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Sample records for exposure doses communication

  1. Collection of DICOM RDSR (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine, Radiation Dose Structured Report) Information Aimed at Reducing Patient Exposure Dose.

    PubMed

    Morota, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Sun, Lue; Ishihara, Takahiro; Kuma, Natsuyo; Murata, Satomi; Yamada, Takahiro; Okazaki, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    The recent progress in angiography technology bestows benefits on patients for minimally invasive than surgery, while there has been an increase in the number of cases involving stochastic effects, such as radiation dermatitis, resulting from upgrading of the procedure because of an extension of the time for fluoroscopy and the number of shots. Recent CT equipment saves the dose data along with image data about the information management for patient exposure dose, which is used for management of individual cumulative dose and the presumed effective dose, using digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM). We extracted detailed information about shooting conditions and dose from the DICOM radiation dose structured report (DICOM RDSR) in the angiography area, and evaluated the trend of patient exposure dose in each procedure. As a result, we found that cases exceeding 3 Gy which needed observation in the head region were 16.7% and in the heart region were 27.3%. We also found that angiography had a higher dose of shooting than did fluoroscopy, and that the diagnosis and treatment with tumor involvement required a exposure dose than did vascular lesion. In this paper, we review the shooting conditions as a root of DICOM RDSR information and consider the possibility of planning for further reduction of the exposure dose.

  2. Short Communication: Viremic Control Is Independent of Repeated Low-Dose SHIVSF162p3 Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Tara R.; Hanson, Debra; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Butler, Katherine; Dobard, Charles; Garcia-Lerma, Gerardo; Radzio, Jessica; Smith, James; McNicholl, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The repeat low-dose virus challenge model is commonly used in nonhuman primate studies of HIV transmission and biomedical preventions. For some viruses or challenge routes, it is uncertain whether the repeated exposure design might induce virus-directed innate or adaptive immunity that could affect infection or viremic outcomes. Retrospective cohorts of male Indian rhesus (n=40) and female pigtail (n=46) macaques enrolled in repeat low-dose rectal or vaginal SHIVSF162p3 challenge studies, respectively, were studied to compare the relationship between the number of previous exposures and peak plasma SHIV RNA levels or viral load area under the curve (AUC), surrogate markers of viral control. Repeated mucosal exposures of 10 or 50 TCID50 of virus for rectal and vaginal exposures, respectively, were performed. Virus levels were measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR. The cumulative number of SHIVSF162p3 exposures did not correlate with observed peak virus levels or with AUC in rectally challenged rhesus macaques [peak: rho (ρ)=0.04, p=0.8; AUC: ρ=0.33, p=0.06] or vaginally challenged pigtail macaques (peak: ρ=−0.09, p=0.7; AUC: ρ=0.11, p=0.6). Infections in these models occur independently of exposure history and provide assurance that neither inoculation route nor number of exposures required for infection correlates with postinfection viremia. These data also indicate that both the vaginal and rectal repeated low-dose virus exposure models using SHIVSF162p3 provide a reliable system for nonhuman primate studies. PMID:25313448

  3. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, James

    2002-09-14

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation.

  4. Prenatal radiation exposure: dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Scharwächter, C; Röser, A; Schwartz, C A; Haage, P

    2015-05-01

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero x-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties. • Radiation exposure of the unborn child can result in both deterministic as well as stochastic damage und hitherto should be avoided or reduced to a minimum

  5. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear energy transfer radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been applied to assessment of the risks resulting from exposure to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation; however, a statistically significant increase has hardly been described for radiation doses below 100 mSv. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the physical and biological features of low-dose radiation and discusses the possibilities of induction of cancer by low-dose radiation.

  6. Short communication: Survival of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in tissues of cows following low-dose exposure to electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bode, John F; Thoen, Charles O

    2016-08-01

    This investigation was designed to determine the effects of low-dose electron beam irradiation on the survival of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in tissue samples collected at necropsy from clinically affected cows. Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis was isolated from the ileum and ileocecal valve of one cow and from the ileum of another cow irradiated at 4.0 kGy, but was not isolated from the ileum, ileocecal valve, or mesenteric lymph node of 11 other cows irradiated at 4 kGy.

  7. HUMAN BIOMONITORING TO LINK ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract and presentation on Human Biomonitoring to Link Environmental Exposure to Biologically Relevant Dose describes the use of biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers of current health state, and biomarker measurements. The abstract and presentation focuses on how biomarkers ...

  8. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  9. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR ROUTE TO ROUTE DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  10. Risk equivalent of exposure versus dose of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a risk analysis study of low-dose irradiation and the resulting biological effects on a cell. The author describes fundamental differences between the effects of high-level exposure (HLE) and low-level exposure (LLE). He stresses that the concept of absorbed dose to an organ is not a dose but a level of effect produced by a particular number of particles. He discusses the confusion between a linear-proportional representation of dose limits and a threshold-curvilinear representation, suggesting that a LLE is a composite of both systems. (TEM)

  11. Rapid Chemical Exposure and Dose Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA evaluates the potential risks of the manufacture and use of thousands of chemicals. To assist with this evaluation, EPA scientists developed a rapid, automated model using off the shelf technology that predicts exposures for thousands of chemicals.

  12. TESS-based dose-response using pediatric clonidine exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Blaine E. . E-mail: jebenson@salud.unm.edu; Spyker, Daniel A.; Troutman, William G.; Watson, William A. . E-mail: http://www.aapcc.org/

    2006-06-01

    Objective: The toxic and lethal doses of clonidine in children are unclear. This study was designed to determine whether data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) could be utilized to determine a dose-response relationship for pediatric clonidine exposure. Methods: 3458 single-substance clonidine exposures in children <6 years of age reported to TESS from January 2000 through December 2003 were examined. Dose ingested, age, and medical outcome were available for 1550 cases. Respiratory arrest cases (n = 8) were classified as the most severe of the medical outcome categories (Arrest, Major, Moderate, Mild, and No effect). Exposures reported as a 'taste or lick' (n = 51) were included as a dose of 1/10 of the dosage form involved. Dose ranged from 0.4 to 1980 (median 13) {mu}g/kg. Weight was imputed based on a quadratic estimate of weight for age. Dose certainty was coded as exact (26% of cases) or not exact (74%). Medical outcome (response) was examined via logistic regression using SAS JMP (release 5.1). Results: The logistic model describing medical outcome (P < 0.0001) included Log dose/kg (P 0.0000) and Certainty (P = 0.045). Conclusion: TESS data can provide the basis for a statistically sound description of dose-response for pediatric clonidine poisoning exposures.

  13. Paediatric entrance doses from exposure index in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Martinez, D.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Prieto, C.; Floriano, A.; Ten, J. I.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last two years we have evaluated paediatric patient doses in projection radiography derived from exposure level (EL) in computed radiography (CR) in a large university hospital. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for 3501 paediatric examinations was calculated from the EL, which is a dose index parameter related to the light emitted by the phosphor-stimulable plate, archived in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header of the images and automatically transferred to a database using custom-built dedicated software. Typical mean thicknesses for several age bands of paediatric patients was estimated to calculate ESAK from the EL values, using results of experimental measurements with phantoms for the typical x-ray beam qualities used in paediatric examinations. Mean/median ESAK values (in µGy) for the age bands of <1 year, 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years have been obtained for chest without a bucky: 51/41, 57/34, 91/54 and 122/109; chest with a bucky (for only the last three age bands): 114/87, 129/105 and 219/170; abdomen: 119/91, 291/225, 756/600 and 1960/1508 and pelvis: 65/48, 455/314, 943/707 and 2261/1595. Sample sizes of clinical images used for the (indirect) measurements were 1724 for chest without a bucky, 799 for chest with a bucky, 337 for abdomen and 641 for pelvis. The methodology we describe could be applicable to other centres using CR as an imaging modality for paediatrics. Presently, this method is the only practical approach to automatically extract parameters contained in the DICOM header, for the calculation of patient dose values for the CR modality.

  14. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ERDEM is a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with a graphical user interface (GUI) front end. Such a mathematical model was needed to make reliable estimates of the chemical dose to organs of animals or humans because of uncertainties of making route-to route, lo...

  15. INHALATION EXPOSURE AND INTAKE DOSE MODEL IMPROVEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation highlights recent human exposure model improvements and products developed by the EMRB in coordination with scientists in the OAQPS and provides insight into how these products are used by the OAQPS in its regulatory process. Besides providing a status report of...

  16. MODELING AGGREGATE CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help address the aggregate exposure assessment needs of the Food Quality Protection Act, a physically-based probabilistic model (SHEDS-Pesticides, version 3) has been applied to estimate aggregate chlorpyrifos exposure and dose to children. Two age groups (0-4, 5-9 years) a...

  17. Open-source radiation exposure extraction engine (RE3) for dose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenthal, Samuel; Folio, Les; Derderian, Vana; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Our goal was to investigate the feasibility of an open-source, PACS-integrated, DICOM header-based tool that automatically provides granular data for monitoring of CT radiation exposure. To do so, we constructed a radiation exposure extraction engine (RE3) that is seamlessly connected to the PACS using the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) toolkit (DCMTK) and runs on the fly within the workflow. We evaluated RE3's ability to determine the number of acquisitions and calculate the exposure metric dose length product (DLP) by comparing its output to the vendor dose pages. RE3 output closely correlated to the dose pages for both contiguously acquired exams (R2 =0.9987) and non-contiguously acquired exams (R2 =0.9994). RE3 is an open-source, automated radiation monitoring program to provide study-, series-, and slice-level radiation data.

  18. Effective biological dose from occupational exposure during nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demou, Evangelia; Tran, Lang; Housiadas, Christos

    2009-02-01

    Nanomaterial and nanotechnology safety require the characterization of occupational exposure levels for completing a risk assessment. However, equally important is the estimation of the effective internal dose via lung deposition, transport and clearance mechanisms. An integrated source-to-biological dose assessment study is presented using real monitoring data collected during nanoparticle synthesis. Experimental monitoring data of airborne exposure levels during nanoparticle synthesis of CaSO4 and BiPO4 nanoparticles in a research laboratory is coupled with a human lung transport and deposition model, which solves in an Eulerian framework the general dynamic equation for polydisperse aerosols using particle specific physical-chemical properties. Subsequently, the lung deposition model is coupled with a mathematical particle clearance model providing the effective biological dose as well as the time course of the biological dose build-up after exposure. The results for the example of BiPO4 demonstrate that even short exposures throughout the day can lead to particle doses of 1.10·E+08#/(kg-bw·8h-shift), with the majority accumulating in the pulmonary region. Clearance of particles is slow and is not completed within a working shift following a 1 hour exposure. It mostly occurs via macrophage activity in the alveolar region, with small amounts transported to the interstitium and less to the lymph nodes.

  19. A preliminary examination of audience-related communications issues for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, C.W.

