Science.gov

Sample records for exposure comparative analysis

  1. Comparative international analysis of radiofrequency exposure surveys of mobile communication radio base stations

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Jack T; Joyner, Ken H

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of data from surveys of radio base stations in 23 countries across five continents from the year 2000 onward and includes over 173,000 individual data points. The research compared the results of the national surveys, investigated chronological trends and compared exposures by technology. The key findings from this data are that irrespective of country, the year and cellular technology, exposures to radio signals at ground level were only a small fraction of the relevant human exposure standards. Importantly, there has been no significant increase in exposure levels since the widespread introduction of 3G mobile services, which should be reassuring for policy makers and negate the need for post-installation measurements at ground level for compliance purposes. There may be areas close to antennas where compliance levels could be exceeded. Future potential work includes extending the study to additional countries, development of cumulative exposure distributions and investigating the possibility of linking exposure measurements to population statistics to assess the distribution of exposure levels relative to population percentiles. PMID:22377680

  2. COMPARING THE UTILITY OF MULTIMEDIA MODELS FOR HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL EXPOSURE ANALYSIS: TWO CASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of models are available for exposure assessment; however, few are used as tools for both human and ecosystem risks. This discussion will consider two modeling frameworks that have recently been used to support human and ecological decision making. The study will compare ...

  3. Comparative analysis of toxicological evaluations for dermal exposure performed under two different EU regulatory frameworks.

    PubMed

    Westerholm, Emma; Schenk, Linda

    2014-02-01

    Dermal exposure to chemicals is highly relevant in relation to the use of cosmetic products, both in consumers and in individuals exposed occupationally. Regulatory frameworks exist within the EU to limit the dermal exposure of the general population and workers to chemicals in general, as well as to limit the use of certain substances in cosmetic products. The objective of the study was to investigate and compare toxicological evaluations of dermal exposure performed under current regulatory frameworks. The publicly disseminated hazard information under the respective regulatory frameworks was compiled and compared for the five substances resorcinol, p-phenylenediamine, p-aminophenol, N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine, and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether. A low consistency between evaluations was observed in respect to data coverage and cited dose descriptors. No systematic differences over all five substances were identified from the viewpoint of dermal hazard assessment. The critical effect and corresponding systemic effect dose descriptor was identical for two substances, differed somewhat for two other (a factor of 2-2.5). For N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine a critical effect was only identified under REACH.

  4. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proceedings chapter will discuss the state-of-the-science regarding the evaluation of exposure as it relates to water quality criteria (WQC), sediment quality guidelines (SQG), and wildlife criteria (WC). Throughout this discussion, attempts are made to identify the methods ...

  5. Comparative Analysis of Immune Cells Activation and Cytotoxicity upon Exposure Pathogen and Glycoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Entsar; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) including macrophages are key players in the immune responses against pathogens. Any infection could be attenuated if PMNC would be activated and capable to kill pathogen on exposure. It was shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) play an important role in adhesion to, activation, and recognition of pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is a regulatory molecule released by immune cells against pathogens that include bacteria, protozoa, helminthes, and fungi. NO is a highly reactive and diffusible molecule that controls replication or intracellular killing of pathogens during infection and immune responses against infections caused by pathogens. Avirulent Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores were used as a model in our study. The purpose of this study was two-fold: A) to analyze PMNC activation through NO production and B) to determine the cytotoxicity effect based on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) upon exposure to pathogen exerted by GCs. The latter were used "prior to," "during," and "following" PMNC exposure to pathogen in order to modulate immune responses to spores during phagocytosis. Post-phagocytosis study involved the assessment of NO and LDH release by macrophages upon exposure to spores. Results have shown that untreated PMNC released low levels of NO. However, in the presence of GCs, PMNC were activated and produced high levels of NO under all experimental conditions. In addition, the results showed that GC1, GC3 are capable of increasing PMNC activity as evidenced by higher NO levels under the "prior," "during" and "following" to pathogen exposure conditions. On the other hand, GCs were capable of controlling cytotoxicity and decreased LDH levels during phagocytosis of spores. Our findings suggest that GCs stimulate NO production by activating PMNC and decrease cytotoxicity caused by pathogens on PMNC.

  6. Exposure of Brassica juncea (L) to arsenic species in hydroponic medium: comparative analysis in accumulation and biochemical and transcriptional alterations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohd Anwar; Gupta, Meetu

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in the environment has attracted considerable attention worldwide. The objective of the present study was to see the comparative effect of As species As(III) and As(V) on accumulation, biochemical responses, and gene expression analysis in Brassica juncea var. Pusa Jaganath (PJn). Hydroponically grown 14-day-old seedlings of B. juncea were treated with different concentrations of As(III) and As(V). Accumulation of total As increased with increasing concentration of both As species and exposure time, mainly in roots. Reduction in seed germination, root-shoot length, chlorophyll, and protein content were observed with increasing concentration and exposure time of both As species, being more in As(III)-treated leaves. PJn variety showed that antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)) and stress-related parameters (cysteine, proline, and malondialdehyde (MDA)) were stimulated and allows plant to tolerate both As species. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis in leaves showed significant changes in protein profile with more stringent effect with As(III) stress. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis showed regulation in expression of phytochelatin synthase (PCS), metallothionine-2 (MT-2), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione synthetase (GS) genes under both As(III) and As(V) stresses. Results suggested that accumulation and inhibition on physiological parameters differ according to the As species, while molecular and biochemical parameters showed a combinatorial type of tolerance mechanism against As(III) and As(V) stresses.

  7. Comparative toxicogenomic analysis of oral Cr(VI) exposure effects in rat and mouse small intestinal epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; Thompson, Chad M.; Kim, Suntae; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2012-07-15

    Continuous exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal tumors in mice but not rats. Concentration-dependent gene expression effects were evaluated in female F344 rat duodenal and jejunal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/L (as sodium dichromate dihydrate, SDD) in drinking water. Whole-genome microarrays identified 3269 and 1815 duodenal, and 4557 and 1534 jejunal differentially expressed genes at 8 and 91 days, respectively, with significant overlaps between the intestinal segments. Functional annotation identified gene expression changes associated with oxidative stress, cell cycle, cell death, and immune response that were consistent with reported changes in redox status and histopathology. Comparative analysis with B6C3F1 mouse data from a similarly designed study identified 2790 differentially expressed rat orthologs in the duodenum compared to 5013 mouse orthologs at day 8, and only 1504 rat and 3484 mouse orthologs at day 91. Automated dose–response modeling resulted in similar median EC{sub 50}s in the rodent duodenal and jejunal mucosae. Comparative examination of differentially expressed genes also identified divergently regulated orthologs. Comparable numbers of differentially expressed genes were observed at equivalent Cr concentrations (μg Cr/g duodenum). However, mice accumulated higher Cr levels than rats at ≥ 170 mg/L SDD, resulting in a ∼ 2-fold increase in the number of differentially expressed genes. These qualitative and quantitative differences in differential gene expression, which correlate with differences in tissue dose, likely contribute to the disparate intestinal tumor outcomes. -- Highlights: ► Cr(VI) elicits dose-dependent changes in gene expression in rat intestine. ► Cr(VI) elicits less differential gene expression in rats compared to mice. ► Cr(VI) gene expression can be phenotypically anchored to intestinal changes. ► Species

  8. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Human Liver Tissue and Isolated Hepatocytes with a Focus on Proteins Determining Drug Exposure.

    PubMed

    Vildhede, Anna; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Norén, Agneta; Karlgren, Maria; Artursson, Per

    2015-08-01

    Freshly isolated human hepatocytes are considered the gold standard for in vitro studies of liver functions, including drug transport, metabolism, and toxicity. For accurate predictions of the in vivo outcome, the isolated hepatocytes should reflect the phenotype of their in vivo counterpart, i.e., hepatocytes in human liver tissue. Here, we quantified and compared the membrane proteomes of freshly isolated hepatocytes and human liver tissue using a label-free shotgun proteomics approach. A total of 5144 unique proteins were identified, spanning over 6 orders of magnitude in abundance. There was a good global correlation in protein abundance. However, the expression of many plasma membrane proteins was lower in the isolated hepatocytes than in the liver tissue. This included transport proteins that determine hepatocyte exposure to many drugs and endogenous compounds. Pathway analysis of the differentially expressed proteins confirmed that hepatocytes are exposed to oxidative stress during isolation and suggested that plasma membrane proteins were degraded via the protein ubiquitination pathway. Finally, using pitavastatin as an example, we show how protein quantifications can improve in vitro predictions of in vivo liver clearance. We tentatively conclude that our data set will be a useful resource for improved hepatocyte predictions of the in vivo outcome.

  9. Spatial analysis of air pollution and childhood asthma in Hamilton, Canada: comparing exposure methods in sensitive subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Variations in air pollution exposure within a community may be associated with asthma prevalence. However, studies conducted to date have produced inconsistent results, possibly due to errors in measurement of the exposures. Methods A standardized asthma survey was administered to children in grades one and eight in Hamilton, Canada, in 1994–95 (N ~1467). Exposure to air pollution was estimated in four ways: (1) distance from roadways; (2) interpolated surfaces for ozone, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter and nitrous oxides from seven to nine governmental monitoring stations; (3) a kriged nitrogen dioxide (NO2) surface based on a network of 100 passive NO2 monitors; and (4) a land use regression (LUR) model derived from the same monitoring network. Logistic regressions were used to test associations between asthma and air pollution, controlling for variables including neighbourhood income, dwelling value, state of housing, a deprivation index and smoking. Results There were no significant associations between any of the exposure estimates and asthma in the whole population, but large effects were detected the subgroup of children without hayfever (predominately in girls). The most robust effects were observed for the association of asthma without hayfever and NO2LUR OR = 1.86 (95%CI, 1.59–2.16) in all girls and OR = 2.98 (95%CI, 0.98–9.06) for older girls, over an interquartile range increase and controlling for confounders. Conclusion Our findings indicate that traffic-related pollutants, such as NO2, are associated with asthma without overt evidence of other atopic disorders among female children living in a medium-sized Canadian city. The effects were sensitive to the method of exposure estimation. More refined exposure models produced the most robust associations. PMID:19338672

  10. Comparative Analysis of Stress Induced Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans following Exposure to Environmental and Lab Reconstituted Complex Metal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Pradhan, Ajay; Khan, Faisal Ahmad; Lindström, Pia; Ragnvaldsson, Daniel; Ivarsson, Per; Olsson, Per-Erik; Jass, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Metals are essential for many physiological processes and are ubiquitously present in the environment. However, high metal concentrations can be harmful to organisms and lead to physiological stress and diseases. The accumulation of transition metals in the environment due to either natural processes or anthropogenic activities such as mining results in the contamination of water and soil environments. The present study used Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate gene expression as an indicator of physiological response, following exposure to water collected from three different locations downstream of a Swedish mining site and a lab reconstituted metal mixture. Our results indicated that the reconstituted metal mixture exerted a direct stress response in C. elegans whereas the environmental waters elicited either a diminished or abrogated response. This suggests that it is not sufficient to use the biological effects observed from laboratory mixtures to extrapolate the effects observed in complex aquatic environments and apply this to risk assessment and intervention. PMID:26168046

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF HUMAN ACTIVITY PATTERNS ON PERSONAL PM EXPOSURE: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-BASED AND CONTINUOUS PARTICLE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) exposure data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored 1998 Baltimore and 1999 Fresno PM Exposure Studies were analyzed to identify important microenvironments and activities that may lead to increased particle exposure for select elderly ...

  12. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of the Response of Dunaliella acidophila (Chlorophyta) to Short-Term Cadmium and Chronic Natural Metal-Rich Water Exposures.

    PubMed

    Puente-Sánchez, Fernando; Olsson, Sanna; Aguilera, Angeles

    2016-10-01

    Heavy metals are toxic compounds known to cause multiple and severe cellular damage. However, acidophilic extremophiles are able to cope with very high concentrations of heavy metals. This study investigated the stress response under natural environmental heavy metal concentrations in an acidophilic Dunaliella acidophila. We employed Illumina sequencing for a de novo transcriptome assembly and to identify changes in response to high cadmium concentrations and natural metal-rich water. The photosynthetic performance was also estimated by pulse amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorescence. Transcriptomic analysis highlights a number of processes mainly related to a high constitutive expression of genes involved in oxidative stress and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS), even in the absence of heavy metals. Photosynthetic activity seems to be unaltered under short-term exposition to Cd and chronic exposure to natural metal-rich water, probably due to an increase in the synthesis of structural photosynthetic components preserving their functional integrity. An overrepresentation of Gene Ontology (GO) terms related to metabolic activities, transcription, and proteosomal catabolic process was observed when D. acidophila grew under chronic exposure to natural metal-rich water. GO terms involved in carbohydrate metabolic process, reticulum endoplasmic and Golgi bodies, were also specifically overrepresented in natural metal-rich water library suggesting an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. PMID:27484342

  13. Farmworker Exposure to Pesticides: Methodologic Issues for the Collection of Comparable Data

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Barr, Dana B.; Hoppin, Jane A.; McCauley, Linda; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Robson, Mark G.

    2006-01-01

    The exposure of migrant and seasonal farmworkers and their families to agricultural and residential pesticides is a continuing public health concern. Pesticide exposure research has been spurred on by the development of sensitive and reliable laboratory techniques that allow the detection of minute amounts of pesticides or pesticide metabolites. The power of research on farmworker pesticide exposure has been limited because of variability in the collection of exposure data, the predictors of exposure considered, the laboratory procedures used in analyzing the exposure, and the measurement of exposure. The Farmworker Pesticide Exposure Comparable Data Conference assembled 25 scientists from diverse disciplinary and organizational backgrounds to develop methodologic consensus in four areas of farmworker pesticide exposure research: environmental exposure assessment, biomarkers, personal and occupational predictors of exposure, and health outcomes of exposure. In this introduction to this mini-monograph, first, we present the rationale for the conference and its organization. Second, we discuss some of the important challenges in conducting farmworker pesticide research, including the definition and size of the farmworker population, problems in communication and access, and the organization of agricultural work. Third, we summarize major findings from each of the conference’s four foci—environmental exposure assessment, biomonitoring, predictors of exposure, and health outcomes of exposure—as well as important laboratory and statistical analysis issues that cross-cut the four foci. PMID:16759996

  14. Validity of Self-Reported Solar UVR Exposure Compared to Objectively Measured UVR Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Glanz, Karen; Gies, Peter; O’Riordan, David L.; Elliott, Tom; Nehl, Eric; McCarty, Frances; Davis, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Background Reliance on verbal self-report of solar exposure in skin cancer prevention and epidemiologic studies may be problematic if self-report data are not valid due to systematic errors in recall, social desirability bias, or other reasons. Methods This study examines the validity of self-reports of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) compared to objectively measured exposure among children and adults in outdoor recreation settings in four regions of the United States. Objective UVR exposures of 515 participants were measured using polysulfone film badge UVR dosimeters on two days. The same subjects provided self-reported UVR exposure data on surveys and 4-day sun exposure diaries, for comparison to their objectively measured exposure. Results Dosimeter data showed that lifeguards had the greatest UVR exposure (24.5% of weekday ambient UVR), children the next highest exposures (10.3% ambient weekday UVR) and parents had the lowest (6.6% ambient weekday UVR). Similar patterns were observed in self-report data. Correlations between diary reports and dosimeter findings were fair to good and were highest for lifeguards (r = 0.38 – 0.57), followed by parents (r = 0.28 – 0.29) and children (r = 0.18 – 0.34). Correlations between survey and diary measures were moderate to good for lifeguards (r = 0.20 – 0.54) and children (r = 0.35 – 0.53). Conclusions This is the largest study of its kind to date, and supports the utility of self-report measures of solar UVR exposure. Impact Overall, self-reports of sun exposure produce valid measures of UVR exposure among parents, children, and lifeguards who work outdoors. PMID:20940277

  15. Comparing the ecological relevance of four wave exposure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundblad, G.; Bekkby, T.; Isæus, M.; Nikolopoulos, A.; Norderhaug, K. M.; Rinde, E.

    2014-03-01

    Wave exposure is one of the main structuring forces in the marine environment. Methods that enable large scale quantification of environmental variables have become increasingly important for predicting marine communities in the context of spatial planning and coastal zone management. Existing methods range from cartographic solutions to numerical hydrodynamic simulations, and differ in the scale and spatial coverage of their outputs. Using a biological exposure index we compared the performance of four wave exposure models ranging from simple to more advanced techniques. All models were found to be related to the biological exposure index and their performance, measured as bootstrapped R2 distributions, overlapped. Qualitatively, there were differences in the spatial patterns indicating higher complexity with more advanced techniques. In order to create complex spatial patterns wave exposure models should include diffraction, especially in coastal areas rich in islands. The inclusion of wind strength and frequency, in addition to wind direction and bathymetry, further tended to increase the amount of explained variation. The large potential of high-resolution numerical models to explain the observed patterns of species distribution in complex coastal areas provide exciting opportunities for future research. Easy access to relevant wave exposure models will aid large scale habitat classification systems and the continuously growing field of marine species distribution modelling, ultimately serving marine spatial management and planning.

  16. Comparative analysis of bacterial community-metagenomics in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms following exposure to Macondo oil (MC252).

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyunmin; Mojib, Nazia; Thacker, Robert W; Bej, Asim K

    2014-11-01

    The indigenous bacterial communities in sediment microcosms from Dauphin Island (DI), Petit Bois Island (PB) and Perdido Pass (PP) of the coastal Gulf of Mexico were compared following treatment with Macondo oil (MC252) using pyrosequencing and culture-based approaches. After quality-based trimming, 28,991 partial 16S rRNA sequence reads were analyzed by rarefaction, confirming that analyses of bacterial communities were saturated with respect to species diversity. Changes in the relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes played an important role in structuring bacterial communities in oil-treated sediments. Proteobacteria were dominant in oil-treated samples, whereas Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were either the second or the third most abundant taxa. Tenericutes, members of which are known for oil biodegradation, were detected shortly after treatment, and continued to increase in DI and PP sediments. Multivariate statistical analyses (ADONIS) revealed significant dissimilarity of bacterial communities between oil-treated and untreated samples and among locations. In addition, a similarity percentage analysis showed the contribution of each species to the contrast between untreated and oil-treated samples. PCR amplification using DNA from pure cultures of Exiguobacterium,  Pseudoalteromonas,  Halomonas and Dyadobacter, isolated from oil-treated microcosm sediments, produced amplicons similar to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading genes. In the context of the 2010 Macondo blowout, the results from our study demonstrated that the indigenous bacterial communities in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms responded to the MC252 oil with altered community structure and species composition. The rapid proliferation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria suggests their involvement in the degradation of the spilt oil in the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

  17. A new mask exposure and analysis facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    te Sligte, Edwin; Koster, Norbert; Deutz, Alex; Staring, Wilbert

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of ever higher source powers in EUV systems causes increased risks for contamination and degradation of EUV masks and pellicles. Appropriate testing can help to inventory and mitigate these risks. To this end, we propose EBL2: a laboratory EUV exposure system capable of operating at high EUV powers and intensities, and capable of exposing and analyzing EUV masks. The proposed system architecture is similar to the EBL system which has been operated jointly by TNO and Carl Zeiss SMT since 2005. EBL2 contains an EUV Beam Line, in which samples can be exposed to EUV irradiation in a controlled environment. Attached to this Beam Line is an XPS system, which can be reached from the Beam Line via an in-vacuum transfer system. This enables surface analysis of exposed masks without breaking vacuum. Automated handling with dual pods is foreseen so that exposed EUV masks will still be usable in EUV lithography tools to assess the imaging impact of the exposure. Compared to the existing system, large improvements in EUV power, intensity, reliability, and flexibility are proposed. Also, in-situ measurements by e.g. ellipsometry is foreseen for real time monitoring of the sample condition. The system shall be equipped with additional ports for EUVR or other analysis tools. This unique facility will be open for external customers and other research groups.

  18. Measurement methods for human exposure analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, P J

    1995-01-01

    The general methods used to complete measurements of human exposures are identified and illustrations are provided for the cases of indirect and direct methods used for exposure analysis. The application of the techniques for external measurements of exposure, microenvironmental and personal monitors, are placed in the context of the need to test hypotheses concerning the biological effects of concern. The linkage of external measurements to measurements made in biological fluids is explored for a suite of contaminants. This information is placed in the context of the scientific framework used to conduct exposure assessment. Examples are taken from research on volatile organics and for a large scale problem: hazardous waste sites. PMID:7635110

  19. Tsunamis: Global Exposure and Local Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbitz, C. B.; Løvholt, F.; Glimsdal, S.; Horspool, N.; Griffin, J.; Davies, G.; Frauenfelder, R.

    2014-12-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami led to a better understanding of the likelihood of tsunami occurrence and potential tsunami inundation, and the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) was one direct result of this event. The United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction (UN-ISDR) adopted HFA in January 2005 in order to reduce disaster risk. As an instrument to compare the risk due to different natural hazards, an integrated worldwide study was implemented and published in several Global Assessment Reports (GAR) by UN-ISDR. The results of the global earthquake induced tsunami hazard and exposure analysis for a return period of 500 years are presented. Both deterministic and probabilistic methods (PTHA) are used. The resulting hazard levels for both methods are compared quantitatively for selected areas. The comparison demonstrates that the analysis is rather rough, which is expected for a study aiming at average trends on a country level across the globe. It is shown that populous Asian countries account for the largest absolute number of people living in tsunami prone areas, more than 50% of the total exposed people live in Japan. Smaller nations like Macao and the Maldives are among the most exposed by population count. Exposed nuclear power plants are limited to Japan, China, India, Taiwan, and USA. On the contrary, a local tsunami vulnerability and risk analysis applies information on population, building types, infrastructure, inundation, flow depth for a certain tsunami scenario with a corresponding return period combined with empirical data on tsunami damages and mortality. Results and validation of a GIS tsunami vulnerability and risk assessment model are presented. The GIS model is adapted for optimal use of data available for each study. Finally, the importance of including landslide sources in the tsunami analysis is also discussed.

  20. HUMAN EXPOSURE ANALYSIS, AN INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relatively new and expanding field of human exposure analysis has its genesis in the environmental movement and the interest of scientists and the public in understanding the interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic chemicals and people. The universe is full of chemi...

  1. EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that...

  2. Comparative effect of water and food-chain mediated cadmium exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Asagba, Samuel Ogheneovo

    2010-12-01

    This study sets out to compare the absorption and toxicity of Cadmium (Cd) administered via the food-chain and inorganic Cd administered in drinking water after 1 and 3 months exposure using rats as animal model. The food-chain was mimicked by exposing rats to diet containing Cd pre-exposed fish. The uptake of Cd by the rats after both mode of exposure was calculated by summing up the Cd burden in the liver and kidneys and was expressed in terms of % intake. The toxicity of Cd was assessed by monitoring biochemical indices of liver function in the plasma and liver. Regardless of the mode of exposure of the rats, the Cd load in the liver and kidney was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the respective controls with the kidney having a significantly higher load than the liver after both periods of exposure. However irrespective of the mode of exposure, more Cd was accumulated in the liver and kidney of the 3 months exposed rats relative to those exposed for 1 month. The uptake of Cd by rats exposed to Cd via the food-chain for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) lower when compared to the corresponding water mediated Cd exposed rats, except for the liver after 3 months of exposure. The liver L-ALT activity of rats administered inorganic Cd in drinking water for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) lower as compared to controls. Parallel analysis of the plasma showed no significant (P > 0.05) difference in L-ALT activity between both groups after the same periods of exposure. The L-AST activity in the plasma of rats similarly exposed to Cd for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) higher as compared to controls with a corresponding reduction in the liver. Conversely no significant (P > 0.05) change was observed in plasma and liver L-ALT and L-AST activities after food-chain mediated exposure to Cd for 1 and 3 months in relation to their respective controls. These findings indicate that Cd incorporated in fish is more easily bioavailable, but

  3. Comparative effect of water and food-chain mediated cadmium exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Asagba, Samuel Ogheneovo

    2010-12-01

    This study sets out to compare the absorption and toxicity of Cadmium (Cd) administered via the food-chain and inorganic Cd administered in drinking water after 1 and 3 months exposure using rats as animal model. The food-chain was mimicked by exposing rats to diet containing Cd pre-exposed fish. The uptake of Cd by the rats after both mode of exposure was calculated by summing up the Cd burden in the liver and kidneys and was expressed in terms of % intake. The toxicity of Cd was assessed by monitoring biochemical indices of liver function in the plasma and liver. Regardless of the mode of exposure of the rats, the Cd load in the liver and kidney was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the respective controls with the kidney having a significantly higher load than the liver after both periods of exposure. However irrespective of the mode of exposure, more Cd was accumulated in the liver and kidney of the 3 months exposed rats relative to those exposed for 1 month. The uptake of Cd by rats exposed to Cd via the food-chain for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) lower when compared to the corresponding water mediated Cd exposed rats, except for the liver after 3 months of exposure. The liver L-ALT activity of rats administered inorganic Cd in drinking water for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) lower as compared to controls. Parallel analysis of the plasma showed no significant (P > 0.05) difference in L-ALT activity between both groups after the same periods of exposure. The L-AST activity in the plasma of rats similarly exposed to Cd for 1 and 3 months was significantly (P < 0.05) higher as compared to controls with a corresponding reduction in the liver. Conversely no significant (P > 0.05) change was observed in plasma and liver L-ALT and L-AST activities after food-chain mediated exposure to Cd for 1 and 3 months in relation to their respective controls. These findings indicate that Cd incorporated in fish is more easily bioavailable, but

  4. Probabilistic Exposure Analysis for Chemical Risk Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, Kenneth T.; Cullen, Alison C.; Frey, H. Christopher; Price, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of the science of probabilistic exposure assessment (PEA) as applied to chemical risk characterization. Current probabilistic risk analysis methods applied to PEA are reviewed. PEA within the context of risk-based decision making is discussed, including probabilistic treatment of related uncertainty, interindividual heterogeneity, and other sources of variability. Key examples of recent experience gained in assessing human exposures to chemicals in the environment, and other applications to chemical risk characterization and assessment, are presented. It is concluded that, although improvements continue to be made, existing methods suffice for effective application of PEA to support quantitative analyses of the risk of chemically induced toxicity that play an increasing role in key decision-making objectives involving health protection, triage, civil justice, and criminal justice. Different types of information required to apply PEA to these different decision contexts are identified, and specific PEA methods are highlighted that are best suited to exposure assessment in these separate contexts. PMID:19223660

  5. Comparative analysis of collaboration networks

    SciTech Connect

    Progulova, Tatiana; Gadjiev, Bahruz

    2011-03-14

    In this paper we carry out a comparative analysis of the word network as the collaboration network based on the novel by M. Bulgakov 'Master and Margarita', the synonym network of the Russian language as well as the Russian movie actor network. We have constructed one-mode projections of these networks, defined degree distributions for them and have calculated main characteristics. In the paper a generation algorithm of collaboration networks has been offered which allows one to generate networks statistically equivalent to the studied ones. It lets us reveal a structural correlation between word network, synonym network and movie actor network. We show that the degree distributions of all analyzable networks are described by the distribution of q-type.

  6. Sociological analysis and comparative education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woock, Roger R.

    1981-12-01

    It is argued that comparative education is essentially a derivative field of study, in that it borrows theories and methods from academic disciplines. After a brief humanistic phase, in which history and philosophy were central for comparative education, sociology became an important source. In the mid-50's and 60's, sociology in the United States was characterised by Structural Functionalism as a theory, and Social Survey as a dominant methodology. Both were incorporated into the development of comparative education. Increasingly in the 70's, and certainly today, the new developments in sociology are characterised by an attack on Positivism, which is seen as the philosophical position underlying both functionalism and survey methods. New or re-discovered theories with their attendant methodologies included Marxism, Phenomenological Sociology, Critical Theory, and Historical Social Science. The current relationship between comparative education and social science is one of uncertainty, but since social science is seen to be returning to its European roots, the hope is held out for the development of an integrated social theory and method which will provide a much stronger basis for developments in comparative education.

  7. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM (EXAMS): USER MANUAL AND SYSTEM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Analysis Modeling System, first published in 1982 (EPA-600/3-82-023), provides interactive computer software for formulating aquatic ecosystem models and rapidly evaluating the fate, transport, and exposure concentrations of synthetic organic chemicals - pesticides, ...

  8. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  9. Comparing children's GPS tracks with geospatial proxies for exposure to junk food.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Richard C; Gilliland, Jason A

    2015-01-01

    Various geospatial techniques have been employed to estimate children's exposure to environmental cardiometabolic risk factors, including junk food. But many studies uncritically rely on exposure proxies which differ greatly from actual exposure. Misrepresentation of exposure by researchers could lead to poor decisions and ineffective policymaking. This study conducts a GIS-based analysis of GPS tracks--'activity spaces'--and 21 proxies for activity spaces (e.g. buffers, container approaches) for a sample of 526 children (ages 9-14) in London, Ontario, Canada. These measures are combined with a validated food environment database (including fast food and convenience stores) to create a series of junk food exposure estimates and quantify the errors resulting from use of different proxy methods. Results indicate that exposure proxies consistently underestimate exposure to junk foods by as much as 68%. This underestimation is important to policy development because children are exposed to more junk food than estimated using typical methods. PMID:26530823

  10. Advancing Exposure Science through Chemical Data Curation and Integration in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Cynthia J.; Davis, Allan Peter; Wiegers, Thomas C.; King, Benjamin L.; Wiegers, Jolene A.; Reif, David M.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure science studies the interactions and outcomes between environmental stressors and human or ecological receptors. To augment its role in understanding human health and the exposome, we aimed to centralize and integrate exposure science data into the broader biological framework of the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), a public resource that promotes understanding of environmental chemicals and their effects on human health. Objectives: We integrated exposure data within the CTD to provide a centralized, freely available resource that facilitates identification of connections between real-world exposures, chemicals, genes/proteins, diseases, biological processes, and molecular pathways. Methods: We developed a manual curation paradigm that captures exposure data from the scientific literature using controlled vocabularies and free text within the context of four primary exposure concepts: stressor, receptor, exposure event, and exposure outcome. Using data from the Agricultural Health Study, we have illustrated the benefits of both centralization and integration of exposure information with CTD core data. Results: We have described our curation process, demonstrated how exposure data can be accessed and analyzed in the CTD, and shown how this integration provides a broad biological context for exposure data to promote mechanistic understanding of environmental influences on human health. Conclusions: Curation and integration of exposure data within the CTD provides researchers with new opportunities to correlate exposures with human health outcomes, to identify underlying potential molecular mechanisms, and to improve understanding about the exposome. Citation: Grondin CJ, Davis AP, Wiegers TC, King BL, Wiegers JA, Reif DM, Hoppin JA, Mattingly CJ. 2016. Advancing exposure science through chemical data curation and integration in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. Environ Health Perspect 124:1592–1599; http://dx.doi.org/10

  11. Comparative Measurements of Cosmic Radiation Monitors for Aircrew Exposure Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getley, I. L.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M. L.; Lewis, B. J.; Green, A. R.; Butler, A.; Takada, M.; Nakamura, T.

    Various commercially available electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) have recently been flown on numerous scheduled airline flights in order to determine their viability as small, convenient monitors to measure cosmic radiation at altitude. Often, frequent flyers or airline crew will acquire such dosimeters and report the readings from their flights, without due regard for the mixed radiation field at altitude, which is different from the intended fields on land. A sampling of EPDs has been compared to two types of spectrometers, which measure the total radiation spectrum. The "HAWK" tissue equivalent proportional counter is considered a reference instrument and measures the total dose equivalent H*(10). The Liulin-4N and 4SN linear energy transfer spectrometers each have a silicon semiconductor-based PIN diode detector which provides an absorbed dose, D, but have been further developed to provide H*(10). A Thermo Electron FH41B and B-10, and EPD-N2, and several personal dosimeters (Fuji NRY-21 and NRF-20, and RADOS DIS-100) were also flown.

  12. An examination of population exposure to traffic related air pollution: Comparing spatially and temporally resolved estimates against long-term average exposures at the home location.

    PubMed

    Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Faghih-Imani, Ahmadreza; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2016-05-01

    Air pollution in metropolitan areas is mainly caused by traffic emissions. This study presents the development of a model chain consisting of a transportation model, an emissions model, and atmospheric dispersion model, applied to dynamically evaluate individuals' exposure to air pollution by intersecting daily trajectories of individuals and hourly spatial variations of air pollution across the study domain. This dynamic approach is implemented in Montreal, Canada to highlight the advantages of the method for exposure analysis. The results for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a marker of traffic related air pollution, reveal significant differences when relying on spatially and temporally resolved concentrations combined with individuals' daily trajectories compared to a long-term average NO2 concentration at the home location. We observe that NO2 exposures based on trips and activity locations visited throughout the day were often more elevated than daily NO2 concentrations at the home location. The percentage of all individuals with a lower 24-hour daily average at home compared to their 24-hour mobility exposure is 89.6%, of which 31% of individuals increase their exposure by more than 10% by leaving the home. On average, individuals increased their exposure by 23-44% while commuting and conducting activities out of home (compared to the daily concentration at home), regardless of air quality at their home location. We conclude that our proposed dynamic modelling approach significantly improves the results of traditional methods that rely on a long-term average concentration at the home location and we shed light on the importance of using individual daily trajectories to understand exposure.

  13. An examination of population exposure to traffic related air pollution: Comparing spatially and temporally resolved estimates against long-term average exposures at the home location.

    PubMed

    Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Faghih-Imani, Ahmadreza; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2016-05-01

    Air pollution in metropolitan areas is mainly caused by traffic emissions. This study presents the development of a model chain consisting of a transportation model, an emissions model, and atmospheric dispersion model, applied to dynamically evaluate individuals' exposure to air pollution by intersecting daily trajectories of individuals and hourly spatial variations of air pollution across the study domain. This dynamic approach is implemented in Montreal, Canada to highlight the advantages of the method for exposure analysis. The results for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a marker of traffic related air pollution, reveal significant differences when relying on spatially and temporally resolved concentrations combined with individuals' daily trajectories compared to a long-term average NO2 concentration at the home location. We observe that NO2 exposures based on trips and activity locations visited throughout the day were often more elevated than daily NO2 concentrations at the home location. The percentage of all individuals with a lower 24-hour daily average at home compared to their 24-hour mobility exposure is 89.6%, of which 31% of individuals increase their exposure by more than 10% by leaving the home. On average, individuals increased their exposure by 23-44% while commuting and conducting activities out of home (compared to the daily concentration at home), regardless of air quality at their home location. We conclude that our proposed dynamic modelling approach significantly improves the results of traditional methods that rely on a long-term average concentration at the home location and we shed light on the importance of using individual daily trajectories to understand exposure. PMID:26970897

  14. The risk of lung cancer from asbestos among Swedish construction workers: self-reported exposure and a job exposure matrix compared.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, A C; Engholm, G; Englund, A

    1993-01-01

    A total of 719 lung cancers were identified in a follow-up of 135,000 Swedish construction workers interviewed during 1971-1974 by occupational health nurses as part of a routine health check-up. These were analysed in a matched case-control study nested within this cohort, to compare different methods of characterizing exposure to asbestos. Self-reported exposure was contrasted with a job exposure matrix (JEM) of five levels of exposure intensity, applied to the job at the time of health check-up. Smoking adjusted odds ratios were computed and the JEM performed better than self-reported exposure, in being able to discriminate high risk subgroups. The same pattern was evident in a parallel analysis of 41 mesotheliomas. However both measures appeared subject to misclassification, and the question put seemed to pick up the use of asbestos cement products more effectively than asbestos insulation products. It is concluded that a simple JEM can be more reliable than a simple question, but that both should be much more detailed, to take account of different types of asbestos exposure and their variation over time.

  15. A Comparative Study of Item Exposure Control Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shun-Wen; Twu, Bor-Yaun

    This study investigated and compared the properties of five methods of item exposure control within the purview of estimating examinees' abilities in a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) context. Each of the exposure control algorithms was incorporated into the item selection procedure and the adaptive testing progressed based on the CAT design…

  16. Data analysis techniques: a tool for cumulative exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Lalloué, Benoît; Monnez, Jean-Marie; Padilla, Cindy; Kihal, Wahida; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Deguen, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Everyone is subject to environmental exposures from various sources, with negative health impacts (air, water and soil contamination, noise, etc.or with positive effects (e.g. green space). Studies considering such complex environmental settings in a global manner are rare. We propose to use statistical factor and cluster analyses to create a composite exposure index with a data-driven approach, in view to assess the environmental burden experienced by populations. We illustrate this approach in a large French metropolitan area. The study was carried out in the Great Lyon area (France, 1.2 M inhabitants) at the census Block Group (BG) scale. We used as environmental indicators ambient air NO2 annual concentrations, noise levels and proximity to green spaces, to industrial plants, to polluted sites and to road traffic. They were synthesized using Multiple Factor Analysis (MFA), a data-driven technique without a priori modeling, followed by a Hierarchical Clustering to create BG classes. The first components of the MFA explained, respectively, 30, 14, 11 and 9% of the total variance. Clustering in five classes group: (1) a particular type of large BGs without population; (2) BGs of green residential areas, with less negative exposures than average; (3) BGs of residential areas near midtown; (4) BGs close to industries; and (5) midtown urban BGs, with higher negative exposures than average and less green spaces. Other numbers of classes were tested in order to assess a variety of clustering. We present an approach using statistical factor and cluster analyses techniques, which seem overlooked to assess cumulative exposure in complex environmental settings. Although it cannot be applied directly for risk or health effect assessment, the resulting index can help to identify hot spots of cumulative exposure, to prioritize urban policies or to compare the environmental burden across study areas in an epidemiological framework.

  17. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  18. Analysis of exposure due to work on activated components

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this brief note the author summarized analysis of the exposure incurred in various maintenance jobs involving activated accelerator and beam line components at Fermilab. A tabulation was made of parameters associated with each job. Included are rather terse descriptions of the various tasks. The author presented various plots of the quantities in the table. All exposure rates are mR/hr while all exposures accumulated are mR. The exposure rates were generally measured at the Fermilab standard one foot distance from the activated component. Accumulated exposures are taken from the self-reading pocket dosimeter records maintained by the radiation control technicians.

  19. Virtual reality treatment versus exposure in vivo: a comparative evaluation in acrophobia.

    PubMed

    Emmelkamp, P M G; Krijn, M; Hulsbosch, A M; de Vries, S; Schuemie, M J; van der Mast, C A P G

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-budget virtual reality (VR) exposure versus exposure in vivo in a between-group design in 33 patients suffering from acrophobia. The virtual environments used in treatment were exactly copied from the real environments used in the exposure in vivo program. VR exposure was found to be as effective as exposure in vivo on anxiety and avoidance as measured with the Acrophobia Questionnaire (AQ), the Attitude Towards Heights Questionnaire (ATHQ) and the Behavioral Avoidance Test (BAT). Results were maintained up to six months follow-up. The present study shows that VR exposure can be effective with relatively cheap hardware and software on stand-alone computers currently on the market. Further studies into the effectiveness of VR exposure are recommended in other clinical groups as agoraphobics and social phobics and studies in which VR exposure is compared with more emerging virtual worlds as presented in CAVE-type systems.

  20. Variability in exposure to ambient ultrafine particles in urban schools: Comparative assessment between Australia and Spain.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mandana; Reche, Cristina; Rivas, Ioar; Crilley, Leigh R; Álvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Viana, Mar; Tobias, Aurelio; Alastuey, Andrés; Sunyer, Jordi; Querol, Xavier; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-03-01

    Ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC) have inhomogeneous spatio-temporal distributions and depend on a number of different urban factors, including background conditions and distant sources. This paper quantitatively compares exposure to ambient ultrafine particles at urban schools in two cities in developed countries, with high insolation climatic conditions, namely Brisbane (Australia) and Barcelona (Spain). The analysis used comprehensive indoor and outdoor air quality measurements at 25 schools in Brisbane and 39 schools in Barcelona. PNC modes were analysed with respect to ambient temperature, land use and urban characteristics, combined with the measured elemental carbon concentrations, NOx (Brisbane) and NO2 (Barcelona). The trends and modes of the quantified weekday average daily cycles of ambient PNC exhibited significant differences between the two cities. PNC increases were observed during traffic rush hours in both cases. However, the mid-day peak was dominant in Brisbane schools and had the highest contribution to total PNC for both indoors and outdoors. In Barcelona, the contribution from traffic was highest for ambient PNC, while the mid-day peak had a slightly higher contribution for indoor concentrations. Analysis of the relationships between PNC and land use characteristics in Barcelona schools showed a moderate correlation with the percentage of road network area and an anti-correlation with the percentage of green area. No statistically significant correlations were found for Brisbane. Overall, despite many similarities between the two cities, school-based exposure patterns were different. The main source of ambient PNC at schools was shown to be traffic in Barcelona and mid-day new particle formation in Brisbane. The mid-day PNC peak in Brisbane could have been driven by the combined effect of background and meteorological conditions, as well as other local/distant sources. The results have implications for urban development

  1. Comparative Analysis of Whole-Genome Gene Expression Changes in Cultured Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Response to Low, Clinical Diagnostic Relevant, and High Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Mykyta; Nguyen, Van; Neumann, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure in humans are not comprehensively understood, generating a high degree of controversy in published literature. The earliest stages of human development are known to be among the most sensitive to stress exposures, especially genotoxic stresses. However, the risks stemming from exposure to LDIR, particularly within the clinical diagnostic relevant dose range, have not been directly evaluated in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we describe the dynamics of the whole genome transcriptional responses of different hESC lines to both LDIR and, as a reference, high-dose IR (HDIR). We found that even doses as low as 0.05 Gy could trigger statistically significant transient changes in a rather limited subset of genes in all hESCs lines examined. Gene expression signatures of hESCs exposed to IR appear to be highly dose-, time-, and cell line-dependent. We identified 50 genes constituting consensus gene expression signature as an early response to HDIR across all lines of hESC examined. We observed substantial differences in biological pathways affected by either LDIR or HDIR in hESCs, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms underpinning the responses of hESC may fundamentally differ depending on radiation doses. PMID:26133243

  2. Comparative Environmental Threat Analysis: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, J. B.; Reiling, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews how carrying capacity for different environmental problems is operationalized. Discusses whether it is possible to compare threats, using the exceeding of carrying capacity as a yardstick. Points out problems in comparative threat analysis using three case studies: threats to European groundwater resources, threats to ecosystems in Europe,…

  3. Risk analysis for worker exposure to benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, William H.; Flowers, Roxanne E.

    1992-05-01

    Cancer risk factors (characterized by route, dose, dose rate per kilogram, fraction of lifetime exposed, species, and sex) were derived for workers exposed to benzene via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure at the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) and at leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites were evaluated. At the current PEL of 1 ppm, the theoretical lifetime excess risk of cancer from benzene inhalation is ten per 1000. The theoretical lifetime excess risk for worker inhalation exposure at LUST sites ranged from 10 to 40 per 1000. These results indicate that personal protection should be required. The theoretical lifetime excess risk due to soil ingestion is five to seven orders of magnitude less than the inhalation risks.

  4. Targeting clinician concerns about exposure therapy: A pilot study comparing standard vs. enhanced training.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Nicholas R; Kemp, Joshua J; Blakey, Shannon M; Meyer, Johanna M; Deacon, Brett J

    2016-10-01

    Owing to concerns about the safety and tolerability of exposure therapy, many clinicians deliver the treatment in an overly cautious manner, which may limit its effectiveness. Although didactic training in exposure reduces clinician concerns about the treatment to a moderate extent, improved training strategies are needed to minimize these concerns and improve exposure delivery. The present study compared the effectiveness of a standard (i.e., didactic) exposure therapy training model to an "enhanced" training paradigm encompassing strategies derived from social-cognitive theory on attitude change. Clinicians (N = 49) were assigned to one of the two training approaches. Relative to standard training, clinicians who received enhanced training showed: (a) significantly greater reductions in concerns about exposure from pre- to post-training, and (b) superior self-reported delivery of the treatment. Reduction in concerns during training mediated the effects of training condition on clinicians' self-reported exposure delivery. These findings underscore the importance of addressing clinician concerns about exposure therapy in training contexts. PMID:27567972

  5. Defining Product Intake Fraction to Quantify and Compare Exposure to Consumer Products.

    PubMed

    Jolliet, Olivier; Ernstoff, Alexi S; Csiszar, Susan A; Fantke, Peter

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing consciousness that exposure studies need to better cover near-field exposure associated with products use. To consistently and quantitatively compare human exposure to chemicals in consumer products, we introduce the concept of product intake fraction, as the fraction of a chemical within a product that is eventually taken in by the human population. This metric enables consistent comparison of exposures during consumer product use for different product-chemical combinations, exposure duration, exposure routes and pathways and for other life cycle stages. We present example applications of the product intake fraction concept, for two chemicals in two personal care products and two chemicals encapsulated in two articles, showing how intakes of these chemicals can primarily occur during product use. We demonstrate the utility of the product intake fraction and its application modalities within life cycle assessment and risk assessment contexts. The product intake fraction helps to provide a clear interface between the life cycle inventory and impact assessment phases, to identify best suited sentinel products and to calculate overall exposure to chemicals in consumer products, or back-calculate maximum allowable concentrations of substances inside products.

  6. Fault tree analysis for exposure to refrigerants used for automotive air conditioning in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jetter, J J; Forte, R; Rubenstein, R

    2001-02-01

    A fault tree analysis was used to estimate the number of refrigerant exposures of automotive service technicians and vehicle occupants in the United States. Exposures of service technicians can occur when service equipment or automotive air-conditioning systems leak during servicing. The number of refrigerant exposures of service technicians was estimated to be 135,000 per year. Exposures of vehicle occupants can occur when refrigerant enters passenger compartments due to sudden leaks in air-conditioning systems, leaks following servicing, or leaks caused by collisions. The total number of exposures of vehicle occupants was estimated to be 3,600 per year. The largest number of exposures of vehicle occupants was estimated for leaks caused by collisions, and the second largest number of exposures was estimated for leaks following servicing. Estimates used in the fault tree analysis were based on a survey of automotive air-conditioning service shops, the best available data from the literature, and the engineering judgement of the authors and expert reviewers from the Society of Automotive Engineers Interior Climate Control Standards Committee. Exposure concentrations and durations were estimated and compared with toxicity data for refrigerants currently used in automotive air conditioners. Uncertainty was high for the estimated numbers of exposures, exposure concentrations, and exposure durations. Uncertainty could be reduced in the future by conducting more extensive surveys, measurements of refrigerant concentrations, and exposure monitoring. Nevertheless, the analysis indicated that the risk of exposure of service technicians and vehicle occupants is significant, and it is recommended that no refrigerant that is substantially more toxic than currently available substitutes be accepted for use in vehicle air-conditioning systems, absent a means of mitigating exposure. PMID:11332544

  7. Fault tree analysis for exposure to refrigerants used for automotive air conditioning in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jetter, J J; Forte, R; Rubenstein, R

    2001-02-01

    A fault tree analysis was used to estimate the number of refrigerant exposures of automotive service technicians and vehicle occupants in the United States. Exposures of service technicians can occur when service equipment or automotive air-conditioning systems leak during servicing. The number of refrigerant exposures of service technicians was estimated to be 135,000 per year. Exposures of vehicle occupants can occur when refrigerant enters passenger compartments due to sudden leaks in air-conditioning systems, leaks following servicing, or leaks caused by collisions. The total number of exposures of vehicle occupants was estimated to be 3,600 per year. The largest number of exposures of vehicle occupants was estimated for leaks caused by collisions, and the second largest number of exposures was estimated for leaks following servicing. Estimates used in the fault tree analysis were based on a survey of automotive air-conditioning service shops, the best available data from the literature, and the engineering judgement of the authors and expert reviewers from the Society of Automotive Engineers Interior Climate Control Standards Committee. Exposure concentrations and durations were estimated and compared with toxicity data for refrigerants currently used in automotive air conditioners. Uncertainty was high for the estimated numbers of exposures, exposure concentrations, and exposure durations. Uncertainty could be reduced in the future by conducting more extensive surveys, measurements of refrigerant concentrations, and exposure monitoring. Nevertheless, the analysis indicated that the risk of exposure of service technicians and vehicle occupants is significant, and it is recommended that no refrigerant that is substantially more toxic than currently available substitutes be accepted for use in vehicle air-conditioning systems, absent a means of mitigating exposure.

  8. Association between cadmium exposure and renal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ju kun; Luo, Hong; Yin, Xin hai; Huang, Guang lei; Luo, Si yang; Lin, Du ren; Yuan, Dong Bo; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Jian guo

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant and has been a recognized carcinogen for several decades. Many observational studies reported Cd exposure might be one cause of renal cancer. However, these findings are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between cadmium exposure and renal cancer risk. A comprehensive PubMed and Embase search was conducted to retrieve observational studies meeting our meta-analysis criteria. A combined odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to assess the association between Cd exposure and renal cancer risk. The meta-analysis showed that a high Cd exposure significantly increased renal cancer 1.47 times (OR = 1.47; 95% CI = 1.27 to 1.71, for highest versus lowest category of cadmium categories). The significant association remained consistent when stratified by geographic region and gender, however mixed results were produced when stratified by sample size, study design, NOS score, adjustment for covariates, effects measure, and exposure type. Our results indicated that a high Cd exposure was associated with increased renal cancer risk and the association was higher for occupational exposure compared with non-occupational exposure. This meta-analysis suggests that a high Cd exposure may be a risk factor for renal cancer in occupational population. PMID:26656678

  9. Association between cadmium exposure and renal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju kun; Luo, Hong; Yin, Xin hai; Huang, Guang lei; Luo, Si yang; Lin, Du ren; Yuan, Dong Bo; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Jian guo

    2015-12-11

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental pollutant and has been a recognized carcinogen for several decades. Many observational studies reported Cd exposure might be one cause of renal cancer. However, these findings are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between cadmium exposure and renal cancer risk. A comprehensive PubMed and Embase search was conducted to retrieve observational studies meeting our meta-analysis criteria. A combined odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to assess the association between Cd exposure and renal cancer risk. The meta-analysis showed that a high Cd exposure significantly increased renal cancer 1.47 times (OR = 1.47; 95% CI = 1.27 to 1.71, for highest versus lowest category of cadmium categories). The significant association remained consistent when stratified by geographic region and gender, however mixed results were produced when stratified by sample size, study design, NOS score, adjustment for covariates, effects measure, and exposure type. Our results indicated that a high Cd exposure was associated with increased renal cancer risk and the association was higher for occupational exposure compared with non-occupational exposure. This meta-analysis suggests that a high Cd exposure may be a risk factor for renal cancer in occupational population.

  10. Comparative effects of petrol and diesel on enzyme activity in Tympanotonus fuscatus after sublethal exposure.

    PubMed

    Edori, O S; Festus, C; Edori, E S

    2014-04-01

    Pollution of the aquatic environment by petroleum and its products is common the world over. This study is aimed at examining sublethal effects of petrol and diesel on enzymes in Tympanotonus fuscatus namely: Aspartate Transaminase (AST) (E.C. 2.6.1.1), Alanine Transaminase (ALT) (E.C. 2.6.2.2) and Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) (E.C. 3.1.3.1) activity after exposure. The periwinkles were exposed to 10.40, 15.60, 21.00, 26.00 ml L(-1) and a control. The organs were removed on the sixth day and were prepared for enzymatic analysis. Enzyme activities were compared to the control value and between the toxicants. The effects of the toxicants on AST activity in the muscle and viscera were significantly different (p > 0.05) from the control value (137.50 ± 15.10 IU L(-1)). AST activity were raised more in petrol concentrations than the diesel concentrations in the muscle. The reverse was the case in the viscera at 15.60 ml L(-1) (227.50 ± 24.75 IU L(-1)). ALT activity in the muscle were not significant (p > 0.05) between the toxicant media. In the viscera, significant differences (p > 0.05) were observed in some of the concentrations with petrol showing higher activity. ALP activity in the muscle were not significant (p > 0.05) in both media, but were more elicited in the diesel concentrations. In the viscera, the activities of ALP were more pronounced in the petrol concentrations and were significant (p > 0.05) at the higher diesel concentrations. The exposure of Tympanotonus fuscatus to petrol and diesel concentrations caused changes in the enzymatic activities in the organism with those of petrol more pronounced than those of the diesel.

  11. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Behnaz; Andrew, Nigel R

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus 'natural' fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies. PMID:27547583

  12. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Behnaz; Andrew, Nigel R

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus 'natural' fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies.

  13. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Nigel R.

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus ‘natural’ fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies. PMID:27547583

  14. Comparing exposure metrics for classifying ‘dangerous heat’ in heat wave and health warning systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Rood, Richard B.; Michailidis, George; Oswald, Evan M.; Schwartz, Joel D.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Ebi, Kristie L.; O’Neill, Marie S.

    2012-01-01

    Heat waves have been linked to excess mortality and morbidity, and are projected to increase in frequency and intensity with a warming climate. This study compares exposure metrics to trigger heat wave and health warning systems (HHWS), and introduces a novel multi-level hybrid clustering method to identify potential dangerously hot days. Two-level and three-level hybrid clustering analysis as well as common indices used to trigger HHWS, including spatial synoptic classification (SSC); and 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles of minimum and relative minimum temperature (using a 10 day reference period), were calculated using a summertime weather dataset in Detroit from 1976 to 2006. The days classified as ‘hot’ with hybrid clustering analysis, SSC, minimum and relative minimum temperature methods differed by method type. SSC tended to include the days with, on average, 2.6 °C lower daily minimum temperature and 5.3 °C lower dew point than days identified by other methods. These metrics were evaluated by comparing their performance in predicting excess daily mortality. The 99th percentile of minimum temperature was generally the most predictive, followed by the three-level hybrid clustering method, the 95th percentile of minimum temperature, SSC and others. Our proposed clustering framework has more flexibility and requires less substantial meteorological prior information than the synoptic classification methods. Comparison of these metrics in predicting excess daily mortality suggests that metrics thought to better characterize physiological heat stress by considering several weather conditions simultaneously may not be the same metrics that are better at predicting heat-related mortality, which has significant implications in HHWSs. PMID:22673187

  15. Comparing exposure metrics for classifying 'dangerous heat' in heat wave and health warning systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Rood, Richard B; Michailidis, George; Oswald, Evan M; Schwartz, Joel D; Zanobetti, Antonella; Ebi, Kristie L; O'Neill, Marie S

    2012-10-01

    Heat waves have been linked to excess mortality and morbidity, and are projected to increase in frequency and intensity with a warming climate. This study compares exposure metrics to trigger heat wave and health warning systems (HHWS), and introduces a novel multi-level hybrid clustering method to identify potential dangerously hot days. Two-level and three-level hybrid clustering analysis as well as common indices used to trigger HHWS, including spatial synoptic classification (SSC), and the 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles of minimum and relative minimum temperature (using a 10 day reference period), were calculated using a summertime weather dataset in Detroit from 1976 to 2006. The days classified as 'hot' with hybrid clustering analysis, SSC, minimum and relative minimum temperature methods differed by method type. SSC tended to include the days with, on average, 2.5 °C lower daily minimum temperature and 5.3 °C lower dew point than days identified by other methods. These metrics were evaluated by comparing their performance in predicting excess daily mortality. The 99th percentile of minimum temperature was generally the most predictive, followed by the three-level hybrid clustering method, the 95th percentile of minimum temperature, SSC and others. Our proposed clustering framework has more flexibility and requires less substantial meteorological prior information than the synoptic classification methods. Comparison of these metrics in predicting excess daily mortality suggests that metrics thought to better characterize physiological heat stress by considering several weather conditions simultaneously may not be the same metrics that are better at predicting heat-related mortality, which has significant implications in HHWSs. PMID:22673187

  16. Comparative modeling of exposure to airborne nanoparticles released by consumer spray products.

    PubMed

    Riebeling, Christian; Luch, Andreas; Götz, Mario Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Consumer exposure to sprays containing nano-objects is a continuing concern as a potential health hazard. One potential hazard has been formulated in the overload hypothesis. It describes a volume fraction of the macrophages that is occupied by deposited nanoparticles that leads to reduced macrophage mobility. Subsequent chronic inflammation may then lead to severe health consequences including cancer. To calculate lung deposition of spherical particles, the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD) model (ARA, Albuquerque, NM) provides different kinds of lung models and age settings. Using the MPPD v 2.11 software, we modeled several consumer-related exposure scenarios. Different body orientations and age groups were investigated. Moreover, a number of materials representing different densities were used, and the exposure calculated using MPPD is compared to the hazard derived from the overload hypothesis. Conditions leading to macrophage overload were found for exposures to high particle doses for prolonged times and repeated exposure. Such conditions are unlikely in the context of regular consumer exposure. The overload hypothesis assumes the particles to be inert and biopersistent, a condition that currently lacks a clear regulatory definition and is valid only for a few selected materials. Furthermore, because of material-specific effects and the possibility of surface adsorption of hazardous chemicals, nano-objects in propellant sprays remain of concern for consumer health.

  17. Reaching new heights: Comparing interpretation bias modification to exposure therapy for extreme height fear

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Shari A.; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cognitive models of anxiety disorders posit that biases in interpretation maintain, and potentially cause, anxiety. This study tested whether it is possible to decrease height fear symptoms through cognitive bias modification for interpretations (CBM-I). Additionally, the clinical utility of CBM-I was tested by comparing it to an already established treatment: exposure therapy. Method Extremely height fearful (N = 110) individuals participated in the study. Acrophobic symptoms were measured before and after two sessions of CBM-I, and compared to the standard treatment for acrophobia (exposure therapy), a combination of CBM-I and exposure therapy, and a Control condition. Results In line with hypotheses, participants in the three active conditions showed greater response to treatment than the Control condition in height-relevant interpretation bias, symptoms, and behavioral avoidance on a height stressor, with few differences between the active conditions. Further, symptom change was mediated by change in interpretation bias. Conclusions Overall, findings suggest that different pathways to fear reduction (exposure vs. shifting interpretations) can lead to similar reductions in height fear. This study provides the first evidence that directly shifting cognitive processing, even with no therapist involvement, can reduce symptoms as effectively as the gold standard, therapist-directed exposure therapy. PMID:24588406

  18. Comparing population exposure to multiple Washington earthquake scenarios for prioritizing loss estimation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Ratliff, Jamie L.; Schelling, John; Weaver, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Scenario-based, loss-estimation studies are useful for gauging potential societal impacts from earthquakes but can be challenging to undertake in areas with multiple scenarios and jurisdictions. We present a geospatial approach using various population data for comparing earthquake scenarios and jurisdictions to help emergency managers prioritize where to focus limited resources on data development and loss-estimation studies. Using 20 earthquake scenarios developed for the State of Washington (USA), we demonstrate how a population-exposure analysis across multiple jurisdictions based on Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) classes helps emergency managers understand and communicate where potential loss of life may be concentrated and where impacts may be more related to quality of life. Results indicate that certain well-known scenarios may directly impact the greatest number of people, whereas other, potentially lesser-known, scenarios impact fewer people but consequences could be more severe. The use of economic data to profile each jurisdiction’s workforce in earthquake hazard zones also provides additional insight on at-risk populations. This approach can serve as a first step in understanding societal impacts of earthquakes and helping practitioners to efficiently use their limited risk-reduction resources.

  19. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my PMID:26666970

  20. Network Analysis in Comparative Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Eugenia Roldan; Schupp, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This essay describes the pertinence of Social Network Analysis (SNA) for the social sciences in general, and discusses its methodological and conceptual implications for comparative research in particular. The authors first present a basic summary of the theoretical and methodological assumptions of SNA, followed by a succinct overview of its…

  1. Teacher Policy: A Framework for Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatto, Maria Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines a framework for analysis of teacher focused policy studies within an international and comparative perspective. Using the notion of the professional life cycle of teachers, the article examines examples of key empirical studies that illustrate the impact of policy on addressing such issues as teacher recruitment, education,…

  2. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my.

