommendations included a need to establish trigger points and protocols for information sharing and alerts among public health, academic, and law enforcement; to establish relationships with local, state, and federal stakeholders to facilitate communications during an emergency; and to catalogue and leverage strengths, assets, and priorities of academic institutions to add value to outbreak responses.

  9. Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats Tabletop Exercise: Foodborne Toxoplasmosis Outbreak on College Campuses

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. Glenn; Greenspan, Allison; Howell, Kelly; Mitchell, Joanne; Jones, Jeffrey L.; Potter, Morris; Isakov, Alexander; Woods, Christopher; Hughes, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of tabletop exercises as a tool in emergency preparedness and response has proven to be an effective means of assessing readiness for unexpected events. Whereas most exercise developers target a population in a defined space (eg, state, county, metropolitan area, hospital), the Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats (SECEBT) conducted an innovative tabletop exercise involving an unusual foodborne outbreak pathogen, targeting public health agencies and academic institutions in 7 southeastern states. The exercise tested the ability of participants to respond to a simulated foodborne disease outbreak affecting the region. The attendees represented 4 federal agencies, 9 state agencies, 6 universities, 1 nonprofit organization, and 1 private corporation. The goals were to promote collaborative relationships among the players, identify gaps in plans and policies, and identify the unique contributions of each organization—and notably academic institutions—to outbreak recognition, investigation, and control. Participants discussed issues and roles related to outbreak detection and management, risk communication, and coordination of policies and responsibilities before, during, and after an emergency, with emphasis on assets of universities that could be mobilized during an outbreak response. The exercise generated several lessons and recommendations identified by participants and evaluators. Key recommendations included a need to establish trigger points and protocols for information sharing and alerts among public health, academic, and law enforcement; to establish relationships with local, state, and federal stakeholders to facilitate communications during an emergency; and to catalogue and leverage strengths, assets, and priorities of academic institutions to add value to outbreak responses. PMID:22283568

  10. Allergy and asthma: Effects of the exposure to particulate matter and biological allergens.

    PubMed

    Baldacci, S; Maio, S; Cerrai, S; Sarno, G; Baïz, N; Simoni, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Viegi, G

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of asthma and allergies including atopy has increased during the past decades, particularly in westernized countries. The rapid rise in the prevalence of such diseases cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. Rapid urbanization and industrialization throughout the world have increased air pollution and population exposures, so that most epidemiologic studies are focusing on possible links between air pollution and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, a growing body of evidence shows that chemical air pollution may interact with airborne allergens enhancing the risk of atopic sensitization and exacerbation of symptoms in sensitized subjects. These phenomena are supported by current in vitro and animal studies showing that the combined exposure to air pollutants and allergens may have a synergistic or additive effect on asthma and allergies, although there is an insufficient evidence about this link at the population level. Further research is needed in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which pollutants and biological allergens induce damage in exposed subjects. The abatement of the main risk factors for asthma and allergic diseases may achieve huge health benefits. Thus, it is important to raise awareness of respiratory allergies as serious chronic diseases which place a heavy burden on patients and on society as a whole.

  11. Adverse effects of prenatal tobacco smoke exposure on biological parameters of the developing brainstem.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi

    2005-11-01

    We aimed to study the consequences of chronic exposure to tobacco smoke in utero on the morphological and functional maturation of the brainstem by comparing stillbirths of smoker mothers versus nonsmoker mothers. A total of 42 stillbirths, aged 25-40 gestational weeks, underwent autopsy according to our guidelines (). The brainstem was studied on serial sections and by immunohistochemistry to assay the expression of the EN2 gene, somatostatin (SS) and the tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme (TH). We observed a significant correlation between maternal smoking and sudden intrauterine unexplained death (SIUD), hypoplasia of the ArcN, no immunostaining of the EN2 in the arcuate nucleus (ArcN), and of TH in the locus coeruleus (LC) (P < 0.05). An increased incidence of maternal smoking was also observed in fetuses with SS negativity in the hypoglossus nucleus (HypoglN). Exposure in utero to maternal smoking may strongly interfere with brain biological parameters, giving rise not only to structural developmental abnormalities of the arcuate nucleus, but also to a decrease of noradrenergic activity in the LC, of EN2 gene expression in the ArcN and of SS in the HypoglN.

  12. Evaluation of exposure to PAHs in asphalt workers by environmental and biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Buratti, Marina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cirla, Piero E; Martinotti, Irene; Longhi, Omar; Cavallo, Domenico; Foà, Vito

    2006-09-01

    In the present article we assessed exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Italian asphalt workers (AW, n = 100), exposed to bitumen fumes and diesel exhausts, and in roadside construction workers (CW, n = 47), exposed to diesel exhausts, by means of environmental and biological monitoring. 1-hydroxypyrene (OH-Py) was determined in urine spot samples collected, respectively, after 2 days of vacation (baseline), before, and at the end of the monitored work shift, in the second part of the workweek. Median airborne levels during the work shift of 15 PAHs (both vapor and particulate phases), from naphthalene (NAP) to indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, ranged from below 0.03 to 426 ng/m(3). Median excretion values of OH-Py in baseline, before- and end-shift samples were 228, 402, and 690 ng/L for AW and 260, 304, and 378 ng/L for CW. Lower values were found in nonsmokers compared to smokers (e.g., in AW 565 and 781 versus 252 and 506 ng/L in before-shift and end-shift samples, respectively). In all subjects a weak correlation between personal exposure to the sum of airborne 15 PAHs and OH-Py was observed (r = 0.30). The results of this article show that AW experienced a moderate occupational exposure to airborne PAHs, resulting in a significant increase of urinary OH-Py during the workday and the workweek. The contribution of working activities to internal dose was in the same order of magnitude of the contribution of cigarette smoking.

  13. Physical and biological properties of U. S. standard endotoxin EC after exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Elin, R.J.; Hochstein, H.D.; Tsai, C.M.

    1983-07-01

    Techniques that reduce the toxicity of bacterial endotoxins are useful for studying the relationship between structure and biological activity. We used ionizing radiation to detoxify a highly refined endotoxin preparation. U.S. standard endotoxin EC. Dose-dependent changes occurred by exposure to /sup 60/Co-radiation in the physical properties and biological activities of the endotoxin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis showed gradual loss of the polysaccharide components (O-side chain and R-core) from the endotoxin molecules. In contrast, although endotoxin revealed a complex absorption pattern in the UV range, radiation treatment failed to modify that pattern. Dose-related destruction of the primary toxic component, lipid A, was suggested by the results of activity tests: both the pyrogenicity and limulus reactivity of the endotoxin were destroyed by increasing doses of radiation. The results indicate that the detoxification is probably due to multiple effects of the ionizing radiation on bacterial lipopolysaccharides, and the action involves (i) the destruction of polysaccharide moieties and possibly (ii) the alteration of lipid A component of the endotoxin molecule.

  14. Problem-Centered Supplemental Instruction in Biology: Influence on Content Recall, Content Understanding, and Problem Solving Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Joel; Belland, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    To address the need for effective, efficient ways to apply active learning in undergraduate biology courses, in this paper, we propose a problem-centered approach that utilizes supplemental web-based instructional materials based on principles of active learning. We compared two supplementary web-based modules using active learning strategies: the…

  15. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  16. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  17. Systematic review of biological effects of exposure to static electric fields. Part II: Invertebrates and plants.

    PubMed

    Schmiedchen, Kristina; Petri, Anne-Kathrin; Driessen, Sarah; Bailey, William H

    2017-09-27

    The construction of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines for the long-distance transport of energy is becoming increasingly popular. This has raised public concern about potential environmental impacts of the static electric fields (EF) produced under and near HVDC power lines. As the second part of a comprehensive literature analysis, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of static EF exposure on biological functions in invertebrates and plants and to provide the basis for an environmental impact assessment of such exposures. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was used to guide the methodological conduct and reporting. Thirty-three studies - 14 invertebrate and 19 plant studies - met the eligibility criteria and were included in this review. The reported behavioral responses of insects and planarians upon exposure strongly suggest that invertebrates are able to perceive the presence of a static EF. Many other studies reported effects on physiological functions that were expressed as, for example, altered metabolic activity or delayed reproductive and developmental stages in invertebrates. In plants, leaf damage, alterations in germination rates, growth and yield, or variations in the concentration of essential elements, for example, have been reported. However, these physiological responses and changes in plant morphology appear to be secondary to surface stimulation by the static EF or caused by concomitant parameters of the electrostatic environment. Furthermore, all of the included studies suffered from methodological flaws, which lowered credibility in the results. At field levels encountered from natural sources or HVDC lines (< 35kV/m), the available data provide reliable evidence that static EF can trigger behavioral responses in invertebrates, but they do not provide evidence for adverse effects of static EF on other biological functions in invertebrates and plants. At far higher field

  18. Biological effects of short-term, high-concentration exposure to methyl isocyanate. I. Study objectives and inhalation exposure design

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, D.E.; Frank, F.R.; Fowler, E.H.; Troup, C.M.; Milton, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    Early reports from India indicated that humans were dying within minutes to a few hours from exposure to methyl isocyanate (MIC). Attempts to explain the cause(s) of these rapid mortalities is where Union Carbide Corporation concentrated its post-Bhopal toxicologic investigations. The MIC studies involving rats and guinea pigs focused primarily on the consequences of acute pulmonary damage. All MIC inhalation exposures were acute, of short duration (mainly 15 min), and high in concentration. MIC vapors were statically generated in a double chamber exposure design. Precautionary measures taken during exposures are discussed. Guinea pigs were more susceptible than rats to MIC exposure-related early mortality. A greater than one order of magnitude difference was observed between an MIC concentration that caused no early mortality in rats (3506 ppm) and an MIC concentration that caused partial (6%) early mortality in guinea pigs (225 ppm) for exposures of 10 to 15 min duration. For both species, the most noteworthy clinical signs during exposure were lacrimation, blepharospasm, and mouth breathing. Fifteen minute LC/sub 50/ tests with 14-day postexposure follow-up were conducted, and the LC/sub 50/ (95% confidence limit) values were 171 (114-256) ppm for rats and 112 (61-204) ppm for guinea pigs. Target exposure concentrations for the toxicologic investigations of MIC-induced early mortality were established. A short summary of pertinent results of Union Carbide Corporation's post-Bhopal toxicologic investigations is presented.

  19. Estimating the Time Interval Between Exposure to the World Trade Center Disaster and Incident Diagnoses of Obstructive Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Michelle S.; Webber, Mayris P.; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Kelly, Kerry J.; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D.; Prezant, David J.; Hall, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13–24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  20. Estimating the time interval between exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and incident diagnoses of obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Michelle S; Webber, Mayris P; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kelly, Kerry J; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D; Prezant, David J; Hall, Charles B

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13-24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  1. Biomarkers of World Trade Center Particulate Matter Exposure: Physiology of Distal Airway and Blood Biomarkers that Predict FEV₁ Decline.

    PubMed

    Weiden, Michael D; Kwon, Sophia; Caraher, Erin; Berger, Kenneth I; Reibman, Joan; Rom, William N; Prezant, David J; Nolan, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Biomarkers can be important predictors of disease severity and progression. The intense exposure to particulates and other toxins from the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) overwhelmed the lung's normal protective barriers. The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) cohort not only had baseline pre-exposure lung function measures but also had serum samples banked soon after their WTC exposure. This well-phenotyped group of highly exposed first responders is an ideal cohort for biomarker discovery and eventual validation. Disease progression was heterogeneous in this group in that some individuals subsequently developed abnormal lung function while others recovered. Airflow obstruction predominated in WTC-exposed patients who were symptomatic. Multiple independent disease pathways may cause this abnormal FEV1 after irritant exposure. WTC exposure activates one or more of these pathways causing abnormal FEV1 in an individual. Our hypothesis was that serum biomarkers expressed within 6 months after WTC exposure reflect active disease pathways and predict subsequent development or protection from abnormal FEV1 below the lower limit of normal known as WTC-Lung Injury (WTC-LI). We utilized a nested case-cohort control design of previously healthy never smokers who sought subspecialty pulmonary evaluation to explore predictive biomarkers of WTC-LI. We have identified biomarkers of inflammation, metabolic derangement, protease/antiprotease balance, and vascular injury expressed in serum within 6 months of WTC exposure that were predictive of their FEV1 up to 7 years after their WTC exposure. Predicting future risk of airway injury after particulate exposures can focus monitoring and early treatment on a subset of patients in greatest need of these services. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Sharp Injury and Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids among Health Care Workers in Health Care Centers of Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, T; Worku, A; Assefa, N

    2016-07-01

    Health care workers are facing certain occupational hazards because of sharp injury and exposure to human blood and body fluids as a result of handling wastes. Though much attention is paid for the protection of these workers, the number of exposures and injuries do not show a sign of decline from time to time. To examine the occurrence of sharp injury and exposure to blood and body fluids in health care workers in health care centers in Ethiopia. In a case-control study, a randomly selected sample of 65 health facilities with 391 cases and 429 controls were studied. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Detailed analysis of exposure among the health care workers was done by logistic regression analysis with generalized estimating equations model to control correlation effects of responses within the cluster of health facilities. The number of health care workers who got sharp injury was 217 (26.5%). 296 (36.1%) had exposure to blood and body fluids. Working at Harari region (adjusted OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.75) and East Hararghea (adjusted OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.94), being male (adjusted OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.91), and a being nurse (adjusted OR 0.188, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.63) were independent risk factors of the exposure. Regardless of the anticipated low self-reporting for exposure status, the number of health care workers reported having sharp injury and exposure to blood and body fluids was high. Such high exposures indicate that health care workers are at high risk of acquiring blood-borne viral infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV.

  3. Influence of the degree of exposure to lead on relations between alcohol consumption and the biological indices of lead exposure: epidemiological study in a lead acid battery factory.

    PubMed Central

    Cezard, C; Demarquilly, C; Boniface, M; Haguenoer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Alcohol has been shown to interact with lead to influence haem biosynthesis. The aim of this study was to define the dependence of this interaction on the degree of exposure to lead. Exposure to alcohol was estimated by measurement of alcohol concentrations in a sample of urine collected during the morning (AlcUM) (0.82 (SD 4.36) mmol/l) and in a sample collected during the afternoon (AlcUA) (1.15 (SD 3.49) mmol/l). The biological monitoring of exposure to lead included measurements of blood lead (Pb-B) (1.82 (SD 0.72) mumol/l), urinary delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALAU) (35.33 (SD 28.00) mumol/l; d = 1.015), and erythrocyte zinc-protoporphyrin (ZPP) (112.90 (SD 83.71) nmol/mmol Hb) concentrations. The study of the influence of the degree of occupational exposure to lead on relations between alcohol consumption and effects of the exposure to lead led to the consideration of two different groups--namely, mildly and strongly exposed subjects. In the first group, individual biological susceptibility seemed to play a preponderant part. In the second, the pool of lead present in the body seemed to be sufficiently important to mask the effects of individual susceptibility. PMID:1390270

  4. Attitude, achievement, and classroom environment in a learner-centered introductory biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Bonnie Day

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the revision of an undergraduate biology course to meet the standards set forth by current science education reform documents. This course was revised by a collaborate team at a small, religious, liberal arts university located in an urban area of South Texas. This institution is a Hispanic serving institution where the majority of students are Hispanic. The female population of this institution is approximately 70 percent. The course was revised to meet teaching standards called for in the National Science Education Standards. The guiding principle was to use an instructional model that was based on constructivist theories of learning. The lecture and laboratory sections of the course were combined into a class that met two days a week for three hours. A learner-centered instructional model based on learning cycles and the 5E model were used to organize instruction. Three sections of the experimental course were compared to three control sections that were taught in a traditional format of a three-hour lecture with a separate lab. Instruments that measured classroom learning environment, achievement, and attitude toward science were given at the beginning and conclusion of the course. Qualitative data was gathered from a questionnaire, university course evaluations, and student portfolios. Results of the learning environment survey found that two sections of the control class used some active learning within the context of the traditional lecture. These sections were analyzed as a modified lecture and the other control section as the traditional lecture. The experimental sections were the integrated sections. Subjects in the traditional and integrated sections scored higher on the content knowledge test than those in the modified section. This suggests that the integrated course was as successful as the traditional method in acquisition of content knowledge. Subjects the integrated course and the

  5. Biological effects and epidemiological consequences of arsenic exposure, and reagents that can ameliorate arsenic damage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Pal, Sanya; Mohammed, Altaf; Farooqui, Mudassir; Doescher, Mark P.; Asch, Adam S.; Yamada, Hiroshi Y.

    2017-01-01

    Through contaminated diet, water, and other forms of environmental exposure, arsenic affects human health. There are many U.S. and worldwide “hot spots” where the arsenic level in public water exceeds the maximum exposure limit. The biological effects of chronic arsenic exposure include generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to oxidative stress and DNA damage, epigenetic DNA modification, induction of genomic instability, and inflammation and immunomodulation, all of which can initiate carcinogenesis. High arsenic exposure is epidemiologically associated with skin, lung, bladder, liver, kidney and pancreatic cancer, and cardiovascular, neuronal, and other diseases. This review briefly summarizes the biological effects of arsenic exposure and epidemiological cancer studies worldwide, and provides an overview for emerging rodent-based studies of reagents that can ameliorate the effects of arsenic exposure in vivo. These reagents may be translated to human populations for disease prevention. We propose the importance of developing a biomarker-based precision prevention approach for the health issues associated with arsenic exposure that affects millions of people worldwide. PMID:28915699

  6. Minimally invasive transcriptome profiling in salmon: detection of biological response in rainbow trout caudal fin following exposure to environmental chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Stevenson, Mitchel R; Skirrow, Rachel C; Rieberger, Kevin J; van Aggelen, Graham; Meays, Cynthia L; Helbing, Caren C

    2013-10-15

    An increasing number of anthropogenic chemicals have demonstrated potential for disruption of biological processes critical to normal growth and development of wildlife species. Both anadromous and freshwater salmon species are at risk of exposure to environmental chemical contaminants that may affect migratory behavior, environmental fitness, and reproductive success. A sensitive metric in determination of the presence and impact of such environmental chemical contaminants is through detection of changes in the status of gene transcript levels using a targeted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Ideally, the wildlife assessment strategy would incorporate conservation-centered non-lethal practices. Herein, we describe the development of such an assay for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, following an acute 96 h exposure to increasing concentrations of either 17α-ethinyl estradiol or cadmium. The estrogenic screen included measurement of mRNA encoding estrogen receptor α and β isoforms, vitellogenin, vitelline envelope protein γ, cytochrome p450 family 19 subfamily A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and the stress indicator, catalase. The metal exposure screen included evaluation of the latter two mRNA transcripts along with those encoding the metallothionein A and B isoforms. Exposure-dependent transcript abundance profiles were detected in both liver and caudal fin supporting the use of the caudal fin as a non-lethally obtained tissue source. The potential for both transcriptome profiling and genotypic sex determination from fin biopsy was extended, in principle, to field-captured Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

  7. Retrospective assessment of radiation exposure using biological dosimetry: chromosome painting, electron paramagnetic resonance and the glycophorin a mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, R A; Romanyukha, A A; Schauer, D A; Tucker, J D

    2006-07-01

    Biological monitoring of dose can contribute important, independent estimates of cumulative radiation exposure in epidemiological studies, especially in studies in which the physical dosimetry is lacking. Three biodosimeters that have been used in epidemiological studies to estimate past radiation exposure from external sources will be highlighted: chromosome painting or FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization), the glycophorin A somatic mutation assay (GPA), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with teeth. All three biodosimeters have been applied to A-bomb survivors, Chernobyl clean-up workers, and radiation workers. Each biodosimeter has unique advantages and limitations depending upon the level and type of radiation exposure. Chromosome painting has been the most widely applied biodosimeter in epidemiological studies of past radiation exposure, and results of these studies provide evidence that dose-related translocations persist for decades. EPR tooth dosimetry has been used to validate dose models of acute and chronic radiation exposure, although the present requirement of extracted teeth has been a disadvantage. GPA has been correlated with physically based radiation dose after high-dose, acute exposures but not after low-dose, chronic exposures. Interindividual variability appears to be a limitation for both chromosome painting and GPA. Both of these techniques can be used to estimate the level of past radiation exposure to a population, whereas EPR can provide individual dose estimates of past exposure. This paper will review each of these three biodosimeters and compare their application in selected epidemiological studies.

  8. Developing physical exposure-based back injury risk models applicable to manual handling jobs in distribution centers.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Steven A; Marras, William S; Ferguson, Sue A; Splittstoesser, Riley E; Yang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Using our ultrasound-based "Moment Monitor," exposures to biomechanical low back disorder risk factors were quantified in 195 volunteers who worked in 50 different distribution center jobs. Low back injury rates, determined from a retrospective examination of each company's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 300 records over the 3-year period immediately prior to data collection, were used to classify each job's back injury risk level. The analyses focused on the factors differentiating the high-risk jobs (those having had 12 or more back injuries/200,000 hr of exposure) from the low-risk jobs (those defined as having no back injuries in the preceding 3 years). Univariate analyses indicated that measures of load moment exposure and force application could distinguish between high (n = 15) and low (n = 15) back injury risk distribution center jobs. A three-factor multiple logistic regression model capable of predicting high-risk jobs with very good sensitivity (87%) and specificity (73%) indicated that risk could be assessed using the mean across the sampled lifts of the peak forward and or lateral bending dynamic load moments that occurred during each lift, the mean of the peak push/pull forces across the sampled lifts, and the mean duration of the non-load exposure periods. A surrogate model, one that does not require the Moment Monitor equipment to assess a job's back injury risk, was identified although with some compromise in model sensitivity relative to the original model.

  9. Microdosimetric analysis confirms similar biological effectiveness of external exposure to gamma-rays and internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Manabe, Kentaro; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The risk of internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I is of great public concern after the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE, defined herein as effectiveness of internal exposure relative to the external exposure to γ-rays) is occasionally believed to be much greater than unity due to insufficient discussions on the difference of their microdosimetric profiles. We therefore performed a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation in ideally aligned cell systems to calculate the probability densities of absorbed doses in subcellular and intranuclear scales for internal exposures to electrons emitted from 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I, as well as the external exposure to 662 keV photons. The RBE due to the inhomogeneous radioactive isotope (RI) distribution in subcellular structures and the high ionization density around the particle trajectories was then derived from the calculated microdosimetric probability density. The RBE for the bystander effect was also estimated from the probability density, considering its non-linear dose response. The RBE due to the high ionization density and that for the bystander effect were very close to 1, because the microdosimetric probability densities were nearly identical between the internal exposures and the external exposure from the 662 keV photons. On the other hand, the RBE due to the RI inhomogeneity largely depended on the intranuclear RI concentration and cell size, but their maximum possible RBE was only 1.04 even under conservative assumptions. Thus, it can be concluded from the microdosimetric viewpoint that the risk from internal exposures to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I should be nearly equivalent to that of external exposure to γ-rays at the same absorbed dose level, as suggested in the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  10. Microdosimetric Analysis Confirms Similar Biological Effectiveness of External Exposure to Gamma-Rays and Internal Exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Manabe, Kentaro; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The risk of internal exposure to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I is of great public concern after the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE, defined herein as effectiveness of internal exposure relative to the external exposure to γ-rays) is occasionally believed to be much greater than unity due to insufficient discussions on the difference of their microdosimetric profiles. We therefore performed a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation in ideally aligned cell systems to calculate the probability densities of absorbed doses in subcellular and intranuclear scales for internal exposures to electrons emitted from 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I, as well as the external exposure to 662 keV photons. The RBE due to the inhomogeneous radioactive isotope (RI) distribution in subcellular structures and the high ionization density around the particle trajectories was then derived from the calculated microdosimetric probability density. The RBE for the bystander effect was also estimated from the probability density, considering its non-linear dose response. The RBE due to the high ionization density and that for the bystander effect were very close to 1, because the microdosimetric probability densities were nearly identical between the internal exposures and the external exposure from the 662 keV photons. On the other hand, the RBE due to the RI inhomogeneity largely depended on the intranuclear RI concentration and cell size, but their maximum possible RBE was only 1.04 even under conservative assumptions. Thus, it can be concluded from the microdosimetric viewpoint that the risk from internal exposures to 137Cs, 134Cs, and 131I should be nearly equivalent to that of external exposure to γ-rays at the same absorbed dose level, as suggested in the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. PMID:24919099

  11. The anatomy of the exposures that occurred around the World Trade Center site: 9/11 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Lioy, Paul J; Georgopoulos, Panos

    2006-09-01

    The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) resulted in a new era of awareness on terrorism in the United States and the issues surrounding the potential for acute and/or long-term health outcomes caused by personal exposures to toxicants released during a terrorist event or an accident. The aftermath of the collapse yielded a situation usually not encountered in environmental health science: a large population's exposure to a previously uncharacterized complex mixture of airborne gases and particles, and re-suspendable particles (>2.5 microm in diameter). This led to a series of rapidly changing potential and actual exposure categories, both in space and time that were associated with the complex mixture of heterogeneous composition and character; e.g., very large particles mixed with much smaller amounts of fine particles, and gases released by uncontrolled combustion. The four categories of outdoor exposure that were encountered will be discussed over the period from September 11 until the fires ended on December 20, 2001. Further, the complex issue of indoor exposure to deposited dust will be highlighted from the beginning through the residual exposure issues being examined today (Category 5 period). The strength of the information on the initial WTC dust and smoke, and the smoke plumes from the fires and the continuing (permanent) gaps in our knowledge within the exposure sciences will be discussed, as well as our attempt to reconstruct exposure for various segments of the population in southern Manhattan and the surrounding areas. This all will be tied to lessons that must be considered in response to future events, natural or otherwise.