    1991-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation doses people may have received from exposure to radioactive materials released during past operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project was initiated in response to public concerns about possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to effectively communicate to the many different concerned audiences. Accordingly, the TSP directed PNL to examine methods for communicating causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. After considering the directive and discussing it with the Communications Subcommittee of the TSP, PNL undertook a broad investigation of communications methods to consider for inclusion in the TSP's current communications program. As part of this investigation, a literature review was conducted regarding risk communications. A key finding was that, in order to successfully communicate risk-related information, a thorough understanding of the knowledge level, concerns and information needs of the intended recipients (i.e., the audience) is necessary. Hence, a preliminary audience analysis was conducted as part of the present research. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. 1 ref., 9 tabs.

  20. Student's music exposure: Full-day personal dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Washnik, Nilesh Jeevandas; Phillips, Susan L; Teglas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that collegiate level music students are exposed to potentially hazardous sound levels. Compared to professional musicians, collegiate level music students typically do not perform as frequently, but they are exposed to intense sounds during practice and rehearsal sessions. The purpose of the study was to determine the full-day exposure dose including individual practice and ensemble rehearsals for collegiate student musicians. Sixty-seven college students of classical music were recruited representing 17 primary instruments. Of these students, 57 completed 2 days of noise dose measurements using Cirrus doseBadge programed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion. Sound exposure was measured for 2 days from morning to evening, ranging from 7 to 9 h. Twenty-eight out of 57 (49%) student musicians exceeded a 100% daily noise dose on at least 1 day of the two measurement days. Eleven student musicians (19%) exceeded 100% daily noise dose on both days. Fourteen students exceeded 100% dose during large ensemble rehearsals and eight students exceeded 100% dose during individual practice sessions. Approximately, half of the student musicians exceeded 100% noise dose on a typical college schedule. This finding indicates that a large proportion of collegiate student musicians are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss due to hazardous sound levels. Considering the current finding, there is a need to conduct hearing conservation programs in all music schools, and to educate student musicians about the use and importance of hearing protection devices for their hearing.

  1. Exposure to Multiple Languages Enhances Communication Skills in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberman, Zoe; Woodward, Amanda L.; Keysar, Boaz; Kinzler, Katherine D.

    2017-01-01

    Early exposure to multiple languages can enhance children's communication skills, even when children are effectively monolingual (Fan, Liberman, Keysar & Kinzler, 2015). Here we report evidence that the social benefits of multilingual exposure emerge in infancy. Sixteen-month-old infants participated in a communication task that required…

  2. ASSESSING RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a workshop sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development and Office of Pesticide Programs, the Aggregate Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) Model was used to assess potential aggregate residential pesticide e...

  3. TRIAGE DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR PARTIAL-BODY EXPOSURE: DICENTRIC ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Pellmar, Terry C.

    2009-01-01

    Partial-body biodosimetry is likely to be required after a radiological or nuclear exposure. Clinical signs and symptoms, distribution of dicentrics in circulating blood cells, organ-specific biomarkers, physical signals in teeth and nails all can provide indications of non-homogeneous exposures. Organ specific biomarkers may provide early warning regarding physiological systems at risk after radiation injury. Use of a combination of markers and symptoms will be needed for clinical insights for therapeutic approaches. Analysis of dicentrics, a marker specific for radiation injury, is the “Gold standard” of biodosimetry and can reveal partial-body exposures. Automation of sample processing for dicentric analysis can increase throughput with customization of off-the-shelf technologies for cytogenetic sample processing and information management. Automated analysis of the metaphase spreads is currently limited but improvements are in development. Our efforts bridge the technological gaps to allow the use of dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) for risk-based stratification of mass casualties. This article summarizes current knowledge on partial-body cytogenetic dose assessment synthesizing information leading to the proposal of an approach to triage dose prediction in radiation mass casualties, based on equivalent whole-body doses under partial-body exposure conditions and assesses the validity of using this model. An initial screening using only 20 metaphase spreads per subject can confirm irradiation above 2-Gy. A subsequent increase to 50 metaphases improves dose determination to allow risk stratification for clinical triage. Metaphases evaluated for inhomogeneous distribution of dicentrics can reveal partial-body exposures. We tested the validity of this approach in an in vitro model that simulates partial-body irradiation by mixing irradiated and un-irradiated lymphocytes in various proportions. Our preliminary results support the notion that this approach will

  4. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at the IPNS

    SciTech Connect

    Campos Torres, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenetic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem.

  5. Student's music exposure: Full-day personal dose measurements

    PubMed Central

    Washnik, Nilesh Jeevandas; Phillips, Susan L.; Teglas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that collegiate level music students are exposed to potentially hazardous sound levels. Compared to professional musicians, collegiate level music students typically do not perform as frequently, but they are exposed to intense sounds during practice and rehearsal sessions. The purpose of the study was to determine the full-day exposure dose including individual practice and ensemble rehearsals for collegiate student musicians. Sixty-seven college students of classical music were recruited representing 17 primary instruments. Of these students, 57 completed 2 days of noise dose measurements using Cirrus doseBadge programed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion. Sound exposure was measured for 2 days from morning to evening, ranging from 7 to 9 h. Twenty-eight out of 57 (49%) student musicians exceeded a 100% daily noise dose on at least 1 day of the two measurement days. Eleven student musicians (19%) exceeded 100% daily noise dose on both days. Fourteen students exceeded 100% dose during large ensemble rehearsals and eight students exceeded 100% dose during individual practice sessions. Approximately, half of the student musicians exceeded 100% noise dose on a typical college schedule. This finding indicates that a large proportion of collegiate student musicians are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss due to hazardous sound levels. Considering the current finding, there is a need to conduct hearing conservation programs in all music schools, and to educate student musicians about the use and importance of hearing protection devices for their hearing. PMID:26960787

  6. UV dose-effect relationships and current protection exposure standards

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we have attempted to quantify the health effects in man of uv-radiation exposure of wavelengths from 240 nm to 320 nm. Exposure to uv in this region could result in the formation of skin cancer or premature aging in man. The induction of cancer by uv radiation results from changes in genetic material. We have used the DNA action spectrum coupled with the uv skin cancer data available in the literature to derive the dose-effect relationships. The results are compared against the current uv protection standards.

  7. Quantifying and Communicating Uncertainty in Preclinical Human Dose-Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, M; Lundahl, A; Någård, MB; Bredberg, U; Gennemark, P

    2015-01-01

    Human dose-prediction is fundamental for ranking lead-optimization compounds in drug discovery and to inform design of early clinical trials. This tutorial describes how uncertainty in such predictions can be quantified and efficiently communicated to facilitate decision-making. Using three drug-discovery case studies, we show how several uncertain pieces of input information can be integrated into one single uncomplicated plot with key predictions, including their uncertainties, for many compounds or for many scenarios, or both. PMID:26225248

  8. High-dose allergen exposure leads to tolerance.

    PubMed

    Woodfolk, Judith A

    2005-02-01

    Reports of decreased sensitization to cat allergen (Fel d 1) among individuals living with a cat or subjects exposed to high-dose cat allergen may be explained by the development of a form of high-dose tolerance resulting from natural exposure to an inhalant allergen. Although the epidemiological data regarding the relationship between exposure and sensitization to Fel d 1 are conflicting, the ability for high-dose Fel d 1 to induce a characteristic nonallergic immune response with a distinctive serum antibody profile has been established. Definition of this modified T-helper (Th)2 response to cat allergen, coupled with the renewed interest in regulatory T cells within the immunology field, has provided an avenue for exploring the mechanism by which IgE antibody-mediated responses are controlled. There is mounting evidence to suggest that the modified Th2 response is a variation of the allergic response and that the modified Th2-allergic axis is influenced by allergen dose and genetics. This article discusses putative immune mechanisms of tolerance within the context of an allergen-specific system. The relevance of high-dose allergen exposure and alternate factors such as endotoxin to the development of tolerance is considered. Fel d 1 exhibits unique molecular and immunological characteristics that may contribute to its tolerogenic properties. Major T-cell epitopes of Fel d 1 that preferentially induce regulatory factors have been defined. Furthermore, high-titer IgE antibody responses associated with atopic dermatitis are characterized by a defect in the T-cell repertoire that is specific to these epitopes. Identification of Fel d 1 epitopes that induce interleukin-10 may provide new targets for treatment.

  9. Biomarkers of exposure and dose: state of the art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Biomarkers provide methods to measure changes in biological systems and to relate them to environmental insults and disease processes. Biomarkers can be classified as markers of exposure and dose, markers of sensitivity, and markers of disease. It is important that the differences and applications of the various types of biomarkers be clearly understood. The military is primarily interested in early biomarkers of exposure and dose that do not require high levels of sensitivity but can be used to rapidly triage war fighters under combat or terrorist conditions and determine which, if any, require medical attention. Biomarkers of long-term radiation risk represent the second area of interest for the military. Biomarkers of risk require high sensitivity and specificity for the disease and insult but do not require rapid data turnaround. Biomarkers will help provide information for quick command decisions in the field, characterise long-term troop risks and identify early stages of radiation-induced diseases. This information provides major positive reassurances about individual exposures and risk that will minimise the physical and psychological impact of wartime radiation exposures.

  10. Uniform dose atmospheric pressure microplasma exposure of individual bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; Mahony, Charles; Spence, Sarah; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Kelsey, Colin; Hamilton, Neil; Diver, Declan; Bennet, Euan; Potts, Hugh; Mariotti, Davide; McDowell, David; Maguire, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Plasma - bacteria interactions have been studied for some time with a view to using plasma exposure for wound healing, sterilization and decontamination. While high efficacy has been demonstrated, important fundamental mechanisms are not understood and may be critical for ultimate acceptance. The dose variation across the exposed population and the impact of non-lethal exposure on subsequent bacterial growth are important issues. We demonstrate that individual bacterial cells can remain viable after exposure to a uniform plasma dose. Each bacteria cell (E coli) is delivered to the atmospheric pressure plasma in an aerosolised droplet (d ~ 10 micron). The estimated plasma density is 1E13 - 1E14 cm-3, gas temperature <400 K, and exposure times vary between 0.04 and 0.1ms. Droplet evaporation in flight is ~2 micron and plasma - cell interactions are mediated by the surrounding liquid (Ringers solution) where plasma-induced droplet surface chemistry and charging is known to occur. We report the cell viability and recovery dynamics of individual exposed cells as well as impact on DNA and membrane components with reference to measured plasma parameters. This research was funded by EPSRC (Grants: EP/K006088/1 & EP/K006142/1).