  3. Estimate of safe human exposure levels for lunar dust based on comparative benchmark dose modeling.

    PubMed

    James, John T; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Santana, Patricia A; Scully, Robert R

    2013-04-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure to lunar dust. The United States and other space faring nations intend to return to the moon for extensive exploration within a few decades. In the meantime, habitats for that exploration, whether mobile or fixed, must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. Herein we estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission. We instilled three respirable-sized (∼2 μ mass median diameter) lunar dusts (two ground and one unground) and two standard dusts of widely different toxicities (quartz and TiO₂) into the respiratory system of rats. Rats in groups of six were given 0, 1, 2.5 or 7.5 mg of the test dust in a saline-Survanta® vehicle, and biochemical and cellular biomarkers of toxicity in lung lavage fluid were assayed 1 week and one month after instillation. By comparing the dose--response curves of sensitive biomarkers, we estimated safe exposure levels for astronauts and concluded that unground lunar dust and dust ground by two different methods were not toxicologically distinguishable. The safe exposure estimates were 1.3 ± 0.4 mg/m³ (jet-milled dust), 1.0 ± 0.5 mg/m³ (ball-milled dust) and 0.9 ± 0.3 mg/m³ (unground, natural dust). We estimate that 0.5-1 mg/m³ of lunar dust is safe for periodic human exposures during long stays in habitats on the lunar surface.

  4. Estimate of safe human exposure levels for lunar dust based on comparative benchmark dose modeling.

    PubMed

    James, John T; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Santana, Patricia A; Scully, Robert R

    2013-04-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure to lunar dust. The United States and other space faring nations intend to return to the moon for extensive exploration within a few decades. In the meantime, habitats for that exploration, whether mobile or fixed, must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. Herein we estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission. We instilled three respirable-sized (∼2 μ mass median diameter) lunar dusts (two ground and one unground) and two standard dusts of widely different toxicities (quartz and TiO₂) into the respiratory system of rats. Rats in groups of six were given 0, 1, 2.5 or 7.5 mg of the test dust in a saline-Survanta® vehicle, and biochemical and cellular biomarkers of toxicity in lung lavage fluid were assayed 1 week and one month after instillation. By comparing the dose--response curves of sensitive biomarkers, we estimated safe exposure levels for astronauts and concluded that unground lunar dust and dust ground by two different methods were not toxicologically distinguishable. The safe exposure estimates were 1.3 ± 0.4 mg/m³ (jet-milled dust), 1.0 ± 0.5 mg/m³ (ball-milled dust) and 0.9 ± 0.3 mg/m³ (unground, natural dust). We estimate that 0.5-1 mg/m³ of lunar dust is safe for periodic human exposures during long stays in habitats on the lunar surface. PMID:23614726

  5. A comparative environmental and medical study of dust exposure in jute and cotton mills in Burma.

    PubMed

    Noweir, M H; Noweir, K H; Myo Tint, U; Win, Z; Myint, H

    1990-01-01

    Jute is extensively cultivated and processed in Burma, as well as "lower-grade" cotton. This study was conducted there to compare dust exposure in jute and cotton mills, to study the acute and chronic effects of dust exposure on workers, and to establish exposure-response relationship. A sample of 799 male and female workers in two jute mills and two cotton textile mills, as well as a control group of 153 matching subjects, was examined, and dust exposure in the work environment was evaluated. Very high dust concentrations existed in the early stages of jute processing and sorting, which were reduced when jute fibers got cleaner, as in drawing and spinning, and were related to the grade of the processed fiber. Much lower concentrations of dust existed in the cotton mills, but exceeded the TLV (ACGIH) only in opening and cleaning and in carding operations. However, byssinosis occurred only in workers exposed to cotton dust, particularly among males, and its prevalence was related to the level and duration of dust exposure. Chronic bronchitis, cough and wheezing occurred at higher rates among all workers than in the control, while irritation to nose and throat, eyes and skin prevailed only among jute workers. A significant reduction in FVC, FEV1.0 and PEF (before and during shift) was observed in workers compared to control subjects, and was related to workers' exposure and age; however, this reduction was not related to symptoms of different respiratory conditions. "Cheroots" smoking was found to be an important potentiating factor in the occurrence of non-specific respiratory diseases and reduction in FEV1.0, particularly among jute workers.

  6. National Launch System comparative economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, A.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of economic benefits (or losses), in the form of the life cycle cost savings, resulting from the development of the National Launch System (NLS) family of launch vehicles. The analysis was carried out by comparing various NLS-based architectures with the current Shuttle/Titan IV fleet. The basic methodology behind this NLS analysis was to develop a set of annual payload requirements for the Space Station Freedom and LEO, to design launch vehicle architectures around these requirements, and to perform life-cycle cost analyses on all of the architectures. A SEI requirement was included. Launch failure costs were estimated and combined with the relative reliability assumptions to measure the effects of losses. Based on the analysis, a Shuttle/NLS architecture evolving into a pressurized-logistics-carrier/NLS architecture appears to offer the best long-term cost benefit.

  7. Image analysis in comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lundsteen, C.; Maahr, J.; Christensen, B.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new technique by which genomic imbalances can be detected by combining in situ suppression hybridization of whole genomic DNA and image analysis. We have developed software for rapid, quantitative CGH image analysis by a modification and extension of the standard software used for routine karyotyping of G-banded metaphase spreads in the Magiscan chromosome analysis system. The DAPI-counterstained metaphase spread is karyotyped interactively. Corrections for image shifts between the DAPI, FITC, and TRITC images are done manually by moving the three images relative to each other. The fluorescence background is subtracted. A mean filter is applied to smooth the FITC and TRITC images before the fluorescence ratio between the individual FITC and TRITC-stained chromosomes is computed pixel by pixel inside the area of the chromosomes determined by the DAPI boundaries. Fluorescence intensity ratio profiles are generated, and peaks and valleys indicating possible gains and losses of test DNA are marked if they exceed ratios below 0.75 and above 1.25. By combining the analysis of several metaphase spreads, consistent findings of gains and losses in all or almost all spreads indicate chromosomal imbalance. Chromosomal imbalances are detected either by visual inspection of fluorescence ratio (FR) profiles or by a statistical approach that compares FR measurements of the individual case with measurements of normal chromosomes. The complete analysis of one metaphase can be carried out in approximately 10 minutes. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Comparative responses of freshwater organisms to exposures of a commercial naphthenic acid.

    PubMed

    Kinley, Ciera M; McQueen, Andrew D; Rodgers, John H

    2016-06-01

    Comparative toxicity studies using unconfounded exposures can prioritize the selection of sensitive sentinel test species and refine methods for evaluating ecological risks of complex mixtures like naphthenic acids (NAs), a group of organic acids associated with crude oils and energy-derived waters that have been a source of aquatic toxicity. The objectives of this study were to compare responses of freshwater aquatic organisms (vertebrate, invertebrates, and a macrophyte; in terms of acute toxicity) to Fluka commercial NAs and to compare measured toxicity data with peer-reviewed toxicity data for other commercial NA sources and energy-derived NA sources. Exposures were confirmed using high performance liquid chromatography. Responses (7-d LC50s/EC50) ranged from 1.9 mg L(-1) for Pimephales promelas to 56.2 mg L(-1) for Typha latifolia. Following P. promelas in order of decreasing sensitivity were Ceriodaphnia dubia (7-d LC50 = 2.8 mg L(-1)), Hyalella azteca (7-d LC50 = 4.1 mg L(-1)), Chironomus dilutus (7-d LC50 = 6.5 mg L(-1)), and T. latifolia (7-d EC50 = 56.2 mg L(-1)), indicating that in terms of sensitivities, fish > invertebrates > plant for Fluka NAs in this study. Factors that affect exposures and measurements of exposures differ among commercial and energy-derived NAs and constrain comparisons. Despite differences in exposures, fish and invertebrates were relatively sensitive to both commercial and energy-derived NA sources (based on laboratory measurements and peer-reviewed data) and could be appropriate sentinel species for risk evaluations. PMID:27016812

  9. Comparative performance analysis of mobile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaee-Rad, Reza; Aleksic, Milivoje

    2012-01-01

    Cell-phone display performance (in terms of color quality and optical efficiency) has become a critical factor in creating a positive user experience. As a result, there is a significant amount of effort by cell-phone OEMs to provide a more competitive display solution. This effort is focused on using different display technologies (with significantly different color characteristics) and more sophisticated display processors. In this paper, the results of a mobile-display comparative performance analysis are presented. Three cell-phones from major OEMs are selected and their display performances are measured and quantified. Comparative performance analysis is done using display characteristics such as display color gamut size, RGB-channels crosstalk, RGB tone responses, gray tracking performance, color accuracy, and optical efficiency.

  10. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  11. Comparing disproportionate exposure to acute and chronic pollution risks: a case study in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jayajit; Collins, Timothy W; Grineski, Sara E; Montgomery, Marilyn C; Hernandez, Maricarmen

    2014-11-01

    While environmental justice (EJ) research in the United States has focused primarily on the social distribution of chronic pollution risks, previous empirical studies have not analyzed disparities in exposure to both chronic (long-term) and acute (short-term) pollution in the same study area. Our article addresses this limitation though a case study that compares social inequities in exposure to chronic and acute pollution risks in the Greater Houston Metropolitan Statistical Area, Texas. The study integrates estimates of chronic cancer risk associated with ambient exposure to hazardous air pollutants from the Environmental Protection Agency's National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (2005), hazardous chemical accidents from the National Response Center's Emergency Response Notification System (2007-2011), and sociodemographic characteristics from the American Community Survey (2007-2011). Statistical analyses are based on descriptive comparisons, bivariate correlations, and locally derived spatial regression models that account for spatial dependence in the data. Results indicate that neighborhoods with a higher percentage of Hispanic residents, lower percentage of homeowners, and higher income inequality are facing significantly greater exposure to both chronic and acute pollution risks. The non-Hispanic black percentage is significantly higher in neighborhoods with greater chronic cancer risk, but lower in areas exposed to acute pollution events. Households isolated by language--those highly likely to face evacuation problems during an actual chemical disaster--tend to reside in areas facing significantly greater exposure to high-impact acute events. Our findings emphasize the growing need to examine social inequities in exposure to both chronic and acute pollution risks in future EJ research and policy.

  12. Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling as a Tool to Make the First Estimate of Safe Human Exposure Levels to Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Scully, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo Astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure ot lunar dust. Habitats for exploration, whether mobile of fixed must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. We have used a new technique we call Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling to estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission.

  13. NORMAL MAMMARY GLAND MORPHOLOGY IN PUBERTAL FEMALE MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO GENISTEIN AT LEVELS COMPARABLE TO HUMAN DIETARY EXPOSURE. (R827402)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of in utero and lactational exposure to genistein (0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg/day) on mammary gland morphology in female B6D2F1 mice at levels comparable to or greater than human exposures. The effect of diethylstilbest...

  14. Comparative Genome Analysis of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wing-Yee; Wong, Chi-Fat; Chung, Karl Ming-Kar; Jiang, Jing-Wei; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The Enterobacter cloacae species includes an extremely diverse group of bacteria that are associated with plants, soil and humans. Publication of the complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting endophytic E. cloacae subsp. cloacae ENHKU01 provided an opportunity to perform the first comparative genome analysis between strains of this dynamic species. Examination of the pan-genome of E. cloacae showed that the conserved core genome retains the general physiological and survival genes of the species, while genomic factors in plasmids and variable regions determine the virulence of the human pathogenic E. cloacae strain; additionally, the diversity of fimbriae contributes to variation in colonization and host determination of different E. cloacae strains. Comparative genome analysis further illustrated that E. cloacae strains possess multiple mechanisms for antagonistic action against other microorganisms, which involve the production of siderophores and various antimicrobial compounds, such as bacteriocins, chitinases and antibiotic resistance proteins. The presence of Type VI secretion systems is expected to provide further fitness advantages for E. cloacae in microbial competition, thus allowing it to survive in different environments. Competition assays were performed to support our observations in genomic analysis, where E. cloacae subsp. cloacae ENHKU01 demonstrated antagonistic activities against a wide range of plant pathogenic fungal and bacterial species. PMID:24069314

  15. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ainur B.; Izekenova, Aigulsum; Abikulova, Akmaral

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results: Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level. PMID:24516484

  16. Fundus camera systems: a comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    DeHoog, Edward; Schwiegerling, James

    2010-01-01

    Retinal photography requires the use of a complex optical system, called a fundus camera, capable of illuminating and imaging the retina simultaneously. The patent literature shows two design forms but does not provide the specifics necessary for a thorough analysis of the designs to be performed. We have constructed our own designs based on the patent literature in optical design software and compared them for illumination efficiency, image quality, ability to accommodate for patient refractive error, and manufacturing tolerances, a comparison lacking in the existing literature. PMID:19137032

  17. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF HUMAN BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID AFTER SUBSGEMENTAL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew W.; Will Thompson, J.; Que, Loretta G.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Arthur Moseley, M.; Marshall, Harvey E.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of airway fluid, as sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), provides a minimally invasive route to interrogate lung biology in health and disease. Here, we used immunodepletion, coupled with gel- and label-free LC-MS/MS, for quantitation of the BAL fluid (BALF) proteome in samples recovered from human subjects following bronchoscopic instillation of saline, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite antigen into three distinct lung subsegments. Among more than 200 unique proteins quantified across nine samples, neutrophil granule-derived and acute phase proteins were most highly enriched in the LPS-exposed lobes. Of these, peptidoglycan response protein 1 was validated and confirmed as a novel marker of neutrophilic inflammation. Compared to a prior transcriptomic analysis of airway cells in this same cohort, the BALF proteome revealed a novel set of response factors. Independent of exposure, the enrichment of tracheal-expressed proteins in right lower lung lobes suggests a potential for constitutive intralobar variability in the BALF proteome; sampling of multiple lung subsegments also appears to aid in the identification of protein signatures that differentiate individuals at baseline. Collectively, this proof-of-concept study validates a robust workflow for BALF proteomics and demonstrates the complementary nature of proteomic and genomic techniques for investigating airway (patho)physiology. PMID:23550723

  18. Comparative transcriptomic responses to chronic cadmium, fluoranthene, and atrazine exposure in Lumbricus rubellus.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, C; Owen, J; Kille, P; Wren, J; Jonker, M J; Headley, B A; Morgan, A J; Blaxter, M; Stürzenbaum, S R; Hankard, P K; Lister, L J; Spurgeon, D J

    2008-06-01

    Transcriptional responses of a soil-dwelling organism (the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus) to three chemicals, cadmium (Cd), fluoranthene (FA), and atrazine (AZ), were measured following chronic exposure, with the aim of identifying the nature of any shared transcriptional response. Principal component analysis indicated full or partial separation of control and exposed samples for each compound but not for the composite set of all control and exposed samples. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis allowed separation of the control and exposed samples for each chemical and also for the composite data set, suggesting a common transcriptional response to exposure. Genes identified as changing in expression level (by the least stringent test for significance) following exposure to two chemicals indicated a substantial number of common genes (> 127). The three compound overlapping gene set, however, comprised only 25 genes. We suggest that the low commonality in transcriptional response may be linked to the chronic concentrations (approximately 10% EC50) and chronic duration (28 days) used. Annotations of the three compound overlapping gene set indicated that genes from pathways most often associated with responses to environmental stress, such as heat shock, phase I and II metabolism, antioxidant defense, and cation balance, were not represented. The strongest annotation signature was for genes important in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. PMID:18589989

  19. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Four Prymnesiophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Koid, Amy E.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C.; Caron, David A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  20. Comparative transcriptome analysis of four prymnesiophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Koid, Amy E; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C; Caron, David A; Heidelberg, Karla B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists.

  1. Comparative chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics via multiple routes of exposure and vehicles of administration in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Campbell, James A; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L; Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S; Barr, Dana B; Timchalk, Charles

    2009-06-30

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a commonly used organophosphorus pesticide. A number of toxicity and mechanistic studies have been conducted in animals, where CPF has been administered via a variety of different exposure routes and dosing vehicles. This study compared chlorpyrifos (CPF) pharmacokinetics using oral, intravenous (IV), and subcutaneous (SC) exposure routes and corn oil, saline/Tween 20, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as dosing vehicles. Two groups of rats were co-administered target doses (5 mg/kg) of CPF and isotopically labeled CPF (L-CPF). One group was exposed by both oral (CPF) and IV (L-CPF) routes using saline/Tween 20 vehicle; whereas, the second group was exposed by the SC route using two vehicles, corn oil (CPF) and DMSO (L-CPF). A third group was only administered CPF by the oral route in corn oil. For all treatments, blood and urine time course samples were collected and analyzed for 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), and isotopically labeled 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (L-TCPy). Peak TCPy/L-TCPy concentrations in blood (20.2 micromol/l), TCPy/L-TCPy blood AUC (94.9 micromol/lh), and percent of dose excreted in urine (100%) were all highest in rats dosed orally with CPF in saline/Tween 20 and second highest in rats dosed orally with CPF in corn oil. Peak TCPy concentrations in blood were more rapidly obtained after oral administration of CPF in saline/Tween 20 compared to all other dosing scenarios (>1.5 h). These results indicate that orally administered CPF is more extensively metabolized than systemic exposures of CPF (SC and IV), and vehicle of administration also has an effect on absorption rates. Thus, equivalent doses via different routes and/or vehicles of administration could potentially lead to different body burdens of CPF, different rates of bioactivation to CPF-oxon, and different toxic responses. Simulations using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model for CPF are consistent with these possibilities

  2. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  3. Association between Arsenic Exposure and Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Tzu-Ching; Huang, Jhih-Wei; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the association between arsenic exposure and diabetes mellitus (DM) yielded inconsistent results. Epidemiologic data on the associations between arsenic exposures via inhalation and DM are limited. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the risk of DM associated with arsenic exposure. We searched the related literature through a systematic approach and analyzed the data according to the exposure route (inhalation and ingestion). We used random-effect models to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs) for DM associated with arsenic exposure and used I2 statistics to assess the heterogeneity of studies. We identified 38 relevant studies, of which the 32 on the ingestion route showed a significant association between arsenic exposure and DM (RR = 1.57; 95% CI 1.27–1.93). Focusing on the 24 studies in which the diagnosis of DM was confirmed using laboratory tests or medical records, we found that the summary RR was 1.71 (95% CI 1.32–2.23), very close to the overall estimates. We concluded that ingested arsenic is associated with the development of DM, but the heterogeneity among the studies may affect the results. PMID:26000288

  4. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia results in higher oxidative stress compared to normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ribon, A; Pialoux, V; Saugy, J J; Rupp, T; Faiss, R; Debevec, T; Millet, G P

    2016-03-01

    Sixteen healthy exercise trained participants underwent the following three, 10-h exposures in a randomized manner: (1) Hypobaric hypoxia (HH; 3450m terrestrial altitude) (2) Normobaric hypoxia (NH; 3450m simulated altitude) and (3) Normobaric normoxia (NN). Plasma oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, MDA; advanced oxidation protein products, AOPP) and antioxidant markers (superoxide dismutase, SOD; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; catalase; ferric reducing antioxidant power, FRAP) were measured before and after each exposure. MDA was significantly higher after HH compared to NN condition (+24%). SOD and GPX activities were increased (vs. before; +29% and +54%) while FRAP was decreased (vs. before; -34%) only after 10h of HH. AOPP significantly increased after 10h for NH (vs. before; +83%), and HH (vs. before; +99%) whereas it remained stable in NN. These results provide evidence that prooxidant/antioxidant balance was impaired to a greater degree following acute exposure to terrestrial (HH) vs. simulated altitude (NH) and that the chamber confinement (NN) did likely not explain these differences. PMID:26732282

  5. Measuring exposure in Hurricane Katrina: a meta-analysis and an integrative data analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christian S; Rhodes, Jean E

    2014-01-01

    To date there is no consensus on the operationalization of exposure severity in the study of the impact of natural disasters. This is problematic because incomplete and inconsistent measurement of exposure limits the internal and external validity of disaster studies. The current paper examined the predictive validity of severity measures in two interrelated studies of Hurricane Katrina survivors. First, in a meta-analysis of eight studies that measured both exposure severity and posttraumatic stress, the effect size was estimated to be r = .266. The moderating effects of sample and study characteristics were examined and we found that minority status and number of stressors assessed were significant moderators. Second, in an integrative data analysis of five independent samples of Hurricane Katrina survivors, the impact of specific disaster-related stressors on mental health was compared. Threat to physical integrity of self and others were found to have the strongest association with posttraumatic stress (PTS) and general psychological distress (GPD). The lack of basic necessities, such as food, water, and medical care, and loss of pet were also found to be strongly associated with both PTS and GPD. The results from the two studies are integrated and their implication for disaster research and relief are discussed.

  6. Measuring exposure in Hurricane Katrina: a meta-analysis and an integrative data analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christian S; Rhodes, Jean E

    2014-01-01

    To date there is no consensus on the operationalization of exposure severity in the study of the impact of natural disasters. This is problematic because incomplete and inconsistent measurement of exposure limits the internal and external validity of disaster studies. The current paper examined the predictive validity of severity measures in two interrelated studies of Hurricane Katrina survivors. First, in a meta-analysis of eight studies that measured both exposure severity and posttraumatic stress, the effect size was estimated to be r = .266. The moderating effects of sample and study characteristics were examined and we found that minority status and number of stressors assessed were significant moderators. Second, in an integrative data analysis of five independent samples of Hurricane Katrina survivors, the impact of specific disaster-related stressors on mental health was compared. Threat to physical integrity of self and others were found to have the strongest association with posttraumatic stress (PTS) and general psychological distress (GPD). The lack of basic necessities, such as food, water, and medical care, and loss of pet were also found to be strongly associated with both PTS and GPD. The results from the two studies are integrated and their implication for disaster research and relief are discussed. PMID:24713851

  7. Measuring Exposure in Hurricane Katrina: A Meta-Analysis and an Integrative Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christian S.; Rhodes, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    To date there is no consensus on the operationalization of exposure severity in the study of the impact of natural disasters. This is problematic because incomplete and inconsistent measurement of exposure limits the internal and external validity of disaster studies. The current paper examined the predictive validity of severity measures in two interrelated studies of Hurricane Katrina survivors. First, in a meta-analysis of eight studies that measured both exposure severity and posttraumatic stress, the effect size was estimated to be r = .266. The moderating effects of sample and study characteristics were examined and we found that minority status and number of stressors assessed were significant moderators. Second, in an integrative data analysis of five independent samples of Hurricane Katrina survivors, the impact of specific disaster-related stressors on mental health was compared. Threat to physical integrity of self and others were found to have the strongest association with posttraumatic stress (PTS) and general psychological distress (GPD). The lack of basic necessities, such as food, water, and medical care, and loss of pet were also found to be strongly associated with both PTS and GPD. The results from the two studies are integrated and their implication for disaster research and relief are discussed. PMID:24713851

  8. Comparative Plasma Exposure of Albendazole after Administration of Rapidly Disintegrating Tablets in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Silvina G.; Dib, Alicia; Suarez, Gonzalo; Allemandi, Daniel; Lanusse, Carlos; Sanchez Bruni, Sergio; Palma, Santiago D.

    2013-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were (a) to evaluate the in vitro performance of the rapid disintegration tablets as a way to improve the solid dispersions and (b) to study the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the albendazole modified formulation in dogs. Rapid disintegration of tablets seems to be a key factor for efficiency of solid dispersions with regard to improvement of the albendazole bioavailability. The in vivo assays performed on dogs showed a marked increase in drug plasma exposure when albendazole was given in solid dispersions incorporated into rapid disintegration tablets compared with conventional solid dosage form. PMID:24063016

  9. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS AND HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that u...

  10. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  11. Three-dimensional comparative analysis of bitemarks.

    PubMed

    Lasser, Allan J; Warnick, Allan J; Berman, Gary M

    2009-05-01

    Historically, the inability to accurately represent bitemarks and other wound patterns has limited their evidentiary value. The development of the ABFO #2 scale by Krauss and Hyzer enabled forensic odontologists to correct for most photographic plane distortions. The technique presented here uses the ABFO #2 scale in conjunction with the evolving technologies of laser scanners and comparative software commonly used by the automobile industry for three-dimensional (3D) analysis. The 3D software comparison was performed in which measurements were analyzed of the normal distance for each point on the teeth relative to the bitemarks. It created a color-mapped display of the bitemark model, with the color indicating the deviation at each point. There was a correlation between the bitemark and the original teeth. PMID:19432742

  12. Comparative biology approaches for charged particle exposures and cancer development processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Sudo, Hiroko; Wiese, Claudia; Dan, Cristian; Turker, Mitchell

    Comparative biology studies can provide useful information for the extrapolation of results be-tween cells in culture and the more complex environment of the tissue. In other circumstances, they provide a method to guide the interpretation of results obtained for cells from differ-ent species. We have considered several key cancer development processes following charged particle exposures using comparative biology approaches. Our particular emphases have been mutagenesis and genomic instability. Carcinogenesis requires the accumulation of mutations and most of htese mutations occur on autosomes. Two loci provide the greatest avenue for the consideration of charged particle-induced mutation involving autosomes: the TK1 locus in human cells and the APRT locus in mouse cells. Each locus can provide information on a wide variety of mutational changes, from small intragenic mutations through multilocus dele-tions and extensive tracts of mitotic recombination. In addition, the mouse model can provide a direct measurement of chromosome loss which cannot be accomplished in the human cell system. Another feature of the mouse APRT model is the ability to examine effects for cells exposed in vitro with those obtained for cells exposed in situ. We will provide a comparison of the results obtained for the TK1 locus following 1 GeV/amu Fe ion exposures to the human lymphoid cells with those obtained for the APRT locus for mouse kidney epithelial cells (in vitro or in situ). Substantial conservation of mechanisms is found amongst these three exposure scenarios, with some differences attributable to the specific conditions of exposure. A similar approach will be applied to the consideraiton of proton-induced autosomal mutations in the three model systems. A comparison of the results obtained for Fe ions vs. protons in each case will highlight LET-specificc differences in response. Another cancer development process that is receiving considerable interest is genomic instability. We

  13. Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-07

    Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

  14. Comparative metagenome analysis of an Alaskan glacier.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Sulbha; Lohia, Ruchi; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    The temperature in the Arctic region has been increasing in the recent past accompanied by melting of its glaciers. We took a snapshot of the current microbial inhabitation of an Alaskan glacier (which can be considered as one of the simplest possible ecosystems) by using metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA recovered from ice/snow samples. Somewhat contrary to our expectations and earlier estimates, a rich and diverse microbial population of more than 2,500 species was revealed including several species of Archaea that has been identified for the first time in the glaciers of the Northern hemisphere. The most prominent bacterial groups found were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Firmicutes were not reported in large numbers in a previously studied Alpine glacier but were dominant in an Antarctic subglacial lake. Representatives of Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes were among the most numerous, likely reflecting the dependence of the ecosystem on the energy obtained through photosynthesis and close links with the microbial community of the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) of nucleotide word frequency revealed distinct sequence clusters for different taxonomic groups in the Alaskan glacier community and separate clusters for the glacial communities from other regions of the world. Comparative analysis of the community composition and bacterial diversity present in the Byron glacier in Alaska with other environments showed larger overlap with an Arctic soil than with a high Arctic lake, indicating patterns of community exchange and suggesting that these bacteria may play an important role in soil development during glacial retreat.

  15. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  16. Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences with VISTA

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dubchak, Inna

    VISTA is a comprehensive suite of programs and databases developed by and hosted at the Genomics Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They provide information and tools designed to facilitate comparative analysis of genomic sequences. Users have two ways to interact with the suite of applications at the VISTA portal. They can submit their own sequences and alignments for analysis (VISTA servers) or examine pre-computed whole-genome alignments of different species. A key menu option is the Enhancer Browser and Database at http://enhancer.lbl.gov/. The VISTA Enhancer Browser is a central resource for experimentally validated human noncoding fragments with gene enhancer activity as assessed in transgenic mice. Most of these noncoding elements were selected for testing based on their extreme conservation with other vertebrates. The results of this enhancer screen are provided through this publicly available website. The browser also features relevant results by external contributors and a large collection of additional genome-wide conserved noncoding elements which are candidate enhancer sequences. The LBL developers invite external groups to submit computational predictions of developmental enhancers. As of 10/19/2009 the database contains information on 1109 in vivo tested elements - 508 elements with enhancer activity.

  17. Comparative statistical analysis of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Landais, Francois; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, we aim to provide a statistical and comparative description of topographic fields by using the huge amount of topographic data available for different bodies in the solar system, including Earth, Mars, the Moon etc.. Our goal is to characterize and quantify the geophysical processes involved by a relevant statistical description. In each case, topographic fields exhibit an extremely high variability with details at each scale, from millimeter to thousands of kilometers. This complexity seems to prohibit global descriptions or global topography models. Nevertheless, this topographic complexity is well-known to exhibit scaling laws that establish a similarity between scales and permit simpler descriptions and models. Indeed, efficient simulations can be made using the statistical properties of scaling fields (fractals). But realistic simulations of global topographic fields must be multi (not mono) scaling behaviour, reflecting the extreme variability and intermittency observed in real fields that can not be generated by simple scaling models. A multiscaling theory has been developed in order to model high variability and intermittency. This theory is a good statistical candidate to model the topography field with a limited number of parameters (called the multifractal parameters). After a global analysis of Mars (Landais et. al, 2015) we have performed similar analysis on different body in the solar system including the Moon, Venus and mercury indicating that the mulifractal parameters might be relevant to explain the competition between several processes operating on multiple scales

  18. Passive smoke exposure and risk of diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kan; Liu, Dan; Wang, Chuan; Ren, Men; Yang, Chuan; Yan, Li

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that passive smoke exposure is related to the development of diabetes. However, data on this issue are controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to provide a quantitative assessment of the association between passive smoking and the risk of diabetes. We searched the Medline and Embase databases up to October 2013 to identify prospective cohort studies related to passive smoke exposure and incident diabetes. Summary effect estimates with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were derived using a fixed or random effects model, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Six prospective studies that span three continents involving 154,406 participants (ages 18-74) with 7,116 new diabetes cases were included in the meta-analysis. On the basis of the Newcastle Ottawa Scale system, five studies were identified as relatively high-quality. In our primary analysis, compared to never smokers without passive smoke exposure, never smokers reporting passive smoke exposure was associated with increased risk of diabetes (pooled relative risk 1.21, 95 % CI 1.07-1.38). Such association persisted in the dose-response analysis. No indications of significant heterogeneity and publication bias were detected. Estimates of total effects were generally consistent in the sensitivity and subgroup analyses. Findings of the present meta-analysis suggest that passive smoke exposure is independently associated with the risk of diabetes. The conclusion may have a far-reaching significance for public health in countries of high smoking intensity and high incident diabetes.

  19. Rating locomotive crew diesel emission exposure profiles using statistics and Bayesian Decision Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Paul; Bullock, William H

    2014-01-01

    For more than 20 years CSX Transportation (CSXT) has collected exposure measurements from locomotive engineers and conductors who are potentially exposed to diesel emissions. The database included measurements for elemental and total carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatics, aldehydes, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide. This database was statistically analyzed and summarized, and the resulting statistics and exposure profiles were compared to relevant occupational exposure limits (OELs) using both parametric and non-parametric descriptive and compliance statistics. Exposure ratings, using the American Industrial Health Association (AIHA) exposure categorization scheme, were determined using both the compliance statistics and Bayesian Decision Analysis (BDA). The statistical analysis of the elemental carbon data (a marker for diesel particulate) strongly suggests that the majority of levels in the cabs of the lead locomotives (n = 156) were less than the California guideline of 0.020 mg/m(3). The sample 95th percentile was roughly half the guideline; resulting in an AIHA exposure rating of category 2/3 (determined using BDA). The elemental carbon (EC) levels in the trailing locomotives tended to be greater than those in the lead locomotive; however, locomotive crews rarely ride in the trailing locomotive. Lead locomotive EC levels were similar to those reported by other investigators studying locomotive crew exposures and to levels measured in urban areas. Lastly, both the EC sample mean and 95%UCL were less than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference concentration of 0.005 mg/m(3). With the exception of nitrogen dioxide, the overwhelming majority of the measurements for total carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatics, aldehydes, and combustion gases in the cabs of CSXT locomotives were either non-detects or considerably less than the working OELs for the years represented in the database. When compared to the previous American

  20. Quantitative Plasma Biomarker Analysis in HDI Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Sheila L.; Fent, Kenneth W.; Trelles Gaines, Linda G.; Thomasen, Jennifer M.; Whittaker, Steve; Ball, Louise M.; Nylander-French, Leena A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of amines in biological samples is important for evaluating occupational exposure to diisocyanates. In this study, we describe the quantification of 1,6-hexamethylene diamine (HDA) levels in hydrolyzed plasma of 46 spray painters applying 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)-containing paint in vehicle repair shops collected during repeated visits to their workplace and their relationship with dermal and inhalation exposure to HDI monomer. HDA was detected in 76% of plasma samples, as heptafluorobutyryl derivatives, and the range of HDA concentrations was ≤0.02–0.92 μg l−1. After log-transformation of the data, the correlation between plasma HDA levels and HDI inhalation exposure measured on the same workday was low (N = 108, r = 0.22, P = 0.026) compared with the correlation between plasma HDA levels and inhalation exposure occurring ∼20 to 60 days before blood collection (N = 29, r = 0.57, P = 0.0014). The correlation between plasma HDA levels and HDI dermal exposure measured on the same workday, although statistically significant, was low (N = 108, r = 0.22, P = 0.040) while the correlation between HDA and dermal exposure occurring ∼20 to 60 days before blood collection was slightly improved (N = 29, r = 0.36, P = 0.053). We evaluated various workplace factors and controls (i.e. location, personal protective equipment use and paint booth type) as modifiers of plasma HDA levels. Workers using a downdraft-ventilated booth had significantly lower plasma HDA levels relative to semi-downdraft and crossdraft booth types (P = 0.0108); this trend was comparable to HDI inhalation and dermal exposure levels stratified by booth type. These findings indicate that HDA concentration in hydrolyzed plasma may be used as a biomarker of cumulative inhalation and dermal exposure to HDI and for investigating the effectiveness of exposure controls in the workplace. PMID:19805392

  1. Space Shuttle and Space Station Radio Frequency (RF) Exposure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Loh, Yin-Chung; Sham, Catherine C.; Kroll, Quin D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the modeling techniques and important parameters to define a rigorous but practical procedure that can verify the compliance of RF exposure to the NASA standards for astronauts and electronic equipment. The electromagnetic modeling techniques are applied to analyze RF exposure in Space Shuttle and Space Station environments with reasonable computing time and resources. The modeling techniques are capable of taking into account the field interactions with Space Shuttle and Space Station structures. The obtained results illustrate the multipath effects due to the presence of the space vehicle structures. It's necessary to include the field interactions with the space vehicle in the analysis for an accurate assessment of the RF exposure. Based on the obtained results, the RF keep out zones are identified for appropriate operational scenarios, flight rules and necessary RF transmitter constraints to ensure a safe operating environment and mission success.

  2. Analysis of exposure biomarker relationships with the Johnson SBB distribution.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Michael R

    2007-08-01

    Application of the Johnson bivariate S(B) distribution, or alternatively the S(BB) distribution, is presented here as a tool for the analysis of concentration data and in particular for characterizing the relationship between exposures and biomarkers. Methods for fitting the marginal S(B) distributions are enhanced by maximizing the Shapiro-Wilk W statistic. The subsequent goodness of fit for the S(BB) distribution is evaluated with a multivariate Z statistic. Median regression results are extended here with methods for calculating the mean and standard deviation of the conditional array distributions. Application of these methods to the evaluation of the relationship between exposure to airborne bromopropane and the biomarker of serum bromide concentration suggests that the S(BB) distribution may be useful in stratifying workers by exposure based on using a biomarker. A comparison with the usual two-parameter log-normal approach shows that in some cases the S(BB) distribution may offer advantages.

  3. Comparative risk assessment of residential radon exposures in two radon-prone areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain).

    PubMed

    Sainz, Carlos; Dinu, Alexandra; Dicu, Tiberius; Szacsvai, Kinga; Cosma, Constantin; Quindós, Luis Santiago

    2009-07-15

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon-prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq m(-3) and 366 Bq m(-3) in the Spanish region. The results are computed with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq m(-3). We used the EC Radon Software to calculate the lifetime lung cancer death risks for individuals groups in function of attained age, radon exposures and tobacco consumption. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were observed in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than expected from the national statistics. In addition, the number of deaths estimated for the year 2005 is 28, which is worth more than 2.21 times the amount expected by authorities. In comparison, for Torrelodones was rated a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer for a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number expected by authorities. For the year 2005 in the Spanish region were reported 32 deaths caused by pulmonary cancer, the number of deaths exceeding seen again with a factor of 2.10 statistical expectations. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

  4. Comparative risk assessment of residential radon exposures in two radon-prone areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain).

    PubMed

    Sainz, Carlos; Dinu, Alexandra; Dicu, Tiberius; Szacsvai, Kinga; Cosma, Constantin; Quindós, Luis Santiago

    2009-07-15

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon-prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq m(-3) and 366 Bq m(-3) in the Spanish region. The results are computed with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq m(-3). We used the EC Radon Software to calculate the lifetime lung cancer death risks for individuals groups in function of attained age, radon exposures and tobacco consumption. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were observed in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than expected from the national statistics. In addition, the number of deaths estimated for the year 2005 is 28, which is worth more than 2.21 times the amount expected by authorities. In comparison, for Torrelodones was rated a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer for a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number expected by authorities. For the year 2005 in the Spanish region were reported 32 deaths caused by pulmonary cancer, the number of deaths exceeding seen again with a factor of 2.10 statistical expectations. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure. PMID:19428051

  5. Isocyanate and VOC exposure analysis using Flexane®.

    PubMed

    Blake, Charles L; Johnson, Giffe T; Abritis, Alison J; Lieckfield, Robert; Harbison, Raymond D

    2012-08-01

    Flexane® 80 is a trowelable urethane product used in combination with cleaners and primers to effect rubber conveyor belt repairs. These products are of concern due to the potential for worker exposure to isocyanates and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Small chamber experiments were used to identify chemicals liberated to the ambient air from each of the Flexane®-related products. A new sample collection method using treated cotton sleeves as a surrogate skin surface to assess potential dermal exposure to isocyanates during mixing and application of the Flexane® product was validated. Six simulations of a worst case scenario were performed by an experienced belt repair technician in a walk-in laboratory exposure chamber. Analysis of air samples from the large chamber simulations did not detect airborne isocyanates. The average airborne VOC concentrations were below established occupational exposure levels. Dermal sleeve samples detected intermittent and low levels of isocyanates from self-application while wearing gloves having surface residues of uncured Flexane®. The data strongly suggest that the normal and intended use of Flexane® putty, and its associated products under worst case or typical working conditions is not likely to result in worker VOC or isocyanate exposure levels sufficient to produce adverse health effects. PMID:22627177

  6. Isocyanate and VOC exposure analysis using Flexane®.

    PubMed

    Blake, Charles L; Johnson, Giffe T; Abritis, Alison J; Lieckfield, Robert; Harbison, Raymond D

    2012-08-01

    Flexane® 80 is a trowelable urethane product used in combination with cleaners and primers to effect rubber conveyor belt repairs. These products are of concern due to the potential for worker exposure to isocyanates and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Small chamber experiments were used to identify chemicals liberated to the ambient air from each of the Flexane®-related products. A new sample collection method using treated cotton sleeves as a surrogate skin surface to assess potential dermal exposure to isocyanates during mixing and application of the Flexane® product was validated. Six simulations of a worst case scenario were performed by an experienced belt repair technician in a walk-in laboratory exposure chamber. Analysis of air samples from the large chamber simulations did not detect airborne isocyanates. The average airborne VOC concentrations were below established occupational exposure levels. Dermal sleeve samples detected intermittent and low levels of isocyanates from self-application while wearing gloves having surface residues of uncured Flexane®. The data strongly suggest that the normal and intended use of Flexane® putty, and its associated products under worst case or typical working conditions is not likely to result in worker VOC or isocyanate exposure levels sufficient to produce adverse health effects.

  7. Surgical approaches for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: comparative analysis and current trends.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Fuat; Ozer, Cem; Gerek, Mustafa; Yetiser, Sertac

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of current surgical approaches for the treatment of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, including extension of tumors, postoperative morbidity, complications, and recurrence rate. Twenty-four patients who underwent surgery with the diagnosis of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma at our department between 1993 and 2003 were retrospectively reviewed according to their clinical presentation, surgical approaches, and prognosis. Radkowski staging scale was used for staging tumors. The transpalatal approach was used in 10 patients before 1999 with tumor stages between Ia and IIa. Transpalatal fistula was encountered in one. Nine patients underwent transnasal endoscopic surgery after 1999 with tumor stages between Ia and IIIa. Lateral rhinotomy in four patients and a degloving approach in one patient were used with tumor stages between IIa and IIIa; postoperative nasal crusting was the most annoying problem in these groups. Recurrent tumor was seen in only one patient who had undergone the transpalatal approach in the 12- to 56-month follow-up period. In this regard, the transnasal endoscopic approach can be used successfully in place of the transpalatal approach due to the former's lesser surgical morbidity and wide lateral exposure of the field in patients with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Also, many patients who underwent lateral rhinotomy for the removal of stage IIa, IIb, and IIIa tumors can successfully be treated using the transnasal endoscopic approach. In tumors that extend, infratemporal fossa lateral rhinotomy and degloving approaches provide the optimal exposure but have higher potential for morbidity than does transnasal endoscopic surgery.

  8. Comparative analysis of the Borrelia garinii genome.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, G; Lehmann, R; Romualdi, A; Pradella, S; Schulte-Spechtel, U; Schilhabel, M; Wilske, B; Sühnel, J; Platzer, M

    2004-01-01

    Three members of the genus Borrelia (B.burgdorferi, B.garinii, B.afzelii) cause tick-borne borreliosis. Depending on the Borrelia species involved, the borreliosis differs in its clinical symptoms. Comparative genomics opens up a way to elucidate the underlying differences in Borrelia species. We analysed a low redundancy whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly of a B.garinii strain isolated from a patient with neuroborreliosis in comparison to the B.burgdorferi genome. This analysis reveals that most of the chromosome is conserved (92.7% identity on DNA as well as on amino acid level) in the two species, and no chromosomal rearrangement or larger insertions/deletions could be observed. Furthermore, two collinear plasmids (lp54 and cp26) seem to belong to the basic genome inventory of Borrelia species. These three collinear parts of the Borrelia genome encode 861 genes, which are orthologous in the two species examined. The majority of the genetic information of the other plasmids of B.burgdorferii is also present in B.garinii although orthology is not easy to define due to a high redundancy of the plasmid fraction. Yet, we did not find counterparts of the B.burgdorferi plasmids lp36 and lp38 or their respective gene repertoire in the B.garinii genome. Thus, phenotypic differences between the two species could be attributable to the presence or absence of these two plasmids as well as to the potentially positively selected genes. PMID:15547252

  9. Comparative Plasma Exposure and Lung Distribution of Two Human Use Commercial Azithromycin Formulations Assessed in Murine Model: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivulgo, Virginia; Sparo, Mónica; Ceci, Mónica; Fumuso, Elida; Confalonieri, Alejandra; Sánchez Bruni, Sergio F.

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) therapeutic failure and relapses of patients treated with generic formulations have been observed in clinical practice. The main goal of this research was to compare in a preclinical study the serum exposure and lung tissue concentration of two commercial formulations AZM-based in murine model. The current study involved 264 healthy Balb-C. Mice were divided into two groups (n = 44): animals of Group A (reference formulation -R-) were orally treated with AZM suspension at 10 mg/kg of b.w. Experimental animals of Group B (generic formulation -G-) received identical treatment than Group A with a generic formulation AZM-based. The study was repeated twice as Phase II and III. Serum and lung tissue samples were taken 24 h post treatment. Validated microbiological assay was used to determine the serum pharmacokinetic and lung distribution of AZM. After the pharmacokinetic analysis was observed, a similar serum exposure for both formulations of AZM assayed. In contrast, statistical differences (P < 0.001) were obtained after comparing the concentrations of both formulations in lung tissue, being the values obtained for AUC and Cmax (AZM-R-) +1586 and 122%, respectively, than those obtained for AZM-G- in lung. These differences may indicate large differences on the distribution process of both formulations, which may explain the lack of efficacy/therapeutic failure observed on clinical practice. PMID:24073402

  10. Comparative risk assessment of carcinogens in alcoholic beverages using the margin of exposure approach.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Przybylski, Maria C; Rehm, Jürgen

    2012-09-15

    Alcoholic beverages have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. As alcoholic beverages are multicomponent mixtures containing several carcinogenic compounds, a quantitative approach is necessary to compare the risks. Fifteen known and suspected human carcinogens (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, lead, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, ochratoxin A and safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages were identified based on monograph reviews by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The margin of exposure (MOE) approach was used for comparative risk assessment. MOE compares a toxicological threshold with the exposure. MOEs above 10,000 are judged as low priority for risk management action. MOEs were calculated for different drinking scenarios (low risk and heavy drinking) and different levels of contamination for four beverage groups (beer, wine, spirits and unrecorded alcohol). The lowest MOEs were found for ethanol (3.1 for low risk and 0.8 for heavy drinking). Inorganic lead and arsenic have average MOEs between 10 and 300, followed by acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate between 1,000 and 10,000. All other compounds had average MOEs above 10,000 independent of beverage type. Ethanol was identified as the most important carcinogen in alcoholic beverages, with clear dose response. Some other compounds (lead, arsenic, ethyl carbamate, acetaldehyde) may pose risks below thresholds normally tolerated for food contaminants, but from a cost-effectiveness point of view, the focus should be on reducing alcohol consumption in general rather than on mitigative measures for some contaminants that contribute only to a limited extent (if at all) to the total health risk.

  11. Comparative analysis of planetary laser ranging concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkx, D.; Bauer, S.; Noomen, R.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.; Visser, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    missions for various combinations of clock and state arc length. Thereby, we quantify the relative capabilities of the one- and two-way laser range systems. In addition, we study the optimal data analysis strategies for these missions, which we apply for LRO orbit determination. Finally, we compare the performance of the laser ranging systems with typical DSN tracking.

  12. Comparative analysis of health risk assessments for municipal waste combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.; Fratt, D.B.; Leonard, A.; Bruins, R.J.F.; Fradkin, L.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative health risk assessments have been performed for a number of proposed municipal waste combustor (MWC) facilities over the past several years. The article presents the results of a comparative analysis of a total of 21 risk assessments, focusing on seven of the most comprehensive methodologies. The analysis concentrates on stack emissions of noncriteria pollutants and is comparative rather than critical in nature. Overall, the risk assessment methodologies used were similar whereas the assumptions and input values used varied from study to study. Some of the variability results directly from differences in site-specific characteristics, but much of it is due to absence of data, lack of field validation, lack of specific guidelines from regulatory agencies, and reliance on professional judgment. The results indicate that carcinogenic risks are more significant than chronic non-carcinogenic risks. In most instances polychlorodibenzodioxins, polychlorodibenzofurans, and cadmium contribute more significantly to the total carcinogenic risk from MWC stack emissions than other contaminants. In addition, the contribution to total risk of all indirect routes of exposure (ingestion and dermal contact) exceeds that of the direct inhalation route for most studies reviewed.

  13. Comparative analysis of health risk assessments for municipal waste combustors.

    PubMed

    Levin, A; Fratt, D B; Leonard, A; Bruins, R J; Fradkin, L

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative health risk assessments have been performed for a number of proposed municipal waste combustor (MWC) facilities over the past several years. This article presents the results of a comparative analysis of a total of 21 risk assessments, focusing on seven of the most comprehensive methodologies. The analysis concentrates on stack emissions of noncriteria pollutants and is comparative rather than critical in nature. Overall, the risk assessment methodologies used were similar whereas the assumptions and input values used varied from study to study. Some of this variability results directly from differences in site-specific characteristics, but much of it is due to absence of data, lack of field validation, lack of specific guidelines from regulatory agencies, and reliance on professional judgment. The results indicate that carcinogenic risks are more significant than chronic non-carcinogenic risks. In most instances polychlorodibenzodioxins, polychlorodibenzofurans, and cadmium contribute more significantly to the total carcinogenic risk from MWC stack emissions than other contaminants. In addition, the contribution to total risk of all indirect routes of exposure (ingestion and dermal contact) exceeds that of the direct inhalation route for most studies reviewed.

  14. Comparative analysis of health risk assessments for municipal waste combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.; Fratt, D.B.; Leonard, A.; Bruins, R.J.; Fradkin, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative health risk assessments have been performed for a number of proposed municipal waste combustor (MWC) facilities over the past several years. This article presents the results of a comparative analysis of a total of 21 risk assessments, focusing on seven of the most comprehensive methodologies. The analysis concentrates on stack emissions of noncriteria pollutants and is comparative rather than critical in nature. Overall, the risk assessment methodologies used were similar whereas the assumptions and input values used varied from study to study. Some of this variability results directly from differences in site-specific characteristics, but much of it is due to absence of data, lack of field validation, lack of specific guidelines from regulatory agencies, and reliance on professional judgment. The results indicate that carcinogenic risks are more significant than chronic non-carcinogenic risks. In most instances polychlorodibenzodioxins, polychlorodibenzofurans, and cadmium contribute more significantly to the total carcinogenic risk from MWC stack emissions than other contaminants. In addition, the contribution to total risk of all indirect routes of exposure (ingestion and dermal contact) exceeds that of the direct inhalation route for most studies reviewed. 42 refs.

  15. TRIAGE DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR PARTIAL-BODY EXPOSURE: DICENTRIC ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Pellmar, Terry C.

    2009-01-01

    Partial-body biodosimetry is likely to be required after a radiological or nuclear exposure. Clinical signs and symptoms, distribution of dicentrics in circulating blood cells, organ-specific biomarkers, physical signals in teeth and nails all can provide indications of non-homogeneous exposures. Organ specific biomarkers may provide early warning regarding physiological systems at risk after radiation injury. Use of a combination of markers and symptoms will be needed for clinical insights for therapeutic approaches. Analysis of dicentrics, a marker specific for radiation injury, is the “Gold standard” of biodosimetry and can reveal partial-body exposures. Automation of sample processing for dicentric analysis can increase throughput with customization of off-the-shelf technologies for cytogenetic sample processing and information management. Automated analysis of the metaphase spreads is currently limited but improvements are in development. Our efforts bridge the technological gaps to allow the use of dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) for risk-based stratification of mass casualties. This article summarizes current knowledge on partial-body cytogenetic dose assessment synthesizing information leading to the proposal of an approach to triage dose prediction in radiation mass casualties, based on equivalent whole-body doses under partial-body exposure conditions and assesses the validity of using this model. An initial screening using only 20 metaphase spreads per subject can confirm irradiation above 2-Gy. A subsequent increase to 50 metaphases improves dose determination to allow risk stratification for clinical triage. Metaphases evaluated for inhomogeneous distribution of dicentrics can reveal partial-body exposures. We tested the validity of this approach in an in vitro model that simulates partial-body irradiation by mixing irradiated and un-irradiated lymphocytes in various proportions. Our preliminary results support the notion that this approach will

  16. Comparative study of spermatogonial survival after X-ray exposure, high LET (HZE) irradiation or spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapp, W. J.; Williams, C. S.; Williams, J. W.; Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Miquel, J. M.; Serova, L.

    1992-01-01

    Spermatogonial cell loss has been observed in rats flown on Space Lab 3, Cosmos 1887, Cosmos 2044 and in mice following irradiation with X-ray or with HZE particle beams. Spermatogonial loss is determined by cell counting in maturation stage-6 seminferous tubules. With the exception of iron, laboratory irradiation experiments (with mice) revealed a similar pattern of spermatogonial loss proportional to the radiation dose at levels less than 0.1 Gy. Helium and argon irradiation resulted in a 5-percent loss of spermatogonia after only 0.01 Gy exposure. Significant spermatogonial loss (45 percent) occurred at this radiation level with iron particle beams. The loss of spermatogonia during each spaceflight was less than 10 percent when compared to control (nonflight) animals.

  17. Occupational exposure to synthetic musks in barbershops, compared with the common exposure in the dormitories and households.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nannan; Shi, Yali; Xu, Lin; Li, Wenhui; Cai, Yaqi

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic musks (SMs) have been widely used as fragrance ingredients in personal care and sanitary commodities. Due to their high volatility and particle-binding affinity, the indoor dust is a major reservoir of SMs, and dust ingestion could be an important exposure way to special populations, such as hairdressers. In spite of the known toxicity of SMs, there is no information regarding the occurrence of SMs in barbershop dusts and the exposure of hairdressers through indoor dust ingestion. In the present study, the levels of two nitro musks and five polycyclic musks were measured from indoor dust samples collected from barbershops, and some other indoor dust samples were also collected from dormitories, bathhouses and households for comparison. The concentrations of ∑SMs in barbershop dusts were 10-100 times higher than those from the other three indoor microenvironments. Polycyclic musks accounted for 89.4% of ∑SMs on average in all samples, of which two compounds, HHCB and AHTN jointly dominated 97.9% of polycyclic musks. The levels of HHCB and AHTN varied from 12.2 to 8.39×10(5) and from 13.2 to 3.49×10(5) ng g(-1), respectively. The daily intakes (DIs) of ∑SMs through house dust ingestion were estimated using the model of high dust ingestion and worst-case exposure (P95), and the corresponding exposure rates were 2791, 135 and 727 ng d(-1) for the hairdressers, general population and toddlers. SMs were also detected in blood samples collected from the hairdressers and normal adults (n=50 and 10, respectively). There was no significant difference between these two groups. Despite the absence of higher SM concentrations in hairdresser's blood, we should not overlook the potential occupational health risks due to their high SMs ingestion rate.

  18. Occupational exposure to synthetic musks in barbershops, compared with the common exposure in the dormitories and households.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nannan; Shi, Yali; Xu, Lin; Li, Wenhui; Cai, Yaqi

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic musks (SMs) have been widely used as fragrance ingredients in personal care and sanitary commodities. Due to their high volatility and particle-binding affinity, the indoor dust is a major reservoir of SMs, and dust ingestion could be an important exposure way to special populations, such as hairdressers. In spite of the known toxicity of SMs, there is no information regarding the occurrence of SMs in barbershop dusts and the exposure of hairdressers through indoor dust ingestion. In the present study, the levels of two nitro musks and five polycyclic musks were measured from indoor dust samples collected from barbershops, and some other indoor dust samples were also collected from dormitories, bathhouses and households for comparison. The concentrations of ∑SMs in barbershop dusts were 10-100 times higher than those from the other three indoor microenvironments. Polycyclic musks accounted for 89.4% of ∑SMs on average in all samples, of which two compounds, HHCB and AHTN jointly dominated 97.9% of polycyclic musks. The levels of HHCB and AHTN varied from 12.2 to 8.39×10(5) and from 13.2 to 3.49×10(5) ng g(-1), respectively. The daily intakes (DIs) of ∑SMs through house dust ingestion were estimated using the model of high dust ingestion and worst-case exposure (P95), and the corresponding exposure rates were 2791, 135 and 727 ng d(-1) for the hairdressers, general population and toddlers. SMs were also detected in blood samples collected from the hairdressers and normal adults (n=50 and 10, respectively). There was no significant difference between these two groups. Despite the absence of higher SM concentrations in hairdresser's blood, we should not overlook the potential occupational health risks due to their high SMs ingestion rate. PMID:23849834

  19. Comparative toxicities of bismuth oxybromide and titanium dioxide exposure on human skin keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoya; Wang, Yawen; Peng, Shiqi; Yue, Bin; Fan, Caimei; Chen, Weiyi; Li, Xiaona

    2015-09-01

    Nano-sized bismuth oxybromide (BiOBr) particles are being considered for applications within the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about their potential impact on human health. In this study, we comparatively investigated the cytotoxicity of BiOBr and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) using human skin keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) as a research model. Results indicate that lamellar-shaped BiOBr (length: 200 nm, width: 150 nm, and an average thickness: around 15 nm) has less toxic effects on cell viability and intracellular organelles than TiO2 (P25) NPs. BiOBr mainly induced late cell apoptosis, while for TiO2, both early apoptosis and late apoptosis were involved. Cell cycle arrest was found in cells on both NPs exposure, and more prominent in TiO2-treated cells. More cellular uptake was achieved after TiO2 exposure, particularly at 10 μg mL(-1), presence of TiO2 resulted in more than 2-fold increase in cellular granularity compared with BiOBr. Furthermore, TiO2 had a high potential to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, where a 2.7-fold increase in TiO2 group and 2.0-fold increase in BiOBr group at the same concentration of 25 μg mL(-1). Higher cellular uptake and ROS stimulation should contribute to the more hazards of TiO2 than BiOBr NPs. This knowledge is a crucial component in the environmental and human hazard assessment of BiOBr and TiO2 NPs.

  20. Comparing Results from Constant Comparative and Computer Software Methods: A Reflection about Qualitative Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putten, Jim Vander; Nolen, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared qualitative research results obtained by manual constant comparative analysis with results obtained by computer software analysis of the same data. An investigated about issues of trustworthiness and accuracy ensued. Results indicated that the inductive constant comparative data analysis generated 51 codes and two coding levels…

  1. Comparison of nested case-control and survival analysis methodologies for analysis of time-dependent exposure

    PubMed Central

    Essebag, Vidal; Platt, Robert W; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Pilote, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies of exposures that vary with time require an additional level of methodological complexity to account for the time-dependence of exposure. This study compares a nested case-control approach for the study of time-dependent exposure with cohort analysis using Cox regression including time-dependent covariates. Methods A cohort of 1340 subjects with four fixed and seven time-dependent covariates was used for this study. Nested case-control analyses were repeated 100 times for each of 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 controls per case, and point estimates were compared to those obtained using Cox regression on the full cohort. Computational efficiencies were evaluated by comparing central processing unit times required for analysis of the cohort at sizes 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 times its initial size. Results Nested case-control analyses yielded results that were similar to results of Cox regression on the full cohort. Cox regression was found to be 125 times slower than the nested case-control approach (using four controls per case). Conclusions The nested case-control approach is a useful alternative for cohort analysis when studying time-dependent exposures. Its superior computational efficiency may be particularly useful when studying rare outcomes in databases, where the ability to analyze larger sample sizes can improve the power of the study. PMID:15670334

  2. Comparative safety analysis of LNG storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Fecht, B.A.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, K.O.; Marr, G.D.

    1982-07-01

    LNG storage tank design and response to selected release scenarios were reviewed. The selection of the scenarios was based on an investigation of potential hazards as cited in the literature. A review of the structure of specific LNG storage facilities is given. Scenarios initially addressed included those that most likely emerge from the tank facility itself: conditions of overfill and overflow as related to liquid LNG content levels; over/underpressurization at respective tank vapor pressure boundaries; subsidence of bearing soil below tank foundations; and crack propagation in tank walls due to possible exposure of structural material to cryogenic temperatures. Additional scenarios addressed include those that result from external events: tornado induced winds and pressure drops; exterior tank missile impact with tornado winds and rotating machinery being the investigated mode of generation; thermal response due to adjacent fire conditions; and tank response due to intense seismic activity. Applicability of each scenario depended heavily on the specific tank configurations and material types selected. (PSB)

  3. Human Capital Development: Comparative Analysis of BRICs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardichvili, Alexandre; Zavyalova, Elena; Minina, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article is to conduct macro-level analysis of human capital (HC) development strategies, pursued by four countries commonly referred to as BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is based on comparisons of macro indices of human capital and innovativeness of the economy and a…

  4. Risk Analysis of UVB Exposure in Canadian Inland Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molot, L. A.; Keller, W.; Leavitt, P. R.; Robarts, R. D.; Waiser, M. J.; Arts, M. T.; Clair, T. A.; Pienitz, R.; Yan, N. D.; McNicol, D. K.; Prairie, Y.; Dillon, P. J.; Macrae, M.; Bello, R.; Nordin, R. N.; Curtis, P. J.