  12. Injury, intense dust exposure, and chronic disease among survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

    PubMed

    Alper, Howard E; Yu, Shengchao; Stellman, Steven D; Brackbill, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    The World Trade Center attack of September 11, 2001 in New York City (9/11) exposed thousands of people to intense concentrations of hazardous materials that have resulted in reports of increased levels of asthma, heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic diseases along with psychological illnesses such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Few studies have discriminated between health consequences of immediate (short-term or acute) intense exposures versus chronic residential or workplace exposures. We used proportional hazards methods to determine adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) for associations between several components of acute exposures (e.g., injury, immersion in the dust cloud) and four chronic disease outcomes: asthma, other non-neoplastic lung diseases, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, in 8701 persons free of those conditions prior to exposure and who were physically present during or immediately after the World Trade Center attacks. Participants were followed prospectively up to 11 years post-9/11. Heart disease exhibited a dose-response association with sustaining injury (1 injury type: AHR =2.0, 95% CI (Confidence Interval) 1.1-3.6; 2 injury types: AHR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.2-7.9; 3 or more injury types: AHR = 6.8, 95% CI 2.0-22.6), while asthma and other lung diseases were both significantly associated with dust cloud exposure (AHR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6). Diabetes was not associated with any of the predictors assessed in this study. In this study we demonstrated that the acute exposures of injury and dust cloud that were sustained on 9/11/2001 had significant associations with later heart and respiratory diseases. Continued monitoring of 9/11 exposed persons' health by medical providers is warranted for the foreseeable future.

  13. Creatinine and specific gravity normalization in biological monitoring of occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Jean-François; Lévesque, Martine; Huard, Mélanie; Drolet, Daniel; Lavoué, Jérôme; Tardif, Robert; Truchon, Ginette

    2015-01-01

    Reference values for the biological monitoring of occupational exposures are generally normalized on the basis of creatinine (CR) concentration or specific gravity (SG) to account for fluctuations in urine dilution. For instance, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH(®)) uses a reference value of 1g/L for CR. The comparison of urinary concentrations of biomarkers between studies requires the adjustment of results based on a reference CR and/or SG value, although studies have suggested that age, sex, muscle mass, and time of the day can exert non-negligible influences on CR excretion, while SG appears to be less affected. The objective of this study was to propose reference values for urinary CR and SG based on the results of samples sent for analysis by occupational health practitioners to the laboratory of the Occupational Health and Safety Research Institute of Québec (IRSST). We analyzed a database containing 20,395 urinary sample results collected between 1985 and 2010. Linear mixed-effects models with worker as a random effect were used to estimate the influence of sex and collection period on urinary CR and SG. Median CR concentrations were 25-30% higher in men (1.6 g/L or 14.4 mmol/L) than in women (1.2 g/L or 10.2 mmol/L). Four percent of the samples for men and 12% for women were below the acceptable threshold for CR (4.4 mmol/L). For SG, 5% of samples for men and 12% for women were below the threshold of 1.010. The difference in SG levels between sexes was lower than for CR, with a median of 1.024 for men compared to 1.020 for women. Our results suggest that the normalization of reference values based on a standard CR value of 1 g/L as proposed by the ACGIH is a conservative approach. According to the literature, CR excretion is more influenced by physiological parameters than SG. We therefore suggest that correction based on SG should be favored in future studies involving the proposal of reference values for the

  14. Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects Schreinemachers DM, Ghio AJ, Cascio WE, Sobus JR. U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA Perchlorate (ClO4-), an environmental pollutant, is a known thyroid toxicant and...

  15. EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND IT'S BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE: EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS.
    Rolondo R. Enoch2, Sara N. Greiner 1, Geri L. Youngblood 1, Christine C. Davis 1, and Suzanne E. Fenton 1
    1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, ...

  16. EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE: EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS.
    Rolondo R. Enoch2, Sara N. Greiner 1, Geri L. Youngblood 1, Christine C. Davis 1, and Suzanne E. Fenton 1
    1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, ...

  17. What are Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) ?Examples of Biological and Chemistry Approaches to their Detection, Exposure and Effects?

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will overview what Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) are, provide some examples of various CECs and some of the biological and chemistry approaches to assess their exposure and effects to aquatic life. The term CECs has been used since the 1990s to identif...

  18. Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects Schreinemachers DM, Ghio AJ, Cascio WE, Sobus JR. U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA Perchlorate (ClO4-), an environmental pollutant, is a known thyroid toxicant and...

  19. What are Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) ?Examples of Biological and Chemistry Approaches to their Detection, Exposure and Effects?

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will overview what Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) are, provide some examples of various CECs and some of the biological and chemistry approaches to assess their exposure and effects to aquatic life. The term CECs has been used since the 1990s to identif...

  20. EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE: EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS.
    Rolondo R. Enoch2, Sara N. Greiner 1, Geri L. Youngblood 1, Christine C. Davis 1, and Suzanne E. Fenton 1
    1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, ...

  1. EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND IT'S BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE: EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS.
    Rolondo R. Enoch2, Sara N. Greiner 1, Geri L. Youngblood 1, Christine C. Davis 1, and Suzanne E. Fenton 1
    1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, ...

  2. External Quality Assessment Scheme for Biological Monitoring of Occupational Exposure to Toxic Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we summarized the External Quality Assessment Scheme (EQAS) for the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to toxic chemicals which started in 1995 and continued until a 31st round robin in the spring of 2010. The program was performed twice per year until 2009, and this was changed to once a year since 2010. The objective of the program is to ensure the reliability of the data related to biological monitoring from analytical laboratories. Methods One hundred and eighteen laboratories participated in the 31st round robin. The program offers 5 items for inorganic analysis: lead in blood, cadmium in blood, manganese in blood, cadmium in urine, and mercury in urine. It also offers 10 items for organic analysis, including hippuric acid, methylhippuric acid, mandelic acid, phenylglyoxylic acid, N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide, trichloroacetic acid, total trichloro-compounds, trans,trans-muconic acid, and 2,5-hexanedione in urine. Target values were determined by statistical analysis using consensus values. All the data, such as chromatograms and calibration curves, were reviewed by the committee. Results The proficiency rate was below 70% prior to the first round robin and improved to over 90% for common items, such as PbB and HA, while those for other items still remained in the range of 60-90% and need to be improved up to 90%. Conclusion The EQAS has taken a primary role in improving the reliability of analytical data. A total quality assurance scheme is suggested, including the validation of technical documentation for the whole analytical procedure. PMID:22953206

  3. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  4. Field comparison of passive sampling and biological approaches for measuring exposure to PAH and alkylphenols from offshore produced water discharges.

    PubMed

    Harman, Christopher; Brooks, Steven; Sundt, Rolf C; Meier, Sonnich; Grung, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and alkylphenols (AP) that are present in routine discharges of produced water (PW) from the offshore industry continue to cause concern. The suitability of biological methods and chemical based passive samplers to determine exposure to these compounds was tested by deploying them around an oil installation and at reference locations in the North Sea. PAH and AP were analysed either as parent compounds in passive samplers and mussel tissue or as metabolites in fish bile. Generally the pattern of exposure relative to proximity to the discharge was represented by mussels, SPMDs and fish for PAH. Fish and SPMDs showed good correlation for PAH accumulations, whereas some differences were apparent between mussels and SPMDs. POCIS was the only technique tested that could accurately measure the most abundant AP in PW. The advantages of biologically independent measures of exposure for inclusion in discharge monitoring studies are outlined.

  5. [Exposure to liquid detergent capsules: a study of the cases reported to the Paris Poison Center, 2011-2012].

    PubMed

    Villa, A; Médernach, C; Arropetian, N; Lagrange, F; Langrand, J; Garnier, R

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the toxicity of liquid detergent capsules for children. Analysis of 684 consecutive cases from the Paris Poison Center (2011-2012). Most enquiries (97 %) concerned children 5 years of age or younger. The main circumstances of exposure were ingestion alone (72.4 %) or together with eye or skin contact (7.5 % and 7.3 %, respectively). The effects observed were generally due to the irritating properties of concentrated detergents: minor digestive disturbances (particularly vomiting in nearly 50 % of cases) after ingestion and conjunctivitis and/or keratitis after eye contact. The main complications were 24 cases of keratitis and one case of pulmonary toxicity after ingestion. A rash was observed in nine patients; it was delayed in two. The effects observed with liquid detergent capsules were very similar to those resulting from exposure to other detergents. However, exposure to these agents are very frequent and often results in eye contact, which may be responsible for keratitis, and after ingestion detergent inhalation is a possible complication. All cases with eye symptoms or cough after liquid detergent capsule exposure deserve prompt medical examination and assistance. Greater awareness of both health professionals and consumers on the dangers and risks of these laundry detergent pods is required for better treatment of exposure accidents and for their prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. World Trade Center Disaster Exposure-Related Probable Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Responders and Civilians: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H.; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts. PMID:25047411

  7. World Trade Center disaster exposure-related probable posttraumatic stress disorder among responders and civilians: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts.

  8. [New selen-organic biologically active nutrition supplement as a palliative for protection against chemical exposure].

    PubMed

    Sanotskiĭ, I V

    2009-01-01

    The article covers data on new biologically active nutrition supplement containing 3 generation selenium compound. The data include biologic effects, pharmacokinetics and usage recommendation for the supplement.

  9. REE incorporation and behaviour in aquatic turtles as a consequence of environmental exposure and biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censi, P.; Randazzo, L. A.; D'Angelo, S.; Cuttitta, A.; Saiano, F.

    2012-04-01

    features in whole blood samples suggest that behaviour of these elements can be influenced by vital effects, probably related to the phosphate deposition during formation of turtle skeleton. In order to corroborate this suggestion a portion of esoskeleton sample coming from an Emys trinacris individual was analysed and REE concentrations normalised to the environmental water. Observed features of REE pattern from this material strongly agree with above the mentioned hypothesis being MREE enriched, from Nd to Ho, with respect to LREE and HREE. Therefore collected data indicate that REE contents in blood of Emys trinacris is influenced by exposure to environmental conditions but elemental behaviour in whole blood is driven by biological processes, probably associated to formation of esoskeleton that can be subjected to the incorporation of radionuclides.

  10. The REPAIR Project: Examining the Biological Impacts of Sub-Background Radiation Exposure within SNOLAB, a Deep Underground Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Thome, Christopher; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Pirkkanen, Jake; Zarnke, Andrew; Laframboise, Taylor; Boreham, Douglas R

    2017-07-19

    Considerable attention has been given to understanding the biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure at levels slightly above background. However, relatively few studies have been performed to examine the inverse, where natural background radiation is removed. The limited available data suggest that organisms exposed to sub-background radiation environments undergo reduced growth and an impaired capacity to repair genetic damage. Shielding from background radiation is inherently difficult due to high-energy cosmic radiation. SNOLAB, located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, is a unique facility for examining the effects of sub-background radiation exposure. Originally constructed for astroparticle physics research, the laboratory is located within an active nickel mine at a depth of over 2,000 m. The rock overburden provides shielding equivalent to 6,000 m of water, thereby almost completely eliminating cosmic radiation. Additional features of the facility help to reduce radiological contamination from the surrounding rock. We are currently establishing a biological research program within SNOLAB: Researching the Effects of the Presence and Absence of Ionizing Radiation (REPAIR project). We hypothesize that natural background radiation is essential for life and maintains genomic stability, and that prolonged exposure to sub-background radiation environments will be detrimental to biological systems. Using a combination of whole organism and cell culture model systems, the effects of exposure to a sub-background environment will be examined on growth and development, as well as markers of genomic damage, DNA repair capacity and oxidative stress. The results of this research will provide further insight into the biological effects of low-dose radiation exposure as well as elucidate some of the processes that may drive evolution and selection in living systems. This Radiation Research focus issue contains reviews and original articles, which relate to the

  11. Liquid chromatography of urinary porphyrins for the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to porphyrinogenic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Colombi, A.; Maroni, M.; Ferioli, A.; Valla, C.; Coletti, G.; Foa, V.

    1983-01-01

    Very sensitive and precise analytical methods for measuring total porphyrin excretion and the relative amounts of different porphyrins in urine are required in order to monitor the biological effects of porphyrinogenic substances in workers and the general population. Many analytical steps of a HPLC method for measuring porphyrins as methyl esters in urine have been perfected. Sensitivity is 0.1 microgram/1 for each type of porphyrin, and average recovery is 92% in the range of 50-450 micrograms/liter porphyrins. The coefficient of variation is 3.4% within a series and 12.5% between series. Chemical oxidation before analysis and appropriate storing of the samples are the key points in achieving high quality results. The urinary excretion of porphyrins in healthy male workers varies within the range 21 to 161 micrograms/liter (95% limits of a group of 78 subjects). Concomitant factors, like drug use or liver disorders, were found to alter urinary porphyrin excretion. The proposed method permits the detection of extremely small alterations in porphyrin excretion resulting from occupational exposure to industrial chemicals such as, for example, mild coproporphyrinuria or early stages of chemical porphyria induced by polyhalogenated arylhydrocarbons.

  12. Sublethal Effects of Insecticide Exposure on Megacopta cribraria (Fabricius) Nymphs: Key Biological Traits and Acetylcholinesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jin; Reisig, Dominic D.; Li, Guoping; Wu, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Megacopta cribraria F. (Hemiptera: Plataspidae), the kudzu bug, is an invasive insect pest of U.S. soybean. At present, insecticide application is the primary and most effective control option for M. cribraria. In this study, the potential effects of sublethal and low-lethal concentrations (LC10 and LC40) of three common insecticides on key biological traits and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the treated nymphal stage of insect were assessed. The results show that the sublethal concentration of imidacloprid significantly reduced adult emergence rate of M. cribraria. A low-lethal concentration of imidacloprid significantly increased nymphal development time, but significantly decreased adult emergence rate and adult longevity. Both sublethal and low-lethal concentrations of acephate caused an increase in nymphal development time and a reduction in adult emergence rate and adult longevity. Fecundity of females was significantly reduced only by exposure to low-lethal concentrations of acephate. Sublethal and low-lethal concentrations of bifenthrin increased nymphal development time, but significantly decreased adult emergence rate. In addition, we found that the AChE activity of M. cribraria was significantly increased only by LC40 imidacloprid, but strongly inhibited by acephate. PMID:27638957

  13. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of biological aerosol exposure risks from automobile air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Mingzhen; Shen, Fangxia; Zou, Zhuanglei; Yao, Maosheng; Wu, Chang-yu

    2013-09-17

    Although use of automobile air conditioning (AC) was shown to reduce in-vehicle particle levels, the characterization of its microbial aerosol exposure risks is lacking. Here, both AC and engine filter dust samples were collected from 30 automobiles in four different geographical locations in China. Biological contents (bacteria, fungi, and endotoxin) were studied using culturing, high-throughput gene sequence, and Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) methods. In-vehicle viable bioaerosol concentrations were directly monitored using an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS) before and after use of AC for 5, 10, and 15 min. Regardless of locations, the vehicle AC filter dusts were found to be laden with high levels of bacteria (up to 26,150 CFU/mg), fungi (up to 1287 CFU/mg), and endotoxin (up to 5527 EU/mg). More than 400 unique bacterial species, including human opportunistic pathogens, were detected in the filter dusts. In addition, allergenic fungal species were also found abundant. Surprisingly, unexpected fluorescent peaks around 2.5 μm were observed during the first 5 min use of AC, which was attributed to the reaerosolization of those filter-borne microbial agents. The information obtained here can assist in minimizing or preventing the respiratory allergy or infection risk from the use of automobile AC system.

  15. NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclntire, Larry V.; Rudolph, Frederick B.

    1996-01-01

    The mission of our NSCORT is to investigate the effects of gravity and other environmental factors on biological function at the cellular and molecular level. The research efforts, training opportunities, and scientific exchange will promote the expansion of a scientific peer group well-educated in space-related biological issues. This will stimulate the interest of the larger scientific community and insure the continuing development of rigorous flight investigations in Gravitational Biology.

  16. A biological indicator of inorganic arsenic exposure using the sum of urinary inorganic arsenic and monomethylarsonic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Akihisa; Kurosawa, Hidetoshi; Endo, Yoko; Yamanaka, Kenzo; Fujitani, Noboru; Endo, Ginji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The sum of urinary inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) concentrations is used for the biological monitoring of occupational iAs exposure. Although DMA is a major metabolite of iAs, it is an inadequate index because high DMA levels are present in urine after seafood consumption. We estimated the urinary iAs+MMA concentration corresponding to iAs exposure. Methods: We used data from two arsenic speciation analyses of urine samples from 330 Bangladeshi with oral iAs exposure and 172 Japanese workers without occupational iAs exposure using high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: iAs, MMA, and DMA, but not arsenobetaine (AsBe), were detected in the urine of the Bangladeshi subjects. The correlation between iAs+MMA+DMA and iAs+MMA was obtained as log (iAs+MMA) = 1.038 log (iAs+MMA+DMA) -0.658. Using the regression formula, the iAs+MMA value was calculated as 2.15 and 7.5 μg As/l, corresponding to 3 and 10 μg As/m3 of exposures, respectively. In the urine of the Japanese workers, arsenic was mostly excreted as AsBe. We used the 95th percentile of iAs+MMA (12.6 μg As/l) as the background value. The sum of the calculated and background values can be used as a biological indicator of iAs exposure. Conclusion: We propose 14.8 and 20.1 μg As/l of urinary iAs+MMA as the biological indicators of 3 and 10 μg As/m3 iAs exposure, respectively. PMID:27010090

  17. Exposure to the World Trade Center Attack and the Use of Cigarettes and Alcohol Among New York City Public High-School Students

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Mandell, Donald J.; Fan, Bin; Liu, Xinhua; Fuller, Cordelia J.; Musa, George; Cohen, Michael; Cohen, Patricia; Hoven, Christina W.

    2006-01-01

    We examined exposure to the World Trade Center attack and changes in cigarette smoking and drinking among 2731 New York City public high-school students evaluated 6 months after the attack. Increased drinking was associated with direct exposure to the World Trade Center attack (P < .05). Increased smoking was not directly associated with exposure to the World Trade Center attack but was marginally significantly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (P= .06). Our findings suggest that targeted substance-use interventions for youths may be warranted after large-scale disasters. PMID:16571705

  18. NIEHS/EPA Children’s Environmental Health Centers: Lifecourse Exposures & Diet: Epigenetics, Maturation & Metabolic Syndrome

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  19. Establishment of the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority Resource Center for Children with Prenatal Alcohol/Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Løhaugen, Gro C. C.; Flak, Marianne Møretrø; Gerstner, Thorsten; Sundberg, Cato; Lerdal, Bjørn; Skranes, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new initiative in the South-Eastern Health Region of Norway to establish a regional resource center focusing on services for children and adolescents aged 2–18 years with prenatal exposure to alcohol or other drugs. In Norway, the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum (FAS) is not known but has been estimated to be between 1 and 2 children per 1000 births, while the prevalence of prenatal exposure to illicit drugs is unknown. The resource center is the first of its kind in Scandinavia and will have three main objectives: (1) provide hospital staff, community health and child welfare personnel, and special educators with information, educational courses, and seminars focused on the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of children with a history of prenatal alcohol/drug exposure; (2) provide specialized health services, such as diagnostic services and intervention planning, for children referred from hospitals in the South-Eastern Health Region of Norway; and (3) initiate multicenter studies focusing on the diagnostic process and evaluation of interventions. PMID:26692762

  20. Increasing the Use of Student-Centered Pedagogies from Moderate to High Improves Student Learning and Attitudes about Biology

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Georgianne L.; Donovan, Deborah A.; Chambers, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Student-centered strategies are being incorporated into undergraduate classrooms in response to a call for reform. We tested whether teaching in an extensively student-centered manner (many active-learning pedagogies, consistent formative assessment, cooperative groups; the Extensive section) was more effective than teaching in a moderately student-centered manner (fewer active-learning pedagogies, less formative assessment, without groups; the Moderate section) in a large-enrollment course. One instructor taught both sections of Biology 101 during the same quarter, covering the same material. Students in the Extensive section had significantly higher mean scores on course exams. They also scored significantly higher on a content postassessment when accounting for preassessment score and student demographics. Item response theory analysis supported these results. Students in the Extensive section had greater changes in postinstruction abilities compared with students in the Moderate section. Finally, students in the Extensive section exhibited a statistically greater expert shift in their views about biology and learning biology. We suggest our results are explained by the greater number of active-learning pedagogies experienced by students in cooperative groups, the consistent use of formative assessment, and the frequent use of explicit metacognition in the Extensive section. PMID:26865643

  1. Increasing the Use of Student-Centered Pedagogies from Moderate to High Improves Student Learning and Attitudes about Biology.

    PubMed

    Connell, Georgianne L; Donovan, Deborah A; Chambers, Timothy G

    2016-01-01

    Student-centered strategies are being incorporated into undergraduate classrooms in response to a call for reform. We tested whether teaching in an extensively student-centered manner (many active-learning pedagogies, consistent formative assessment, cooperative groups; the Extensive section) was more effective than teaching in a moderately student-centered manner (fewer active-learning pedagogies, less formative assessment, without groups; the Moderate section) in a large-enrollment course. One instructor taught both sections of Biology 101 during the same quarter, covering the same material. Students in the Extensive section had significantly higher mean scores on course exams. They also scored significantly higher on a content postassessment when accounting for preassessment score and student demographics. Item response theory analysis supported these results. Students in the Extensive section had greater changes in postinstruction abilities compared with students in the Moderate section. Finally, students in the Extensive section exhibited a statistically greater expert shift in their views about biology and learning biology. We suggest our results are explained by the greater number of active-learning pedagogies experienced by students in cooperative groups, the consistent use of formative assessment, and the frequent use of explicit metacognition in the Extensive section.

  2. Exposure Calls to U. S. Poison Centers Involving Electronic Cigarettes and Conventional Cigarettes-September 2010-December 2014.

    PubMed

    Chatham-Stephens, Kevin; Law, Royal; Taylor, Ethel; Kieszak, Stephanie; Melstrom, Paul; Bunnell, Rebecca; Wang, Baoguang; Day, Hannah; Apelberg, Benjamin; Cantrell, Lee; Foster, Howell; Schier, Joshua G

    2016-12-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing, and the long-term impact on public health is unclear. We described the acute adverse health effects from e-cigarette exposures reported to U.S. poison centers. We compared monthly counts and demographic, exposure, and health effects data of calls about e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes made to poison centers from September 2010 through December 2014. Monthly e-cigarette calls increased from 1 in September 2010, peaked at 401 in April 2014, and declined to 295 in December 2014. Monthly conventional cigarette calls during the same period ranged from 302 to 514. E-cigarette calls were more likely than conventional cigarette calls to report adverse health effects, including vomiting, eye irritation, and nausea. Five e-cigarette calls reported major health effects, such as respiratory failure, and there were two deaths associated with e-cigarette calls. E-cigarette calls to U.S. poison centers increased over the study period, and were more likely than conventional cigarettes to report adverse health effects. It is important for health care providers and the public to be aware of potential acute health effects from e-cigarettes. Developing strategies to monitor and prevent poisonings from these novel devices is critical.