  11. Exposure Knowledge and Perception of Wireless Communication Technologies.

    PubMed

    Freudenstein, Frederik; Correia, Luis M; Oliveira, Carla; Sebastião, Daniel; Wiedemann, Peter M

    2015-11-06

    The presented survey investigates risk and exposure perceptions of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF) associated with base stations, mobile phones and other sources, the key issue being the interaction between both sets of perceptions. The study is based on a cross-sectional design, and conducted with an online sample of 838 citizens from Portugal. The results indicate that respondents' intuitive exposure perception differs from the actual exposure levels. Furthermore, exposure and risk perceptions are found to be highly correlated. Respondents' beliefs about exposure factors, which might influence possible health risks, is appropriate. A regression analysis between exposure characteristics, as predictor variables, and RF EMF risk perception, as the response variable, indicates that people seem to use simple heuristics to form their perceptions. What is bigger, more frequent and longer lasting is seen as riskier. Moreover, the quality of exposure knowledge is not an indicator for amplified EMF risk perception. These findings show that exposure perception is key to future risk communication.

  12. Dose-response relationship between light exposure and cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Knaier, R; Meister, S; Aeschbacher, T; Gemperle, D; Rossmeissl, A; Cajochen, C; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A

    2016-07-01

    Light has a stimulating effect on physical performance if scheduled according to the chronotype, but dose-dependent effects on performance have not yet been examined. Three groups of healthy men (25.1 ± 3.1 years) were exposed to light for different durations in a parallel group design before a 40-min time-trial. In each group, subjects were exposed to either bright light (BL, 4420 lx) or moderate light (ML, 230 lx) in a randomized order in a crossover design. The durations of light exposure were 120 min prior to and during exercise (2HEX; n = 16), 60 min prior to and during exercise (1HEX; n = 10), or only for 60 min prior to exercise (1H; n = 15). Total work performed during the time-trial in kJ in the 2HEX group was significantly higher in the BL setting (527 kJ) than in ML (512 kJ) (P = 0.002), but not in 1HEX (BL: 485 kJ; ML: 498 kJ) or 1H (BL: 519 kJ; ML: 514 kJ) (P = 0.770; P = 0.485). There was a significant (P = 0.006) positive dose-response relationship between the duration of light exposure and the work performed over the three doses of light exposure. A long duration light exposure is an effective tool to increase total work in a medium length time-trial in subjects normalized for their individual chronotype.

  13. Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A.; Grigoryan, N.

    2013-07-01

    The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different

  14. ASSESSING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS USING A MECHANISTIC SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Modeling Environment for Total Risks studies (MENTOR) system, combined with an extension of the SHEDS (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation) methodology, provide a mechanistically consistent framework for conducting source-to-dose exposure assessments of multiple pol...

  15. Communication Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abkarian, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    This literature review addresses studies of speech, language, and communication skills evidenced by children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects. Concomitant physical, behavioral, intellectual, and learning patterns are reviewed, and symptoms presented by alcohol-exposed children are compared to those seen in other…

  16. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  17. Low dose TBT exposure decreases amphipod immunocompetence and reproductive fitness.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese; Sundelin, Brita; Yang, Gongda; Ford, Alex T

    2011-01-17

    The antifouling agent tributyltin (TBT) is a highly toxic pollutant present in many aquatic ecosystems. Despite of regulations on the usage of TBT, it remains in high concentrations in sediments both in harbors and in off-shore sites. The toxicity of TBT in mollusks is well documented. However, adverse effects in other aquatic organisms, such as crustaceans, are less well known. This study is an effort to assess the effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of TBT on an ecologically important species in Swedish fresh and brackish water ecosystems, the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis. Field collected animals were exposed during gonad maturation to TBT (70 and 170 ng/g sediment d wt) for five weeks in static microcosms with natural sediment. Exposure concentrations were chosen to reflect effects at concentrations found in Swedish coastal sediment, but below expected effects on survival. TBT exposure resulted in a statistically significant adverse effect on oocyte viability and a doubling of the prevalence of microsporidian parasites in females, from 17% in the control to 34% in the 170 ng TBT/g sediment d wt exposure. No effects on survival were observed. Borderline significant effects were observed on male sexual maturation in the 70 ng TBT/g d wt exposure and on ecdysteroid levels in the 170 ng/g sediment d wt exposure. Both reproduction and parasite infection effects are of ecological importance since they have the potential to affect population viability in the field. This study gives further evidence to the connection between low dose contaminant exposure and increases in microsporidian parasite infection.

  18. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODEL FOR AIR TOXICS: A BENZENE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing a human exposure and dose model called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) to characterize population exposure to air toxics in support of the National Air ...

  19. Exposure Scenarios and Unit Dose Factors for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-12-29

    Exposure scenarios are defined to identify potential pathways and combinations of pathways that could lead to radiation exposure from immobilized tank waste. Appropriate data and models are selected to permit calculation of dose factors for each exposure

  20. Summary of literature review of risk communication: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Byram, S.J.

    1991-05-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation exposures people may have received from radioactive materials released during past operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The project is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) will use HEDR dose estimates in studies to investigate a potential link between thyroid disease and historical Hanford emissions. The HEDR Project was initiated to address public concerns about the possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to communicate effectively to the many different concerned audiences. To identify and develop these mechanisms, the TSP issued Directive 89-7 to PNL in May 1989. The TSP directed PNL to examine methods to communicate the causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. A literature review was conducted as the first activity in response to the TSP's directive. This report presents the results of the literature review. The objective of the literature review was to identify key principles'' that could be applied to develop communications strategies for the project. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  1. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  2. Estimating exposure and dose to characterize health risks: the role of human tissue monitoring in exposure assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, K; Callahan, M A; Bryan, E F

    1995-01-01

    Exposure assessment is an integral part of health risk characterization. Exposure assessments typically address three critical aspects of exposure: the number of people exposed to the environmental toxicant, at specific concentrations, for the time period of interest; the resulting dose; and the relative contribution of important sources and pathways to exposure/dose. Because historically both "point-of-contact" measurements and information about dose and related pharmacokinetic processes have been lacking, exposure assessments have had to rely on construction of "scenarios" to estimate exposure and dose. This could change, however, as advances in development of biologic markers of exposure and dose make it possible to measure and interpret toxicant concentrations in accessible human tissues. The increasing availability of "biomarkers," coupled with improvements in pharmacokinetic understanding, present opportunities to estimate ("reconstruct") exposure from measurements of dose and knowledge of intake and uptake parameters. Human tissue monitoring, however, is not a substitute for more traditional methods of measuring exposure, but rather a complementary approach. A combination of exposure measurements and dose measurements provides the most credible scientific basis for exposure assessment. PMID:7635107

  3. The Exposure Advantage: Early Exposure to a Multilingual Environment Promotes Effective Communication.

    PubMed

    Fan, Samantha P; Liberman, Zoe; Keysar, Boaz; Kinzler, Katherine D

    2015-07-01

    Early language exposure is essential to developing a formal language system, but may not be sufficient for communicating effectively. To understand a speaker's intention, one must take the speaker's perspective. Multilingual exposure may promote effective communication by enhancing perspective taking. We tested children on a task that required perspective taking to interpret a speaker's intended meaning. Monolingual children failed to interpret the speaker's meaning dramatically more often than both bilingual children and children who were exposed to a multilingual environment but were not bilingual themselves. Children who were merely exposed to a second language performed as well as bilingual children, despite having lower executive-function scores. Thus, the communicative advantages demonstrated by the bilinguals may be social in origin, and not due to enhanced executive control. For millennia, multilingual exposure has been the norm. Our study shows that such an environment may facilitate the development of perspective-taking tools that are critical for effective communication.

  4. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  5. Pre- and Postnatal Exposure to Low Dose Glufosinate Ammonium Induces Autism-Like Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laugeray, Anthony; Herzine, Ameziane; Perche, Olivier; Hébert, Betty; Aguillon-Naury, Marine; Richard, Olivier; Menuet, Arnaud; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Lesné, Laurianne; Briault, Sylvain; Jegou, Bernard; Pichon, Jacques; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Mortaud, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Glufosinate ammonium (GLA) is one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture. As is the case for most pesticides, potential adverse effects of GLA have not been studied from the perspective of developmental neurotoxicity. Early pesticides exposure may weaken the basic structure of the developing brain and cause permanent changes leading to a wide range of lifelong effects on health and/or behavior. Here, we addressed the developmental impact of GLA by exposing female mice to low dose GLA during both pre- and postnatal periods and analyzed potential developmental and behavioral changes of the offspring during infancy and adulthood. A neurobehavioral test battery revealed significant effects of GLA maternal exposure on early reflex development, pup communication, affiliative behaviors, and preference for social olfactory cues, but emotional reactivity and emotional memory remained unaltered. These behavioral alterations showed a striking resemblance to changes seen in animal models of Autistic Spectrum Disorders. At the brain level, GLA maternal exposure caused some increase in relative brain weight of the offspring. In addition, reduced expression of Pten and Peg3 – two genes implicated in autism-like deficits – was observed in the brain of GLA-exposed pups at postnatal day 15. Our work thus provides new data on the link between pre- and postnatal exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of autism-like symptoms later in life. It also raises fundamental concerns about the ability of current safety testing to assess risks of pesticide exposure during critical developmental periods. PMID:25477793

  6. Inhalation exposure system used for acute and repeated-dose methyl isocyanate exposures of laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Adkins, B; O'Connor, R W; Dement, J M

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory animals were exposed by inhalation for 2 hr/day (acute) or 6 hr/day (four consecutive days, repeated dose) to methyl isocyanate (MIC). Exposures were conducted in stainless steel and glass inhalation exposure chambers placed in stainless steel, wire mesh cages. MIC was delivered with nitrogen via stainless steel and Teflon supply lines. Chamber concentrations ranged from 0 to 60 ppm and were monitored continuously with infrared spectrophotometers to 1 ppm and at 2-hr intervals to 20 ppb with a high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a fluorescence detector. Other operational parameters monitored on a continuous basis included chamber temperature (20-27 degrees C), relative humidity (31-64%), static (transmural) pressure (-0.3 in.), and flow (300-500 L/min). The computer-assistance system interfaced with the inhalation exposure laboratory is described in detail, including the analytical instrumentation calibration system used throughout this investigation.

  7. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  8. Exposure Knowledge and Perception of Wireless Communication Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Freudenstein, Frederik; Correia, Luis M.; Oliveira, Carla; Sebastião, Daniel; Wiedemann, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    The presented survey investigates risk and exposure perceptions of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF) associated with base stations, mobile phones and other sources, the key issue being the interaction between both sets of perceptions. The study is based on a cross-sectional design, and conducted with an online sample of 838 citizens from Portugal. The results indicate that respondents’ intuitive exposure perception differs from the actual exposure levels. Furthermore, exposure and risk perceptions are found to be highly correlated. Respondents’ beliefs  about exposure factors, which might influence possible health risks, is appropriate. A regression analysis between exposure characteristics, as predictor variables, and RF EMF risk perception, as the response variable, indicates that people seem to use simple heuristics to form their perceptions. What is bigger, more frequent and longer lasting is seen as riskier. Moreover, the quality of exposure knowledge is not an indicator for amplified EMF risk perception. These findings show that exposure perception is key to future risk communication. PMID:26561826

  9. Influence of organs in the ICRP's remainder on effective dose equivalent computed for diagnostic radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.