    2004-05-01

    Exposure to UVB (290-320 nm) harms some aquatic taxa and processes. With the restoration of pre-industrial ozone levels still some years away and the possibility that climate change might lower dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations and thus lead to increased exposure, evaluating the extent to which freshwater environments in Canada are at risk is warranted. First, the distribution of a UVB-sensitive zooplankton genus, Daphnia, was examined as a function of DOM and maximum depth (Zmax) in 258 lakes and ponds in Ontario and the eastern U.S. to determine whether UVB exposure restricts its distribution. Our results indicate that the distribution of Daphnia is not restricted by exposure to UVB with the possible exception of very clear, shallow systems underrepresented in the surveys. Secondly, the maximum depth of UVB transmission (the depth at which 1% of surface irradiance at 320 nm occurs, Z320,1%) was compared to Zmax in over 900 aquatic systems in different Canadian ecozones to determine the proportion of optically clear systems (Zmax< Z320,1%) and the extent to which systems that are not clear may become so (`at risk') should they lose 50% of their DOM. The proportion of systems deemed optically clear is low (<6%) across Canada with the exception of three ecozones between 13% and 20%. The proportion of systems deemed at risk is 0% in most regions with 5--9% in five regions from four ecozones. These results suggest that DOM levels are adequate to prevent large-scale loss of sensitive species from direct exposure to elevated UVB in most regions of Canada.

  5. RECONSTRUCTING EXPOSURE SCENARIOS USING DOSE BIOMARKERS - AN APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use Bayesian uncertainty analysis to explore how to estimate pollutant exposures from biomarker concentrations. The growing number of national databases with exposure data makes such an analysis possible. They contain datasets of pharmacokinetic biomarkers for many polluta...

  6. Pesticide exposure assessment in rice paddies in Europe: a comparative study of existing mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Cervelli, Stefano; Watanabe, Hirozumi; Capri, Ettore; Ferrero, Aldo

    2006-07-01

    A comparative test was undertaken in order to identify the potential of existing mathematical models, including the rice water quality (RICEWQ) 1.6.4v model, the pesticide concentration in paddy field (PCPF-1) model and the surface water and groundwater (SWAGW) model, for calculating pesticide dissipation and exposure in rice paddies in Europe. Previous versions of RICEWQ and PCPF-1 models had been validated under European and Japanese conditions respectively, unlike the SWAGW model which was only recently developed as a tier-2 modelling tool. Two datasets, derived from field dissipation studies undertaken in northern Italy with the herbicides cinosulfuron and pretilachlor, were used for the modelling exercise. All models were parameterized according to field experimentations, as far as possible, considering their individual deficiencies. Models were not calibrated against field data in order to remove bias in the comparison of the results. RICEWQ 1.6.4v provided the highest agreement between measured and predicted pesticide concentrations in both paddy water and paddy soil, with modelling efficiency (EF) values ranging from 0.78 to 0.93. PCPF-1 simulated well the dissipation of herbicides in paddy water, but significantly underestimated the concentrations of pretilachlor, a chemical with high affinity for soil sorption, in paddy soil. SWAGW simulated relatively well the dissipation of both herbicides in paddy water, and especially pretilachlor, but failed to predict closely the pesticide dissipation in paddy soil. Both RICEWQ and SWAGW provided low groundwater (GW) predicted environmental concentrations (PECs), suggesting a low risk of GW contamination for the two herbicides. Overall, this modelling exercise suggested that RICEWQ 1.6.4v is currently the most reliable model for higher-tier exposure assessment in rice paddies in Europe. PCPF-1 and SWAGW showed promising results, but further adjustments are required before these models can be considered as strong

  7. MANAGEMENT AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DATASET ENSEMBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Geveci, Berk

    2010-05-17

    The primary Phase I technical objective was to develop a prototype that demonstrates the functionality of all components required for an end-to-end meta-data management and comparative visualization system.

  8. Biomonitoring of concurrent mycotoxin exposure among adults in Sweden through urinary multi-biomarker analysis.

    PubMed

    Wallin, S; Gambacorta, L; Kotova, N; Lemming, E Warensjö; Nälsén, C; Solfrizzo, M; Olsen, M

    2015-09-01

    Mycotoxin producing moulds may contaminate numerous agricultural commodities either before harvest or during storage. A varied diet consisting of different foods may therefore be contaminated with a range of mycotoxins. The aim of the present study was to study concurrent exposure to mycotoxins through urinary multi-biomarker analysis, as well as its possible associations with the diet. Urinary samples from 252 adults, participating in the Swedish national dietary survey Riksmaten 2010-11, were collected together with a 4-day diet record. Concurrent mycotoxin exposure was studied using a multi-biomarker LC-MS/MS method. The results revealed that exposure to mycotoxins is common and concurrent exposure to more than one toxin was found in 69% of the study population. However, when comparing the number of toxins detected with the reported consumption data it was difficult to distinguish food patterns which would indicate an increased risk of exposure to many mycotoxins simultaneously. This is the first study to investigate concurrent mycotoxin exposure and urinary levels of fumonisin B1 (FB1), fumonisin B2 (FB2), nivalenol (NIV), ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), α-zearalenol (α-ZOL), β-zearalenol (β-ZOL) and de-epoxydeoxynivalenol (DOM-1) among adults in Sweden.

  9. Biomonitoring of concurrent mycotoxin exposure among adults in Sweden through urinary multi-biomarker analysis.

    PubMed

    Wallin, S; Gambacorta, L; Kotova, N; Lemming, E Warensjö; Nälsén, C; Solfrizzo, M; Olsen, M

    2015-09-01

    Mycotoxin producing moulds may contaminate numerous agricultural commodities either before harvest or during storage. A varied diet consisting of different foods may therefore be contaminated with a range of mycotoxins. The aim of the present study was to study concurrent exposure to mycotoxins through urinary multi-biomarker analysis, as well as its possible associations with the diet. Urinary samples from 252 adults, participating in the Swedish national dietary survey Riksmaten 2010-11, were collected together with a 4-day diet record. Concurrent mycotoxin exposure was studied using a multi-biomarker LC-MS/MS method. The results revealed that exposure to mycotoxins is common and concurrent exposure to more than one toxin was found in 69% of the study population. However, when comparing the number of toxins detected with the reported consumption data it was difficult to distinguish food patterns which would indicate an increased risk of exposure to many mycotoxins simultaneously. This is the first study to investigate concurrent mycotoxin exposure and urinary levels of fumonisin B1 (FB1), fumonisin B2 (FB2), nivalenol (NIV), ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), α-zearalenol (α-ZOL), β-zearalenol (β-ZOL) and de-epoxydeoxynivalenol (DOM-1) among adults in Sweden. PMID:26070503

  10. An economic analysis of comparable worth.

    PubMed

    Disch, J M; Feldstein, P J

    1986-06-01

    Comparable worth has been called the civil rights issue of the 1980s. Nursing is in the forefront of this movement. Although several governmental agencies are implementing salary programs based on comparable worth, establishing such a program in the hospital setting could yield problems for nurse executives. Implementation could be costly and demand a significant investment of resources. This paper discusses how wages are determined in a competitive market and what happens to that process when restrictions and barriers make the market noncompetitive. Of most importance, alternative strategies for increasing nursing salaries are presented.

  11. Wellness Model of Supervision: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.; Oliver, Marvarene; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared the effectiveness of the Wellness Model of Supervision (WELMS; Lenz & Smith, 2010) with alternative supervision models for developing wellness constructs, total personal wellness, and helping skills among counselors-in-training. Participants were 32 master's-level counseling students completing their…

  12. Comparative analysis of Orem's and King's theories.

    PubMed

    Hanucharurnkul, S

    1989-05-01

    Dorothea Orem and Imogene King are two nursing theorists who are contributing significantly to the development of nursing knowledge. This paper compares the similarities and differences in their strategies for theory development, their views of nursing metaparadigm concepts, and their theories of nursing system and goal attainment in terms of scope, usefulness, and their unique contribution to nursing science. PMID:2738232

  13. General Education Requirements: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Darrell B.; Koeppel, Katie

    2009-01-01

    While "general education" is a phrase heavily used in higher education, Leskes and Wright note that it has multiple meanings: it can refer to those courses that a college or university requires all of its students must pass as a condition for graduation, a common curriculum, a distribution requirement, or even core texts. This analysis of general…

  14. Comparative Lifecycle Energy Analysis: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jeffrey; Canzoneri, Diana

    1992-01-01

    Explores the position that more energy is conserved through recycling secondary materials than is generated from municipal solid waste incineration. Discusses one component of a lifecycle analysis--a comparison of energy requirements for manufacturing competing products. Includes methodological issues, energy cost estimates, and difficulties…

  15. Comparing Work Skills Analysis Tools. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kathryn

    This document outlines the processes and outcomes of a research project conducted to review work skills analysis tools (products and/or services) that profile required job skills and/or assess individuals' acquired skills. The document begins with a brief literature review and discussion of pertinent terminology. Presented next is a list of…

  16. Comparative molecular analysis of endoevaporitic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Jason W; Pace, Norman R; Spear, John R

    2008-10-01

    A phylogenetic comparison of microbial communities in hypersaline evaporites was conducted on crusts from Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and Lindsey Lake, New Mexico, using culture-independent rRNA gene sequence analysis. Many sequences were shared between evaporites, which suggests that similar environments select for specific microbial lineages from a global metacommunity. PMID:18757573

  17. Comparative molecular analysis of endoevaporitic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Jason W; Pace, Norman R; Spear, John R

    2008-10-01

    A phylogenetic comparison of microbial communities in hypersaline evaporites was conducted on crusts from Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and Lindsey Lake, New Mexico, using culture-independent rRNA gene sequence analysis. Many sequences were shared between evaporites, which suggests that similar environments select for specific microbial lineages from a global metacommunity.

  18. New results from FRECOPA analysis. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durin, Christian

    1992-01-01

    Given Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) new situation (5.8 years mission), CNES decided to set up a team to analyze FRECOPA systems (AO 138). We studied the kinematic system first. We observed damage on the DELRIN gears and lubricant ageing. The results are based on comparative appraisals between components after flight and those stored on ground in laboratory conditions. We observed also the aluminum surface treatment in the exposed areas and we measured the thermo-optical properties changes. Now, with all the results stored, we try to give a ruling on the use of FRECOPA materials in space environment.

  19. Census tract analysis of lead exposure in Rhode Island children.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J D; Bailey, A; Simon, P; Blake, M; Dalton, M A

    1997-01-01

    significant and robust predictor; we suggest that vacancy is an ecological marker for the deterioration of leadbased paint, with higher vacancy neighborhoods containing houses in poorer condition. In Rhode Island, census tracts with high vacancy rates also have high rates of recent immigration, making immigrant groups vulnerable to lead exposure. Small-areas analysis may be useful in directing resources to high risk areas, explaining the sociocultural forces which produce such exposure and analyzing the effects of housing policy over time in states with high screening penetration. PMID:9339229

  20. Comparative analysis of theories of relativistic photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, Bahman; Gordon, Daniel; Palastro, John

    2015-11-01

    Laser-plasma experiments routinely rely on photoionization for plasma formation. For large laser intensities or for high-Z atoms relativistic effects become important. We investigate a unique regime of relativistic photoionization from high-Z atoms where relativistic effects modify both the bound and continuum electronic states. Theories of photoionization are based on the imaginary time method and the S-matrix method, amongst others. We compare the results of these approaches for both the Dirac and the Klein-Gordon equations. Analytical results for the momentum distribution of ejected electrons and ionization rate are presented and compared with those from numerical solutions. Work supported by the Department of Energy and the NRL Base Program.

  1. Light beam deflector performance: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zook, J D

    1974-04-01

    The performance of various types of analog light beam deflectors is summarized, and their relative positions in a deflector hierarchy are defined. The three types of deflectors considered are (1) mechanical (galvanometer) mirror deflectors, (2) acoustooptic deflectors, and (3) analog electrooptic deflectors. Material figures of merit are defined and compared, and the theoretical trade-off between speed and resolution is given for each type of deflector. PMID:20126095

  2. A comparative analysis of vertebrate sex determination.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Andrew; Smith, Craig; Western, Patrick; McClive, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Sex determination in vertebrates is controlled by a variety of mechanisms. We compared the expression of SF1, DAX1, DMRT1, SOX9 and AMH during gonadogenesis in the mouse, chicken and alligator embryo. In contrast to the expression profile of Sf1 in mouse embryos, chicken and alligator embryos show higher levels of Sf1 expression in the developing ovaries compared to testes. This may reflect the higher level of sex hormone synthesis in the ovary compared to the testis in chickens and alligators. The DAX1 gene has a similar expression profile in all three vertebrate species but appears to have different gene structure. As in mouse, DMRT1 was expressed at very high levels in the chicken and alligator male gonad. The male-specific up-regulation of SOX9 expression appears to be a common feature in all three vertebrates. In the chicken and alligator AMH is expressed prior to SOX9, suggesting that in these species SOX9 cannot initiate AMH expression as it does in mammals. SOX9 acts at multiple points in the vertebrate testis pathway but it appears that only some of these functions have been conserved through evolution. PMID:11990786

  3. Comparative analysis of plant oil based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziejewski, M.; Goettler, H.J.; Haines, H.; Huong, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the evaluation results from the analysis of different blends of fuels using the 13-mode standard SAE testing method. Six high oleic safflower oil blends, six ester blends, six high oleic sunflower oil blends, and six sunflower oil blends were used in this portion of the investigation. Additionally, the results from the repeated 13-mode tests for all the 25/75% mixtures with a complete diesel fuel test before and after each alternative fuel are presented.

  4. Design and Evaluation of a Breath Analysis System for Occupational Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Soldat, Kelvin L.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2001-06-01

    Exposure assessment is an integral part of industrial hygiene and occupational health. To ensure the health and safety of workers, integrated industrial hygiene methodologies often include biological monitoring strategies. Exhaled breath is an ideal matrix for measuring volatile biomarkers, particularly since the non-invasive collection of breath may improve volunteer participation. A real-time, field-portable system was developed to analyze undiluted exhaled air from experimental animals and humans. The system combines (1) an ion-trap mass spectrometer capable of atmospheric sampling; (2) a breath interface for continual analysis of the exhaled breath stream; (3) chemical dosimeters that are analyzed in the field/workplace; and (4) physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to estimate total exposure and internal target tissue dosimetry. The intent of this development was to provide new instrumentation to evaluate volatile chemical exposures as part of a daily monitoring pro gram. For example, the system was designed to monitor a worker every time they enter and leave a work environment - a vast improvement over current 8-hr integrated monitoring strategies. To evaluate the system in actual work environments, field tests were conducted using volunteers providing exhaled breath samples before and after each specific job task. In these field studies, several volunteers had post-task breath levels higher than pre-task levels. Compared to the breath analysis findings, chemical dosimeters underpredicted exposures, particularly for longer sampling intervals where the volume of air sampled may have diluted exposures. The results of these field studies illustrate the utility of monitoring workers for exposures at numerous times throughout the day, particularly when job-specific tasks may indicate a potential for exposure.

  5. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  6. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  7. Long-term dietary exposure to lead in young European children: comparing a pan-European approach with a national exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Boon, P E; Te Biesebeek, J D; Sioen, I; Huybrechts, I; Moschandreas, J; Ruprich, J; Turrini, A; Azpiri, M; Busk, L; Christensen, T; Kersting, M; Lafay, L; Liukkonen, K-H; Papoutsou, S; Serra-Majem, L; Traczyk, I; De Henauw, S; Van Klaveren, J D

    2012-01-01

    Long-term dietary exposures to lead in young children were calculated by combining food consumption data of 11 European countries categorised using harmonised broad food categories with occurrence data on lead from different Member States (pan-European approach). The results of the assessment in children living in the Netherlands were compared with a long-term lead intake assessment in the same group using Dutch lead concentration data and linking the consumption and concentration data at the highest possible level of detail. Exposures obtained with the pan-European approach were higher than the national exposure calculations. For both assessments cereals contributed most to the exposure. The lower dietary exposure in the national study was due to the use of lower lead concentrations and a more optimal linkage of food consumption and concentration data. When a pan-European approach, using a harmonised food categorisation system and "European" concentration data, results in a possible health risk related to the intake of an environmental chemical for a certain country, it is advisable to refine this assessment, as part of a tiered approach, using national occurrence data, including an optimised linkage between foods analysed and consumed for that country. In the case of lack of occurrence data, these data can be supplemented with data from the "European" concentration database or by generating additional concentration data at country level. PMID:22950755

  8. [Amaranth flour: characteristics, comparative analysis, application possibilities].

    PubMed

    Zharkov, I M; Miroshnichenko, L A; Zviagin, A A; Bavykina, I A

    2014-01-01

    Amaranth flour--a product of amaranth seeds processing--is a valuable industrial raw material that has an unique chemical composition and may be used for nutrition of people suffering from intolerance to traditional cereals protein, including celiac disease patients. The research aim was to study the composition of amaranth flour of two types compared with semolina which is traditionally used for nutrition by Russian population, as well as to compare the composition of milk amaranth flour porridge with milk semolina porridge. The composition of amaranth whole-ground flour and amaranth flour of premium grade processed from amaranth seeds grown in Voronezh region has been researched. It is to be noted that protein content in amaranth flour was 10.8-24.3% higher than in semolina, and its biological value and NPU-coefficient were higher by 22.65 and 46.51% respectively; lysine score in amaranth flour protein of premium grade came up to 107.54%, and in semolina protein only 40.95%. The level of digestible carbohydrates, including starch, was lower in amaranth flour than in semolina by 2.79-12.85 and 4.76-15.85% respectively, while fiber content was 15.5-30 fold higher. Fat content in amaranth flour of premium grade was 2,4 fold lower than in whole-ground amaranth flour but it was 45% higher than in semolina. The main advantage of amaranth flour protein compared to wheat protein is the predominance of albumins and globulins and a minimal content of prolamines and alpha-gliadin complete absence. The specifics of chemical composition allow the amaranth flour to be recommended for being included into nutrition of both healthy children and adults and also celiac disease patients.

  9. Comparative analysis of GOCI ocean color products.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Lewis, Mark David; Lawson, Adam; Gould, Richard W; Martinolich, Paul; Li, Rong-Rong; Ladner, Sherwin; Gallegos, Sonia

    2015-10-12

    The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) is the first geostationary ocean color sensor in orbit that provides bio-optical properties from coastal and open waters around the Korean Peninsula at unprecedented temporal resolution. In this study, we compare the normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) products generated by the Naval Research Laboratory Automated Processing System (APS) with those produced by the stand-alone software package, the GOCI Data Processing System (GDPS), developed by the Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI). Both results are then compared to the nLw measured by the above water radiometer at the Ieodo site. This above-water radiometer is part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AeroNET). The results indicate that the APS and GDPS processed  correlates well within the same image slot where the coefficient of determination (r²) is higher than 0.84 for all the bands from 412 nm to 745 nm. The agreement between APS and the AeroNET data is higher when compared to the GDPS results. The Root-Mean-Squared-Error (RMSE) between AeroNET and APS data ranges from 0.24 [mW/(cm²srμm)] at 555 nm to 0.52 [mW/(cm²srμm)]  at 412 nm while RMSE between AeroNET and GDPS data ranges from 0.47 [mW/(cm²srμm)] at 443 nm to 0.69 [mW/(cm²srμm)]  at 490 nm.

  10. Comparative analysis of GOCI ocean color products.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Lewis, Mark David; Lawson, Adam; Gould, Richard W; Martinolich, Paul; Li, Rong-Rong; Ladner, Sherwin; Gallegos, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) is the first geostationary ocean color sensor in orbit that provides bio-optical properties from coastal and open waters around the Korean Peninsula at unprecedented temporal resolution. In this study, we compare the normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) products generated by the Naval Research Laboratory Automated Processing System (APS) with those produced by the stand-alone software package, the GOCI Data Processing System (GDPS), developed by the Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI). Both results are then compared to the nLw measured by the above water radiometer at the Ieodo site. This above-water radiometer is part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AeroNET). The results indicate that the APS and GDPS processed  correlates well within the same image slot where the coefficient of determination (r²) is higher than 0.84 for all the bands from 412 nm to 745 nm. The agreement between APS and the AeroNET data is higher when compared to the GDPS results. The Root-Mean-Squared-Error (RMSE) between AeroNET and APS data ranges from 0.24 [mW/(cm²srμm)] at 555 nm to 0.52 [mW/(cm²srμm)]  at 412 nm while RMSE between AeroNET and GDPS data ranges from 0.47 [mW/(cm²srμm)] at 443 nm to 0.69 [mW/(cm²srμm)]  at 490 nm. PMID:26473861

  11. Comparative Analysis of GOCI Ocean Color Products

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Lewis, Mark David; Lawson, Adam; Gould, Richard W.; Martinolich, Paul; Li, Rong-Rong; Ladner, Sherwin; Gallegos, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) is the first geostationary ocean color sensor in orbit that provides bio-optical properties from coastal and open waters around the Korean Peninsula at unprecedented temporal resolution. In this study, we compare the normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) products generated by the Naval Research Laboratory Automated Processing System (APS) with those produced by the stand-alone software package, the GOCI Data Processing System (GDPS), developed by the Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI). Both results are then compared to the nLw measured by the above water radiometer at the Ieodo site. This above-water radiometer is part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AeroNET). The results indicate that the APS and GDPS processed nLw correlates well within the same image slot where the coefficient of determination (r2) is higher than 0.84 for all the bands from 412 nm to 745 nm. The agreement between APS and the AeroNET data is higher when compared to the GDPS results. The Root-Mean-Squared-Error (RMSE) between AeroNET and APS data ranges from 0.24 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 555 nm to 0.52 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 412 nm while RMSE between AeroNET and GDPS data ranges from 0.47 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 443 nm to 0.69 [mW/(cm2srμm)] at 490 nm. PMID:26473861

  12. Comparative analysis of condensation models within DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, Nikolay Y.; Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2014-12-09

    Two condensation process modeling approaches within DSMC methodology are compared. The first is based on the modified nucleation theory which correctly describes small clusters and the second on the kinetic theory and considers not only supercritical clusters, but clusters of all sizes including dimers. The relaxation of the size distribution function is calculated for the spatially homogeneous cases, where the monomer parameters are kept constant. As an example the vapour of Cu atoms is considered and importance of taking into account of the internal energies of clusters is shown. Peculiarities of the classical and kinetic approaches are discussed herein.

  13. Analysis of pesticide exposure and DNA damage in immigrant farmworkers.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Linda A; Lasarev, Michael; Muniz, Juan; Nazar Stewart, Valle; Kisby, Glen

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, the Comet assay has been used increasingly in studies of workers potentially exposed to genotoxic substances in the workplace or environment. Significant increases in DNA damage measured with the Comet assay has been reported in lymphocytes of agricultural workers; however, less intrusive means of biomonitoring are needed in epidemiological investigations. This study was designed to use the Comet assay to describe the association of markers of DNA damage in oral leukocytes with biomarkers of pesticide exposure in 134 farmworkers working in berry crops in Oregon compared to control populations. The authors also examined the extent of DNA damage in young workers compared to adults and the effect of work histories, lifestyle factors, and diet on markers of DNA damage. Urinary levels of organophosphate pesticides were low at the time of sampling; however, mean levels of the Captan metabolite tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) were found to be shifted significantly higher in the farmworkers (0.14 microg/ml) compared to controls (0.078 microg/ml) (one-sided p value=.01). Likewise, the combined molar equivalent of all dialkylphosphate metabolites was marginally higher in farmworkers (p value=.05). The mean tail intensity was significantly greater for agricultural workers compared to controls (one-sided p value<.001), indicating more DNA damage in the oral leukocytes. On average, the mean tail intensity was 10.9 units greater for agricultural workers (95% CI: 6-16 units greater). Tail moment was also significantly greater for agricultural workers compared to nonagricultural workers (one-sided p value<.001). No Comet parameter was significantly associated with years spent working in agriculture, age, sex, body mass index, diet, and alcohol or tobacco use. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility for using the Comet assay in biomonitoring studies of farmworkers. Additional studies are needed to examine the effects of different pesticide types on

  14. Personal Exposure to Mixtures of Volatile Organic Compounds: Modeling and Further Analysis of the RIOPA Data

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Su, Feng-Chiao; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Jia, Chunrong

    2015-01-01

    known to affect VOC exposures, many personal, environmental, and socioeconomic determinants remain to be identified, and the significance and applicability of the determinants reported in the literature are uncertain. To help answer these unresolved questions and overcome limitations of previous analyses, this project used several novel and powerful statistical modeling and analysis techniques and two large data sets. The overall objectives of this project were (1) to identify and characterize exposure distributions (including extreme values), (2) evaluate mixtures (including dependencies), and (3) identify determinants of VOC exposure. METHODS VOC data were drawn from two large data sets: the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study (1999–2001) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; 1999–2000). The RIOPA study used a convenience sample to collect outdoor, indoor, and personal exposure measurements in three cities (Elizabeth, NJ; Houston, TX; Los Angeles, CA). In each city, approximately 100 households with adults and children who did not smoke were sampled twice for 18 VOCs. In addition, information about 500 variables associated with exposure was collected. The NHANES used a nationally representative sample and included personal VOC measurements for 851 participants. NHANES sampled 10 VOCs in common with RIOPA. Both studies used similar sampling methods and study periods. Specific Aim 1 To estimate and model extreme value exposures, extreme value distribution models were fitted to the top 10% and 5% of VOC exposures. Health risks were estimated for individual VOCs and for three VOC mixtures. Simulated extreme value data sets, generated for each VOC and for fitted extreme value and lognormal distributions, were compared with measured concentrations (RIOPA observations) to evaluate each model’s goodness of fit. Mixture distributions were fitted with the conventional finite mixture of normal distributions and the

  15. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ratelle, Mylène; Coté, Jonathan; Bouchard, Michèle

    2015-12-01

    Biomonitoring of pyrethroid exposure is largely conducted but human toxicokinetics has not been fully documented. This is essential for a proper interpretation of biomonitoring data. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers have been documented and compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin dosing. Six volunteers ingested 0.1 mg kg(-1) bodyweight of cypermethrin acutely. The same volunteers were exposed to permethrin earlier. Blood samples were taken over 72 h after treatment and complete timed urine voids were collected over 84 h postdosing. Cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (trans- and cis-DCCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) metabolites, common to both cypermethrin and permethrin, were quantified. Blood and urinary time courses of all three metabolites were similar following cypermethrin and permethrin exposure. Plasma levels of metabolites reached peak values on average ≈ 5-7 h post-dosing; the elimination phase showed mean apparent half-lives (t½ ) for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA of 5.1, 6.9 and 9.2 h, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 7.1, 6.2 and 6.5 h after permethrin dosing. Corresponding mean values obtained from urinary rate time courses were peak values at ≈ 9 h post-dosing and apparent elimination t½ of 6.3, 6.4 and 6.4 h for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 5.4, 4.5 and 5.7 h after permethrin dosing. These data confirm that the kinetics of cypermethrin is similar to that of permethrin in humans and that their common biomarkers of exposure may be used for an overall assessment of exposure.

  16. Residential exposure to electromagnetic fields and childhood leukaemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Angelillo, I. F.; Villari, P.

    1999-01-01

    Although individual epidemiological investigations have suggested associations between residential exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and childhood leukaemia, overall the findings have been inconclusive. Several of these studies do, however, lend themselves to application of the meta-analysis technique. For this purpose we carried out searches using MEDLINE and other sources, and 14 case-control studies and one cohort study were identified and evaluated for epidemiological quality and included in the meta-analysis. Relative risk estimates were extracted from each of the studies and pooled. Separate meta-analyses were performed on the basis of the assessed EMF exposure (wiring configuration codes, distance to power distribution equipment, spot and 24-h measures of magnetic field strength (magnetic flux density) and calculated magnetic field). The meta-analysis based on wiring configuration codes yielded a pooled relative risk estimate of 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-2.04, P = 0.024) and for that for exposure to 24-h measurements of magnetic fields, 1.59 (95% CI = 1.14-2.22, P = 0.006), indicating a potential effect of residential EMF exposure on childhood leukaemia. In most cases, lower risk estimates were obtained by pooling high-quality studies than pooling low-quality studies. There appears to be a clear trend for more recent studies to be of higher quality. Enough evidence exists to conclude that dismissing concerns about residential EMFs and childhood leukaemia is unwarranted. Additional high-quality epidemiological studies incorporating comparable measures for both exposure and outcomes are, however, needed to confirm these findings and, should they prove to be true, the case options for minimizing exposure should be thoroughly investigated to provide definitive answers for policy-makers. PMID:10612886

  17. Comparative analysis of Goodwin's business cycle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S.; Todorov, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    We compare the behavior of solutions of Goodwin's business cycle equation in the form of neutral delay differential equation with fixed delay (NDDE model) and in the form of the differential equations of 3rd, 4th and 5th orders (ODE model's). Such ODE model's (Taylor series expansion of NDDE in powers of θ) are proposed in N. Dharmaraj and K. Vela Velupillai [6] for investigation of the short periodic sawthooth oscillations in NDDE. We show that the ODE's of 3rd, 4th and 5th order may approximate the asymptotic behavior of only main Goodwin's mode, but not the sawthooth modes. If the order of the Taylor series expansion exceeds 5, then the approximate ODE becomes unstable independently of time lag θ.

  18. Comparative LIBS Analysis Of Calcified Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Salam, Z. A.; Harith, M. A.

    2008-09-01

    Signal enhancement, limits of detection, and relevance to environmental concentration for element in calcified tissues using LIBS with single and double laser pulses will be presented. These measurements were performed on three calcified tissues representing different matrices, namely enamel of human teeth, shells and eggshells. This method depends on the role of the laser induced shock wave on the ionization rate of the ablated target material atoms. The effect of the laser single and double pulse on the ionic to atomic ratio of calcium and magnesium spectral emission lines, CaII/CaI and MgII/MgI, will be presented and compared with the previous results and its relevance to the target material hardness. The results show that in case of single pulse the intensity ratios in calcium are higher than the double pulse while there is no appreciable difference between both in case of magnesium.

  19. Comparative LIBS Analysis Of Calcified Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Salam, Z. A.; Harith, M. A.

    2008-09-23

    Signal enhancement, limits of detection, and relevance to environmental concentration for element in calcified tissues using LIBS with single and double laser pulses will be presented. These measurements were performed on three calcified tissues representing different matrices, namely enamel of human teeth, shells and eggshells. This method depends on the role of the laser induced shock wave on the ionization rate of the ablated target material atoms. The effect of the laser single and double pulse on the ionic to atomic ratio of calcium and magnesium spectral emission lines, CaII/CaI and MgII/MgI, will be presented and compared with the previous results and its relevance to the target material hardness. The results show that in case of single pulse the intensity ratios in calcium are higher than the double pulse while there is no appreciable difference between both in case of magnesium.

  20. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Cystatin Superfamily in Platyhelminths

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution. PMID:25853513

  2. Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

    2007-08-01

    This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  3. Comparative pharmacokinetic study of the role of gender and developmental differences in occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it shows that physiological differences between men and women result in gender-specific exposures with respect to benzene. Second, it assesses the potential for a lactating woman's occupational and personal benzene exposure to impact a nursing infant's exposure, highlighting the possibility of subjecting an infant to the effects of industrial chemicals via breast feeding. This study employs physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to investigate the influence of physiological parameters and to evaluate the ability of inhaled benzene to transfer from mother to infant through breastmilk. The models are run through scenarios that simulate occupational, smoking, and background exposures. The gender comparison is facilitated by a sensitivity analysis. The blood/air partition coefficient and maximum velocity of metabolism were found to substantially impact model output. These values were both higher in women and caused an increase in the percentage of benzene metabolized in all of the exposure scenarios. The study of lactating women and infants is essentially theoretical. There is evidence that over 65% of an infant's benzene exposure can be attributed to contaminated breastmilk. A large portion of the ingested exposure can be eliminated by adjusting the mother's working or nursing schedule. Benzene, Physiologically based pharmacokinetics, PBPK.

  4. Comparative network analysis via differential graphlet communities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Serene W H; Cercone, Nick; Jurisica, Igor

    2015-01-01

    While current protein interaction data provides a rich resource for molecular biology, it mostly lacks condition-specific details. Abundance of mRNA data for most diseases provides potential to model condition-specific transcriptional changes. Transcriptional data enables modeling disease mechanisms, and in turn provide potential treatments. While approaches to compare networks constructed from healthy and disease samples have been developed, they do not provide the complete comparison, evaluations are performed on very small networks, or no systematic network analyses are performed on differential network structures. We propose a novel method for efficiently exploiting network structure information in the comparison between any graphs, and validate results in non-small cell lung cancer. We introduce the notion of differential graphlet community to detect deregulated subgraphs between any graphs such that the network structure information is exploited. The differential graphlet community approach systematically captures network structure differences between any graphs. Instead of using connectivity of each protein or each edge, we used shortest path distributions on differential graphlet communities in order to exploit network structure information on identified deregulated subgraphs. We validated the method by analyzing three non-small cell lung cancer datasets and validated results on four independent datasets. We observed that the shortest path lengths are significantly longer for normal graphs than for tumor graphs between genes that are in differential graphlet communities, suggesting that tumor cells create "shortcuts" between biological processes that may not be present in normal conditions. PMID:25283527

  5. Comparative analysis of de novo transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Kaitlin; Yang, Yi; Marsh, Ronald; Xie, Linglin; Zhang, Ke K

    2013-02-01

    The fast development of next-generation sequencing technology presents a major computational challenge for data processing and analysis. A fast algorithm, de Bruijn graph has been successfully used for genome DNA de novo assembly; nevertheless, its performance for transcriptome assembly is unclear. In this study, we used both simulated and real RNA-Seq data, from either artificial RNA templates or human transcripts, to evaluate five de novo assemblers, ABySS, Mira, Trinity, Velvet and Oases. Of these assemblers, ABySS, Trinity, Velvet and Oases are all based on de Bruijn graph, and Mira uses an overlap graph algorithm. Various numbers of RNA short reads were selected from the External RNA Control Consortium (ERCC) data and human chromosome 22. A number of statistics were then calculated for the resulting contigs from each assembler. Each experiment was repeated multiple times to obtain the mean statistics and standard error estimate. Trinity had relative good performance for both ERCC and human data, but it may not consistently generate full length transcripts. ABySS was the fastest method but its assembly quality was low. Mira gave a good rate for mapping its contigs onto human chromosome 22, but its computational speed is not satisfactory. Our results suggest that transcript assembly remains a challenge problem for bioinformatics society. Therefore, a novel assembler is in need for assembling transcriptome data generated by next generation sequencing technique.

  6. Breastfeeding policy: a globally comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raub, Amy; Earle, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the extent to which national policies guaranteeing breastfeeding breaks to working women may facilitate breastfeeding. Methods An analysis was conducted of the number of countries that guarantee breastfeeding breaks, the daily number of hours guaranteed, and the duration of guarantees. To obtain current, detailed information on national policies, original legislation as well as secondary sources on 182 of the 193 Member States of the United Nations were examined. Regression analyses were conducted to test the association between national policy and rates of exclusive breastfeeding while controlling for national income level, level of urbanization, female percentage of the labour force and female literacy rate. Findings Breastfeeding breaks with pay are guaranteed in 130 countries (71%) and unpaid breaks are guaranteed in seven (4%). No policy on breastfeeding breaks exists in 45 countries (25%). In multivariate models, the guarantee of paid breastfeeding breaks for at least 6 months was associated with an increase of 8.86 percentage points in the rate of exclusive breastfeeding (P < 0.05). Conclusion A greater percentage of women practise exclusive breastfeeding in countries where laws guarantee breastfeeding breaks at work. If these findings are confirmed in longitudinal studies, health outcomes could be improved by passing legislation on breastfeeding breaks in countries that do not yet ensure the right to breastfeed. PMID:24052676

  7. Comparative analysis of de novo transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Kaitlin; Yang, Yi; Marsh, Ronald; Xie, Linglin; Zhang, Ke K

    2013-02-01

    The fast development of next-generation sequencing technology presents a major computational challenge for data processing and analysis. A fast algorithm, de Bruijn graph has been successfully used for genome DNA de novo assembly; nevertheless, its performance for transcriptome assembly is unclear. In this study, we used both simulated and real RNA-Seq data, from either artificial RNA templates or human transcripts, to evaluate five de novo assemblers, ABySS, Mira, Trinity, Velvet and Oases. Of these assemblers, ABySS, Trinity, Velvet and Oases are all based on de Bruijn graph, and Mira uses an overlap graph algorithm. Various numbers of RNA short reads were selected from the External RNA Control Consortium (ERCC) data and human chromosome 22. A number of statistics were then calculated for the resulting contigs from each assembler. Each experiment was repeated multiple times to obtain the mean statistics and standard error estimate. Trinity had relative good performance for both ERCC and human data, but it may not consistently generate full length transcripts. ABySS was the fastest method but its assembly quality was low. Mira gave a good rate for mapping its contigs onto human chromosome 22, but its computational speed is not satisfactory. Our results suggest that transcript assembly remains a challenge problem for bioinformatics society. Therefore, a novel assembler is in need for assembling transcriptome data generated by next generation sequencing technique. PMID:23393031

  8. Gender and work values: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Elizur, D

    1994-04-01

    The results of recent investigations on work values suggest that the contradictory findings in regard to gender differences may be rooted in variations in the underlying structure of the work-values domain. In the present study a definitional framework for work values was proposed and tested. Smallest space analysis (SSA; Guttman, 1968) was performed on the ratings of 24 work-value items by samples of men and women from Hungary, Israel, and the Netherlands. A double-ordered conceptual system, a radex structure, was obtained in each of the samples, reflecting two hypothesized facets: modality of outcome (cognitive, affective, and instrumental) and type of system performance contingency. Essentially the same structure was obtained for women and men. However, women ranked affective outcomes as well as some of the instrumental and cognitive values higher than men did, whereas men ranked some other cognitive (influence, independence, responsibility) and instrumental (pay) items higher than women did. Personal growth and use of abilities were ranked higher by men in some samples and by women in others. PMID:8201817

  9. Exposure of Prague's homeless population to lead and cadmium, compared to Prague's general population.

    PubMed

    Hrncírová, Dana; Batáriová, Andrea; Cerná, Milena; Procházka, Bohumír; Dlouhý, Pavel; Andel, Michal

    2008-10-01

    Homelessness is a growing problem in the Czech Republic where homeless people represent a specific minority group beset by many problems linked to their divergent lifestyle. It was therefore expected that the homeless population would be at greater risk of exposure to environmental pollutants than the general population. The aim of our study was to compare blood lead (B-Pb) and blood cadmium (B-Cd) levels in the homeless population (HP) with those obtained from the Human Biomonitoring Project (CZ-HBM), which used blood donors considered representative of the general population (GP). We present data obtained between 2004 and 2006 for B-Pb and B-Cd in 257 Prague homeless adults and compare them to B-Pb and B-Cd levels in 104 Prague adult blood donors from the CZ-HBM project in 2005. The mean (geometric) B-Pb levels in men were 36.5 (HP) and 35.4microg/l (GP), which is not significantly different. However, statistically significant differences were observed between men and women in the GP (P<0.001), but not in HP; B-Pb levels in women (34.8microg/l) did not differ from those of HP men (36.5microg/l), but were significantly (P<0.001) higher than those of GP women (25.8microg/l). B-Pb levels were not influenced by smoking. B-Cd levels in the homeless nonsmokers (geometric means 1.06 and 1.18microg/l in men and women, respectively) were more than 2.5 times higher than in the nonsmoking GP (0.36 and 0.38microg/l for men and women, respectively). B-Cd levels were significantly (P<0.001) influenced by smoking in both groups, but, surprisingly, the values in GP smokers (men=0.96microg/l, women=0.93microg/l) were lower than those in HP nonsmokers (men=1.06microg/l, women=1.18microg/l). A positive correlation was found between cadmium and lead in both men (P<0.05) and women (P<0.01). Our results indicate that the homeless population under study might be exposed to lead and cadmium more extensively than the general population of Prague and that homeless women represent a

  10. Comparative Analysis of State Fish Consumption Advisories Targeting Sensitive Populations

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Alison C.; Tsuchiya, Ami; Younglove, Lisa R.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Fish consumption advisories are issued to warn the public of possible toxicological threats from consuming certain fish species. Although developing fetuses and children are particularly susceptible to toxicants in fish, fish also contain valuable nutrients. Hence, formulating advice for sensitive populations poses challenges. We conducted a comparative analysis of advisory Web sites issued by states to assess health messages that sensitive populations might access. Data sources We evaluated state advisories accessed via the National Listing of Fish Advisories issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Data extraction We created criteria to evaluate advisory attributes such as risk and benefit message clarity. Data synthesis All 48 state advisories issued at the time of this analysis targeted children, 90% (43) targeted pregnant women, and 58% (28) targeted women of childbearing age. Only six advisories addressed single contaminants, while the remainder based advice on 2–12 contaminants. Results revealed that advisories associated a dozen contaminants with specific adverse health effects. Beneficial health effects of any kind were specifically associated only with omega-3 fatty acids found in fish. Conclusions These findings highlight the complexity of assessing and communicating information about multiple contaminant exposure from fish consumption. Communication regarding potential health benefits conferred by specific fish nutrients was minimal and focused primarily on omega-3 fatty acids. This overview suggests some lessons learned and highlights a lack of both clarity and consistency in providing the breadth of information that sensitive populations such as pregnant women need to make public health decisions about fish consumption during pregnancy. PMID:19079708

  11. TOXICOLOGY LABORATORY ANALYSIS AND HUMAN EXPOSURE TO p-CHLOROANILINE

    PubMed Central

    Pizon, AF; Schwartz, AR; Shum, LR; Rittenberger, JC; Lower, DR; Giannoutsos, S; Virji, MA; Krasowski, MD

    2008-01-01

    Introduction p-Chloroaniline is more potent at producing methemoglobin than aniline in animal models. This case highlights the clinical presentation of an inhalation exposure to p-chloroaniline and associated laboratory analysis. An in-vitro study evaluating the metabolism of p-chloroaniline in human hepatocytes was undertaken to evaluate the metabolic fate more closely. Case Presentation A 20 year-old man was working at a chemical waste plant when he developed dizziness, abdominal pain, and nausea. The exam was remarkable for coma, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulse oximetry of 75%. Arterial blood gases showed a pH 7.38, pCO2 41 mmHg, pO2 497 mmHg, bicarbonate 24 mEq/L and methemoglobin 69%. Methylene blue administration led to complete recovery without sequelae. p-Chloroaniline was later identified as the chemical involved. He denied direct contact with the chemical, but was not wearing a dust mask or respirator. GC/MS confirmed p-chloroaniline and metabolites in the patient’s urine. Methods Human hepatocytes were incubated with 100 µM p-chloroaniline for 24 hours, in both rifampicin- and vehicle only-treated cells. The cell culture medium was collected for GC/MS analysis for p-chloroaniline metabolites. Results Similar to the patient sample, both p-chloroaniline and p-chloroacetanilide were identified by GC/MS in hepatocytes incubated with p-chloroaniline. Neither p-chloroaniline incubated in empty cell culture nor direct GC/MS injection of p-chloroaniline generated any p-chloroacetanilide via non-enzymatic degradation. Discussion/Conclusion The seemingly innocuous dermal and inhalation exposure to p-chloroaniline dust can lead to life-threatening methemoglobinemia. The diagnosis can be confirmed with GC/MS analysis of the patient’s urine, searching for p-chloroaniline and its primary metabolite p-chloroacetanilide. PMID:18608262

  12. Respirable quartz dust exposure and airway obstruction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brüske, Irene; Thiering, Elisabeth; Heinrich, Joachim; Huster, Katharina M; Nowak, Dennis

    2014-08-01

    Studies on exposure to respirable quartz dust at the workplace and the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were selected into a systematic review and meta-analysed to obtain an overall estimate of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) reduction. PubMed and Embase were searched from 1970 to 2010. In total, 257 cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were identified that reported on inorganic dust exposure and had available lung function data. Of the 55 publications which met our inclusion criteria, 11 reported on associations with occupational exposure to respirable quartz dust. The combined average effect estimate of respirable quartz dust on spirometric parameters was obtained using a random effects model meta-analysis. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed via the I(2) statistic. Most studies found a significant negative association of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC related to increasing exposure to crystalline quartz at the workplace. One study found an effect only for smokers, and one did not observe such an effect at all. The meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies showed that the mean ratio FEV1 to FVC was reduced and FEV1 of workers exposed to respirable quartz dust was 4.6% less than predicted compared with workers with no/low exposure. Both results showed a statistically significant difference. Occupational exposure to respirable quartz dust was associated with a statistically significant decrease in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC, revealing airway obstruction consistent with COPD.

  13. Analysis for Acoustic Characterization of Microbubbles under Ultrasound Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Wataru; Nakamura, Yoji; Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Teiichiro; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    Microbubble contrast agents are used in many diagnoses and studied for therapeutic applications. But ultrasound parameters have not been physically analyzed, which means we do not have sufficient data about the parameters to explain unexpected events during diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to obtain sufficient knowledge about the parameters relevant to ultrasound therapy using microbubble contrast agents and to analyze the microbubble dynamics under ultrasound exposure. We measured the acoustic pressures of commercial contrast agent (Sonazoid™) resulting from ultrasound sine burst exposure of 3 cycles at center frequency 3.5 MHz, in various concentrations (void fractions). Results showed that for a high void fraction of 10-4, there appeared a low frequency signal of the order of 100 kHz in radiated echo from microbubbles, and comparatively low intensity level of the driving frequency in transmitted signal. The results suggested some change in dynamics of bubbles according to void fraction. We calculated the bubble interaction parameter β to know the transition range from single bubble behavior to bubble cloud behavior, and concluded that the low frequency signal appearing in the radiated echo is likely to be a resonance frequency of bubble cloud.

  14. TISSUE CONCENTRATION OF PCBS IN ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS AS COMPARED WITH THOSE IN HUMANS WITH BACKGROUND-LEVEL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE CONCENTRATION OF PCBS IN ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS AS COMPARED WITH THOSE IN HUMANS WITH BACKGROUND-LEVEL EXPOSURE. M J DeVito1 and M P Longnecker2. 1NHEERL, ORD, USEPA; Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Epidemiology
    Branch, NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

    To ...

  15. Solar ultraviolet and the occupational radiant exposure of Queensland school teachers: A comparative study between teaching classifications and behavior patterns.

    PubMed

    Downs, Nathan J; Harrison, Simone L; Chavez, Daniel R Garzon; Parisi, Alfio V

    2016-05-01

    Classroom teachers located in Queensland, Australia are exposed to high levels of ambient solar ultraviolet as part of the occupational requirement to provide supervision of children during lunch and break times. We investigated the relationship between periods of outdoor occupational radiant exposure and available ambient solar radiation across different teaching classifications and schools relative to the daily occupational solar ultraviolet radiation (HICNIRP) protection standard of 30J/m(2). Self-reported daily sun exposure habits (n=480) and personal radiant exposures were monitored using calibrated polysulphone dosimeters (n=474) in 57 teaching staff from 6 different schools located in tropical north and southern Queensland. Daily radiant exposure patterns among teaching groups were compared to the ambient UV-Index. Personal sun exposures were stratified among teaching classifications, school location, school ownership (government vs non-government), and type (primary vs secondary). Median daily radiant exposures were 15J/m(2) and 5J/m(2)HICNIRP for schools located in northern and southern Queensland respectively. Of the 474 analyzed dosimeter-days, 23.0% were found to exceed the solar radiation protection standard, with the highest prevalence found among physical education teachers (57.4% dosimeter-days), followed by teacher aides (22.6% dosimeter-days) and classroom teachers (18.1% dosimeter-days). In Queensland, peak outdoor exposure times of teaching staff correspond with periods of extreme UV-Index. The daily occupational HICNIRP radiant exposure standard was exceeded in all schools and in all teaching classifications. PMID:26963432

  16. ANALYSIS OF DISCRIMINATING FACTORS IN HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT AFFECT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately modeling exposure to particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants ultimately involves the utilization of human location-activity databases to assist in understanding the potential variability of microenvironmental exposures. This paper critically considers and stati...

  17. Comparative bactericidal exposures for selected oral bacteria using carbon dioxide laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dederich, D.N.; Pickard, M.A.; Vaughn, A.S.; Tulip, J.; Zakariasen, K.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Although relatively high CO{sub 2} laser energies have been shown to sterilize root canals, the response of several bacterial strains to decreasing exposures of CO{sub 2} laser energy remains unknown. Freshly grown bacterial cells were irradiated on glass microscope coverslips. A comparison of equivalent energy exposures with differing parameters was made on the bacterial viability. No statistically significant difference was found in the energy required to kill closely related bacterial species. However, the energy density required to kill greater than 99.5% of the bacteria is less than 200 J/cm{sup 2}, much less than that shown to sterilize in a previous study.

  18. MicroExposure Monte Carlo analysis modeling PCB exposures through fish ingestion from the Upper Hudson River

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, E.S.; Price, P.S.; McCrodden, J.L.; Ducey, J.S.; Keenan, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The risks associated with exposures to mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the consumption of fish in the vicinity of Superfund sites traditionally have been evaluated by using simple algebraic equations to calculate the dose received by a highly successful angler. A Lifetime Average Daily Dose (LADD) is estimated using default assumptions concerning the quantity of fish consumed, an angler`s body weight, an angler`s exposure duration, and a static measure of PCB levels in fish. Recent changes in EPA`s policies and guidelines, however, have focused on improving the management of environmental risks by providing decision-makers with a distribution of possible risks rather than a single point estimate. MicroExposure Monte Carlo analysis is a recent development in probabilistic exposure assessment in which a LADD for a given angler is calculated as the sum of many individual doses received over the course of a lifetime from individual exposure events. Data on concentrations of PCBs in individual fish are thereby incorporated into the analysis as are other temporal changes in the various exposure parameters. In this paper, the MicroExposure Monte Carlo model is applied to characterize the distribution of PCB dose rates in a hypothetical population of recreational anglers who might potentially consume fish from the Upper Hudson River in the absence of a fishing ban. The analysis uses probabilistic techniques to account for temporal and age-related changes in exposure parameters and as a means of properly considering meal-to-meal variation in fish concentrations, cooking practices, and fish species.

  19. Exposure of the human body to professional and domestic induction cooktops compared to the basic restrictions.

    PubMed

    Christ, Andreas; Guldimann, René; Bühlmann, Barbara; Zefferer, Marcel; Bakker, Jurriaan F; van Rhoon, Gerard C; Kuster, Niels

    2012-12-01

    We investigated whether domestic and professional induction cooktops comply with the basic restrictions defined by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). Based on magnetic field measurements, a generic numerical model of an induction cooktop was derived in order to model user exposure. The current density induced in the user was simulated for various models and distances. We also determined the exposure of the fetus and of young children. While most measured cooktops comply with the public exposure limits at the distance specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (standard IEC 62233), the majority exceeds them at closer distances, some of them even the occupational limits. The maximum current density in the tissue of the user significantly exceeds the basic restrictions for the general public, reaching the occupational level. The exposure of the brains of young children reaches the order of magnitude of the limits for the general public. For a generic worst-case cooktop compliant with the measurement standards, the current density exceeds the 1998 ICNIRP basic restrictions by up to 24 dB or a factor of 16. The brain tissue of young children can be overexposed by 6 dB or a factor of 2. The exposure of the tissue of the central nervous system of the fetus can exceed the limits for the general public if the mother is exposed at occupational levels. This demonstrates that the methodology for testing induction cooktops according to IEC 62233 contradicts the basic restrictions. This evaluation will be extended considering

  20. Occupational exposures and pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ojajarvi, I; Partanen, T.; Ahlbom, A.; Boffetta, P.; Hakulinen, T.; Jourenkova, N.; Kauppinen, T.; Kogevinas, M.; Porta, M.; Vainio, H.; Weiderpass, E.; Wesseling, C.

    2000-01-01

    insecticides, 33%; and to PAHs, 33%.
CONCLUSION—Occupational exposures may increase risk of pancreatic cancer. High quality studies are called for on interactions between occupational, environmental, and lifestyle factors as well as interactions between genes and the environment.


Keywords: pancreatic cancer; occupational exposure; meta-analysis PMID:10769297

  1. Analysis of Noise Exposure Measurements Acquired Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limardo, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique workplace environment for U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts to conduct research and live for a period of six months or more. Noise has been an enduring environmental physical hazard that has been a challenge for the U.S. space program since before the Apollo era. Noise exposure in ISS poses significant risks to the crewmembers, such as; hearing loss (temporary or permanent), possible disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and communication, possible interference with crew task performance, and possible reduction in alarm audibility. Acoustic measurements were made onboard ISS and compared to requirements in order to assess the acoustic environment to which the crewmembers are exposed. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the noise exposure monitoring program as well as an assessment of the acoustic dosimeter data collected to date. The hardware currently being used for monitoring the noise exposure onboard ISS will be discussed. Acoustic data onboard ISS has been collected since the beginning of ISS (Increment 1, November 2001). Noise exposure data analysis will include acoustic dosimetry logged data from crew-worn dosimeters during work and sleep periods and also fixed-location measurements from Increment 1 to present day. Noise exposure levels (8-, 16- and 24-hr), LEQ, will also be provided and discussed in this paper. Future directions and recommendations for the noise exposure monitoring program will be highlighted. This acoustic data is used to ensure a safe and healthy working and living environment for the crewmembers onboard the ISS.

  2. Analysis of Noise Exposure Measurements Made Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limardo, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique workplace environment for U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts to conduct research and live for a period of six months or more. Noise has been an enduring environmental physical hazard that has been a challenge for the U.S. space program since before the Apollo era. Noise exposure in ISS poses significant risks to the crewmembers, such as; hearing loss (temporary or permanent), possible disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and communication, possible interference with crew task performance, and possible reduction in alarm audibility. Acoustic measurements are made aboard ISS and compared to requirements in order to assess the acoustic environment to which the crewmembers are exposed. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the noise exposure monitoring program as well as an assessment of the acoustic dosimeter data collected to date. The hardware currently being used for monitoring the noise exposure onboard ISS will be discussed. Acoustic data onboard ISS has been collected since the beginning of ISS (Increment 1, November 2000). Noise exposure data analysis will include acoustic dosimetry logged data from crew-worn during work and sleep periods and also fixed-location measurements from Increment 1 to present day. Noise exposure levels (8-, 16- and 24-hr), LEQ, will also be provided and discussed in this paper. Discussions related to hearing protection will also be included. Future directions and recommendations for the noise exposure monitoring program will be highlighted. This acoustic data is used to ensure a safe and healthy working and living environment for the crewmembers aboard the ISS.

  3. The Effect of DEM Quality on Sea Level Rise Exposure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, S. A.; Strauss, B.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) caused by climate change could cause significant disruptions in coastal communities across the world. Current projections estimate that we may see in the vicinity of 1 meter of SLR by the end of the century, and due to collapsing ice sheets in West Antarctica, more than 3 meters of global SLR appear very likely in the long run. It is therefore crucial that we begin to accurately understand both the short- and long-term effects this level of flooding could have on each country's land area and population. However, while we have high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) publicly available for some parts of the world, such as the coastal lidar datasets distributed by NOAA for the US, most of the rest of the world is only covered by much poorer-quality data, such as data from SRTM (3 arcsec, or roughly 90m, horizontal resolution). In this work, we perform SLR analysis using both NOAA lidar- and SRTM-derived DEMs in the United States, in order to understand how using low-quality DEMs affect the final analysis results. We find that in many states, the computed population exposure at 1 meter SLR is over 2x higher when using the Lidar DEM, compared to the results computed from SRTM. In addition to the clear differences in horizontal resolution, this very large difference in computed exposure could likely be explained by the fact that SRTM is based on surface elevation, while the Lidar DEM is based on bare earth elevation. We therefore conclude that any worldwide SLR analysis using SRTM would produce exposure estimates that are far too low, and higher-quality global DEMs are necessary in order to generate exposure analysis of reasonable accuracy.

  4. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN ACTIVITY DATA FOR USE IN MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity data are a critical part of exposure models being developed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). An analysis of human activity data within NERL's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) was performed in two areas relevant to exposure ...

  5. The LINA Study: Higher Sensitivity of Infant Compared to Maternal Eosinophil/Basophil Progenitors to Indoor Chemical Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Hörnig, Friederike; Kohajda, Tibor; Röder, Stefan; Herberth, Gunda; von Bergen, Martin; Borte, Michael; Diez, Ulrike; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Simon, Jan-C.; Denburg, Judah A.; Lehmann, Irina; Junge, Kristin M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Enhanced eosinophil/basophil (Eo/B) progenitor cell levels are known to be associated with allergic inflammation and atopy risk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different indoor exposures on the recruitment and differentiation of Eo/B progenitors in mother-child pairs. Methods. In 68 mother-child pairs of the LINA study peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used to assess Eo/B colony forming units (CFUs). Information about disease outcomes and indoor exposures was obtained from questionnaires. Indoor concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by passive sampling. Results. Infant's Eo/B CFUs were positively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke, disinfectants, or VOCs. In contrast, for maternal Eo/B CFUs, only a few associations were seen. Higher numbers of infant Eo/B CFUs were observed in children with wheezing symptoms within the second year of life. Conclusions. We demonstrate that infant's hematopoietic cells seem to respond with more sensitivity to environmental exposure compared to maternal cells. At least in infants, an activation of these hematopoietic cells by environmental exposure could contribute to an enhanced risk for the development of respiratory outcomes. PMID:27313631

  6. An innovative land use regression model incorporating meteorology for exposure analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G; Brauer, Michael; Ainslie, Bruce; Steyn, Douw; Larson, Timothy; Buzzelli, Michael

    2008-02-15

    The advent of spatial analysis and geographic information systems (GIS) has led to studies of chronic exposure and health effects based on the rationale that intra-urban variations in ambient air pollution concentrations are as great as inter-urban differences. Such studies typically rely on local spatial covariates (e.g., traffic, land use type) derived from circular areas (buffers) to predict concentrations/exposures at receptor sites, as a means of averaging the annual net effect of meteorological influences (i.e., wind speed, wind direction and insolation). This is the approach taken in the now popular land use regression (LUR) method. However spatial studies of chronic exposures and temporal studies of acute exposures have not been adequately integrated. This paper presents an innovative LUR method implemented in a GIS environment that reflects both temporal and spatial variability and considers the role of meteorology. The new source area LUR integrates wind speed, wind direction and cloud cover/insolation to estimate hourly nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) concentrations from land use types (i.e., road network, commercial land use) and these concentrations are then used as covariates to regress against NO and NO(2) measurements at various receptor sites across the Vancouver region and compared directly with estimates from a regular LUR. The results show that, when variability in seasonal concentration measurements is present, the source area LUR or SA-LUR model is a better option for concentration estimation.

  7. Comparative performance of geopolymers made with metakaolin and fly ash after exposure to elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Daniel L.Y.; Sanjayan, Jay G. Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of elevated temperatures on geopolymers manufactured using metakaolin and fly ash of various mixture proportions. Both types of geopolymers (metakaolin and fly ash) were synthesized with sodium silicate and potassium hydroxide solutions. The strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer increased after exposure to elevated temperatures (800 deg. C). However, the strength of the corresponding metakaolin-based geopolymer decreased after similar exposure. Both types of geopolymers were subjected to thermogravimetric, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The paper concludes that the fly ash-based geopolymers have large numbers of small pores which facilitate the escape of moisture when heated, thus causing minimal damage to the geopolymer matrix. On the other hand, metakaolin geopolymers do not possess such pore distribution structures. The strength increase in fly ash geopolymers is also partly attributed to the sintering reactions of un-reacted fly ash particles.