  3. Notes from the Field: Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) Exposures Reported to Poison Centers - United States, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mehruba; Law, Royal; Schier, Josh

    2016-07-29

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (1). It is typically brewed into a tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules (2). It is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketum, and Biak (3). The Drug Enforcement Administration includes kratom on its Drugs of Concern list (substances that are not currently regulated by the Controlled Substances Act, but that pose risks to persons who abuse them), and the National Institute of Drug Abuse has identified kratom as an emerging drug of abuse (3,4). Published case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, and deaths (5,6). Because deaths have been attributed to kratom in the United States (7), some jurisdictions have passed or are considering legislation to make kratom use a felony (8). CDC characterized kratom exposures that were reported to poison centers and uploaded to the National Poison Data System (NPDS) during January 2010-December 2015. The NPDS is a national database of information logged by the country's regional poison centers serving all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico and is maintained by the American Association of Poison Control Centers. NPDS case records are the result of call reports made by the public and health care providers.

  4. Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: clinical intervention science and stress-biology research join forces.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Terrie E

    2013-11-01

    Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child's body, alterations that may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathology and for society, and we recommend that stress-biology research and intervention science join forces to tackle the problem. We examine the evidence base in relation to stress-sensitive measures for the body (inflammatory reactions, telomere erosion, epigenetic methylation, and gene expression) and brain (mental disorders, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological testing). We also review promising interventions for families, couples, and children that have been designed to reduce the effects of childhood violence exposure. We invite intervention scientists and stress-biology researchers to collaborate in adding stress-biology measures to randomized clinical trials of interventions intended to reduce effects of violence exposure and other traumas on young people.

  5. The critical role of the Poison Center in the recognition, mitigation and management of biological and chemical terrorism.

    PubMed

    Krenzelok, E P

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) terrorism counter measures are a major priority with healthcare providers, municipalities, states and the federal government. Significant resources are being invested to enhance civilian domestic preparedness through training in anticipation of a NBC terroristic incident. The key to a successful response, in addition to education, is integration of efforts as well as thorough communication and understanding the role that each agency would play in an actual or impending NBC incident. In anticipation of a NBC event, a regional counter-terrorism task force was established in southwestern Pennsylvania to identify resources, establish responsibilities and coordinate the response to NBC terrorism. Members of the task force include first responders, hazmat, law enforcement (local, regional, national), government officials, health departments, the statewide emergency management agency and the regional poison information center. The poison center is one of several critical components of a regional counter-terrorism response force. It can conduct active and passive toxicosurveillance and identify sentinel events. To be responsive, the poison center staff must be knowledgeable about biological and chemical agents. The development of basic protocols and a standardized staff education program is essential. The use of the RaPID-T (R-recognition, P-protection, D-detection, T-triage/treatment) course can provide basic staff education for responding to this important but rare consultation to the poison center.

  6. [Respiratory effects of exposure to chlorine vapors during a swimming pool accident in a recreational center in Rome].

    PubMed

    Di Napoli, Anteo; Agabiti, Nera; Ancona, Carla; Forastiere, Francesco; Lo Presti, Elena; Corbo, Giuseppe M; D'Orsi, Fulvio; Perucci, Carlo A

    2002-01-01

    When inhaled, chlorine is a highly irritating gas that can damage larger airways as well as distal lung structure. We examined the short-term respiratory effects of acute chlorine inhalation during a swimming pool accident. On October 22, 1998, an emission of chlorine vapours occurred in the chlorinating maintenance procedures room of a recreational center in Rome. A total of 282 subjects (134 children) inhaled hydrogen chloride and sodium hypochlorite. Most people received bronchodilators and cortisone at the emergency room; five children were hospitalised. A telephone follow-up was taken on 260 (92.2%) subjects to obtain information about duration of exposure (less than 3 minutes, 3-5 minutes, more than 5 minutes), intensity of exposure (not at all/a little, a fair amount, a lot), and acute respiratory symptoms. A total of 236 (90.7% of the target) individuals underwent clinical examinations, which took place 15-30 days after the accident. Lung function was measured in 184 people (82 children) after 15-30 days. A multiple linear regression was run to test the association between chlorine exposure and lung function, separately in adults and in children. Acute respiratory symptoms occurred among 66.7% adults and 71.6% children. The incidence rates were highest among those who had chronic respiratory disease and had a longer duration of exposure. In about 30% of the subjects, respiratory symptoms persisted 15-30 days after the accident. Lung function levels were reduced among those who reported high intensity of exposure in comparison to those who reported low exposure, both in children and in adults (forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV1, ml differences: -109 (CI 95%: -310, 93) and -275 (CI 95%: -510, -40). Given high prevalence of potential exposed people, findings from this study should alert public health authority about the possible clinical consequences.

  7. Variability in airborne and biological measures of exposure to mercury in the chloralkali industry: implications for epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Symanski, E; Sällsten, G; Barregård, L

    2000-01-01

    Exposure assessment is a critical component of epidemiologic studies, and more sophisticated approaches require that variation in exposure be considered. We examined the intra- and interindividual sources of variation in exposure to mercury vapor as measured in air, blood, and urine among four groups of workers during 1990-1997 at a Swedish chloralkali plant. Consistent with the underlying kinetics of mercury in the body, the variability of biological measures was dampened considerably relative to the variation in airborne levels. Owing to the effects of intraindividual variation, estimating workers' exposures from a few measurements can attenuate measures of effect. To examine such effects on studies relating long-term exposure to a continuous health outcome, we evaluated the utility of each exposure measure by comparing the necessary sample sizes required for accurate estimation of a slope coefficient obtained from a regression analysis. No single measure outperformed the others for all groups of workers. However, when workers were evaluated together, creatinine-corrected urinary mercury better discriminated workers' exposures than airborne or blood mercury levels. Thus, pilot studies should be conducted to examine variability in both air and biomonitoring data because quantitative information about the relative magnitude of the intra- and interindividual sources of variation feeds directly into our efforts to design an optimal sampling strategy when evaluating health risks associated with occupational or environmental contaminants. Images Figure 1 PMID:10856033

  8. Principles of antidote pharmacology: an update on prophylaxis, post-exposure treatment recommendations and research initiatives for biological agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, S; Liu, CQ; Tran, H; Gubala, A; Gauci, P; McAllister, J; Vo, T

    2010-01-01

    The use of biological agents has generally been confined to military-led conflicts. However, there has been an increase in non-state-based terrorism, including the use of asymmetric warfare, such as biological agents in the past few decades. Thus, it is becoming increasingly important to consider strategies for preventing and preparing for attacks by insurgents, such as the development of pre- and post-exposure medical countermeasures. There are a wide range of prophylactics and treatments being investigated to combat the effects of biological agents. These include antibiotics (for both conventional and unconventional use), antibodies, anti-virals, immunomodulators, nucleic acids (analogues, antisense, ribozymes and DNAzymes), bacteriophage therapy and micro-encapsulation. While vaccines are commercially available for the prevention of anthrax, cholera, plague, Q fever and smallpox, there are no licensed vaccines available for use in the case of botulinum toxins, viral encephalitis, melioidosis or ricin. Antibiotics are still recommended as the mainstay treatment following exposure to anthrax, plague, Q fever and melioidosis. Anti-toxin therapy and anti-virals may be used in the case of botulinum toxins or smallpox respectively. However, supportive care is the only, or mainstay, post-exposure treatment for cholera, viral encephalitis and ricin – a recommendation that has not changed in decades. Indeed, with the difficulty that antibiotic resistance poses, the development and further evaluation of techniques and atypical pharmaceuticals are fundamental to the development of prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment options. The aim of this review is to present an update on prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment recommendations and research initiatives for biological agents in the open literature from 2007 to 2009. PMID:20860656

  9. Occurrence of ²¹⁰Po and biological effects of low-level exposure: the need for research.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Ralph L; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2012-09-01

    Polonium-210 (²¹⁰Po) concentrations that exceed 1 Bq/L in drinking-water supplies have been reported from four widely separated U.S. states where exposure to it went unnoticed for decades. The radionuclide grandparents of ²¹⁰Po are common in sediments, and segments of the public may be chronically exposed to low levels of ²¹⁰Po in drinking water or in food products from animals raised in contaminated areas. We summarized information on the environmental behavior, biokinetics, and toxicology of ²¹⁰Po and identified the need for future research. Potential linkages between environmental exposure to ²¹⁰Po and human health effects were identified in a literature review. ²¹⁰Po accumulates in the ovaries where it kills primary oocytes at low doses. Because of its radiosensitivity and tendency to concentrate ²¹⁰Po, the ovary may be the critical organ in determining the lowest injurious dose for ²¹⁰Po. ²¹⁰Po also accumulates in the yolk sac of the embryo and in the fetal and placental tissues. Low-level exposure to ²¹⁰Po may have subtle, long-term biological effects because of its tropism towards reproductive and embryonic and fetal tissues where exposure to a single alpha particle may kill or damage critical cells. ²¹⁰Po is present in cigarettes and maternal smoking has several effects that appear consistent with the toxicology of ²¹⁰Po. Much of the important biological and toxicological research on ²¹⁰Po is more than four decades old. New research is needed to evaluate environmental exposure to ²¹⁰Po and the biological effects of low-dose exposure to it so that public health officials can develop appropriate mitigation measures where necessary.

  10. Occupational exposures to air contaminants at the World Trade Center disaster site--New York, September-October, 2001.

    PubMed

    2002-05-31

    Amid concerns about the fires and suspected presence of toxic materials in the rubble pile following the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) buildings on September 11, 2001, the New York City Department of Health (NYCDOH) asked CDC for assistance in evaluating occupational exposures at the site. CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) collected general area (GA) and personal breathing zone (PBZ) air samples for numerous potential air contaminants. This report summarizes the results of the assessment, which indicate that most exposures, including asbestos, did not exceed NIOSH recommended exposure limits (RELs) or Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limits (PELs). One torch cutter was overexposed to cadmium; another worker was overexposed to carbon monoxide (CO) while cutting metal beams with an oxyacetylene torch or a gasoline-powered saw, and two more were possibly overexposed to CO. NIOSH recommended that workers ensure adequate on-site ventilation when using gas-powered equipment and use rechargeable, battery-powered equipment when possible.

  11. Surveillance of toxic exposures: the pilot experience of the Poison Control Centers of Milan, Pavia and Bergamo in 2006.

    PubMed

    Settimi, Laura; Davanzo, Franca; Carbone, Pietro; Sesana, Fabrizio; Locatelli, Carlo; Farina, Maria Luisa; Maiozzi, Pietro; Roazzi, Paolo; Maccari, Fabio; Macchi, Luigi; Fanuzzi, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Between 1 February and 31 March 2006, the Poison Control Centers (PPC) active in Lombardy collaborated with an integrated surveillance system carried out in Piedmont during the Olympic Games 2006. The collaborating PPC notified to the system 697 human cases of exposure occurred in Piedmont during the observation period. Among these cases, 70% were exposed accidentally, 40% were 6 years old or younger, and 45% reported at least a clinical effect. The agents more frequently reported were: cleaning substances (household) (110 cases), fumes/gases/vapors (63 cases, comprising 38 cases accidentally exposed to carbon monoxide), and sedative/hypnotics/antipsychotics (53 cases). Although very limited, the available observations focused the attention on specific hazards and were able to highlight the potential of a toxic exposure surveillance system based on the information reported by the Italian PPC.

  12. Associations of World Trade Center exposures with pulmonary and cardiometabolic outcomes among children seeking care for health concerns

    PubMed Central

    Trasande, Leonardo; Fiorino, Elizabeth Kajunski; Attina, Teresa; Berger, Kenneth; Goldring, Roberta; Chemtob, Claude; Levy-Carrick, Nomi; Shao, Yongzhao; Liu, Mengling; Urbina, Elaine; Reibman, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prior research on the physical health of children exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks has largely relied on parental report via questionnaire. We examined the impact of clinically-reported exposures on the physical health of children who lived and/or attended school in downtown Manhattan on September 11, 2001. Study design We performed a cross-sectional study of 148 patients who presented to the WTC Environmental Health Center/Survivors Health Program, and were ≤18 years old on September 11, 2001. Results 38.5% were caught in the dust cloud from the collapsing buildings on September 11; over 80% spent ≥1 day in their home between September 11 and 18, 2001; and 25.7% reported home dust exposure. New-onset nasal/sinus congestion was reported in 52.7%, while nearly one-third reported new gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) symptoms. Prehypertension or hypertension was identified in 45.5%. Multivariable regression with exposure variables, body mass index category, and age as covariates identified strongest associations of dust cloud with spirometry (17.1% decrease in maximum midexpiratory flow). Younger children experienced increased peripheral eosinophils (+0.098% per year, p=0.023), while older children experienced more new-onset GERD (OR 1.17, p=0.004), headaches (OR 1.10, p=0.011), and prehypertension (OR 1.09, p=0.024). Home dust exposure was associated with reduced high-density lipoprotein (−10.3 mg/dL, p=0.027) and elevated triglycerides (+36.3 mg/dL, p=0.033). Conclusions While these findings cannot be assumed to generalize to all children exposed to the WTC attacks, they strongly suggest the need for more extensive study of respiratory, metabolic, and cardiovascu lar consequences. PMID:23280289

  13. [Waste sorting plants--recognition of exposure to biological agents (moulds)].

    PubMed

    Kozajda, Anna; Sowiak, Małgorzata; Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to recognize exposure to biological agents in the air of waste sorting plants. This publication contains the characteristics of technical solutions in use during sorting of waste and the results of quantitative analysis in terms of the presence of moulds and inhalable dust in the air. The study was conducted in the summertime inside two waste sorting plants with different production capacity ("big" and "small"). To evaluate inhalable dust in the air, 53 samples were collected using personal samplers on glass fiber filters. To assess mycological contamination of the air, 30 triple samples were directly collected on Petri dishes (Malt Extract Agar medium), using the volumetric impact method in the worker's respiratory zone. Samples were incubated for 5 days at 30 degrees C. Outcomes of the total number of moulds were provided in cfu/m3 (cfu--colony forming units). The mean concentration of inhalable dust, determined in the "big" waste sorting plant, was 2.38 mg/m3 and in the "small" plant 1.12 mg/m3. The quantitative analysis revealed the following values of the total number of moulds present in the air: 1) "big" waste sorting plant, 2.9 x 10(4) cfu/m3 (work premises) and 3.6 x 10(3) jtk/m3 (office premises); 2) "small" waste sorting plant, 7.8 x 10(4) cfu/m3 (work premises) and 2.5 x 10(3) jtk/m3 (office premises). Mould concentrations determined in the environment of waste sorting plants were high. To protect health of workers in this kind of plants, preventive programs focused on the protection of the skin and respiratory system should be implemented. Offices should be properly isolated from work premises to minimize spreading of inhalable dust.

  14. [Meconium as a new biological material for detecting intrauterine exposure to toxic substances].

    PubMed

    Lisowska-Myjak, Barbara

    2005-07-01

    The use of licit and illicit drugs and exposure to other xenobiotic agents during pregnancy is common. These substances are known to have adverse effects on the pregnancy and fetus; however information on fetal exposure is sparse due to the lack of an appropriate measure of exposure. Meconium analysis is a new method for identifying in utero exposure of infants to a number of illicit and legal drugs, alcohol, nicotine, heavy metals, pesticides, congenital infections. It's testing is non-invasive, highly accurate and able to detect prior exposure in utero during 12-40 weeks of gestation. This has implications for toxicology to develop improved methods to identify exposed infants.

  15. Notes from the field: carbon monoxide exposures reported to poison centers and related to hurricane Sandy - Northeastern United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-11-09

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone along the coast of southern New Jersey on Monday, October 29, 2012. In the wake of Sandy, state and federal public health agencies have observed an increase in the number of exposures to carbon monoxide (CO) reported to poison centers. CO is imperceptible and can cause adverse health effects ranging from fatigue and headache to cardiorespiratory failure, coma, and death. CO poisoning is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in post-disaster situations, when widespread power outages occur and risky behaviors, such as improper placement of generators and indoor use of charcoal grills, increase.

  16. Accidental injuries associated with nonhuman primate exposure at two regional primate research centers (USA): 1988-1993.

    PubMed

    bin Zakaria, M; Lerche, N W; Chomel, B B; Kass, P H

    1996-06-01

    Although occupationally acquired zoonoses of nonhuman primates have been well documented, the epidemiology of work-related injuries associated with occupational exposure to nonhuman primates has not been studied. To investigate such injuries, we retrospectively reviewed injury records at one regional primate research center and distributed a self-administered, anonymous questionnaire to at-risk personnel at two centers. Records of bite, animal-inflicted scratch, needlestick, cut, and mucous membrane exposure injuries were reviewed at one center for the 5-year period 1988 to 1993 to determine incidence and frequency of injuries and to identify possible risk factors. A total of 261 injuries were reported during this period, with an annual incidence for all injuries combined ranging from 43.5 to 65.5 injuries per 100,000 person workdays (pwd) at risk. For specific injuries the highest incidence was observed for animal-inflicted scratches and bites, with a rate of 82 and 81 per 100,000 pwd respectively. The job category Veterinary Resident was found to have the highest incidence for needlestick injuries (547 per 100,000 pwd), scratches (239 per 100,000 pwd), and cuts (171 per 100,000 pwd). The highest rates for bites were observed in the job categories Animal Health Technician and Animal Technician, with 171 and 150 per 100,000 pwd respectively; the category Staff Veterinarian had the highest rate of mucous membrane exposures (71 per 100,000 pwd). The frequency of all injuries was greatest in personnel employed < or = 2 years. Questionnaire responses indicated that having > 20 h per week of contact with nonhuman primates or contact with more than 50 nonhuman primates per week was associated with a significantly increased risk of bites, animal-inflicted scratches, needlesticks, and mucous membrane exposures. In addition, data analysis indicated that under-reporting of work-related injuries was high; 59% of scratches, 50% of mucous membrane exposures, 45% of cuts, 37% of

  17. The levels of kerosene components in biological samples after repeated dermal exposure to kerosene in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Junko; Hieda, Yoko; Tsujino, Yoshio; Xue, Yuying; Takayama, Koji; Kimura, Kojiro; Dekio, Satoshi

    2004-04-01

    The current study was experimentally investigated using rats whether or not kerosene components are accumulated from daily repeated dermal exposure. Rats received daily 1h-exposure to kerosene for 5 days (5K), daily 1h-exposure for 4 days and left for 1 day (4KL), a single 1h-exposure (1K), a single 1h-exposure and left for 1 day (1KL), or a single 1h-exposure, sacrificed and left dead for 1 day (1KLD). Kerosene components, trimethylbenzenes (TMBs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHCs) in blood and tissues were determined by GC-MS. In blood, almost the same concentrations of TMBs were detected in the rats sacrificed immediately after exposure (5K, 1K and 1KLD), and only trace levels were detected in the rats sacrificed 1 day after exposure (4 and 1KL). Almost the same levels of AHCs in blood were detected among groups except for the rats sacrificed 1 day after a single exposure (1KL), in which AHCs were slightly lower. These results suggest that (1) AHCs tend to be accumulated from daily exposure, while TMBs do not, (2) the proportions of detected kerosene components in blood can be an indicator of whether the last exposure occurred just before death or not, (3) the kerosene levels last at least 1 day without blood circulation.

  18. DURIP: Center on Countermeasures Prevention of Human Performance Failure from Biological Vulnerability: Achieving Optimal Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    countermeasures in animals. At the University of Pennsylvania and at Harvard University , integrated systems for the on-line measurement of a range of...This DURIP grant made possible major technological advances at the three sites of the AFOSR PRET Center (University of Pennsylvania, Harvard ... University and Stanford University), substantially improving the Center’s capability to study the neurobehavioral and neurobiological deficits associated with

  19. Exposure and Human Health Evaluation of Airborne Pollution from the World Trade Center Disaster

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the days following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center (WTC) towers, many Federal agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), were called upon to bring their technical and scientific expertise to the national e...

  20. EXPOSURE AND HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE POLLUTION FROM THE WORLD TRADE CENTER DISASTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the days following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center (WTC) towers, many Federal agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), were called upon to bring their technical and scientific expertise to the national e...

  1. Exposure and Human Health Evaluation of Airborne Pollution from the World Trade Center Disaster

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the days following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center (WTC) towers, many Federal agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), were called upon to bring their technical and scientific expertise to the national e...

  2. Occupational Exposure to Mercury: Air Exposure Assessment and Biological Monitoring based on Dispersive Ionic Liquid-Liquid Microextraction

    PubMed Central

    SHIRKHANLOO, Hamid; GOLBABAEI, Farideh; HASSANI, Hamid; EFTEKHAR, Farrokh; KIAN, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to mercury (Hg) as a heavy metal can cause health effects. The objective of this study was to assess occupational exposure to Hg in a chlor-alkali petrochemical industry in Iran by determining of Hg concentrations in air, blood and urine samples. Methods The study was performed on 50 exposed subjects and 50 unexposed controls. Air samples were collected in the breathing zone of exposed subjects, using hopcalite sorbents. Analysis was performed using a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CV-AAS) according to NIOSH analytical method 6009. For all participants, blood and urine samples were collected and then transferred into sterile glass tubes. After micro-extraction with ionic liquid and back extraction with nitric acid, Hg concentrations in blood and urine samples were determined by CV-AAS. Results The mean concentration of air Hg was 0.042± 0.003 mg/m3. The mean concentrations of Hg in blood and urine samples of exposed subjects were significantly higher than unexposed controls (22.41± 12.58 versus 1.19± 0.95 μg/l and 30.61± 10.86 versus 1.99± 1.34 μg/g creatinine, respectively). Correlation of air Hg with blood Hg, urine Hg and blood Hg-urine Hg ratio were significant statistically (P< 0.05). Conclusions The values of Hg in blood and urine samples of chlor-alkali workers were considerably high. Correlation coefficients showed that blood Hg and blood Hg-urine Hg ratio are better indicators than urine Hg for assessing occupationally exposed workers in terms of current exposure assessment. PMID:26110150

  3. Characteristics and outcomes of e-cigarette exposure incidents reported to 10 European Poison Centers: a retrospective data analysis.

    PubMed

    Vardavas, Constantine I; Girvalaki, Charis; Filippidis, Filippos T; Oder, Mare; Kastanje, Ruth; de Vries, Irma; Scholtens, Lies; Annas, Anita; Plackova, Silvia; Turk, Rajka; Gruzdyte, Laima; Rato, Fátima; Genser, Dieter; Schiel, Helmut; Balázs, Andrea; Donohoe, Elaine; Vardavas, Alexander I; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Behrakis, Panagiotis K

    2017-01-01

    The use of e-cigarettes has increased during the past few years. Exposure to e-cigarette liquids, whether intentional or accidental, may lead to adverse events our aim was to assess factors associated with e-cigarette exposures across European Union Member States (EU MS). A retrospective analysis of exposures associated with e-cigarettes reported to national poison centers was performed covering incidents from 2012 to March 2015 from 10 EU MS. De-identified and anonymous raw data was acquired. In total, 277 incidents were reported. Unintentional exposure was the most frequently cited type of exposure (71.3%), while e-cigarette refill vials were responsible for the majority of the reported incidents (87.3%). Two-thirds of all exposures (67.5%) occurred as ingestion of e-liquids, which was more frequent among children (≤ 5 years, 6-18 years) compared to adults (87.0% vs. 59.3% vs. 57.6%, p < 0.001 respectively), exposure via the respiratory (5.4% vs. 22.2% vs. 22.2%, p < 0.001) were more frequent among paediatric patients while ocular routes (2.2% vs. 3.7% vs. 11.4%, p = 0.021) were more frequent among adults. Logistic regression analyses indicated that paediatric incidents (≤ 5 years) were more likely to be through ingestion (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] = 4.36, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.]: 1.87-10.18), but less likely to have a reported clinical effect (aOR = 0.41, 95% C.I.: 0.21-0.82). Our study highlighted parameters related to e-cigarette exposure incidents in 10 EU MS, the results of which indicate that consideration should be given to the design features which may mitigate risks, thereby protecting users, non-users and especially children.

  4. The Effect of World Trade Center Exposure on the Timing of Diagnoses of Obstructive Airway Disease, Chronic Rhinosinusitis, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxue; Yip, Jennifer; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Webber, Mayris P; Schwartz, Theresa M; Prezant, David J; Weiden, Michael D; Hall, Charles B

    2017-01-01

    In a cohort of rescue/recovery workers exposed to the dust that resulted from the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC), we assessed how a diagnosis of obstructive airways disease (OAD) affected the likelihood of a subsequent diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We also assessed whether OAD acted as a mediator of the association between exposure to the WTC rescue/recovery effort and CRS and GERD diagnoses. In this prospective cohort study, we analyzed Fire Department of the City of New York physician diagnoses of OAD, CRS, and GERD that were first documented between September 11, 2001, and September 10, 2011, among 8,968 WTC-exposed firefighters. We used piecewise exponential survival models to evaluate whether OAD was a risk factor for either CRS or GERD and to assess OAD as a possible mediator. An OAD diagnosis significantly increased the risks for subsequent CRS [relative rate (RR), 4.24; 95% CI, 3.78-4.76] and GERD (RR, 3.21; 95% CI, 2.93-3.52) diagnoses. Further, 21% of the WTC exposure effect (high vs. low intensity) on GERD and 13% of the effect (high vs. low intensity) on CRS were mediated by a prior OAD diagnosis. Individuals with an OAD diagnosis had elevated risks for subsequent diagnoses of CRS or GERD. Part of the effect of WTC exposure on CRS and GERD diagnoses is mediated by prior diagnoses of OAD; this mediation effect of OAD may reflect biological pathways or healthcare utilization practices.