    1989-04-01

    The ICRP effective dose equivalent has been compared with a weighted dose equivalent, computed by treating the entire remainder instead of the sample of five remainder organs in the ICRP method as uniformly radiosensitive, for dose distributions from three common diagnostic exposures: chest, dental full-mouth and dental panoramic. Complete dose distributions were computed by a Monte Carlo model. In all three cases the effective dose equivalent was greater than the weighted dose equivalent. The difference was only 20% for the chest exam but was more than fivefold for both dental exposures. Dose distributions for the dental exposures were less homogeneous than for the chest examination. Selection of organs to be included in the remainder markedly affects the effective dose equivalent. In the case of highly inhomogeneous dose distributions, the effective dose equivalent probably significantly over-estimates radiation detriment.

  10. Development of a standard documentation protocol for communicating exposure models.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, P; Altenpohl, A; Fait, G; Fransman, W; Paini, A; Radovnikovic, A; Simon-Cornu, M; Suciu, N; Verdonck, F

    2016-10-15

    An important step in building a computational model is its documentation; a comprehensive and structured documentation can improve the model applicability and transparency in science/research and for regulatory purposes. This is particularly crucial and challenging for environmental and/or human exposure models that aim to establish quantitative relationships between personal exposure levels and their determinants. Exposure models simulate the transport and fate of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and may involve a large set of entities (e.g. all the media the contaminants may pass though). Such complex models are difficult to be described in a comprehensive, unambiguous and accessible way. Bad communication of assumptions, theory, structure and/or parameterization can lead to lack of confidence by the user and it may be source of errors. The goal of this paper is to propose a standard documentation protocol (SDP) for exposure models, i.e. a generic format and a standard structure by which all exposure models could be documented. For this purpose, a CEN (European Committee for Standardisation) workshop was set up with objective to agree on minimum requirements for the amount and type of information to be provided on exposure models documentation along with guidelines for the structure and presentation of the information. The resulting CEN workshop agreement (CWA) was expected to facilitate a more rigorous formulation of exposure models description and the understanding by users. This paper intends to describe the process followed for defining the SDP, the standardisation approach, as well as the main components of the SDP resulting from a wide consultation of interested stakeholders. The main outcome is a CEN CWA which establishes terms and definitions for exposure models and their elements, specifies minimum requirements for the amount and type of information to be documented, and proposes a structure for communicating the documentation to different

  11. Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: A Dose-Response Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    SR92-34 Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: N A Dose -Response Study L51 BERNARD M. RABIN, Ph.D., WALTER A. HUNT...fission neutrons (1500-2000 following exposure to different types o" radiation: a dose -response cGy), Young (13) reported that increasing the propor...order to establish the dose -response relationships monkey, but did not produce an increase in the total for emesis following exposure to different types

  12. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, T.-M. . E-mail: tsungming.a.shih@us.army.mil; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-09-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD{sub 5} dose of sarin (42 {mu}g/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD{sub 5} of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD{sub 5} of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD{sub 5} sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0

  13. BIOACCUMULATION OF POPS IN FISH AND ESTIMATION OF HUMAN DIETARY EXPOSURE AND DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk assessment process is fundamental in understanding and controlling environmental health risks. Risk assessment includes four steps: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Exposure assessments seek to characteriz...

  14. RECONSTRUCTING POPULATION EXPOSURES FROM DOSE BIOMARKERS: INHALATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-established toxicological tool designed to relate exposure to a target tissue dose. The emergence of federal and state programs for environmental health tracking and the availability of exposure monitoring through bi...

  15. [The advance of model of action in low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Zhang, Zhengbao; Chen, Liping; Chen, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Benzene is classified as Group 1 carcinogen by IARC. It has been found that benzene induces hematotoxicity even in low dose exposure. The identification of key events during benzene induced hematotoxicty leads to adjustment of occupational exposure limits of benzene. In this review, we focus on the exposure, metabolism, target organs, key epigenetic changes, toxicty effects and end points of low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity and finally discuss the perspectives on the future study of this area.

  16. Analysis of Exposure-Dose Variation of Inhaled Particles in Adult Subjects.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although internal dose is a key factor for determining the health risk of inhaled pollutant particles, available dose information is largely limited to young healthy adults under a few typical exposure conditions. Extrapolation of the limited dose information to different populat...

  17. ASSESSING CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO PESTICIDES: AN IMPORTANT APPLICATION OF THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION MODEL (SHEDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately quantifying human exposures and doses of various populations to environmental pollutants is critical for the Agency to assess and manage human health risks. For example, the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 (FQPA) requires EPA to consider aggregate human exposure ...

  18. Dose-Response Modeling for Inhalational Anthrax in Rabbits Following Single or Multiple Exposures.

    PubMed

    Gutting, Bradford W; Rukhin, Andrey; Marchette, David; Mackie, Ryan S; Thran, Brandolyn

    2016-11-01

    There is a need to advance our ability to characterize the risk of inhalational anthrax following a low-dose exposure. The exposure scenario most often considered is a single exposure that occurs during an attack. However, long-term daily low-dose exposures also represent a realistic exposure scenario, such as what may be encountered by people occupying areas for longer periods. Given this, the objective of the current work was to model two rabbit inhalational anthrax dose-response data sets. One data set was from single exposures to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Ames spores. The second data set exposed rabbits repeatedly to aerosols of B. anthracis Ames spores. For the multiple exposure data the cumulative dose (i.e., the sum of the individual daily doses) was used for the model. Lethality was the response for both. Modeling was performed using Benchmark Dose Software evaluating six models: logprobit, loglogistic, Weibull, exponential, gamma, and dichotomous-Hill. All models produced acceptable fits to either data set. The exponential model was identified as the best fitting model for both data sets. Statistical tests suggested there was no significant difference between the single exposure exponential model results and the multiple exposure exponential model results, which suggests the risk of disease is similar between the two data sets. The dose expected to cause 10% lethality was 15,600 inhaled spores and 18,200 inhaled spores for the single exposure and multiple exposure exponential dose-response model, respectively, and the 95% lower confidence intervals were 9,800 inhaled spores and 9,200 inhaled spores, respectively.

  19. Radiation dose assessment of exposure to depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Bo; Gerstmann, Udo C; Höllriegl, Vera; Szymczak, Wilfried; Roth, Paul; Hoeschen, Christoph; Oeh, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is claimed to contribute to human health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and the Balkan Syndrome. Quantitative radiation dose is required to estimate the health risk of DU materials. The influences of the solubility parameters in the human alimentary tract and the respiratory tract systems and the aerosol particles size on the radiation dose of DU materials were evaluated. The dose conversion factor of daily urinary excretion of DU is provided. The retention and excretion of DU in the human body after a contamination at a wound site were predicted. Dose coefficients of DU after ingestion and inhalation were calculated using the solubility parameters of the DU corrosion products in simulated gastric and simulated lung fluid, which were determined in the Helmholtz Zentrum München. (238)U is the main radiation dose contributor per 1 Bq of DU materials. The dose coefficients of DU materials were estimated to be 3.5 x 10(-8) and 2.1 x 10(-6) Sv Bq(-1) after ingestion and inhalation for members of the public. The ingestion dose coefficient of DU materials is about 75% of the natural uranium value. The inhalation dose coefficient of DU material is in between those for Type M and Type S according to the category for inhaled materials defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Radiation dose possibly received from DU materials can directly be estimated by using the dose conversion factor provided in this study, if daily urinary excretion of DU is measured.

  20. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  1. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  2. USE OF EXPOSURE-RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) FOR ASSESSMENT OF AGGREGATE EXPOSURE OF INFANT AND CHILDREN TO N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed within the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework to investigate selected exposure inputs related to recognized exposure scenarios of infants and children to N-methyl carbamate pesticides as spec...

  3. Effects of long term low- and high-dose sodium arsenite exposure in human transitional cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianming; Wang, Feng; Luo, Fen; Chen, Xuedan; Liang, Xi; Jiang, Wenbin; Huang, Zhizhong; Lei, Jiafan; Shan, Fabo; Xu, Xueqing

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed the association between increased risk of bladder cancer and chronic arsenic exposure. Here, we explored biological effects of arsenic in T24. Microarray analysis was applied to analyze mRNA in T24 following 0, 2 or 5 μM sodium arsenite (As) exposure for 72 hours. Long term (up to 140 days) low-dose (200 nM) and high-dose (1,000 nM) As decreased E-cadherin protein level through different mechanisms because the mRNA levels of E-cadherin increased following low-dose As exposure but decreased following high-dose As exposure. Long term As increased the protein levels of N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and slug. Low-dose As exposure resulted in a change in the morphology of T24 cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal-like appearance. Knockdown of E-cadherin increased the protein levels of N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and slug. Cell proliferation and growth of T24 with or without As exposure for 100 days were assayed using EdU and WST, respectively. Low-dose As exposure increased cell proliferation and growth while high-dose As exposure decreased both. Long term As activated p53 on account of increasing protein levels of p53, p-p53 (Ser15), and mRNA levels of p21. These demonstrate that arsenic exposure exerts multiple effects. Long term low- or high-dose arsenic induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition, likely via downregulation of E-cadherin, activates p53, and differently affects cell proliferation/growth. PMID:28337271

  4. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TCE USING THE DOSE EXPOSURE ESTIMATING MODEL (DEEM) IN ACSL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ACSL-based Dose Exposure Estimating Model(DEEM) under development by EPA is used to perform art uncertainty analysis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PSPK) model of trichloroethylene (TCE). This model involves several circulating metabolites such as trichloroacet...

  5. Micro RNA responses to chronic or acute exposures to low dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad; Omaruddin, Romaica A.; Kreger, Bridget; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    Human health risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. A wide variety of biological effects are induced after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain to be completely understood. We hypothesized that low dose c-radiation-induced effects are controlled by the modulation of micro RNA (miRNA) that participate in the control of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in many cellular processes. We monitored the expression of several miRNA in human cells exposed to acute or chronic low doses of 10 cGy or a moderate dose of 400 cGy of 137Cs γ-rays. Dose, dose rate and time dependent differences in the relative expression of several miRNA were investigated. The expression patterns of many miRNA differed after exposure to either chronic or acute 10 cGy. The expression of miRNA let-7e, a negative regulator of RAS oncogene, and the c-MYC miRNA cluster were upregulated after 10 cGy chronic dose but were downregulated after 3 h of acute 10 cGy. The miR-21 was upregulated in chronic or acute low dose and moderate dose treated cells and its target genes hPDCD4, hPTEN, hSPRY2, and hTPM1 were found to be downregulated. These findings provide evidence that low dose and dose rate c-irradiation dictate the modulation of miRNA, which can result in a differential cellular response than occurs at high doses. This information will contribute to understanding the risks to human health after exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:22367372

  6. Genistein genotoxicity: Critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B. King, Audrey A.

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein > 5 {mu}M as non-physiological, and thus 'high' doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of 'the dose defines the poison' applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein.