  8. Comparative studies of pulse and continuous exposure in human tumor clonogenic assay.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, F; Matsushima, Y; Chiang, C D; Nakano, H; Nakagawa, K; Takahashi, H; Sasaki, Y; Saijo, N

    1987-09-01

    To assess the influence of different schedules of drug exposure in human tumor clonogenic assay on in vitro cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs, the in vitro sensitivities of a human carcinoma cell line, PC-9, to various antitumor drugs were measured by using two different procedures: exposure was either by pulse for 1 h prior to plating or continuous throughout the period of growth in agar. Marked differences between the two procedures in testing actinomycin D, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, vinblastine and vindesine but not in adriamycin, daunomycin, melphalan, nimustine and ranomustine were observed. The former and the latter were classified as schedule dependent drugs and a schedule independent drugs, respectively. In this study, the schedule dependency of in vitro drug response appears to be related mainly to time-dependency and partially to other factors, such as stability during culture in medium. PMID:3437386

  9. Asthmatics Exhibit Altered Oxylipin Profiles Compared to Healthy Individuals after Subway Air Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Nording, Malin; Klepczynska-Nyström, Anna; Sköld, Magnus; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Grunewald, Johan; Svartengren, Magnus; Hammock, Bruce D.; Larsson, Britt-Marie; Eklund, Anders; Wheelock, Åsa M.; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and oxidants are important factors in causing exacerbations in asthmatics, and the source and composition of pollutants greatly affects pathological implications. Objectives This randomized crossover study investigated responses of the respiratory system to Stockholm subway air in asthmatics and healthy individuals. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins were quantified in the distal lung to provide a measure of shifts in lipid mediators in association with exposure to subway air relative to ambient air. Methods Sixty-four oxylipins representing the cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways were screened using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)-fluid. Validations through immunocytochemistry staining of BAL-cells were performed for 15-LOX-1, COX-1, COX-2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Multivariate statistics were employed to interrogate acquired oxylipin and immunocytochemistry data in combination with patient clinical information. Results Asthmatics and healthy individuals exhibited divergent oxylipin profiles following exposure to ambient and subway air. Significant changes were observed in 8 metabolites of linoleic- and α-linolenic acid synthesized via the 15-LOX pathway, and of the COX product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Oxylipin levels were increased in healthy individuals following exposure to subway air, whereas asthmatics evidenced decreases or no change. Conclusions Several of the altered oxylipins have known or suspected bronchoprotective or anti-inflammatory effects, suggesting a possible reduced anti-inflammatory response in asthmatics following exposure to subway air. These observations may have ramifications for sensitive subpopulations in urban areas. PMID:21897859

  10. Selective agonists of retinoic acid receptors: comparative toxicokinetics and embryonic exposure.

    PubMed

    Arafa, H M; Elmazar, M M; Hamada, F M; Reichert, U; Shroot, B; Nau, H

    2000-01-01

    Three biologically active synthetic retinoids were investigated that bind selectively to retinoic acid receptors RARs (alpha, beta and gamma). The retinoids were previously demonstrated to have different teratogenic effects in the mouse in terms of potency and regioselectivity. The teratogenic potency rank order (alpha >beta >gamma) was found to be more or less compatible with the receptor binding affinities and transactivation potencies of the retinoid ligands to their respective receptors. The RARalpha agonist (Am580; CD336) induced a wide spectrum of malformations; CD2019 (RARbeta agonist) and especially CD437 (RARgamma agonist) produced more restricted defects. In the current study we tried to address whether the differences in teratogenic effects are solely related to binding affinity and transactivation differences or also due to differences in embryonic exposure. Therefore, transplacental kinetics of the ligands were assessed following administration of a single oral dose of 15 mg/kg of either retinoid given to NMRI mice on day 11 of gestation. Am580 was rapidly transferred to the embryo resulting in the highest embryonic exposure [embryo to maternal plasma area under the time vs concentration curve (AUC)(0-24 h )ratio (E/M) was 1.7], in accordance with its highest teratogenic potency. The low placental transfer of CD2019 (E/M of 0.3) was compatible with its lower teratogenic potential. Of major interest was the finding that the CD437, though being least teratogenic, exhibited considerable embryonic exposure (E/M of 0.6). These findings suggest that both the embryonic exposure and receptor binding transactivation selectivity are crucial determinants of the teratogenicity of these retinoid ligands.

  11. Comparing plasma and X-ray exposure and identifying vulnerable cell parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bill

    2012-10-01

    Here two issues in plasma medicine that are being addressed in a collaboration between the Centre of Plasma Physics and the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University Belfast and the Plasma Institute at York University UK will be discussed. Recent measurements of the interaction of plasmas created directly in DMEM cell medium and MDAMB-231, a human breast cancer cell line, showed evidence of reduced cell viability and of DNA damage. The same set of experiments were undertaken but with X-ray exposure. A correlation of the dependence on plasma exposure time and X-ray dose was observed which might point the way to dose definition in plasma medicine. We have also been working to identify the cell parts most vulnerable to plasma exposure. In this study a 10 kHz atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet, operating in He/0.5%O2 and characterized to determine the behavior of many of the plasma species, was incident onto the surface of media containing either bacterial strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, or isolated bacterial plasmid DNA. The results of measurements to look for changes in plasmid structural conformation, rates of single and double strand breaks, the catalytic activity of certain bacterial enzymes, the peroxidation of lipid content of the bacterial cells, the leakage of ATP and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images will be discussed.

  12. Population exposure to ultraviolet radiation in Finland 1920-1995: Exposure trends and a time-series analysis of exposure and cutaneous melanoma incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, Katja . E-mail: katja.kojo@uta.fi; Jansen, Christer T.; Nybom, Pia; Huurto, Laura; Laihia, Jarmo; Ilus, Taina; Auvinen, Anssi

    2006-05-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the principal cause of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). However, the relation between CMM and UVR exposure is not clear. We present the trends of population exposure to UVR and conduct a time-series analysis of the relation between UVR exposure and incidence of CMM. Data on CMM incidence were obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Clothing coverage of the body was scored from archival photographs and the proportion of uncovered skin was used as a measure of solar exposure. Information on the number of sunny resort holidays, duration of annual holidays, and sunscreen sales were obtained from various sources. Exposed skin area doubled from 1920 to 1985. The average duration of annual holidays increased 30-fold. The number of sunny resort holidays and the sales of sunscreens increased rapidly from 1980. CMM was most strongly associated with solar exposure of 5-19 years earlier. There is a considerable decrease in clothing coverage during the 20th century. UVR exposure preceding CMM occurrence 4 years or less does not appear relevant, whereas the period 5-19 years prior to CMM occurrence might be the most relevant period. However, findings of ecological studies may not be applicable at the individual level.

  13. Comparative MicroRNA Expression Patterns in Fibroblasts after Low and High Doses of Low-LET Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Olivier C.; Xu, Suying; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu; Wang, Eugenia

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation causes DNA damage to cells, and provokes a plethora of cellular responses controlled by unique gene-directed signaling pathways. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (22-nucleotide), non-coding RNAs which functionally silence gene expression by either degrading the messages or inhibiting translation. Here we investigate radiation-dependent changes in these negative regulators by comparing the expression patterns of all 462 known human miRNAs in fibroblasts, after exposure to low (0.1 Gy) or high (2 Gy) doses of X-rays at 30 min, 2, 6 and 24 hrs post-treatment. The expression patterns of microRNAs after low and high doses of radiation show a similar qualitative down-regulation trend at early (0.5 hr) and late (24 hr) time points, with a quantitatively steeper slope following the 2 Gy exposures. Interestingly, an interruption of this downward trend is observed after the 2 Gy exposure, i.e. a significant up-regulation of microRNAs at 2 hrs, then reverting to the downward trend by 6 hrs; this interruption at the intermediate time point was not observed with the 0.1 Gy exposure. At the early time point (0.5 hr), candidate gene targets of selected down-regulated microRNAs, common to both 0.1 and 2 Gy exposures, were those functioning in chromatin remodeling. Candidate target genes of unique up-regulated microRNAs seen at a 2 hr intermediate time point, after the 2 Gy exposure only, are those involved in cell death signaling. Finally, putative target genes of down-regulated microRNAs seen at the late (24 hr) time point after either doses of radiation are those involved in the up-regulation of DNA repair, cell signaling and homeostasis. Thus we hypothesize that after radiation exposure, microRNAs acting as hub negative regulators for unique signaling pathways needed to be down-regulated so as to de-repress their target genes for the proper cellular responses, including DNA repair and cell maintenance. The unique microRNAs up-regulated at 2 hr after 2

  14. In situ measurements of radiofrequency exposure levels in Greece from 2008 to 2013: a multi-parametric annual analysis.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Maria; Karabetsos, Efthymios

    2015-04-01

    From 2008 through 2013, more than 6,000 in situ frequency selective audits, in the proximity of base stations, were conducted throughout Greece by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (EEAE), in order to verify exposure limit compliance. EEAE is the competent national authority for protection of the general public against artificially produced non-ionizing radiation. This paper presents the first post processing and multi-parametric year statistical analysis of in situ measurement data corresponding to 4,705 audits in the whole country, compared to general public exposure levels, according to Greek legislation. The aim is to derive nationwide conclusions for the characterization of general public exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields, during the last 6 years. The results' presentation includes electric field exposure ratios referring to broadband and frequency selective measurements at the highest exposure measurement point. Statistical analysis is applied to assist the data presentation and evaluation, based on selected criteria and classification parameters, including: (i) year (2008-2013); (ii) environment (urban/suburban/rural); (iii) frequency bands of selected common telecommunication services (e.g., TV, FM, GSM, DCS, UMTS); and (iv) number of service providers installed at the same site. In general, measurement results revealed that the vast majority of exposure values were below reference levels for general public exposure, as defined by Greek legislation. Data are constantly updated with the latest measurements, including emerging wireless technologies. PMID:25726724

  15. In situ measurements of radiofrequency exposure levels in Greece from 2008 to 2013: a multi-parametric annual analysis.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Maria; Karabetsos, Efthymios

    2015-04-01

    From 2008 through 2013, more than 6,000 in situ frequency selective audits, in the proximity of base stations, were conducted throughout Greece by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (EEAE), in order to verify exposure limit compliance. EEAE is the competent national authority for protection of the general public against artificially produced non-ionizing radiation. This paper presents the first post processing and multi-parametric year statistical analysis of in situ measurement data corresponding to 4,705 audits in the whole country, compared to general public exposure levels, according to Greek legislation. The aim is to derive nationwide conclusions for the characterization of general public exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields, during the last 6 years. The results' presentation includes electric field exposure ratios referring to broadband and frequency selective measurements at the highest exposure measurement point. Statistical analysis is applied to assist the data presentation and evaluation, based on selected criteria and classification parameters, including: (i) year (2008-2013); (ii) environment (urban/suburban/rural); (iii) frequency bands of selected common telecommunication services (e.g., TV, FM, GSM, DCS, UMTS); and (iv) number of service providers installed at the same site. In general, measurement results revealed that the vast majority of exposure values were below reference levels for general public exposure, as defined by Greek legislation. Data are constantly updated with the latest measurements, including emerging wireless technologies.

  16. Analysis of intervention strategies for inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated lung cancer risk based on a Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to evaluate and compare interventions for reducing exposure to air pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a widely found air pollutant in both indoor and outdoor air. This study presents the first application of the Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model to quantify the effects of different intervention strategies on inhalation exposure to PAHs and the associated lung cancer risk. The method was applied to the population in Beijing, China, in the year 2006. Several intervention strategies were designed and studied, including atmospheric cleaning, smoking prohibition indoors, use of clean fuel for cooking, enhancing ventilation while cooking and use of indoor cleaners. Their performances were quantified by population attributable fraction (PAF) and potential impact fraction (PIF) of lung cancer risk, and the changes in indoor PAH concentrations and annual inhalation doses were also calculated and compared. The results showed that atmospheric cleaning and use of indoor cleaners were the two most effective interventions. The sensitivity analysis showed that several input parameters had major influence on the modeled PAH inhalation exposure and the rankings of different interventions. The ranking was reasonably robust for the remaining majority of parameters. The method itself can be extended to other pollutants and in different places. It enables the quantitative comparison of different intervention strategies and would benefit intervention design and relevant policy making.

  17. Analysis of Intervention Strategies for Inhalation Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Associated Lung Cancer Risk Based on a Monte Carlo Population Exposure Assessment Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to evaluate and compare interventions for reducing exposure to air pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a widely found air pollutant in both indoor and outdoor air. This study presents the first application of the Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model to quantify the effects of different intervention strategies on inhalation exposure to PAHs and the associated lung cancer risk. The method was applied to the population in Beijing, China, in the year 2006. Several intervention strategies were designed and studied, including atmospheric cleaning, smoking prohibition indoors, use of clean fuel for cooking, enhancing ventilation while cooking and use of indoor cleaners. Their performances were quantified by population attributable fraction (PAF) and potential impact fraction (PIF) of lung cancer risk, and the changes in indoor PAH concentrations and annual inhalation doses were also calculated and compared. The results showed that atmospheric cleaning and use of indoor cleaners were the two most effective interventions. The sensitivity analysis showed that several input parameters had major influence on the modeled PAH inhalation exposure and the rankings of different interventions. The ranking was reasonably robust for the remaining majority of parameters. The method itself can be extended to other pollutants and in different places. It enables the quantitative comparison of different intervention strategies and would benefit intervention design and relevant policy making. PMID:24416436

  18. Recommended default methodology for analysis of airborne exposures to mixtures of chemicals in emergencies.

    PubMed

    Craig, D K; Baskett, R L; Davis, J S; Dukes, L; Hansen, D J; Petrocchi, A J; Powell, T J; Sutherland, P J; Tuccinardi, T E

    1999-09-01

    Emergency planning and hazard assessment of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities require consideration of potential exposures to mixtures of chemicals released to the atmosphere. Exposure to chemical mixtures may lead to additive, synergistic, or antagonistic health effects. In the past, the consequences of exposures to each chemical have been analyzed separately. This approach may not adequately protect the health of persons exposed to mixtures. This article presents default recommendations for use in emergency management and safety analysis within the DOE complex where potential exists for releases of mixtures of chemicals. These recommendations were developed by the DOE Subcommittee on Consequence Assessment and Protective Actions (SCAPA). It is recommended that hazard indices (e.g., HIi = Ci/Limiti, where Ci is the concentration of chemical "i") be calculated for each chemical, and unless sufficient toxicological knowledge is available to indicate otherwise, that they be summed, that is, sigma i(n) = 1HIi = HI1 + HI2 + ... + HIn. A sum of 1.0 or less means the limits have not been exceeded. To facilitate application of these recommendations for analysis of exposures to specific mixtures, chemicals are classified according to their toxic consequences. This is done using health code numbers describing toxic effects by target organ for each chemical. This methodology has been applied to several potential releases of chemicals to compare the resulting hazard indices of a chemical mixture with those obtained when each chemical is treated independently. The methodology used and results obtained from analysis of one mixture are presented in this article. This article also demonstrates how health code numbers can be used to sum hazard indices only for those chemicals that have the same toxic consequence.

  19. MIXED MODELS ANALYSIS OR URBANIZATION LEVEL ON CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) pilot studies were conducted from 1995 through 1997 to examine human population exposure to a wide range of environmental contaminants. In one of the studies, NHEXAS-Maryland, a longitudinal design was used to repeatedly m...

  20. An Analysis of Sound Exposure in a University Music Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Joe; Thrasher, Michael; Fumo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high sound levels may lead to a variety of hearing abnormalities, including Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). Pre-professional university music majors may experience frequent exposure to elevated sound levels, and this may have implications on their future career prospects (Jansen, Helleman, Dreschler & de Laat, 2009). Studies…

  1. Social and Cognitive Influences on Information Exposure: A Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschman, Elizabeth C.

    1981-01-01

    Investigates the combined influences of social and cognitive factors upon the pattern and level of information exposure of adults. Develops a model of information exposure based on parental socioeconomic status, sex, educational attainment, childhood use of print media, occupational status and complexity, adult print media usage, television usage,…

  2. Comparative Study of Several Behaviors in Caenorhabditis Elegans Following High-Let Radiation Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya

    Learning and behavioral impairments following ionizing radiation exposure are an important potential risk in manned space missions. We previously reported the effects of γ-ray exposure on olfactory adaptation [1], salt chemotaxis learning [2], and locomotion - learning behavior relationship [3] in Caenorhabditis elegans. However, little is known about the effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. We investigated various behavioral responses of wellfed adult Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to accelerated carbon ions (1 2C, 18.3M eV /u, LET = 113.3keV /µm). Following carbon-ion irradiation, locomotion, basal slowing response and salt chemotaxis learning were not significantly affected, whereas chemosensation to NaCl of animals during learning was altered. These results suggest that sensitivity of the C. elegans nervous system to high-LET heavy ions differs with the types of behaviors. References: [1] Sakashita et al., Biol. Sci. Space 21, 117-20 (2007), [2] Sakashita et al., FASEB J 22, 713-20 (2008), [3] Sakashita et al., J. Radiat. Res. 49, in press (2008).

  3. EMERGY ANALYSIS AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our mission at USEPA is to protect human health and safeguard the natural environment. We aim to base our environmental regulations and policies on sound scientific and, where appropriate, economic analyses. Although EPA has conducted analysis of the impact of regulations on ...

  4. Personal Exposure to Mixtures of Volatile Organic Compounds: Modeling and Further Analysis of the RIOPA Data

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Su, Feng-Chiao; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Jia, Chunrong

    2015-01-01

    known to affect VOC exposures, many personal, environmental, and socioeconomic determinants remain to be identified, and the significance and applicability of the determinants reported in the literature are uncertain. To help answer these unresolved questions and overcome limitations of previous analyses, this project used several novel and powerful statistical modeling and analysis techniques and two large data sets. The overall objectives of this project were (1) to identify and characterize exposure distributions (including extreme values), (2) evaluate mixtures (including dependencies), and (3) identify determinants of VOC exposure. METHODS VOC data were drawn from two large data sets: the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study (1999–2001) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; 1999–2000). The RIOPA study used a convenience sample to collect outdoor, indoor, and personal exposure measurements in three cities (Elizabeth, NJ; Houston, TX; Los Angeles, CA). In each city, approximately 100 households with adults and children who did not smoke were sampled twice for 18 VOCs. In addition, information about 500 variables associated with exposure was collected. The NHANES used a nationally representative sample and included personal VOC measurements for 851 participants. NHANES sampled 10 VOCs in common with RIOPA. Both studies used similar sampling methods and study periods. Specific Aim 1 To estimate and model extreme value exposures, extreme value distribution models were fitted to the top 10% and 5% of VOC exposures. Health risks were estimated for individual VOCs and for three VOC mixtures. Simulated extreme value data sets, generated for each VOC and for fitted extreme value and lognormal distributions, were compared with measured concentrations (RIOPA observations) to evaluate each model’s goodness of fit. Mixture distributions were fitted with the conventional finite mixture of normal distributions and the

  5. Comparative sensitivity of juvenile and adult Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Mollusca: Hydrobiidae) under chronic exposure to cadmium and tributyltin.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Katharina; Geiß, Cornelia; Ostermann, Sina; Theis, Christina; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2016-07-28

    To investigate a potential extension of a partial life cycle test protocol to a full life cycle test design, a comparative sensitivity analysis with juvenile and adult Potamopyrgus antipodarum was performed. Neonates and adult snails were exposed to the metal cadmium (Cd) and the endocrine disruptor tributyltin (TBT) at nominal concentrations ranging from 1.56 to 50 μg Cd/L and from 25 to 1,000 ng TBT-Sn/L. The experiments were performed over 28 days at 16°C in a semi-static test design. Mortality was assessed for both life stages. Juvenile snails' specific growth rate and reproduction of adults were investigated as main endpoints. We determined effects on snails' survival, juvenile growth and embryo numbers in the brood pouch of adult snails under exposure to both chemicals. Juvenile control mortality was between 25% and 30% and significantly higher than in the control groups with adult snails. A higher sensitivity of juvenile snails compared to adults was observed for the endpoint mortality. Calculated LC50 in Cd exposed snails was 38.2 μg/L for adults and 15.0 μg/L for juvenile snails. Significant effects on mortality in TBT exposed adult snails occurred at the highest test concentration only with a LC50 of 535 ng Sn/L. Juvenile survival was significantly affected at 50.8 ng Sn/L and higher concentrations. Effect concentrations for the main endpoints reproduction and juvenile growth show comparable sensitivities. For Cd exposed groups, EC50 values were 11.3 μg/L for the endpoint reproduction in adult snails and 3.82 μg/L for juvenile growth with overlapping confidence intervals. TBT also significantly affected juvenile snails' growth (EC50: 178 ng Sn /L). EC50 for embryo numbers was 125 ng TBT-Sn/L. Results indicate the manageability of a FLC test starting with newly hatched snails. Precautions have to be taken to guarantee a sufficient number of surviving snails until adulthood so that reproduction can be assessed. For final decision for the

  6. Comparative sensitivity of juvenile and adult Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Mollusca: Hydrobiidae) under chronic exposure to cadmium and tributyltin.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Katharina; Geiß, Cornelia; Ostermann, Sina; Theis, Christina; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2016-07-28

    To investigate a potential extension of a partial life cycle test protocol to a full life cycle test design, a comparative sensitivity analysis with juvenile and adult Potamopyrgus antipodarum was performed. Neonates and adult snails were exposed to the metal cadmium (Cd) and the endocrine disruptor tributyltin (TBT) at nominal concentrations ranging from 1.56 to 50 μg Cd/L and from 25 to 1,000 ng TBT-Sn/L. The experiments were performed over 28 days at 16°C in a semi-static test design. Mortality was assessed for both life stages. Juvenile snails' specific growth rate and reproduction of adults were investigated as main endpoints. We determined effects on snails' survival, juvenile growth and embryo numbers in the brood pouch of adult snails under exposure to both chemicals. Juvenile control mortality was between 25% and 30% and significantly higher than in the control groups with adult snails. A higher sensitivity of juvenile snails compared to adults was observed for the endpoint mortality. Calculated LC50 in Cd exposed snails was 38.2 μg/L for adults and 15.0 μg/L for juvenile snails. Significant effects on mortality in TBT exposed adult snails occurred at the highest test concentration only with a LC50 of 535 ng Sn/L. Juvenile survival was significantly affected at 50.8 ng Sn/L and higher concentrations. Effect concentrations for the main endpoints reproduction and juvenile growth show comparable sensitivities. For Cd exposed groups, EC50 values were 11.3 μg/L for the endpoint reproduction in adult snails and 3.82 μg/L for juvenile growth with overlapping confidence intervals. TBT also significantly affected juvenile snails' growth (EC50: 178 ng Sn /L). EC50 for embryo numbers was 125 ng TBT-Sn/L. Results indicate the manageability of a FLC test starting with newly hatched snails. Precautions have to be taken to guarantee a sufficient number of surviving snails until adulthood so that reproduction can be assessed. For final decision for the

  7. Analysis of the individual risk of altitude decompression sickness under repeated exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. Vasantha; Horrigan, David J.; Waligora, James M.; Gilbert, John H.

    1991-01-01

    In a case-control study, researchers examined the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in individual subjects with higher number of exposures. Of the 126 subjects, 42 showed one or more episodes of DCS. Examination of the exposure-DCS relationship by odds ratio showed a linear relationship. Stratification analysis showed that sex, tissue ratio, and the presence of Doppler microbubbles were cofounders of this risk. A higher number of exposures increased the risk of DCS in this analysis.

  8. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  9. A comparative study on the varying exposure to atmospheric fine and coarse particles under urban and rural conditions.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Benning, Uta; Schultz, Eckart; Dietze, Volker; Kaminski, Uwe; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2012-11-01

    This paper is based on the results of three air quality studies conducted in Buenos Aires in Berlin, and in German spas between 2003 and 2007. A high comparability of results was ensured by using the same sampling techniques and analytical methods. Total particle sampling was achieved by active sampling of fine (PM2.5) and passive sampling of coarse particles > or = 2.5 microm and giant particles > or = 10 microm. The highly absorbing, black, predominantly carbonaceous particles (BC) of fine particle samples were determined by measuring the total light attenuation of filter samples and interpreting the extinction value as black carbon. The difference between the gravimetric total mass concentration of the PM2.5 samples and the BC is defined as the transparent, mostly mineral fine fraction. In coarse/giant particle samples the mean gray value was determined by means of automated light microscopy with subsequent single-particle analysis. "Opaque" particles were separated from the "transparent" particle fraction by applying a grey value threshold level. Microscopic measurement of individual particles was employed to establish the size distribution of the coarse and giant fraction. Due to different health effects, the separate detection of these components is suggested. Decline functions of particles are given, possibly providing useful information for a more detailed specification of the local particle distribution, and for a better estimate of the individual exposure. Atmospheric dispersal of particles was found effected mainly by source characteristics. An increased, spatially largely constant level of fine transparent particles in Berlin indicates a particle plume originating from photochemical processes. Buenos Aires, in contrast, is characterized by a lower background level of fine transparent particles but is considerably affected by fine black particles from diesel emissions and by a higher resuspension of coarse/giant transparent, mainly soil particles.

  10. REVIEW OF NATIONAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS (NAAQS) FOR CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) - EXPOSURE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the review process, a CO Exposure Analysis will also be conducted to assess the extent of human exposure posed by current ambient CO concentrations and, upon meeting the current CO NAAQS. The results of this analysis will be incorporated into the Staff Paper. (This w...

  11. Pathophysiology of tobacco smoke exposure: recent insights from comparative and redox proteomics.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Clerici, Marco; Giustarini, Daniela; Portinaro, Nicola M; Aldini, Giancarlo; Rossi, Ranieri; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    First-hand and second-hand tobacco smoke are causally linked to a huge number of deaths and are responsible for a broad spectrum of pathologies such as cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, and eye diseases as well as adverse effects on female reproductive function. Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture of thousands of different chemical species, which exert their negative effects on macromolecules and biochemical pathways, both directly and indirectly. Many compounds can act as oxidants, pro-inflammatory agents, carcinogens, or a combination of these. The redox behavior of cigarette smoke has many implications for smoke related diseases. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (both radicals and non-radicals), reactive carbonyl compounds, and other species may induce oxidative damage in almost all the biological macromolecules, compromising their structure and/or function. Different quantitative and redox proteomic approaches have been applied in vitro and in vivo to evaluate, respectively, changes in protein expression and specific oxidative protein modifications induced by exposure to cigarette smoke and are overviewed in this review. Many gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques have already been used successfully to obtain clues about smoke effects on different proteins in cell cultures, animal models, and humans. The further implementation with other sensitive screening techniques could be useful to integrate the comprehension of cigarette smoke effects on human health. In particular, the redox proteomic approach may also help identify biomarkers of exposure to tobacco smoke useful for preventing these effects or potentially predictive of the onset and/or progression of smoking-induced diseases as well as potential targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:24272816

  12. Aberrant cell divisions in root meristeme of maize following exposure to X-rays low doses compared to similar effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Capraru, G.; Racuciu, M.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-04-01

    The response of maize to radiation exposure was investigated by two cytogenetic methods considering the importance of the geno-toxic effect for environmental and agricultural purposes. Uniform genophond seeds, freshly germinated, were exposed to relatively low radiation doses using a radiotherapy X-ray applicator from a hospital irradiation device and to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field with about 10 mT magnetic induction (generated within laboratory assembled electromagnetic coils). Radicular meristeme tissue aliquots were prevailed for cytogenetic investigation based on microscopic observations and cell counting. Microscope slides were prepared following a specific procedure (squash technique and Feulgen method based on modified Carr reactive coloration). Mitotic index as well as chromosomal aberration percentage were calculated for more than 30,000 cells taken into account. From a qualitative viewpoint, chromosomal aberrations such as interchromatidian bridges, lagging and expelled chromosomes and multipolar divisions were evidenced - no distinct situation for either ionizing radiation or electromagnetic field being identified. The main quantitative difference consisted in the increased mitotic index for electromagnetic exposure increased times compared with the diminished mitotic index in the case of low X-ray doses.

  13. Transmittance Variations Analysis in Sunglasses Lenses Post Sun Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, A. D.; Gomes, L. M.; Ventura, L.

    2016-07-01

    The hypothesis that sunglass ultraviolet (UV) protection can degrade with Sun exposure has never been proven experimentally. No sunglasses standards take into account UV transmittance changes after long Sun exposure. We selected 12 sunglass lenses and measured transmittance values from 280 nm to 780 nm. After 50 hours of exposure, new transmittance measurements were taken and transmittance variations inferior to 0.2% were observed. The exposition continues longer and more lenses will be tested to obtain conclusive results. We hope to obtain experimental data to confirm UV protection loss hypothesis and obtain a relation between Sun and solar simulator exposition

  14. The Constant Comparative Analysis Method Outside of Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fram, Sheila M.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary addresses the gap in the literature regarding discussion of the legitimate use of Constant Comparative Analysis Method (CCA) outside of Grounded Theory. The purpose is to show the strength of using CCA to maintain the emic perspective and how theoretical frameworks can maintain the etic perspective throughout the analysis. My…

  15. Comparing Operative Exposures of the Le Fort I Osteotomy and the Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Clivus

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christopher I. Sanders; Kurbanov, Almaz; Zimmer, Lee A.; Keller, Jeffrey T.; Theodosopoulos, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We compare surgical exposures to the clivus by Le Fort I osteotomy (LFO) and the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEEA). Methods Ten cadaveric specimens were imaged with 1.25-mm computed tomography. After stereotactic navigation, EEEA was performed followed by LFO. Clival measurements included lateral and vertical limits to the midline lower extent of exposure (t test). Results For EEFA and LFO, respectively, maximal lateral exposure in millimeters (mean ± standard deviation) was 24.5 ± 3.7 and 24.5 ±  − 3.8 (p = 0.99) at the opticocarotid recess (OCR) and 25.1 ±  − 4.1 and 24.1 ±  − 3.0 (p = 0.53) at the foramen lacerum level; lateral reach at the hypoglossal canals was 39.0 ±  − 5.88 and 56.1 ±   − 5.3 (p = 0.0004); and vertical extension was 56.0 ±  − 4.1 and 56.3 ±  − 3.4 (p = 0.78). Conclusions For clival exposures, LFO and EEEA were similar craniocaudally and laterally at the levels of the OCR and foramen lacerum. LFO achieved greater exposure at the level of the hypoglossal canal. PMID:25685646

  16. Elementary methods of cohort analysis with several exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Sato, T

    1991-09-01

    This paper proposes an extension of the Mantel-Haenszel rate ratio for the dichotomous exposure to the multiple exposure levels. This extension is based on the unbiased estimating function approach and yields closed-form Mantel-Haenszel rate ratio estimators. Dually consistent variance and covariance estimators of the estimating functions are given and a quasi-score-based confidence interval for individual common rate ratio is provided. A similar extension to the common rate difference case is also given.

  17. Comparative cellular toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human astrocyte and neuronal cells after acute and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Coccini, Teresa; Grandi, Stefania; Lonati, Davide; Locatelli, Carlo; De Simone, Uliana

    2015-05-01

    Although in the last few decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂NPs) have attracted extensive interest due to their use in wide range of applications, their influences on human health are still quite uncertain and less known. Evidence exists indicating TiO₂NPs ability to enter the brain, thus representing a realistic risk factor for both chronic and accidental exposure with the consequent needs for more detailed investigation on CNS. A rapid and effective in vitro test strategy has been applied to determine the effects of TiO₂NPs anatase isoform, on human glial (D384) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cell lines. Toxicity was assessed at different levels: mitochondrial function (by MTT), membrane integrity and cell morphology (by calcein AM/PI staining) after acute exposure (4-24-48 h) at doses from 1.5 to 250 μg/ml as well as growth and cell proliferation (by clonogenic test) after prolonged exposure (7-10 days) at sub-toxic concentrations (from 0.05 to 31 μg/ml). The cytotoxic effects of TiO₂NPs were compared with those caused by TiO₂ bulk counterpart treatment. Acute TiO₂NP exposure produced (i) dose- and time-dependent alterations of the mitochondrial function on D384 and SH-SY5Y cells starting at 31 and 15 μg/ml doses, respectively, after 24h exposure. SH-SY5Y were slightly more sensitive than D384 cells; and (ii) cell membrane damage occurring at 125 μg/ml after 24h exposure in both cerebral cells. Comparatively, the effects of TiO₂ bulk were less pronounced than those induced by nanoparticles in both cerebral cell lines. Prolonged exposure indicated that the proliferative capacity (colony size) was compromised at the extremely low TiO₂NP doses namely 1.5 μg/ml and 0.1 μg/ml for D384 and SH-SY5Y, respectively; cell sensitivity was still higher for SH-SY5Y compared to D384. Colony number decrease (15%) was also evidenced at ≥0.2 μg/ml TiO₂NP dose. Whereas, TiO₂ bulk treatment affected cell morphology only. TiO₂ internalization in SH

  18. Acute nonhypothermic exposure to cold impedes motor skill performance in video gaming compared to thermo-neutral and hot conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrew M; Crowther, Robert G; Morton, R Hugh; Polman, Remco C

    2011-02-01

    The study examined whether or not acute exposure to unfamiliar hot or cold conditions impairs performance of highly skilled coordinative activities and whether prior physical self-efficacy beliefs were associated with task completion. Nineteen volunteers completed both Guitar Hero and Archery activities as a test battery using the Nintendo Wii console in cold (2 degrees C), neutral (20 degrees C), and hot (38 degrees C) conditions. Participants all completed physical self-efficacy questionnaires following experimental familiarization. Performances of both Guitar Hero and Archery significantly decreased in the cold compared with the neutral condition. The cold trial was also perceived as the condition requiring both greater concentration and effort. There was no association between performance and physical self-efficacy. Performance of these coordinative tasks was compromised by acute (nonhypothermic) exposure to cold; the most likely explanation is that the cold condition presented a greater challenge to attentional processes as a form of environmental distraction. PMID:21466095

  19. Comparative thermoregulatory response to passive heat loading by exposure to radiofrequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Ali, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Colonic and tail-skin temperature of the unrestrained Fischer rat were measured immediately after a 90-min exposure to 600-MHz radiofrequency radiation in a waveguide-type system. Ambient temperature (Ta) was maintained at either 20, 28, or 35 C. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in dimensions of W/kg was controlled at a constant level through a feedback control circuit. The SAR needed to elevate colonic and tail-skin temperature decreased with increasing Ta. For example, a 0.5 C elevation in colonic temperature occurred at SAR's of 4.3, 0.9, and 0.5 W/kg when Ta was maintained at 20, 28, and 35 C, respectively. Data from this study were combined with data from earlier studies to assess the impact of varying Ta on the thermogenic effect of RF radiation in different species. In species ranging in mass from 0.02 to 3.2 kg, a double logarithmic plot of body mass versus SAR needed to elevate colonic temperature by 0.5 C was linear and inverse with a high goodness of fit (r(2) = -0.94). The highly correlated allometric relationship shows that, as body mass decreases, the relative impact of Ta on the thermogenic effect of RF radiation increases.

  20. Comparison of discriminant analysis methods: Application to occupational exposure to particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, M. Rosário; Carolino, E.; Viegas, Carla; Viegas, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Health effects associated with occupational exposure to particulate matter have been studied by several authors. In this study were selected six industries of five different areas: Cork company 1, Cork company 2, poultry, slaughterhouse for cattle, riding arena and production of animal feed. The measurements tool was a portable device for direct reading. This tool provides information on the particle number concentration for six different diameters, namely 0.3 µm, 0.5 µm, 1 µm, 2.5 µm, 5 µm and 10 µm. The focus on these features is because they might be more closely related with adverse health effects. The aim is to identify the particles that better discriminate the industries, with the ultimate goal of classifying industries regarding potential negative effects on workers' health. Several methods of discriminant analysis were applied to data of occupational exposure to particulate matter and compared with respect to classification accuracy. The selected methods were linear discriminant analyses (LDA); linear quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), robust linear discriminant analysis with selected estimators (MLE (Maximum Likelihood Estimators), MVE (Minimum Volume Elipsoid), "t", MCD (Minimum Covariance Determinant), MCD-A, MCD-B), multinomial logistic regression and artificial neural networks (ANN). The predictive accuracy of the methods was accessed through a simulation study. ANN yielded the highest rate of classification accuracy in the data set under study. Results indicate that the particle number concentration of diameter size 0.5 µm is the parameter that better discriminates industries.

  1. Comparative carcinogenicity of the PAHs as a basis for acceptable exposure levels (AELs) in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Rugen, P.J.; Stern, C.D.; Lamm, S.H. )

    1989-06-01

    The carcinogenicity of various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has generally been demonstrated by their ability to act as complete carcinogens in the development of cancers in rodent skin tests. In order to develop proposed acceptable concentration levels for various PAHs in drinking water, we reviewed the studies that formed the basis for determining that these specific PAHs were carcinogenic in animals. We found that the relative potency of these PAHs varied over a range of many orders of magnitude. For example, the carcinogenic strength of benz(a)anthracene (BaA) is found to be about 1/2000th that of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). We have used the calculated carcinogenic potency of the various PAHs relative to that of BaP as a means for proposing specific acceptable concentration levels in drinking water for each of the specific PAHs. BaP is the only carcinogenic PAH for which EPA has published an acceptable concentration level based on carcinogenicity. Based on the level EPA set for BaP (0.028 micrograms/liter), this methodology has provided for the specific PAHs a determination of proposed acceptable concentration levels quantitatively based on the same data that were used to qualitatively determine them to be animal carcinogens. We have proposed acceptable concentration levels for the carcinogenic PAHs in drinking water that range from 0.03 micrograms/liter for BaP to 6.5 micrograms/liter for BaA. We recommend that acceptable concentration levels for the various PAHs be based on their relative carcinogenic potencies rather than the EPA method of using the potency of only one specific PAH, BaP, to serve as the exposure level determinant for all PAHs. We further suggest that this methodology may be applicable to other classes of carcinogenic compounds.

  2. A multiple additive regression tree analysis of three exposure measures during Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Andrew; Li, Bin; Marx, Brian D; Mills, Jacqueline W; Pine, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses structural and personal exposure to Hurricane Katrina. Structural exposure is measured by flood height and building damage; personal exposure is measured by the locations of 911 calls made during the response. Using these variables, this paper characterises the geography of exposure and also demonstrates the utility of a robust analytical approach in understanding health-related challenges to disadvantaged populations during recovery. Analysis is conducted using a contemporary statistical approach, a multiple additive regression tree (MART), which displays considerable improvement over traditional regression analysis. By using MART, the percentage of improvement in R-squares over standard multiple linear regression ranges from about 62 to more than 100 per cent. The most revealing finding is the modelled verification that African Americans experienced disproportionate exposure in both structural and personal contexts. Given the impact of exposure to health outcomes, this finding has implications for understanding the long-term health challenges facing this population.

  3. Comparative susceptibility of Atlantic salmon, lake trout and rainbow trout to Myxobolus cerebralis in controlled laboratory exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, V.S.; Densmore, Christine L.; Schill, W.B.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Page, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar to Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease, was compared in controlled laboratory exposures. A total of 450 (225 for each dose) fry for each species were exposed to a low (200 spores per fish) or high (2000 spores per fish) dose of the infective triactinomyxon. At 22 wk post-exposure, 60 fish from each group, as well as controls for each species, were examined for clinical signs (whirling behavior, blacktail, deformed heads and skeletal deformities), microscopic lesions, and presence of spores. Rainbow trout were highly susceptible to infection, with 100% being positive for spores and with microscopic pathological changes in both exposure groups. Rainbow trout were the only species to show whirling behavior and blacktail. Atlantic salmon were less susceptible, with only 44 and 61% being positive for spores, respectively, in the low and high dose groups, while 68 and 75%, respectively, had microscopic pathology associated with cartilage damage. Rainbow trout heads contained mean spore concentrations of 2.2 (low dose) or 4.0 (high dose) ?? 106 spores g tissue-1. The means for positive Atlantic salmon (not including zero values) were 1.7 (low) and 7.4 (high) ?? 104 spores g tissue-1. Lake trout showed no clinical signs of infection, were negative for spores in both groups and showed no histopathological signs of M. cerebralis infection.

  4. Comparative analysis of genomic signal processing for microarray data clustering.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, Robert S H; Sungoor, Ala; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Genomic signal processing is a new area of research that combines advanced digital signal processing methodologies for enhanced genetic data analysis. It has many promising applications in bioinformatics and next generation of healthcare systems, in particular, in the field of microarray data clustering. In this paper we present a comparative performance analysis of enhanced digital spectral analysis methods for robust clustering of gene expression across multiple microarray data samples. Three digital signal processing methods: linear predictive coding, wavelet decomposition, and fractal dimension are studied to provide a comparative evaluation of the clustering performance of these methods on several microarray datasets. The results of this study show that the fractal approach provides the best clustering accuracy compared to other digital signal processing and well known statistical methods.

  5. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-05-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer.

  6. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer. PMID:8199684

  7. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rabbits under environmentally realistic exposure conditions and comparative assessment between mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, J V; Rodríguez, C; Alonso, E; Sáez, M; González, F; San Andrés, M D; Jiménez, B; San Andrés, M I

    2016-01-22

    This article describes the toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in rabbits under low repeated dosing, equivalent to 0.085μg/kg per day, and the observed differences between rabbits and chickens. The best fitting for both species was provided by a simple pseudo monocompartmental first-order kinetics model, regulated by two rates, and accounting for real elimination as well as binding of PFOS to non-exchangeable structures. Elimination was more rapid in rabbits, with a pseudo first-order dissipation half-life of 88 days compared to the 230 days observed for chickens. By contrast, the calculated assimilation efficiency for rabbits was almost 1, very close to full absorption, significantly higher than the 0.66 with confidence intervals of 0.64 and 0.68 observed for chickens. The results confirm a very different kinetics than that observed in single-dose experiments confirming clear dose-related differences in apparent elimination rates in rabbits, as previously described for humans and other mammals; suggesting the role of a capacity-limited saturable process resulting in different kinetic behaviours for PFOS in high dose versus environmentally relevant low dose exposure conditions. The model calculations confirmed that the measured maximum concentrations were still far from the steady state situation, and that the different kinetics between birds and mammals should may play a significant role in the biomagnifications assessment and potential exposure for humans and predators. For the same dose regime, the steady state concentration was estimated at about 36μg PFOS/L serum for rabbits, slightly above one-half of the 65μg PFOS/L serum estimated for chickens. The toxicokinetic parameters presented here can be used for higher-tier bioaccumulation estimations of PFOS in rabbits and chickens as starting point for human health exposure assessments and as surrogate values for modeling PFOS kinetics in wild mammals and bird in exposure assessment of predatory

  8. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rabbits under environmentally realistic exposure conditions and comparative assessment between mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, J V; Rodríguez, C; Alonso, E; Sáez, M; González, F; San Andrés, M D; Jiménez, B; San Andrés, M I

    2016-01-22

    This article describes the toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in rabbits under low repeated dosing, equivalent to 0.085μg/kg per day, and the observed differences between rabbits and chickens. The best fitting for both species was provided by a simple pseudo monocompartmental first-order kinetics model, regulated by two rates, and accounting for real elimination as well as binding of PFOS to non-exchangeable structures. Elimination was more rapid in rabbits, with a pseudo first-order dissipation half-life of 88 days compared to the 230 days observed for chickens. By contrast, the calculated assimilation efficiency for rabbits was almost 1, very close to full absorption, significantly higher than the 0.66 with confidence intervals of 0.64 and 0.68 observed for chickens. The results confirm a very different kinetics than that observed in single-dose experiments confirming clear dose-related differences in apparent elimination rates in rabbits, as previously described for humans and other mammals; suggesting the role of a capacity-limited saturable process resulting in different kinetic behaviours for PFOS in high dose versus environmentally relevant low dose exposure conditions. The model calculations confirmed that the measured maximum concentrations were still far from the steady state situation, and that the different kinetics between birds and mammals should may play a significant role in the biomagnifications assessment and potential exposure for humans and predators. For the same dose regime, the steady state concentration was estimated at about 36μg PFOS/L serum for rabbits, slightly above one-half of the 65μg PFOS/L serum estimated for chickens. The toxicokinetic parameters presented here can be used for higher-tier bioaccumulation estimations of PFOS in rabbits and chickens as starting point for human health exposure assessments and as surrogate values for modeling PFOS kinetics in wild mammals and bird in exposure assessment of predatory

  9. Renal Effects and Carcinogenicity of Occupational Exposure to Uranium: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stammler, Leonhard; Uhl, Andreas; Mayer, Benjamin; Keller, Frieder

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Uranium is a heavy metal with alpha radioactivity. We state the hypothesis that uranium exposure is harmful to human kidneys and carcinogenic to body tissues. Therefore, we review epidemiological studies from people with known long-lasting uranium exposure. Materials and Methods Three meta-analyses are performed using clinical studies published in the PubMed database and applying RevMan 5.3 from the Cochrane Collaboration to calculate the outcome. The first two meta-analyses examine the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and the standardized incidence ratio for any cancers of uranium workers who were operating in areas ranging from uranium processing to the assembly of final uranium products. The third meta-analysis evaluates the nephrotoxic risk in uranium workers as well as soldiers and of individuals with exposure to drinking water containing uranium. Results Overall and contrasting to our hypothesis, the tumor risk is significantly lower for uranium workers than for control groups (SMR = 0.90 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.84 to 0.96). In addition and also contrasting to our hypothesis, the risk of nephrotoxicity is not increased either. This holds for both the incidence and the mortality due to renal cell carcinoma or due to acute kidney injury or chronic kidney disease. In contrast, a significantly better creatinine clearance is found for the uranium cohort as compared to the control groups (mean difference = 7.66 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 15.2). Conclusion Our hypothesis that a chronic uranium exposure is associated with an increased risk of cancer mortality or of kidney failure is refuted by clinical data. The decreased risk may result from better medical surveillance of uranium workers. PMID:27275162

  10. Evaluating experimental bias and completeness in comparative phosphoproteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Boekhorst, Jos; Boersema, Paul J; Tops, Bastiaan B J; van Breukelen, Bas; Heck, Albert J R; Snel, Berend

    2011-01-01

    Unraveling the functional dynamics of phosphorylation networks is a crucial step in understanding the way in which biological networks form a living cell. Recently there has been an enormous increase in the number of measured phosphorylation events. Nevertheless, comparative and integrative analysis of phosphoproteomes is confounded by incomplete coverage and biases introduced by different experimental workflows. As a result, we cannot differentiate whether phosphosites indentified in only one or two samples are the result of condition or species specific phosphorylation, or reflect missing data. Here, we evaluate the impact of incomplete phosphoproteomics datasets on comparative analysis, and we present bioinformatics strategies to quantify the impact of different experimental workflows on measured phosphoproteomes. We show that plotting the saturation in observed phosphosites in replicates provides a reproducible picture of the extent of a particular phosphoproteome. Still, we are still far away from a complete picture of the total human phosphoproteome. The impact of different experimental techniques on the similarity between phosphoproteomes can be estimated by comparing datasets from different experimental pipelines to a common reference. Our results show that comparative analysis is most powerful when datasets have been generated using the same experimental workflow. We show this experimentally by measuring the tyrosine phosphoproteome from Caenorhabditis elegans and comparing it to the tyrosine phosphoproteome of HeLa cells, resulting in an overlap of about 4%. This overlap between very different organisms represents a three-fold increase when compared to dataset of older studies, wherein different workflows were used. The strategies we suggest enable an estimation of the impact of differences in experimental workflows on the overlap between datasets. This will allow us to perform comparative analyses not only on datasets specifically generated for this

  11. CRITICA: coding region identification tool invoking comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badger, J. H.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Gene recognition is essential to understanding existing and future DNA sequence data. CRITICA (Coding Region Identification Tool Invoking Comparative Analysis) is a suite of programs for identifying likely protein-coding sequences in DNA by combining comparative analysis of DNA sequences with more common noncomparative methods. In the comparative component of the analysis, regions of DNA are aligned with related sequences from the DNA databases; if the translation of the aligned sequences has greater amino acid identity than expected for the observed percentage nucleotide identity, this is interpreted as evidence for coding. CRITICA also incorporates noncomparative information derived from the relative frequencies of hexanucleotides in coding frames versus other contexts (i.e., dicodon bias). The dicodon usage information is derived by iterative analysis of the data, such that CRITICA is not dependent on the existence or accuracy of coding sequence annotations in the databases. This independence makes the method particularly well suited for the analysis of novel genomes. CRITICA was tested by analyzing the available Salmonella typhimurium DNA sequences. Its predictions were compared with the DNA sequence annotations and with the predictions of GenMark. CRITICA proved to be more accurate than GenMark, and moreover, many of its predictions that would seem to be errors instead reflect problems in the sequence databases. The source code of CRITICA is freely available by anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu in/pub/critica) and on the World Wide Web (http:/(/)rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu).

  12. Effects analysis of time-varying or repeated exposures in aquatic ecological risk assessment of agrochemicals.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Kevin H; Giddings, Jeffrey M; Judd, Laura

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to agrochemicals in the aquatic environment often occurs as time-varying or repeated pulses. Time-varying exposures may occur due to runoff events and spray drift associated with precipitation and application events. Hydrologic dilution, dispersion, and degradation also produce pulsed exposures. Standard laboratory toxicity tests using constant exposure concentrations typically do not investigate the toxicity of time-varying or repeated exposures. Detoxification, elimination, and recovery may occur within organisms or populations during the periods between exposures. The difficulty of estimating effects of realistic time-varying exposures from measurements made under constant exposure conditions is often an important source of uncertainty in ecological risk assessment of pesticides. This article discusses the criteria and tools for deciding whether time-varying exposures are relevant in a particular risk assessment, approaches for laboratory toxicity testing with time-varying exposure, modeling approaches for addressing effects oftime-varying exposure, deterministic and probabilistic ecological risk characterization of time-varyingexposures and toxicity, and uncertainty analysis.

  13. Computational Methods for the Analysis of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Raj; Lockwood, William W.; Lam, Wan L.

    2006-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) is a technique for assaying the copy number status of cancer genomes. The widespread use of this technology has lead to a rapid accumulation of high throughput data, which in turn has prompted the development of computational strategies for the analysis of array CGH data. Here we explain the principles behind array image processing, data visualization and genomic profile analysis, review currently available software packages, and raise considerations for future software development. PMID:17992253

  14. Pesticide flow analysis to assess human exposure in greenhouse flower production in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R

    2013-04-01

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area. PMID:23528812

  15. Pesticide flow analysis to assess human exposure in greenhouse flower production in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R

    2013-03-25

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area.

  16. Pesticide Flow Analysis to Assess Human Exposure in Greenhouse Flower Production in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R.

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area. PMID:23528812

  17. Assessing population exposure for landslide risk analysis using dasymetric cartography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ricardo A. C.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Zezere, Jose L.

    2015-04-01

    Exposed Population is a major topic that needs to be taken into account in a full landslide risk analysis. Usually, risk analysis is based on an accounting of inhabitants number or inhabitants density, applied over statistical or administrative terrain units, such as NUTS or parishes. However, this kind of approach may skew the obtained results underestimating the importance of population, mainly in territorial units with predominance of rural occupation. Furthermore, the landslide susceptibility scores calculated for each terrain unit are frequently more detailed and accurate than the location of the exposed population inside each territorial unit based on Census data. These drawbacks are not the ideal setting when landslide risk analysis is performed for urban management and emergency planning. Dasymetric cartography, which uses a parameter or set of parameters to restrict the spatial distribution of a particular phenomenon, is a methodology that may help to enhance the resolution of Census data and therefore to give a more realistic representation of the population distribution. Therefore, this work aims to map and to compare the population distribution based on a traditional approach (population per administrative terrain units) and based on dasymetric cartography (population by building). The study is developed in the Region North of Lisbon using 2011 population data and following three main steps: i) the landslide susceptibility assessment based on statistical models independently validated; ii) the evaluation of population distribution (absolute and density) for different administrative territorial units (Parishes and BGRI - the basic statistical unit in the Portuguese Census); and iii) the dasymetric population's cartography based on building areal weighting. Preliminary results show that in sparsely populated administrative units, population density differs more than two times depending on the application of the traditional approach or the dasymetric

  18. ANALYSIS OF NASAL TISSUE FOR BIOMARKERS OF CHLORINE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both 3-chloro-tyrosine (CT) and 3,5-dichloro-tyrosine (dCT) are sensitive and specific biomarkers for evaluating exposure to chlorine gas (Cl2) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Previous investigations have focused on the formation of CT and dCT resulting from biochemical responses ...

  19. Causal Analysis of the Unanticipated Extremity Exposure at HFEF

    SciTech Connect

    David E. James; Charles R. Posegate; Thomas P. Zahn; Alan G. Wagner

    2011-11-01

    This report covers the unintended extremity exposure to an operator while handling a metallurgical mount sample of irradiated fuel following an off-scale high beta radiation reading of the sample. The decision was made to continue working after the meter indicated high off-scale by the HPT Supervisor, which resulted in the operator at the next operation being exposed.

  20. Comparative DNA Sequence Analysis of Wheat and Rice Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sorrells, Mark E.; La Rota, Mauricio; Bermudez-Kandianis, Catherine E.; Greene, Robert A.; Kantety, Ramesh; Munkvold, Jesse D.; Miftahudin; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Ma, Xuefeng; Gustafson, Perry J.; Qi, Lili L.; Echalier, Benjamin; Gill, Bikram S.; Matthews, David E.; Lazo, Gerard R.; Chao, Shiaoman; Anderson, Olin D.; Edwards, Hugh; Linkiewicz, Anna M.; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Akhunov, Eduard D.; Dvorak, Jan; Zhang, Deshui; Nguyen, Henry T.; Peng, Junhua; Lapitan, Nora L.V.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Jose L.; Anderson, James A.; Hossain, Khwaja; Kalavacharla, Venu; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Choi, Dong-Woog; Close, Timothy J.; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Gill, Kulvinder S.; Steber, Camille; Walker-Simmons, Mary K.; McGuire, Patrick E.; Qualset, Calvin O.

    2003-01-01

    The use of DNA sequence-based comparative genomics for evolutionary studies and for transferring information from model species to crop species has revolutionized molecular genetics and crop improvement strategies. This study compared 4485 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that were physically mapped in wheat chromosome bins, to the public rice genome sequence data from 2251 ordered BAC/PAC clones using BLAST. A rice genome view of homologous wheat genome locations based on comparative sequence analysis revealed numerous chromosomal rearrangements that will significantly complicate the use of rice as a model for cross-species transfer of information in nonconserved regions. PMID:12902377

  1. Occupational Exposure to Asbestos and Ovarian Cancer: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, M. Constanza; Straif, Kurt; Reina, Margarita; Al-Alem, Umaima; Demers, Paul A.; Landrigan, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A recent Monographs Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) concluded that there is sufficient evidence for a causal association between exposure to asbestos and ovarian cancer. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate this association. Data sources: Searches of PubMed and unpublished data yielded a total of 18 cohort studies of women occupationally exposed to asbestos. Data extraction: Two authors independently abstracted data; any disagreement was resolved by consulting a third reviewer. Data synthesis: All but one study reported standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) comparing observed numbers of deaths with expected numbers for the general population; the exception was a study that reported standardized incidence ratios. For simplicity, we refer to all effect estimates as SMRs. The overall pooled SMR estimate for ovarian cancer was 1.77 (95% confidence interval, 1.37–2.28), with a moderate degree of heterogeneity among the studies (I2 = 35.3%, p = 0.061). Effect estimates were stronger for cohorts compensated for asbestosis, cohorts with estimated lung cancer SMRs > 2.0, and studies conducted in Europe compared with other geographic regions. Effect estimates were similar for studies with and without pathologic confirmation, and we found no evidence of publication bias (Egger’s test p-value = 0.162). Conclusions: Our study supports the IARC conclusion that exposure to asbestos is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:21642044

  2. Simulation study comparing exposure matching with regression adjustment in an observational safety setting with group sequential monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelly G; Cook, Andrea J; Jackson, Lisa A; Nelson, Jennifer C

    2015-03-30

    Sequential methods are well established for randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and their use in observational settings has increased with the development of national vaccine and drug safety surveillance systems that monitor large healthcare databases. Observational safety monitoring requires that sequential testing methods be better equipped to incorporate confounder adjustment and accommodate rare adverse events. New methods designed specifically for observational surveillance include a group sequential likelihood ratio test that uses exposure matching and generalized estimating equations approach that involves regression adjustment. However, little is known about the statistical performance of these methods or how they compare to RCT methods in both observational and rare outcome settings. We conducted a simulation study to determine the type I error, power and time-to-surveillance-end of group sequential likelihood ratio test, generalized estimating equations and RCT methods that construct group sequential Lan-DeMets boundaries using data from a matched (group sequential Lan-DeMets-matching) or unmatched regression (group sequential Lan-DeMets-regression) setting. We also compared the methods using data from a multisite vaccine safety study. All methods had acceptable type I error, but regression methods were more powerful, faster at detecting true safety signals and less prone to implementation difficulties with rare events than exposure matching methods. Method performance also depended on the distribution of information and extent of confounding by site. Our results suggest that choice of sequential method, especially the confounder control strategy, is critical in rare event observational settings. These findings provide guidance for choosing methods in this context and, in particular, suggest caution when conducting exposure matching.

  3. 77 FR 37717 - Electrical Cable Test Results and Analysis During Fire Exposure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... COMMISSION Electrical Cable Test Results and Analysis During Fire Exposure AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... during Fire Exposure (ELECTRA-FIRE), A Consolidation of the Three Major Fire-Induced Circuit and Cable... conducted to realistically explore the electrical functionality of electrical cables under severe...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purpose of this appendix, the tank is considered inert when the bulk average oxygen concentration within... flammability exposure time for a fuel tank. (k) Oxygen evolution occurs when oxygen dissolved in the fuel is... within the fuel tank not occupied by liquid fuel. N25.3Fuel tank flammability exposure analysis. (a)...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... purpose of this appendix, the tank is considered inert when the bulk average oxygen concentration within... flammability exposure time for a fuel tank. (k) Oxygen evolution occurs when oxygen dissolved in the fuel is... within the fuel tank not occupied by liquid fuel. N25.3Fuel tank flammability exposure analysis. (a)...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... purpose of this appendix, the tank is considered inert when the bulk average oxygen concentration within... flammability exposure time for a fuel tank. (k) Oxygen evolution occurs when oxygen dissolved in the fuel is... within the fuel tank not occupied by liquid fuel. N25.3Fuel tank flammability exposure analysis. (a)...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... purpose of this appendix, the tank is considered inert when the bulk average oxygen concentration within... flammability exposure time for a fuel tank. (k) Oxygen evolution occurs when oxygen dissolved in the fuel is... within the fuel tank not occupied by liquid fuel. N25.3Fuel tank flammability exposure analysis. (a)...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... purpose of this appendix, the tank is considered inert when the bulk average oxygen concentration within... flammability exposure time for a fuel tank. (k) Oxygen evolution occurs when oxygen dissolved in the fuel is... within the fuel tank not occupied by liquid fuel. N25.3Fuel tank flammability exposure analysis. (a)...