  5. Exposure to ethylene oxide in hospitals: biological monitoring and influence of glutathione S-transferase and epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Haufroid, Vincent; Merz, Brigitte; Hofmann, Annette; Tschopp, Alois; Lison, Dominique; Hotz, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Ethylene oxide is considered as a human carcinogen. A biomarker of exposure would be a useful instrument to assess the risk in occupationally exposed workers. This cross-sectional study aimed at examining (a) whether the urinary excretion of a metabolite of ethylene oxide, 2-hydroxyethyl mercapturic acid (HEMA), could be used for monitoring occupational exposure and (b) whether glutathione S-transferase (GST) and epoxide hydrolase genotypes influenced biological monitoring. Exposure to ethylene oxide was measured by personal sampling in 80 hospital workers (95% of those eligible). HEMA concentrations were determined in three urine samples (baseline, end of shift, and next morning) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. GSTs (GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1) and epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) were also genotyped. The influence of exposure, genotypes, and several other factors was examined in multiple regression analyses. Exposure was always <1 parts per million. On a group basis, exposure and a non-null GSTT1 genotype increased the HEMA concentrations in the urine sample collected at the end of the shift and these factors remained statistically significant after considering possible confounding or modifying factors.

  6. Systems responses of rats to aflatoxin B1 exposure revealed with metabonomic changes in multiple biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Ye, Yangfang; An, Yanpeng; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2011-02-04

    Exposure to aflatoxins causes liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma posing a significant health risk for human populations and livestock. To understand the mammalian systems responses to aflatoxin-B1 (AFB1) exposure, we analyzed the AFB1-induced metabonomic changes in multiple biological matrices (plasma, urine, and liver) of rats using (1)H NMR spectroscopy together with clinical biochemistry and histopathologic assessments. We found that AFB1 exposure caused significant elevation of glucose, amino acids, and choline metabolites (choline, phosphocholine, and glycerophosphocholine) in plasma but reduction of plasma lipids. AFB1 also induced elevation of liver lipids, amino acids (tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine), choline, and nucleic acid metabolites (inosine, adenosine, and uridine) together with reduction of hepatic glycogen and glucose. AFB1 further caused decreases in urinary TCA cycle intermediates (2-oxoglutarate and citrate) and elevation of gut microbiota cometabolites (phenylacetylglycine and hippurate). These indicated that AFB1 exposure caused hepatic steatosis accompanied with widespread metabolic changes including lipid and cell membrane metabolisms, protein biosynthesis, glycolysis, TCA cycle, and gut microbiota functions. This implied that AFB1 exposure probably caused oxidative-stress-mediated impairments of mitochondria functions. These findings provide an overview of biochemical consequences of AFB1 exposure and comprehensive insights into the metabolic aspects of AFB1-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

  7. Edgewood Chemical Biological Center In-House Laboratory Independent Research Program Annual Report FY11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    vitro following exposure to the toxicant paraoxon” (PI: Dorsey). Human induced pluripotnet stem (IPS) cells, differentiated to form glial cells and...graphene/lanthanide materials were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and laser induced ...polymer films induce a visible color change when exposed to aqueous media. The P2VP block of the copolymer was functionalized with either 2

  8. Systems genomics analysis centered on epigenetic inheritance supports development of a unified theory of biology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhay

    2015-11-01

    New discoveries are increasingly demanding integration of epigenetics, molecular biology, genomic networks and physiology with evolution. This article provides a proof of concept for evolutionary transgenerational systems biology, proposed recently in the context of epigenetic inheritance in mammals. Gene set enrichment analysis of available genome-level mammalian data presented here seem consistent with the concept that: (1) heritable information about environmental effects in somatic cells is communicated to the germline by circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) or other RNAs released in physiological fluids; (2) epigenetic factors including miRNA-like small RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications are propagated across generations via gene networks; and (3) inherited epigenetic variations in the form of methylated cytosines are fixed in the population as thymines over the evolutionary time course. The analysis supports integration of physiology and epigenetics with inheritance and evolution. This may catalyze efforts to develop a unified theory of biology.

  9. [Methodological aspects in environmental and biological monitoring of exposure to low doses of benzene: problems and possible solutions].

    PubMed

    Tranfo, Giovanna; Paci, Enrico; Fustinoni, Silvia; Barbieri, Anna; Carrieri, Mariella

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine some methods to measure human exposure to benzene, both in life and occupational environments, through environmental and biological monitoring, examining the critical issues and optimal conditions of use. The overall performance of environmental monitoring, from the analytical point of view, strongly depend on the choice of an appropriate method of sampling and analysis. Urinary SPMA and t, t-MA are the biomarkers listed by ACGIH to evaluate occupational exposure: most of the recent studies use HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry, but since t, t-MA is present in the urine in larger quantities it is also determinable with UV detectors. The urinary benzene is an index not officially included in the list of the ACGIH BEIs, but it is useful to assess exposure and benzene at low concentrations, that most frequently are found today in the occupational and life environments.

  10. Determination of platinum in blood and urine as a tool for the biological monitoring of internal exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Karl H.; Angerer, Juergen; Alt, Friedrich; Messerschmidt, Juergen; Weber, Andreas

    1993-03-01

    The increased industrial use of platinum has led to a growing need for the determination of platinum levels in biological materials. Concern about the release of toxic material from catalytic converters in motor vehicles in the environment and about occupational platinum exposure of employees working in the assembly of motor vehicle catalyzers and recycling led us to establish background and internal exposure levels in human body fluids. The development of an analytical procedure, based on adsorptive voltammetry with an extremely high power of detection (2 pg Pt absolute) for the determination in body fluids made population studies reliable and practicable. The methods are described and the reliability criteria are presented. For 13 not occupationally exposed persons the platinum levels ranged in urine from exposure levels, which exceeded the German MAK value of 2 (mu) g/m3. Platinum concentrations in human biological materials seem to be suitable as internal exposure indicators.

  11. Cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in relation to exposure to the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center disaster and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Hannah T; Stellman, Steven D; Morabia, Alfredo; Miller-Archie, Sara A; Alper, Howard; Laskaris, Zoey; Brackbill, Robert M; Cone, James E

    2013-10-24

    A cohort study found that 9/11-related environmental exposures and posttraumatic stress disorder increased self-reported cardiovascular disease risk. We attempted to replicate these findings using objectively defined cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in the same cohort. Data for adult World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees residing in New York State on enrollment and no cardiovascular disease history (n = 46,346) were linked to a New York State hospital discharge-reporting system. Follow-up began at Registry enrollment (2003-2004) and ended at the first cerebrovascular or heart disease (HD) hospitalization, death, or December 31, 2010, whichever was earliest. We used proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) for HD (n = 1151) and cerebrovascular disease (n = 284) hospitalization during 302,742 person-years of observation (mean follow-up, 6.5 years per person), accounting for other factors including age, race/ethnicity, smoking, and diabetes. An elevated risk of HD hospitalization was observed among women (AHR 1.32, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.71) but not men (AHR 1.16, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.40) with posttraumatic stress disorder at enrollment. A high overall level of World Trade Center rescue and recovery-related exposure was associated with an elevated HD hospitalization risk in men (AHR 1.82, 95% CI 1.06 to 3.13; P for trend = 0.05), but findings in women were inconclusive (AHR 3.29, 95% CI 0.85 to 12.69; P for trend = 0.09). Similar associations were observed specifically with coronary artery disease hospitalization. Posttraumatic stress disorder increased the cerebrovascular disease hospitalization risk in men but not in women. 9/11-related exposures and posttraumatic stress disorder appeared to increase the risk of subsequent hospitalization for HD and cerebrovascular disease. This is consistent with findings based on self-reported outcomes.

  12. The Effects of an Innovative Activity-Centered Biology Program on Attitude toward Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Donald A.

    One of the primary goals in many teacher education programs is to design and to implement specific courses, strategies, and methods that promote positive attitude toward science and science teaching among elementary education majors. This paper describes the effects of a biology content course, patterned after innovative elementary school science…

  13. Nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond: nanoscale sensors for physics and biology.

    PubMed

    Schirhagl, Romana; Chang, Kevin; Loretz, Michael; Degen, Christian L

    2014-01-01

    Crystal defects in diamond have emerged as unique objects for a variety of applications, both because they are very stable and because they have interesting optical properties. Embedded in nanocrystals, they can serve, for example, as robust single-photon sources or as fluorescent biomarkers of unlimited photostability and low cytotoxicity. The most fascinating aspect, however, is the ability of some crystal defects, most prominently the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center, to locally detect and measure a number of physical quantities, such as magnetic and electric fields. This metrology capacity is based on the quantum mechanical interactions of the defect's spin state. In this review, we introduce the new and rapidly evolving field of nanoscale sensing based on single NV centers in diamond. We give a concise overview of the basic properties of diamond, from synthesis to electronic and magnetic properties of embedded NV centers. We describe in detail how single NV centers can be harnessed for nanoscale sensing, including the physical quantities that may be detected, expected sensitivities, and the most common measurement protocols. We conclude by highlighting a number of the diverse and exciting applications that may be enabled by these novel sensors, ranging from measurements of ion concentrations and membrane potentials to nanoscale thermometry and single-spin nuclear magnetic resonance.

  14. [Exposure to biologic hazards in rehabilitation: analysis of the perceived risk and of the educational needs of nurses and physiotherapists].

    PubMed

    Papalia, Francesco; Monami, Stefano; Antonelli, Leone; Magnavita, Nicola; Marchi, Edda

    2007-01-01

    Nurses and physiotherapists who work in a Rehabilitation Centre are exposed to biologic hazards due to the close physical contact they have with their patients, who are often affected by contagious infectious diseases. The perceived risk amongst these workers is a significant element in establishing an effective prevention plan and in evaluating educational needs and was therefore investigated in this survey. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire, structured in four subsections for a total of twenty four multiple-choice questions was used. The evaluated variables included knowledge of pathogen transmission pathways, modes of exposure to such pathogens, knowledge of universal precautions and of ways in which to deal with known exposure. Physiotherapists, more so than nurses, have a partial and insufficient knowledge of biologic hazards. The main reason for this gap can be found in the school curriculum for such professionals, in which, in comparison to other graduate degree courses (medicine, nursing) a much smaller amount of course time is allotted to the topic of biologic hazards and risk prevention. In order to practice effective risk management it is therefore necessary for the employer to commit to providing specific on-site education and training to its workers. For this purpose, our centre has developed specific educational activities and internal procedures which can be shared on the topic of biologic hazards and risk management.

  15. Personal air sampling and biological monitoring of occupational exposure to the soil fumigant cis-1,3-dichloropropene

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, E; Verplanke, A; Boogaard, P; Bloemen, L; Van Sittert, N J; Christian, F; Stokkentreeff, M; Dijksterhuis, A; Mulder, A; De Wolff, F A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess exposure of commercial application workers to the nematocide cis-1,3-dichloropropene (cis-DCP).
METHODS—The study was conducted during the annual application season, August to 15 November, in the starch potato growing region in The Netherlands. 14 Application workers collected end of shift urine samples on each fumigation day (n=119). The mercapturic acid metabolite N-acetyl-S-(cis-3-chloro-2-propenyl)-L-cysteine (cis-DCP-MA) in urine was used for biological monitoring of the cis-DCP uptake. Inhalatory exposure was assessed by personal air sampling during a representative sample (n=37) of the fumigation days. Extensive information was collected on factors of possible relevance to the exposure and the application workers were observed for compliance with the statutory directions for use. The inhalatory exposure during all fumigation days was estimated from the relation between the personal air sampling data and the biological monitoring data. Exposure levels were correlated with the general work practice. The fumigation equipment and procedures were in accordance with the statutory directions of use, with the exception of the antidrip systems. Two antidrip systems were used: antidrip nozzles or a compressed air system.
RESULTS—The geometric mean exposure of the application workers was 2.7 mg/m3 (8 hour time weighted average); range 0.1-9.5 mg/m3. On 25 days (21%) the exposure exceeded the Dutch occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 5 mg/m3. This could mainly be explained by prolonged working days of more than 8 hours. The general work practice of the application workers was rated by the observers as good or poor. No difference in exposure to cis-DCP was found in the use of none, one, or two antidrip systems. Malfunctioning of the antidrip systems and lack of experience with the compressed air system were identified as possible causes for the lack of effectiveness of these antidrip systems. The use of personal protection was not

  16. A study of energy and effective atomic number dependence of the exposure build-up factors in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, G S; Singh, P S; Mudahar, G S

    2000-03-01

    A theoretical method is presented to determine the gamma-radiation build-up factors in various biological materials. The gamma energy range is 0.015-15.0 MeV, with penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths considered. The dependence of the exposure build-up factor on incident photon energy and the effective atomic number (Zeff) has also been assessed. In a practical analysis of dose burden to gamma-irradiated biological materials, the sophistication of Monte Carlo computer techniques would be applied, with associated detailed modelling. However, a feature of the theoretical method presented is its ability to make the consequences of the physics of the scattering process in biological materials more transparent. In addition, it can be quickly employed to give a first-pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed computer study.

  17. Biological and Behavorial Factors Modify Biomarkers of Arsenic Exposure in a U.S. Population**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although consumption of drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is usually considered the primary exposure route, aggregate exposure to arsenic depends on direct consumption of water, use of water in food preparation, and the presence in arsenicals in foods. To gain in...

  18. ORD research and results using biological end points to detect exposures to contaminants of emerging concern

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the past nine years the Ecological Exposure Research Division (EERD) has been developing methods for the assessment of EDCs and other contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). These methods include genomic techniques for detecting the presence and potential exposure to human p...

  19. SUMMARY OF BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING RESULTS FROM THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY/PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a prospective epidemiologic study of pesticide applicators and spouses in Iowa and North Carolina. Exposure to 2,4-D or chlorpyrifos was measured for a subset of applicators and their families in the AHS Pesticide Exposure Study to assess...

  20. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CO-EXPOSURE TO FINE PARTICLES AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN HEALTHY YOUNG ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects. It is unclear if co-exposure to NO2, a common pollutant gas, potentiates the PM effects. Healthy young volunteers were recruited and exposed to either filtered air (FA), NO2 (0.5 ppm), concentrated Cha...

  1. ORD research and results using biological end points to detect exposures to contaminants of emerging concern

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the past nine years the Ecological Exposure Research Division (EERD) has been developing methods for the assessment of EDCs and other contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). These methods include genomic techniques for detecting the presence and potential exposure to human p...

  2. Biological and Behavorial Factors Modify Biomarkers of Arsenic Exposure in a U.S. Population**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although consumption of drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic is usually considered the primary exposure route, aggregate exposure to arsenic depends on direct consumption of water, use of water in food preparation, and the presence in arsenicals in foods. To gain in...

  3. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CO-EXPOSURE TO FINE PARTICLES AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN HEALTHY YOUNG ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with adverse health effects. It is unclear if co-exposure to NO2, a common pollutant gas, potentiates the PM effects. Healthy young volunteers were recruited and exposed to either filtered air (FA), NO2 (0.5 ppm), concentrated Cha...

  4. SUMMARY OF BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING RESULTS FROM THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY/PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a prospective epidemiologic study of pesticide applicators and spouses in Iowa and North Carolina. Exposure to 2,4-D or chlorpyrifos was measured for a subset of applicators and their families in the AHS Pesticide Exposure Study to assess...

  5. Exposure to benzene in urban workers: environmental and biological monitoring of traffic police in Rome

    PubMed Central

    Crebelli, R; Tomei, F; Zijno, A; Ghittori, S; Imbriani, M; Gamberale, D; Martini, A; Carere, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate the contribution of traffic fumes to exposure to benzene in urban workers, an investigation on personal exposure to benzene in traffic police from the city of Rome was carried out.
METHODS—The study was performed from December 1998 to June 1999. Diffusive Radiello personal samplers were used to measure external exposures to benzene and alkyl benzenes during the workshift in 139 policemen who controlled medium to high traffic areas and in 63 office police. Moreover, as biomarkers of internal exposure to benzene, blood benzene, and urinary trans, trans-muconic and S-phenyl mercapturic acids were measured at the beginning and at the end of the workshift in 124 traffic police and 58 office police.
RESULTS—Time weighted average (TWA) exposure to benzene was consistently higher among traffic police than among indoor workers (geometric mean 6.8 and 3.5 µg/m3, respectively). Among the traffic police, the distribution of individual exposures was highly asymmetric, skewed toward higher values. Mean ambient benzene concentrations measured by municipal air monitoring stations during workshifts of traffic police were generally higher (geometric mean 12.6 µg/m3) and did not correlat with personal exposure values. In particular, no association was found between highest personal exposure scores and environmental benzene concentrations. Among the exposure biomarkers investigated, only blood benzene correlated slightly with on-shift exposure to benzene, but significant increases in both urinary trans, trans-muconic and S-phenylmercapturic acids were found in active smokers compared with non-smokers, irrespective of their job.
CONCLUSION—The exposure to traffic fumes during working activities in medium to high traffic areas in Rome may give a relatively greater contribution to personal exposure to benzene than indoor sources present in confined environments. Smoking significantly contributed to internal exposure to benzene in both

  6. Determinants of biological drug survival in rheumatoid arthritis: evidence from a Hungarian rheumatology center over 8 years of retrospective data

    PubMed Central

    Brodszky, Valentin; Bíró, Anikó; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Soós, Boglárka; Baji, Petra; Rencz, Fanni; Tóthfalusi, László; Gulácsi, László; Péntek, Márta

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare drug survival of biological therapies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and analyze the determinants of discontinuation probabilities and switches to other biological therapies. Materials and methods Consecutive RA patients initiating first biological treatment in one rheumatology center between 2006 and 2013 were included. Log-rank test was used to analyze the differences between the survival curves of different biological drugs. Cox regression was applied to analyze the discontinuation due to inefficacy, the occurrence of adverse events, or to any reasons. Results A total of 540 patients were included in the analysis. The most frequently used first-line biological treatments were infliximab (N=176, 33%), adalimumab (N=150, 28%), and etanercept (N=132, 24%). Discontinuation of first tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) treatment was observed for 347 (64%) patients, due to inefficacy (n=209, 60%), adverse events (n=103, 30%), and other reasons (n=35, 10%). Drug survival rates for TNF-α and non-TNF-α therapies were significantly different, and were in favor of non-TNF-α therapies. Every additional number of treatment significantly increased the risk of inefficacy by 27% (p<0.001) and of adverse events by 35% (p=0.002). After the discontinuation of the initial TNF-α treatment, switching to rituximab and tocilizumab was associated with significantly longer treatment duration than switching to a second TNF-α. The non-TNF-α therapies resulted in significantly longer treatment duration, due to both less adverse events and longer maintenance of effectiveness. Conclusion Non-TNF-α therapies resulted in significantly longer treatment duration, and lost their effectiveness later. Increase in the number of switches significantly increased the risk of discontinuation of any biological therapy. PMID:28243133

  7. The role of CO2 variability and exposure time for biological impacts of ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Emily C.; Munday, Philip L.; McNeil, Ben I.

    2013-09-01

    impacts of ocean acidification have mostly been studied using future levels of CO2 without consideration of natural variability or how this modulates both duration and magnitude of CO2 exposure. Here we combine results from laboratory studies on coral reef fish with diurnal in situ CO2 data from a shallow coral reef, to demonstrate how natural variability alters exposure times for marine organisms under increasingly high-CO2 conditions. Large in situ CO2 variability already results in exposure of coral reef fish to short-term CO2 levels higher than laboratory-derived critical CO2 levels (~600 µatm). However, we suggest that the in situ exposure time is presently insufficient to induce negative effects observed in laboratory studies. Our results suggest that both exposure time and the magnitude of CO2 levels will be important in determining the response of organisms to future ocean acidification, where both will increase markedly with future increases in CO2.

  8. [Effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Qiao, L; Yang, H Z; Li, X C; Huang, X Q; Yuan, B; Zhou, Z D

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To observe the effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured in vitro. Methods: The dividing method and treatment of cells for the detection of all indexes in this study were as follows. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells of the 4th passage were divided into 3 groups according to the random number table, with 12 wells in each group. Cells in control group (C) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. Cells in transient high glucose group (THG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 2 d and complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 5 d. Cells in prolonged high glucose group (PHG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. (1) The cell morphology in groups C and PHG on culture day 7 and that in group THG on culture day 2 and 7 was observed by inverted optical microscope. (2) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, cell proliferation rate was determined by cell viability analyzing counter. (3) After culture day 2, the scratch experiment was performed, and the cells were further cultured. At post scratch hour (PSH) 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120, the scratch area was measured, and the cell migration rates of the latter 5 time points were calculated. (4) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, the cell apoptosis rate was determined by cell analyzer. (5) Cells were seeded into Matrigel to culture for 24 h after culture day 7. The formation of vessel-like structure was observed by inverted optical microscope. The length and number of branch point of vessel-like structure were calculated. (6) On culture day 2, 4, and 7, mRNA expression of vascularization-related gene tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) was determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Data were processed with

  9. Exposure, probable PTSD and lower respiratory illness among World Trade Center rescue, recovery and clean-up workers

    PubMed Central

    Luft, B. J.; Schechter, C.; Kotov, R.; Broihier, J.; Reissman, D.; Guerrera, K.; Udasin, I.; Moline, J.; Harrison, D.; Friedman-Jimenez, G.; Pietrzak, R. H.; Southwick, S. M.; Bromet, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Thousands of rescue and recovery workers descended on the World Trade Center (WTC) in the wake of the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001 (9/11). Recent studies show that respiratory illness and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are the hallmark health problems, but relationships between them are poorly understood. The current study examined this link and evaluated contributions of WTC exposures. Method Participants were 8508 police and 12 333 non-traditional responders examined at the WTC Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program (WTC-MMTP), a clinic network in the New York area established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to explore patterns of association among exposures, other risk factors, probable WTC-related PTSD [based on the PTSD Checklist (PCL)], physician-assessed respiratory symptoms arising after 9/11 and present at examination, and abnormal pulmonary functioning defined by low forced vital capacity (FVC). Results Fewer police than non-traditional responders had probable PTSD (5.9% v. 23.0%) and respiratory symptoms (22.5% v. 28.4%), whereas pulmonary function was similar. PTSD and respiratory symptoms were moderately correlated (r=0.28 for police and 0.27 for non-traditional responders). Exposure was more strongly associated with respiratory symptoms than with PTSD or lung function. The SEM model that best fit the data in both groups suggested that PTSD statistically mediated the association of exposure with respiratory symptoms. Conclusions Although longitudinal data are needed to confirm the mediation hypothesis, the link between PTSD and respiratory symptoms is noteworthy and calls for further investigation. The findings also support the value of integrated medical and psychiatric treatment for disaster responders. PMID:22459506

  10. Comparison of lisdexamfetamine and dextroamphetamine exposures reported to U.S. poison centers.

    PubMed

    Kaland, Mingzohn Ellen; Klein-Schwartz, Wendy

    2015-06-01

    Lisdexamfetamine is a pro-drug stimulant that requires the enzymatic hydrolysis of lysine from dexamphetamine for pharmacologic effects. There is limited information comparing non-therapeutic lisdexamfetamine and dextroamphetamine exposures. The objective was to compare lisdexamfetamine exposures with dextroamphetamine/amphetamine extended release and dextroamphetamine/amphetamine immediate release. A retrospective observational case series of single-substance exposures to lisdexamfetamine, dextroamphetamine/amphetamine extended release, or dextroamphetamine/amphetamine immediate release reported to the National Poison Data System from 2007 to 2012 was performed. Data were analyzed for demographics, reason, clinical effects, management site, and outcomes. There were 23,553 exposures: lisdexamfetamine (7,113), dextroamphetamine/amphetamine extended release (6,245), and dextroamphetamine/amphetamine immediate release (10,195). The most frequent clinical effects observed for lisdexamfetamine, dextroamphetamine/amphetamine extended release, and dextroamphetamine/amphetamine immediate release were agitation (19.8%, 21.7%, and 25.1%, respectively) and tachycardia (19.2%, 22.8%, and 23.9%, respectively). The reason was most often exploratory (93.4%) in children < 6 years and therapeutic error (65.6%) in children aged 6-12 years. In adolescents and adults most common reasons were suicide attempts (28.4%) followed by abuse (19.5%) and therapeutic errors (18.8%). Overall, 61.6% of cases were managed in a health care facility, with the majority treated in the emergency department only. The majority of cases (76.0%) experienced no or minor effects. More serious outcomes (moderate/major/death) occurred in 21.2% of lisdexamfetamine, 24.7% of dextroamphetamine/amphetamine extended release, and 25.5% of dextroamphetamine/amphetamine immediate release. There were 4 deaths (1 dextroamphetamine/amphetamine extended release and 3 dextroamphetamine/amphetamine immediate release). In

  11. Lithium cell tests at Langley Research Center. [for the long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bene, J.