  7. Effects of Dose Frequency of Early Communication Intervention in Young Children with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Paul; Woynaroski, Tiffany; Fey, Marc; Warren, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Children with intellectual disability were randomly assigned to receive Milieu Communication Teaching (MCT) at one 1-hr session per week (low dose frequency, LDF) or five 1-hr sessions per week (high dose frequency, HDF) over 9 months (Fey, Yoder, Warren, & Bredin-Oja, 2013. Non-Down syndrome (NDS) and Down syndrome (DS) subgroups were matched…

  8. APPLICATION OF THE EXPOSURE DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) TO ASSESSMENT OF DERMAL EXPOSURE IN THE RAT TO MALATHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPLICATION OF THE EXPOSURE DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) TO ASSESSMENT OF DERMAL EXPOSURE IN THE RAT TO MALATHION.
    Evans, M.V1., Power, F.W2., Dary, C.C2., Tornero-Velez, R2., and Blancato, J.N2.
    1 NHEERL, US EPA, ORD, ETD, RTP, NC; 2 NERL, US EPA, ORD, EDRB, LV, NV
    Re...

  9. A novel sulfur mustard (HD) vapor inhalation exposure system for accurate inhaled dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark R.; Benson, Eric M.; Kohne, Jonathon W.; Plahovinsak, Jennifer L.; Babin, Michael C.; Platoff, Gennady E.; Yeung, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A custom designed HD exposure system was used to deliver controlled inhaled doses to an animal model through an endotracheal tube. Methods Target HD vapor challenges were generated by a temperature controlled bubbler/aerosol trap, while concentration was monitored near real-time by gas chromatography. Animal breathing parameters were monitored real-time by an in-line pneumotach, pressure transducer, and Buxco pulmonary analysis computer/software. For each exposure, the challenge atmosphere was allowed to stabilize at the desired concentration while the anesthetized animal was provided humidity controlled clean air. Once the target concentration was achieved and stable, a portion of the challenge atmosphere was drawn past the endotracheal tube, where the animal inhaled the exposure ad libitum. During the exposure, HD vapor concentration and animal weight were used to calculate the needed inhaled volume to achieve the target inhaled dose (μg/kg). The exposures were halted when the inhaled volume was achieved. Results The exposure system successfully controlled HD concentrations from 22.2 to 278 mg/m3 and accurately delivered inhaled doses between 49.3 and 1120 μg/kg with actual administered doses being within 4% of the target level. Discussion This exposure system administers specific HD inhaled doses to evaluate physiological effects and for evaluation of potential medical countermeasure treatments. PMID:25291290

  10. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  11. RESPIRATORY DOSE TO SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS ASSESSED BY EXPOSURE AND DOSIMETRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory Dose to Susceptible Populations Assessed by Exposure and Dosimetry Studies

    Chong Kim1 and Ronald Williams2, 1USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and 2USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory, RTP, NC.

    Rationale: Parti...

  12. MODELING HUMAN EXPOSURES AND DOSE USING A 2-DIMENSIONAL MONTE-CARLO MODEL (SHEDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1998, US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been developing the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model for various classes of pollutants. SHEDS is a physically-based probabilistic model intended for improving estimates of human ex...

  13. Population exposure dose reconstruction for the Urals Region

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M.O.; Kozheurov, V.P.; Vorobiova, M.I.; Burmistrov, D.S.; Khokhryakov, V.V.; Suslova, K.G.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.; Bouville, A.

    1996-06-01

    This presentation describes the first preliminary results of an ongoing joint Russian-US pilot feasibility study. Many people participated in workshops to determine what Russian and United States scientists could do together in the area of dose reconstruction in the Urals population. Most of the results presented here came from a joint work shop in St. Petersburg, Russia (11-13 July 1995). The Russians at the workshop represented the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM), the Mayak Industrial Association, and Branch One of the Moscow Biophysics Institute. The US Collaborators were Dr. Anspaugh of LLNL, Dr. Nippier of PNL, and Dr. Bouville of the National Cancer Institute. The objective of the first year of collaboration was to look at the source term and levels of radiation contamination, the historical data available, and the results of previous work carried out by Russian scientists, and to determine a conceptual model for dose reconstruction.

  14. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Camarata, A. S.; Switchenko, J. M.; Demidenko, E.; Flood, A. B.; Swartz, H. M.; Ali, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy/min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures. PMID:26910032

  15. Biochemical Markers for Exposure to Low Doses of Organophosphorus Insecticides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    dose of diazepam or ibuprofen. Or conver- Hui, D. M., and Minami, M. (2000). Monitoring of fluorine in urine samples ofpatients involved in the Tokyo...O’Hair, The role of nucleophile- electrophile interactions in 710 653 require further studies. the unimolecular and bimolecular gas-phase ion chemistry...consistent used in these studies. with P-F coupling. The doublet is the result of fluorine splitting Rate Constant for Inhibition of Human BChE by FP

  16. Statistical characterization of radiation doses from external exposures and relevant contributors in Fukushima prefecture.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shogo; Abe, Tatsuya; Iijima, Masashi; Shimada, Kazumasa; Shiratori, Yoshitake

    2014-10-01

    In areas contaminated by radioactive materials, well designed dose assessment is necessary in order to protect people from radiation exposure and manage the exposure situation appropriately. Probabilistic dose assessment is a useful method for providing a more complete characterization of information on dose distributions in the population and requires statistically characterized data on pathway-relevant contributors. The objective of this paper is to determine statistical features of contributors to external exposures, as well as to identify causes of variabilities of individual doses to the populations living in areas contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. To achieve these objectives, measurements of individual doses and ambient dose rates, as well as surveys of behavioral patterns, were performed between February and April 2012. These were made with the cooperation of indoor workers, outdoor workers, and pensioners living in Fukushima prefecture. On the basis of these results, statistical analyses were performed in order to identify variabilities of contributors. In addition, a multi-regression analysis was done to explore a significant relationship between individual doses and relevant contributors. Results showed that the ambient dose equivalent rate also distributed with lognormal form, and it had variabilities attributable to the spatial distribution of deposited radionuclides. The distribution form of time spent outdoors depends on the characteristics of occupation, and the distributions for indoor workers and outdoor workers were lognormal and normal, respectively. Results of a multiple-regression analysis suggested that such variabilities of contributors give rise to significant differences in individual doses among the populations.

  17. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-08-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons have been calculated for approximately 500 radionuclides of potential importance in environmental radiological assessments. The dose-rate factors were obtained using the DOSFACTER computer code. The results given in this report incorporate calculation of electron dose-rate factors for radiosensitive tissues of the skin, improved estimates of organ dose-rate factors for photons, based on organ doses for monoenergetic sources at the body surface of an exposed individual, and the spectra of scattered photons in air from monoenergetic sources in an infinite, uniformly contaminated atmospheric cloud, calculation of dose-rate factors for other radionuclides in addition to those of interest in the nuclear fuel cycle, and incorporation of updated radioactive decay data for all radionuclides. Dose-rate factors are calculated for three exposure modes - immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and exposure at a height of 1 m above a contaminated ground surface. The report presents the equations used to calculate the external dose-rate factors for photons and electrons, documentation of the revised DOSFACTER computer code, and a complete tabulation of the calculated dose-rate factors. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Neuropathological Consequences of Exposure to Sublethal Doses of Cyanide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Arch. Pharmacol. 337, 373-368. Yamamoto , Y. and Ames, B.N. (1987). Detection of lipid hydroperoxides and hydrogen peroxide at picmole levels by an HPLC...deoxyglucose 12 ([14C]-2-DG) method. Microdialysis perfusion 13 Lactate and pyruvate 13 [𔃾C]-2-DG in perfusate 13 Hydroperoxides 13 Ascorbate and...17. Catalase- resistant chemiluminescence of microdialysis 40 perfusates before, during and after NaCN exposure. Figure 18. Concentration of glutamate

  19. The Effects of Repeated Low-Dose Sarin Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    this report, the investigators complied with the regulations and standards of the Animal Welfare Act and adhered to the principles of the Guide for...the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (NRC 1996). The use of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of...exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with

  20. Exposure reductions encouraged by the determination of the effective dose equivalent for non-uniform exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Matheny, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Dyer, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    DOE Order 5480.11 requires calculation of the effective dose equivalent (EDE) due to non-uniform radiation fields using ICRP-26 weighting factors. To comply with this requirement, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) developed a simple dose calculation scheme based on a draft report by the External Dosimetry Working Group of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The calculations involved are fairly simple and provide a conservative dose estimate. The resulting EDE estimate provides a much better representation of the risk to the monitored individual than the more prevalent practice of assigning the highest measured dose. Details of the dose assessment methodology are included as an attachment.

  1. Low dose exposure of diethylnitrosamine affects mice liver thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Pariat, T; Sharan, R N

    1995-11-17

    Swiss albino mice exposed to 5 and 10 mg diethylnitrosamine kg-1 body weight by intravenous route up to four weeks showed cyto- and genotoxic effects. Distortion of cell and nucleus shapes and extensive necrosis were observed. Thymidine kinase activity in the liver declined in diethylnitrosamine dose and duration dependent manners. The adult-form of thymidine kinase isozyme declined continuously during this period. Simultaneously, two isozymic forms of thymidine kinase, with small anodic migrations in an electrophoretic field, were gradually induced. Significance of theses changes in diethylnitrosamine induced precarcinogenic toxicity has been discussed.

  2. Dose optimization for different medical imaging tasks from exposure index, exposure control factor, and MAS in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Menglong; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yaying; Chen, Weixia; Hou, Lixia

    2012-09-01

    In radiographic examination, not all medical imaging tasks require the same level of image quality or diagnostic information. Criteria should be established for different imaging tasks to avoid excessive doses where there is no clear net benefit in the diagnosis or the image quality. An exposure index provided by manufacturers would be a useful tool for this purpose. This study aims to establish an optimum exposure index to be used as a guideline for clinical imaging tasks to minimize radiation exposure for chest digital radiography. A three-level classification of image quality (high, medium, and low) for chest imaging tasks was carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom was employed to establish minimum exposure index and exposure (mAs) for clinical imaging task type I (corresponding to high image quality). The exposures of medium and low quality images derived from it. Thirty patients were exposed consecutively with these optimized exposure factors, and clinical tasks were considered, while another 30 patients were exposed with the exposure factors routinely used in practice. Image quality was assessed objectively by a consensus panel. The optimized exposure provided a significant reduction of the mean exposure index from 1,556 to 1,207 (p < 0.0001) and mean patient's entrance surface dose from 0.168 mGy to 0.092 mGy (p < 0.0001). The results show that a clinical-task-determined radiographic procedure is more conducive to radiation protection of patients. In this study, the posteroanterior chest imaging examination was chosen as an example. This procedure can also apply to other body parts and views.