  9. Comparative Hazard Identification by a Single Dose Lung Exposure of Zinc Oxide and Silver Nanomaterials in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gosens, Ilse; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Bokkers, Bas; de Jong, Wim H.; Krystek, Petra; Tran, Lang; Stone, Vicki; Wallin, Håkan; Stoeger, Tobias; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs) can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag), non-functionalised zinc oxide (ZnO) and a triethoxycaprylylsilane functionalised ZnO NM suspended in water with 2% mouse serum were examined 24 hours following a single intratracheal instillation (I.T.). An acute pulmonary inflammation was noted (marked by a polymorphonuclear neutrophil influx) with cell damage (LDH and total protein) in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) after administration of both non-functionalised and functionalised ZnO. The latter also induced systemic inflammation measured as an increase in blood neutrophils and a decrease in blood lymphocytes. Exposure to Ag NM was not accompanied by pulmonary inflammation or cytotoxicity, or by systemic inflammation. A decrease in glutathione levels was demonstrated in the liver following exposure to high doses of all three nanomaterials irrespective of any noticeable inflammatory or cytotoxic effects in the lung. By applying benchmark dose (BMD) modeling statistics to compare potencies of the NMs, we rank functionalised ZnO ranked the highest based on the largest number of affected endpoints, as well as the strongest responses observed after 24 hours. The non-functionalised ZnO NM gave an almost similar response, whereas Ag NM did not cause an acute response at similar doses. PMID:25966284

  10. Comparative hazard identification by a single dose lung exposure of zinc oxide and silver nanomaterials in mice.

    PubMed

    Gosens, Ilse; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Bokkers, Bas; de Jong, Wim H; Krystek, Petra; Tran, Lang; Stone, Vicki; Wallin, Håkan; Stoeger, Tobias; Cassee, Flemming R

    2015-01-01

    Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs) can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag), non-functionalised zinc oxide (ZnO) and a triethoxycaprylylsilane functionalised ZnO NM suspended in water with 2% mouse serum were examined 24 hours following a single intratracheal instillation (I.T.). An acute pulmonary inflammation was noted (marked by a polymorphonuclear neutrophil influx) with cell damage (LDH and total protein) in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) after administration of both non-functionalised and functionalised ZnO. The latter also induced systemic inflammation measured as an increase in blood neutrophils and a decrease in blood lymphocytes. Exposure to Ag NM was not accompanied by pulmonary inflammation or cytotoxicity, or by systemic inflammation. A decrease in glutathione levels was demonstrated in the liver following exposure to high doses of all three nanomaterials irrespective of any noticeable inflammatory or cytotoxic effects in the lung. By applying benchmark dose (BMD) modeling statistics to compare potencies of the NMs, we rank functionalised ZnO ranked the highest based on the largest number of affected endpoints, as well as the strongest responses observed after 24 hours. The non-functionalised ZnO NM gave an almost similar response, whereas Ag NM did not cause an acute response at similar doses. PMID:25966284

  11. Comparative and Familial Analysis of Handedness in Great Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, population-level handedness has been considered a hallmark of human evolution. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit population-level handedness remains a topic of considerable debate. This paper summarizes published data on handedness in great apes. Comparative analysis indicated that chimpanzees and bonobos show population-level right…

  12. A Framework for the Comparative Analysis of Farm Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Joseph J.

    Presenting a model for the comparative analysis of farm organizations, this paper analyzes the farm firm as a complex organization; identifies key structural dimensions of an agricultural production unit; and reviews various organizational perspectives for their utility in understanding and explaining the behavior of farm operations and farm…

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Three Unique Theories of Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present three classical theories on organizational learning and conduct a comparative analysis that highlights their strengths, similarities, and differences. Two of the theories -- experiential learning theory and adaptive -- generative learning theory -- represent the thinking of the cognitive perspective, while…

  14. The Comparative Analysis of Main Access Control Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Su; Niu, Li; Chen, Jing

    Effective access control security design is an important precondition for the stable running of an information system. So it's necessary to establish a well-designed security mechanism to ensure the security of the system. This paper analysis and compares the main access control theories.

  15. Initial implementation of a comparative data analysis ontology.

    PubMed

    Prosdocimi, Francisco; Chisham, Brandon; Pontelli, Enrico; Thompson, Julie D; Stoltzfus, Arlin

    2009-01-01

    Comparative analysis is used throughout biology. When entities under comparison (e.g. proteins, genomes, species) are related by descent, evolutionary theory provides a framework that, in principle, allows N-ary comparisons of entities, while controlling for non-independence due to relatedness. Powerful software tools exist for specialized applications of this approach, yet it remains under-utilized in the absence of a unifying informatics infrastructure. A key step in developing such an infrastructure is the definition of a formal ontology. The analysis of use cases and existing formalisms suggests that a significant component of evolutionary analysis involves a core problem of inferring a character history, relying on key concepts: "Operational Taxonomic Units" (OTUs), representing the entities to be compared; "character-state data" representing the observations compared among OTUs; "phylogenetic tree", representing the historical path of evolution among the entities; and "transitions", the inferred evolutionary changes in states of characters that account for observations. Using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), we have defined these and other fundamental concepts in a Comparative Data Analysis Ontology (CDAO). CDAO has been evaluated for its ability to represent token data sets and to support simple forms of reasoning. With further development, CDAO will provide a basis for tools (for semantic transformation, data retrieval, validation, integration, etc.) that make it easier for software developers and biomedical researchers to apply evolutionary methods of inference to diverse types of data, so as to integrate this powerful framework for reasoning into their research.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Cryptography Library in IoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Uday; Borgohain, Tuhin; Sanyal, Sugata

    2015-05-01

    The paper aims to do a survey along with a comparative analysis of the various cryptography libraries that are applicable in the field of Internet of Things (IoT). The first half of the paper briefly introduces the various cryptography libraries available in the field of cryptography along with a list of all the algorithms contained within the libraries. The second half of the paper deals with cryptography libraries specifically aimed for application in the field of Internet of Things. The various libraries and their performance analysis listed down in this paper are consolidated from various sources with the aim of providing a single comprehensive repository for reference to the various cryptography libraries and the comparative analysis of their features in IoT.

  17. World Trade Center disaster exposure-related probable posttraumatic stress disorder among responders and civilians: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts.

  18. World Trade Center Disaster Exposure-Related Probable Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Responders and Civilians: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H.; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts. PMID:25047411

  19. World Trade Center disaster exposure-related probable posttraumatic stress disorder among responders and civilians: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bian; Tarigan, Lukman H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Kim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on September 11, 2001 was an unprecedented traumatic event with long-lasting health consequences among the affected populations in the New York metropolitan area. This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with specific types of WTC exposures. Meta-analytical findings from 10 studies of 3,271 to 20,294 participants yielded 37 relevant associations. The pooled summary odds ratio (OR) was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.82, 2.32), with substantial heterogeneity linked to exposure classification, cohort type, data source, PTSD assessment instrument/criteria, and lapse time since 9/11. In general, responders (e.g. police, firefighters, rescue/recovery workers and volunteers) had a lower probable PTSD risk (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.39, 1.87) compared to civilians (e.g. residents, office workers, and passersby; OR = 2.71, 95% CI: 2.35, 3.12). The differences in ORs between responders and civilians were larger for physical compared to psychosocial exposure types. We also found that injury, lost someone, and witnessed horror were the three (out of six) most pernicious exposures. These findings suggest that these three exposures should be a particular focus in psychological evaluation and treatment programs in WTC intervention and future emergency preparedness efforts. PMID:25047411

  20. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TCE USING THE DOSE EXPOSURE ESTIMATING MODEL (DEEM) IN ACSL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ACSL-based Dose Exposure Estimating Model(DEEM) under development by EPA is used to perform art uncertainty analysis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PSPK) model of trichloroethylene (TCE). This model involves several circulating metabolites such as trichloroacet...

  1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS AND HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will explore historical and newly emerging methods for the collection and analysis of exhaled breath for use in environmental exposure assessment studies. We will discuss their applicability and limitations with respect to environmental research. Particular em...

  2. Influence of Human Activity Patterns, particle composition, and residential air exchange rates on modeled distributions of PM 2.5 exposure compared with central-site monitoring data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central-site monitors do not account for factors such as outdoor-to-indoor transport and human activity patterns that influence personal exposures to ambient fine-particulate matter (PM2.5). We describe and compare different ambient PM2.5 exposure estimation...

  3. BLAT-based comparative analysis for transposable elements: BLATCAT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangbum; Oh, Sumin; Kang, Keunsoo; Han, Kyudong

    2014-01-01

    The availability of several whole genome sequences makes comparative analyses possible. In primate genomes, the priority of transposable elements (TEs) is significantly increased because they account for ~45% of the primate genomes, they can regulate the gene expression level, and they are associated with genomic fluidity in their host genomes. Here, we developed the BLAST-like alignment tool (BLAT) based comparative analysis for transposable elements (BLATCAT) program. The BLATCAT program can compare specific regions of six representative primate genome sequences (human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, and rhesus macaque) on the basis of BLAT and simultaneously carry out RepeatMasker and/or Censor functions, which are widely used Windows-based web-server functions to detect TEs. All results can be stored as a HTML file for manual inspection of a specific locus. BLATCAT will be very convenient and efficient for comparative analyses of TEs in various primate genomes.

  4. Dermoscopy analysis of RGB-images based on comparative features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myakinin, Oleg O.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Neretin, Evgeny Y.; Kozlov, Sergey V.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for color and texture analysis for dermoscopic images of human skin based on Haar wavelets, Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and Histogram Analysis. This approach is a modification of «7-point checklist» clinical method. Thus, that is an "absolute" diagnostic method because one is using only features extracted from tumor's ROI (Region of Interest), which can be selected manually and/or using a special algorithm. We propose additional features extracted from the same image for comparative analysis of tumor and healthy skin. We used Euclidean distance, Cosine similarity, and Tanimoto coefficient as comparison metrics between color and texture features extracted from tumor's and healthy skin's ROI separately. A classifier for separating melanoma images from other tumors has been built by SVM (Support Vector Machine) algorithm. Classification's errors with and without comparative features between skin and tumor have been analyzed. Significant increase of recognition quality with comparative features has been demonstrated. Moreover, we analyzed two modes (manual and automatic) for ROI selecting on tumor and healthy skin areas. We have reached 91% of sensitivity using comparative features in contrast with 77% of sensitivity using the only "absolute" method. The specificity was the invariable (94%) in both cases.

  5. Micronuclei as biomarkers of carcinogen exposure in populations exposed to arsenic through drinking water in West Bengal, India: a comparative study in three cell types.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Ghosh, Pritha; Das, Jayanta K; Banerjee, Apurba; Ray, Kunal; Giri, Ashok K

    2004-05-01

    Contamination of groundwater by arsenic, a paradoxical human carcinogen, has become a cause of global public health concern. In West Bengal, India, the groundwater in 9 of 18 districts is heavily contaminated with arsenic. Various adverse health effects including cancer have been reported from these districts and are associated with prolonged arsenic exposure. A cross-sectional biomarker study was conducted to evaluate and compare the frequencies of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes, oral mucosa cells, and urothelial cells from the inhabitants of North 24 Parganas, one of the arsenic-affected districts. The three cell types were collected from 163 residents exposed to high levels of arsenic in drinking water (214.7213 +/- 9.0273 microg/l) and from 154 unexposed subjects residing in the unaffected East Midnapur district with very little or no exposure to arsenic through drinking water (9.2017 +/- 0.3157 microg/l). Our analysis revealed that micronuclei frequencies in the exposed group were significantly elevated to 5.33-fold over unexposed levels for lymphocytes, 4.63-fold for oral mucosa cells, and 4.71-fold for urothelial cells (increases in micronuclei frequencies significant at P < 0.01). The results indicate that chronic ingestion of arsenic in drinking water by the exposed subjects is linked to the enhanced incidence of micronuclei in all the three cell types, slightly higher level of micronuclei being observed in lymphocytes compared with oral mucosa and urothelial cells.

  6. Histomorphometric and proteomic analysis of the acute rabbit corneal tissue response following in vitro exposure to 1540-nm laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eurell, Thomas E.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Roach, William P.

    2003-06-01

    In vitro exposures of explant rabbit corneas to single pulse 1540 nm infrared laser light operating at a pulse width of 0.8 milliseconds resulted in coagulative necrosis of both the corneal epithelium and stroma. Histomorphometric data correlated with increasing tissue radiant exposures. Histologic alterations in the corneal stroma were typical of matrix remodeling within the beam path and reactive to antibodies against matrix metalloproteinase-2. A two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis, using a mini-gel format, was developed to determine if specific corneal protein changes within tissue sections could be detected. Frozen sections taken through the center of the laser lesion were evaluated for proteomic data using tissue isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the second dimension. Histomorphometric data describing the extent of the laser lesions were compared to the isoelectric points, molecular weights and relative densities of individual corneal proteins. Increasing radiant exposures of corneal tissues were associated with characteristic histomorphometric and proteomic changes.

  7. Comparative analysis of two DOPA dioxygenases from Phytolacca Americana.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kana; Yoshida, Kazuko; Sakuta, Masaaki

    2015-05-01

    The comparative analysis of two Phytolacca americana DOPA dioxygenases (PaDOD1 and PaDOD2) that may be involved in betalain biosynthesis was carried out. The recombinant protein of PaDOD catalyzed the conversion of DOPA to betalamic acid, whereas DOD activity was not detected in PaDOD2 in vitro. The role of DOD genes is discussed in the evolutionary context using phylogenetic analysis, suggesting that DOD might have been duplicated early in evolution and that accumulation of base substitutions could have led to the different characteristics of DODs within the betalain-producing Caryophyllales. PMID:26058141

  8. Comparative analysis of two DOPA dioxygenases from Phytolacca Americana.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kana; Yoshida, Kazuko; Sakuta, Masaaki

    2015-05-01

    The comparative analysis of two Phytolacca americana DOPA dioxygenases (PaDOD1 and PaDOD2) that may be involved in betalain biosynthesis was carried out. The recombinant protein of PaDOD catalyzed the conversion of DOPA to betalamic acid, whereas DOD activity was not detected in PaDOD2 in vitro. The role of DOD genes is discussed in the evolutionary context using phylogenetic analysis, suggesting that DOD might have been duplicated early in evolution and that accumulation of base substitutions could have led to the different characteristics of DODs within the betalain-producing Caryophyllales.

  9. Ultraviolet spectral distribution and erythema-weighted irradiance from indoor tanning devices compared with solar radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Sola, Yolanda; Baeza, David; Gómez, Miguel; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2016-08-01

    Concern regarding the impact of indoor tanning devices on human health has led to different regulations and recommendations, which set limits on erythema-weighted irradiance. Here, we analyze spectral emissions from 52 tanning devices in Spanish facilities and compare them with surface solar irradiance for different solar zenith angles. Whereas most of the devices emitted less UV-B radiation than the midday summer sun, the unweighted UV-A irradiance was 2-6 times higher than solar radiation. Moreover, the spectral distributions of indoor devices were completely different from that of solar radiation, differing in one order of magnitude at some UV-A wavelengths, depending on the lamp characteristics. In 21% of the devices tested, the erythema-weighted irradiance exceeded 0.3Wm(-2): the limit fixed by the European standard and the Spanish regulation. Moreover, 29% of the devices fall within the UV type 4 classification, for which medical advice is required. The high variability in erythema-weighted irradiance results in a wide range of exposure times to reach 1 standard erythemal dose (SED: 100Jm(-2)), with 62% of devices requiring exposures of <10min to reach 1 SED. Nevertheless, the unweighted UV-A dose during this time period would be from 1.4 to 10.3 times more than the solar UV-A dose. PMID:27318601

  10. Ultraviolet spectral distribution and erythema-weighted irradiance from indoor tanning devices compared with solar radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Sola, Yolanda; Baeza, David; Gómez, Miguel; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2016-08-01

    Concern regarding the impact of indoor tanning devices on human health has led to different regulations and recommendations, which set limits on erythema-weighted irradiance. Here, we analyze spectral emissions from 52 tanning devices in Spanish facilities and compare them with surface solar irradiance for different solar zenith angles. Whereas most of the devices emitted less UV-B radiation than the midday summer sun, the unweighted UV-A irradiance was 2-6 times higher than solar radiation. Moreover, the spectral distributions of indoor devices were completely different from that of solar radiation, differing in one order of magnitude at some UV-A wavelengths, depending on the lamp characteristics. In 21% of the devices tested, the erythema-weighted irradiance exceeded 0.3Wm(-2): the limit fixed by the European standard and the Spanish regulation. Moreover, 29% of the devices fall within the UV type 4 classification, for which medical advice is required. The high variability in erythema-weighted irradiance results in a wide range of exposure times to reach 1 standard erythemal dose (SED: 100Jm(-2)), with 62% of devices requiring exposures of <10min to reach 1 SED. Nevertheless, the unweighted UV-A dose during this time period would be from 1.4 to 10.3 times more than the solar UV-A dose.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of the Impact of Subacute Exposure of Smokeless Tobacco and Tobacco Smoke on Rat Testis.

    PubMed

    Aprioku, Jonah Sydney; Ugwu, Theresa Chioma

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 30-day exposure to tobacco smoke (TS), smokeless tobacco (ST), and nicotine on reproductive parameters and oxidative biomarkers in prepubertal and adult male rats. Sperm motility was reduced by 77.5 and 89.0% in TS and ST exposed prepubertal rats and 71.1 and 86.4% in adult rats, respectively. Sperm count was also reduced by 64.7 and 89.9% in prepubertal rats and 64.9 and 47.0% in adult rats, respectively. Nicotine decreased sperm motility (82.2%) and count (62.6%) in prepubertal rats but caused no effect in adult rats. There were no changes in sperm morphology; testosterone was decreased, while LH and FSH were increased in exposed rats, when compared with control. Malondialdehyde levels in testes of exposed rats were increased, and GSH, SOD, and catalase were altered. Results indicate that subacute exposure of tobacco products alters sperm characteristics in a rank order of ST > TS > nicotine, which may be linked to increase in oxidative stress in the testis. PMID:26634225

  12. Comparative risk assessment of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other illicit drugs using the margin of exposure approach.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A comparative risk assessment of drugs including alcohol and tobacco using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach was conducted. The MOE is defined as ratio between toxicological threshold (benchmark dose) and estimated human intake. Median lethal dose values from animal experiments were used to derive the benchmark dose. The human intake was calculated for individual scenarios and population-based scenarios. The MOE was calculated using probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations. The benchmark dose values ranged from 2 mg/kg bodyweight for heroin to 531 mg/kg bodyweight for alcohol (ethanol). For individual exposure the four substances alcohol, nicotine, cocaine and heroin fall into the "high risk" category with MOE < 10, the rest of the compounds except THC fall into the "risk" category with MOE < 100. On a population scale, only alcohol would fall into the "high risk" category, and cigarette smoking would fall into the "risk" category, while all other agents (opiates, cocaine, amphetamine-type stimulants, ecstasy, and benzodiazepines) had MOEs > 100, and cannabis had a MOE > 10,000. The toxicological MOE approach validates epidemiological and social science-based drug ranking approaches especially in regard to the positions of alcohol and tobacco (high risk) and cannabis (low risk). PMID:25634572

  13. Gamma-ray double-layered transmission exposure buildup factors of some engineering materials, a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh; Heer, Manmohan Singh; Rani, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Comparative study on various deterministic methods and formulae of double layered transmission exposure buildup factors (DLEBF) for point isotropic gamma-ray sources has been performed and the results are provided here. This investigation has been performed on some commonly available engineering materials for the purpose of gamma-ray shielding. In reality, the presence of air around the gamma-ray shield motivated to focus this study on exposure buildup factor (EBF). DLEBF have been computed at four energies viz. 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 MeV for various combinations of the chosen five samples taken two at a time with combined optical thickness up to 8 mean free path (mfp). For the necessary computations for DLEBF, a computer program (BUF-toolkit) has been designed. Comparison of Monte Carlo (EGS4-code) and Geometric Progression (G.P.) fitting point kernel methods were done for DLEBF computation. It is concluded that empirical formula given by Lin and Jiang using EBF computed by G.P. fitting formula is the most accurate and easiest method for DLEBF computations. It was observed that DLEBF values at selected energies for two layered slabs with an orientation (low-Z material followed by high-Z material) were lower than the opposite orientation. For optical thickness up to 8 mfp and chosen energy range (0.5-3.0 MeV), Aluminum-Lime Stone shield, appears to provide the best protection against the gamma-rays.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of the Impact of Subacute Exposure of Smokeless Tobacco and Tobacco Smoke on Rat Testis

    PubMed Central

    Aprioku, Jonah Sydney; Ugwu, Theresa Chioma

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 30-day exposure to tobacco smoke (TS), smokeless tobacco (ST), and nicotine on reproductive parameters and oxidative biomarkers in prepubertal and adult male rats. Sperm motility was reduced by 77.5 and 89.0% in TS and ST exposed prepubertal rats and 71.1 and 86.4% in adult rats, respectively. Sperm count was also reduced by 64.7 and 89.9% in prepubertal rats and 64.9 and 47.0% in adult rats, respectively. Nicotine decreased sperm motility (82.2%) and count (62.6%) in prepubertal rats but caused no effect in adult rats. There were no changes in sperm morphology; testosterone was decreased, while LH and FSH were increased in exposed rats, when compared with control. Malondialdehyde levels in testes of exposed rats were increased, and GSH, SOD, and catalase were altered. Results indicate that subacute exposure of tobacco products alters sperm characteristics in a rank order of ST > TS > nicotine, which may be linked to increase in oxidative stress in the testis. PMID:26634225

  15. Comparative risk assessment of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and other illicit drugs using the margin of exposure approach

    PubMed Central

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W.; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A comparative risk assessment of drugs including alcohol and tobacco using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach was conducted. The MOE is defined as ratio between toxicological threshold (benchmark dose) and estimated human intake. Median lethal dose values from animal experiments were used to derive the benchmark dose. The human intake was calculated for individual scenarios and population-based scenarios. The MOE was calculated using probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations. The benchmark dose values ranged from 2 mg/kg bodyweight for heroin to 531 mg/kg bodyweight for alcohol (ethanol). For individual exposure the four substances alcohol, nicotine, cocaine and heroin fall into the “high risk” category with MOE < 10, the rest of the compounds except THC fall into the “risk” category with MOE < 100. On a population scale, only alcohol would fall into the “high risk” category, and cigarette smoking would fall into the “risk” category, while all other agents (opiates, cocaine, amphetamine-type stimulants, ecstasy, and benzodiazepines) had MOEs > 100, and cannabis had a MOE > 10,000. The toxicological MOE approach validates epidemiological and social science-based drug ranking approaches especially in regard to the positions of alcohol and tobacco (high risk) and cannabis (low risk). PMID:25634572

  16. Analysis of School Commuting Data for Exposure Modeling Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Jianping; McCurdy, Thomas; Burke, Janet; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Liu, Cheng; Nutaro, James J; Patterson, Lauren A

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure models often make the simplifying assumption that school children attend school in the same census tract where they live. This paper analyzes that assumption and provides information on the temporal and spatial distributions associated with school commuting. The data were obtained using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s LandScan USA population distribution model (Bhaduri et al., 2007) applied to Philadelphia PA. It is a high-resolution model used to allocate individual school-aged children to both a home and school location, and to devise a minimum-time home-to school commuting path (called a trace) between the two locations. LandScan relies heavily on Geographic Information System (GIS) data. Our GIS analyses found that in Philadelphia: (1) about 32% of the students walk across 2 or more census tracts and 40% of them walk across 4 or more census blocks; (2) 60% drive across 4 or more census tracts going to school and 50% drive across 10 or more census blocks; (3) five-minute commuting time intervals result in misclassification as high as 90% for census blocks, 70% for block groups, and 50% for census tracts; (4) a one-minute time interval is needed to reasonably resolve time spent in the various census unit designations; (5) approximately 50% of both schoolchildren s homes and schools are located within 160 m of highly-traveled roads, and 64% of the schools are located within 200 m. These findings are very important when modeling school children s exposures, especially when ascertaining the impacts of near-roadway concentrations on their total daily body burden. Since many school children also travel along these streets and roadways to get to school, a majority of children in Philadelphia are in mobile-source dominated locations most of the day. We hypothesize that exposures of school children in Philadelphia to benzene and particulate matter will be much higher than if home and school locations and commuting paths at a 1-minute time resolution are

  17. Biological monitoring of smoke exposure among wildland firefighters: Apilot study comparing urinary methoxyphenols with personal exposures to carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and levoglucosan.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, R.; Naeher, L., P.; Paulsen, M.; Dunn, R.; Stock, A.; Simpson, C., D.

    2008-04-01

    Urinary methoxyphenols (MPs) have been proposed as biomarkers of woodsmoke exposure. However, few field studies have been undertaken to evaluate the relationship between woodsmoke exposure and urinary MP concentrations. We conducted a pilot study at the US Forest Service Savannah River Site, in which carbon monoxide (CO), levoglucosan (LG), and particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures were measured in wildland firefighters on prescribed burn days. Pre- and post-shift urine samples were collected from each subject, and cross-shift changes in creatinine-corrected urinary MP concentrations were calculated. Correlations between exposure measures and creatine-adjusted urinary MP concentrations were explored, and regression models were developed relating changes in urinary MP concentrations to measured exposure levels. Full-shift measurements were made on 13 firefighters over 20 work shifts in winter 2004 at the US Forest Service Savannah River site, a National Environmental Research Park. The average workshift length across the 20 measured shifts was 701±95 min. LG and CO exposures were significantly correlated for samples where the filter measurement captured at least 60% of the work shift (16 samples), as well as for the smaller set of full-shift exposure samples (n¼9). PM2.5 and CO exposures were not significantly correlated, and LG and PM2.5 exposures were only significantly correlated for samples representing at least 60% of the work shift. Creatinine-corrected urinary concentrations for 20 of the 22 MPs showed cross-shift increases, with 14 of these changes showing statistical significance. Individual and summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MPs were highly associated with CO (and, to a lesser degree, LG) exposure levels, and random-effects regression models including CO and LG exposure levels explained up to 80% of the variance in cross-shift changes in summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MP concentrations. Although limited by the small sample size

  18. Biological monitoring of smoke exposure among wildland firefighters: Apilot study comparing urinary methoxyphenols with personal exposures to carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and levoglucosan.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, R.; Naeher, L., P.; Paulsen, M.; Dunn, R.; Stock, A.; Simpson, C., D.

    2009-04-01

    Urinary methoxyphenols (MPs) have been proposed as biomarkers of woodsmoke exposure. However, few field studies have been undertaken to evaluate the relationship between woodsmoke exposure and urinary MP concentrations. We conducted a pilot study at the US Forest Service Savannah River Site, in which carbon monoxide (CO), levoglucosan (LG), and particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures were measured in wildland firefighters on prescribed burn days. Pre- and post-shift urine samples were collected from each subject, and cross-shift changes in creatinine-corrected urinary MP concentrations were calculated. Correlations between exposure measures and creatine-adjusted urinary MP concentrations were explored, and regression models were developed relating changes in urinary MP concentrations to measured exposure levels. Full-shift measurements were made on 13 firefighters over 20 work shifts in winter 2004 at the US Forest Service Savannah River site, a National Environmental Research Park. The average workshift length across the 20 measured shifts was 701±95 min. LG and CO exposures were significantly correlated for samples where the filter measurement captured at least 60% of the work shift (16 samples), as well as for the smaller set of full-shift exposure samples (n¼9). PM2.5 and CO exposures were not significantly correlated, and LG and PM2.5 exposures were only significantly correlated for samples representing at least 60% of the work shift. Creatinine-corrected urinary concentrations for 20 of the 22 MPs showed cross-shift increases, with 14 of these changes showing statistical significance. Individual and summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MPs were highly associated with CO (and, to a lesser degree, LG) exposure levels, and random-effects regression models including CO and LG exposure levels explained up to 80% of the variance in cross-shift changes in summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MP concentrations. Although limited by the small sample size

  19. Biological monitoring of smoke exposure among wildland firefighters: Apilot study comparing urinary methoxyphenols with personal exposures to carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and levoglucosan.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, R.; Naeher, L., P.; Paulsen, M.; Dunn, R.; Stock, A.; Simpson, C., D.

    2009-04-01

    Urinary methoxyphenols (MPs) have been proposed as biomarkers of woodsmoke exposure. However, few field studies have been undertaken to evaluate the relationship between woodsmoke exposure and urinary MP concentrations. We conducted a pilot study at the US Forest ServiceFSavannah River Site, in which carbon monoxide (CO), levoglucosan (LG), and particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures were measured in wildland firefighters on prescribed burn days. Pre- and post-shift urine samples were collected from each subject, and cross-shift changes in creatinine-corrected urinary MP concentrations were calculated. Correlations between exposure measures and creatine-adjusted urinary MP concentrations were explored, and regression models were developed relating changes in urinary MP concentrations to measured exposure levels. Full-shift measurements were made on 13 firefighters over 20 work shifts in winter 2004 at the US Forest Service Savannah River site, a National Environmental Research Park. The average workshift length across the 20 measured shifts was 701±95 min. LG and CO exposures were significantly correlated for samples where the filter measurement captured at least 60% of the work shift (16 samples), as well as for the smaller set of full-shift exposure samples (n¼9). PM2.5 and CO exposures were not significantly correlated, and LG and PM2.5 exposures were only significantly correlated for samples representing at least 60% of the work shift. Creatinine-corrected urinary concentrations for 20 of the 22 MPs showed cross-shift increases, with 14 of these changes showing statistical significance. Individual and summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MPs were highly associated with CO (and, to a lesser degree, LG) exposure levels, and random-effects regression models including CO and LG exposure levels explained up to 80% of the variance in cross-shift changes in summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MP concentrations. Although limited by the small sample size

  20. Biological monitoring of smoke exposure among wildland firefighters: A pilot study comparing urinary methoxyphenols with personal exposures to carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and levoglucosan.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, R.; Naeher, L., P.; Paulsen, M.; Dunn, R.; Stock, A.; Simpson, C., D.

    2009-04-01

    Urinary methoxyphenols (MPs) have been proposed as biomarkers of woodsmoke exposure. However, few field studies have been undertaken to evaluate the relationship between woodsmoke exposure and urinary MP concentrations. We conducted a pilot study at the US Forest ServiceFSavannah River Site, in which carbon monoxide (CO), levoglucosan (LG), and particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures were measured in wildland firefighters on prescribedburn days. Pre- and post-shift urine samples were collected from each subject, and cross-shift changes in creatinine-corrected urinary MP concentrations were calculated. Correlations between exposure measures and creatine-adjusted urinary MP concentrations were explored, and regression models were developed relating changes in urinary MP concentrations to measured exposure levels. Full-shift measurements were made on 13 firefighters over 20 work shifts in winter 2004 at the US Forest Service Savannah River site, a National Environmental Research Park. The average workshift length across the 20 measured shifts was 701±95 min. LG and CO exposures were significantly correlated for samples where the filter measurement captured at least 60% of the work shift (16 samples), as well as for the smaller set of full-shift exposure samples (n¼9). PM2.5 and CO exposures were not significantly correlated, and LG and PM2.5 exposures were only significantly correlated for samples representing at least 60% of the work shift. Creatinine-corrected urinary concentrations for 20 of the 22 MPs showed cross-shift increases, with 14 of these changes showing statistical significance. Individual and summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MPs were highly associated with CO (and, to a lesser degree, LG) exposure levels, and random-effects regression models including CO and LG exposure levels explained up to 80% of the variance in cross-shift changes in summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MP concentrations. Although limited by the small sample size

  1. Biological monitoring of smoke exposure among wildland firefighters: A pilot study comparing urinary methoxyphenols with personal exposures to carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and levoglucosan.

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, R.; Naeher, L., P.; Paulsen, M.; Dunn, R.; Stock, A.; Simpson, C., D.

    2009-04-01

    Urinary methoxyphenols (MPs) have been proposed as biomarkers of woodsmoke exposure. However, few field studies have been undertaken to evaluate the relationship between woodsmoke exposure and urinary MP concentrations. We conducted a pilot study at the US Forest Service Savannah River Site, in which carbon monoxide (CO), levoglucosan (LG), and particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures were measured in wildland firefighters on prescribed burn days. Pre- and post-shift urine samples were collected from each subject, and cross-shift changes in creatinine-corrected urinary MP concentrations were calculated. Correlations between exposure measures and creatine-adjusted urinary MP concentrations were explored, and regression models were developed relating changes in urinary MP concentrations to measured exposure levels. Full-shift measurements were made on 13 firefighters over 20 work shifts in winter 2004 at the US Forest Service Savannah River site, a National Environmental Research Park. The average workshift length across the 20 measured shifts was 701±95 min. LG and CO exposures were significantly correlated for samples where the filter measurement captured at least 60% of the work shift (16 samples), as well as for the smaller set of full-shift exposure samples (n¼9). PM2.5 and CO exposures were not significantly correlated, and LG and PM2.5 exposures were only significantly correlated for samples representing at least 60% of the work shift. Creatinine-corrected urinary concentrations for 20 of the 22 MPs showed cross-shift increases, with 14 of these changes showing statistical significance. Individual and summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MPs were highly associated with CO (and, to a lesser degree, LG) exposure levels, and random-effects regression models including CO and LG exposure levels explained up to 80% of the variance in cross-shift changes in summed creatinine-adjusted guaiacol urinary MP concentrations. Although limited by the small sample size

  2. Comparative Genomics via Wavelet Analysis for Closely Related Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jiuzhou; Ware, Tony; Liu, Shu-Lin; Surette, M.

    2004-12-01

    Comparative genomics has been a valuable method for extracting and extrapolating genome information among closely related bacteria. The efficiency of the traditional methods is extremely influenced by the software method used. To overcome the problem here, we propose using wavelet analysis to perform comparative genomics. First, global comparison using wavelet analysis gives the difference at a quantitative level. Then local comparison using keto-excess or purine-excess plots shows precise positions of inversions, translocations, and horizontally transferred DNA fragments. We firstly found that the level of energy spectra difference is related to the similarity of bacteria strains; it could be a quantitative index to describe the similarities of genomes. The strategy is described in detail by comparisons of closely related strains: S.typhi CT18, S.typhi Ty2, S.typhimurium LT2, H.pylori 26695, and H.pylori J99.

  3. A comparative analysis of different approaches for integrated WWTP modelling.

    PubMed

    Grau, P; Copp, J; Vanrolleghem, P A; Takács, I; Ayesa, E

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a comparative analysis of the most important approaches for integrated WWTP modelling is presented. After an introductory presentation of the most important drawbacks and challenges for plant wide modelling, the fundamentals of three different approaches to construct integrated models are presented: "Interfaces" "Standard Supermodel" and "Tailored Supermodel". Afterwards, a comparative analysis of these approaches from different points of view (difficulties for the model end user, characterization of the process in the plant, flexibility or adaptability for each case of study, simulation platform requirements and computational costs) is carried out. From this comparison, some important conclusions about the suitability of each alternative depending on the simulation case study are extracted. PMID:19151496

  4. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  5. [Comparative analysis of 2 methods of DNA extraction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez García, I; Martín Seisdedos, C; Pérez Grande, R; Corral de la Calle, J; Rodríguez Arias, C; González-Sarmiento, R

    1990-10-01

    The study of the organization of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes in leukaemias and lymphomas depends on our ability to obtain high molecular weight DNA. We have compared two different methods of DNA extraction: one being enzymatic, using the enzyme proteinase K, and the other chemical, using urea as a substance purifying DNA. Since the amount and purity of the DNA obtained are similar with each of the two methods of DNA extraction, both are valid to make such a genetic analysis.

  6. Hepatic Proteome Analysis of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) After Exposure to Environmental Concentrations of Human Pharmaceuticals*

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Miriam; Alonso, Esteban; Aparicio, Irene; Santos, Juan Luis; Leaver, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are pseudopersistent aquatic pollutants with unknown effects at environmentally relevant concentrations. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were exposed to Acetaminophen: 54.77 ± 34.67; Atenolol: 11.08 ± 7.98, and Carbamazepine: 7.85 ± 0.13 μg·L−1 for 5 days. After Acetaminophen treatment, 19 proteins were differently expressed, of which 11 were significant with respect to the control group (eight up-regulated and three down-regulated). After Atenolol treatment, seven differently expressed proteins were obtained in comparison with the control, of which six could be identified (four up-regulated and two down-regulated). Carbamazepine exposure resulted in 15 differently expressed proteins compared with the control, with 10 of them identified (seven up-regulated and three down-regulated). Out of these, three features were common between Acetaminophen and Carbamazepine and one between Carbamazepine and Atenolol. One feature was common across all treatments. Principal component analysis and heat map clustering showed a clear grouping of the variability caused by the applied treatments. The obtained data suggest (1) that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of the pharmaceuticals alters the hepatic protein expression profile of the Atlantic salmon; and (2) the existence of treatment specific processes that may be useful for biomarker development. PMID:25394398

  7. Do self-statements enhance the effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy? A comparative evaluation in acrophobia.

    PubMed

    Krijn, M; Emmelkamp, P M G; Olafsson, R P; Schuemie, Martijn J; van der Mast, Charles A P G

    2007-06-01

    There is a clear need for more detailed analysis of the role of cognitive self-statements in virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET). To date, no research on this topic has been done. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether coping self-statements would enhance the effectiveness of VRET. In a randomized crossover design, 26 patients with acrophobia (DSM-IV diagnosis of specific phobia) were randomly assigned to two sessions of VRET followed by two sessions of VRET plus coping self-statements, or the other way around: first two sessions of VRET plus coping self-statements followed by two sessions of VRET. Results showed that VRET, regardless of addition of coping self-statements, decreased anxiety of heights, decreased avoidance of height situations, and improved attitudes towards heights. However, at 6-month follow-up, most gains during treatment were not fully retained.

  8. Toxicoproteomic analysis of pulmonary carbon nanotube exposure using LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Gina M.; Taylor, Alexia J.; McClure, Christina D.; Parsons, Gregory N.; Bonner, James C.; Bereman, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Toxicoproteomics is a developing field that utilizes global proteomic methodologies to investigate the physiological response as a result of adverse toxicant exposure. The aim of this study was to compare the protein secretion profile in lung bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from mice exposed to non-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (U-MWCNTs) or MWCNTs functionalized by nanoscale Al2O3 coatings (A-MWCNT) formed using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Proteins were identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and quantified using a combination of two label-free proteomic methods: spectral counting and MS1 peak area analysis. On average 465 protein groups were identified per sample and proteins were first screened using spectral counting and the Fisher’s exact test to determine differentially regulated species. Significant proteins by Fisher’s exact test (p<0.05) were then verified by integrating the intensity under the extracted ion chromatogram from a single unique peptide for each protein across all runs. A two sample t-test based on integrated peak intensities discovered differences in 27 proteins for control versus U-MWCNT, 13 proteins for control versus A-MWCNT, and 2 proteins for U-MWCNT versus A-MWCNT. Finally, an in-vitro binding experiment was performed yielding 4 common proteins statistically different (p<0.05) for both the in-vitro and in-vivo study. Several of the proteins found to be significantly different between exposed and control groups are known to play a key role in inflammatory and immune response. A comparison between the in-vitro and in-vivo CNT exposure emphasized a true biological response to CNT exposure. PMID:25598225

  9. Association of Exposure to Particular Matter and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaole; Lian, Hui; Ruan, Yanping; Liang, Ruijuan; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Routledge, Michael; Fan, Zhongjie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long time exposure to particular matter has been linked to myocardial infarction, stroke and blood pressure, but its association with atherosclerosis is not clear. This meta-analysis was aimed at assessing whether PM2.5 and PM10 have an effect on subclinical atherosclerosis measured by carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Methods: Pubmed, Ovid Medline, Embase and NICK between 1948 and 31 March 2015 were searched by combining the keywords about exposure to the outcome related words. The random-effects model was applied in computing the change of CIMT and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The effect of potential confounding factors was assessed by stratified analysis and the impact of traffic proximity was also estimated. Results: Among 56 identified studies, 11 articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. In overall analysis increments of 10 μg/m3 in PM2.5 and PM10 were associated with an increase of CIMT (16.79 μm; 95% CI, 4.95–28.63 μm and 4.13 μm; 95% CI, −5.79–14.04 μm, respectively). Results shown in subgroup analysis had reference value for comparing with those of the overall analysis. The impact of traffic proximity on CIMT was uncertain. Conclusions: Exposure to PM2.5 had a significant association with CIMT and for women the effect may be more obvious. PMID:26501300

  10. Pesticide exposure and risk of Alzheimer’s disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dandan; Zhang, Yunjian; Liu, Liegang; Yan, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that lifelong cumulative exposure to pesticides may generate lasting toxic effects on the central nervous system and contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A number of reports indicate a potential association between long-term/low-dose pesticide exposure and AD, but the results are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to clarify this association. Relevant studies were identified according to inclusion criteria. Summary odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed-effects models. A total of seven studies were included in our meta-analysis. A positive association was observed between pesticide exposure and AD (OR = 1.34 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.67; n = 7). The summary ORs with 95% CIs from the crude and adjusted effect size studies were 1.14 (95% CI = 0.94, 1.38; n = 7) and 1.37 (95% CI = 1.09, 1.71; n = 5), respectively. The sensitivity analyses of the present meta-analysis did not substantially modify the association between pesticide exposure and AD. Subgroup analyses revealed that high-quality studies tended to show significant relationships. The present meta-analysis suggested a positive association between pesticide exposure and AD, confirming the hypothesis that pesticide exposure is a risk factor for AD. Further high-quality cohort and case-control studies are required to validate a causal relationship.

  11. Pesticide exposure and risk of Alzheimer’s disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dandan; Zhang, Yunjian; Liu, Liegang; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that lifelong cumulative exposure to pesticides may generate lasting toxic effects on the central nervous system and contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A number of reports indicate a potential association between long-term/low-dose pesticide exposure and AD, but the results are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to clarify this association. Relevant studies were identified according to inclusion criteria. Summary odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed-effects models. A total of seven studies were included in our meta-analysis. A positive association was observed between pesticide exposure and AD (OR = 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.67; n = 7). The summary ORs with 95% CIs from the crude and adjusted effect size studies were 1.14 (95% CI = 0.94, 1.38; n = 7) and 1.37 (95% CI = 1.09, 1.71; n = 5), respectively. The sensitivity analyses of the present meta-analysis did not substantially modify the association between pesticide exposure and AD. Subgroup analyses revealed that high-quality studies tended to show significant relationships. The present meta-analysis suggested a positive association between pesticide exposure and AD, confirming the hypothesis that pesticide exposure is a risk factor for AD. Further high-quality cohort and case-control studies are required to validate a causal relationship. PMID:27581992

  12. Pesticide exposure and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dandan; Zhang, Yunjian; Liu, Liegang; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that lifelong cumulative exposure to pesticides may generate lasting toxic effects on the central nervous system and contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of reports indicate a potential association between long-term/low-dose pesticide exposure and AD, but the results are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to clarify this association. Relevant studies were identified according to inclusion criteria. Summary odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed-effects models. A total of seven studies were included in our meta-analysis. A positive association was observed between pesticide exposure and AD (OR = 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.67; n = 7). The summary ORs with 95% CIs from the crude and adjusted effect size studies were 1.14 (95% CI = 0.94, 1.38; n = 7) and 1.37 (95% CI = 1.09, 1.71; n = 5), respectively. The sensitivity analyses of the present meta-analysis did not substantially modify the association between pesticide exposure and AD. Subgroup analyses revealed that high-quality studies tended to show significant relationships. The present meta-analysis suggested a positive association between pesticide exposure and AD, confirming the hypothesis that pesticide exposure is a risk factor for AD. Further high-quality cohort and case-control studies are required to validate a causal relationship. PMID:27581992

  13. Personal sun exposure and risk of non Hodgkin lymphoma: a pooled analysis from the Interlymph Consortium.

    PubMed

    Kricker, Anne; Armstrong, Bruce K; Hughes, Ann Maree; Goumas, Chris; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Zheng, Tongzhang; Spinelli, John J; De Sanjosé, Sylvia; Hartge, Patricia; Melbye, Mads; Willett, Eleanor V; Becker, Nikolaus; Chiu, Brian C H; Cerhan, James R; Maynadié, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Cocco, Pierluigi; Boffeta, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    In 2004-2007 4 independent case-control studies reported evidence that sun exposure might protect against NHL; a fifth, in women only, found increased risks of NHL associated with a range of sun exposure measurements. These 5 studies are the first to examine the association between personal sun exposure and NHL. We report here on the relationship between sun exposure and NHL in a pooled analysis of 10 studies participating in the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph), including the 5 published studies. Ten case-control studies covering 8,243 cases and 9,697 controls in the USA, Europe and Australia contributed original data for participants of European origin to the pooled analysis. Four kinds of measures of self-reported personal sun exposure were assessed at interview. A two-stage estimation method was used in which study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for potential confounders including smoking and alcohol use, were obtained from unconditional logistic regression models and combined in random-effects models to obtain the pooled estimates. Risk of NHL fell significantly with the composite measure of increasing recreational sun exposure, pooled OR = 0.76 (95% CI 0.63-0.91) for the highest exposure category (p for trend 0.01). A downtrend in risk with increasing total sun exposure was not statistically significant. The protective effect of recreational sun exposure was statistically significant at 18-40 years of age and in the 10 years before diagnosis, and for B cell, but not T cell, lymphomas. Increased recreational sun exposure may protect against NHL.

  14. The association between noise exposure and blood pressure and ischemic heart disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    van Kempen, Elise E M M; Kruize, Hanneke; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Ameling, Caroline B; Staatsen, Brigit A M; de Hollander, Augustinus E M

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that noise exposure is associated with blood pressure changes and ischemic heart disease risk, but epidemiologic evidence is still limited. Furthermore, most reviews investigating these relations were not carried out in a systematic way, which makes them more prone to bias. We conducted a meta-analysis of 43 epidemiologic studies published between 1970 and 1999 that investigate the relation between noise exposure (both occupational and community) and blood pressure and/or ischemic heart disease (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes 410-414). We studied a wide range of effects, from blood pressure changes to a myocardial infarction. With respect to the association between noise exposure and blood pressure, small blood pressure differences were evident. Our meta-analysis showed a significant association for both occupational noise exposure and air traffic noise exposure and hypertension: We estimated relative risks per 5 dB(A) noise increase of 1.14 (1.01-1.29) and 1.26 (1.14-1.39), respectively. Air traffic noise exposure was positively associated with the consultation of a general practitioner or specialist, the use of cardiovascular medicines, and angina pectoris. In cross-sectional studies, road traffic noise exposure increases the risk of myocardial infarction and total ischemic heart disease. Although we can conclude that noise exposure can contribute to the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, the evidence for a relation between noise exposure and ischemic heart disease is still inconclusive because of the limitations in exposure characterization, adjustment for important confounders, and the occurrence of publication bias. PMID:11882483

  15. Analysis of comparative data using generalized estimating equations.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Emmanuel; Claude, Julien

    2002-09-21

    It is widely acknowledged that the analysis of comparative data from related species should be performed taking into account their phylogenetic relationships. We introduce a new method, based on the use of generalized estimating equations (GEE), for the analysis of comparative data. The principle is to incorporate, in the modelling process, a correlation matrix that specifies the dependence among observations. This matrix is obtained from the phylogenetic tree of the studied species. Using this approach, a variety of distributions (discrete or continuous) can be analysed using a generalized linear modelling framework, phylogenies with multichotomies can be analysed, and there is no need to estimate ancestral character state. A simulation study showed that the proposed approach has good statistical properties with a type-I error rate close to the nominal 5%, and statistical power to detect correlated evolution between two characters which increases with the strength of the correlation. The proposed approach performs well for the analysis of discrete characters. We illustrate our approach with some data on macro-ecological correlates in birds. Some extensions of the use of GEE are discussed.

  16. [The physiological analysis of cross adaptation to regular cold exposure and physical activities].

    PubMed

    Son'kin, V D; Iakushkin, A V; Akimov, E B; Andreev, R S; Kalenov, Iu N; Kozlov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Research is devoted to the comparative analysis of results of cold adaptation and physical training. The adaptive shifts occurring in an organism under the influence of a hardening (douche by a cold shower 2 times a day 2 minutes long within 6 weeks) and running training on the treadmill (30 minutes at 70-80% of individual VO2max, 3 times a week, within 6 weeks) were compared at 6 the same subjects. The interval between the two cycles of training was no less than 3 months. The indicators registered during ramp test and standard cold exposure test before and after each cycle of trainings were compared. It is shown that patterns of adaptive shifts at adaptation to factors of various modality strongly differ. Shifts at adaptation to physical activities were as a whole more expressed, than at adaptation to regular cold exposition. An individual variety of adaptive reactions suggests the feasibility of developing new approaches to the theory of the adaptation, connected with studying of physiological individuality. PMID:25711113

  17. Long duration exposure facility post-flight thermal analysis, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, William M.; Sampair, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of the post-flight thermal analysis of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission are presented. The LDEF mission thermal analysis was verified by comparing the thermal model results to flight data from the LDEF Thermal Measurements System (THERM). Post-flight calculated temperature uncertainties have been reduced to under +/- 18 F from the pre-flight uncertainties of +/- 40 F. The THERM consisted of eight temperature sensors, a shared tape recorder, a standard LDEF flight battery, and an electronics control box. The temperatures were measured at selected locations on the LDEF structure interior during the first 390 days of flight and recorded for post-flight analysis. After the LDEF retrieval from Space on 12 Jan. 1990, the tape recorder was recovered from the spacecraft and the data reduced for comparison to the LDEF predicted temperatures. The LDEF mission temperatures were calculated prior to the LDEF deployment on 7 Apr. 1980, and updated after the LDEF retrieval with the following actual flight parameter data: including thermal fluxes, spacecraft attitudes, thermal coatings degradation, and contamination effects. All updated data used for the calculation of post-flight temperatures is also presented in this document.

  18. Long duration exposure facility post-flight thermal analysis, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, William M.; Sampair, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of the post-flight thermal analysis for the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission are presented. The LDEF mission thermal analysis was verified by comparing the thermal model results to flight data from the LDEF Thermal Measurements System (THERM). Post-flight calculated temperature uncertainties have been reduced to under +/- 18 F from the pre-flight uncertainties of +/- 40 F. The THERM consisted of eight temperature sensors, a shared tape recorder, a standard LDEF flight battery, and an electronics control box. The temperatures were measured at selected locations on the LDEF structure interior during the first 390 days of flight and recorded for post-flight analysis. After the LDEF retrieval from Space on 12 Jan. 1990, the tape recorder was recovered from the spacecraft and the data reduced for comparison to the LDEF predicted temperatures. The LDEF mission temperatures were calculated prior to the LDEF deployment on 7 Apr. 1980, and updated after the LDEF retrieval with the following actual flight parameter data: thermal fluxes, spacecraft attitudes, thermal coatings degradation, and contamination effects. All updated data used for calculation of post-flight temperatures is also presented in this document.

  19. Systems analysis of the mechanisms of cardiac diastolic function changes after microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Richard; Coleman, Thomas; Steven, Platts; Martin, David

    Detailed information concerning cardiac function was collected by two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography at 10 days before flight and 3h after landing in astronauts returning from shuttle missions. A comparative analysis of this data suggests that cardiac diastolic function is reduced after microgravity exposure with little or no change in systolic function as measured by ejection fraction However, the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations have not been determined. In this study, an integrative computer model of human physiology that forms the framework for the Digital Astronaut Project (Guyton/Coleman/Summers Model) was used in a systems analysis of the echocardiographic data in the context of general cardiovascular physiologic functioning. The physiologic mechanisms involved in the observed changes were then determined by a dissection of model interrelationships. The systems analysis of possible physiologic mechanisms involved reveals that a loss of fluid from the myocardial interstitial space may lead to a stiffening of the myocardium and could potentially result in some of the cardiac diastolic dysfunction seen postflight. The cardiovascular dynamics may be different during spaceflight.

  20. A tensor-based morphometry analysis of regional differences in brain volume in relation to prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Meintjes, E M; Narr, K L; van der Kouwe, A J W; Molteno, C D; Pirnia, T; Gutman, B; Woods, R P; Thompson, P M; Jacobson, J L; Jacobson, S W

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in brain volumes represent a neurobiological signature of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Less clear is how regional brain tissue reductions differ after normalizing for brain size differences linked with FASD and whether these profiles can predict the degree of prenatal exposure to alcohol. To examine associations of regional brain tissue excesses/deficits with degree of prenatal alcohol exposure and diagnosis with and without correction for overall brain volume, tensor-based morphometry (TBM) methods were applied to structural imaging data from a well-characterized, demographically homogeneous sample of children diagnosed with FASD (n = 39, 9.6-11.0 years) and controls (n = 16, 9.5-11.0 years). Degree of prenatal alcohol exposure was significantly associated with regionally pervasive brain tissue reductions in: (1) the thalamus, midbrain, and ventromedial frontal lobe, (2) the superior cerebellum and inferior occipital lobe, (3) the dorsolateral frontal cortex, and (4) the precuneus and superior parietal lobule. When overall brain size was factored out of the analysis on a subject-by-subject basis, no regions showed significant associations with alcohol exposure. FASD diagnosis was associated with a similar deformation pattern, but few of the regions survived FDR correction. In data-driven independent component analyses (ICA) regional brain tissue deformations successfully distinguished individuals based on extent of prenatal alcohol exposure and to a lesser degree, diagnosis. The greater sensitivity of the continuous measure of alcohol exposure compared with the categorical diagnosis across diverse brain regions underscores the dose dependence of these effects. The ICA results illustrate that profiles of brain tissue alterations may be a useful indicator of prenatal alcohol exposure when reliable historical data are not available and facial features are not apparent. PMID:25057467

  1. Comparative assessments of the effects of alcohol exposure on fetal brain development using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-02-01

    The developing fetal brain is vulnerable to a variety of environmental agents including maternal ethanol consumption. Preclinical studies on the development and amelioration of fetal teratology would be significantly facilitated by the application of high resolution imaging technologies like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (US). This study investigates the ability of these imaging technologies to measure the effects of maternal ethanol exposure on brain development, ex vivo, in fetal mice. Pregnant mice at gestational day 12.5 were administered ethanol (3 g/Kg b.wt.) or water by intragastric gavage, twice daily for three consecutive days. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and imaged. Three-dimensional images of the mice fetus brains were obtained by OCT and high-resolution US, and the volumes of the left and right ventricles of the brain were measured. Ethanol-exposed fetuses exhibited a statistically significant, 2-fold increase in average left and right ventricular volumes compared with the ventricular volume of control fetuses, with OCT-derived measures of 0.38 and 0.18 mm3, respectively, whereas the boundaries of the fetal mouse lateral ventricles were not clearly definable with US imaging. Our results indicate that OCT is a useful technology for assessing ventriculomegaly accompanying alcohol-induced developmental delay. This study clearly demonstrated advantages of using OCT for quantitative assessment of embryonic development compared with US imaging.

  2. Comparative assessments of the effects of alcohol exposure on fetal brain development using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C; Larin, Kirill V

    2013-02-01

    The developing fetal brain is vulnerable to a variety of environmental agents including maternal ethanol consumption. Preclinical studies on the development and amelioration of fetal teratology would be significantly facilitated by the application of high resolution imaging technologies like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (US). This study investigates the ability of these imaging technologies to measure the effects of maternal ethanol exposure on brain development, ex vivo, in fetal mice. Pregnant mice at gestational day 12.5 were administered ethanol (3 g/Kg b.wt.) or water by intragastric gavage, twice daily for three consecutive days. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and imaged. Three-dimensional images of the mice fetus brains were obtained by OCT and high-resolution US, and the volumes of the left and right ventricles of the brain were measured. Ethanol-exposed fetuses exhibited a statistically significant, 2-fold increase in average left and right ventricular volumes compared with the ventricular volume of control fetuses, with OCT-derived measures of 0.38 and 0.18 mm3, respectively, whereas the boundaries of the fetal mouse lateral ventricles were not clearly definable with US imaging. Our results indicate that OCT is a useful technology for assessing ventriculomegaly accompanying alcohol-induced developmental delay. This study clearly demonstrated advantages of using OCT for quantitative assessment of embryonic development compared with US imaging.

  3. Translational analysis of effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on human infant cries and rat pup ultrasonic vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Zeskind, Philip Sanford; McMurray, Matthew S; Cox Lippard, Elizabeth T; Grewen, Karen M; Garber, Kristin A; Johns, Josephine M

    2014-01-01

    Spectral and temporal features of human infant crying may detect neurobehavioral effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE). Finding comparable measures of rodent ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) would promote translational analyses by controlling the effects of correlated variables that confound human studies. To this end, two studies examined the sensitivity of similar acoustic structures in human infant and rat pup vocalizations to effects of PCE. In Study 1, cry sounds of 107 one month-old infants were spectrum analyzed to create a novel set of measures and to detect the presence of hyperphonation - a qualitative shift to an atypically high fundamental frequency (basic pitch) associated with neurobehavioral insult. Infants with PCE were compared to infants with prenatal polydrug-exposure (PPE) without cocaine and with infants in a standard comparison (SC) group with no prenatal drug exposure. In Study 2, USVs of 118 five day-old rat pups with either PCE, prenatal saline exposure or no prenatal exposures were spectrum analyzed to detect the presence of frequency shifts - acoustic features that have a frequency waveform similar to that of hyperphonation. Results of study 1 showed PCE had two sets of sex-dependent effects on human infants: PCE males had higher pitched cries with more dysphonation (turbulence); PCE females had longer pauses between fewer cry sounds that were of lower amplitude than comparison groups. PCE and PPE infants had more cries with hyperphonation than SC infants. In study 2, PCE pups had a greater percentage of USVs with shift in the acoustic structure than pups in the two control groups. As such, the novel measures of human infant crying and rat pup USVs were sensitive to effects of PCE. These studies provide the first known translational analysis of similar acoustic structures of vocalizations in two species to detect adverse effects of prenatal drug exposure.

  4. Sequence and comparative analysis of Leuconostoc dairy bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H; Neve, Horst; Hammer, Karin; Jacobsen, Susanne; Pedersen, Per D; Sørensen, Søren J; Heller, Knut J; Vogensen, Finn K

    2014-04-17

    Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc species may significantly influence the quality of the final product. There is however limited knowledge of this group of phages in the literature. We have determined the complete genome sequences of nine Leuconostoc bacteriophages virulent to either Leuconostoc mesenteroides or Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides strains. The phages have dsDNA genomes with sizes ranging from 25.7 to 28.4 kb. Comparative genomics analysis helped classify the 9 phages into two classes, which correlates with the host species. High percentage of similarity within the classes on both nucleotide and protein levels was observed. Genome comparison also revealed very high conservation of the overall genomic organization between the classes. The genes were organized in functional modules responsible for replication, packaging, head and tail morphogenesis, cell lysis and regulation and modification, respectively. No lysogeny modules were detected. To our knowledge this report provides the first comparative genomic work done on Leuconostoc dairy phages.

  5. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  6. Stigma, sex work, and substance use: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Cecilia; McCarthy, Bill; Jansson, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Stigma is a widely used concept in social science research and an extensive literature claims that stigmatisation contributes to numerous negative health outcomes. However, few studies compare groups that vary in the extent to which they are stigmatised and even fewer studies examine stigma's independent and mediating effects. This article addresses these gaps in a comparative study of perceived stigma and drug use among three low-income feminised service occupations: sex work, food and alcoholic beverage serving, and barbering and hairstyling. An analysis of longitudinal data shows positive associations between sex work, perceived stigma, and socially less acceptable drug use (for example, heroin and cocaine), and that stigma mediates part of the link between sex work and the use of these drugs. Our overall findings suggest that perceived stigma is pronounced among those who work in the sex industry and negatively affects health independently of sex work involvement.