    1977-01-01

    The long duration exposure facility mission places temperature requirements of from -30 F to +150 F on the batteries to be used. A hermetically sealed lithium sulfur dioxide cell was tested to predict what the temperature of the battery would be over a given spectrum of temperatures of operation. Near the end of cell discharge, as the voltage started collapsing, a very high heat output rise due to chemical reaction took place. However, if the cells were thermally insulated, they vented, ignited, and burned if an attempt was made to discharge them all the way. The cells do not go into reversal. It was determined that the root of the problem was probably the chemical reaction between the lithium and the acetonitrite solvent. A redesigned cell is discussed as well as some alternates.

  12. Municipal waste incinerators: air and biological monitoring of workers for exposure to particles, metals, and organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, A; Collot-Fertey, D; Anzivino, L; Marques, M; Hours, M; Stoklov, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate occupational exposure to toxic pollutants at municipal waste incinerators (MWIs). Methods: Twenty nine male subjects working near the furnaces in two MWIs, and 17 subjects not occupationally exposed to combustion generated pollutants were studied. Individual air samples were taken throughout the shift; urine samples were collected before and after. Stationary air samples were taken near potential sources of emission. Results: Occupational exposure did not result in the infringement of any occupational threshold limit value. Atmospheric exposure levels to particles and metals were 10–100 times higher in MWIs than at the control site. The main sources were cleaning operations for particles, and residue transfer and disposal operations for metals. MWI workers were not exposed to higher levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons than workers who are routinely in contact with vehicle exhaust. The air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes were low and did not appear to pose any significant threat to human health. Only the measurement of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels would seem to be a reliable marker for the combustion of plastics. Urine metal levels were significantly higher at plant 1 than at plant 2 because of high levels of pollutants emanating from one old furnace. Conclusion: While biological monitoring is an easy way of acquiring data on long term personal exposure, air monitoring remains the only method that makes it possible to identify the primary sources of pollutant emission which need to be controlled if occupational exposure and environmental pollution are to be reduced. PMID:12883016

  13. Does habituation really happen? Investigation of psycho-biological responses to body exposure in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Trentowska, Monika; Svaldi, Jennifer; Blechert, Jens; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2017-03-01

    Body exposure is a common and effective treatment for body image disturbance in bulimia nervosa (BN). However, little is known about treatment mechanisms. Based on models of emotional processing and neurovisceral integration, we expected to observe a) initial activation and b) habituation of cognitive-affective and autonomic responding within one and between two standardized body exposure sessions. A group of 13 women with BN and 13 healthy controls (HC) were repeatedly exposed to their bodies. Prior to and after treatment with three individualized mirror exposure sessions participants received a session of standardized exposure to videographic recordings of their body. Subjective ratings of body-related emotions and thoughts were assessed repeatedly throughout the standardized exposure sessions and autonomic responses were recorded continuously. Subjective and sympathetic responses were activated initially in both groups. Cognitive-affective responses habituated within the standardized sessions in both groups, whereas between the standardized sessions habituation was only found in women with BN. Increasing sympathetic responses were found within the sessions in both groups. The results support cognitive-affective habituation during body exposure in BN and to a lesser extent in HC. Autonomic responses however did not show a corresponding pattern and did not distinguish between groups. Implications for body exposure research and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness and properties of the biological prosthesis Permacol™ in pediatric surgery: A large single center experience.

    PubMed

    Filisetti, Claudia; Costanzo, Sara; Marinoni, Federica; Vella, Claudio; Klercy, Catherine; Riccipetitoni, Giovanna

    2016-05-01

    The use of prosthetic patches of non-absorbable materials represents a valid tool in the treatment of abdominal wall and diaphragmatic defects in pediatric age. In recent years research has developed biological dermal scaffolds made from a sheet of acellular matrix that can provide the desired support and reduce the occurrence of complications from non-absorbable implant. We present our experience and a systematic review to evaluate the use of biologic prosthesis for abdominal wall closure in pediatric patients. The study from January 2009 to January 2015 involved 20 patients treated with Permacol™ implant. We observed postoperative complications only in patients treated for abdominal wall closure, which is the major indication for the use of Permacol™. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (according to PRISMA) on PubMed/Medline, Scopus and EMBASE regarding the use of biological prosthesis in pediatric population considering the incidence of complications as the primary outcome. 3/20 patients experienced complications: 2 patients with skin necrosis healed conservatively and 1 of them developed laparocele. Thus only 1 patient with incisional hernia had significant surgery complication. In patients who were permanently implanted with Permacol™ it has not determined adverse reactions with optimal functional outcome. In accordance with the few data (case reports and case series) reported in literature about pediatric patients, our experience in different pathologies and applications has shown the effectiveness of Permacol™, in particular for the non-occurrence of infections, that often affect the use of prosthesis.

  15. A Method for Quantifying the Acute Health Impacts of Residential Non-Biological Exposure Via Inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Singer, Bret C.

    2014-08-01

    The inability to monetize the health costs of acute exposures in homes and the benefits of various control options is a barrier to justifying policies and approaches that can reduce exposure and improve health.We synthesized relationships between short-term outdoor concentration changes and health outcomes to estimate the health impacts of short-term in-home exposures. Damage and cost impacts of specific health outcomes were taken from the literature. We assessed the impact of vented and non-vented residential natural gas cooking burners on Southern California occupants for two pollutants (NO2 and CO).

  16. Physical and biological studies with protons and HZE particles in a NASA supported research center in radiation health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Borak, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA has established and supports a specialized center for research and training (NSCORT) to specifically address the potential deleterious effects of HZE particles on human health. The NSCORT in radiation health is a joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Colorado State University (CSU). The overall scope of research encompasses a broad range of subjects from microdosimetric studies to cellular and tissue responses to initial damage produced by highly energetic protons and heavy charged particles of the type found in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) spectrum. The objectives of the microdosimetry studies are to determine the response of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) to cosmic rays using ground based accelerators. This includes evaluation of energy loss due to the escape of high-energy delta rays and increased energy deposition due to the enhanced delta ray production in the wall of the detector. In this report major results are presented for 56Fe at 1000, 740, 600 and 400 MeV/nucleon. An assessment of DNA repair and early development of related chromosomal changes is extremely important to our overall understanding of enhanced biological effectiveness of high LET particle radiation. Results are presented with respect to the fidelity of the rejoining of double strand breaks and the implications of misrejoining. The relationship between molecular and cytogenetic measurements is presented by studying damage processing in highly heterochromatic supernumerary (correction of sypernumerary) X chromosomes and the active X-chromosome. One of the important consequences of cell's inability to handle DNA damage can be evaluated through mutation studies. Part of our goal is the assessment of potential radioprotectors to reduce the mutation yield following HZE exposures, and some promising results are presented on one compound. A second goal is the integration of DNA repair and mutation studies. Results are presented on a direct

  17. Physical and biological studies with protons and HZE particles in a NASA supported research center in radiation health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Borak, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA has established and supports a specialized center for research and training (NSCORT) to specifically address the potential deleterious effects of HZE particles on human health. The NSCORT in radiation health is a joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Colorado State University (CSU). The overall scope of research encompasses a broad range of subjects from microdosimetric studies to cellular and tissue responses to initial damage produced by highly energetic protons and heavy charged particles of the type found in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) spectrum. The objectives of the microdosimetry studies are to determine the response of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) to cosmic rays using ground based accelerators. This includes evaluation of energy loss due to the escape of high-energy delta rays and increased energy deposition due to the enhanced delta ray production in the wall of the detector. In this report major results are presented for 56Fe at 1000, 740, 600 and 400 MeV/nucleon. An assessment of DNA repair and early development of related chromosomal changes is extremely important to our overall understanding of enhanced biological effectiveness of high LET particle radiation. Results are presented with respect to the fidelity of the rejoining of double strand breaks and the implications of misrejoining. The relationship between molecular and cytogenetic measurements is presented by studying damage processing in highly heterochromatic supernumerary (correction of sypernumerary) X chromosomes and the active X-chromosome. One of the important consequences of cell's inability to handle DNA damage can be evaluated through mutation studies. Part of our goal is the assessment of potential radioprotectors to reduce the mutation yield following HZE exposures, and some promising results are presented on one compound. A second goal is the integration of DNA repair and mutation studies. Results are presented on a direct

  18. Physical and biological studies with protons and HZE particles in a NASA supported research center in radiation health.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Borak, T H

    2001-01-01

    NASA has established and supports a specialized center for research and training (NSCORT) to specifically address the potential deleterious effects of HZE particles on human health. The NSCORT in radiation health is a joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Colorado State University (CSU). The overall scope of research encompasses a broad range of subjects from microdosimetric studies to cellular and tissue responses to initial damage produced by highly energetic protons and heavy charged particles of the type found in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) spectrum. The objectives of the microdosimetry studies are to determine the response of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) to cosmic rays using ground based accelerators. This includes evaluation of energy loss due to the escape of high-energy delta rays and increased energy deposition due to the enhanced delta ray production in the wall of the detector. In this report major results are presented for 56Fe at 1000, 740, 600 and 400 MeV/nucleon. An assessment of DNA repair and early development of related chromosomal changes is extremely important to our overall understanding of enhanced biological effectiveness of high LET particle radiation. Results are presented with respect to the fidelity of the rejoining of double strand breaks and the implications of misrejoining. The relationship between molecular and cytogenetic measurements is presented by studying damage processing in highly heterochromatic supernumerary (correction of sypernumerary) X chromosomes and the active X-chromosome. One of the important consequences of cell's inability to handle DNA damage can be evaluated through mutation studies. Part of our goal is the assessment of potential radioprotectors to reduce the mutation yield following HZE exposures, and some promising results are presented on one compound. A second goal is the integration of DNA repair and mutation studies. Results are presented on a direct

  19. Patient-centered imaging: shared decision making for cardiac imaging procedures with exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Berman, Daniel S; Min, James K; Hendel, Robert C; Gerber, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cullom, S James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal W; Dorbala, Sharmila; Fazel, Reza; Garcia, Ernest V; Gibbons, Raymond J; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R; Raff, Gilbert L; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A; Shaw, Leslee J

    2014-04-22

    The current paper details the recommendations arising from an NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium held in November 2012, aiming to identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Symposium participants, working in 3 tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. The use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3 mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written informed consent. However, a protocol effective dose >20 mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization.

  20. Patient-Centered Imaging: Shared Decision Making for Cardiac Imaging Procedures with Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.; Hendel, Robert C.; Gerber, Thomas C.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D.; Cullom, S. James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal; Dorbala, Sharmila; Garcia, Ernest V.; Gibbons, Raymond J.; Halliburton, Sandra S.; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V.; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R.; Fazel, Reza; Raff, Gilbert L.; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A.; Shaw, Leslee J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Background An NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium was held in November 2012 to address these issues. Methods Symposium participants, working in three tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. Results Use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written consent. However, a protocol effective dose <20mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. Conclusions The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:24530677

  1. Predicting Lactational and Early Post-Weaning Exposures in Rats Using Biologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk and safety assessments for early life exposures to environmental chemicals or pharmaceuticals based on cross-species extrapolation would greatly benefit from information on chemical dosimetry in the young.

  2. Radiation exposure in the acute and short-term management of urolithiasis at 2 academic centers.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Michael N; Bagrodia, Aditya; Pierre, Sean A; Scales, Charles D; Rampersaud, Edward; Pearle, Margaret S; Preminger, Glenn M

    2009-02-01

    Diagnostic imaging has a central role in the evaluation and management of urolithiasis. A variety of modalities are available, each with benefits and limitations. Without careful consideration of imaging modalities in quantity and type patients may receive excessive doses of radiation during initial diagnostic and followup evaluations. Therefore, we determined the effective radiation dose associated with an acute stone episode and short-term followup. A multicenter retrospective study of all patients who presented with an acute stone episode was performed. The analysis included all imaging studies related to stone disease performed within 1 year of the acute event. Using accepted effective radiation dose standards for each of these examinations, the total radiation dose administered was calculated and compared by patient characteristics including stone location, stone number and intervention strategy. The primary outcome assessed was a total radiation dose greater than 50 mSv, the recommended yearly dose limit for occupational exposure by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. We identified 108 patients who presented to our respective institutions with a primary acute stone episode between 2000 and 2006. The mean age in our cohort was 48.6 years and 50% of the patients were men. Patients underwent an average of 4 radiographic examinations during the 1-year period. Studies performed included a mean of 1.2 plain abdominal films of the kidneys, ureters and bladder (range 0 to 7), 1.7 abdominopelvic computerized tomograms (range 0 to 6) and 1 excretory urogram (range 0 to 3) during the first year of followup. The median total effective radiation dose per patient was 29.7 mSv (IQR 24.2, 45.1). There were 22 (20%) patients who received greater than 50 mSv. Analysis of stone location, number of stones, stone composition, patient age, sex and surgical intervention indicated no statistically significant difference in the probability of receiving a total

  3. Personnel radiation exposure analysis in a radiotherapy center: fourteen year retrospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, P.M.K.

    1983-11-01

    The radiation exposure to the staff in the Ontario Cancer Institute between 1964-1977 was analyzed based on data from personnel film monitors. The annual collective dose equivalent was found to vary from 320 to 720 person-mSv. Of this, about 75% was attributable to the use of radionuclides for intracavitary and interstitial therapy, about 17% the use of external radiation therapy equipment, and the remaining, about 8% was equally attributable to diagnostic x ray and a mixture of many radiation sources used in research. The most influential factor to the annual collective dose equivalent was the number of patients treated with intracavitary and interstitial therapy. The dose per such application to this population was about .70 mSv, and was further broken down into .48 mSv to nurses in the wards where these patients were admitted, .11 mSv to personnel who handle these sources, .08 mSv to the operating room staff, and .04 mSv to the others. The collective dose per external radiation daily treatment was about .0008 mSv. For a course of 20 treatments, the collective dose equivalent will be in the order of .02 mSv. For diagnostic radiology, the collective dose per patient visit was in the order of 0.0003 mSv.

  4. Sensor structure concepts for the analysis or local radiation exposure of biological samples at terahertz and millimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornuf, Fabian; Dörr, Roland; Lämmle, David; Schlaak, Helmut F.; Krozer, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    We have studied several sensor concepts for biomedical applications operating in the millimeter wave and terahertz range. On one hand, rectangular waveguide structure were designed and extended with microfluidic channels. In this way a simple analysis of aqueous solutions at various waveguide bands is possible. In our case, we focused on the frequency range between 75 GHz and 110 GHz. On the other hand, planar sensor structures for aqueous solutions have been developed based on coplanar waveguides. With these planar sensors it is possible to concentrate the interaction volume on small sensor areas, which achieve a local exposure of the radiation to the sample. When equipping the sensor with microfluidic structures the sample volume could be reduced significantly and enabled a localized interaction with the sensor areas. The sensors are designed to exhibit a broadband behavior up to 300 GHz. Narrow-band operation can also be achieved for potentially increased sensitivity by using resonant structures. Several tests with Glucose dissolved in water show promising results for the distinction of different glucose levels at millimeter wave frequencies. The planar structures can also be used for the exposure of biological cells or cell model systems like liposomes with electromagnetic radiation. Several studies are planned to distinguish on one hand the influence of millimeter wave exposure on biological systems and also to have a spectroscopic method which enables the analysis of cell processes, like membrane transport processes, with millimeter wave and terahertz frequencies by focusing the electric field directly on the analyzing sample.

  5. Development of a Free-Electron Laser Center and Research in Medicine, Biology and Materials Science,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-14

    electron laser through the diagnostic room to the various experimental laboratories, as indicated in Fig. 2. For experiments in surgery, the Center...evidence. In ’Jew of thle UPS [1-3] and EELS [6.7] The experimental values of the Ga*/GaO ratio experiments on GaAs, it is generally believed that are...Excited-state neutral alkalis, on the other hand. The experimental layout of the ESD/PSD experi - are detected from their characteristic de-excitation fluo

  6. Biomarkers of Patient Intrinsic Risk for Upper and Lower Airway Injury After Exposure to the World Trade Center Atrocity

    PubMed Central

    Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Nolan, Anna; Putman, Barbara; Singh, Ankura; Prezant, David J.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Background High rates of upper and lower airways disease have occurred in Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) workers exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster site. Most experienced acute declines in pulmonary function, and some continued to experience decline over 14 years of follow-up. Similarly, some with rhinosinusitis had symptoms requiring sinus surgery. Aim To increase generalizability of biomarker investigation, we describe biomarkers of risk for upper and lower airway injury that do not require stored serum. Methods We review WTC biomarker literature. Results Cytokines expressed in stored serum from the first 6 months post-9/11 can identify individuals at higher risk for future abnormal pulmonary function. Conclusion This research will help identify individuals at high risk of lung and sinus disease that develop after these, or future, irritant exposures for intensive monitoring and treatment. It may also identify targets for effective therapeutic interventions. PMID:27582481

  7. Comparing virtual reality exposure therapy to present-centered therapy with 11 U.S. Vietnam veterans with PTSD.

    PubMed

    Ready, David J; Gerardi, Robert J; Backscheider, Andrea G; Mascaro, Nathan; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2010-02-01

    Eleven Vietnam veterans with war-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomly assigned to 10 sessions of either virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy within a computer-generated virtual Vietnam environment or present-centered therapy (PCT) that avoided traumatic content and utilized a problem-solving approach. Participants were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 6 months posttreatment by an independent assessor blind to treatment condition. Nine participants completed treatment with one dropout per condition. No significant differences emerged between treatments, likely due to insufficient power. Although comparison of mean changes in PTSD symptoms for the VRE and PCT conditions yielded a moderate effect size (d = 0.56) in favor of VRE at 6 months posttreatment, changes in PTSD scores were more variable, and therefore less reliable, within the VRE condition. The utility of VRE with older veterans with PTSD is discussed.

  8. Attachment and psychological adaptation in high exposure survivors of the September 11th attack on the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Fraley, R Chris; Fazzari, David A; Bonanno, George A; Dekel, Sharon

    2006-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between individual differences in adult attachment and psychological adaptation in a sample of high-exposure survivors of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression were assessed via self-report 7 and 18 months after the attacks. In addition, friends and relatives were asked to provide evaluations of participants' adjustment before and after the attacks. Findings indicate that securely attached individuals exhibited fewer symptoms of PTSD and depression than insecurely attached individuals and were viewed by friends and relatives as showing an increase in adjustment following the attacks. Highly dismissing adults were viewed by their friends and family as showing neither increments nor decrements in adjustment, despite the fact that highly dismissing people self-reported relatively high levels of PTSD and depression.

  9. The effects of oil exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes and splenic melano-macrophage centers of Gulf of Mexico fishes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmad Omar; Hohn, Claudia; Allen, Peter J; Ford, Lorelei; Dail, Mary Beth; Pruett, Stephen; Petrie-Hanson, Lora

    2014-02-15

    In August and November 2010 we collected and examined peripheral blood and tissues from three species of Gulf of Mexico fish. Findings were compared to non-exposed control fish. The leukocyte counts of exposed alligator gar were not significantly different from controls, while exposed Gulf killifish and sea trout had significantly decreased lymphocyte counts. Liver ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) values from sea trout were significantly greater than control sea trout EROD values, suggesting poly aromatic hydrocarbon exposure. Splenic melano-macrophage centers (MMCs) from exposed sea trout and Gulf killifish showed a significant increase in number compared to non-exposed fish. Sea trout splenic MMCs were also significantly greater in size. These findings suggest that Gulf fish sampled were exposed to crude oil from the Macondo well and were in a lymphopenic or immuno-compromised state.

  10. Biological monitoring techniques for human exposure to industrial chemicals. Analysis of human fat, skin, nails, hair, blood, urine, and breath

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, L.; Umana, M.; Bursey, J.; Gutknecht, W.; Handy, R.; Hyldburg, P.; Michael, L.; Moseley, A.; Raymer, J.; Smith, D.

    1986-01-01

    Biological monitoring techniques for human exposure to industrial chemicals are detailed in this book which surveys and evaluates methods and procedures to identify and quantitative chemical constituents in human tissues and body fluids, including fat, skin, nails, hair, blood, urine, and breath. The book details attempts to determine 1) the feasibility of correlating preferred methods with specific tissues or fluids and/or with readily identifiable chemical characteristics, and 2) which biological matrices serve as the best indicators of past or present exposure to chemical constituents of concern. The methods studied have been evaluated of their ease and rapidly, as well as cost, accuracy and precision. Target compounds studied were those inorganic and organic chemicals basically of current or previous concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Information provided for the methods evaluated includes sections regarding various types of instrumentation and sample preparation. Sections on method/analyte correlation suggest physical or chemical properties which might be used to predict the applicability of a given analytical method to the analysis of that chemical in a specific biological matrix.

  11. Substrate activation for O2 reactions by oxidized metal centers in biology.

    PubMed

    Pau, Monita Y M; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-11-20

    The uncatalyzed reactions of O(2) (S = 1) with organic substrates (S = 0) are thermodynamically favorable but kinetically slow because they are spin-forbidden and the one-electron reduction potential of O(2) is unfavorable. In nature, many of these important O(2) reactions are catalyzed by metalloenzymes. In the case of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes, either Fe(II) or Fe(III) can play the catalytic role in these spin-forbidden reactions. Whereas the ferrous enzymes activate O(2) directly for reaction, the ferric enzymes activate the substrate for O(2) attack. The enzyme-substrate complex of the ferric intradiol dioxygenases exhibits a low-energy catecholate to Fe(III) charge transfer transition that provides a mechanism by which both the Fe center and the catecholic substrate are activated for the reaction with O(2). In this Perspective, we evaluate how the coupling between this experimentally observed charge transfer and the change in geometry and ligand field of the oxidized metal center along the reaction coordinate can overcome the spin-forbidden nature of the O(2) reaction.

  12. Fort Collins Science Center- Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch : Integrating social, behavioral, economic and biological sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2010-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center's Policy Analysis and Science Assistance (PASA) Branch is a team of approximately 22 scientists, technicians, and graduate student researchers. PASA provides unique capabilities in the U.S. Geological Survey by leading projects that integrate social, behavioral, economic, and biological analyses in the context of human-natural resource interactions. Resource planners, managers, and policymakers in the U.S. Departments of the Interior (DOI) and Agriculture (USDA), State and local agencies, as well as international agencies use information from PASA studies to make informed natural resource management and policy decisions. PASA scientists' primary functions are to conduct both theoretical and applied social science research, provide technical assistance, and offer training to advance performance in policy relevant research areas. Management and research issues associated with human-resource interactions typically occur in a unique context, involve difficult to access populations, require knowledge of both natural/biological science in addition to social science, and require the skill to integrate multiple science disciplines. In response to these difficult contexts, PASA researchers apply traditional and state-of-the-art social science methods drawing from the fields of sociology, demography, economics, political science, communications, social-psychology, and applied industrial organization psychology. Social science methods work in concert with our rangeland/agricultural management, wildlife, ecology, and biology capabilities. The goal of PASA's research is to enhance natural resource management, agency functions, policies, and decision-making. Our research is organized into four broad areas of study.