  3. SHEDS-PM: A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PREDICTING DISTRIBUTIONS OF PM EXPOSURE AND DOSE FROM BOTH OUTDOOR AND INDOOR SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM), called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model. SHEDS-PM uses a probabilistic approach that incorporates both variabi...

  4. Dose Response of MARV/Angola Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques following IM or Aerosol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sara C.; Lin, Kenny L.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Raymond, Jo Lynne W.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Wollen, Suzanne E.; Wlazlowski, Carly B.; Wilkinson, Eric R.; Botto, Miriam A.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Marburg virus infection in humans causes a hemorrhagic disease with a high case fatality rate. Countermeasure development requires the use of well-characterized animal models that mimic human disease. To further characterize the cynomolgus macaque model of MARV/Angola, two independent dose response studies were performed using the intramuscular or aerosol routes of exposure. All animals succumbed at the lowest target dose; therefore, a dose effect could not be determined. For intramuscular-exposed animals, 100 PFU was the first target dose that was not significantly different than higher target doses in terms of time to disposition, clinical pathology, and histopathology. Although a significant difference was not observed between aerosol-exposed animals in the 10 PFU and 100 PFU target dose groups, 100 PFU was determined to be the lowest target dose that could be consistently obtained and accurately titrated in aerosol studies. PMID:26413900

  5. Organ doses from environmental exposures calculated using voxel phantoms of adults and children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Endo, A.; Saito, K.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents effective and organ dose conversion coefficients for members of the public due to environmental external exposures, calculated using the ICRP adult male and female reference computational phantoms as well as voxel phantoms of a baby, two children and four adult individual phantoms--one male and three female, one of them pregnant. Dose conversion coefficients are given for source geometries representing environmental radiation exposures, i.e. whole body irradiations from a volume source in air, representing a radioactive cloud, a plane source in the ground at a depth of 0.5 g cm-2, representing ground contamination by radioactive fall-out, and uniformly distributed natural sources in the ground. The organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated employing the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc simulating the photon transport in the voxel phantoms, and are given as effective and equivalent doses normalized to air kerma free-in-air at height 1 m above the ground in Sv Gy-1. The findings showed that, in general, the smaller the body mass of the phantom, the higher the dose. The difference in effective dose between an adult and an infant is 80-90% at 50 keV and less than 40% above 100 keV. Furthermore, dose equivalent rates for photon exposures of several radionuclides for the above environmental exposures were calculated with the most recent nuclear decay data. Data are shown for effective dose, thyroid, colon and red bone marrow. The results are expected to facilitate regulation of exposure to radiation, relating activities of radionuclides distributed in air and ground to dose of the public due to external radiation as well as the investigation of the radiological effects of major radiation accidents such as the recent one in Fukushima and the decision making of several committees.

  6. Occupational Exposure to Diesel Motor Exhaust and Lung Cancer: A Dose-Response Relationship Hidden by Asbestos Exposure Adjustment? The ICARE Study

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Mireille; Guida, Florence; Cénée, Sylvie; Févotte, Joelle; Carton, Matthieu; Cyr, Diane; Menvielle, Gwenn; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Radoï, Loredana; Schmaus, Annie; Bara, Simona; Velten, Michel; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle; The Icare Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Background. In a French large population-based case-control study we investigated the dose-response relationship between lung cancer and occupational exposure to diesel motor exhaust (DME), taking into account asbestos exposure. Methods. Exposure to DME was assessed by questionnaire. Asbestos was taken into account through a global indicator of exposure to occupational carcinogens or by a specific JEM. Results. We found a crude dose response relationship with most of the indicators of DME exposure, including with the cumulative exposure index. All results were affected by adjustment for asbestos exposure. The dose response relationships between DME and lung cancer were observed among subjects never exposed to asbestos. Conclusions. Exposure to DME and to asbestos is frequently found among the same subjects, which may explain why dose-response relationships in previous studies that adjusted for asbestos exposure were inconsistent. PMID:26425123

  7. Nurse exposure doses resulted from bone scintigraphy patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçman, Duygu; Kovan, Bilal; Poyraz, Leyla; ćapali, Veli; Demir, Bayram; Türkmen, Cüneyt

    2016-03-01

    Bone scintigraphy is used for displaying the radiologic undiagnosed bone lesions in nuclear medicine. It's general indications are researching bone metastases, detection of radiographically occult fractures, staging and follow-up in primary bone tumors, diagnosis of paget's disease, investigation of loosening and infection in orthopedic implants. It is applied with using 99mTc labeled radiopharmaceuticals (e.g 99m Tc MDP,99mTc HEDP and 99mTc HMDP). 20 -25 mCi IV radiotracer was injected into vein and radiotracer emits gamma radiation. Patient waits in isolated room for about 3 hours then a gamma camera scans radiation area and creates an image. When some patient's situation is not good, patients are hospitalized until the scanning because of patients' close contact care need. In this study, measurements were taken from ten patients using Geiger Muller counter. After these measurements, we calculated nurse's exposure radiations from patient's routine treatment, examination and emergency station.

  8. Indoor aerosol modeling for assessment of exposure and respiratory tract deposited dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Tareq; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Löndahl, Jakob; Lazaridis, Mihalis; Hänninen, Otto

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution is one of the major environmental problems that influence people's health. Exposure to harmful particulate matter (PM) occurs both outdoors and indoors, but while people spend most of their time indoors, the indoor exposures tend to dominate. Moreover, higher PM concentrations due to indoor sources and tightness of indoor environments may substantially add to the outdoor originating exposures. Empirical and real-time assessment of human exposure is often impossible; therefore, indoor aerosol modeling (IAM) can be used as a superior method in exposure and health effects studies. This paper presents a simple approach in combining available aerosol-based modeling techniques to evaluate the real-time exposure and respiratory tract deposited dose based on particle size. Our simple approach consists of outdoor aerosol data base, IAM simulations, time-activity pattern data-base, physical-chemical properties of inhaled aerosols, and semi-empirical deposition fraction of aerosols in the respiratory tract. These modeling techniques allow the characterization of regional deposited dose in any metric: particle mass, particle number, and surface area. The first part of this presentation reviews recent advances in simple mass-balance based modeling methods that are needed in analyzing the health relevance of indoor exposures. The second part illustrates the use of IAM in the calculations of exposure and deposited dose. Contrary to previous methods, the approach presented is a real-time approach and it goes beyond the exposure assessment to provide the required information for the health risk assessment, which is the respiratory tract deposited dose. This simplified approach is foreseen to support epidemiological studies focusing on exposures originating from both indoor and outdoor sources.

  9. Achieving Consistent Multiple Daily Low-Dose Bacillus anthracis Spore Inhalation Exposures in the Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Barnewall, Roy E.; Comer, Jason E.; Miller, Brian D.; Gutting, Bradford W.; Wolfe, Daniel N.; Director-Myska, Alison E.; Nichols, Tonya L.; Taft, Sarah C.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated low-level exposures to biological agents could occur before or after the remediation of an environmental release. This is especially true for persistent agents such as B. anthracis spores, the causative agent of anthrax. Studies were conducted to examine aerosol methods needed for consistent daily low aerosol concentrations to deliver a low-dose (less than 106 colony forming units (CFU) of B. anthracis spores) and included a pilot feasibility characterization study, acute exposure study, and a multiple 15 day exposure study. This manuscript focuses on the state-of-the-science aerosol methodologies used to generate and aerosolize consistent daily low aerosol concentrations and resultant low inhalation doses to rabbits. The pilot feasibility characterization study determined that the aerosol system was consistent and capable of producing very low aerosol concentrations. In the acute, single day exposure experiment, targeted inhaled doses of 1 × 102, 1 × 103, 1 × 104, and 1 × 105 CFU were used. In the multiple daily exposure experiment, rabbits were exposed multiple days to targeted inhaled doses of 1 × 102, 1 × 103, and 1 × 104 CFU. In all studies, targeted inhaled doses remained consistent from rabbit-to-rabbit and day-to-day. The aerosol system produced aerosolized spores within the optimal mass median aerodynamic diameter particle size range to reach deep lung alveoli. Consistency of the inhaled dose was aided by monitoring and recording respiratory parameters during the exposure with real-time plethysmography. Overall, the presented results show that the animal aerosol system was stable and highly reproducible between different studies and over multiple exposure days. PMID:22919662

  10. Dose-response modeling of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with biomarkers of exposure and effect.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Kappler, Martin; Straif, Kurt; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Preuss, Ralf; Rossbach, Bernd; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Weiss, Tobias; Rabstein, Sylvia; Pierl, Christiane; Scherenberg, Michael; Adams, Ansgar; Käfferlein, Heiko Udo; Angerer, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael; Seidel, Albrecht; Brüning, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    In regulatory toxicology, the dose-response relationship between occupational exposure and biomarkers is of importance in setting threshold values. We analyzed the relationships between occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and various biomarkers of internal exposure and DNA damage with data from 284 highly exposed male workers. Personal exposure to phenanthrene and other PAHs was measured during shift and correlated with the sum of 1-, 2+9-, 3-, and 4-hydroxyphenanthrenes in post-shift urine. PAHs and hydroxyphenanthrenes were associated with DNA damage assessed in WBC as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine/10(6) dGuo and strand breaks by Comet assay as Olive tail moment. Hydroxyphenanthrenes correlated with phenanthrene (Spearman r(s) = 0.70; P < 0.0001). No correlations could be found between strand breaks and exposure (r(s) = 0.01, P < 0.0001 for PAHs; r(s) = -0.03, P = 0.68 for hydroxyphenanthrenes). Correlations with 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine/10(6) dGuo were weakly negative (r(s) = -0.22, P = 0.004 for PAHs) or flat (r(s) = -0.08, P = 0.31 for hydroxyphenanthrenes). Linear splines were applied to assess the relationships between the log-transformed variables. All regression models were adjusted for smoking and type of industry. For hydroxyphenanthrenes, 51.7% of the variance could be explained by phenanthrene and other predictors. Up to 0.77 microg/m(3) phenanthrene, no association could be found with hydroxyphenanthrenes. Above that point, hydroxyphenanthrenes increased by a factor of 1.47 under a doubling of phenanthrene exposure (slope, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.64). Hydroxyphenanthrenes may be recommended as biomarker of occupational PAH exposure, whereas biomarkers of DNA damage in blood did not show a dose-response relation to PAH exposure.