  7. Personal Breathing Zone Exposures among Hot-Mix Asphalt Paving Workers; Preliminary Analysis for Trends and Analysis of Work Practices That Resulted in the Highest Exposure Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Linda V.; Snawder, John E.; Kriech, Anthony J.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; McClean, Michael D.; Herrick, Robert F.; Blackburn, Gary R.; Olsen, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    An exposure assessment of hot-mix asphalt (HMA) paving workers was conducted to determine which of four exposure scenarios impacted worker exposure and dose. Goals of this report are to present the personal-breathing zone (PBZ) data, discuss the impact of substituting the releasing/cleaning agent, and discuss work practices that resulted in the highest exposure concentration for each analyte. One-hundred-seven PBZ samples were collected from HMA paving workers on days when diesel oil was used as a releasing/cleaning agent. An additional 36 PBZ samples were collected on days when B-100 (100% biodiesel, containing no petroleum-derived products) was used as a substitute releasing/cleaning agent. Twenty-four PBZ samples were collected from a reference group of concrete workers, who also worked in outdoor construction but had no exposure to asphalt emissions. Background and field blank samples were also collected daily. Total particulates and the benzene soluble fraction were determined gravimetrically. Total organic matter was determined using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection and provided qualitative information about other exposure sources contributing to worker exposure besides asphalt emissions. Thirty-three individual polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were determined using GC with time-offlight mass spectrometry; results were presented as either the concentration of an individual PAC or a summation of the individual PACs containing either 2- to 3-rings or 4- to 6-rings. Samples were also screened for PACs containing 4- to 6-rings using fluorescence spectroscopy. Arithmetic means, medians, and box plots of the PBZ data were used to evaluate trends in the data. Box plots illustrating the diesel oil results were more variable than the B-100. Also, the highest diesel oil results were much higher in concentration than the highest B-100 results. An analysis of the highest exposure results and field notes revealed a probable association between

  8. Feature-level sentiment analysis by using comparative domain corpora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Changqin; Ren, Fuji

    2016-06-01

    Feature-level sentiment analysis (SA) is able to provide more fine-grained SA on certain opinion targets and has a wider range of applications on E-business. This study proposes an approach based on comparative domain corpora for feature-level SA. The proposed approach makes use of word associations for domain-specific feature extraction. First, we assign a similarity score for each candidate feature to denote its similarity extent to a domain. Then we identify domain features based on their similarity scores on different comparative domain corpora. After that, dependency grammar and a general sentiment lexicon are applied to extract and expand feature-oriented opinion words. Lastly, the semantic orientation of a domain-specific feature is determined based on the feature-oriented opinion lexicons. In evaluation, we compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods (including unsupervised and semi-supervised) using a standard product review test collection. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of using comparative domain corpora.

  9. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    SciTech Connect

    Waterston, Robert H.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birney, Ewan; Rogers, Jane; Abril, Josep F.; Agarwal, Pankaj; Agarwala, Richa; Ainscough, Rachel; Alexandersson, Marina; An, Peter; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Attwood, John; Baertsch, Robert; Bailey, Jonathon; Barlow, Karen; Beck, Stephan; Berry, Eric; Birren, Bruce; Bloom, Toby; Bork, Peer; Botcherby, Marc; Bray, Nicolas; Brent, Michael R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Brown, Stephen D.; Bult, Carol; Burton, John; Butler, Jonathan; Campbell, Robert D.; Carninci, Piero; Cawley, Simon; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Church, Deanna M.; Clamp, Michele; Clee, Christopher; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, Lisa L.; Copley, Richard R.; Coulson, Alan; Couronne, Olivier; Cuff, James; Curwen, Val; Cutts, Tim; Daly, Mark; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Delehaunty, Kimberly D.; Deri, Justin; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dewey, Colin; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Diekhans, Mark; Dodge, Sheila; Dubchak, Inna; Dunn, Diane M.; Eddy, Sean R.; Elnitski, Laura; Emes, Richard D.; Eswara, Pallavi; Eyras, Eduardo; Felsenfeld, Adam; Fewell, Ginger A.; Flicek, Paul; Foley, Karen; Frankel, Wayne N.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Furey, Terrence S.; Gage, Diane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glusman, Gustavo; Gnerre, Sante; Goldman, Nick; Goodstadt, Leo; Grafham, Darren; Graves, Tina A.; Green, Eric D.; Gregory, Simon; Guigo, Roderic; Guyer, Mark; Hardison, Ross C.; Haussler, David; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hinrichs, Angela; Hlavina, Wratko; Holzer, Timothy; Hsu, Fan; Hua, Axin; Hubbard, Tim; Hunt, Adrienne; Jackson, Ian; Jaffe, David B.; Johnson, L. Steven; Jones, Matthew; Jones, Thomas A.; Joy, Ann; Kamal, Michael; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Karolchik, Donna; Kasprzyk, Arkadiusz; Kawai, Jun; Keibler, Evan; Kells, Cristyn; Kent, W. James; Kirby, Andrew; Kolbe, Diana L.; Korf, Ian; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Kulbokas III, Edward J.; Kulp, David; Landers, Tom; Leger, J.P.; Leonard, Steven; Letunic, Ivica; Levine, Rosie; et al.

    2002-12-15

    The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome and a key experimental tool for biomedical research. Here, we report the results of an international collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the two sequences. We discuss topics including the analysis of the evolutionary forces shaping the size, structure and sequence of the genomes; the conservation of large-scale synteny across most of the genomes; the much lower extent of sequence orthology covering less than half of the genomes; the proportions of the genomes under selection; the number of protein-coding genes; the expansion of gene families related to reproduction and immunity; the evolution of proteins; and the identification of intraspecies polymorphism.

  10. Comparative analysis of selected radiative transfer approaches for aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Sokoletsky, Leonid

    2005-01-01

    A comparative analysis is presented of simple approaches to radiative transfer in plane-parallel layers, such as the self-consistent Haltrin approach, the Chandrasekhar-Klier exact solution for isotropic scatters, an extended version of two-flux radiative Kubelka-Munk theory, the neutron-diffuse Gate-Brinkworth theory, and different versions of the delta-Eddington theory. It is shown that the Haltrin approach is preferable to others and can be used for the solution of an inverse optical problem of the estimation of absorption and backscattering coefficients of aquatic environments from measured apparent optical properties. Two different methods of transformation from measured irradiance reflectance at combined illumination to irradiance reflectance induced by diffuse illumination only are developed. An analysis of the use of the different models for estimation of the effect of the bottom albedo is also presented. PMID:15662895

  11. Establishing a framework for comparative analysis of genome sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, A.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a framework and a high-level language toolkit for comparative analysis of genome sequence alignment The framework integrates the information derived from multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree (hypothetical tree of evolution) to derive new properties about sequences. Multiple sequence alignments are treated as an abstract data type. Abstract operations have been described to manipulate a multiple sequence alignment and to derive mutation related information from a phylogenetic tree by superimposing parsimonious analysis. The framework has been applied on protein alignments to derive constrained columns (in a multiple sequence alignment) that exhibit evolutionary pressure to preserve a common property in a column despite mutation. A Prolog toolkit based on the framework has been implemented and demonstrated on alignments containing 3000 sequences and 3904 columns.

  12. Systems design and comparative analysis of large antenna concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual designs are evaluated and comparative analyses conducted for several large antenna spacecraft for Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) communications missions. Structural configurations include trusses, hoop and column and radial rib. The study was conducted using the Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) system. The current capabilities, development status, and near-term plans for the IDEAS system are reviewed. Overall capabilities are highlighted. IDEAS is an integrated system of computer-aided design and analysis software used to rapidly evaluate system concepts and technology needs for future advanced spacecraft such as large antennas, platforms, and space stations. The system was developed at Langley to meet a need for rapid, cost-effective, labor-saving approaches to the design and analysis of numerous missions and total spacecraft system options under consideration. IDEAS consists of about 40 technical modules efficient executive, data-base and file management software, and interactive graphics display capabilities.

  13. The digital storytelling process: A comparative analysis from various experts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Hashiroh; Shiratuddin, Norshuhada

    2016-08-01

    Digital Storytelling (DST) is a method of delivering information to the audience. It combines narrative and digital media content infused with the multimedia elements. In order for the educators (i.e the designers) to create a compelling digital story, there are sets of processes introduced by experts. Nevertheless, the experts suggest varieties of processes to guide them; of which some are redundant. The main aim of this study is to propose a single guide process for the creation of DST. A comparative analysis is employed where ten DST models from various experts are analysed. The process can also be implemented in other multimedia materials that used the concept of DST.

  14. Comparative biomorphologic analysis about three dentinal adhesives of last generations.

    PubMed

    Carini, F; Varia, P; Valenza, V

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work consists in a comparative biomorphological analysis of the properties of infiltration and of adhesion to dental tissues of three among the more used enamel dentinal adhesives of the last generation known with the commercial name of Syntac, Excite and Prompt. The results have given evidence that Syntac has got short adhesion, Excite has got good capacity of infiltration and moderate adhesion, Prompt seems to possess a capacity of infiltration equal to Excite's one, but a better adhesion besides an easier modality of use.

  15. Comparative promoter analysis in vertebrate genomes with the CORG workbench.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Christoph; Vingron, Martin

    2006-01-01

    CORG is a versatile web-based workbench for comparative promoter analysis in vertebrate model organisms. Two kinds of information are explicitly considered in the automated annotation process. First, local conservation patterns in upstream regions of homologous genes: These phylogenetic footprints are likely to stem from sequence elements that are under selective pressure. The CORG pipeline detects and exploits patterns of local similarity to annotate promoter regions. Second, experimental data on transcription start sites: exon positions and DNA binding site descriptions complete the promoter annotation. These data are made available via an interactive web portal. Individual promoter studies are supported by a JAVA applet that supplies all data down to the nucleotide level.

  16. Comparative study of analysis methods in biospeckle phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Emerson Rodrigo; Muramatsu, Mikiya

    2008-04-01

    In this work we present a review of main statistical properties of speckle patterns and accomplish a comparative study of the more used methods for analysis and extraction of information from optical grainy. The first and second order space-time statistics are dicussed in an overview perspective. The biospeckle phenomenon has detailed attention, specially in its application on monitoring of activity in tissues. The main techniques used to obtain information from speckle patterns are presented, with special prominence to autocorrelation function, co-occurrence matrices, Fujii's method, Briers' contrast and spatial and temporal contrast analisys (LASCA and LASTCA). An incipient method for analysis, based on the study of sucessive correlations contrast, is introduced. Numerical simulations, using diferent probability density functions for velocities of scatterers, were made with two objectives: to test the analysis methods and to give subsidies for interpretation of in vivo results. Vegetable and animal tissues are investigated, achieving the monitoring of senescence process and vascularization maps on leaves, the accompaniment of fungi contamined fruits, the mapping of activity in flowers and the analisys of healing in rats subjected to abdominal surgery. Experiments using the biospeckle phenomenon in microscopy are carried out. At last, it is evaluated the potentiality of biospeckle as diagnosis tool in chronic vein ulcer cared with low intensity laser therapy and the better analysis methods for each kind of tissue are pointed.

  17. Comparative analysis of evaluation techniques for transport policies

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, David; Ryan, Lisa

    2011-04-15

    The objective of this paper is to examine and compare the use of a number of policy evaluation tools, which can be used to measure the impact of transport policies and programmes as part of a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) or sustainability appraisal. The evaluation tools that were examined include cost-benefit analysis (CBA), cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) and multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). It was concluded that both CEA and CBA are useful for estimating the costs and/or benefits associated with transport policies but are constrained by the difficulty in quantifying non-market impacts and monetising total costs and benefits. Furthermore, CEA is limited to identifying the most 'cost-effective policy' for achieving a single, narrowly defined objective, usually greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and is, therefore, not suitable for evaluating policy options with ancillary costs or a variety of potential benefits. Thus, CBA or CEA evaluation should be complemented by a complete environmental and socio-economic impact assessment approach such as MCDA. This method allows for participatory analysis and qualitative assessment but is subject to caveats such as subjectivity and value-laden judgments.

  18. Genome-wide Comparative Analysis of Annexin Superfamily in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Sravan Kumar; Clark, Greg B.; Ayele, Belay T.; Ashe, Paula; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2012-01-01

    Most annexins are calcium-dependent, phospholipid-binding proteins with suggested functions in response to environmental stresses and signaling during plant growth and development. They have previously been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis and rice, and constitute a multigene family in plants. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of annexin gene families in the sequenced genomes of Viridiplantae ranging from unicellular green algae to multicellular plants, and identified 149 genes. Phylogenetic studies of these deduced annexins classified them into nine different arbitrary groups. The occurrence and distribution of bona fide type II calcium binding sites within the four annexin domains were found to be different in each of these groups. Analysis of chromosomal distribution of annexin genes in rice, Arabidopsis and poplar revealed their localization on various chromosomes with some members also found on duplicated chromosomal segments leading to gene family expansion. Analysis of gene structure suggests sequential or differential loss of introns during the evolution of land plant annexin genes. Intron positions and phases are well conserved in annexin genes from representative genomes ranging from Physcomitrella to higher plants. The occurrence of alternative motifs such as K/R/HGD was found to be overlapping or at the mutated regions of the type II calcium binding sites indicating potential functional divergence in certain plant annexins. This study provides a basis for further functional analysis and characterization of annexin multigene families in the plant lineage. PMID:23133603

  19. Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

    2002-10-01

    An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

  20. Assessing and reporting uncertainties in dietary exposure analysis: Mapping of uncertainties in a tiered approach.

    PubMed

    Kettler, Susanne; Kennedy, Marc; McNamara, Cronan; Oberdörfer, Regina; O'Mahony, Cian; Schnabel, Jürgen; Smith, Benjamin; Sprong, Corinne; Faludi, Roland; Tennant, David

    2015-08-01

    Uncertainty analysis is an important component of dietary exposure assessments in order to understand correctly the strength and limits of its results. Often, standard screening procedures are applied in a first step which results in conservative estimates. If through those screening procedures a potential exceedance of health-based guidance values is indicated, within the tiered approach more refined models are applied. However, the sources and types of uncertainties in deterministic and probabilistic models can vary or differ. A key objective of this work has been the mapping of different sources and types of uncertainties to better understand how to best use uncertainty analysis to generate more realistic comprehension of dietary exposure. In dietary exposure assessments, uncertainties can be introduced by knowledge gaps about the exposure scenario, parameter and the model itself. With this mapping, general and model-independent uncertainties have been identified and described, as well as those which can be introduced and influenced by the specific model during the tiered approach. This analysis identifies that there are general uncertainties common to point estimates (screening or deterministic methods) and probabilistic exposure assessment methods. To provide further clarity, general sources of uncertainty affecting many dietary exposure assessments should be separated from model-specific uncertainties. PMID:25890086

  1. Comparative Mitochondrial Proteomic Analysis of Raji Cells Exposed to Adriamycin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Jie; Sun, Qing; Fang, Xiao-Sheng; Wang, Xin

    2009-01-01

    The antitumor mechanisms of adriamycin (ADR) have been thought to contribute to induction of apoptosis and inefficiency of DNA repair, processes that are to a large extent mediated by mitochondria. This study aimed to investigate characteristics of ADR, including its antineoplastic activity, drug resistance, and unexpected toxicity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) Raji cells at the mitochondrial proteomic level. The alterations of the mitochondrial proteome of Raji cells treated with ADR were analyzed by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with linear ion trap quadrupole–electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LTQ-ESI-MS/MS).The altered patterns of three identified proteins were validated by Western blot and analyzed by pathway studio software. The results showed that 34 proteins were downregulated and 3 proteins upregulated in the study group compared with the control group. The differentially expressed proteins distributed their functions in reduction-oxidation reactions, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, transporters and channels, and oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), ATP-binding cassette transporter isoform B6 (ABCB6), and prohibitin (PHB) identified in this study may be closely related to chemoresistance and could serve as potential chemotherapeutic targets for NHL. Collectively, these results suggest that specific mitochondrial proteins are uniquely susceptible to alterations in abundance following exposure to ADR and carry implications for the investigation of therapeutic and prognostic markers. Further studies focusing on these identified proteins will be used to predict treatment response and reverse apoptosis resistance,and to explore drug-combination strategies associated with ADR for NHL therapy. PMID:19209238

  2. Occupational Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Birth Weight and Length of Gestation: A European Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Birks, Laura; Casas, Maribel; Garcia, Ana M.; Alexander, Jan; Barros, Henrique; Bergström, Anna; Bonde, Jens Peter; Burdorf, Alex; Costet, Nathalie; Danileviciute, Asta; Eggesbø, Merete; Fernández, Mariana F.; González-Galarzo, M. Carmen; Hanke, Wojciech; Jaddoe, Vincent; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kull, Inger; Lertxundi, Aitana; Melaki, Vasiliki; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Olea, Nicolás; Polanska, Kinga; Rusconi, Franca; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Santos, Ana Cristina; Vrijkotte, Tanja; Zugna, Daniela; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Cordier, Sylvaine; Vrijheid, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women of reproductive age can be exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) at work, and exposure to EDCs in pregnancy may affect fetal growth. Objectives: We assessed whether maternal occupational exposure to EDCs during pregnancy as classified by application of a job exposure matrix was associated with birth weight, term low birth weight (LBW), length of gestation, and preterm delivery. Methods: Using individual participant data from 133,957 mother–child pairs in 13 European cohorts spanning births from 1994 through 2011, we linked maternal job titles with exposure to 10 EDC groups as assessed through a job exposure matrix. For each group, we combined the two levels of exposure categories (possible and probable) and compared birth outcomes with the unexposed group (exposure unlikely). We performed meta-analyses of cohort-specific estimates. Results: Eleven percent of pregnant women were classified as exposed to EDCs at work during pregnancy, based on job title. Classification of exposure to one or more EDC group was associated with an increased risk of term LBW [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.49], as were most specific EDC groups; this association was consistent across cohorts. Further, the risk increased with increasing number of EDC groups (OR = 2.11; 95% CI: 1.10, 4.06 for exposure to four or more EDC groups). There were few associations (p < 0.05) with the other outcomes; women holding job titles classified as exposed to bisphenol A or brominated flame retardants were at higher risk for longer length of gestation. Conclusion: Results from our large population-based birth cohort design indicate that employment during pregnancy in occupations classified as possibly or probably exposed to EDCs was associated with an increased risk of term LBW. Citation: Birks L, Casas M, Garcia AM, Alexander J, Barros H, Bergström A, Bonde JP, Burdorf A, Costet N, Danileviciute A, Eggesbø M, Fernández MF, González-Galarzo MC, Gražulevičienė R

  3. Comparative analysis of programmed cell death pathways in filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Natalie D; Badger, Jonathan H; Robson, Geoff D; Wortman, Jennifer R; Nierman, William C

    2005-01-01

    Background Fungi can undergo autophagic- or apoptotic-type programmed cell death (PCD) on exposure to antifungal agents, developmental signals, and stress factors. Filamentous fungi can also exhibit a form of cell death called heterokaryon incompatibility (HI) triggered by fusion between two genetically incompatible individuals. With the availability of recently sequenced genomes of Aspergillus fumigatus and several related species, we were able to define putative components of fungi-specific death pathways and the ancestral core apoptotic machinery shared by all fungi and metazoa. Results Phylogenetic profiling of HI-associated proteins from four Aspergilli and seven other fungal species revealed lineage-specific protein families, orphan genes, and core genes conserved across all fungi and metazoa. The Aspergilli-specific domain architectures include NACHT family NTPases, which may function as key integrators of stress and nutrient availability signals. They are often found fused to putative effector domains such as Pfs, SesB/LipA, and a newly identified domain, HET-s/LopB. Many putative HI inducers and mediators are specific to filamentous fungi and not found in unicellular yeasts. In addition to their role in HI, several of them appear to be involved in regulation of cell cycle, development and sexual differentiation. Finally, the Aspergilli possess many putative downstream components of the mammalian apoptotic machinery including several proteins not found in the model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion Our analysis identified more than 100 putative PCD associated genes in the Aspergilli, which may help expand the range of currently available treatments for aspergillosis and other invasive fungal diseases. The list includes species-specific protein families as well as conserved core components of the ancestral PCD machinery shared by fungi and metazoa. PMID:16336669

  4. Joint analysis of three European nested case-control studies of lung cancer among radon exposed miners: exposure restricted to below 300 WLM.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R; Tomasek, Ladislav; Kreuzer, Michaela; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Schnelzer, Maria; Grosche, Bernd; Placek, Vit; Heribanova, Alena; Timarche, Margot

    2013-03-01

    Analyses of lung cancer risk were carried out using restrictions to nested case-control data on uranium miners in the Czech Republic, France, and Germany. With the data restricted to cumulative exposures below 300 working-level-months (WLM) and adjustment for smoking status, the excess relative risk (ERR) per WLM was 0.0174 (95% CI: 0.009-0.035), compared to the estimate of 0.008 (95% CI: 0.004-0.014) using the unrestricted data. Analysis of both the restricted and unrestricted data showed that time since exposure windows had a major effect; the ERR/WLM was six times higher for more recent exposures (5-24 y) than for more distant exposures (25 y or more). Based on a linear model fitted to data on exposures <300 WLM, the ERR WLM of lung cancer at 30 y after exposure was estimated to be 0.021 (95% CI: 0.011-0.040), and the risks decreased by 47% per decade increase in time since exposure. The results from analyzing the joint effects of radon and smoking were consistent with a sub-multiplicative interaction; the ERR WLM was greater for non-smokers compared with current or ex-smokers, although there was no statistically significant variation in the ERR WLM by smoking status. The patterns of risk with radon exposure from the combined European nested case-control miner analysis were generally consistent with those based on the BEIR VI Exposure-Age-Concentration model. Based on conversions from WLM to time weighted averaged radon concentration (expressed per 100 Bq m), the results from this analysis of miner data were in agreement with those from the joint analysis of the European residential radon studies.

  5. Integrative Analysis of miRNA and Inflammatory Gene Expression After Acute Particulate Matter Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are environmentally sensitive inhibitors of gene expression that may mediate the effects of metal-rich particulate matter (PM) and toxic metals on human individuals. Previous environmental miRNA studies have investigated a limited number of candidate miRNAs and have not yet evaluated the functional effects on gene expression. In this study, we wanted to identify PM-sensitive miRNAs using microarray profiling on matched baseline and postexposure RNA from foundry workers with well-characterized exposure to metal-rich PM and to characterize miRNA relations with expression of candidate inflammatory genes. We applied microarray analysis of 847 human miRNAs and real-time PCR analysis of 18 candidate inflammatory genes on matched blood samples collected from foundry workers at baseline and after 3 days of work (postexposure). We identified differentially expressed miRNAs (fold change [FC] > 2 and p < 0.05) and correlated their expression with the inflammatory associated genes. We performed in silico network analysis in MetaCore v6.9 to characterize the biological pathways connecting miRNA-mRNA pairs. Microarray analysis identified four miRNAs that were differentially expressed in postexposure compared with baseline samples, including miR-421 (FC = 2.81, p < 0.001), miR-146a (FC = 2.62, p = 0.007), miR-29a (FC = 2.91, p < 0.001), and let-7g (FC = 2.73, p = 0.019). Using false discovery date adjustment for multiple comparisons, we found 11 miRNA-mRNA correlated pairs involving the 4 differentially expressed miRNAs and candidate inflammatory genes. In silico network analysis with MetaCore database identified biological interactions for all the 11 miRNA-mRNA pairs, which ranged from direct mRNA targeting to complex interactions with multiple intermediates. Acute PM exposure may affect gene regulation through PM-responsive miRNAs that directly or indirectly control inflammatory gene expression. PMID:23358196

  6. Statistical Methods and Software for the Analysis of Occupational Exposure Data with Non-detectable Values

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, EL

    2005-09-20

    Environmental exposure measurements are, in general, positive and may be subject to left censoring; i.e,. the measured value is less than a ''detection limit''. In occupational monitoring, strategies for assessing workplace exposures typically focus on the mean exposure level or the probability that any measurement exceeds a limit. Parametric methods used to determine acceptable levels of exposure, are often based on a two parameter lognormal distribution. The mean exposure level, an upper percentile, and the exceedance fraction are used to characterize exposure levels, and confidence limits are used to describe the uncertainty in these estimates. Statistical methods for random samples (without non-detects) from the lognormal distribution are well known for each of these situations. In this report, methods for estimating these quantities based on the maximum likelihood method for randomly left censored lognormal data are described and graphical methods are used to evaluate the lognormal assumption. If the lognormal model is in doubt and an alternative distribution for the exposure profile of a similar exposure group is not available, then nonparametric methods for left censored data are used. The mean exposure level, along with the upper confidence limit, is obtained using the product limit estimate, and the upper confidence limit on an upper percentile (i.e., the upper tolerance limit) is obtained using a nonparametric approach. All of these methods are well known but computational complexity has limited their use in routine data analysis with left censored data. The recent development of the R environment for statistical data analysis and graphics has greatly enhanced the availability of high-quality nonproprietary (open source) software that serves as the basis for implementing the methods in this paper.

  7. Meta-analysis on occupational exposure to pesticides--neurobehavioral impact and dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baron, Monika; Knapp, Guido; Schäper, Michael; van Thriel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While the health impact of high exposures to pesticides is acknowledged, the impact of chronic exposures in the absence of acute poisonings is controversial. A systematic analysis of dose-response relationships is still missing. Its absence may provoke alternative explanations for altered performances. Consequently, opportunities for health prevention in the occupational and environmental field may be missed. Objectives were (1) quantification of the neurotoxic impact of pesticides by an analysis of functional alterations in workers measured by neuropsychological performance tests, (2) estimates of dose-response relationships on the basis of exposure duration, and (3) exploration of susceptible subgroups. The meta-analysis employed a random effects model to obtain overall effects for individual performance tests. Twenty-two studies with a total of 1758 exposed and 1260 reference individuals met the inclusion criteria. At least three independent outcomes were available for twenty-six performance variables. Significant performance effects were shown in adults and referred to both cognitive and motor performances. Effect sizes ranging from dRE=-0.14 to dRE=-0.67 showed consistent outcomes for memory and attention. Relationships between effect sizes and exposure duration were indicated for individual performance variables and the total of measured performances. Studies on adolescents had to be analyzed separately due to numerous outliers. The large variation among outcomes hampered the analysis of the susceptibility in this group, while data on female workers was too scant for the analysis. Relationships exist between the impact of pesticides on performances and exposure duration. A change in test paradigms would help to decipher the impact more specifically. The use of biomarkers appropriate for lower exposures would allow a better prevention of neurotoxic effects due to occupational and environmental exposure. Intervention studies in adolescents seem warranted to

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-04-04

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy. PMID:27173185

  10. Suitability of molecular descriptors for database mining. A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Gabriele; Pastor, Manuel; Mannhold, Raimund

    2002-06-20

    Database mining methods rely on the molecular descriptors used to characterize a structural database. In the present investigation, five different types of descriptors (log P, UNITY fingerprints, ISIS keys, VolSurf, and GRIND) are applied to characterize various databases (n = 1007, 100, and 229) comprising drugs almost exclusively. The validity of the descriptors is comparatively analyzed via principal component analysis and its hierarchical variant, consensus principal component analysis. Both pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic aspects of database mining are treated. For pharmacodynamic aspects, clustering behavior achieved with the different descriptors is tested on the chemically homogeneous beta-blockers, benzodiazepines, and penicillins and on the chemically more diverse class I antiarrhythmics. The following ranking is observed: UNITY fingerprints > ISIS keys and GRIND > VolSurf > log P. Regarding information content, the CPCA superweight plot indicates similarity between fingerprints and ISIS keys as well as between VolSurf and log P, while GRIND differs from all the remaining descriptors. Solubility data and blood/brain barrier penetrating behavior serve as test cases for pharmacokinetic aspects. Comparison of the descriptors applied to these data reveals that VolSurf has the most realistic and consistent behavior, GRIND shows intermediate behavior, while UNITY fingerprints and ISIS keys are not well suited for pharmacokinetic profiling. From this comparative analysis, we conclude that VolSurf descriptors exhibit particular advantages in treating pharmacokinetic aspects; UNITY fingerprints, ISIS keys, and GRIND descriptors are of special value for tackling pharmacodynamic aspects of database mining. The parameter log P is of limited applicability in database mining because of rather poor reliability and lack of completeness of data.

  11. Comparative analysis of EPA cost-benefit methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Poch, L.; Gillette, J.; Veil, J.

    1998-05-01

    In recent years, reforming the regulatory process has received much attention from diverse groups such as environmentalists, the government, and industry. A cost-benefit analysis can be a useful way to organize and compare the favorable and unfavorable impacts a proposed action night have on society. Since 1981, two Executive Orders have required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other regulatory agencies to perform cost-benefit analyses in support of regulatory decision making. At the EPA, a cost-benefit analysis is published as a document called a regulatory impact analysis (RIA). This report reviews cost-benefit methodologies used by three EPA program offices: Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Solid Waste, and Office of Water. These offices were chosen because they promulgate regulations that affect the policies of this study`s sponsor (U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy) and the technologies it uses. The study was conducted by reviewing 11 RIAs recently published by the three offices and by interviewing staff members in the offices. To draw conclusions about the EPA cost-benefit methodologies, their components were compared with those of a standard methodology (i.e., those that should be included in a comprehensive cost-benefit methodology). This study focused on the consistency of the approaches as well as their strengths and weaknesses, since differences in the cost-benefit methodologies themselves or in their application can cause confusion and preclude consistent comparison of regulations both within and among program offices.

  12. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zakham, F; Belayachi, L; Ussery, D; Akrim, M; Benjouad, A; El Aouad, R; Ennaji, M M

    2011-02-08

    The genus Mycobacterium represents more than 120 species including important pathogens of human and cause major public health problems and illnesses. Further, with more than 100 genome sequences from this genus, comparative genome analysis can provide new insights for better understanding the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length of genomes, GC content, number of genes in different data bases (Genbank, Refseq, and Prodigal). The BLAST matrix of these genomes has been figured to give a lot of information about the similarity between species in a simple scheme. As a result of multiple genome analysis, the pan and core genome have been defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene for tuberculosis and non tuberculosis Mycobacteria to understand the evolutionary events of these species.

  13. NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS): ANALYSIS OF EXPOSURE PATHWAYS AND ROUTES FOR ARSENIC AND LEAD IN EPA REGION 5

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I field study conducted in EPA Region 5 (Great Lakes Area) provides extensive exposure data on a representative sample of approximately 250 residents of the region. Associated environmental media and biomarker (blood...

  14. Rice fortification: a comparative analysis in mandated settings.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Carmen; Milani, Peiman; Schondebare, Jill A; Matthias, Dipika; Guyondet, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Legal mandates can play an important role in the success of rice fortification programs that involve the private sector. However, merely enacting mandatory legislation does not guarantee success; it requires a coordinated, multidimensional cross-sector effort that addresses stewardship, develops an appropriate rice fortification technology, enables sustainable production and distribution channels through a range of private-sector players, ensures quality, generates consumer demand, and monitors progress. Furthermore, economic sustainability must be built into the supply chain and distribution network to enable the program to outlast government administrations and/or time-limited funding. Hence, mandates can serve as valuable long-term enablers of cross-sector mobilization and collaboration and as catalysts of civil society engagement in and ownership of fortification programs. This paper compares the rice fortification experiences of Costa Rica and the Philippines--two countries with mandates, yet distinctly different industry landscapes. Costa Rica has achieved national success through strong government stewardship and active market development--key elements of success regardless of industry structure. With a comparatively more diffuse rice industry structure, the Philippines has also had success in limited geographies where key stakeholders have played an active role in market development. A comparative analysis provides lessons that may be relevant to other rice fortification programs. PMID:24913356

  15. Rice fortification: a comparative analysis in mandated settings.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Carmen; Milani, Peiman; Schondebare, Jill A; Matthias, Dipika; Guyondet, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Legal mandates can play an important role in the success of rice fortification programs that involve the private sector. However, merely enacting mandatory legislation does not guarantee success; it requires a coordinated, multidimensional cross-sector effort that addresses stewardship, develops an appropriate rice fortification technology, enables sustainable production and distribution channels through a range of private-sector players, ensures quality, generates consumer demand, and monitors progress. Furthermore, economic sustainability must be built into the supply chain and distribution network to enable the program to outlast government administrations and/or time-limited funding. Hence, mandates can serve as valuable long-term enablers of cross-sector mobilization and collaboration and as catalysts of civil society engagement in and ownership of fortification programs. This paper compares the rice fortification experiences of Costa Rica and the Philippines--two countries with mandates, yet distinctly different industry landscapes. Costa Rica has achieved national success through strong government stewardship and active market development--key elements of success regardless of industry structure. With a comparatively more diffuse rice industry structure, the Philippines has also had success in limited geographies where key stakeholders have played an active role in market development. A comparative analysis provides lessons that may be relevant to other rice fortification programs.

  16. White matter degeneration in schizophrenia: a comparative diffusion tensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura A.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Kim, Jinsuh; Alexander, Andrew L.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2010-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious and disabling mental disorder. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies performed on schizophrenia have demonstrated white matter degeneration either due to loss of myelination or deterioration of fiber tracts although the areas where the changes occur are variable across studies. Most of the population based studies analyze the changes in schizophrenia using scalar indices computed from the diffusion tensor such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and relative anisotropy (RA). The scalar measures may not capture the complete information from the diffusion tensor. In this paper we have applied the RADTI method on a group of 9 controls and 9 patients with schizophrenia. The RADTI method converts the tensors to log-Euclidean space where a linear regression model is applied and hypothesis testing is performed between the control and patient groups. Results show that there is a significant difference in the anisotropy between patients and controls especially in the parts of forceps minor, superior corona radiata, anterior limb of internal capsule and genu of corpus callosum. To check if the tensor analysis gives a better idea of the changes in anisotropy, we compared the results with voxelwise FA analysis as well as voxelwise geodesic anisotropy (GA) analysis.

  17. Multivariate Comparative Analysis of Stock Exchanges: The European Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralun-Bereźnicka, Julia

    The aim of the research is to perform a multivariate comparative analysis of 20 European stock exchanges in order to identify the main similarities between the objects. Due to the convergence process of capital markets in Europe the similarities between stock exchanges could be expected to increase over time. The research is meant to show whether and how these similarities change. Consequently, the distances between clusters of similar stock exchanges should become less significant, which the analysis also aims at verifying. The basis of comparison is a set of 48 monthly variables from the period January, 2003 to December, 2006. The variables are classified into three categories: size of the market, equity trading and bonds. The paper aims at identifying the clusters of alike stock exchanges and at finding the characteristic features of each of the distinguished groups. The obtained categorization to some extent corresponds with the division of the European Union into “new” and “old” member countries. Clustering method, performed for each quarter separately, also reveals that the classification is fairly stable in time. The factor analysis, which was carried out to reduce the number of variables, reveals three major factors behind the data, which are related with the earlier mentioned categories of variables.

  18. Comparative genomic analysis reveals bilateral breast cancers are genetically independent.

    PubMed

    Song, Fangfang; Li, Xiangchun; Song, Fengju; Zhao, Yanrui; Li, Haixin; Zheng, Hong; Gao, Zhibo; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kexin

    2015-10-13

    Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) poses a major challenge for oncologists because of the cryptic relationship between the two lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin of the contralateral breast cancer (either dependent or independent of the index tumor). Here, we used ultra-deep whole-exome sequencing and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to study four paired samples of BBCs with different tumor subtypes and time intervals between the developments of each tumor. We used two paired primary breast tumors and corresponding metastatic liver lesions as the control. We tested the origin independent nature of BBC in three ways: mutational concordance, mutational signature clustering, and clonality analysis using copy number profiles. We found that the paired BBC samples had near-zero concordant mutation rates, which were much lower than those of the paired primary/metastasis samples. The results of a mutational signature analysis also suggested that BBCs are independent of one another. A clonality analysis using aCGH data further revealed that paired BBC samples was clonally independent, in contrast to clonal related origin found for paired primary/metastasis samples. Our preliminary findings show that BBCs in Han Chinese women are origin independent and thus should be treated separately. PMID:26378809

  19. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Mouse and Human Cardiac Maturation.

    PubMed

    Uosaki, Hideki; Taguchi, Y-H

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how human cardiomyocytes mature is crucial to realizing stem cell-based heart regeneration, modeling adult heart diseases, and facilitating drug discovery. However, it is not feasible to analyze human samples for maturation due to inaccessibility to samples while cardiomyocytes mature during fetal development and childhood, as well as difficulty in avoiding variations among individuals. Using model animals such as mice can be a useful strategy; nonetheless, it is not well-understood whether and to what degree gene expression profiles during maturation are shared between humans and mice. Therefore, we performed a comparative gene expression analysis of mice and human samples. First, we examined two distinct mice microarray platforms for shared gene expression profiles, aiming to increase reliability of the analysis. We identified a set of genes displaying progressive changes during maturation based on principal component analysis. Second, we demonstrated that the genes identified had a differential expression pattern between adult and earlier stages (e.g., fetus) common in mice and humans. Our findings provide a foundation for further genetic studies of cardiomyocyte maturation. PMID:27431744

  20. Selenium Exposure and Cancer Risk: an Updated Meta-analysis and Meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xianlei; Wang, Chen; Yu, Wanqi; Fan, Wenjie; Wang, Shan; Shen, Ning; Wu, Pengcheng; Li, Xiuyang; Wang, Fudi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between selenium exposure and cancer risk. We identified 69 studies and applied meta-analysis, meta-regression and dose-response analysis to obtain available evidence. The results indicated that high selenium exposure had a protective effect on cancer risk (pooled OR = 0.78; 95%CI: 0.73–0.83). The results of linear and nonlinear dose-response analysis indicated that high serum/plasma selenium and toenail selenium had the efficacy on cancer prevention. However, we did not find a protective efficacy of selenium supplement. High selenium exposure may have different effects on specific types of cancer. It decreased the risk of breast cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, and prostate cancer, but it was not associated with colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, and skin cancer. PMID:26786590

  1. SURROGATE TISSUE ANALYSIS: MONITORING TOXICANT EXPOSURE AND HEALTH STATUS OF INACCESSIBLE TISSUES THROUGH THE ANALYSIS OF ACCESSIBLE TISSUES AND CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surrogate Tissue Analysis: Monitoring Toxicant Exposure And Health Status Of Inaccessible Tissues Through The Analysis Of Accessible Tissues And Cells*
    John C. Rockett1, Michael E. Burczynski 2, Albert J. Fornace, Jr.3, Paul.C. Herrmann4, Stephen A. Krawetz5, and David J. Dix1...

  2. Radiation Exposure Effects and Shielding Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Richard; Armendariz, Lupita (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotube materials promise to be the basis for a variety of emerging technologies with aerospace applications. Potential applications to human space flight include spacecraft shielding, hydrogen storage, structures and fixtures and nano-electronics. Appropriate risk analysis on the properties of nanotube materials is essential for future mission safety. Along with other environmental hazards, materials used in space flight encounter a hostile radiation environment for all mission profiles, from low earth orbit to interplanetary space.

  3. Exposure Measurement Error in PM2.5 Health Effects Studies: A Pooled Analysis of Eight Personal Exposure Validation Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Exposure measurement error is a concern in long-term PM2.5 health studies using ambient concentrations as exposures. We assessed error magnitude by estimating calibration coefficients as the association between personal PM2.5 exposures from validation studies and typ...

  4. Exposure to UV radiation and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Monnereau, Alain; Glaser, Sally L; Schupp, Clayton W; Ekström Smedby, Karin; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Kane, Eleanor; Melbye, Mads; Forétova, Lenka; Maynadié, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Becker, Nikolaus; Nieters, Alexandra; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Cocco, Pierluigi; Glimelius, Ingrid; Clavel, Jacqueline; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Chang, Ellen T

    2013-11-14

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure has been inversely associated with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) risk, but only inconsistently, only in a few studies, and without attention to HL heterogeneity. We conducted a pooled analysis of HL risk focusing on type and timing of UVR exposure and on disease subtypes by age, histology, and tumor-cell Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status. Four case-control studies contributed 1320 HL cases and 6381 controls. We estimated lifetime, adulthood, and childhood UVR exposure and history of sunburn and sunlamp use. We used 2-stage estimation with mixed-effects models and weighted pooled effect estimates by inverse marginal variances. We observed statistically significant inverse associations with HL risk for UVR exposures during childhood and adulthood, sunburn history, and sunlamp use, but we found no significant dose-response relationships. Risks were significant only for EBV-positive HL (pooled odds ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.91 for the highest overall UVR exposure category), with a significant linear trend for overall exposure (P = .03). Pooled relative risk estimates were not heterogeneous across studies. Increased UVR exposure may protect against HL, particularly EBV-positive HL. Plausible mechanisms involving UVR induction of regulatory T cells or the cellular DNA damage response suggest opportunities for new prevention targets.

  5. Environmental exposure to asbestos and risk of pleural mesothelioma: review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bourdès, V; Boffetta, P; Pisani, P

    2000-05-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have addressed the risk of pleural mesothelioma from environmental (household and neighborhood) exposure to asbestos, but no overall risk estimate is available. We reviewed the epidemiological studies on risk of pleural mesothelioma and household or neighborhood exposure to asbestos. We identified eight relevant studies; most were conducted in populations with relatively high exposure levels. We combined the risk estimates in a meta-analysis based on the random-effects model. The relative risks (RRs) of pleural mesothelioma for household exposure ranged between 4.0 and 23.7, and the summary risk estimate was 8.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3-12). For neighborhood exposure, RRs ranged between 5.1 and 9.3 (with a single RR of 0.2) and the summary estimate was 7.0 (95% CI: 4.7-11). This review suggests a substantial increase in risk of pleural mesothelioma following high environmental exposure to asbestos; however, the available data are insufficient to estimate the magnitude of the excess risk at the levels of environmental exposure commonly encountered by the general population in industrial countries.

  6. Comparative risk assessment of tobacco smoke constituents using the margin of exposure approach: the neglected contribution of nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Baumung, Claudia; Rehm, Jürgen; Franke, Heike; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine was not included in previous efforts to identify the most important toxicants of tobacco smoke. A health risk assessment of nicotine for smokers of cigarettes was conducted using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach and results were compared to literature MOEs of various other tobacco toxicants. The MOE is defined as ratio between toxicological threshold (benchmark dose) and estimated human intake. Dose-response modelling of human and animal data was used to derive the benchmark dose. The MOE was calculated using probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations for daily cigarette smokers. Benchmark dose values ranged from 0.004 mg/kg bodyweight for symptoms of intoxication in children to 3 mg/kg bodyweight for mortality in animals; MOEs ranged from below 1 up to 7.6 indicating a considerable consumer risk. The dimension of the MOEs is similar to those of other tobacco toxicants with high concerns relating to adverse health effects such as acrolein or formaldehyde. Owing to the lack of toxicological data in particular relating to cancer, long term animal testing studies for nicotine are urgently necessary. There is immediate need of action concerning the risk of nicotine also with regard to electronic cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. PMID:27759090

  7. Comparative effects of disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate against testicular toxicity in rats caused by acute exposure to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Hiroshige; Funakoshi, Takayuki; Shimada, Hideaki; Kojima, Shoji

    1997-03-01

    Disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DED) were compared for their protective effects against the testicular toxicity induced by acute exposure to cadmium (Cd) in rats. Rats were injected subcutaneously with CdCl{sub 2} [26.7 {mu}mol (3 mg) Cd/kg], and 30 min later they were injected intraperitoneally with DSF (0.05-0.5 mmol/kg) or DED (0.1-1 mmol/kg). The treatment with DSF at dose levels of 0.1-0.5 mmol/kg prevented the increases in testicular lipid peroxidation and calcium (Ca) concentrations and the decreases in testicular weight that were observed at 7 d after Cd injection. DED at dosage levels of 0.2-1 mmol/kg likewise reduced Cd-induced testicular toxicity. An increase in testicular iron (Fe) concentrations at 7 d and sterility at 59 d after Cd injection were almost completely blocked by treatment with DSF or DED at the highest doses, but lower doses of DSF or DED were ineffective. These results indicated that DSF, which is metabolized to DED, had a protective effect against Cd-induced testicular toxicity nearly equivalent to DED at approximately one-half the dose. 37 refs., 6 tabs.

  8. Meta-analysis of residential exposure to radon gas and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pavia, Maria; Bianco, Aida; Pileggi, Claudia; Angelillo, Italo F.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relation between residential exposure to radon and lung cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed using Medline and other sources. The quality of studies was assessed. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the risk of lung cancer among categories of levels of exposure to radon were extracted. For each study, a weighted log-linear regression analysis of the adjusted odds ratios was performed according to radon concentration. The random effect model was used to combine values from single studies. Separate meta-analyses were performed on results from studies grouped with similar characteristics or with quality scores above or equal to the median. FINDINGS: Seventeen case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quality scoring for individual studies ranged from 0.45 to 0.77 (median, 0.64). Meta-analysis based on exposure at 150 Bq/m3 gave a pooled odds ratio estimate of 1.24 (95% CI, 1.11-1.38), which indicated a potential effect of residential exposure to radon on the risk of lung cancer. Pooled estimates of fitted odds ratios at several levels of randon exposure were all significantly different from unity--ranging from 1.07 at 50 Bq/m3 to 1.43 at 250 Bq/m3. No remarkable differences from the baseline analysis were found for odds ratios from sensitivity analyses of studies in which > 75% of eligible cases were recruited (1.12, 1.00-1.25) and studies that included only women (1.29, 1.04-1.60). CONCLUSION: Although no definitive conclusions may be drawn, our results suggest a dose-response relation between residential exposure to radon and the risk of lung cancer. They support the need to develop strategies to reduce human exposure to radon. PMID:14758433

  9. Nickel exposure promotes osmoregulatory disturbances in Oreochromis niloticus gills: histopathological and energy dispersive spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Marcato, A C C; Yabuki, A T; Fontanetti, C S

    2014-11-01

    Water is an essential factor for maintaining the vital functions of living beings. Nickel is the 24th most abundant element on Earth; it is a heavy metal that is genotoxic and mutagenic in its chloride form. Due to industrial use, its concentration in surface sediments increased considerably. Fish develop characteristics that make them excellent experimental models for studying aquatic toxicology. They are particularly useful because they can alert of the potential danger of chemical substances or environmental pollution. Due to water quality impairment and because there are few published studies that relate nickel to tissue alteration, this study aimed to examine the consequences of nickel in an aquatic environment. For this analysis, individuals of Oreochromis niloticus were exposed for 96 h to three different concentrations of nickel dissolved in water according to the standard established by Brazilian law and compared them to a control group. After exposure, the gills were analyzed using X-ray microanalysis, ultramorphology, and histological and histochemical analysis. The results demonstrated that all the concentrations used in the experiment altered the histophysiology of the individuals exposed. In conclusion, the nickel presents a toxic potential to fish, even at the lowest concentration tested, which is equivalent to half of the concentration allowed by law. The CONAMA resolution should be revised for this parameter because of the interference of this metal in the histophysiology of the tested organism.

  10. Nickel exposure promotes osmoregulatory disturbances in Oreochromis niloticus gills: histopathological and energy dispersive spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Marcato, A C C; Yabuki, A T; Fontanetti, C S

    2014-11-01

    Water is an essential factor for maintaining the vital functions of living beings. Nickel is the 24th most abundant element on Earth; it is a heavy metal that is genotoxic and mutagenic in its chloride form. Due to industrial use, its concentration in surface sediments increased considerably. Fish develop characteristics that make them excellent experimental models for studying aquatic toxicology. They are particularly useful because they can alert of the potential danger of chemical substances or environmental pollution. Due to water quality impairment and because there are few published studies that relate nickel to tissue alteration, this study aimed to examine the consequences of nickel in an aquatic environment. For this analysis, individuals of Oreochromis niloticus were exposed for 96 h to three different concentrations of nickel dissolved in water according to the standard established by Brazilian law and compared them to a control group. After exposure, the gills were analyzed using X-ray microanalysis, ultramorphology, and histological and histochemical analysis. The results demonstrated that all the concentrations used in the experiment altered the histophysiology of the individuals exposed. In conclusion, the nickel presents a toxic potential to fish, even at the lowest concentration tested, which is equivalent to half of the concentration allowed by law. The CONAMA resolution should be revised for this parameter because of the interference of this metal in the histophysiology of the tested organism. PMID:24996943

  11. Comparative Long-Term Toxicity of Libby Amphibole and Amosite Asbestos after Single or Multiple Intratracheal Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    In former mine workers of Libby, Montana, exposure to amphibole-containing vermiculite has been linked to increased rates of asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma. Although many studies have shown adverse effects of Libby Amphibole (LA) exposure, little is known regarding th...

  12. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (P thlA ) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (P pta-ack ) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  13. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (PthlA) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (Ppta-ack) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  14. Industrial Acetogenic Biocatalysts: A Comparative Metabolic and Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Poehlein, Anja; Linder, Sonja; Erz, Catarina; Hummel, Tim; Hoffmeister, Sabrina; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation by anaerobic acetogenic bacteria employing the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway is a bioprocess for production of biofuels and biocommodities. The major fermentation products of the most relevant biocatalytic strains (Clostridium ljungdahlii, C. autoethanogenum, C. ragsdalei, and C. coskatii) are acetic acid and ethanol. A comparative metabolic and genomic analysis using the mentioned biocatalysts might offer targets for metabolic engineering and thus improve the production of compounds apart from ethanol. Autotrophic growth and product formation of the four wild type (WT) strains were compared in uncontrolled batch experiments. The genomes of C. ragsdalei and C. coskatii were sequenced and the genome sequences of all four biocatalytic strains analyzed in comparative manner. Growth and product spectra (acetate, ethanol, 2,3-butanediol) of C. autoethanogenum, C. ljungdahlii, and C. ragsdalei were rather similar. In contrast, C. coskatii produced significantly less ethanol and its genome sequence lacks two genes encoding aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (AOR). Comparative genome sequence analysis of the four WT strains revealed high average nucleotide identity (ANI) of C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum (99.3%) and C. coskatii (98.3%). In contrast, C. ljungdahlii WT and C. ragsdalei WT showed an ANI-based similarity of only 95.8%. Additionally, recombinant C. ljungdahlii strains were constructed that harbor an artificial acetone synthesis operon (ASO) consisting of the following genes: adc, ctfA, ctfB, and thlA (encoding acetoacetate decarboxylase, acetoacetyl-CoA:acetate/butyrate:CoA-transferase subunits A and B, and thiolase) under the control of thlA promoter (P thlA ) from C. acetobutylicum or native pta-ack promoter (P pta-ack ) from C. ljungdahlii. Respective recombinant strains produced 2-propanol rather than acetone, due to the presence of a NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that converts acetone to 2

  15. Anthropometric analysis of homosexuals and heterosexuals: implications for early hormone exposure.

    PubMed

    Martin, James T; Nguyen, Duc Huu

    2004-01-01

    Early exposure to sex steroids is thought to be important in mediating the differentiation of male-typical sexual orientation. Bone morphology is a marker of childhood sex steroid exposure, because estrogens and androgens control sexual dimorphism in skeletal size. Anthropometric analysis of heterosexuals and homosexuals indicates that those bones, which become sexually dimorphic in childhood, but not those which become sexually dimorphic after puberty, are different in length in homosexuals and heterosexuals. Persons with a sexual preference for males have less long bone growth in the arms, legs and hands, than those with sexual preference for females. The data support the hypothesis that male homosexuals have had less steroid exposure during development than male heterosexuals and that female homosexuals have had greater steroid exposure during development than their heterosexual counterparts.

  16. Cytogenetic analysis from DNA by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, G; Aboura, A; Lapierre, J M; Viguié, F

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a modified in situ hybridization technique which allows detection and mapping of DNA sequence copy differences between two genomes in a single experiment. In CGH analysis, two differentially labelled genomic DNA (study and reference) are co-hybridized to normal metaphase spreads. Chromosomal locations of copy number changes in the DNA segments of the study genome are revealed by a variable fluorescence intensity ratio along each target chromosome. Since its development, CGH has been applied mostly as a research tool in the field of cancer cytogenetics to identify genetic changes in many previously unknown regions. CGH may also have a role in clinical cytogenetics for detection and identification of unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities.

  17. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals vertebrate phylotypic period during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    One of the central issues in evolutionary developmental biology is how we can formulate the relationships between evolutionary and developmental processes. Two major models have been proposed: the 'funnel-like' model, in which the earliest embryo shows the most conserved morphological pattern, followed by diversifying later stages, and the 'hourglass' model, in which constraints are imposed to conserve organogenesis stages, which is called the phylotypic period. Here we perform a quantitative comparative transcriptome analysis of several model vertebrate embryos and show that the pharyngula stage is most conserved, whereas earlier and later stages are rather divergent. These results allow us to predict approximate developmental timetables between different species, and indicate that pharyngula embryos have the most conserved gene expression profiles, which may be the source of the basic body plan of vertebrates. PMID:21427719

  18. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  19. A comparative and comprehensive analysis of nonsexual assaults.

    PubMed

    Asirdizer, Mahmut; Yavuz, M Sunay

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to make a comparative and comprehensive analysis of nonsexual assaults in 488 medico-legal cases presented to Forensic Medicine Outpatient Clinic of Celal Bayar University Hospital (Manisa, Turkey), between 2005 and 2009. There were blunt force injuries (BFI) in 262 cases (53.7%), sharp force injuries (SFI) in 163 cases (33.4%), and firearm-related wounds (FRW) in 63 cases (12.9%). The results showed significant differences in the monthly distribution of assaults, localization of injuries, and severity of injuries depending on the types of assaults. Most of the injuries were localized to the face, head, and neck in BFI and SFI and to the lower limbs in FRW. The results of this study will help researchers to investigate characteristics of victims, offenders, and injuries and types of assaults because of nonsexual violence.

  20. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  1. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  2. Comparative dynamic analysis of the full Grossman model.

    PubMed

    Ried, W

    1998-08-01

    The paper applies the method of comparative dynamic analysis to the full Grossman model. For a particular class of solutions, it derives the equations implicitly defining the complete trajectories of the endogenous variables. Relying on the concept of Frisch decision functions, the impact of any parametric change on an endogenous variable can be decomposed into a direct and an indirect effect. The focus of the paper is on marginal changes in the rate of health capital depreciation. It also analyses the impact of either initial financial wealth or the initial stock of health capital. While the direction of most effects remains ambiguous in the full model, the assumption of a zero consumption benefit of health is sufficient to obtain a definite for any direct or indirect effect.

  3. Comparative analysis of DG and solar PV water pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharani, Kusum; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    Looking at present day electricity scenario, there is a major electricity crisis in rural areas. The farmers are still dependant on the monsoon rains for their irrigation needs and livestock maintenance. Some of the agrarian population has opted to use Diesel Generators for pumping water in their fields. But taking into consideration the economics and environmental conditions, the above choice is not suitable for longer run. An effort to shift from non-renewable sources such as diesel to renewable energy source such as solar has been highlighted. An approximate comparative analysis showing the life cycle costs of a PV pumping system with Diesel Generator powered water pumping is done using MATLAB/STMULTNK.

  4. Cardiovascular disease research in Latin America: A comparative bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jahangir, Eiman; Comandé, Daniel; Rubinstein, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the number of publications in cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Latin America and the Caribbean over the last decade. METHODS: We performed a bibliometric analysis in PubMed from 2001 to 2010 for Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and India. RESULTS: Latin America published 4% of articles compared with 26% from the United States/Canada and 42% from Europe. In CVD, Latin America published 4% of articles vs 23% from the United States/Canada and 40% from Europe. The number of publications in CVD in Latin America increased from 41 in 2001 to 726 in 2010. CONCLUSION: Latin America, while publishing more articles than previously, lags behind developed countries. Further advances in research infrastructure are necessary to develop prevention strategies for this region. PMID:22216374

  5. Tracking personal exposure to particulate diesel exhaust in a diesel freight terminal using organic tracer analysis

    PubMed Central

    SHEESLEY, REBECCA J.; SCHAUER, JAMES J.; GARSHICK, ERIC; LADEN, FRANCINE; SMITH, THOMAS J.; BLICHARZ, ANDREW P.; DEMINTER, JEFFREY T.

    2008-01-01

    Personal exposure to particle-phase molecular markers was measured at a trucking terminal in St Louis, MO, as part of a larger epidemiologic project aimed at assessing carbonaceous fine particulate matter (PM) exposure in this occupational setting. The integration of parallel personal exposure, ambient worksite area and ambient urban background (St Louis Supersite) measurements provided a unique opportunity to track the work-related exposure to carbonaceous fine PM in a freight terminal. The data were used to test the proposed personal exposure model in this occupational setting: Personal exposure=urban background+work site background+personal activity To accurately assess the impact of PM emission sources, particularly motor vehicle exhaust, and organic elemental carbon (OCEC) analysis and nonpolar organic molecular marker analysis by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GCMS) were conducted on all of the PM samples. EC has been used as a tracer for diesel exhaust in urban areas, however, the emission profile for diesel exhaust is dependent upon the operating conditions of the vehicle and can vary considerably within a fleet. Hopanes, steranes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkanes were measured by TD-GCMS. Hopanes are source-specific organic molecular markers for lubricating oil present in motor vehicle exhaust. The concentrations of OC, EC and the organic tracers were averaged to obtain average profiles to assess differences in the personal, worksite area and urban background samples, and were also correlated individually by sample time to evaluate the exposure model presented above. Finally, a chemical mass balance model was used to apportion the motor vehicle and cigarette-smoke components of the measured OC and EC for the average personal exposure, worksite area and urban background samples. PMID:18322451

  6. Occupational exposure to pesticides and prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Mikhael, Anne-Mary; Bueno-Cavanillas, Aurora; Ofir Guiron, Talia; Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies on exposure to pesticides and risk of prostate cancer (PC) provide inconsistent results. We aimed to explore various potential sources of heterogeneity not previously assessed and to derive updated risk estimates from homogenous studies. We searched PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases for case-control and cohort studies published from 1985 to April 2014. We assessed the quality of the articles using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled estimates were calculated using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was explored using subset analyses and metaregression. Fifty-two studies were included in the review and 25 in the meta-analysis. No association was found between low exposure to pesticides and PC, but association was significant for high exposure, pooled OR 1.33 (1.02 to 1.63), I(2)=44.8%, p=0.024. Heterogeneity was explained by a number of variables including method used to assess exposure. Pooled OR was weak and non-significant for studies measuring serum pesticide level, 1.12 (0.74 to 1.50), I(2)=0.00%, p=0.966. For studies applying self-reporting of exposure, pooled estimate was 1.34 (0.91 to 1.77), I(2)=0.00%, p=0.493, while a high significant association was detected for grouped exposure assessment, 2.24 (1.36 to 3.11), I(2)=0.00%, p=0.955. In spite of a weak significant association detected when pooling ORs for high occupational exposure to pesticides, the magnitude of the association was related to the method of exposure assessment used by the original studies. A family history-pesticide exposure interaction was also observed for a number of pesticides.