  13. Advancing Cancer Systems Biology: Introducing the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT

    PubMed Central

    Deisboeck, Thomas S.; Zhang, Le; Martin, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Integrative cancer biology research relies on a variety of data-driven computational modeling and simulation methods and techniques geared towards gaining new insights into the complexity of biological processes that are of critical importance for cancer research. These include the dynamics of gene-protein interaction networks, the percolation of sub-cellular perturbations across scales and the impact they may have on tumorigenesis in both experiments and clinics. Such innovative ‘systems’ research will greatly benefit from enabling Information Technology that is currently under development, including an online collaborative environment, a Semantic Web based computing platform that hosts data and model repositories as well as high-performance computing access. Here, we present one of the National Cancer Institute’s recently established Integrative Cancer Biology Programs, i.e. the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT, which is charged with building a cancer modeling community, developing the aforementioned enabling technologies and fostering multi-scale cancer modeling and simulation. PMID:19390664

  14. [Occupational risk for blood exposure and staff behaviour: a cross-sectional study in 3 Moroccan healthcare centers].

    PubMed

    Djeriri, K; Charof, R; Laurichesse, H; Fontana, L; El Aouad, R; Merle, J L; Catilina, P; Beytout, J; Chamoux, A

    2005-01-01

    As in other countries, Moroccan health-care workers are exposed to occupational blood exposure (OBE) hazards. The purpose of this study was to estimate the occupational safety and hygiene conditions determining the OBE risk for health-care workers. WORKERS AND METHODS: In March 2000, a multicentric study was carried out in Morocco on 420 health-care workers, with an anonymous questionnaire. The study included health-care workers in the Taza and Temara hospitals and health centers, as well as in a Rabat public medical analysis laboratory. The participation rate was 67.8% (285/420). The population was mainly female (61%) with a mean age of 41.4 years (+/-7 years). Health-care workers answered that: occupational hygiene and safety were inadequate (55.1%); wearing single-use gloves was rare (34.5%); resheathing used needles was frequent (74.5%); safe containers were often missing (67%). In 1999, the annual average incidence of OBE was 1.5 (+/-4.3) per capita. If we consider the whole career of health-care workers, the incidence reached about 14.3+/-28.1 per capita. The absence of post-exposure chemoprophylaxis was the rule. The study shows that there is a need to improve occupational hygiene and safety conditions for Moroccan health-care workers in order to reduce OBE hazards.

  15. A preliminary study using 10Be-26Al exposure dating at the Xi'an AMS Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, Y., Sr.; Wu, Z.; Chang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Exposure age dating using in situ 10Be and 26Al is a very useful technique for dating fluvial terraces. This is especially true in semiarid regions where other methods suffer from a paucity of suitable dating materials. This article describes sample preparation procedures and analytical benchmarks established at the Xi'an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Center for the study of in situ 10Be and 26Al. Four intercomparison samples were analyzed in the study, using an improved sample preparation method. The exposure age results are shown to be in good agreement with published data, and demonstrate the reliability of the dating method. This article also presents new 10Be and 26Al results from quartz samples collected from a series of fluvial terraces from Guanshan River, along the Qilian Shan, northeastern Tibetan Plateau. The ages of three fluvial terraces from the Jinfosi site are shown to be (56.4 ± 5.3) ka for T3, (10.7 ± 1.0) ka for T2, and (7.2 ± 1.0) ka for T1. The dating results are consistent with published data from the same region (10Be, 14C, and optically stimulated luminescence dating methods). A comparison of high-resolution climate records with age constraints for the terrace formation shows a close relationship between terrace formation and climate change.

  16. A systematic review of secondhand smoke exposure in a car: Attributable changes in atmospheric and biological markers.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Sana A; Agaku, Israel T; Vardavas, Constantine I

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) has been linked to disease, disability, and premature death. While several countries have enacted smoke-free legislations, exposure to SHS may still occur in unregulated private environments, such as in the family car. We performed a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature in PubMed and Web of Science up to May 2013. Articles were selected if they provided a quantitative measure of SHS exposure (biological or atmospheric markers); the study was conducted inside a car; and the assessed exposure was attributable to cigarette combustion. From 202 articles identified, 12 met the inclusion criteria. Among all studies that assessed smoking in cars with at least one window partially open, the particulate matter 2.5 μm or less in diameter (PM2.5) concentrations ranged from 47 μg/m(3) to 12,150 μg/m(3). For studies with all windows closed, PM2.5 ranged from 203.6 μg/m(3) to 13,150 μg/m(3). SHS concentration in a car was mediated by air-conditioning status, extent of airflow, and driving speed. Smoking in cars leads to extremely high exposure to SHS and increased concentration of atmospheric markers of exposure-even in the presence of air-conditioning or increased airflow from open windows. This clearly shows that the only way to protect nonsmokers, especially children, from SHS within cars is by eliminating tobacco smoking. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Air exposure assessment of TDI and biological monitoring of TDA in urine in workers in polyurethane foam industry.

    PubMed

    Geens, Tom; Dugardin, Sandra; Schockaert, Ann; De Cooman, Geert; van Sprundel, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is used in the manufacturing process of polyurethane (PU) foams and is a potent inducer of occupational asthma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the exposure to total TDI (2,4- and 2,6-TDI) in air and the corresponding biomarker concentration of total TDA (2,4- and 2,6-TDA) in hydrolysed urine. The aim was also to propose an appropriate biological exposure limit for total TDA in urine. 9 workers from two production lines in a PU foam producing plant were studied. Personal exposure to TDI during four representative production shifts was monitored by an active air sampling method (filter impregnated with 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine) and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection (NIOSH n° 2535, 5521). In parallel, pre-shift and post-shift urinary samples were collected from the exposed workers, and TDA concentrations were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after alkaline hydrolysis. All samples were collected on four measuring days: two Fridays (end of workweek) and two Mondays (start of workweek) separated by a weekend without exposure. Strong correlations between the personal air concentrations of total TDI and the corresponding biomarker levels of total TDA in urine (r=0.816) were observed. An increase of 18.12 μg TDA/l (post-shift minus pre-shift concentration) corresponds to an exposure of 5 ppb (37 μg/m(3), the current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value) during the shift. The increase in TDA during the shift is a suitable biomarker for exposure to TDI during the same shift. Further research is needed to evaluate the use of start of week or end of week post-shift TDA in urine as biomarker since TDA was found to accumulate during the working week and thus the moment of sampling will clearly influence the result.

  18. Quantification of ocular biologically effective UV exposure for different rotation angle ranges based on data from a manikin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liwen; Wang, Fang; Ou-Yang, Nan-Ning; Gao, Na; Gao, Qian; Ge, Tiantian; Gao, Yanyan; Liu, Guangcong; Zheng, Yang; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Human outdoor activities are randomly orientated at different angles to the sun. To quantify the ocular UV and biologically effective UV (UVBE; i.e. the ocular UV irradiance exposure for photokeratitis (UVpker), photoconjunctivitis (UVpcon), and cataract (UVcat)) exposure for different rotation angle ranges, a rotating manikin was used to monitor the ocular UV exposure at different rotation angles in clear skies during July 2010 in Sanya, China. As a result, the ocular UV and UVBE irradiance was directly influenced by the rotation angle variations, primarily for the 120° rotation angle ranges facing the morning and afternoon sun when the solar elevation was lower than 60°; during these times, the UV and UVBE spectral irradiance decreased as the rotation angle increased. When compared to the 360° rotation angle ranges (which were considered to be the average exposure situation), the cumulative ocular UVBE for 60°, 120° and 180° rotation angle ranges were maximally 91% (UVcat), 94% (UVpker) and 121% (UVpcon); 71% (UVcat), 74% (UVpker) and 95% (UVpcon); 42%(UVcat), 45%(UVpker) and 55% (UVpcon) higher respectively. Meanwhile, the cumulative ocular UVBE for the 180° rotation angle ranges facing away from the sun were 46% (UVpker), 59% (UVpcon) and 45% (UVcat) lower. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  19. Relationship of biological indices of lead exposure to the health status of workers in a secondary lead smelter

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P.B.; Lerner, S.I.; Gartside, P.S.; Hanenson, I.B.; Roda, S.B.; Foulkes, E.C.; Johnson, D.R.; Pesce, A.J.

    1980-07-01

    The fidelity with which common indices of lead exposure correlate with renal and hematopoietic function and with frequency of symptoms was studied. The subjects were men working in a secondary lead smelter. Among several indices of renal function, only serum urea nitrogen (SUN) was consistely correlated with any of the indices of lead exposure. The concentration of lead in blood (PbB), the rate of urinary excretion of lead (PbU) and of delta aminolevulinic acid in the urine (ALAU) correlated with SUN. By contrast, erythrocytic porphyrin concentration (EP) did not correlate with SUN. Similarly, the frequency of occurrence of symptoms correlated well with PbB and ALAU but did not correlate with EP. All of the above indices of lead exposure, with the exception of PbU, correlated well with hemoglobin (Hb) status. In summary, these results suggest that PbB rather than EP is the best single exposure index for biological monitoring of lead workers. This measurement should be supplemented by periodic determination of SUN and Hb.

  20. Biological effects of short, high-level exposure to gases: ammonia. Phase report, May 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Legters, L.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report presents an analysis and synthesis of the available literature concerned with possible health and performance effects of exposures to ammonia. The US Army's concern is with short, high-level exposures that may exceed present threshold limit values of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (25 ppm or 17 mg/cum as a TWA and a ceiling of 35 ppm or 24 mg/cum for 15 minutes). The organs primarily affected by exposure to ammonia gas are the respiratory tract and the eyes. During brief exposures to concentrations of 500 ppm (348 mg/cum) or less, the biologic responses are immediate, reversible, and mainly irritant. Below 50 ppm (35 mg/cum), there are no significant effects except that the odor of ammonia is detectable. Between 50-100 ppm (35-70 mg/cum), most people experience some degree of irritation of the eyes, nose and throat. There is some evidence indicating that personnel may become acclimated to the irritant effects after only 1 or 2 weeks of inhalation.

  1. Biological effects of emissions from resistance spot welding of zinc-coated material after controlled exposure of healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Gube, Monika; Kraus, Thomas; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Brand, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Do emissions from a resistance spot welding process of zinc-coated materials induce systemic inflammation in healthy subjects after exposure for 6 hours? Twelve healthy male subjects were exposed once for 6 hours either to filtered ambient air or to welding fume from resistance spot welding of zinc-coated material (mass concentration approximately 100 μg m). Biological effects were measured before, after, and 24 hours after exposure. At the concentrations used in this study, however, the suspected properties of ultrafine particles did not lead to systemic inflammation as reflected by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or other endpoint parameters under consideration. Ultrafine particles from a resistance spot welding process of zinc-covered materials with a number concentration of about 10 cm and a mass concentration of about 100 μg m did not induce systemic inflammation.

  2. Oxygen activation by mononuclear Mn, Co, and Ni centers in biology and synthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Adam T; Fischer, Anne A

    2017-04-01

    The active sites of metalloenzymes that catalyze O2-dependent reactions generally contain iron or copper ions. However, several enzymes are capable of activating O2 at manganese or nickel centers instead, and a handful of dioxygenases exhibit activity when substituted with cobalt. This minireview summarizes the catalytic properties of oxygenases and oxidases with mononuclear Mn, Co, or Ni active sites, including oxalate-degrading oxidases, catechol dioxygenases, and quercetin dioxygenase. In addition, recent developments in the O2 reactivity of synthetic Mn, Co, or Ni complexes are described, with an emphasis on the nature of reactive intermediates featuring superoxo-, peroxo-, or oxo-ligands. Collectively, the biochemical and synthetic studies discussed herein reveal the possibilities and limitations of O2 activation at these three "overlooked" metals.

  3. Changes in negative cognitions mediate PTSD symptom reductions during client-centered therapy and prolonged exposure for adolescents.

    PubMed

    McLean, Carmen P; Yeh, Rebecca; Rosenfield, David; Foa, Edna B

    2015-05-01

    To assess whether changes in negative trauma-related cognitions play an important role in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression during prolonged exposure therapy for adolescents (PE-A). Secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial comparing PE-A with client-centered therapy (CCT) for PTSD. Participants were 61 adolescent female sexual assault survivors ages 13-18 who received 8-14 weekly sessions of PE-A or CCT at a community rape crisis center. PTSD severity was assessed at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and 3-months post-treatment. Participants also completed self-report measures of negative posttraumatic cognitions and depressive symptoms at the same assessment points. Cross lag panel mediation analyses showed that change in negative trauma-related cognitions mediated change in PTSD symptoms and depressive symptoms whereas change in PTSD and depressive symptoms did not mediate change in negative cognitions. Our findings support EPT and suggest that change in negative trauma-related cognitions is a mechanism of both PE-A and CCT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological monitoring of exposures to aluminium, gallium, indium, arsenic, and antimony in optoelectronic industry workers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-H; Yu, H-S; Ho, C-K; Wu, M-T; Yang, C-Y; Chen, J-R; Chang, C-C

    2004-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate aluminum, gallium, indium, arsenic, and antimony exposures on blood and urine levels in the optoelectronic workers. One hundred seventy subjects were enrolled in this cohort study. Whole blood and urine levels were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Blood indium and urine gallium and arsenic levels in the 103 workers were significantly higher than that in 67 controls during the follow-up period. In regression models, the significant risk factors of exposure were job title, preventive equipment, Quetelet's index, sex, and education level. The findings of this study suggest that gallium, indium, and arsenic exposure levels may affect their respective levels in blood and urine. The use of clean, preventive equipment is recommended when prioritizing the administration of safety and hygiene in optoelectronics industries.

  5. Biological monitoring of organophosphorus pesticide exposure among children of agricultural workers in central Washington State.

    PubMed Central

    Loewenherz, C; Fenske, R A; Simcox, N J; Bellamy, G; Kalman, D

    1997-01-01

    Children up to 6 years of age who lived with pesticide applicators were monitored for increased risk of pesticide exposure: 48 pesticide applicator and 14 reference families were recruited from an agricultural region of Washington State in June 1995. A total of 160 spot urine samples were collected from 88 children, including repeated measures 3-7 days apart. Samples were assayed by gas chromatography flame photometric detector for dimethylphosphate metabolites. Dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP) was the dominant metabolite. DMTP levels were significantly higher in applicator children than in reference children (p = 0.015), with median concentrations of 0.021 and 0.005 microg/ml, respectively; maximum concentrations were 0.44 and 0.10 microg/ml, respectively. Percentages of detectable samples were 47% for applicator children and 27% for reference children. A marginally significant trend of increasing concentration was observed with decreasing age among applicator children (p = 0.060), and younger children within these families had significantly higher concentrations when compared to their older siblings (p = 0.040). Applicator children living less than 200 feet from an orchard were associated with higher frequency of detectable DMTP levels than nonproximal applicator children (p =0.036). These results indicate that applicator children experienced higher organophosphorus pesticide exposures than did reference children in the same community and that proximity to spraying is an important contributor to such exposures. Trends related to age suggest that child activity is an important variable for exposure. It is unlikely that any of the observed exposures posed a hazard of acute intoxication. This study points to the need for a more detailed understanding of pesticide exposure pathways for children of agricultural workers. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9405329

  6. Cardiovascular Disease Hospitalizations in Relation to Exposure to the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center Disaster and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Hannah T.; Stellman, Steven D.; Morabia, Alfredo; Miller‐Archie, Sara A.; Alper, Howard; Laskaris, Zoey; Brackbill, Robert M.; Cone, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Background A cohort study found that 9/11‐related environmental exposures and posttraumatic stress disorder increased self‐reported cardiovascular disease risk. We attempted to replicate these findings using objectively defined cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in the same cohort. Methods and Results Data for adult World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees residing in New York State on enrollment and no cardiovascular disease history (n=46 346) were linked to a New York State hospital discharge–reporting system. Follow‐up began at Registry enrollment (2003–2004) and ended at the first cerebrovascular or heart disease (HD) hospitalization, death, or December 31, 2010, whichever was earliest. We used proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) for HD (n=1151) and cerebrovascular disease (n=284) hospitalization during 302 742 person‐years of observation (mean follow‐up, 6.5 years per person), accounting for other factors including age, race/ethnicity, smoking, and diabetes. An elevated risk of HD hospitalization was observed among women (AHR 1.32, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.71) but not men (AHR 1.16, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.40) with posttraumatic stress disorder at enrollment. A high overall level of World Trade Center rescue and recovery–related exposure was associated with an elevated HD hospitalization risk in men (AHR 1.82, 95% CI 1.06 to 3.13; P for trend=0.05), but findings in women were inconclusive (AHR 3.29, 95% CI 0.85 to 12.69; P for trend=0.09). Similar associations were observed specifically with coronary artery disease hospitalization. Posttraumatic stress disorder increased the cerebrovascular disease hospitalization risk in men but not in women. Conclusions 9/11‐related exposures and posttraumatic stress disorder appeared to increase the risk of subsequent hospitalization for HD and cerebrovascular disease. This is consistent with findings based on self‐reported outcomes. PMID:24157650

  7. Identification and Development of Biological Markers of Human Exposure to the Insecticide Permethrin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    from an ozone generator) as passed into the stirred, cold solution with a flow rate f 0.0248 l min−1. The reaction solution was monitored by LC...sulfonate (400 mg, 1.6 mmol) and tetramethylurea (180 mg, 1.6 mmol), and the mixture was stirred under an argon atmosphere at -20 ˚C for 12 h. The reaction...13 hr ± 5.1 hr) following a dermal exposure or Leng et al. (1997) for cyfluthrin (6.44 ± 0.64 hr) following an oral exposure. Figure 9

  8. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic Acid (DCA) is a major byproduct of the chlorine disinfection of humic acid containing drinking water sources. It is a hepatocarcinogen in mice and rats at exposure concentrations in drinking water that are at least 4 orders of magnitude above the concentrations in ...

  9. Exposure Path Perceptions and Protective Actions in Biological Water Contamination Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Michael K; Mumpower, Jeryl L; Huang, Shih-Kai; Wu, Hao-Che; Samuelson, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    This study extends the Protective Action Decision Model, developed to address disaster warning responses in the context of natural hazards, to "boil water" advisories. The study examined 110 Boston residents' and 203 Texas students' expectations of getting sick through different exposure paths for contact with contaminated water. In addition, the study assessed respondents' actual implementation (for residents) or behavioral expectations (for students) of three different protective actions - bottled water, boiled water, and personally chlorinated water - as well as their demographic characteristics and previous experience with water contamination. The results indicate that people distinguish among the exposure paths, but the differences are small (one-third to one-half of the response scale). Nonetheless, the perceived risk from the exposure paths helps to explain why people are expected to consume (or actually consumed) bottled water rather than boiled or personally chlorinated water. Overall, these results indicate that local authorities should take care to communicate the relative risks of different exposure paths and should expect that people will respond to a boil water order primarily by consuming bottled water. Thus, they should make special efforts to increase supplies of bottled water in their communities during water contamination emergencies.

  10. Biologic effects of prolonged exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields in rats. 2: 50 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Margonato, V.; Cerretelli, P.; Nicolini, P.; Conti, R.; Zecca, L.; Veicsteinas, Z.

    1995-12-31

    To provide possible laboratory support to health risk evaluation associated with long-term, low-intensity magnetic field exposure, 256 male albino rats and an equal number of control animals (initial age 12 weeks) were exposed 22 h/day to a 50 Hz magnetic flux density of 5 {micro}T for 32 weeks (a total of about 5,000 h). Hematology was studied from blood samples before exposure to the field and at 12 week intervals. Morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, and testes as well as brain neurotransmitters were assessed at the end of the exposure period. In two identical sets of experiments, no significant differences in the investigated variables were found between exposed and sham-exposed animals. It is concluded that continuous exposure to a 50 Hz magnetic field of 5 {micro}T from week 12 to week 44, which makes up {approximately}70% of the life span of the rat before sacrifice, does not cause changes in growth rate, in the morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, testes, and bone marrow, in hematology and hematochemistry, or in the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin.

  11. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic Acid (DCA) is a major byproduct of the chlorine disinfection of humic acid containing drinking water sources. It is a hepatocarcinogen in mice and rats at exposure concentrations in drinking water that are at least 4 orders of magnitude above the concentrations in ...

  12. Exposure Path Perceptions and Protective Actions in Biological Water Contamination Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, Michael K; Mumpower, Jeryl L; Huang, Shih-Kai; Wu, Hao-Che; Samuelson, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    This study extends the Protective Action Decision Model, developed to address disaster warning responses in the context of natural hazards, to “boil water” advisories. The study examined 110 Boston residents’ and 203 Texas students’ expectations of getting sick through different exposure paths for contact with contaminated water. In addition, the study assessed respondents’ actual implementation (for residents) or behavioral expectations (for students) of three different protective actions – bottled water, boiled water, and personally chlorinated water – as well as their demographic characteristics and previous experience with water contamination. The results indicate that people distinguish among the exposure paths, but the differences are small (one-third to one-half of the response scale). Nonetheless, the perceived risk from the exposure paths helps to explain why people are expected to consume (or actually consumed) bottled water rather than boiled or personally chlorinated water. Overall, these results indicate that local authorities should take care to communicate the relative risks of different exposure paths and should expect that people will respond to a boil water order primarily by consuming bottled water. Thus, they should make special efforts to increase supplies of bottled water in their communities during water contamination emergencies. PMID:26609238

  13. Photochemical reactions of metal nitrosyl complexes. Mechanisms of NO reactions with biologically relevant metal centers

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Tmore » he discoveries that nitric oxide (a.k.a. nitrogen monoxide) serves important roles in mammalian bioregulation and immunology have stimulated intense interest in the chemistry and biochemistry of NO and derivatives such as metal nitrosyl complexes. Also of interest are strategies to deliver NO to biological targets on demand. One such strategy would be to employ a precursor which displays relatively low thermal reactivity but is photochemically active to release NO.his proposition led us to investigate laser flash and continuous photolysis kinetics of nitrosyl complexes such as the Roussin's iron-sulfur-nitrosyl cluster anions Fe 2 S 2 ( NO ) 4 2 − and Fe 4 S 3 ( NO ) 7 − and several ruthenium salen and porphyrin nitrosyls.hese include studies using metal-nitrosyl photochemistry as a vehicle for delivering NO to hypoxic cell cultures in order to sensitize γ -radiation damage. Also studied were the rates and mechanisms of NO “on” reactions with model water soluble heme compounds, the ferriheme protein met-myoglobin and various ruthenium complexes using ns laser flash photolysis techniques. An overview of these studies is presented.« less

  14. Center of cancer systems biology second annual workshop--tumor metronomics: timing and dose level dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2013-05-15

    Metronomic chemotherapy, the delivery of doses in a low, regular manner so as to avoid toxic side effects, was introduced over 12 years ago in the face of substantial clinical and preclinical evidence supporting its tumor-suppressive capability. It constituted a marked departure from the classic maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) strategy, which, given its goal of rapid eradication, uses dosing sufficiently intense to require rest periods between cycles to limit toxicity. Even so, upfront tumor eradication is frequently not achieved with MTD, whereupon a de facto goal of longer-term tumor control is often pursued. As metronomic dosing has shown tumor control capability, even for cancers that have become resistant to the same drug delivered under MTD, the question arises whether it may be a preferable alternative dosing approach from the outset. To date, however, our knowledge of the coupled dynamics underlying metronomic dosing is neither sufficiently well developed nor widely enough disseminated to establish its actual potential. Meeting organizers thus felt the time was right, armed with new quantitative approaches, to call a workshop on "Tumor Metronomics: Timing and Dose Level Dynamics" to explore prospects for gaining a deeper, systems-level appreciation of the metronomics concept. The workshop proved to be a forum in which experts from the clinical, biologic, mathematical, and computational realms could work together to clarify the principles and underpinnings of metronomics. Among other things, the need for significant shifts in thinking regarding endpoints to be used as clinical standards of therapeutic progress was recognized.

  15. Chemical and biological interactions in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field, Galapagos spreading center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Childress, James J.; Hessler, Robert R.; Sakamoto-Arnold, Carole M.; Beehler, Carl L.

    1988-10-01

    The concentrations of a suite of redox reactive chemicals were measured in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field of the Galapagos spreading center. Sulfide, silicate, oxygen and temperature distributions were measured in situ with a submersible chemical analyser. In addition, 15 chemical species were measured in discrete samples. Variability in the slope of the temperature-silicate plots indicates that heat is lost from these relatively low temperatures (<15°C) solutions by conduction to the solid phase. Consumption of oxygen, sulfide and nitrate from the hydrothermal solution as it flows past the vent animals is apparent from the distributions measured in situ and in the discrete samples. The fraction of sulfide and nitrate removed from the solution by consumption appears to have increased between 1979-1985. Sulfide and oxygen appear to be consumed under different conditions: sulfide is removed primarily from the warmest solutions, and oxygen is consumed only from the cold seawater. This separation may be driven primarily by the increased gradients of each chemical under these conditions. There is no evidence for the consumption of significant amounts of manganese(II) by the vent organisms. The analysis of other data sets from this vent field indicate no significant consumption of methane by the vent organisms, as well.