  11. Internal Radiation Exposure Dose in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture after the Accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nukui, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Naoko; Kudo, Takashi; Matsuda, Naoki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Takamura, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) on 11 March 2011, a huge amount of radionuclides, including radiocesium, was released and spread over a wide area of eastern Japan. Although three years have passed since the accident, residents around the FNPP are anxious about internal radiation exposure due to radiocesium. In this study, we screened internal radiation exposure doses in Iwaki city of Fukushima prefecture, using a whole-body counter. The first screening was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013, and the second screening was conducted from May to November 2013. Study participants were employees of ALPINE and their families who underwent examination. A total of 2,839 participants (1,366 men and 1,473 women, 1–86 years old) underwent the first screening, and 2,092 (1,022 men and 1,070 women, 1–86 years old) underwent the second screening. The results showed that 99% of subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the first screening, and all subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the second screening. The committed effective dose ranged from 0.01–0.06 mSv in the first screening and 0.01–0.02 mSv in the second screening. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to avoid unnecessary chronic internal exposure and to reduce anxiety among the residents by communicating radiation health risks. PMID:25478794

  12. Internal radiation exposure dose in Iwaki city, Fukushima prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nukui, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Naoko; Kudo, Takashi; Matsuda, Naoki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Takamura, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) on 11 March 2011, a huge amount of radionuclides, including radiocesium, was released and spread over a wide area of eastern Japan. Although three years have passed since the accident, residents around the FNPP are anxious about internal radiation exposure due to radiocesium. In this study, we screened internal radiation exposure doses in Iwaki city of Fukushima prefecture, using a whole-body counter. The first screening was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013, and the second screening was conducted from May to November 2013. Study participants were employees of ALPINE and their families who underwent examination. A total of 2,839 participants (1,366 men and 1,473 women, 1-86 years old) underwent the first screening, and 2,092 (1,022 men and 1,070 women, 1-86 years old) underwent the second screening. The results showed that 99% of subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the first screening, and all subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the second screening. The committed effective dose ranged from 0.01-0.06 mSv in the first screening and 0.01-0.02 mSv in the second screening. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to avoid unnecessary chronic internal exposure and to reduce anxiety among the residents by communicating radiation health risks.

  13. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  14. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses.

  15. Joint Minimization of Uplink and Downlink Whole-Body Exposure Dose in Indoor Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Plets, D.; Joseph, W.; Vanhecke, K.; Vermeeren, G.; Wiart, J.; Aerts, S.; Varsier, N.; Martens, L.

    2015-01-01

    The total whole-body exposure dose in indoor wireless networks is minimized. For the first time, indoor wireless networks are designed and simulated for a minimal exposure dose, where both uplink and downlink are considered. The impact of the minimization is numerically assessed for four scenarios: two WiFi configurations with different throughputs, a Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) configuration for phone call traffic, and a Long-Term Evolution (LTE) configuration with a high data rate. Also, the influence of the uplink usage on the total absorbed dose is characterized. Downlink dose reductions of at least 75% are observed when adding more base stations with a lower transmit power. Total dose reductions decrease with increasing uplink usage for WiFi due to the lack of uplink power control but are maintained for LTE and UMTS. Uplink doses become dominant over downlink doses for usages of only a few seconds for WiFi. For UMTS and LTE, an almost continuous uplink usage is required to have a significant effect on the total dose, thanks to the power control mechanism. PMID:25793213

  16. Joint minimization of uplink and downlink whole-body exposure dose in indoor wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Plets, D; Joseph, W; Vanhecke, K; Vermeeren, G; Wiart, J; Aerts, S; Varsier, N; Martens, L

    2015-01-01

    The total whole-body exposure dose in indoor wireless networks is minimized. For the first time, indoor wireless networks are designed and simulated for a minimal exposure dose, where both uplink and downlink are considered. The impact of the minimization is numerically assessed for four scenarios: two WiFi configurations with different throughputs, a Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) configuration for phone call traffic, and a Long-Term Evolution (LTE) configuration with a high data rate. Also, the influence of the uplink usage on the total absorbed dose is characterized. Downlink dose reductions of at least 75% are observed when adding more base stations with a lower transmit power. Total dose reductions decrease with increasing uplink usage for WiFi due to the lack of uplink power control but are maintained for LTE and UMTS. Uplink doses become dominant over downlink doses for usages of only a few seconds for WiFi. For UMTS and LTE, an almost continuous uplink usage is required to have a significant effect on the total dose, thanks to the power control mechanism.

  17. Low-dose sarin exposure produces long term changes in brain neurochemistry of mice.

    PubMed

    Oswal, Dhawal P; Garrett, Teresa L; Morris, Mariana; Lucot, James B

    2013-01-01

    Sarin is a toxic organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent that has been reported to cause long-term alterations in behavioral and neuropsychological processes. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of low dose sarin exposure on the monoamine neurotransmitter systems in various brain regions of mice. The rationale was to expand our knowledge about the noncholinergic neurochemical alterations associated with low dose exposure to this cholinesterase inhibitor. We analyzed the levels of monoamines and their metabolites in different brain areas after exposure of male C57BL/6 mice to a subclinical dose of sarin (0.4 LD50). Mice did not show any signs of cholinergic toxicity or pathological changes in brain tissue. At 1, 4 and 8 weeks post-sarin exposure brains were collected for neurochemical analysis. A significant decrease in the dopamine (DA) turnover, as measured by the metabolite to parent ratio, was observed in the frontal cerebral cortex (FC) at all time points tested. DA turnover was significantly increased in the amygdala at 4 weeks but not at 1 or 8 weeks after exposure. The caudate nucleus displayed a decrease in DA turnover at 1 week but no significant change was observed at 4 and 8 weeks suggesting a reversible effect. In addition to this, serotonin (5-HT) levels were transiently altered at various time points in all the brain regions studied (increase in FC, caudate nucleus and decrease in amygdala). Since there were no signs of cholinergic toxicity or cell death after sarin exposure, different non-cholinergic mechanisms may be involved in regulating these effects. Our results demonstrate that non-symptomatic dose of OP nerve agent sarin has potent long-term, region-specific effects on the monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems. Data also suggests differential effects of sarin on the various DA projections. These neurochemical alterations could be associated with long term behavioral and neuropsychological changes associated with low dose OP

  18. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  19. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Chow, S

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  20. The risk equivalent of an exposure to-, versus a dose of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    The long-term potential carcinogenic effects of low-level exposure (LLE) are addressed. The principal point discussed is linear, no-threshold dose-response curve. That the linear no-threshold, or proportional relationship is widely used is seen in the way in which the values for cancer risk coefficients are expressed - in terms of new cases, per million persons exposed, per year, per unit exposure or dose. This implies that the underlying relationship is proportional, i.e., ''linear, without threshold''. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The effect of ultralow-dose antibiotics exposure on soil nitrate and N2O flux

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, Stephanie L.; Loving, Madeline; Li, Xiqing; Zhang, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics has been shown to alter the metabolic activity of micro-organisms, but the impact on soil denitrification and N2O production has rarely been reported. In this study, incubation and column transport experiments were conducted on soils exposed to as many as four antibiotics in the ng·kg−1 range (several orders of magnitude below typical exposure rates) to evaluate the impact of ultralow dose exposure on net nitrate losses and soil N2O flux over time. Under anaerobic incubation conditions, three antibiotics produced statistically significant dose response curves in which denitrification was stimulated at some doses and inhibited at others. Sulfamethoxazole in particular had a stimulatory effect at ultralow doses, an effect also evidenced by a near 17% increase in nitrate removal during column transport. Narasin also showed evidence of stimulating denitrification in anaerobic soils within 3 days of exposure, which is concurrent to a statistically significant increase in N2O flux measured over moist soils exposed to similar doses. The observation that even ultralow levels of residual antibiotics may significantly alter the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in soil raises a number of concerns pertaining to agriculture, management of nitrogen pollution, and climate change, and warrants additional investigations. PMID:26606964

  2. Determination of threshold adverse effect doses of percutaneous VX exposure in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Raymond F; Benton, Bernard J; Oubre, John L; Byers, Christopher E; Jakubowski, E Michael; Mioduszewski, Robert J; Settle, Timothy J; Steinbach, Thomas J

    2011-01-11

    Percutaneous exposure to the chemical warfare nerve agent VX was evaluated in African green monkeys (n=9). Doses of VX (7.5-100 μg/kg) were applied to the skin for 60 min and residual agent was quantified (before decontamination) to estimate the absorbed dose. Monkeys were evaluated for the presence or absence of clinical signs of toxicity and blood was sampled periodically (30 min--12 weeks) following exposure to measure the degree of circulating acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Monkeys were also evaluated for behavioral changes from VX exposure using a serial probe recognition (SPR) task. The lowest observable adverse effect level (LOAEL) for the production of major clinical signs was determined to be 42.22 μg/kg (absorbed dose estimate=17.36 μg/kg) and the LOAEL for AChE inhibition was 13.33 μg/kg (absorbed dose estimate=6.53 μg/kg). Behavioral performance was unaffected at doses that, while producing substantial AChE inhibition, did not produce clinical signs. VX represents a substantial threat as a contact hazard and these results complement previous studies using the percutaneous route of exposure with VX and extend the findings to a non-human primate species.

  3. Hematopoietic responses under protracted exposures to low daily dose gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Seed, T M; Fritz, T E; Tolle, D V; Jackson, W E

    2002-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the possible health consequences of chronic ionizing radiation exposure during extended space travel (e.g., Mars Mission), ground-based experimental studies of the clinical and pathological responses of canines under low daily doses of 60Co gamma irradiation (0.3-26.3 cGy d-1) have been examined. Specific reference was given to responses of the blood forming system. Results suggest that the daily dose rate of 7.5 cGy d-1 represents a threshold below which the hematopoietic system can retain either partial or full trilineal cell-producing capacity (erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, and megakaryopoiesis) for extended periods of exposure (>1 yr). Trilineal capacity was fully retained for several years of exposure at the lowest dose-rate tested (0.3 cGy d-1) but was completely lost within several hundred days at the highest dose-rate (26.3 cGy d-1). Retention of hematopoietic capacity under chronic exposure has been demonstrated to be mediated by hematopoietic progenitors with acquired radioresistance and repair functions, altered cytogenetics, and cell-cycle characteristics. Radiological, biological, and temporal parameters responsible for these vital acquisitions by hematopoietic progenitors have been partially characterized. These parameters, along with threshold responses, are described and discussed in relation to potential health risks of the space traveler under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation.

  4. The effect of ultralow-dose antibiotics exposure on soil nitrate and N2O flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devries, Stephanie L.; Loving, Madeline; Li, Xiqing; Zhang, Pengfei

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics has been shown to alter the metabolic activity of micro-organisms, but the impact on soil denitrification and N2O production has rarely been reported. In this study, incubation and column transport experiments were conducted on soils exposed to as many as four antibiotics in the ng·kg-1 range (several orders of magnitude below typical exposure rates) to evaluate the impact of ultralow dose exposure on net nitrate losses and soil N2O flux over time. Under anaerobic incubation conditions, three antibiotics produced statistically significant dose response curves in which denitrification was stimulated at some doses and inhibited at others. Sulfamethoxazole in particular had a stimulatory effect at ultralow doses, an effect also evidenced by a near 17% increase in nitrate removal during column transport. Narasin also showed evidence of stimulating denitrification in anaerobic soils within 3 days of exposure, which is concurrent to a statistically significant increase in N2O flux measured over moist soils exposed to similar doses. The observation that even ultralow levels of residual antibiotics may significantly alter the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in soil raises a number of concerns pertaining to agriculture, management of nitrogen pollution, and climate change, and warrants additional investigations.