  7. Effects of Exposure Measurement Error in the Analysis of Health Effects from Traffic-Related Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Lisa K.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Laden, Francine; Suh, Helen H.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-01-01

    In large epidemiological studies, many researchers use surrogates of air pollution exposure such as geographic information system (GIS)-based characterizations of traffic or simple housing characteristics. It is important to evaluate quantitatively these surrogates against measured pollutant concentrations to determine how their use affects the interpretation of epidemiological study results. In this study, we quantified the implications of using exposure models derived from validation studies, and other alternative surrogate models with varying amounts of measurement error, on epidemiological study findings. We compared previously developed multiple regression models characterizing residential indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO2), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations to models with less explanatory power that may be applied in the absence of validation studies. We constructed a hypothetical epidemiological study, under a range of odds ratios, and determined the bias and uncertainty caused by the use of various exposure models predicting residential indoor exposure levels. Our simulations illustrated that exposure models with fairly modest R2 (0.3 to 0.4 for the previously developed multiple regression models for PM2.5 and NO2) yielded substantial improvements in epidemiological study performance, relative to the application of regression models created in the absence of validation studies or poorer-performing validation study models (e.g. EC). In many studies, models based on validation data may not be possible, so it may be necessary to use a surrogate model with more measurement error. This analysis provides a technique to quantify the implications of applying various exposure models with different degrees of measurement error in epidemiological research. PMID:19223939

  8. A comparative analysis of metal transportomes from metabolically versatile Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Haritha, Adhikarla; Rodrigue, Agnes; Mohan, Pamarthi Maruthi

    2008-01-01

    Background The availability of complete genome sequences of versatile Pseudomonas occupying remarkably diverse ecological niches enabled to gain insights into their adaptative assets. The objective of this study was to analyze the complete genetic repertoires of metal transporters (metal transportomes) from four representative Pseudomonas species and to identify metal transporters with "Genomic Island" associated features. Methods A comparative metal transporter inventory was built for the following four Pseudomonas species: P.putida (Ppu) KT2440, P.aeruginosa (Pae) PA01, P.fluorescens (Pfl) Pf-5 and P.syringae (Psy)pv.tomato DC3000 using TIGR-CMR and Transport DB. Genomic analysis of essential and toxic metal ion transporters was accomplished from the above inventory. Metal transporters with "Genomic Island" associated features were identified using Islandpath analysis. Results Dataset cataloguing has been executed for 262 metal transporters from the four spp. Additional metal ion transporters belonging to NiCoT, Ca P-type ATPase, Cu P-type ATPases, ZIP and MgtC families were identified. In Psy DC3000, 48% of metal transporters showed strong GI features while it was 45% in Ppu KT2440. In Pfl Pf-5 and Pae PA01 only 26% of their metal transporters exhibited GI features. Conclusion Our comparative inventory of 262 metal transporters from four versatile Pseudomonas spp is the complete suite of metal transportomes analysed till date in a prokaryotic genus. This study identified differences in the basic composition of metal transportomes from Pseudomonas occupying diverse ecological niches and also elucidated their novel features. Based on this inventory we analysed the role of horizontal gene transfer in expansion and variability of metal transporter families. PMID:18816395

  9. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of Major Peanut Allergen Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaparkhe, Milind B.; Lee, Tae-Ho; Tan, Xu; Wang, Xiyin; Li, Jingping; Kim, Changsoo; Rainville, Lisa K.; Lemke, Cornelia; Compton, Rosana O.; Robertson, Jon; Gallo, Maria; Bertioli, David J.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) causes one of the most serious food allergies. Peanut seed proteins, Arah1, Arah2, and Arah3, are considered to be among the most important peanut allergens. To gain insights into genome organization and evolution of allergen-encoding genes, approximately 617 kb from the genome of cultivated peanut and 215 kb from a wild relative were sequenced including three Arah1, one Arah2, eight Arah3, and two Arah6 gene family members. To assign polarity to differences between homoeologous regions in peanut, we used as outgroups the single orthologous regions in Medicago, Lotus, common bean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, which diverged from peanut about 50 Ma and have not undergone subsequent polyploidy. These regions were also compared with orthologs in many additional dicot plant species to help clarify the timing of evolutionary events. The lack of conservation of allergenic epitopes between species, and the fact that many different proteins can be allergenic, makes the identification of allergens across species by comparative studies difficult. The peanut allergen genes are interspersed with low-copy genes and transposable elements. Phylogenetic analyses revealed lineage-specific expansion and loss of low-copy genes between species and homoeologs. Arah1 syntenic regions are conserved in soybean, pigeonpea, tomato, grape, Lotus, and Arabidopsis, whereas Arah3 syntenic regions show genome rearrangements. We infer that tandem and segmental duplications led to the establishment of the Arah3 gene family. Our analysis indicates differences in conserved motifs in allergen proteins and in the promoter regions of the allergen-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic organization studies provide new insights into the evolution of the major peanut allergen-encoding genes. PMID:25193311

  10. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of major peanut allergen gene families.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhe, Milind B; Lee, Tae-Ho; Tan, Xu; Wang, Xiyin; Li, Jingping; Kim, Changsoo; Rainville, Lisa K; Lemke, Cornelia; Compton, Rosana O; Robertson, Jon; Gallo, Maria; Bertioli, David J; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-09-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) causes one of the most serious food allergies. Peanut seed proteins, Arah1, Arah2, and Arah3, are considered to be among the most important peanut allergens. To gain insights into genome organization and evolution of allergen-encoding genes, approximately 617 kb from the genome of cultivated peanut and 215 kb from a wild relative were sequenced including three Arah1, one Arah2, eight Arah3, and two Arah6 gene family members. To assign polarity to differences between homoeologous regions in peanut, we used as outgroups the single orthologous regions in Medicago, Lotus, common bean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, which diverged from peanut about 50 Ma and have not undergone subsequent polyploidy. These regions were also compared with orthologs in many additional dicot plant species to help clarify the timing of evolutionary events. The lack of conservation of allergenic epitopes between species, and the fact that many different proteins can be allergenic, makes the identification of allergens across species by comparative studies difficult. The peanut allergen genes are interspersed with low-copy genes and transposable elements. Phylogenetic analyses revealed lineage-specific expansion and loss of low-copy genes between species and homoeologs. Arah1 syntenic regions are conserved in soybean, pigeonpea, tomato, grape, Lotus, and Arabidopsis, whereas Arah3 syntenic regions show genome rearrangements. We infer that tandem and segmental duplications led to the establishment of the Arah3 gene family. Our analysis indicates differences in conserved motifs in allergen proteins and in the promoter regions of the allergen-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic organization studies provide new insights into the evolution of the major peanut allergen-encoding genes. PMID:25193311

  11. Comparative and evolutionary analysis of major peanut allergen gene families.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhe, Milind B; Lee, Tae-Ho; Tan, Xu; Wang, Xiyin; Li, Jingping; Kim, Changsoo; Rainville, Lisa K; Lemke, Cornelia; Compton, Rosana O; Robertson, Jon; Gallo, Maria; Bertioli, David J; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-09-04

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) causes one of the most serious food allergies. Peanut seed proteins, Arah1, Arah2, and Arah3, are considered to be among the most important peanut allergens. To gain insights into genome organization and evolution of allergen-encoding genes, approximately 617 kb from the genome of cultivated peanut and 215 kb from a wild relative were sequenced including three Arah1, one Arah2, eight Arah3, and two Arah6 gene family members. To assign polarity to differences between homoeologous regions in peanut, we used as outgroups the single orthologous regions in Medicago, Lotus, common bean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, which diverged from peanut about 50 Ma and have not undergone subsequent polyploidy. These regions were also compared with orthologs in many additional dicot plant species to help clarify the timing of evolutionary events. The lack of conservation of allergenic epitopes between species, and the fact that many different proteins can be allergenic, makes the identification of allergens across species by comparative studies difficult. The peanut allergen genes are interspersed with low-copy genes and transposable elements. Phylogenetic analyses revealed lineage-specific expansion and loss of low-copy genes between species and homoeologs. Arah1 syntenic regions are conserved in soybean, pigeonpea, tomato, grape, Lotus, and Arabidopsis, whereas Arah3 syntenic regions show genome rearrangements. We infer that tandem and segmental duplications led to the establishment of the Arah3 gene family. Our analysis indicates differences in conserved motifs in allergen proteins and in the promoter regions of the allergen-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis and genomic organization studies provide new insights into the evolution of the major peanut allergen-encoding genes.

  12. Profile analysis of after-effects experienced during exposure to several virtual reality environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Robert S.; Jones, Marshall B.; Lilienthal, Michael G.; Harm, Deborah L.

    1994-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms are an unwanted by-product of exposure to virtual environments. This problem is not new and was reported in the early flight simulators and experiments on ego motions and vection. The cardinal symptom of motion sickness is, of course, vomiting, but this symptom is ordinarily preceded by a variety of other symptoms. In his classic studies of motion sickness conducted before and during World War II, G. R. Wendt introduced a three point scale to score motion sickness beyond a vomit/no vomit dichotomy. Later, Navy scientists developed a Motion Sickness Questionnaire (MSQ), originally for use in a slowly rotating room. In the last 20 years the MSQ has been used in a series of studies of air, sea, and space sickness. Only recently, however, has it been appreciated that symptom patterns in the MSQ are not uniform but vary with the way sickness is induced. In seasickness, for example, nausea is the most prominent symptom. In Navy simulators, however, the most common symptom is eye strain, especially when cathode ray tubes are employed in the simulation. The latter result was obtained in a survey of over 1,500 pilot exposures. Using this database, Essex scientists conducted a factor analysis of the MSQ. We found that signs and symptoms of motion sickness fell mainly into three clusters: 1) oculomotor disturbance, 2) nausea and related neurovegetative problems, and 3) disorientation, ataxia, and vertigo. We have since rescored the MSQ results obtained in Navy simulators in terms of these three components. We have also compared these and other profiles obtained from three different vitual reality systems to profiles obtained in sea sickness, space sickness, and alcohol intoxication. We will show examples of these various profiles and point out simularities and differences among them which indicate aspects of what might be called 'virtual-reality sickness'.

  13. Determinants of Exposure to Metalworking Fluid Aerosols: A Literature Review and Analysis of Reported Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donguk; Stewart, Patrica A.; Coble, Joseph B.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive literature review of published metalworking fluid (MWF) aerosol measurement data was conducted to identify the major determinants that may affect exposure to aerosol fractions (total or inhalable, thoracic and respirable) and mass median diameters (MMDs). The identification of determinants was conducted through published studies and analysis of published measurement levels. For the latter, weighted arithmetic means (WAMs) by number of measurements were calculated and compared using analysis of variance and t-tests. The literature review found that the major factors affecting aerosol exposure levels were, primarily, decade, type of industry, operation and fluid and engineering control measures. Our analysis of total aerosol levels found a significant decline in measured levels from an average of 5.36 mg m−3 prior to the 1970s and 2.52 mg m−3 in the 1970s to 1.21 mg m−3 in the 1980s, 0.50 mg m−3 in the 1990s and 0.55 mg m−3 in the 2000s. Significant declines from the 1990s to the 2000s also were found in thoracic fraction levels (0.48 versus 0.40 mg m−3), but not for the respirable fraction. The WAMs for the auto (1.47 mg m−3) and auto parts manufacturing industry (1.83 mg m−3) were significantly higher than that for small-job machine shops (0.68 mg m−3). In addition, a significant difference in the thoracic WAM was found between the automotive industry (0.46 mg m−3) and small-job machine shops (0.32 mg m−3). Operation type, in particular, grinding, was a significant factor affecting the total aerosol fraction [grinding operations (1.75 mg m−3) versus other machining (0.95 mg m−3)], but the levels associated with these operations were not statistically different for either the thoracic or the respirable fractions. Across all decades, the total aerosol fraction for straight oils (1.49 mg m−3) was higher than for other fluid types (soluble = 1.08 mg m−3, synthetic = 0.52 mg m−3 and semisynthetic = 0.50 mg m−3

  14. Association between pesticide exposure and risk of kidney cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo; Hu, Yingfang; Liang, Zhen; Liu, Ben; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the correlation between pesticide exposure and kidney cancer. We conducted a systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Medline (updated to March 1, 2015) to identify all relevant studies. References of the retrieved articles were also identified. Fixed- or random-effect models were used to summarize the estimates of relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval for the association between exposure of pesticide and risk of kidney cancer. The pooled RR estimate indicated that pesticide exposure might have an elevated risk for kidney cancer (RR =1.10, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.19). In a subgroup analysis of high quality articles, we detected that pesticide exposure is a significant risk factor for kidney cancer in a subgroup analysis of case-control studies, (Newcastle–Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale score >6) (RR =1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.12–1.51). North America studies, odds ratio studies, and studies with effect estimate adjusted for more than two confounder studies. In conclusion, pesticide exposure may be a risk factor for kidney cancer. PMID:27418833

  15. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of floral color variegation in peach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xinxin; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Zhihong

    2015-09-01

    Variegation in flower is a special trait in ornamental peach (Prunus persica L.). To investigate the mechanism of color variegation, we used a combination of two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to explore the proteomic profiles between variegated flower (VF) and red flower (RF) buds of the peach cultivar 'Sahong Tao'. More than 500 highly reproducible protein spots (P < 0.05) were detected and 72 protein spots showed a greater than two-fold difference in their values. We identified 70 proteins that may play roles in petal coloration. The mRNA levels of the corresponding genes were detected using quantitative RT-PCR. The results show that most of the proteins are involved in energy and metabolism, which provide energy and substrates. We found that LDOX, WD40, ACC, and PPO II are related to the pigment biosynthetic pathway. The activity of PPO enzyme was further validated and showed the higher with significant differences in RF compared with the VF ones. Moreover, the four UCH proteins are involved in protein fate and may be important in post-translational modifications in peach flowers. Our study is the first comparative proteomic analysis of floral variegation and will contribute to further investigations into the molecular mechanism of flower petal coloration in ornamental peach.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Different LIDAR System Calibration Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; Habib, A.

    2016-06-01

    With light detection and ranging (LiDAR) now being a crucial tool for engineering products and on the fly spatial analysis, it is necessary for the user community to have standardized calibration methods. The three methods in this study were developed and proven by the Digital Photogrammetry Research Group (DPRG) for airborne LiDAR systems and are as follows; Simplified, Quasi-Rigorous, and Rigorous. In lieu of using expensive control surfaces for calibration, these methods compare overlapping LiDAR strips to estimate the systematic errors. These systematic errors are quantified by these methods and include the lever arm biases, boresight biases, range bias and scan angle scale bias. These three methods comprehensively represent all of the possible flight configurations and data availability and this paper will test the limits of the method with the most assumptions, the simplified calibration, by using data that violates the assumptions it's math model is based on and compares the results to the quasi-rigorous and rigorous techniques. The overarching goal is to provide a LiDAR system calibration that does not require raw measurements which can be carried out with minimal control and flight lines to reduce costs. This testing is unique because the terrain used for calibration does not contain gable roofs, all other LiDAR system calibration testing and development has been done with terrain containing features with high geometric integrity such as gable roofs.

  18. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  19. Comparative analysis of essential genes in prokaryotic genomic islands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Peng, Chong; Zhang, Ge; Gao, Feng

    2015-07-30

    Essential genes are thought to encode proteins that carry out the basic functions to sustain a cellular life, and genomic islands (GIs) usually contain clusters of horizontally transferred genes. It has been assumed that essential genes are not likely to be located in GIs, but systematical analysis of essential genes in GIs has not been explored before. Here, we have analyzed the essential genes in 28 prokaryotes by statistical method and reached a conclusion that essential genes in GIs are significantly fewer than those outside GIs. The function of 362 essential genes found in GIs has been explored further by BLAST against the Virulence Factor Database (VFDB) and the phage/prophage sequence database of PHAge Search Tool (PHAST). Consequently, 64 and 60 eligible essential genes are found to share the sequence similarity with the virulence factors and phage/prophages-related genes, respectively. Meanwhile, we find several toxin-related proteins and repressors encoded by these essential genes in GIs. The comparative analysis of essential genes in genomic islands will not only shed new light on the development of the prediction algorithm of essential genes, but also give a clue to detect the functionality of essential genes in genomic islands.

  20. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use.

  1. [Comparative analysis of arterial bioprostheses with various antithrombotic modification].

    PubMed

    Barbarash, L S; Burkov, N N; Kudriavtseva, Iu A; Anufriev, A I; Zhuravleva, I Iu

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at comparing the results of remote patency ol arterial bioprosthcses «KemAngioprosthesis» in infrainguinal position with various antithromhotic modifi cation. We analyzed the outcomes in a total of 133 patients who were subdivided into two groups: Group I (n=91) underwent implantation of hioprostheses with antithrombotic modifi calion by non-fractionated heparin. and Group II (n=42) received prostheses treated with low-molecular-weight heparin «Clexane». Patients of the both groups underwent comprehensive analysis of the haemostatic system, blood plasma lipid spectrum, as well as duplex scanning of the prosthesis. 39 (42.9%) Group I patients and 6 (13.6%) Group II patients were found to have developed thromboses. Besides, 14 (I5.4%) Group I patients were diagnosed as hawing restenosis of the anastomosis site, with this complication observed in 3 (7.3%) Group II patients. The results of the analysis demonstrated better remote patency of bioprostheses with antithromhotic modifi cation by low-molecular-weight heparin «Clexane». Dynamic follow up of the patients made it possible to carry out timely correction of medicamentous therapy, as well as at early stages to reveal restenosis of anastomoses followed by endovascular correction. PMID:22929666

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohui; Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Fu, Jianwei; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-14

    In cultures containing multiple sources of nitrogen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sequential use of nitrogen sources through a mechanism known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). To identify proteins differentially expressed due to NCR, proteomic analysis of S. cerevisiae S288C under different nitrogen source conditions was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), revealing 169 candidate protein spots. Among these 169 protein spots, 121 were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins were closely associated with four main biological processes through Gene Ontology (GO) categorical analysis. The identification of the potential proteins and cellular processes related to NCR offer a global overview of changes elicited by different nitrogen sources, providing clues into how yeast adapt to different nutritional conditions. Moreover, by comparing our proteomic data with corresponding mRNA data, proteins regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level could be distinguished. Biological significance In S. cerevisiae, different nitrogen sources provide different growth characteristics and generate different metabolites. The nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) process plays an important role for S. cerevisiae in the ordinal utilization of different nitrogen sources. NCR process can result in significant shift of global metabolic networks. Previous works on NCR primarily focused on transcriptomic level. The results obtained in this study provided a global atlas of the proteome changes triggered by different nitrogen sources and would facilitate the understanding of mechanisms for how yeast could adapt to different nutritional conditions.

  3. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms.

  4. Sequence and comparative genomic analysis of actin-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jean; Oma, Yukako; Vallar, Laurent; Friederich, Evelyne; Poch, Olivier; Winsor, Barbara

    2005-12-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are key players in cytoskeleton activities and nuclear functions. Two complexes, ARP2/3 and ARP1/11, also known as dynactin, are implicated in actin dynamics and in microtubule-based trafficking, respectively. ARP4 to ARP9 are components of many chromatin-modulating complexes. Conventional actins and ARPs codefine a large family of homologous proteins, the actin superfamily, with a tertiary structure known as the actin fold. Because ARPs and actin share high sequence conservation, clear family definition requires distinct features to easily and systematically identify each subfamily. In this study we performed an in depth sequence and comparative genomic analysis of ARP subfamilies. A high-quality multiple alignment of approximately 700 complete protein sequences homologous to actin, including 148 ARP sequences, allowed us to extend the ARP classification to new organisms. Sequence alignments revealed conserved residues, motifs, and inserted sequence signatures to define each ARP subfamily. These discriminative characteristics allowed us to develop ARPAnno (http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/ARPAnno), a new web server dedicated to the annotation of ARP sequences. Analyses of sequence conservation among actins and ARPs highlight part of the actin fold and suggest interactions between ARPs and actin-binding proteins. Finally, analysis of ARP distribution across eukaryotic phyla emphasizes the central importance of nuclear ARPs, particularly the multifunctional ARP4.

  5. Comparative performance analysis: Commercial cut-flower rose production

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.; Fischer, C.L.

    1990-04-01

    A comparative performance analysis has been conducted to examine the various factors associated with establishing and operating a commercial rose cut-flower greenhouse in ten different locations across the United States. Plant productivity, defined as net blooms produced per plant per year, is largely dependent upon local climatic conditions and technological improvements. Regional variations in productivity have been explicitly analyzed. The greenhouse operation is assumed to be four acres in size and the facilities utilize current technologies. The operation is designed as a professionally-organized company with an owner/manager, grower, and salesperson. The primary product is a red hybrid tea rose for sales. Selling markets vary by location, but in general they are large metropolitan areas. The analysis strongly indicates that new installations for cut-flower rose production are profitable in several areas in the U.S. Southwest, particularly in New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas. No ones stands out as a favored location. Las Cruces, New Mexico, has the highest net present volume and return on investment results. 68 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  6. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted.

  7. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted. PMID:24858716

  8. Comparative transcriptomics reveals genes involved in metabolic and immune pathways in the digestive gland of scallop Chlamys farreri following cadmium exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Yuxiu; Yao, Lin; Jiang, Yanhua; Li, Fengling

    2016-05-01

    Chlamys farreri is an economically important mollusk that can accumulate excessive amounts of cadmium (Cd). Studying the molecular mechanism of Cd accumulation in bivalves is difficult because of the lack of genome background. Transcriptomic analysis based on high-throughput RNA sequencing has been shown to be an efficient and powerful method for the discovery of relevant genes in non-model and genome reference-free organisms. Here, we constructed two cDNA libraries (control and Cd exposure groups) from the digestive gland of C. farreri and compared the transcriptomic data between them. A total of 227 673 transcripts were assembled into 105 071 unigenes, most of which shared high similarity with sequences in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. For functional classification, 24 493 unigenes were assigned to Gene Ontology terms. Additionally, EuKaryotic Ortholog Groups and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses assigned 12 028 unigenes to 26 categories and 7 849 unigenes to five pathways, respectively. Comparative transcriptomics analysis identified 3 800 unigenes that were differentially expressed in the Cd-treated group compared with the control group. Among them, genes associated with heavy metal accumulation were screened, including metallothionein, divalent metal transporter, and metal tolerance protein. The functional genes and predicted pathways identified in our study will contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic and immune system in the digestive gland of C. farreri. In addition, the transcriptomic data will provide a comprehensive resource that may contribute to the understanding of molecular mechanisms that respond to marine pollutants in bivalves.

  9. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Benzene Exposure Among Petroleum Workers: An International Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzene at high concentrations is known to cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its relationship with other lymphohematopoietic (LH) cancers remains uncertain, particularly at low concentrations. In this pooled analysis, we examined the risk of five LH cancers relative to lower levels of benzene exposure in petroleum workers. Methods We updated three nested case–control studies from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom with new incident LH cancers among petroleum distribution workers through December 31, 2006, and pooled 370 potential case subjects and 1587 matched LH cancer-free control subjects. Quantitative benzene exposure in parts per million (ppm) was blindly reconstructed using historical monitoring data, and exposure certainty was scored as high, medium, or low. Two hematopathologists assigned diagnoses and scored the certainty of diagnosis as high, medium, or low. Dose–response relationships were examined for five LH cancers, including the three most common leukemia cell-types (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia [CML], and chronic lymphoid leukemia [CLL]) and two myeloid tumors (myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS] and myeloproliferative disease [MPD]). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and time period. Results Cumulative benzene exposure showed a monotonic dose–response relationship with MDS (highest vs lowest tertile, >2.93 vs ≤0.348 ppm-years, OR = 4.33, 95% CI = 1.31 to 14.3). For peak benezene exposures (>3 ppm), the risk of MDS was increased in high and medium certainty diagnoses (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 6.32, 95% CI = 1.32 to 30.2) and in workers having the highest exposure certainty (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 5.74, 95% CI = 1.05 to 31.2). There was little evidence of dose–response relationships for AML, CLL, CML, or MPD. Conclusions Relatively low-level exposure to benzene experienced by petroleum

  10. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  11. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  12. Adult acclimation to combined temperature and pH stressors significantly enhances reproductive outcomes compared to short-term exposures.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Coleen C; Clark, Melody S; Richard, Joelle; Morley, Simon A; Thorne, Michael A S; Harper, Elizabeth M; Peck, Lloyd S

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the effects of long-term culture under altered conditions on the Antarctic sea urchin, Sterechinus neumayeri. Sterechinus neumayeri was cultured under the combined environmental stressors of lowered pH (-0.3 and -0.5 pH units) and increased temperature (+2 °C) for 2 years. This time-scale covered two full reproductive cycles in this species and analyses included studies on both adult metabolism and larval development. Adults took at least 6-8 months to acclimate to the altered conditions, but beyond this, there was no detectable effect of temperature or pH. Animals were spawned after 6 and 17 months exposure to altered conditions, with markedly different outcomes. At 6 months, the percentage hatching and larval survival rates were greatest in the animals kept at 0 °C under current pH conditions, whilst those under lowered pH and +2 °C performed significantly less well. After 17 months, performance was not significantly different across treatments, including controls. However, under the altered conditions urchins produced larger eggs compared with control animals. These data show that under long-term culture adult S. neumayeri appear to acclimate their metabolic and reproductive physiology to the combined stressors of altered pH and increased temperature, with relatively little measureable effect. They also emphasize the importance of long-term studies in evaluating effects of altered pH, particularly in slow developing marine species with long gonad maturation times, as the effects of altered conditions cannot be accurately evaluated unless gonads have fully matured under the new conditions. PMID:25491898

  13. Adult acclimation to combined temperature and pH stressors significantly enhances reproductive outcomes compared to short-term exposures.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Coleen C; Clark, Melody S; Richard, Joelle; Morley, Simon A; Thorne, Michael A S; Harper, Elizabeth M; Peck, Lloyd S

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the effects of long-term culture under altered conditions on the Antarctic sea urchin, Sterechinus neumayeri. Sterechinus neumayeri was cultured under the combined environmental stressors of lowered pH (-0.3 and -0.5 pH units) and increased temperature (+2 °C) for 2 years. This time-scale covered two full reproductive cycles in this species and analyses included studies on both adult metabolism and larval development. Adults took at least 6-8 months to acclimate to the altered conditions, but beyond this, there was no detectable effect of temperature or pH. Animals were spawned after 6 and 17 months exposure to altered conditions, with markedly different outcomes. At 6 months, the percentage hatching and larval survival rates were greatest in the animals kept at 0 °C under current pH conditions, whilst those under lowered pH and +2 °C performed significantly less well. After 17 months, performance was not significantly different across treatments, including controls. However, under the altered conditions urchins produced larger eggs compared with control animals. These data show that under long-term culture adult S. neumayeri appear to acclimate their metabolic and reproductive physiology to the combined stressors of altered pH and increased temperature, with relatively little measureable effect. They also emphasize the importance of long-term studies in evaluating effects of altered pH, particularly in slow developing marine species with long gonad maturation times, as the effects of altered conditions cannot be accurately evaluated unless gonads have fully matured under the new conditions.

  14. EXPERIENCES WITH USING PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE ANALYSIS METHODS IN THE U.S. EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade various Offices and Programs within the U.S. EPA have either initiated or increased the development and application of probabilistic exposure analysis models. These models have been applied to a broad range of research or regulatory problems in EPA, such as e...

  15. A Meta-Analysis Summarizing the Effects of Pornography II: Aggression after Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Mike; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines by meta-analysis the effect that exposure to pornography produces on aggressive behavior under laboratory conditions considering a variety of possible moderating conditions. Demonstrates a homogeneous set of results showing that pictorial nudity reduces subsequent violent behavior, but that depictions of nonviolent sexual behavior and…

  16. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES AND FUTURE DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Environmental Exposures and Future Disease States

    John C. Rockett, Chad R. Blystone, Amber K. Goetz, Rachel N. Murrell, Hongzu Ren, Judith E. Schmid, Jessica Stapelfeldt, Lillian F. Strader, Kary E. Thompson, Douglas B. T...

  17. GENOMIC AND PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF SURROGATE TISSUES FOR ASSESSING TOXIC EXPOSURES AND DISEASE STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic and Proteomic Analysis of Surrogate Tissues for Assessing Toxic Exposures and Disease States
    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, USEPA, ...

  18. Feeling Validated versus Being Correct: A Meta-Analysis of Selective Exposure to Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, William; Albarracin, Dolores; Eagly, Alice H.; Brechan, Inge; Lindberg, Matthew J.; Merrill, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    A meta-analysis assessed whether exposure to information is guided by defense or accuracy motives. The studies examined information preferences in relation to attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in situations that provided choices between congenial information, which supported participants' pre-existing attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors, and…

  19. The Effects of Credibility, Reliance, and Exposure on Media Agenda-Setting: A Path Analysis Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanta, Wayne; Hu, Yu-Wei

    1994-01-01

    Uses path analysis to investigate a model of agenda-setting. Supports the model, showing that, if individuals perceive the media to be highly credible, they will rely on the media for information, will increase their exposure to media messages and in turn will become more susceptible to agenda-setting. (SR)

  20. Railway noise annoyance: exposure-response relationships and testing a theoretical model by structural equation analysis.

    PubMed

    Pennig, Sibylle; Schady, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    In some regions the exposure to railway noise is extremely concentrated, which may lead to high residential annoyance. Nonacoustical factors contribute to these reactions, but there is limited evidence on the interrelations between the nonacoustical factors that influence railway noise annoyance. The aims of the present study were (1) to examine exposure-response relationships between long-term railway noise exposure and annoyance in a region severely affected by railway noise and (2) to determine a priori proposed interrelations between nonacoustical factors by structural equation analysis. Residents (n = 320) living close to railway tracks in the Middle Rhine Valley completed a socio-acoustic survey. Individual noise exposure levels were calculated by an acoustical simulation model for this area. The derived exposure-response relationships indicated considerably higher annoyance at the same noise exposure level than would have been predicted by the European Union standard curve, particularly for the night-time period. In the structural equation analysis, 72% of the variance in noise annoyance was explained by the noise exposure (L(den)) and nonacoustical variables. The model provides insights into several causal mechanisms underlying the formation of railway noise annoyance considering indirect and reciprocal effects. The concern about harmful effects of railway noise and railway traffic, the perceived control and coping capacity, and the individual noise sensitivity were the most important factors that influence noise annoyance. All effects of the nonacoustical factors on annoyance were mediated by the perceived control and coping capacity and additionally proposed indirect effects of the theoretical model were supported by the data.

  1. Comparative analysis of slot dimension in lingual bracket systems

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances requires - among others - the correct clinical expression of torque, which depends on the precise fitting of archwire and slot. Especially in the lingual technique torque problems become clinically more evident than in labial appliances also with respect to the vertical alignment of teeth due to different distances from the center of resistance. The purpose of the present study was to compare the preciseness of slot dimensions of different lingual bracket systems. Methods Three lingual bracket systems were included in the study (7th Generation and STb, Ormco, Glendora, CA, USA; Incognito, TOP-Service/3 M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA). Non destructive analysis of vertical slot dimensions was performed using precision pin gauges (Azurea, Belprahon, Switzerland) that were tapered in increments of 0.002 mm (0.00008 inch). The sizes of 240 incisor and canine brackets were measured per system (total: 720). Data were compared using one-way ANOVA. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Average slot dimensions were 0.467 mm ± 0.007 mm (0.0184 inch ± 0.0003 inch) for the 7th Generation bracket system, 0.466 mm ± 0.004 mm (0.0183 inch ± 0.0001) inch for the STb bracket system and 0.459 mm ± 0.004 mm (0.0181 inch ± 0.0001) inch for the Incognito bracket system. Differences between systems were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions The analyzed bracket systems for lingual treatment exhibited significant differences in slot dimension that will clinically result in torque play. These aspects must be considered in lingual orthodontic treatment. PMID:20003510

  2. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of the Bacterial Homologous Recombination Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C; Cornet, Emmanuel; Michel, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a housekeeping process involved in the maintenance of chromosome integrity and generation of genetic variability. Although detailed biochemical studies have described the mechanism of action of its components in model organisms, there is no recent extensive assessment of this knowledge, using comparative genomics and taking advantage of available experimental data on recombination. Using comparative genomics, we assessed the diversity of recombination processes among bacteria, and simulations suggest that we missed very few homologs. The work included the identification of orthologs and the analysis of their evolutionary history and genomic context. Some genes, for proteins such as RecA, the resolvases, and RecR, were found to be nearly ubiquitous, suggesting that the large majority of bacterial genomes are capable of homologous recombination. Yet many genomes show incomplete sets of presynaptic systems, with RecFOR being more frequent than RecBCD/AddAB. There is a significant pattern of co-occurrence between these systems and antirecombinant proteins such as the ones of mismatch repair and SbcB, but no significant association with nonhomologous end joining, which seems rare in bacteria. Surprisingly, a large number of genomes in which homologous recombination has been reported lack many of the enzymes involved in the presynaptic systems. The lack of obvious correlation between the presence of characterized presynaptic genes and experimental data on the frequency of recombination suggests the existence of still-unknown presynaptic mechanisms in bacteria. It also indicates that, at the moment, the assessment of the intrinsic stability or recombination isolation of bacteria in most cases cannot be inferred from the identification of known recombination proteins in the genomes. PMID:16132081

  3. Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences Covering the Seven Cronobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Craig A.; Shih, Rita; Degoricija, Lovorka; Rico, Alain; Brzoska, Pius; Hamby, Stephen E.; Masood, Naqash; Hariri, Sumyya; Sonbol, Hana; Chuzhanova, Nadia; McClelland, Michael; Furtado, Manohar R.; Forsythe, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species of Cronobacter are widespread in the environment and are occasional food-borne pathogens associated with serious neonatal diseases, including bacteraemia, meningitis, and necrotising enterocolitis. The genus is composed of seven species: C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis, C. dublinensis, C. muytjensii, C. universalis, and C. condimenti. Clinical cases are associated with three species, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis and, in particular, with C. sakazakii multilocus sequence type 4. Thus, it is plausible that virulence determinants have evolved in certain lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated high quality sequence drafts for eleven Cronobacter genomes representing the seven Cronobacter species, including an ST4 strain of C. sakazakii. Comparative analysis of these genomes together with the two publicly available genomes revealed Cronobacter has over 6,000 genes in one or more strains and over 2,000 genes shared by all Cronobacter. Considerable variation in the presence of traits such as type six secretion systems, metal resistance (tellurite, copper and silver), and adhesins were found. C. sakazakii is unique in the Cronobacter genus in encoding genes enabling the utilization of exogenous sialic acid which may have clinical significance. The C. sakazakii ST4 strain 701 contained additional genes as compared to other C. sakazakii but none of them were known specific virulence-related genes. Conclusions/Significance Genome comparison revealed that pair-wise DNA sequence identity varies between 89 and 97% in the seven Cronobacter species, and also suggested various degrees of divergence. Sets of universal core genes and accessory genes unique to each strain were identified. These gene sequences can be used for designing genus/species specific detection assays. Genes encoding adhesins, T6SS, and metal resistance genes as well as prophages are found in only subsets of genomes and have contributed considerably to the variation of

  4. Comparative analysis of Acinetobacters: three genomes for three lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Vallenet, David; Nordmann, Patrice; Barbe, Valérie; Poirel, Laurent; Mangenot, Sophie; Bataille, Elodie; Dossat, Carole; Gas, Shahinaz; Kreimeyer, Annett; Lenoble, Patricia; Oztas, Sophie; Poulain, Julie; Segurens, Béatrice; Robert, Catherine; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Médigue, Claudine; Weissenbach, Jean; Cruveiller, Stéphane

    2008-03-19

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the source of numerous nosocomial infections in humans and therefore deserves close attention as multidrug or even pandrug resistant strains are increasingly being identified worldwide. Here we report the comparison of two newly sequenced genomes of A. baumannii. The human isolate A. baumannii AYE is multidrug resistant whereas strain SDF, which was isolated from body lice, is antibiotic susceptible. As reference for comparison in this analysis, the genome of the soil-living bacterium A. baylyi strain ADP1 was used. The most interesting dissimilarities we observed were that i) whereas strain AYE and A. baylyi genomes harbored very few Insertion Sequence elements which could promote expression of downstream genes, strain SDF sequence contains several hundred of them that have played a crucial role in its genome reduction (gene disruptions and simple DNA loss); ii) strain SDF has low catabolic capacities compared to strain AYE. Interestingly, the latter has even higher catabolic capacities than A. baylyi which has already been reported as a very nutritionally versatile organism. This metabolic performance could explain the persistence of A. baumannii nosocomial strains in environments where nutrients are scarce; iii) several processes known to play a key role during host infection (biofilm formation, iron uptake, quorum sensing, virulence factors) were either different or absent, the best example of which is iron uptake. Indeed, strain AYE and A. baylyi use siderophore-based systems to scavenge iron from the environment whereas strain SDF uses an alternate system similar to the Haem Acquisition System (HAS). Taken together, all these observations suggest that the genome contents of the 3 Acinetobacters compared are partly shaped by life in distinct ecological niches: human (and more largely hospital environment), louse, soil.

  5. A comparative analysis of biclustering algorithms for gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Eren, Kemal; Deveci, Mehmet; Küçüktunç, Onur; Çatalyürek, Ümit V

    2013-05-01

    The need to analyze high-dimension biological data is driving the development of new data mining methods. Biclustering algorithms have been successfully applied to gene expression data to discover local patterns, in which a subset of genes exhibit similar expression levels over a subset of conditions. However, it is not clear which algorithms are best suited for this task. Many algorithms have been published in the past decade, most of which have been compared only to a small number of algorithms. Surveys and comparisons exist in the literature, but because of the large number and variety of biclustering algorithms, they are quickly outdated. In this article we partially address this problem of evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of existing biclustering methods. We used the BiBench package to compare 12 algorithms, many of which were recently published or have not been extensively studied. The algorithms were tested on a suite of synthetic data sets to measure their performance on data with varying conditions, such as different bicluster models, varying noise, varying numbers of biclusters and overlapping biclusters. The algorithms were also tested on eight large gene expression data sets obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis was performed on the resulting biclusters, and the best enrichment terms are reported. Our analyses show that the biclustering method and its parameters should be selected based on the desired model, whether that model allows overlapping biclusters, and its robustness to noise. In addition, we observe that the biclustering algorithms capable of finding more than one model are more successful at capturing biologically relevant clusters.

  6. Feedback interventions and driving speed: A parametric and comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houten, Ron Van; Nau, Paul A.

    1983-01-01

    Five experiments were conducted to assess the effects of several variables on the efficacy of feedback in reducing driving speed. Experiment 1 systematically varied the criterion used to define speeding, and results showed that the use of a lenient criterion (20 km/hr over the speed limit), which allowed for the posting of high percentages of drivers not speeding, was more effective in reducing speeding than the use of a stringent criterion (10 km/hr over the speed limit). In Experiment 2 an analysis revealed that posting feedback reduced speeding on a limited access highway and the effects persisted to some degree up to 6 km. Experiments 3 and 4 compared the effectiveness of an unmanned parked police vehicle (Experiment 3) and a police air patrol speeding program (Experiment 4) with the feedback sign and determined whether the presence of either of these enforcement variables could potentiate the efficacy of the sign. The results of both experiments demonstrated that although the two enforcement programs initially produced larger effects than the feedback sign, the magnitude of their effect attenuated over time. Experiment 5 compared the effectiveness of a traditional enforcement program with a warning program which included handing out a flier providing feedback on the number and types of accidents occuring on the road during the past year. This experiment demonstrated that the warning program produced a marked reduction in speeding and the traditional enforcement program did not. Furthermore, the warning program and a feedback sign together produced an even greater reduction in speeding than either alone. PMID:16795666

  7. Comparative and retrospective molecular analysis of Parapoxvirus (PPV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, Schirin; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Wolf, Eckhard; Lang, Heike; von Buttlar, Heiner; Büttner, Mathias

    2014-03-01

    Species members of the genus Parapoxvirus (PPV) within the family Poxviridae cause contagious pustular dermatitis in small ruminants (Orf virus, ORFV) and mostly mild localized inflammation in cattle (bovine papular stomatitis virus, BPSV and pseudocowpox virus, PCPV). All PPVs are known to be zoonotic, leading to circumscribed skin lesions in humans, historically known as milker's nodules. Human PPV isolates are often ill defined concerning their allocation to an animal origin. Here we present a comparative molecular analysis of a unique collection of 21 historic and recent human and animal PPV cell culture isolates (and two PPV DNA samples). Cell culture PPV propagation was restricted to primary ruminant fibroblasts and was strictly kept at low passages to avoid genomic changes by in vitro influences. For molecular arrangement of the isolate DNAs and their attribution to established PPV species DNA fragments of the PPVs were generated by two different discriminating PCR protocols, targeting the major part of the open reading frame (ORF) 011 (B2L gene) and the complete ORF 032. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis of both genes resulted in affiliation to the known PPV species. The sequences from the ORF 032 allowed discrimination of the isolate DNAs at a higher resolution. Human PPV isolates could be clearly assigned to the PPV species belonging to the reported or assumed animal host of transmission. For the first time, a whole PPV genome sequence comparison of a human biopsy derived virus (B029) and its ovine counterpart (B015) originating from a defined Orf outbreak in Germany is provided, revealing their well conserved relationship. Thus human PPVs can be molecularly retraced to the PPV species indicating the animal of transmission. After transmission to the human host, molecular conservation of the animal's virus peculiarities indicative for a PPV species became evident. PMID:24373950

  8. Comparative analysis of polygalacturonase in the fruit of strawberry cultivars.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H C; Li, G; Zhao, X; Li, L J

    2015-10-19

    The role of polygalacturonase (PG) in the development, ripening, and softening of fruit from two strawberry cultivars with different flesh firmness and softening characteristics was compared. Changes in PG activity and gene expression during development, ripening and softening were measured. The PG genes from each cultivar were cloned and analyzed, and were classified with other PG genes using phylogenetic analysis. In Toyonoka fruit, PG activity increased gradually, reaching a peak during the pink stage, and remained at this level during post-harvest softening. Changes in PG gene expression were consistent with PG activity in these softer fruits. In the firmer Sweet Charlie fruits, PG activity was detected during the initial development stage, reaching a peak at the white stage, thereafter decreasing gradually with ripening and remaining at this lower level throughout softening. Changes in PG gene expression and PG activity were not consistent in these fruit. For both Toyonoka and Sweet Charlie PG genes (FaTPG and FaSCPG, respectively), the open reading frame was 1218 bp, encoding 405 amino acids. Five different nucleotide sites were observed between the two sequences, leading to two amino acid sequence mutations. FaTPG, FaSCPG, and PG genes from the Fragaria vesca genome were classified into three clades using phylogenetic analysis. The clade containing PG genes involved in fruit softening had functional similarity but there were no functional differences between FaTPG and FaSCPG. Differences in PG activity, gene sequence, and gene expression may have led to different roles of PG during ripening and softening in strawberries with different textures.

  9. Modelling ecological and human exposure to POPs in Venice lagoon - Part II: Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in coupled exposure models.

    PubMed

    Radomyski, Artur; Giubilato, Elisa; Ciffroy, Philippe; Critto, Andrea; Brochot, Céline; Marcomini, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The study is focused on applying uncertainty and sensitivity analysis to support the application and evaluation of large exposure models where a significant number of parameters and complex exposure scenarios might be involved. The recently developed MERLIN-Expo exposure modelling tool was applied to probabilistically assess the ecological and human exposure to PCB 126 and 2,3,7,8-TCDD in the Venice lagoon (Italy). The 'Phytoplankton', 'Aquatic Invertebrate', 'Fish', 'Human intake' and PBPK models available in MERLIN-Expo library were integrated to create a specific food web to dynamically simulate bioaccumulation in various aquatic species and in the human body over individual lifetimes from 1932 until 1998. MERLIN-Expo is a high tier exposure modelling tool allowing propagation of uncertainty on the model predictions through Monte Carlo simulation. Uncertainty in model output can be further apportioned between parameters by applying built-in sensitivity analysis tools. In this study, uncertainty has been extensively addressed in the distribution functions to describe the data input and the effect on model results by applying sensitivity analysis techniques (screening Morris method, regression analysis, and variance-based method EFAST). In the exposure scenario developed for the Lagoon of Venice, the concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCB 126 in human blood turned out to be mainly influenced by a combination of parameters (half-lives of the chemicals, body weight variability, lipid fraction, food assimilation efficiency), physiological processes (uptake/elimination rates), environmental exposure concentrations (sediment, water, food) and eating behaviours (amount of food eaten). In conclusion, this case study demonstrated feasibility of MERLIN-Expo to be successfully employed in integrated, high tier exposure assessment. PMID:27432731

  10. Modelling ecological and human exposure to POPs in Venice lagoon - Part II: Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in coupled exposure models.

    PubMed

    Radomyski, Artur; Giubilato, Elisa; Ciffroy, Philippe; Critto, Andrea; Brochot, Céline; Marcomini, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The study is focused on applying uncertainty and sensitivity analysis to support the application and evaluation of large exposure models where a significant number of parameters and complex exposure scenarios might be involved. The recently developed MERLIN-Expo exposure modelling tool was applied to probabilistically assess the ecological and human exposure to PCB 126 and 2,3,7,8-TCDD in the Venice lagoon (Italy). The 'Phytoplankton', 'Aquatic Invertebrate', 'Fish', 'Human intake' and PBPK models available in MERLIN-Expo library were integrated to create a specific food web to dynamically simulate bioaccumulation in various aquatic species and in the human body over individual lifetimes from 1932 until 1998. MERLIN-Expo is a high tier exposure modelling tool allowing propagation of uncertainty on the model predictions through Monte Carlo simulation. Uncertainty in model output can be further apportioned between parameters by applying built-in sensitivity analysis tools. In this study, uncertainty has been extensively addressed in the distribution functions to describe the data input and the effect on model results by applying sensitivity analysis techniques (screening Morris method, regression analysis, and variance-based method EFAST). In the exposure scenario developed for the Lagoon of Venice, the concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCB 126 in human blood turned out to be mainly influenced by a combination of parameters (half-lives of the chemicals, body weight variability, lipid fraction, food assimilation efficiency), physiological processes (uptake/elimination rates), environmental exposure concentrations (sediment, water, food) and eating behaviours (amount of food eaten). In conclusion, this case study demonstrated feasibility of MERLIN-Expo to be successfully employed in integrated, high tier exposure assessment.

  11. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Childhood Leukemia and Parental Occupational Pesticide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, Donald T.; Turner, Michelle C.; Krewski, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of childhood leukemia and parental occupational pesticide exposure. Data sources Searches of MEDLINE (1950–2009) and other electronic databases yielded 31 included studies. Data extraction Two authors independently abstracted data and assessed the quality of each study. Data synthesis Random effects models were used to obtain summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was no overall association between childhood leukemia and any paternal occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.88–1.34); there were slightly elevated risks in subgroups of studies with low total-quality scores (OR = 1.39; 95% CI, 0.99–1.95), ill-defined exposure time windows (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.00–1.85), and exposure information collected after offspring leukemia diagnosis (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05–1.70). Childhood leukemia was associated with prenatal maternal occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 2.09; 95% CI, 1.51–2.88); this association was slightly stronger for studies with high exposure-measurement-quality scores (OR = 2.45; 95% CI, 1.68–3.58), higher confounder control scores (OR = 2.38; 95% CI, 1.56–3.62), and farm-related exposures (OR = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.53–3.89). Childhood leukemia risk was also elevated for prenatal maternal occupational exposure to insecticides (OR = 2.72; 95% CI, 1.47–5.04) and herbicides (OR = 3.62; 95% CI, 1.28–10.3). Conclusions Childhood leukemia was associated with prenatal maternal occupational pesticide exposure in analyses of all studies combined and in several subgroups. Associations with paternal occupational pesticide exposure were weaker and less consistent. Research needs include improved pesticide exposure indices, continued follow-up of existing cohorts, genetic susceptibility assessment, and basic research on childhood leukemia initiation and progression. PMID:20019898

  12. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Tolerance among Thermoanaerobacter Species.

    PubMed

    Alves, Joana I; Alves, M Madalena; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Sousa, Diana Z

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic thermophilic strain (strain PCO) was isolated from a syngas-converting enrichment culture. Syngas components cannot be used by strain PCO, but the new strain is very tolerant to carbon monoxide (pCO = 1.7 × 10(5) Pa, 100% CO). 16S rRNA gene analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization revealed that strain PCO is a strain of Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus. The physiology of strain PCO and other Thermoanaerobacter species was compared, focusing on their tolerance to carbon monoxide. T. thermohydrosulfuricus, T. brockii subsp. finnii, T. pseudethanolicus, and T. wiegelii were exposed to increased CO concentrations in the headspace, while growth, glucose consumption and product formation were monitored. Remarkably, glucose conversion rates by Thermoanaerobacter species were not affected by CO. All the tested strains fermented glucose to mainly lactate, ethanol, acetate, and hydrogen, but final product concentrations differed. In the presence of CO, ethanol production was generally less affected, but H2 production decreased with increasing CO partial pressure. This study highlights the CO resistance of Thermoanaerobacter species. PMID:27621723

  13. Transcription factor motif quality assessment requires systematic comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kibet, Caleb Kipkurui; Machanick, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site prediction remains a challenge in gene regulatory research due to degeneracy and potential variability in binding sites in the genome. Dozens of algorithms designed to learn binding models (motifs) have generated many motifs available in research papers with a subset making it to databases like JASPAR, UniPROBE and Transfac. The presence of many versions of motifs from the various databases for a single TF and the lack of a standardized assessment technique makes it difficult for biologists to make an appropriate choice of binding model and for algorithm developers to benchmark, test and improve on their models. In this study, we review and evaluate the approaches in use, highlight differences and demonstrate the difficulty of defining a standardized motif assessment approach. We review scoring functions, motif length, test data and the type of performance metrics used in prior studies as some of the factors that influence the outcome of a motif assessment. We show that the scoring functions and statistics used in motif assessment influence ranking of motifs in a TF-specific manner. We also show that TF binding specificity can vary by source of genomic binding data. We also demonstrate that information content of a motif is not in isolation a measure of motif quality but is influenced by TF binding behaviour. We conclude that there is a need for an easy-to-use tool that presents all available evidence for a comparative analysis. PMID:27092243

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice shoots exposed to high arsenate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Li, Ming; Han, Chao; Wu, Fengxia; Tu, Bingkun; Yang, Pingfang

    2013-10-01

    Consumption of arsenic contaminated water and cereals is a serious threat to humans all over the world. Rice (Oryza sativa "Nipponbare"), as a main cereal crop, can accumulate arsenic more than 10-fold that of in other cereals. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of rice subjected to 100 µM arsenate stress, a comparative proteomic analysis of rice shoots in combination with morphological and biochemical investigations have been performed in this study. The results demonstrated that arsenate suppressed the growth of rice seedlings, destroyed the cellular ultra-structure and changed the homeostasis of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, a total of 38 differentially displayed proteins, which were mainly involved in metabolism, redox and protein-metabolism, were identified. The data suggest the arsenic can inhibit rice growth through negatively affecting chloroplast structure and photosynthesis. In addition, upregulation of the proteins involved in redox and protein metabolism might help the rice to be resistant or tolerant to arsenic toxicity. In general, this study improves our understanding about the rice arsenic responsive mechanism.

  15. Mental health network governance: comparative analysis across Canadian regions

    PubMed Central

    Wiktorowicz, Mary E; Fleury, Marie-Josée; Adair, Carol E; Lesage, Alain; Goldner, Elliot; Peters, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective Modes of governance were compared in ten local mental health networks in diverse contexts (rural/urban and regionalized/non-regionalized) to clarify the governance processes that foster inter-organizational collaboration and the conditions that support them. Methods Case studies of ten local mental health networks were developed using qualitative methods of document review, semi-structured interviews and focus groups that incorporated provincial policy, network and organizational levels of analysis. Results Mental health networks adopted either a corporate structure, mutual adjustment or an alliance governance model. A corporate structure supported by regionalization offered the most direct means for local governance to attain inter-organizational collaboration. The likelihood that networks with an alliance model developed coordination processes depended on the presence of the following conditions: a moderate number of organizations, goal consensus and trust among the organizations, and network-level competencies. In the small and mid-sized urban networks where these conditions were met their alliance realized the inter-organizational collaboration sought. In the large urban and rural networks where these conditions were not met, externally brokered forms of network governance were required to support alliance based models. Discussion In metropolitan and rural networks with such shared forms of network governance as an alliance or voluntary mutual adjustment, external mediation by a regional or provincial authority was an important lever to foster inter-organizational collaboration. PMID:21289999

  16. [Comparative analysis of seven marine biological source of mineral drugs].

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; A, Ru-na; Li, Shang-rong; Zhang, Jing-Xian; Wu, Wan-ying; Cui, Ya-jun

    2014-09-01

    The marine biological source of mineral drugs recorded in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010 version) mainly including pearl, nacre, clam shell, common oyster shell, ark shell, cuttle bone, and sea-ear shell are widely used in clinical. Calcium carbonate and a small amount of protein are the main components in this type of drugs. In this paper, a systematical and comparable study were carried out by determination of calcium carbonate by EDTA titration method, the crystal of calcium carbonate by X-Ray powder diffraction and the total amino acids (TAAs) of the hydrolyzed samples by ultraviolet spectrophotometry method. As a result, the crystal structure is calcite for common oyster shell, mixture of calcite and aragonite for nacre and sea-ear shell, aragonite for the other drugs. The content of calcium carbonate ranged from 86% to 96%. Cuttle bone has the highest amount of TAAs among the seven drugs which reached 1.7% while clam shell has the lowest content of 0.16% on average. In conclusion, an effective method was developed for the quality control of marine mineral drugs by comprehensive analysis of calcium carbonate and TAAs in the seven marine mineral drugs.

  17. A comparative analysis of network robustness against different link attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Boping; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Mingxing; Ma, Liangliang

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the study of optimizing network robustness has attracted increasing attentions, and the constraint that every node's degree cannot be changed is considered. Although this constraint maintains the node degree distribution consistently in order to reserve the structure of networks, it makes the network structure be lack of flexibility since many network structure always transform in the modern society. Given this consideration, in this paper, we analyze the robustness of networks through setting a new constraint; that is, only the number of edges should be unchanged. Then, we use the link-robustness index (Rl) as the measure of the network robustness against either random failures or intentional attacks, and make a comparative analysis of network robustness against different types of link attacks. Moreover, we use four types of networks as initial networks, namely scale-free networks, random networks, regular networks, and small-world networks. The experimental results show that the values of robustness measures for the optimized networks starting from different initial networks are similar under different link attacks, but the network topologies may be different. That is to say, networks with different topologies may have similar robustness in terms of the robustness measures. We also find that the optimized networks obtained by one link attack may not robust against other link attacks, sometimes, even weaker than the original networks. Therefore, before building networks, it is better to study which type of link attacks may happen.

  18. Engine System Loads Analysis Compared to Hot-Fire Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Jennings, John M.; Mims, Katherine; Brunty, Joseph; Christensen, Eric R.; McConnaughey, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Early implementation of structural dynamics finite element analyses for calculation of design loads is considered common design practice for high volume manufacturing industries such as automotive and aeronautical industries. However with the rarity of rocket engine development programs starts, these tools are relatively new to the design of rocket engines. In the NASA MC-1 engine program, the focus was to reduce the cost-to-weight ratio. The techniques for structural dynamics analysis practices, were tailored in this program to meet both production and structural design goals. Perturbation of rocket engine design parameters resulted in a number of MC-1 load cycles necessary to characterize the impact due to mass and stiffness changes. Evolution of loads and load extraction methodologies, parametric considerations and a discussion of load path sensitivities are important during the design and integration of a new engine system. During the final stages of development, it is important to verify the results of an engine system model to determine the validity of the results. During the final stages of the MC-1 program, hot-fire test results were obtained and compared to the structural design loads calculated by the engine system model. These comparisons are presented in this paper.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of seven Mycoplasma hyosynoviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Bumgardner, Eric A; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Bumgarner, Roger E; Lawrence, Paulraj K

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Mycoplasma hyosynoviae can result in debilitating arthritis in pigs, particularly those aged 10 weeks or older. Strategies for controlling this pathogen are becoming increasingly important due to the rise in the number of cases of arthritis that have been attributed to infection in recent years. In order to begin to develop interventions to prevent arthritis caused by M. hyosynoviae, more information regarding the specific proteins and potential virulence factors that its genome encodes was needed. However, the genome of this emerging swine pathogen had not been sequenced previously. In this report, we present a comparative analysis of the genomes of seven strains of M. hyosynoviae isolated from different locations in North America during the years 2010 to 2013. We identified several putative virulence factors that may contribute to the ability of this pathogen to adhere to host cells. Additionally, we discovered several prophage genes present within the genomes of three strains that show significant similarity to MAV1, a phage isolated from the related species, M. arthritidis. We also identified CRISPR-Cas and type III restriction and modification systems present in two strains that may contribute to their ability to defend against phage infection. PMID:25693846

  20. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Tolerance among Thermoanaerobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Joana I.; Alves, M. Madalena; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Sousa, Diana Z.

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic thermophilic strain (strain PCO) was isolated from a syngas-converting enrichment culture. Syngas components cannot be used by strain PCO, but the new strain is very tolerant to carbon monoxide (pCO = 1.7 × 105 Pa, 100% CO). 16S rRNA gene analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization revealed that strain PCO is a strain of Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus. The physiology of strain PCO and other Thermoanaerobacter species was compared, focusing on their tolerance to carbon monoxide. T. thermohydrosulfuricus, T. brockii subsp. finnii, T. pseudethanolicus, and T. wiegelii were exposed to increased CO concentrations in the headspace, while growth, glucose consumption and product formation were monitored. Remarkably, glucose conversion rates by Thermoanaerobacter species were not affected by CO. All the tested strains fermented glucose to mainly lactate, ethanol, acetate, and hydrogen, but final product concentrations differed. In the presence of CO, ethanol production was generally less affected, but H2 production decreased with increasing CO partial pressure. This study highlights the CO resistance of Thermoanaerobacter species. PMID:27621723

  1. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Monoxide Tolerance among Thermoanaerobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Joana I.; Alves, M. Madalena; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Sousa, Diana Z.

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic thermophilic strain (strain PCO) was isolated from a syngas-converting enrichment culture. Syngas components cannot be used by strain PCO, but the new strain is very tolerant to carbon monoxide (pCO = 1.7 × 105 Pa, 100% CO). 16S rRNA gene analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization revealed that strain PCO is a strain of Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus. The physiology of strain PCO and other Thermoanaerobacter species was compared, focusing on their tolerance to carbon monoxide. T. thermohydrosulfuricus, T. brockii subsp. finnii, T. pseudethanolicus, and T. wiegelii were exposed to increased CO concentrations in the headspace, while growth, glucose consumption and product formation were monitored. Remarkably, glucose conversion rates by Thermoanaerobacter species were not affected by CO. All the tested strains fermented glucose to mainly lactate, ethanol, acetate, and hydrogen, but final product concentrations differed. In the presence of CO, ethanol production was generally less affected, but H2 production decreased with increasing CO partial pressure. This study highlights the CO resistance of Thermoanaerobacter species.

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis in Miscanthus sinensis exposed to antimony stress.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Ren, Huadong; Li, Sheng; Gao, Ming; Shi, Shengqing; Chang, Ermei; Wei, Yuan; Yao, Xiaohua; Jiang, Zeping; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-06-01

    To explore the molecular basis of Sb tolerance mechanism in plant, a comparative proteomic analysis of both roots and leaves in Miscanthus sinensis has been conducted in combination with physiological and biochemical analyses. M. sinensis seedlings were exposed to different doses of Sb, and both roots and leaves were collected after 3 days of treatment. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and image analyses found that 29 protein spots showed 1.5-fold change in abundance in leaves and 19 spots in roots, of which 31 were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS. Proteins involved in antioxidant defense and stress response generally increased their expression all over the Sb treatments. In addition, proteins relative to transcription, signal transduction, energy metabolism and cell division and cell structure showed a variable expression pattern over Sb concentrations. Overall these findings provide new insights into the probable survival mechanisms by which M. sinensis could be adapting to Sb phytotoxicity.