  16. Reproductive biology of the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas in its center of origin

    PubMed Central

    Rincón-Rabanales, Manuel; Vargas-López, Laura I.; Adriano-Anaya, Lourdes; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the main characteristics of flowering, reproductive system and diversity of pollinators for the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas (L.) in a site of tropical southeastern Mexico, within its center of origin. The plants were monoecious with inflorescences of unisexual flowers. The male flowers produced from 3062–5016 pollen grains (266–647 per anther). The plants produced fruits with both geitonogamy and xenogamy, although insect pollination significantly increased the number and quality of fruits. A high diversity of flower visiting insects (36 species) was found, of which nine were classified as efficient pollinators. The native stingless bees Scaptotrigona mexicana (Guérin-Meneville) and Trigona (Tetragonisca) angustula (Latreille) were the most frequent visitors and their presence coincided with the hours when the stigma was receptive. It is noteworthy that the female flowers open before the male flowers, favoring xenogamy, which may explain the high genetic variability reported in J. curcas for this region of the world. PMID:26989640

  17. [Carbon nanotubes - Characteristic of the substance, biological effects and occupational exposure levels].

    PubMed

    Świdwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2017-03-24

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a diverse group of nano-objects in terms of structure, size (length, diameter), shape and characteristics. The growing interest in these structures is due to the increasing number of people working in exposure to CNTs. Occupational exposure to carbon nanotubes may occur in research laboratories, as well as in plants producing CNTs and their nanocomposites. Carbon nanotubes concentration at the emission source may reach 107 particles/cm3. These values, however, are considerably reduced after the application of adequate ventilation. Animal studies suggest that the main route of exposure is inhalation. Carbon nanotubes administered orally are largely excreted in the feces. In animals exposed by inhalation, CNTs caused mainly inflammation, as a result of oxidative stress, leading above all to changes in the lungs. The main effect of animal dermal exposure is oxidative stress causing local inflammation. In animals exposed by ingestion the mild or no toxicity was observed. Carbon nanotubes did not induce mutations in the bacterial tests, but they were genotoxic in a series of tests on cells in vitro, as well as in exposed mice in vivo. Embryotoxicity of nanotubes depends mainly on their modifications and carcinogenicity - primarily on the CNT size and its rigidity. Occupational exposure limits for CNTs proposed by world experts fall within the range of 1-80 μg/m3. The different effects of various kinds of CNT, leads to the conclusion that each type of nanotube should be treated as a separate substance with individual estimation of hygienic normative. Med Pr 2017;68(2):259-276. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  18. Linking xenobiotic exposure to adverse biological effects in ecotoxicological assessments: The role of biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.E.; Collier, T.K.; Johnson, L.L.; Casillas, E.; Arkoosh, M.A.; Varanasi, U.

    1995-12-31

    Biomarkers of contaminant exposure have been developed and are being successfully applied to a wide range of aquatic species. To improve the utility of biomarkers in the practical assessment of the impact of xenobiotics on aspects of ecosystem integrity requires the identification of biomarkers that are also indicators of adverse physiological effect. Moreover, it is important to determine if the use of biomarkers can improve the ability to diagnose potential adverse effects at the population level. Currently, the authors are evaluating the potential of a battery of molecular and cellular biomarkers in both fish and invertebrates to strengthen linkages between exposure and effects on growth, reproduction and survival of marine species. Concerted field and laboratory studies are employed to delineate dose-response for biomarkers, identify levels at which effects are observed in indigenous species, and to substantiate causality between exposure and the above physiological effects. However, to identify further causal relationships between physiological effects on individuals and population level impacts that are associated with xenobiotic exposure is currently a significant challenge. Their current efforts are focusing on constructing population models using estimates of mortality and reproductive success in a benthic fish, and on constructing population growth curves for a bivalve. Both species were sampled from a range of contaminated sites in Puget Sound, WA, and analyses included measurement of biomarkers to identify or strengthen associations between exposure and estimated population level impacts. Overall, these recent findings demonstrate that properly validated biomarkers are useful in substantiating linkages between environmental contamination and physiological effects that may lead to adverse population level impacts.

  19. Biological monitoring of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene by PAHs exposure among primary school students in Shiraz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Samaneh; Dehghani, Mansooreh; Hoseini, Mohammad; Fararouei, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    This research aimed to estimate PAHs exposure in primary school students and determine its association with other PAHs-related factors. In total, 120 male primary school students (9-12 years old) were randomly selected from urban and suburban areas in Shiraz. The parents were required to complete a questionnaire including information about second-hand smoke exposure, residential traffic density, daily diet, and walking or being driven to school. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector was also used to analyze urinary 1-OHP. t test, ANOVA (with Ducan's post hoc test), and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the relationship between quantitative and qualitative variables and urinary 1-OHP concentration. The range and geometric mean of the creatinine-corrected 1-OHP levels were 120-6950 and 1460 ng/g creatinine, respectively. Besides, 1-OHP levels were higher among the children with smoker parents compared to those having non-smoker parents. The results also revealed a correlation between the duration of exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke and 1-OHP concentration. This correlation was also observed for daily uptake of smoked or grilled foods. However, traffic congestion did not have any significant effects on 1-OHP levels. PAHs are commonly present in Iranian diet. As a result, the weekly intake of dietary PAHs was the most effective predictor of PAHs exposure in the study population. Due to adverse health effects of PAHs on humans, especially children, more extensive studies are required to identify the sources that contribute to environmental PAHs exposure.

  20. Biological monitoring of pesticide exposures in residents living near agricultural land.

    PubMed

    Galea, Karen S; MacCalman, Laura; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John; Teedon, Paul; Sleeuwenhoek, Anne J; Cherrie, John W; van Tongeren, Martie

    2011-11-10

    There is currently a lack of reliable information on the exposures of residents and bystanders to pesticides in the UK. Previous research has shown that the methods currently used for assessing pesticide exposure for regulatory purposes are appropriate for farm workers 1. However, there were indications that the exposures of bystanders may sometimes be underestimated. The previous study did not collect data for residents. Therefore, this study aims to collect measurements to determine if the current methods and tools are appropriate for assessing pesticide exposure for residents living near agricultural fields. The study will recruit owners of farms and orchards (hereafter both will be referred to as farms) that spray their agricultural crops with certain specified pesticides, and which have residential areas in close proximity to these fields. Recruited farms will be asked to provide details of their pesticide usage throughout the spray season. Informed consenting residents (adults (18 years and over) and children (aged 4-12 years)) will be asked to provide urine samples and accompanying activity diaries during the spraying season and in addition for a limited number of weeks before/after the spray season to allow background pesticide metabolite levels to be determined. Selected urine samples will be analysed for the pesticide metabolites of interest. Statistical analysis and mathematical modelling will use the laboratory results, along with the additional data collected from the farmers and residents, to determine systemic exposure levels amongst residents. Surveys will be carried out in selected areas of the United Kingdom over two years (2011 and 2012), covering two spraying seasons and the time between the spraying seasons. The described study protocol was implemented for the sample and data collection procedures carried out in 2011. Based on experience to date, no major changes to the protocol are anticipated for the 2012 spray season although the pesticides

  1. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, M.M.; Painter, M.M.; Bartell, S.E.; Logue, A.; Furlong, E.T.; Werner, S.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305. ng/L and 1104. ng/L) and SER (5.2. ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28. ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish-a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Painter, Meghan M.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Logue, Amanda; Furlong, Edward T.; Werner, Stephen L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimeplwles promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305 ng/L and 1104 ng/L) and SER (5.2 ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28 ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish—a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies.

  3. Biological monitoring of pesticide exposures in residents living near agricultural land

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is currently a lack of reliable information on the exposures of residents and bystanders to pesticides in the UK. Previous research has shown that the methods currently used for assessing pesticide exposure for regulatory purposes are appropriate for farm workers [1]. However, there were indications that the exposures of bystanders may sometimes be underestimated. The previous study did not collect data for residents. Therefore, this study aims to collect measurements to determine if the current methods and tools are appropriate for assessing pesticide exposure for residents living near agricultural fields. Methods/design The study will recruit owners of farms and orchards (hereafter both will be referred to as farms) that spray their agricultural crops with certain specified pesticides, and which have residential areas in close proximity to these fields. Recruited farms will be asked to provide details of their pesticide usage throughout the spray season. Informed consenting residents (adults (18 years and over) and children (aged 4-12 years)) will be asked to provide urine samples and accompanying activity diaries during the spraying season and in addition for a limited number of weeks before/after the spray season to allow background pesticide metabolite levels to be determined. Selected urine samples will be analysed for the pesticide metabolites of interest. Statistical analysis and mathematical modelling will use the laboratory results, along with the additional data collected from the farmers and residents, to determine systemic exposure levels amongst residents. Surveys will be carried out in selected areas of the United Kingdom over two years (2011 and 2012), covering two spraying seasons and the time between the spraying seasons. Discussion The described study protocol was implemented for the sample and data collection procedures carried out in 2011. Based on experience to date, no major changes to the protocol are anticipated for the

  4. A review of air quality, biological indicators and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit R; Davies, Shelby; Weitzman, Michael; Sherman, Scott

    2015-03-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the use of waterpipe tobacco and non-tobacco based shisha in many countries. Understanding the impact and effects of second-hand smoke (SHS) from cigarette was a crucial factor in reducing cigarette use, leading to clean indoor air laws and smoking bans. This article reviews what is known about the effects of SHS exposure from waterpipes. We used PubMed and EMBASE to review the literature. Articles were grouped into quantitative measures of air quality and biological markers, health effects, exposure across different settings, different types of shisha and use in different countries. Criteria for study selection were based on the key words related to SHS: waterpipe, hookah, shisha and third-hand smoke. Independent extraction with two reviewers was performed with inclusion criteria applied to articles on SHS and waterpipe/hookah/shisha. We excluded articles related to pregnancy or prenatal exposure to SHS, animal studies, and non-specific source of exposure as well as articles not written in English. A primary literature search yielded 54 articles, of which only 11 were included based on relevance to SHS from a waterpipe/hookah/shisha. The negative health consequences of second-hand waterpipe exposure have major implications for clean indoor air laws and for occupational safety. There exists an urgent need for public health campaigns about the effects on children and household members from smoking waterpipe at home, and for further development and implementation of regulations to protect the health of the public from this rapidly emerging threat. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. A review of air quality, biological indicators and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumit R; Davies, Shelby; Weitzman, Michael; Sherman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective There has been a rapid increase in the use of waterpipe tobacco and non-tobacco based shisha in many countries. Understanding the impact and effects of second-hand smoke (SHS) from cigarette was a crucial factor in reducing cigarette use, leading to clean indoor air laws and smoking bans. This article reviews what is known about the effects of SHS exposure from waterpipes. Data sources We used PubMed and EMBASE to review the literature. Articles were grouped into quantitative measures of air quality and biological markers, health effects, exposure across different settings, different types of shisha and use in different countries. Study selection Criteria for study selection were based on the key words related to SHS: waterpipe, hookah, shisha and third-hand smoke. Data extraction Independent extraction with two reviewers was performed with inclusion criteria applied to articles on SHS and waterpipe/hookah/shisha. We excluded articles related to pregnancy or prenatal exposure to SHS, animal studies, and non-specific source of exposure as well as articles not written in English. Data synthesis A primary literature search yielded 54 articles, of which only 11 were included based on relevance to SHS from a waterpipe/hookah/shisha. Conclusions The negative health consequences of second-hand waterpipe exposure have major implications for clean indoor air laws and for occupational safety. There exists an urgent need for public health campaigns about the effects on children and household members from smoking waterpipe at home, and for further development and implementation of regulations to protect the health of the public from this rapidly emerging threat. PMID:25480544

  6. Biological Monitoring of Occupational Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at an Electric Steel Foundry in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Hanchi, Mariem; Olgiati, Luca; Polledri, Elisa; Consonni, Dario; Zrafi, Ines; Saidane-Mosbahi, Dalila; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Occupational exposures during iron and steel founding have been classified as carcinogenic to humans, and the exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in this industrial setting may contribute to cancer risk. The occupational exposure to PAHs was assessed in 93 male workers at an electric steel foundry in Tunisia by biomonitoring, with the aims of characterizing the excretion profile and investigating the influence of job title and personal characteristics on the biomarkers. Sixteen 2-6 ring unmetabolized PAHs (U-PAHs) and eight hydroxylated PAH metabolites (OHPAHs) were analyzed by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Among U-PAHs, urinary naphthalene (U-NAP) was the most abundant compound (median level: 643ng l(-1)), followed by phenanthrene (U-PHE, 18.5ng l(-1)). Urinary benzo[a]pyrene (U-BaP) level was <0.30ng l(-1) Among OHPAHs, 2-hydroxynaphthalene (2-OHNAP) was the most abundant metabolite (2.27 µg l(-1)). Median 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPYR) was 0.52 µg l(-1) Significant correlations among urinary biomarkers were observed, with Pearson's r ranging from 0.177 to 0.626. 1-OHPYR was correlated to benzo[a]pyrene, but not to five- and six-rings PAHs. A multiple linear regression model showed that job title was a significant determinant for almost all U-PAHs. In particular, employees in the steel smelter workshop had higher levels of high-boiling U-PAHs and lower levels of low-boiling U-PAHs than those of workers with other job titles. Among OHPAHs, this model was significant only for naphthols and 1-hydroxyphenanthrene (1-OHPHE). Smoking status was a significant predictor for almost all biomarkers. Among all analytes, U-PHE and 1-OHPHE were the less affected by tobacco smoke, and they were significantly correlated with both low- and high-molecular-weight compounds, and their levels were related to job titles, so they could be proposed as suitable

  7. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  8. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  9. The effects of a visualization-centered curriculum on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Anna

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a visualization-centered curriculum, Hemoglobin: A Case of Double Identity, on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology. Sixty-nine students enrolled in three sections of freshman biology taught by the same teacher participated in this study. Online Chemscape Chime computer-based molecular visualizations were incorporated into the 10-week curriculum to introduce students to fundamental structure and function relationships. Measures used in this study included a Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, Mental Imagery Questionnaire, Exam Difficulty Survey, the Student Assessment of Learning Gains, the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, the Attitude Toward Science in School Assessment, audiotapes of student interviews, students' artifacts, weekly unit activity surveys, informal researcher observations and a teacher's weekly questionnaire. The Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, consisting of Parts A and B, was administered as a pre and posttest. Part A used exclusively verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding, while Part B used visual-verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding and representational competence. Results of the Hemoglobin Structure and Function pre and posttest revealed statistically significant gains in conceptual understanding and representational competence, suggesting the visualization-centered curriculum implemented in this study was effective in supporting positive learning outcomes. The large positive correlation between posttest results on Part A, comprised of all-verbal test items, and Part B, using visual-verbal test items, suggests this curriculum supported students' mutual development of conceptual understanding and representational competence. Evidence based on student interviews, Student Assessment of Learning Gains ratings and weekly activity surveys indicated positive attitudes toward the use of Chemscape Chime

  10. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products and World Trade Center particulate induced lung function loss: A case-cohort study and murine model of acute particulate exposure.

    PubMed

    Caraher, Erin J; Kwon, Sophia; Haider, Syed H; Crowley, George; Lee, Audrey; Ebrahim, Minah; Zhang, Liqun; Chen, Lung-Chi; Gordon, Terry; Liu, Mengling; Prezant, David J; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Nolan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    World Trade Center-particulate matter(WTC-PM) exposure and metabolic-risk are associated with WTC-Lung Injury(WTC-LI). The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is most highly expressed in the lung, mediates metabolic risk, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the AGER-locus predict forced expiratory volume(FEV). Our objectives were to test the hypotheses that RAGE is a biomarker of WTC-LI in the FDNY-cohort and that loss of RAGE in a murine model would protect against acute PM-induced lung disease. We know from previous work that early intense exposure at the time of the WTC collapse was most predictive of WTC-LI therefore we utilized a murine model of intense acute PM-exposure to determine if loss of RAGE is protective and to identify signaling/cytokine intermediates. This study builds on a continuing effort to identify serum biomarkers that predict the development of WTC-LI. A case-cohort design was used to analyze a focused cohort of male never-smokers with normal pre-9/11 lung function. Odds of developing WTC-LI increased by 1.2, 1.8 and 1.0 in firefighters with soluble RAGE (sRAGE)≥97pg/mL, CRP≥2.4mg/L, and MMP-9≤397ng/mL, respectively, assessed in a multivariate logistic regression model (ROCAUC of 0.72). Wild type(WT) and RAGE-deficient(Ager-/-) mice were exposed to PM or PBS-control by oropharyngeal aspiration. Lung function, airway hyperreactivity, bronchoalveolar lavage, histology, transcription factors and plasma/BAL cytokines were quantified. WT-PM mice had decreased FEV and compliance, and increased airway resistance and methacholine reactivity after 24-hours. Decreased IFN-γ and increased LPA were observed in WT-PM mice; similar findings have been reported for firefighters who eventually develop WTC-LI. In the murine model, lack of RAGE was protective from loss of lung function and airway hyperreactivity and was associated with modulation of MAP kinases. We conclude that in a multivariate adjusted model increased sRAGE is

  11. Phytotoxicity effects and biological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad

    2014-06-01

    Dioxins are persistent organic pollutants. Their bioaccumulation in the food chain makes dioxins a considerable risk for human health. The use of plants for removing toxic organic compounds, including dioxins, is a safe and efficient strategy. Herein we studied the toxicity effects and the biological responses in Arabidopsis thaliana to 2',3',7',8'-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure. First, TCDD-induced toxicity was demonstrated using several parameters including, a decrease in seed germination, a loss in fresh weight with a striking decrease in chlorophyll content, but not in carotenoids, and an augmentation in the biomass of the lateral roots system, but not in the elongation of the primary root. Uptake of TCDD by Arabidopsis was confirmed. Responses to TCDD-exposure were marked by an enhanced level of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 production and a massive stimulation of anti-oxidative enzyme activities. Moreover, a significant variation in the transcript level of transcription factor genes, bHLH, MYB and AP2-EREBP was detected in Arabidopsis shoot and an up-regulation of WRKY, MYB and IAA was observed in the root. Our results illustrate the TCDD-induced toxicity effects and the biological responses of Arabidopsis to TCDD. Better understanding of the plants ability to detoxifydioxins would help to improve their use as a safe bioremediators.

  12. Differences in exposure and biological markers of fluoride among White and African American children.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E

    2010-01-01

    To determine differences in self-reported fluoride exposure and fluoride exposure biomarkers between two racial groups. Questionnaires regarding fluoride exposure, urine and water collection kits were distributed to African American and White 7-14-year-old children. Children received a dental exam for fluorosis. Water, urine, and saliva were analyzed for fluoride content. Questionnaire responses and results of sample analyses were compared and observed differences were analyzed. 83 African American and 109 White children completed the study. Dental fluorosis was observed in 62.5 percent White and 80.1 percent African American children. Significant differences were found for fluorosis prevalence and severity between the groups (P < 0.05). Less African American children reported having used fluoride supplements in the past. White children began brushing their teeth at an earlier age. More White children visited a dentist for the first time before age 3. African American children reported currently using larger amounts of toothpaste. More Whites than African Americans had received topical fluoride treatments over the previous year. All of these differences were significant. Multivariate models showed that supplement use and amount of toothpaste used for brushing had significant associations to a child's fluorosis scores. Fluoride concentration of water and saliva was not different for the two groups; however, the fluoride content in urine was significantly higher in African Americans than in Whites [P < 0.05; 1.40 +/- standard deviation (SD) 0.65 ppm versus 1.08 +/- SD 0.28 ppm]. Differences in fluoride exposure between two racial groups were observed. These differences are complex and need to be better defined.

  13. The Biology of Bioavailability: The Role of Functional Ecology in Exposure Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-30

    J . Kennedy, R . N. Millward, T . S. Bridges, and R . G. Luthy. 2007. Field methods for amending marine sediment with...infaunal invertebrate exposure to PCBs. In Submission, Chemosphere. Conder, J . M., T . W. La Point, G. R . Lotufo, and J . A. Steevens. 2003. Nondestructive...Steevens, G. R . Lotufo, J . D. Farrar, M. R . Reiss, R . K. Kropp, J . Doi, and T . S. Bridges. 2009. A comparison of acute and chronic toxicity methods

  14. Molecular change signal-to-noise criteria for interpreting experiments involving exposure of biological systems to weakly interacting electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Timothy E; Weaver, James C

    2005-05-01

    We describe an approach to aiding the design and interpretation of experiments involving biological effects of weakly interacting electromagnetic fields that range from steady (dc) to microwave frequencies. We propose that if known biophysical mechanisms cannot account for an inferred, underlying molecular change signal-to-noise ratio, (S/N)gen, of a observed result, then there are two interpretation choices: (1) there is an unknown biophysical mechanism with stronger coupling between the field exposure and the ongoing biochemical process, or (2) the experiment is responding to something other than the field exposure. Our approach is based on classical detection theory, the recognition that weakly interacting fields cannot break chemical bonds, and the consequence that such fields can only alter rates of ongoing, metabolically driven biochemical reactions, and transport processes. The approach includes both fundamental chemical noise (molecular shot noise) and other sources of competing chemical change, to be compared quantitatively to the field induced change for the basic case that the field alters a single step in a biochemical network. Consistent with pharmacology and toxicology, we estimate the molecular dose (mass associated with field induced molecular change per mass tissue) resulting from illustrative low frequency field exposures for the biophysical mechanism of voltage gated channels. For perspective, we then consider electric field-mediated delivery of small molecules across human skin and into individual cells. Specifically, we consider the examples of iontophoretic and electroporative delivery of fentanyl through skin and electroporative delivery of bleomycin into individual cells. The total delivered amount corresponds to a molecular change signal and the delivery variability corresponds to generalized chemical noise. Viewed broadly, biological effects due to nonionizing fields may include animal navigation, medical applications, and environmental

  15. Comparing Game Simulation to Concept Models for Student-Centered Learning in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renganathan, Venkatraman

    Science education research continues to demonstrate improved learning with active-learning techniques compared to lectures. However, the question of which active-learning methods are the most effective for learning complex scientific principles in various context still remains. Models are commonly used in activities that allow students to simplify complex systems and understand how components interact. I investigated the outcomes for student learning and engagement of two model-based activities--concept models and game simulations. The activities were conducted in an introductory biology course in sixteen discussion sections. Eight sections were assigned to the concept model activity and eight to the simulation activity. To assess engagement, students filled out a Likert-scale questionnaire on enjoyment and usefulness of activity (concept model: 130 students for food web activity and 131 for carbon cycle activity; game simulation: 131 students for food web activity and 126 game simulation students during the carbon cycle activity). To assess student learning, 152 students completed pre-post homework assignment based on conservation and transformation of matter. Over 80% of students enjoyed both the concept-mapping and simulation activities. Students reported that the hands-on nature of the concept activity was helpful for understanding the connections in food webs. For the homework assessment, all students significantly increased in their scores from pre to post on the MC (paired t-test, mean pre = 4.86+/-1.6; meanpost = 5.23+/-1.6;p<.05) and TF assessments (paired t-test; meanpre = 2.06+/-1.0 mean post = 2.32+/-1.0; p<0.05). For the TF assessments, we observed the trend that students in the simulation group showed a greater improvement in their scores than students in the concept-mapping group (t-test; meanDelta concept = 0.11+/-1.4; meanDeltasimulation =0 .43+/-1.0 p=.059). There was no difference between student improvement for the two groups on the MC

  16. Exposure of biological material to ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses: dosimetric implications.

    PubMed

    Simicevic, Neven

    2007-06-01

    Interest in ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses in the communications industry and various applications in biotechnology and medicine is constantly increasing. While more and more scientific research of bioelectromagnetic phenomena is focusing on bioeffects of exposure to non-ionizing UWB pulses, characterization of those effects is far from complete. In this paper, a synthesis of experimental studies from the point of computational modeling is presented. The complexity of the experiments requires a numerical rather than an analytical approach. Solving Maxwell's equations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a necessary step in visualizing and understanding broadband response. The advantages of this method include having almost no limits in the description of geometrical and dispersive properties of the simulated material, numerical robustness, and appropriateness for the computer technology of today. Some of the results of the computation and their importance in future experimental design are discussed. Improvements in the computational modeling and dielectric material description are suggested. This paper aims at justifying a scientific basis for UWB exposure safety standards relevant for setting the non-ionizing UWB radiation exposure guidelines. The results of this research will be of interest to people who work with electronic devices involving UWB radiation.

  17. Biological monitoring of wood dust exposure in nasal lavage by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mämmelä, Pirjo; Tuomainen, Anneli; Vartiainen, Terttu; Lindroos, Lasse; Kangas, Juhani; Savolainen, Heikki

    2002-04-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for biomonitoring of occupational wood dust exposure based on nasal lavage as a biomonitoring matrix was developed. Gallic acid (GA) was chosen as the indicator compound for oak dust exposure. From the chromatographic profile of ash dust, four peaks were chosen as indicator compounds. Phenolic indicator compounds were analysed by HPLC. Personal dust samples and corresponding nasal lavage samples were collected from 16 workers exposed to oak dust and six to ash dust. The dust concentrations in the workers' breathing zone varied between 0.7 and 13.8 mg m(-3). The indicators revealed the nature of the wood dust inhaled. For the workers who did not use respirators, the correlation between the dust and corresponding indicator compound in their nasal lavage was significant; r2 = 0.59 (n = 12) for oak dust and r2 = 0.58 (n = 6) for ash dust, respectively. Further, the correlation for oak dust workers who used respirators was r = 0.67 (n = 4). Nasal lavage sampling and HPLC analysis of polyphenol indicator compounds are promising tools for measuring wood dust exposure. Although further validation is necessary, determination of the individual dose may prove invaluable in prospective epidemiological studies.

  18. Biological monitoring of pesticide exposures among applicators and their children in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Teresa; Younglove, Lisa; Lu, Chensheng; Funez, Aura; Weppner, Sarah; Barr, Dana B; Fenske, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Exposures were assessed for seven small-scale farmers using chlorpyrifos on corn and ten banana plantation employees applying diazinon, and for one child of each worker. Metabolites (TCPYand IMPY) were measured in urine before and after applications. TCPY concentrations peaked at 27 and 8.5 hours post-application for applicators and children, respectively (geometric means, 26 and 3.0 microg/L). Proximity to spraying and spray mixture preparation in homes were important exposure factors. IMPY concentrations differed substantially across workers at two plantations (geometric means, 1.3 and 168 mirog/L); however, their children had little or no diazinon exposure. These workers and children were also exposed to chlorpyrifos, most likely through contact with chlorpyrifos-impregnated bags used in banana production. Several recommendations are offered: (1) monitor children's activities during applications; (2) do not store or prepare pesticides in homes; (3) institute sound occupational hygiene practices at banana plantations; (4) dispose of plastic insecticide bags properly at the worksite.

  19. Evaluation of thermal and non-thermal effects of UHF RFID exposure on biological drugs.

    PubMed

    Calcagnini, Giovanni; Censi, Federica; Maffia, Michele; Mainetti, Luca; Mattei, Eugenio; Patrono, Luigi; Urso, Emanuela

    2012-11-01

    The Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology promises to improve several processes in the healthcare scenario, especially those related to traceability of people and things. Unfortunately, there are still some barriers limiting the large-scale deployment of these innovative technologies in the healthcare field. Among these, the evaluation of potential thermal and non-thermal effects due to the exposure of biopharmaceutical products to electromagnetic fields is very challenging, but still slightly investigated. This paper aims to setup a controlled RF exposure environment, in order to reproduce a worst-case exposure of pharmaceutical products to the electromagnetic fields generated by the UHF RFID devices placed along the supply chain. Radiated powers several times higher than recommended by current normative limits were applied (10 W and 20 W). The electric field strength at the exposed sample location, used in tests, was as high as 100 V/m. Non-thermal effects were evaluated by chromatography techniques and in vitro assays. The results obtained for a particular case study, the ActrapidTM human insulin preparation, showed temperature increases lower than 0.5 °C and no significant changes in the structure and performance of the considered drug.

  20. Assessing Current Instructional Practices in General Biology One (BIO1010) and Arguing for a Model-Centered Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthey, Seth

    This collected papers dissertation focused on the argument for the need to adapt and develop a model-centered General Biology I course through the analyses of current instructional practices at a large, public, Hispanic-serving university. This dissertation included a comparison of General Biology I course sections taught in two differing formats, one is a traditional lecture with face-to-face meetings and the other is an online instruction setting. The comparison of these sections was accomplished through the use of a conceptual inventory, student attitude survey, drop-fail-withdraw (DFW) rates, and Social Network Analysis. This comparison found that there was no detectible significant difference between course type for both the conceptual understanding and formation of student-to-student networks. It was also found that there was a significant difference between course type when looking at students' attitudes towards Biology and success in the two course types. Additionally in a second study the project used a phenomoenographic analysis of student interviews that explored the students' use of scientific models when asked about plant cells and animal cells. It was found that during the analysis of students' ideas that students predominantly used a single model function. The cell types of focus in the second study were two models that were identified, in a third study, through a coded analysis of faculty interviews and textbook analysis. These models are viewed as essential for students to possess an understanding of upon completion of General Biology I. The model-based course that this study argued for is based on a curricular framework initially developed for use in introductory physics courses. University Modeling Instruction courses in physics (UMI-P) have been linked to improved student conceptual understanding positive attitudinal shifts, and decreased DFW rates. UMI, however, has not been expanded for implementation within the other science disciplines

  1. The experimental teaching reform in biochemistry and molecular biology for undergraduate students in Peking University Health Science Center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and participated in some original research work. There is a critical educational need to prepare these students for the increasing accessibility of research experience. The redesigned experimental curriculum of biochemistry and molecular biology was developed to fulfill such a requirement, which keeps two original biochemistry experiments (Gel filtration and Enzyme kinetics) and adds a new two-experiment component called "Analysis of anti-tumor drug induced apoptosis." The additional component, also known as the "project-oriented experiment" or the "comprehensive experiment," consists of Western blotting and a DNA laddering assay to assess the effects of etoposide (VP16) on the apoptosis signaling pathways. This reformed laboratory teaching system aims to enhance the participating students overall understanding of important biological research techniques and the instrumentation involved, and to foster a better understanding of the research process all within a classroom setting. Student feedback indicated that the updated curriculum helped them improve their operational and self-learning capability, and helped to increase their understanding of theoretical knowledge and actual research processes, which laid the groundwork for their future research work.

  2. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure in Portuguese airline pilots: study of a possible correlation with oxidative biological markers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo; Folgosa, Filipe; Soares, Paulo; Pereira, Alice S; Garcia, Raquel; Gestal-Otero, Juan Jesus; Tavares, Pedro; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R

    2013-05-01

    Several studies have sought to understand the health effects of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. However, only few biologic markers or associations with disease outcomes have so far been identified. In the present study, 22 long- and 26 medium-haul male Portuguese airline pilots and 36 factory workers who did not fly regularly were investigated. The two groups were comparable in age and diet, were non-smokers, never treated with ionizing radiation and other factors. Cosmic radiation exposure in pilots was quantified based on direct monitoring of 51 flights within Europe, and from Europe to North and South America, and to Africa. Indirect dose estimates in pilots were performed based on the SIEVERT (Système informatisé d'évaluation par vol de l'exposition au rayonnement cosmique dans les transports aériens) software for 6,039 medium- and 1,366 long-haul flights. Medium-haul pilots had a higher cosmic radiation dose rate than long-haul pilots, that is, 3.3 ± 0.2 μSv/h and 2.7 ± 0.3 μSv/h, respectively. Biological tests for oxidative stress on blood and urine, as appropriate, at two time periods separated by 1 year, included measurements of antioxidant capacity, total protein, ferritin, hemoglobin, creatinine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Principal components analysis was used to discriminate between the exposed and unexposed groups based on all the biological tests. According to this analysis, creatinine and 8OHdG levels were different for the pilots and the unexposed group, but no distinctions could be made among the medium- and the long-haul pilots. While hemoglobin levels seem to be comparable between the studied groups, they were directly correlated with ferritin values, which were lower for the airline pilots.

  3. Biological monitoring as a valid tool to assess occupational exposure to mixtures of 2,4-:2,6-toluene diisocyanate.

    PubMed

    De Palma, G; Cortesi, Ilenia; Ghitti, Roberta; Festa, Denise; Bergonzi, R; Apostoli, P

    2012-01-01

    Despite its advantages over environmental monitoring, biological monitoring of exposure to 2,4-:2,6-toluene diisocyanate (TDI) mixtures is still underused. The present study was designed in order to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of biological monitoring in a factory producing polyurethane foam blocks. Airborne TDI isomers were sampled by both static and personal pumps and determined by HPLC with fluorimetric detection. Specific metabolites 2,4- and 2,6-toluenediamine (TDA) were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry on hydrolysed urine samples collected from 16 workers at the beginning of the workweek and both before (BS) and at the end (ES) of the 4th workday. Additional samples were collected at the end of the 1st half-shift and at the beginning of the 2nd half-shift in 5 workers. In the foam production shop, TDI values were on average about 20 microg/m3, with higher levels in the 2nd half-shift and peak levels in workers operating along the polymerization tunnel. Average TDI levels were significantly correlated with ES TDA concentrations (p < 0.0001). TDA showed a fast urinary elimination phase leading to progressively higher TDA levels either during the shift (5 workers) and at the end-of-shift. A slower elimination phase with a weekly accumulation was demonstrated by values at the beginning of the workweek (higher than in unexposed subjects) and by their elevation in subsequent BS samples. The study demonstrates the feasibility and reliability of biological monitoring in workers exposed to 2,4-:2, 6-TDI mixtures. This approach can provide information about both the daily and weekly exposure levels.

  4. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to lead with a zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) meter.

    PubMed

    Mets, J T

    1981-12-05

    Recent literature dealing with biological monitoring of people exposed to lead at work is reviewed. The widespread trend to regard lower levels of lead in air or in the blood of workers as acceptable or as recommended upper limits is discussed. Based on practical experience over a 6-month period, it is concluded that the zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) test is an adequate, convenient and inexpensive screening method for monitoring workers exposed to lead in a motor care manufacturing plant.

  5. Biological responses to PCB exposure in shorthorn sculpin from Saglek Bay, Labrador.

    PubMed

    Kuzyk, Z A; Hodson, P V; Solomon, S M; Reimer, K J

    2005-12-01

    A local source of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Saglek Bay, Labrador, has contaminated marine sediments and the coastal food web. As part of a larger assessment of ecological risks in the Bay, we evaluated biological responses to PCB concentrations in a northern fish species, the shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Biological endpoints, including ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in liver tissue, fish body condition, lipid content, and relative liver mass were examined in 35 sculpin collected during August-September 1999. Across a wide range of PCB concentrations (5.1-6920 ng/g wet weight (ww) in whole fish excluding liver), sculpin showed significant EROD induction (as much as 25-fold in the most exposed group). Responses varied directly with PCB concentrations but there was also an apparent threshold for induction at about 50 ng/g ww (whole fish excluding liver). A strong relationship between sculpin PCB concentrations and the concentrations of PCBs in the marine sediments of Saglek Bay suggests that concentrations above this threshold can arise from very low concentrations in sediments (2.3 ng/g dry weight). Other biological endpoints did not show significant responses to PCB concentrations, nor were they related to the observed EROD activity. Although PCDF compounds were present in trace amounts (primarily 2,3,4,7,8-PnCDF), mono-ortho and non-ortho substituted (coplanar) PCBs appeared to contribute the majority of the total dioxin toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations. Overall, the results indicate that biological responses occur in shorthorn sculpin with relatively low PCB concentrations (approximately 50 ng/g), which are not unrealistic for even mildly contaminated areas in northern Canada.

  6. Biological monitoring of welders' exposure to chromium, molybdenum, tungsten and vanadium.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Dag G; Chashchin, Maxim; Berlinger, Balazs; Fedorov, Vladimir; Chashchin, Valery; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2017-05-01

    Welders are exposed to a number of metallic elements during work. Bioaccessability, that is important for element uptake, has been little studied. This study addresses bioaccessability and uptake of chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W) and vanadium (V) among welders. Bioaccessability of Cr, Mo, V and W was studied in airborne particulate matter collected by personal sampling of the workroom air among shipyard welders by using the lung lining fluid simulant Hatch solution. Associations between concentrations of Hatch soluble and non-soluble elements (Hatchsol and Hatchnon-sol) and concentrations of the four elements in whole blood, serum, blood cells and urine were studied. Air concentrations of the four elements were low. Only a small fraction of Cr, V and W was Hatchsol, while similar amounts of Mo were Hatchsol and Hatchnon-sol. Welders (N=70) had statistically significantly higher concentrations of all four elements in urine and serum when compared to referents (N=74). Highly statistically significant associations were observed between urinary W and Hatchsol W (p<0.001) and serum V and Hatchsol V (p<0.001), in particular when air samples collected the day before collection of biological samples were considered. Associations between Hatchsol elements in air and their biological concentrations were higher than when Hatchnon-sol concentrations were considered. Associations were generally higher when air samples collected the day before biological sampling were considered as compared to air samples collected two days before. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood Eosinophils and World Trade Center Exposure Predict Surgery in Chronic Rhinosinusitis. A 13.5-Year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sophia; Putman, Barbara; Weakley, Jessica; Hall, Charles B; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Schwartz, Theresa; Olivieri, Brianne; Singh, Ankura; Huie, Maryann; Morrison, Debra; Webber, Mayris P; Cohen, Hillel W; Kelly, Kerry J; Aldrich, Thomas K; Nolan, Anna; Prezant, David J; Shohet, Michael R; Weiden, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) collapse generated caustic airborne particulates that caused chronic rhinosinusitis in exposed Fire Department of New York firefighters. Surgery was performed when symptoms remained uncontrolled despite medical management. To identify predictors of surgical intervention for chronic rhinosinusitis in firefighters exposed to airborne irritants at the WTC collapse site. We assessed in 8,227 firefighters with WTC exposure between September 11, 2001 (9/11), and September 25, 2001, including WTC-site arrival time, months of rescue and recovery work, and eosinophil concentration measured between 9/11 and March 10, 2003. We assessed the association of serum cytokines and immunoglobulins with eosinophil concentration and surgery for rhinosinusitis in 112 surgical cases and 376 control subjects with serum available from the first 6 months after exposure to the WTC collapse site. Between 9/11 and March 10, 2015, the surgery rate was 0.47 cases per 100 person-years. In the first 18 months post-9/11, surgical patients had higher mean blood eosinophil levels than study cohort patients (219 ± 155 vs. 191 ± 134; P < 0.0001). Increased surgery risk was associated with increasing blood eosinophil counts (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12 per 100 cells/μl; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.17; P < 0.001); arriving at the WTC site on 9/11 or September 12, 2001 (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.04-1.99; P = 0.03); and working 6 months or longer at the WTC site (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.14-1.93; P < 0.01). Median blood eosinophil levels for surgical patients were above levels for the cohort in all 18-month intervals March 11, 2000, through March 10, 2015, using 51,163 measurements representing 97,733 person-years of observation. Increasing age, increasing IL-17A, and low IgA in serum from 2001 to 2002 predicted blood eosinophil concentration in surgical patients but not in control subjects (R(2) = 0.26, P < 0.0001; vs. R(2) = 0.008, P = 0

  8. Biological monitoring of arsenic exposure of gallium arsenide- and inorganic arsenic-exposed workers by determination of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites in urine and hair

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Mashiko, M.; Yamamura, Y. )

    1989-11-01

    In an attempt to establish a method for biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure, the chemical species of arsenic were measured in the urine and hair of gallium arsenide (GaAs) plant and copper smelter workers. Determination of urinary inorganic arsenic concentration proved sensitive enough to monitor the low-level inorganic arsenic exposure of the GaAs plant workers. The urinary inorganic arsenic concentration in the copper smelter workers was far higher than that of a control group and was associated with high urinary concentrations of the inorganic arsenic metabolites, methylarsonic acid (MAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA). The results established a method for exposure level-dependent biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure. Low-level exposures could be monitored only by determining urinary inorganic arsenic concentration. High-level exposures clearly produced an increased urinary inorganic arsenic concentration, with an increased sum of urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites (inorganic arsenic + MAA + DMAA). The determination of urinary arsenobetaine proved to determine specifically the seafood-derived arsenic, allowing this arsenic to be distinguished clearly from the arsenic from occupational exposure. Monitoring arsenic exposure by determining the arsenic in the hair appeared to be of value only when used for environmental monitoring of arsenic contamination rather than for biological monitoring.

  9. [Fullerenes: Characteristics of the substance, biological effects and occupational exposure levels].

    PubMed

    Świdwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    Fullerenes are molecules composed of an even number of carbon atoms of a spherical or an ellipsoidal, closed spatial structure. The most common fullerene is the C60 molecule with a spherical structure - a truncated icosahedron, compared to a football. Fullerenes are widely used in the diagnostics and medicine, but also in the electronics and energy industry. Occupational exposure to fullerene may occur during its production. The occupational concentrations of fullerenes reached 0.12-1.2 μ/m3 for nanoparticles fraction (< 100 nm), which may evidence low exposure levels. However, fullerene mostly agglomerates into larger particles. Absorption of fullerene by oral and respiratory routes is low, and it is not absorbed by skin. After intravenous administration, fullerene accumulates mainly in the liver but also in the spleen and the kidneys. In animal experiments there was no irritation or skin sensitization caused by fullerene, and only mild irritation to the eyes. Fullerene induced transient inflammation in the lungs in inhalation studies in rodents. Oral exposure does not lead to major adverse effects. Fullerene was not mutagenic, genotoxic or carcinogenic in experimental research. However, fullerene may cause harmful effects on the mice fetus when administered intraperitoneally or intravenously. Pristine C60 fullerene is characterized by poor absorption and low toxicity, and it does not pose a risk in the occupational environment. The authors of this study are of the opinion that there is no ground for estimating the maximum allowable concentration (NDS) of pristine fullerene C60. Fullerene derivatives, due to different characteristics, require separate analysis in terms of occupational risk assessment. Med Pr 2016;67(3):397-410.

  10. Within-subject Pooling of Biological Samples to Reduce Exposure Misclassification in Biomarker-based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Flavie; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Philippat, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Background: For chemicals with high within-subject temporal variability, assessing exposure biomarkers in a spot biospecimen poorly estimates average levels over long periods. The objective is to characterize the ability of within-subject pooling of biospecimens to reduce bias due to exposure misclassification when within-subject variability in biomarker concentrations is high. Methods: We considered chemicals with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.6 and 0.2. In a simulation study, we hypothesized that the chemical urinary concentrations averaged over a given time period were associated with a health outcome and estimated the bias of studies assessing exposure that collected 1 to 50 random biospecimens per subject. We assumed a classical type error. We studied associations using a within-subject pooling approach and two measurement error models (simulation extrapolation and regression calibration), the latter requiring the assay of more than one biospecimen per subject. Results: For both continuous and binary outcomes, using one sample led to attenuation bias of 40% and 80% for compounds with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.6 and 0.2, respectively. For a compound with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.6, the numbers of biospecimens required to limit bias to less than 10% were 6, 2, and 2 biospecimens with the pooling, simulation extrapolation, and regression calibration methods (these values were, respectively, 35, 8, and 2 for a compound with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.2). Compared with pooling, these methods did not improve power. Conclusion: Within-subject pooling limits attenuation bias without increasing assay costs. Simulation extrapolation and regression calibration further limit bias, compared with the pooling approach, but increase assay costs. PMID:27035688

  11. Biological monitoring of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by determination of unmetabolized compounds in urine.

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Addario, Liliana; Buratti, Marina; Scibetta, Licia; Longhi, Omar; Valla, Carla; Cirla, Piero E; Martinotti, Irene; Foà, Vito; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2006-04-10

    In this paper we evaluated the possibility to assess occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measuring unmetabolized PAHs in urine. With this aim, 24 road paving (RP) workers, exposed to bitumen fumes, and 6 road construction workers (CW), exposed to diesel exhausts, were investigated. Median personal exposure to low boiling PAHs (from naphthalene to pyrene) during the work shift ranged from 0.5 to 369 ng/m(3), with naphthalene as the most abundant compound. Three urine samples were collected for each worker: baseline (after 2 days of vacation), before- and end-shift samples (in the second part of the work week). The following urinary compounds were measured by headspace-solid phase microextraction GC/MS: naphthalene (U-NAP), acenaphthylene (U-ACY), acenaphthene (U-ACE), fluorene (U-FLE), phenanthrene (U-PHE), anthracene (U-ANT), fluoranthene (U-FLU), pyrene (U-PYR). Urinary PAHs were detected in almost all samples. Median levels for U-NAP, U-PHE, U-PYR and U-FLE in end-shift samples were 82, 48, 54 and 21 ng/L in RP and 69, 14, 24 and 15 ng/L in CW, respectively. Significant differences in the levels of U-PHE, U-FLU and U-PYR were found between RP and CW (p<0.05). Moreover in RP samples the urinary excretion of most analytes increased during the work shift (p<0.05). These results suggest that urinary PAHs may be useful biomarkers of occupational exposure.

  12. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, P. J.; Pritchard, A. L.; Ihnacik, R.

    2014-05-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis-irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically available radiation (PAR)) and two temperatures (20 and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a polychromatic incubator with 12 long-pass filter configurations with 50% wavelength cutoffs ranging from 291 to 408 nm, giving an effective wavelength range of 280-400 nm. Examination of photosynthetic response vs. weighted exposure revealed that repair rate progressively increases at low exposure but reaches a maximum rate above a threshold exposure ("Emax"). Adding Emax as a parameter to the BWF/P-E model provided a significantly better fit to Synechococcus data than the existing "E" or "T" models. Sensitivity to UV inhibition varied with growth conditions for both strains, but this was mediated mainly by variations in Emax for WH8102 while both the BWF and Emax changed for WH7803. Higher growth temperature was associated with a considerable reduction in sensitivity, consistent with an important role of repair in regulating sensitivity to UV. Based on nominal water column conditions (noon, solstice, 23° latitude, "blue" water), the BWFEmax/P-E model estimates that UV + PAR exposure inhibits Synechococcus photosynthesis from 78 to 91% at 1 m, and integrated productivity to 150 m 17-29% relative to predicted rates in the absence of inhibition.

  13. UV effects on the primary productivity of picophytoplankton: biological weighting functions and exposure response curves of Synechococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, P. J.; Pritchard, A. L.; Ihnacik, R.

    2013-12-01

    A model that predicts UV effects on marine primary productivity using a biological weighting function (BWF) coupled to the photosynthesis-irradiance response (BWF/P-E model) has been implemented for two strains of the picoplanktonic cyanobacteria, Synechococcus, WH7803 and WH8102, which were grown at two irradiances (77 and 174 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR) and two temperatures (20 °C and 26 °C). The model was fit using photosynthesis measured in a polychromatic incubator with 12 long-pass filter configurations with 50% wavelength cutoffs ranging from 291 to 408 nm, giving an effective wavelength range of 280-400 nm. Examination of photosynthetic response vs weighted exposure revealed that repair rate progressively increases at low exposure but reaches a maximum rate above a threshold exposure ("Emax"). Adding Emax as a parameter to the BWF/P-E model provided a significantly better fit to Synechococcus data than the existing "E" or "T" models. Sensitivity to UV inhibition varied with growth conditions for both strains, but this was mediated mainly by variations in Emax for WH8102 while both the BWF and Emax changed for WH7803. Higher growth temperature was associated with a considerable reduction in sensitivity, consistent with an important role of repair in regulating sensitivity to UV. Based on nominal water column conditions (noon, solstice, 23° latitude, "blue" water), the BWFEmax/P-E model estimates that UV + PAR exposure inhibits Synechococcus photosynthesis from 77-91% at 1 m, and integrated productivity to 150 m 15-27% relative to predicted rates in the absence of inhibition.

  14. Biomarkers of patient intrinsic risk for upper and lower airway injury after exposure to the World Trade Center atrocity.

    PubMed

    Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Nolan, Anna; Putman, Barbara; Singh, Ankura; Prezant, David J; Weiden, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    High rates of upper and lower airways disease have occurred in Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) workers exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster site. Most experienced acute declines in pulmonary function, and some continued to experience decline over 14 years of follow-up. Similarly, some with rhinosinusitis had symptoms requiring sinus surgery. To increase generalizability of biomarker investigation, we describe biomarkers of risk for upper and lower airway injury that do not require stored serum. We review WTC biomarker literature. Cytokines expressed in stored serum from the first 6 months post-9/11 can identify individuals at higher risk for future abnormal pulmonary function. This research will help identify individuals at high risk of lung and sinus disease that develop after these, or future, irritant exposures for intensive monitoring and treatment. It may also identify targets for effective therapeutic interventions. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:788-794, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.