  3. The Chlamydia psittaci Genome: A Comparative Analysis of Intracellular Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Saluz, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular pathogens causing a wide range of diseases in animals and humans, and facing unique evolutionary constraints not encountered by free-living prokaryotes. To investigate genomic aspects of infection, virulence and host preference we have sequenced Chlamydia psittaci, the pathogenic agent of ornithosis. Results A comparison of the genome of the avian Chlamydia psittaci isolate 6BC with the genomes of other chlamydial species, C. trachomatis, C. muridarum, C. pneumoniae, C. abortus, C. felis and C. caviae, revealed a high level of sequence conservation and synteny across taxa, with the major exception of the human pathogen C. trachomatis. Important differences manifest in the polymorphic membrane protein family specific for the Chlamydiae and in the highly variable chlamydial plasticity zone. We identified a number of psittaci-specific polymorphic membrane proteins of the G family that may be related to differences in host-range and/or virulence as compared to closely related Chlamydiaceae. We calculated non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratios for pairs of orthologous genes to identify putative targets of adaptive evolution and predicted type III secreted effector proteins. Conclusions This study is the first detailed analysis of the Chlamydia psittaci genome sequence. It provides insights in the genome architecture of C. psittaci and proposes a number of novel candidate genes mostly of yet unknown function that may be important for pathogen-host interactions. PMID:22506068

  4. A comparative reliability analysis of computer-generated bitemark overlays.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Anne H; Sweet, David; Pretty, Iain

    2005-03-01

    This study compared the reliability of two methods used to produce computer-generated bitemark overlays with Adobe Photoshop (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, CA). Scanned images of twelve dental casts were sent to 30 examiners with different experience levels. Examiners were instructed to produce an overlay for each cast image based on the instructions provided for the two techniques. Measurements of the area and the x-y coordinate position of the biting edges of the anterior teeth were obtained using Scion Image software program (Scion Corporation, Frederick, MD) for each overlay. The inter- and intra-reliability assessment of the measurements was performed using an analysis of variance and calculation of reliability coefficients. The assessment of the area measurements showed significant variances seen in the examiner variable for both techniques resulting in low reliability coefficients. Conversely, the results for the positional measurements showed no significant differences in the variances between examiners with exceptionally high reliability coefficients. It was concluded that both techniques were reliable methods to produce bitemark overlays in assessing tooth position. PMID:15818864

  5. Comparative analysis of shell rendering and shear-warp rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao, Alexandre X.; Rocha, Leonardo M.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2002-05-01

    In Medical Imaging, shell rendering and shear-warp rendering are two of the most efficient and effective voxel-based techniques for volume visualization. This work presents a comparative analysis of shell rendering and shear-warp rendering in terms of storage, speed, and image quality. We have chosen 10 different objects of various sizes, shapes and topologies and one 1-GHz Pentium-III PC with 512 MB RAM for our experiments. Hard and fuzzy boundaries of up to 2,833 K voxels in size have been created to test both methods in surface and volume rendering, respectively. Hard surface shell rendering and surface shear-warp rendering required less than 0.5 second. In the worst case, volume shell rendering required 1.45 second, while volume shear-warp rendering spent 0.65 second for the same task. Shear-warp rendering uses on average from 3 to 6 times more memory space than shell rendering, but it can be up to 2.79 times faster than shell rendering. On average, shear-warp rendering is as fast as shell rendering for hard boundaries and 1.7 times faster than shell rendering for fuzzy boundaries. We have also observed that both can produce similar high-quality images.

  6. Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoliang; Lu, Lixia; Su, Hailong; Lou, Zhongzi; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yadong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of small regulatory RNAs that are involved in numerous biological processes through small RNA-induced silencing networks. In an attempt to explore the phylogeny of miRNAs across five platyhelminths, we integrated annotated miRNAs and their full genomes. We identified conserved miRNA clusters and, in particular, miR-71/2 was conserved from planarian to parasitic flatworms and was expanded in free-living Schmidtea mediterranea. Analysis of 22 miRNA loci provided compelling evidence that most known miRNAs are conserved across platyhelminths. Meanwhile, we also observed alterations of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNA(s), such as transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation, in around ~ 41% of 22 known miRNA loci. Compared with Echinococcus multilocularis, the majority of these events occurred in evolution-distant Hymenolepis microstoma, Schistosoma japonicum or/and S. mediterranea. These results imply rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

  7. Comparative analysis of ATRX, a chromatin remodeling protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel J; Pask, Andrew J; Huynh, Kim; Renfree, Marilyn B; Harley, Vincent R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2004-09-15

    The ATRX protein, associated with X-linked alpha-thalassaemia, mental retardation and developmental abnormalities including genital dysgenesis, has been proposed to function as a global transcriptional regulator within a multi-protein complex. However, an understanding of the composition and mechanics of this machinery has remained elusive. We applied inter-specific comparative analysis to identify conserved elements which may be involved in regulating the conformation of chromatin. As part of this study, we cloned and sequenced the entire translatable coding region (7.4 kb) of the ATRX gene from a model marsupial (tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii). We identify an ATRX ancestral core, conserved between plants, fish and mammals, comprising the cysteine-rich and SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like regions and protein interaction domains. Our data are consistent with the model of the cysteine-rich region as a DNA-binding zinc finger adjacent to a protein-binding (plant homeodomain-like) domain. Alignment of vertebrate ATRX sequences highlights other conserved elements, including a negatively charged mammalian sequence which we propose to be involved in binding of positively charged histone tails.

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of ten Streptococcus pneumoniae temperate bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Romero, Patricia; Croucher, Nicholas J; Hiller, N Luisa; Hu, Fen Z; Ehrlich, Garth D; Bentley, Stephen D; García, Ernesto; Mitchell, Tim J

    2009-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that often carries temperate bacteriophages. As part of a program to characterize the genetic makeup of prophages associated with clinical strains and to assess the potential roles that they play in the biology and pathogenesis in their host, we performed comparative genomic analysis of 10 temperate pneumococcal phages. All of the genomes are organized into five major gene clusters: lysogeny, replication, packaging, morphogenesis, and lysis clusters. All of the phage particles observed showed a Siphoviridae morphology. The only genes that are well conserved in all the genomes studied are those involved in the integration and the lysis of the host in addition to two genes, of unknown function, within the replication module. We observed that a high percentage of the open reading frames contained no similarities to any sequences catalogued in public databases; however, genes that were homologous to known phage virulence genes, including the pblB gene of Streptococcus mitis and the vapE gene of Dichelobacter nodosus, were also identified. Interestingly, bioinformatic tools showed the presence of a toxin-antitoxin system in the phage phiSpn_6, and this represents the first time that an addition system in a pneumophage has been identified. Collectively, the temperate pneumophages contain a diverse set of genes with various levels of similarity among them. PMID:19502408

  9. Assessment of exposure to mercury from industrial emissions: comparing “distance as a proxy” and dispersion modelling approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Susan; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Colvile, Roy; Jarup, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Background The Runcorn area, north‐west England, contains many pollution sources, the health effects of which have been under discussion for over 100 years. Preliminary investigations revealed an excess risk of mortality from kidney disease in people living nearest to several point sources of pollution, using distance as a proxy for exposure. Ongoing epidemiological investigations into the effect of ambient mercury exposure on dose and renal effect required a more refined assessment of exposure. Methods Atmospheric dispersion modelling was used to assess mercury dispersion from three mercury‐emitting sources (including a large chlor alkali plant), based on knowledge of emissions, local meteorology and topography. Results The model was sensitive to various input parameters, with different dispersion patterns and ground‐level concentrations, and therefore different exposed populations identified when different input parameters were defined. The different approaches to exposure assessment also had an impact on the epidemiological findings. The model output correlated well with weekly monitoring data collected in the local area, although the model underestimated concentrations in close proximity to the chlor alkali plant. The model identified that one point source did not contribute significantly to ground‐level mercury concentrations, so that inclusion of this source when using the “distance as a proxy” approach led to significant exposure misclassification. Conclusions The model output indicates that assessment of ambient exposure should give consideration to the magnitude of emissions, point source characteristics, local meteorology and topography to ensure that the most appropriate exposure classification is reached. Even if dispersion modelling cannot be undertaken, these data can be used to inform and improve the distance as a proxy approach, and improve the interpretability of the epidemiological findings. PMID:17182645

  10. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis.

    PubMed

    Wambaugh, John F; Barton, Hugh A; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2008-12-01

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskell Laboratories, USEPA Administrative Record AR-226.1499 (2003)] that administered single oral or iv doses of PFOA to adult male and female rats. PFOA concentration was observed over time; in plasma for some animals and in fecal and urinary excretion for others. There were four rats per dose group, for a total of 36 males and 36 females. Assuming that the PK parameters for each individual within a gender were drawn from the same, biologically varying population, plasma and excretion data were jointly analyzed using a hierarchical framework to separate uncertainty due to measurement error from actual biological variability. Bayesian analysis using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) provides tools to perform such an analysis as well as quantitative diagnostics to evaluate and discriminate between models. Starting from a one-compartment PK model with separate clearances to urine and feces, the model was incrementally expanded using Bayesian measures to assess if the expansion was supported by the data. PFOA excretion is sexually dimorphic in rats; male rats have bi-phasic elimination that is roughly 40 times slower than that of the females, which appear to have a single elimination phase. The male and female data were analyzed separately, keeping only the parameters describing the measurement process in common. For male rats, including excretion data initially decreased certainty in the one-compartment parameter estimates compared to an analysis using plasma data only. Allowing a third, unspecified clearance improved agreement and increased certainty when all the data was used, however a significant amount of eliminated PFOA was estimated to be missing from the excretion data. Adding an additional

  11. Diclofenac topical solution compared with oral diclofenac: a pooled safety analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Sanford H; Fuller, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Background Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) formulations, which produce less systemic exposure compared with oral formulations, are an option for the management of osteoarthritis (OA). However, the overall safety and efficacy of these agents compared with oral or systemic therapy remains controversial. Methods Two 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, controlled, multicenter studies compared the safety and efficacy profiles of diclofenac topical solution (TDiclo) with oral diclofenac (ODiclo). Each study independently showed that TDiclo had similar efficacy to ODiclo. To compare the safety profiles of TDiclo and ODiclo, a pooled safety analysis was performed for 927 total patients who had radiologically confirmed symptomatic OA of the knee. This pooled analysis included patients treated with TDiclo, containing 45.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and those treated with ODiclo. Safety assessments included monitoring of adverse events (AEs), recording of vital signs, dermatologic evaluation of the study knee, and clinical laboratory evaluation. Results AEs occurred in 312 (67.1%) patients using TDiclo versus 298 (64.5%) of those taking ODiclo. The most common AE with TDiclo was dry skin at the application site (24.1% vs 1.9% with ODiclo; P < 0.0001). Fewer gastrointestinal (25.4% vs 39.0%; P < 0.0001) and cardiovascular (1.5% vs 3.5%; P = 0.055) AEs occurred with TDiclo compared with ODiclo. ODiclo was associated with significantly greater increases in liver enzymes and creatinine, and greater decreases in creatinine clearance and hemoglobin (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusions These findings suggest that TDiclo represents a useful alternative to oral NSAID therapy in the management of OA, with a more favorable safety profile. PMID:21811391

  12. Socioeconomic Inequality in Exposure to Bullying During Adolescence: A Comparative, Cross-Sectional, Multilevel Study in 35 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Juan; Harel-Fisch, Yossi; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; soc, Mag scient; Holstein, Bjørn E.; soc, Mag scient; Hetland, Jørn; Currie, Candace; Gabhainn, Saoirse Nic; de Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Lynch, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the socioeconomic distribution of adolescent exposure to bullying internationally and documented the contribution of the macroeconomic environment. Methods. We used an international survey of 162 305 students aged 11, 13, and 15 years from nationally representative samples of 5998 schools in 35 countries in Europe and North America for the 2001–2002 school year. The survey used standardized measures of exposure to bullying and socioeconomic affluence. Results. Adolescents from families of low affluence reported higher prevalence of being victims of bullying (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10, 1.16). International differences in prevalence of exposure to bullying were not associated with the economic level of the country (as measured by gross national income) or the school, but wide disparities in affluence at a school and large economic inequality (as measured by the Gini coefficient) at the national level were associated with an increased prevalence of exposure to bullying. Conclusions. There is socioeconomic inequality in exposure to bullying among adolescents, leaving children of greater socioeconomic disadvantage at higher risk of victimization. Adolescents who attend schools and live in countries where socioeconomic differences are larger are at higher risk of being bullied. PMID:19299676

  13. Statistical correlation analysis for comparing vibration data from test and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.; Strang, R. F.; Purves, L. R.; Hershfeld, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A theory was developed to compare vibration modes obtained by NASTRAN analysis with those obtained experimentally. Because many more analytical modes can be obtained than experimental modes, the analytical set was treated as expansion functions for putting both sources in comparative form. The dimensional symmetry was developed for three general cases: nonsymmetric whole model compared with a nonsymmetric whole structural test, symmetric analytical portion compared with a symmetric experimental portion, and analytical symmetric portion with a whole experimental test. The theory was coded and a statistical correlation program was installed as a utility. The theory is established with small classical structures.

  14. Gene expression profiles following exposure to a developmental neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Pathway analysis for possible mode(s) of action

    SciTech Connect

    Royland, Joyce E.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-09-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that low levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure can adversely affect neurocognitive development. In animal models, perturbations in calcium signaling, neurotransmitters, and thyroid hormones have been postulated as potential mechanisms for PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. In order to understand the role of these proposed mechanisms and to identify other mechanisms in PCB-induced neurotoxicity, we have chosen a global approach utilizing oligonucleotide microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in the brain following developmental exposure to Aroclor 1254 (0 or 6 mg/kg/day from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21) in Long-Evans rats. Gene expression levels in the cerebellum and hippocampus from PNDs 7 and 14 animals were determined on Affymetrix rat 230A{sub 2}.0 chips. In the cerebellum, 87 transcripts were altered at PND7 compared to 27 transcripts at PND14 by Aroclor 1254 exposure, with only one transcript affected at both ages. In hippocampus, 175 transcripts and 50 transcripts were altered at PND7 and PND14, respectively, by Aroclor 1254 exposure with five genes commonly affected. Functional analysis suggests that pathways related to calcium homeostasis (Gng3, Ryr2, Trdn, Cacna1a), intracellular signaling (Camk2d, Stk17b, Pacsin2, Ryr2, Trio, Fert2, Ptk2b), axonal guidance (Lum, Mxd3, Akap11, Gucy1b3), aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling (Nfia, Col1a2), and transcripts involved in cell proliferation (Gspt2, Cdkn1c, Ptk2b) and differentiation (Ifitm31, Hpca, Zfp260, Igsf4a, Hes5) leading to the development of nervous system were significantly altered by Aroclor 1254 exposure. Of the two brain regions examined, Aroclor 1254-induced genomic changes were greater in the hippocampus than the cerebellum. The genomic data suggests that PCB-induced neurotoxic effects were due to disruption of normal ontogenetic pattern of nervous system growth and development by altering intracellular signaling pathways

  15. Immunotoxicity and biodistribution analysis of arsenic trioxide in C57Bl/6 mice following a 2-week inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Burchiel, Scott W.; Mitchell, Leah A.; Lauer, Fredine T.; Sun Xi; McDonald, Jacob D.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian

    2009-12-15

    In these studies the immunotoxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO, As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was evaluated in mice following 14 days of inhalation exposures (nose only, 3 h per day) at concentrations of 50 mug/m{sup 3} and 1 mg/m{sup 3}. A biodistribution analysis performed immediately after inhalation exposures revealed highest levels of arsenic in the kidneys, bladder, liver, and lung. Spleen cell levels were comparable to those found in the blood, with the highest concentration of arsenic detected in the spleen being 150 mug/g tissue following the 1 mg/m{sup 3} exposures. No spleen cell cytotoxicity was observed at either of the two exposure levels. There were no changes in spleen cell surface marker expression for B cells, T cells, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. There were also no changes detected in the B cell (LPS-stimulated) and T cell (Con A-stimulated) proliferative responses of spleen cells, and no changes were found in the NK-mediated lysis of Yac-1 target cells. The primary T-dependent antibody response was, however, found to be highly susceptible to ATO suppression. Both the 50 mug/m{sup 3} and 1 mg/m{sup 3} exposures produced greater than 70% suppression of the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells. Thus, the primary finding of this study is that the T-dependent humoral immune response is extremely sensitive to suppression by ATO and assessment of humoral immune responses should be considered in evaluating the health effects of arsenic containing agents.

  16. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and the occurrence of brain tumors. An analysis of possible associations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.S.; Dischinger, P.C.; Conde, J.; Farrell, K.P.

    1985-06-01

    To explore the association between occupation and the occurrence of brain tumor, an epidemiologic study was conducted using data from the death certificates of 951 adult white male Maryland residents who died of brain tumor during the period 1969 through 1982. Compared with the controls, men employed in electricity-related occupations, such as electrician, electric or electronic engineer, and utility company serviceman, were found to experience a significantly higher proportion of primary brain tumors. An increase in the odds ratio for brain tumor was found to be positively related to electromagnetic (EM) field exposure levels. Furthermore, the mean age at death was found to be significantly younger among cases in the presumed high EM-exposure group. These findings suggest that EM exposure may be associated with the pathogenesis of brain tumors, particularly in the promoting stage.

  17. Media exposure, internalization of the thin ideal, and body dissatisfaction: comparing Asian American and European American college females.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mahsa; Hill, Laura G; Orrell-Valente, Joan K

    2011-09-01

    Internalization of the thin ideal mediates the media exposure-body dissatisfaction relation in young adult European American females. There is little related research on Asian Americans. We used structural equations modeling to test: (1) whether media exposure was associated with body dissatisfaction in Asian American young adult females, (2) internalization of the thin ideal mediated any such association, and (3) whether the mediational model provided equivalent fit for European American and Asian American samples. Participants were 287 college females (154 Asian Americans, 133 European Americans). Internalization of the thin ideal explained the media exposure-body dissatisfaction association equally well for both groups. Results suggest that Asian Americans may be employing unhealthy weight control behaviors, and may be prone to developing eating disorders, at rates similar to European American young adult females. Clinicians need to screen carefully for body dissatisfaction, unhealthy weight control behaviors, and eating disorders in Asian American females. PMID:21775227

  18. A Pilot Study Comparing Observational and Questionnaire Surrogate Measures of Pesticide Exposure Among Residents Impacted by the Ecuadorian Flower Industry.

    PubMed

    Handal, Alexis J; McGough-Maduena, Alison; Páez, Maritza; Skipper, Betty; Rowland, Andrew S; Fenske, Richard A; Harlow, Siobán D

    2015-01-01

    Self-reported measures of residential pesticide exposure are commonly used in epidemiological studies, especially when financial and logistical resources are limited. However, self-reporting is prone to misclassification bias. This pilot study assesses the agreement between self-report of residential pesticide exposure with direct observation measures, in an agricultural region of Ecuador, as a cross-validation method in 26 participants (16 rose workers and 10 controls), with percent agreement and kappa statistics calculated. Proximity of homes to nearby flower farms was found to have only fair agreement (kappa =.35). The use of discarded plastics (kappa =.06) and wood (kappa =.13) were found to have little agreement. Results indicate that direct observation or measurement may provide more accurate appraisals of residential exposures, such as proximity to industrial farmland and the use of discarded materials obtained from the flower farms.

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dong; Jia, Fu-Xian; Tian, Chuan-Bei; Tian, Yi; Smagghe, Guy; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental variables affecting growth, reproduction and distribution of insects. The rise of comparative proteomics provides a powerful tool to explore the response in proteins to thermal stress. As an important worldwide pest, the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis causes severe economic losses to crops. To understand the response of B. dorsalis to thermal stress, we performed a comparative proteome analysis of this insect after exposure to extreme low and high temperatures using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Among the separated proteins, 51 diverse protein spots were present differently in response to extreme temperatures. Using tandem mass spectrometry sequencing analysis 39 proteins were successfully identified, which included 13 oxidoreductases, 10 binding proteins, 5 transferases, and 2 each of lyases, isomerases, ligases, and developmental proteins. Subsequently, the expression of these protein transcripts was studied by RT-qPCR to validate the proteomic results. In conclusion, this study provides a first look into the thermal stress response of B. dorsalis at the protein level, and thus it paves the way for further functional studies in the physiological mechanism related to thermal stress.

  20. Environmental Polychlorinated Biphenyl Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwen; Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling; Lin, Kun; Wu, Kusheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Association between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure and breast cancer risk has been widely studied, but the results remain controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the evidences from observational studies on PCB exposure and breast cancer risk. Methods Relevant studies with data on internal PCB dose were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, CBM and CNKI databases through November 2014. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were applied to assess the association between PCB exposure and breast cancer risk. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis and publication bias test were also performed. To further explore the association between specific groups of PCB congeners and breast cancer, we examined the PCB congeners classified, according to their structural, biological and pharmacokinetics properties, as group I (potentially estrogenic), group II (potentially anti-estrogenic and immunotoxic, dioxin-like), and group III (phenobarbital, CYP1A and CYP2B inducers, biologically persistent). Results Of 660 studies screened, 25 studies which met criteria were selected, involving a total of 12866 participants (6088 cases and 6778 controls) from eight countries. The results showed that the risk of breast cancer was associated with group II (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.08–1.40) and group III (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.09–1.43) PCBs, but not with group I (OR = 1.10, 95%CI: 0.97–1.24) PCBs or total PCB exposure (OR = 1.09, 95%CI: 0.97–1.22). Conclusions Our meta-analysis based on the selected studies found group II and group III PCB exposure might contribute to the risk of breast cancer. More studies in developing countries with higher PCB levels are needed, as well as studies to explore the relationships between mixtures of organochlorine compounds and breast cancer risk. PMID:26555153

  1. Cancer and occupational exposure to inorganic lead compounds: a meta-analysis of published data.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, H; Boffetta, P

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To review and summarise the epidemiological evidence on the carcinogenicity of occupational exposure to inorganic lead. METHODS--Case-control and cohort studies were reviewed and combined for meta-analysis. Fixed and random effect methods were used to estimate the summary effects. RESULTS--The combined results show a significant excess risk of overall cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer, with relative risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) in the meta-analysis of 1.11 (1.05-1.17), 1.33 (1.18-1.49), 1.29 (1.10-1.50), and 1.41 (1.16-1.71) respectively. The RR (95% CI) for kidney cancer was also high, but did not reach significance (1.19 (0.96-1.48)). A separate analysis of studies of heavily exposed workers provided slightly increased RRs for cancers of the stomach (1.50) and lung (1.42). CONCLUSIONS--The findings from the workers with heavy exposure to lead provided some evidence to support the hypothesis of an association between stomach and lung cancer and exposure to lead. The main limitation of the present analysis is that the excess risks do not take account of potential confounders, because little information was available for other occupational exposures, smoking, and dietary habits. To some extent, the risk of lung cancer might be explained by confounders such as tobacco smoking and exposure to other occupational carcinogens. The excess risk of stomach cancer may also be explained, at least in part, by non-occupational factors. For bladder and kidney cancers, the excess risks are only suggestive of a true effect because of possible publication bias. PMID:7757170

  2. An analysis of employee exposure to organic dust at large-scale composting facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, P.; Allen, J. A.; Wildsmith, J. D.; Jones, K. P.

    2009-02-01

    The occupational health implications from exposure to dust, endotoxin and 1-3 β Glucan at commercial composting sites are uncertain. This study aims to establish employee exposure levels to inhalable and respirable dust, endotoxin and 1-3 β Glucan during various operational practices in the composting process. Personal samples were collected and the inhalable and respirable dust fractions were determined by gravimetric analysis. Endotoxin concentrations were determined using a Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL). 1-3 β Glucan levels were estimated using a specific blocking agent to establish the contribution that these compounds gave to the original endotoxin assay. Employees' exposure to dust was found to be generally lower than the levels stipulated in the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) 2002 (as amended), (median inhalable fraction 1.08 mg/m3, min 0.25 mg/m3 max 10.80 mg/m3, median respirable fraction 0.05 mg/m3, min 0.02 mg/m3, max 1.49 mg/m3). Determination of the biological component of the dust showed that employees' exposures to endotoxin were elevated (median 31.5 EU/m3, min 2.00 EU/m3, max 1741.78 EU/m3), particularly when waste was agitated (median 175.0 EU/m3, min 2.03 EU/m3, max 1741.78 EU/m3). Eight out of 32 (25%) of the personal exposure data for endotoxin exceeded the 200 EU/m3 temporary legal limit adopted in the Netherlands and thirteen out of 32 (40.6%) exceeded the suggested 50 EU/m3 guidance level suggested to protect workers from respiratory health effects. A significant correlation was observed between employee inhalable dust exposure and personal endotoxin concentration (r = 0.728, p<0.05) and also personal endotoxin exposure and 1-3 β Glucan concentration (r = 0.817, p<0.05). Further work is needed to explore the possibility of using inhalable dust concentration as a predictor for personal endotoxin exposure. The general dust levels stipulated in the COSHH Regulations 2002 (as amended) are inadequate for

  3. Tooth matrix analysis for biomonitoring of organic chemical exposure: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports associations between prenatal exposure to environmental organic chemicals and childhood health impairments. Unlike the common choice of biological matrices such as urine and blood that can be limited by short half-lives for some chemicals, teeth provide a stable repository for chemicals with half-life in the order of decades. Given the potential of the tooth bio-matrix to study long-term exposures to environmental organic chemicals in human biomonitoring programs, it is important to be aware of possible pitfalls and potential opportunities to improve on the current analytical method for tooth organics analysis. We critically review previous results of studies of this topic. The major drawbacks and challenges in currently practiced concepts and analytical methods in utilizing tooth bio-matrix are (i) no consideration of external (from outer surface) or internal contamination (from micro-odontoblast processes), (ii) the misleading assumption that whole ground teeth represent prenatal exposures (latest formed dentine is lipid rich and therefore would absorb and accumulate more organic chemicals), (iii) reverse causality in exposure assessment due to whole ground teeth, and (iv) teeth are a precious bio-matrix and grinding them raises ethical concerns about appropriate use of a very limited resource in exposure biology and epidemiology studies. These can be overcome by addressing the important limitations and possible improvements with the analytical approach associated at each of the following steps: (i) tooth sample preparation to retain exposure timing, (ii) organics extraction and pre-concentration to detect ultra-trace levels of analytes, (iii) chromatography separation, (iv) mass spectrometric detection to detect multi-class organics simultaneously, and (v) method validation, especially to exclude chance findings. To highlight the proposed improvements we present findings from a pilot study that utilizes tooth matrix biomarkers

  4. Tooth Matrix Analysis for Biomonitoring of Organic Chemical Exposure: Current Status, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Andra, Syam S.; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports associations between prenatal exposure to environmental organic chemicals and childhood health impairments. Unlike the common choice of biological matrices such as urine and blood that can be limited by short half-lives for some chemicals, teeth provide a stable repository for chemicals with half-life in the order of decades. Given the potential of the tooth bio-matrix to study long-term exposures to environmental organic chemicals in human biomonitoring programs, it is important to be aware of possible pitfalls and potential opportunities to improve on the current analytical method for tooth organics analysis. We critically review previous results of studies of this topic. The major drawbacks and challenges in currently practiced concepts and analytical methods in utilizing tooth bio-matrix are (i) no consideration of external (from outer surface) or internal contamination (from micro odontoblast processes), (ii) the misleading assumption that whole ground teeth represent prenatal exposures (latest formed dentine is lipid rich and therefore would absorb and accumulate more organic chemicals), (iii) reverse causality in exposure assessment due to whole ground teeth, and (iv) teeth are a precious bio-matrix and grinding them raises ethical concerns about appropriate use of a very limited resource in exposure biology and epidemiology studies. These can be overcome by addressing the important limitations and possible improvements with the analytical approach associated at each of the following steps (i) tooth sample preparation to retain exposure timing, (ii) organics extraction and pre-concentration to detect ultra-trace levels of analytes, (iii) chromatography separation, (iv) mass spectrometric detection to detect multi-class organics simultaneously, and (v) method validation, especially to exclude chance findings. To highlight the proposed improvements we present findings from a pilot study that utilizes tooth matrix biomarkers to

  5. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  6. Detection of urinary stones at reduced radiation exposure: a phantom study comparing computed radiography and a low-dose digital radiography linear slit scanning system

    PubMed Central

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Chakraborty, D. P.; Thoeny, Harriet C.; Loupatatzis, Christos; Vock, Peter; Harald, Bonel

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this experimental study we assessed the diagnostic performance of linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR) compared to conventional computed radiography (CR) in the detection of urinary calculi in an anthropomorphic phantom imitating patients weighing approximately 58 to 88 kg. Conclusion Compared to computed radiography, LSSR is superior in the detection of urinary stones and may be used for pretreatment localization and follow-up at a lower patient exposure. PMID:19457787

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica from Bovine Sources.

    PubMed

    Klima, Cassidy L; Cook, Shaun R; Zaheer, Rahat; Laing, Chad; Gannon, Vick P; Xu, Yong; Rasmussen, Jay; Potter, Andrew; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is a common health problem in beef production. The primary bacterial agent involved, Mannheimia haemolytica, is a target for antimicrobial therapy and at risk for associated antimicrobial resistance development. The role of M. haemolytica in pathogenesis is linked to serotype with serotypes 1 (S1) and 6 (S6) isolated from pneumonic lesions and serotype 2 (S2) found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 11 strains of M. haemolytica, representing all three serotypes and performed comparative genomics analysis to identify genetic features that may contribute to pathogenesis. Possible virulence associated genes were identified within 14 distinct prophage, including a periplasmic chaperone, a lipoprotein, peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase and a stress response protein. Prophage content ranged from 2-8 per genome, but was higher in S1 and S6 strains. A type I-C CRISPR-Cas system was identified in each strain with spacer diversity and organization conserved among serotypes. The majority of spacers occur in S1 and S6 strains and originate from phage suggesting that serotypes 1 and 6 may be more resistant to phage predation. However, two spacers complementary to the host chromosome targeting a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and a glycosyl transferases group 1 gene are present in S1 and S6 strains only indicating these serotypes may employ CRISPR-Cas to regulate gene expression to avoid host immune responses or enhance adhesion during infection. Integrative conjugative elements are present in nine of the eleven genomes. Three of these harbor extensive multi-drug resistance cassettes encoding resistance against the majority of drugs used to combat infection in beef cattle, including macrolides and tetracyclines used in human medicine. The findings here identify key features that are likely contributing to serotype related pathogenesis and specific targets for vaccine design intended to reduce the

  8. Hidden Markov models for evolution and comparative genomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Bykova, Nadezda A; Favorov, Alexander V; Mironov, Andrey A

    2013-01-01

    The problem of reconstruction of ancestral states given a phylogeny and data from extant species arises in a wide range of biological studies. The continuous-time Markov model for the discrete states evolution is generally used for the reconstruction of ancestral states. We modify this model to account for a case when the states of the extant species are uncertain. This situation appears, for example, if the states for extant species are predicted by some program and thus are known only with some level of reliability; it is common for bioinformatics field. The main idea is formulation of the problem as a hidden Markov model on a tree (tree HMM, tHMM), where the basic continuous-time Markov model is expanded with the introduction of emission probabilities of observed data (e.g. prediction scores) for each underlying discrete state. Our tHMM decoding algorithm allows us to predict states at the ancestral nodes as well as to refine states at the leaves on the basis of quantitative comparative genomics. The test on the simulated data shows that the tHMM approach applied to the continuous variable reflecting the probabilities of the states (i.e. prediction score) appears to be more accurate then the reconstruction from the discrete states assignment defined by the best score threshold. We provide examples of applying our model to the evolutionary analysis of N-terminal signal peptides and transcription factor binding sites in bacteria. The program is freely available at http://bioinf.fbb.msu.ru/~nadya/tHMM and via web-service at http://bioinf.fbb.msu.ru/treehmmweb.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomes in Eustigmatophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Strnad, Hynek; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Eustigmatophyceae (Ochrophyta, Stramenopiles) is a small algal group with species of the genus Nannochloropsis being its best studied representatives. Nuclear and organellar genomes have been recently sequenced for several Nannochloropsis spp., but phylogenetically wider genomic studies are missing for eustigmatophytes. We sequenced mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of three species representing most major eustigmatophyte lineages, Monodopsis sp. MarTras21, Vischeria sp. CAUP Q 202 and Trachydiscus minutus, and carried out their comparative analysis in the context of available data from Nannochloropsis and other stramenopiles, revealing a number of noticeable findings. First, mitogenomes of most eustigmatophytes are highly collinear and similar in the gene content, but extensive rearrangements and loss of three otherwise ubiquitous genes happened in the Vischeria lineage; this correlates with an accelerated evolution of mitochondrial gene sequences in this lineage. Second, eustigmatophytes appear to be the only ochrophyte group with the Atp1 protein encoded by the mitogenome. Third, eustigmatophyte mitogenomes uniquely share a truncated nad11 gene encoding only the C-terminal part of the Nad11 protein, while the N-terminal part is encoded by a separate gene in the nuclear genome. Fourth, UGA as a termination codon and the cognate release factor mRF2 were lost from mitochondria independently by the Nannochloropsis and T. minutus lineages. Finally, the rps3 gene in the mitogenome of Vischeria sp. is interrupted by the UAG codon, but the genome includes a gene for an unusual tRNA with an extended anticodon loop that we speculate may serve as a suppressor tRNA to properly decode the rps3 gene. PMID:26872774

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomes in Eustigmatophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Strnad, Hynek; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Eustigmatophyceae (Ochrophyta, Stramenopiles) is a small algal group with species of the genus Nannochloropsis being its best studied representatives. Nuclear and organellar genomes have been recently sequenced for several Nannochloropsis spp., but phylogenetically wider genomic studies are missing for eustigmatophytes. We sequenced mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of three species representing most major eustigmatophyte lineages, Monodopsis sp. MarTras21, Vischeria sp. CAUP Q 202 and Trachydiscus minutus, and carried out their comparative analysis in the context of available data from Nannochloropsis and other stramenopiles, revealing a number of noticeable findings. First, mitogenomes of most eustigmatophytes are highly collinear and similar in the gene content, but extensive rearrangements and loss of three otherwise ubiquitous genes happened in the Vischeria lineage; this correlates with an accelerated evolution of mitochondrial gene sequences in this lineage. Second, eustigmatophytes appear to be the only ochrophyte group with the Atp1 protein encoded by the mitogenome. Third, eustigmatophyte mitogenomes uniquely share a truncated nad11 gene encoding only the C-terminal part of the Nad11 protein, while the N-terminal part is encoded by a separate gene in the nuclear genome. Fourth, UGA as a termination codon and the cognate release factor mRF2 were lost from mitochondria independently by the Nannochloropsis and T. minutus lineages. Finally, the rps3 gene in the mitogenome of Vischeria sp. is interrupted by the UAG codon, but the genome includes a gene for an unusual tRNA with an extended anticodon loop that we speculate may serve as a suppressor tRNA to properly decode the rps3 gene. PMID:26872774

  11. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mannheimia haemolytica from Bovine Sources

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Cassidy L.; Cook, Shaun R.; Zaheer, Rahat; Laing, Chad; Gannon, Vick P.; Xu, Yong; Rasmussen, Jay; Potter, Andrew; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is a common health problem in beef production. The primary bacterial agent involved, Mannheimia haemolytica, is a target for antimicrobial therapy and at risk for associated antimicrobial resistance development. The role of M. haemolytica in pathogenesis is linked to serotype with serotypes 1 (S1) and 6 (S6) isolated from pneumonic lesions and serotype 2 (S2) found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy animals. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 11 strains of M. haemolytica, representing all three serotypes and performed comparative genomics analysis to identify genetic features that may contribute to pathogenesis. Possible virulence associated genes were identified within 14 distinct prophage, including a periplasmic chaperone, a lipoprotein, peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase and a stress response protein. Prophage content ranged from 2–8 per genome, but was higher in S1 and S6 strains. A type I-C CRISPR-Cas system was identified in each strain with spacer diversity and organization conserved among serotypes. The majority of spacers occur in S1 and S6 strains and originate from phage suggesting that serotypes 1 and 6 may be more resistant to phage predation. However, two spacers complementary to the host chromosome targeting a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and a glycosyl transferases group 1 gene are present in S1 and S6 strains only indicating these serotypes may employ CRISPR-Cas to regulate gene expression to avoid host immune responses or enhance adhesion during infection. Integrative conjugative elements are present in nine of the eleven genomes. Three of these harbor extensive multi-drug resistance cassettes encoding resistance against the majority of drugs used to combat infection in beef cattle, including macrolides and tetracyclines used in human medicine. The findings here identify key features that are likely contributing to serotype related pathogenesis and specific targets for vaccine design intended to reduce the

  12. A comparative study of RNA-seq analysis strategies

    PubMed Central

    Jänes, Jürgen; Hu, Fengyuan; Lewin, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Three principal approaches have been proposed for inferring the set of transcripts expressed in RNA samples using RNA-seq. The simplest approach uses curated annotations, which assumes the transcripts in a sample are a subset of the transcripts listed in a curated database. A more ambitious method involves aligning reads to a reference genome and using the alignments to infer the transcript structures, possibly with the aid of a curated transcript database. The most challenging approach is to assemble reads into putative transcripts de novo without the aid of reference data. We have systematically assessed the properties of these three approaches through a simulation study. We have found that the sensitivity of computational transcript set estimation is severely limited. Computational approaches (both genome-guided and de novo assembly) produce a large number of artefacts, which are assigned large expression estimates and absorb a substantial proportion of the signal when performing expression analysis. The approach using curated annotations shows good expression correlation even when the annotations are incomplete. Furthermore, any incorrect transcripts present in a curated set do not absorb much signal, so it is preferable to have a curation set with high sensitivity than high precision. Software to simulate transcript sets, expression values and sequence reads under a wider range of parameter values and to compare sensitivity, precision and signal-to-noise ratios of different methods is freely available online (https://github.com/boboppie/RSSS) and can be expanded by interested parties to include methods other than the exemplars presented in this article. PMID:25788326

  13. Analysis of the influence of handset phone position on RF exposure of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to mobile phone radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields depends on many different parameters. For epidemiological studies investigating the risk of brain cancer linked to RF exposure from mobile phones, it is of great interest to characterize brain tissue exposure and to know which parameters this exposure is sensitive to. One such parameter is the position of the phone during communication. In this article, we analyze the influence of the phone position on the brain exposure by comparing the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the head by two different mobile phone models operating in Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) frequency bands. To achieve this objective, 80 different phone positions were chosen using an experiment based on the Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to select a representative set of positions. The averaged SAR over 10 g (SAR10 g) in the head, the averaged SAR over 1 g (SAR1 g ) in the brain, and the averaged SAR in different anatomical brain structures were estimated at 900 and 1800 MHz for the 80 positions. The results illustrate that SAR distributions inside the brain area are sensitive to the position of the mobile phone relative to the head. The results also show that for 5-10% of the studied positions the SAR10 g in the head and the SAR1 g in the brain can be 20% higher than the SAR estimated for the standard cheek position and that the Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin (SAM) model is conservative for 95% of all the studied positions.

  14. Does D-Cycloserine Enhance Exposure Therapy for Anxiety Disorders in Humans? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Helga; Figueira, Ivan; Lopes, Alessandra; Gonçalves, Raquel; Mendlowicz, Mauro Vitor; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Ventura, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of anxiety is on the edge of a new era of combinations of pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions. A new wave of translational research has focused on the use of pharmacological agents as psychotherapy adjuvants using neurobiological insights into the mechanism of the action of certain psychological treatments such as exposure therapy. Recently, d-cycloserine (DCS) an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis has been applied to enhance exposure-based treatment for anxiety and has proved to be a promising, but as yet unproven intervention. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of DCS in the enhancement of exposure therapy in anxiety disorders. A systematic review/meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic searches were conducted in the databases ISI-Web of Science, Pubmed and PsycINFO. We included only randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with humans, focusing on the role of DCS in enhancing the action of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. We identified 328 references, 13 studies were included in our final sample: 4 on obsessive-compulsive disorder, 2 on panic disorder, 2 on social anxiety disorder, 2 on posttraumatic stress disorder, one on acrophobia, and 2 on snake phobia. The results of the present meta-analysis show that DCS enhances exposure therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders (Cohen d =  −0.34; CI: −0.54 to −0.14), facilitating the specific process of extinction of fear. DCS seems to be effective when administered at a time close to the exposure therapy, at low doses and a limited number of times. DCS emerges as a potential new therapeutic approach for patients with refractory anxiety disorders that are unresponsive to the conventional treatments available. When administered correctly, DCS is a promising strategy for augmentation of CBT and could reduce health care costs, drop-out rates and bring faster relief to patients. PMID:24991926

  15. Substance flow analysis and assessment of environmental exposure potential for triclosan in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chu-Long; Ma, Hwong-Wen; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2014-11-15

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely-used antimicrobial agent in many consumer products around the world, and China is a major producer and consumer of TCS. In this study substance flow analysis (SFA) was used to construct a static model of anthropogenic TCS metabolism in China in 2008. The systematic SFA results were used to determine possible exposure pathways and trends in environmental exposure potential through different pathways. TCS discharged in wastewater mainly flowed into surface water sediment, ocean, and soil, where it accumulates in aquatic and agricultural products that may pose a higher risk to human health than brief exposure during consumption. Only 22% of TCS discharged was removed in the built environment with the remainder discharged into the natural environment, indicating that anthropogenic TCS metabolism in China is unsustainable. Per capita TCS consumption increased 209% from 2003 to 2012, resulting in increased discharge and accumulation in the environment. If current trends continue, it will increase to 713 mg capita(-1) yr(-1) in 2015 and 957 mg capita(-1) yr(-1) in 2020. Accordingly, annual environmental exposure potential will increase from 388 mg capita(-1) in 2008 to 557 mg capita(-1) in 2015 and 747 mg capita(-1) in 2020, indicating an increasing trend of exposure to environmental TCS. Results of Pearson correlation analysis suggested that feasible countermeasures to reduce environmental exposure potential for triclosan would include encouraging the development of small cities, raising awareness of health risks, nurturing environmentally-friendly consumer values, and improving the environmental performance of TCS-containing products.

  16. Does D-cycloserine enhance exposure therapy for anxiety disorders in humans? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Helga; Figueira, Ivan; Lopes, Alessandra; Gonçalves, Raquel; Mendlowicz, Mauro Vitor; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Ventura, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of anxiety is on the edge of a new era of combinations of pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions. A new wave of translational research has focused on the use of pharmacological agents as psychotherapy adjuvants using neurobiological insights into the mechanism of the action of certain psychological treatments such as exposure therapy. Recently, d-cycloserine (DCS) an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis has been applied to enhance exposure-based treatment for anxiety and has proved to be a promising, but as yet unproven intervention. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of DCS in the enhancement of exposure therapy in anxiety disorders. A systematic review/meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic searches were conducted in the databases ISI-Web of Science, Pubmed and PsycINFO. We included only randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with humans, focusing on the role of DCS in enhancing the action of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. We identified 328 references, 13 studies were included in our final sample: 4 on obsessive-compulsive disorder, 2 on panic disorder, 2 on social anxiety disorder, 2 on posttraumatic stress disorder, one on acrophobia, and 2 on snake phobia. The results of the present meta-analysis show that DCS enhances exposure therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders (Cohen d =  -0.34; CI: -0.54 to -0.14), facilitating the specific process of extinction of fear. DCS seems to be effective when administered at a time close to the exposure therapy, at low doses and a limited number of times. DCS emerges as a potential new therapeutic approach for patients with refractory anxiety disorders that are unresponsive to the conventional treatments available. When administered correctly, DCS is a promising strategy for augmentation of CBT and could reduce health care costs, drop-out rates and bring faster relief to patients.

  17. Monitoring of exposure to cyclohexanone through the analysis of breath and urine.

    PubMed

    Ong, C N; Chia, S E; Phoon, W H; Tan, K T; Kok, P W

    1991-12-01

    Occupational exposure to cyclohexanone was studied for 59 workers through the analysis of environmental air, alveolar air, and urinary cyclohexanol. Environmental cyclohexanone exposure was measured by personal sampling with a carbon-felt passive dosimeter. Cyclohexanone in alveolar air and cyclohexanol in urine were determined with gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. The end-of-shift urinary cyclohexanol levels correlated well with the time-weighted average environmental cyclohexanone values (r = 0.66). Urinary cyclohexanol corrected for creatinine correlated best with cyclohexanone in air (r = 0.77); when corrected for specific gravity, it gave a similar correlation coefficient (r = 0.73). When the time-weighted average of the exposure was 25 ppm, the corresponding calculated concentration for urinary cyclohexanol was 54.5 mg/1, 23.3 mg/g of creatinine, or 43.5 mg/l at a specific gravity of 1.018. The relationship between cyclohexanone exposure and its concentration in exhaled breath was found to be poorer than that for cyclohexanone exposure and the urinary metabolite (r = 0.51).

  18. Addressing Informatics Barriers to Conducting Observational Comparative Effectiveness Research: A Comparative Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christopher P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The U.S. health care system has been under immense scrutiny for ever-increasing costs and poor health outcomes for its patients. Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) has emerged as a generally accepted practice by providers, policy makers, and scientists as an approach to identify the most clinical- and cost-effective interventions…

  19. Study to compare veterinarians’ exposure to Toxoplasma gondii to that of veterinary staff and the general public

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis has been epidemiologically linked with the serious mental illness that is schizophrenia. Toxoplasmosis has also been associated with the risk of suicide. The suicide rate in the veterinary population has reached a level of concern. To assess the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii exposure...

  20. Effects of vehicle-ride exposure on cervical pathology: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    KOLLOCK, Roger; GAMES, Kenneth; WILSON, Alan E.; SEFTON, JoEllen M.

    2015-01-01

    Research to date on the effect vehicle-ride exposure has on the development of cervical pathologies in mounted Warfighters is conflicting. The purpose of this study was to determine if the literature suggests a definite effect of vehicle-ride exposure on cervical pathology. Databases were searched using multiple combinations of select terms. Twelve studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the meta-analysis. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that overall vehicle-ride exposure was likely to increase cervical pathology (p=0.01, odds ratio=1.59, 95% CI=1.16−2.17). Using vehicle type as a moderator it was found that vehicle-ride exposure in ground-based vehicles (p=0.01, odds ratio=2.33, 95% CI=1.41−3.85) and fixed-wing aircraft (p=0.01, odds ratio =1.59, 95% CI=1.13−2.23) were likely to increase cervical pathology. Using operator/other personnel moderator it was found that in the populations tested, fighter pilots or fighter jet weapons systems operators were more likely to develop a cervical pathology (p<0.001, odds ratio=1.78, 95% CI=1.26−2.50). The available studies indicate an increase in cervical pathology for personnel exposed to ground-based vehicles and fixed-wing aircraft. PMID:25739897

  1. Head Impact Exposure in Youth Football: High School Ages 14 to 18 Years and Cumulative Impact Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Jillian E.; Davenport, Elizabeth M.; Golman, Adam J.; Maldjian, Joseph A.; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Powers, Alexander K.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Sports-related concussion is the most common athletic head injury with football having the highest rate among high school athletes. Traditionally, research on the biomechanics of football-related head impact has been focused at the collegiate level. Less research has been performed at the high school level, despite the incidence of concussion among high school football players. The objective of this study is to twofold: to quantify the head impact exposure in high school football, and to develop a cumulative impact analysis method. Head impact exposure was measured by instrumenting the helmets of 40 high school football players with helmet mounted accelerometer arrays to measure linear and rotational acceleration. A total of 16,502 head impacts were collected over the course of the season. Biomechanical data were analyzed by team and by player. The median impact for each player ranged from 15.2 to 27.0 g with an average value of 21.7 (±2.4) g. The 95th percentile impact for each player ranged from 38.8 to 72.9 g with an average value of 56.4 (±10.5) g. Next, an impact exposure metric utilizing concussion injury risk curves was created to quantify cumulative exposure for each participating player over the course of the season. Impacts were weighted according to the associated risk due to linear acceleration and rotational acceleration alone, as well as the combined probability (CP) of injury associated with both. These risks were summed over the course of a season to generate risk weighted cumulative exposure. The impact frequency was found to be greater during games compared to practices with an average number of impacts per session of 15.5 and 9.4, respectively. However, the median cumulative risk weighted exposure based on combined probability was found to be greater for practices vs. games. These data will provide a metric that may be used to better understand the cumulative effects of repetitive head impacts, injury mechanisms, and head impact exposure of

  2. Head impact exposure in youth football: high school ages 14 to 18 years and cumulative impact analysis.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jillian E; Davenport, Elizabeth M; Golman, Adam J; Maldjian, Joseph A; Whitlow, Christopher T; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2013-12-01

    Sports-related concussion is the most common athletic head injury with football having the highest rate among high school athletes. Traditionally, research on the biomechanics of football-related head impact has been focused at the collegiate level. Less research has been performed at the high school level, despite the incidence of concussion among high school football players. The objective of this study is to twofold: to quantify the head impact exposure in high school football, and to develop a cumulative impact analysis method. Head impact exposure was measured by instrumenting the helmets of 40 high school football players with helmet mounted accelerometer arrays to measure linear and rotational acceleration. A total of 16,502 head impacts were collected over the course of the season. Biomechanical data were analyzed by team and by player. The median impact for each player ranged from 15.2 to 27.0 g with an average value of 21.7 (±2.4) g. The 95th percentile impact for each player ranged from 38.8 to 72.9 g with an average value of 56.4 (±10.5) g. Next, an impact exposure metric utilizing concussion injury risk curves was created to quantify cumulative exposure for each participating player over the course of the season. Impacts were weighted according to the associated risk due to linear acceleration and rotational acceleration alone, as well as the combined probability (CP) of injury associated with both. These risks were summed over the course of a season to generate risk weighted cumulative exposure. The impact frequency was found to be greater during games compared to practices with an average number of impacts per session of 15.5 and 9.4, respectively. However, the median cumulative risk weighted exposure based on combined probability was found to be greater for practices vs. games. These data will provide a metric that may be used to better understand the cumulative effects of repetitive head impacts, injury mechanisms, and head impact exposure of

  3. Head impact exposure in youth football: high school ages 14 to 18 years and cumulative impact analysis.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jillian E; Davenport, Elizabeth M; Golman, Adam J; Maldjian, Joseph A; Whitlow, Christopher T; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2013-12-01

    Sports-related concussion is the most common athletic head injury with football having the highest rate among high school athletes. Traditionally, research on the biomechanics of football-related head impact has been focused at the collegiate level. Less research has been performed at the high school level, despite the incidence of concussion among high school football players. The objective of this study is to twofold: to quantify the head impact exposure in high school football, and to develop a cumulative impact analysis method. Head impact exposure was measured by instrumenting the helmets of 40 high school football players with helmet mounted accelerometer arrays to measure linear and rotational acceleration. A total of 16,502 head impacts were collected over the course of the season. Biomechanical data were analyzed by team and by player. The median impact for each player ranged from 15.2 to 27.0 g with an average value of 21.7 (±2.4) g. The 95th percentile impact for each player ranged from 38.8 to 72.9 g with an average value of 56.4 (±10.5) g. Next, an impact exposure metric utilizing concussion injury risk curves was created to quantify cumulative exposure for each participating player over the course of the season. Impacts were weighted according to the associated risk due to linear acceleration and rotational acceleration alone, as well as the combined probability (CP) of injury associated with both. These risks were summed over the course of a season to generate risk weighted cumulative exposure. The impact frequency was found to be greater during games compared to practices with an average number of impacts per session of 15.5 and 9.4, respectively. However, the median cumulative risk weighted exposure based on combined probability was found to be greater for practices vs. games. These data will provide a metric that may be used to better understand the cumulative effects of repetitive head impacts, injury mechanisms, and head impact exposure of

  4. Mercury analysis in hair: Comparability and quality assessment within the transnational COPHES/DEMOCOPHES project.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit Karin; Jiménez, José Antonio; Koch, Holger Martin; Angerer, Jürgen; Rosado, Montserrat; Gómez, Silvia; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Becker, Kerstin; Bloemen, Louis; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Sepai, Ovnair; Exley, Karen; Horvat, Milena; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Joas, Anke; Joas, Reinhard; Aerts, Dominique; Biot, Pierre; Borošová, Daniela; Davidson, Fred; Dumitrascu, Irina; Fischer, Marc E; Grander, Margaretha; Janasik, Beata; Jones, Kate; Kašparová, Lucie; Larssen, Thorjørn; Naray, Miklos; Nielsen, Flemming; Hohenblum, Philipp; Pinto, Rui; Pirard, Catherine; Plateel, Gregory; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Castaño, Argelia

    2015-08-01

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool for assessing actual exposure to chemicals that takes into account all routes of intake. Although hair analysis is considered to be an optimal biomarker for assessing mercury exposure, the lack of harmonization as regards sampling and analytical procedures has often limited the comparison of data at national and international level. The European-funded projects COPHES and DEMOCOPHES developed and tested a harmonized European approach to Human Biomonitoring in response to the European Environment and Health Action Plan. Herein we describe the quality assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating laboratories. Training sessions were organized for field workers and four external quality-assessment exercises (ICI/EQUAS), followed by the corresponding web conferences, were organized between March 2011 and February 2012. ICI/EQUAS used native hair samples at two mercury concentration ranges (0.20-0.71 and 0.80-1.63) per exercise. The results revealed relative standard deviations of 7.87-13.55% and 4.04-11.31% for the low and high mercury concentration ranges, respectively. A total of 16 out of 18 participating laboratories the QAP requirements and were allowed to analyze samples from the DEMOCOPHES pilot study. Web conferences after each ICI/EQUAS revealed this to be a new and effective tool for improving analytical performance and increasing capacity building. The procedure developed and tested in COPHES/DEMOCOPHES would be optimal for application on a global scale as regards implementation of the Minamata Convention on Mercury.

  5. Mercury analysis in hair: Comparability and quality assessment within the transnational COPHES/DEMOCOPHES project.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit Karin; Jiménez, José Antonio; Koch, Holger Martin; Angerer, Jürgen; Rosado, Montserrat; Gómez, Silvia; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Becker, Kerstin; Bloemen, Louis; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Sepai, Ovnair; Exley, Karen; Horvat, Milena; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Joas, Anke; Joas, Reinhard; Aerts, Dominique; Biot, Pierre; Borošová, Daniela; Davidson, Fred; Dumitrascu, Irina; Fischer, Marc E; Grander, Margaretha; Janasik, Beata; Jones, Kate; Kašparová, Lucie; Larssen, Thorjørn; Naray, Miklos; Nielsen, Flemming; Hohenblum, Philipp; Pinto, Rui; Pirard, Catherine; Plateel, Gregory; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Castaño, Argelia

    2015-08-01

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool for assessing actual exposure to chemicals that takes into account all routes of intake. Although hair analysis is considered to be an optimal biomarker for assessing mercury exposure, the lack of harmonization as regards sampling and analytical procedures has often limited the comparison of data at national and international level. The European-funded projects COPHES and DEMOCOPHES developed and tested a harmonized European approach to Human Biomonitoring in response to the European Environment and Health Action Plan. Herein we describe the quality assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating laboratories. Training sessions were organized for field workers and four external quality-assessment exercises (ICI/EQUAS), followed by the corresponding web conferences, were organized between March 2011 and February 2012. ICI/EQUAS used native hair samples at two mercury concentration ranges (0.20-0.71 and 0.80-1.63) per exercise. The results revealed relative standard deviations of 7.87-13.55% and 4.04-11.31% for the low and high mercury concentration ranges, respectively. A total of 16 out of 18 participating laboratories the QAP requirements and were allowed to analyze samples from the DEMOCOPHES pilot study. Web conferences after each ICI/EQUAS revealed this to be a new and effective tool for improving analytical performance and increasing capacity building. The procedure developed and tested in COPHES/DEMOCOPHES would be optimal for application on a global scale as regards implementation of the Minamata Convention on Mercury. PMID:25483984

  6. IMPORTANT EXPOSURE FACTORS FOR CHILDREN AN ANALYSIS OF LABORATORY AND OBSERVATIONAL FIELD DATA CHARACTERIZING CUMULATIVE EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to facilitate more realistic risk assessments that take into account unique childhood vulnerabilities to environmental toxicants, the U.S. EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) developed a framework for systematically identifying and addressing the most ...

  7. Association of Secondhand Smoke Exposure with Pediatric Invasive Bacterial Disease and Bacterial Carriage: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Middaugh, Nicole A.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Ezzati, Majid

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of epidemiologic studies have observed an association between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and pediatric invasive bacterial disease (IBD) but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of SHS exposure and two outcomes, IBD and pharyngeal carriage of bacteria, for Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae). Methods and Findings Two independent reviewers searched Medline, EMBASE, and selected other databases, and screened articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria. We identified 30 case-control studies on SHS and IBD, and 12 cross-sectional studies on SHS and bacterial carriage. Weighted summary odd ratios (ORs) were calculated for each outcome and for studies with specific design and quality characteristics. Tests for heterogeneity and publication bias were performed. Compared with those unexposed to SHS, summary OR for SHS exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52–2.69) for invasive meningococcal disease, 1.21 (95% CI 0.69–2.14) for invasive pneumococcal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.93–1.62) for invasive Hib disease. For pharyngeal carriage, summary OR was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19–2.36) for N. meningitidis, 1.66 (95% CI 1.33–2.07) for S. pneumoniae, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.48–1.95) for Hib. The association between SHS exposure and invasive meningococcal and Hib diseases was consistent regardless of outcome definitions, age groups, study designs, and publication year. The effect estimates were larger in studies among children younger than 6 years of age for all three IBDs, and in studies with the more rigorous laboratory-confirmed diagnosis for invasive meningococcal disease (summary OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.72–6.13). Conclusions When considered together with evidence from direct smoking and biological mechanisms, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that SHS exposure may be

  8. The Association between Silica Exposure and Development of ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Puerta, Jose A.; Gedmintas, Lydia; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Crystalline silica is among the environmental exposures associated with increased risk of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Silica exposure has also been related to the development of ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV), but past studies appear to conflict as to the presence and magnitude of the associated risks of disease. We aimed to conduct a systematic review of the existing studies and meta-analysis of their results. Methods We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE and international scientific conference abstract databases for studies examining the association of silica exposure with AAV. Studies in English, French, or Spanish were included and those examining the association of silica with ANCA-positivity alone were excluded. We assessed study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. We meta-analyzed the results using random effects models and tested for heterogeneity. We performed sensitivity and subgroup analyses, examining studies that adjusted for smoking and occupational risk factors as well as studies that analyzed by subtypes of AAV. Results We identified 158 potential manuscripts and 3 abstracts related to silica exposure and risk of AAV. 147 were excluded after abstract review and 14 underwent detailed evaluation of full manuscript/abstract. After further application of exclusion criteria, 6 studies (all case-controls) remained. The studies had moderate heterogeneity in selection of cases and controls, exposure assessment, disease definition and controlling for potential confounders. We found an overall significant summary effect estimate of silica “ever exposure” with development of AAV (summary OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.51- 4.36), with moderate heterogeneity (I2=48.40%). ORs were similar for studies examining only MPA (OR 3.95, CI 95% 1.89-8.24), compared to those only studying GPA (OR 3.56, CI 95% 1.85-6.82). Conclusion Despite moderate heterogeneity among studies, the totality of

  9. Comparative analysis of aerosols elemental distribution in some Romanian regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Susumu; Masuda, Toshio; Popa-Simil, Liviu; Mateescu, Liviu

    1996-04-01

    The study's main aim is obtaining aerosols particulate elemental distribution and mapping it for some Romanian regions, in order to obtain preliminary information regarding the concentrations of aerosol particles and networking strategy versus local conditions. For this we used the mobile sampling strategy, but taking care on all local specific conditions and weather. In the summer of 1993, in July we took about 8 samples on a rather large territory of SE Romania which were analysed and mapped. The regions which showed an interesting behaviour or doubts such as Bucharest and Dobrogea were zoomed in near the same period of 1994, for comparing the new details with the global aspect previously obtained. An attempt was made to infer the minimum necessary number of stations in a future monitoring network. A mobile sampler was used, having tow polycarbonate filter posts of 8 and 0.4 μm. PIXE elemental analysis was performed on a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, by using a proton beam. More than 15 elements were measured. Suggestive 2D and 3D representations were drawn, as well as histogram charts for the concentrations' distribution in the specific regions at the specified times. In spite of the poor samples from the qualitative point of view the experiment surprised us by the good coincidence (good agreement) with realities in terrain known by other means long time ago, and highlighted the power of PIXE methods in terms of money and time. Conclusions over the link between industry, traffic, vegetation, wether, surface waters, soil composition, power plant exhaust and so on, on the one hand, and surface concentration distribution, on the other, were drawn. But the method's weak points were also highlighted; these are weather dependencies (especially air masses movement and precipitation), local relief, microclimate and vegetation, and of course localisation of the sampling point versus the pollution sources and their regime. The paper contains a synthesis of the whole

  10. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Daniel Seth; Davison, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study explores community college student mental health by comparing the responses of California community college and traditional university students on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II). Using MANOVA, we compared community college and traditional university students, examining…

  11. Integrating Public Data Sets for Analysis of Maternal Airborne Environmental Exposures and Stillbirth