  5. Maintaining the Constant Exposure Condition for an Acute Caenorhabditis elegans Mortality Test Using Passive Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuck-Chul; Roh, Ji-Yeon; Lim, Dongyoung; Choi, Jinhee

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Maintaining the constant exposure to hydrophobic organic compouds in acute toxicity tests is one of the most difficult issues in the evaluation of their toxicity and corresponding risks. Passive dosing is an emerging tool to keep constant aqueous concentration because of the overwhelming mass loaded in the dosing phase. The primary objectives of this study were to develop the constant exposure condition for an acute mortality test and to compare the performance of the passive dosing method with the conventional spiking with co-solvent. Methods A custom cut polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tubing loaded with benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) was placed in each well of a 24-well plate containing assay medium. The rate of the release of BBP from PDMS was evaluated by measuring the change in the concentration of BBP in the assay medium. The efficiency of maintaining constant exposure condition was also evaluated using a simple two-compartment mass transport model employing a film-diffusion theory. An acute mortality test using 10 C. elegans in each well was conducted for the evaluation of the validity of passive dosing and the comparative evaluation of the passive dosing method and the conventional spiking method. Results Free concentration in the assay medium reached 95% steady state value within 2.2 hours without test organisms, indicating that this passive dosing method is useful for an acute toxicity test in 24 hours. The measured concentration after the mortality test agreed well with the estimated values from partitioning between PDMS and the assay medium. However, the difference between the nominal and the free concentration became larger as the spiked concentration approached water solubility, indicating the instability of the conventional spiking with a co-solvent. Conclusions The results in this study support that passive dosing provides a stable exposure condition for an acute toxicity test. Thus, it is likely that more reliable toxicity assessment can be

  6. Perinatal Exposure to Low-Dose Methoxychlor Impairs Testicular Development in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaohong; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Yuanwu; Yu, Wanpeng; Huang, Chaobin; Li, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, has adverse effects on male reproduction at toxicological doses. Humans and wild animals are exposed to MXC mostly through contaminated dietary intake. Higher concentrations of MXC have been found in human milk, raising the demand for the risk assessment of offspring after maternal exposure to low doses of MXC. In this study, pregnant mice (F0) were given intraperitoneal daily evening injections of 1 mg/kg/d MXC during their gestational (embryonic day 0.5, E0.5) and lactational periods (postnatal day 21.5, P21.5), and the F1 males were assessed. F1 testes were collected at P0.5, P21.5 and P45.5. Maternal exposure to MXC disturbed the testicular development. Serum testosterone levels decreased, whereas estradiol levels increased. To understand the molecular mechanisms of exposure to MXC in male reproduction, the F1 testes were examined for changes in the expression of steroidogenesis- and spermatogenesis- related genes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MXC significantly decreased Cyp11a1 and increased Cyp19a1; furthermore, it downregulated certain spermatogenic genes (Dazl, Boll, Rarg, Stra8 and Cyclin-a1). In summary, perinatal exposure to low-dose MXC disturbs the testicular development in mice. This animal study of exposure to low-dose MXC in F1 males suggests similar dysfunctional effects on male reproduction in humans. PMID:25048109

  7. The Effect of Realtime Monitoring on Dose Exposure to Staff Within an Interventional Radiology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Frederic Katzen, Barry T.; Carelsen, Bart; Diehm, Nicolas; Benenati, James F.; Peña, Constantino S.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate a new device providing real-time monitoring on radiation exposure during fluoroscopy procedures intending to reduce radiation in an interventional radiology setting.Materials and MethodsIn one interventional suite, a new system providing a real-time radiation dose display and five individual wireless dosimeters were installed. The five dosimeters were worn by the attending, fellow, nurse, technician, and anesthesiologist for every procedure taking place in that suite. During the first 6-week interval the dose display was off (closed phase) and activated thereafter, for a 6-week learning phase (learning phase) and a 10-week open phase (open phase). During these phases, the staff dose and the individual dose for each procedure were recorded from the wireless dosimeter and correlated with the fluoroscopy time. Further subanalysis for dose exposure included diagnostic versus interventional as well as short (<10 min) versus long (>10 min) procedures.ResultsA total of 252 procedures were performed (n = 88 closed phase, n = 50 learning phase, n = 114 open phase). The overall mean staff dose per fluoroscopic minute was 42.79 versus 19.81 µSv/min (p < 0.05) comparing the closed and open phase. Thereby, anesthesiologists were the only individuals attaining a significant dose reduction during open phase 16.9 versus 8.86 µSv/min (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a significant reduction of total staff dose was observed for short 51 % and interventional procedures 45 % (p < 0.05, for both).ConclusionA real-time qualitative display of radiation exposure may reduce team radiation dose. The process may take a few weeks during the learning phase but appears sustained, thereafter.

  8. Repeated low-dose exposures to sarin, soman, or VX affect acoustic startle in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Smith, C D; Lee, R B; Moran, A V; Sipos, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are known to cause behavioral abnormalities in cases of human exposures and in animal models. The behavioral consequences of single exposures to CWNAs that cause observable toxic signs are particularly well characterized in animals; however, less is known regarding repeated smaller exposures that may or may not cause observable toxic signs. In the current study, guinea pigs were exposed to fractions (0.1, 0.2, or 0.4) of a medial lethal dose (LD50) of sarin, soman, or VX for two weeks. On each exposure day, and for a post-exposure period, acoustic startle response (ASR) was measured in each animal. Although relatively few studies use guinea pigs to measure behavior, this species is ideal for CWNA-related experiments because their levels of carboxylesterases closely mimic those of humans, unlike rats or mice. Results showed that the 0.4 LD50 doses of soman and VX transiently increased peak startle amplitude by the second week of injections, with amplitude returning to baseline by the second week post-exposure. Sarin also increased peak startle amplitude independent of week. Latencies to peak startle and PPI were affected by agent exposure but not consistently among the three agents. Most of the changes in startle responses returned to baseline following the cessation of exposures. These data suggest that doses of CWNAs not known to produce observable toxic signs in guinea pigs can affect behavior in the ASR paradigm. Further, these deficits are transient and usually return to baseline shortly after the end of a two-week exposure period.

  9. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  10. Cardiovascular diseases related to ionizing radiation: The risk of low-dose exposure (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Baselet, Bjorn; Rombouts, Charlotte; Benotmane, Abderrafi Mohammed; Baatout, Sarah; Aerts, An

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, non-cancer diseases are not considered as health risks following exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. Indeed, non-cancer diseases are classified as deterministic tissue reactions, which are characterized by a threshold dose. It is judged that below an absorbed dose of 100 mGy, no clinically relevant tissue damage occurs, forming the basis for the current radiation protection system concerning non-cancer effects. Recent epidemiological findings point, however, to an excess risk of non-cancer diseases following exposure to lower doses of ionizing radiation than was previously thought. The evidence is the most sound for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cataract. Due to limited statistical power, the dose-risk relationship is undetermined below 0.5 Gy; however, if this relationship proves to be without a threshold, it may have considerable impact on current low-dose health risk estimates. In this review, we describe the CVD risk related to low doses of ionizing radiation, the clinical manifestation and the pathology of radiation-induced CVD, as well as the importance of the endothelium models in CVD research as a way forward to complement the epidemiological data with the underlying biological and molecular mechanisms. PMID:27748824

  11. Mesothelioma: cases associated with non-occupational and low dose exposures

    PubMed Central

    Hillerdal, G.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the importance of low dose exposure to asbestos on the risk of mesothelioma. METHODS: A review of the literature. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence of a threshold level below which there is no risk of mesothelioma. Low level exposure more often than not contains peak concentrations which can be very high for short periods. There might exist a background level of mesothelioma occurring in the absence of exposure ot asbestos, but there is no proof of this and this "natural level" is probably much lower than the 1- 2/million/year which has been often cited.   PMID:10492646

  12. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  13. DNA fragmentation in leukocytes following repeated low dose sarin exposure in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Dave, J R; Connors, R A; Genovese, R F; Whipple, R A; Chen, R W; DeFord, S M; Moran, A V; Tortella, E C

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine levels of DNA fragmentation in blood leukocytes and parietal cortex from guinea pigs following repeated low-level exposure to the chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) sarin. Guinea pigs were injected (s.c.) once a day for 10 days with saline, or 0.1, 0.2, or 0.4 LD50 (50% mean lethal dose) sarin dissolved in sterile physiological saline. Blood and parietal cortex was collected after injection at 0, 3, and 17 days recovery and evaluated for DNA fragmentation using single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Cells were imaged using comet analysis software and three parameters of DNA fragmentation measured: tail length, percent DNA in the tail, and tail moment arm. Repeated low-dose exposure to sarin produced a dose-dependent response in leukocytes at 0 and 3 days post-exposure. There was a significant increase in all measures of DNA fragmentation at 0.2 and 0.4 LD50, but not at 0.1 LD50. There was no significant increase in DNA fragmentation in any of the groups at 17 days post-exposure. Sarin did not produce a systematic dose-dependent response in parietal cortex at any of the time points. However, significant increases in DNA fragmentation at 0.1 and 0.4 LD50 were observed at 0 and 3 days post-exposure. All measures of DNA fragmentation in both leukocytes and neurons returned to control levels by 17 days post-exposure, indicating a small and non-persistent increase in DNA fragmentation following repeated low-level exposure to sarin.

  14. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    SciTech Connect

    Bushberg, J; Boreham, D; Ulsh, B

    2014-06-15

    At dose levels of (approximately) 500 mSv or more, increased cancer incidence and mortality have been clearly demonstrated. However, at the low doses of radiation used in medical imaging, the relationship between dose and cancer risk is not well established. As such, assumptions about the shape of the dose-response curve are made. These assumptions, or risk models, are used to estimate potential long term effects. Common models include 1) the linear non-threshold (LNT) model, 2) threshold models with either a linear or curvilinear dose response above the threshold, and 3) a hormetic model, where the risk is initially decreased below background levels before increasing. The choice of model used when making radiation risk or protection calculations and decisions can have significant implications on public policy and health care decisions. However, the ongoing debate about which risk model best describes the dose-response relationship at low doses of radiation makes informed decision making difficult. This symposium will review the two fundamental approaches to determining the risk associated with low doses of ionizing radiation, namely radiation epidemiology and radiation biology. The strengths and limitations of each approach will be reviewed, the results of recent studies presented, and the appropriateness of different risk models for various real world scenarios discussed. Examples of well-designed and poorly-designed studies will be provided to assist medical physicists in 1) critically evaluating publications in the field and 2) communicating accurate information to medical professionals, patients, and members of the general public. Equipped with the best information that radiation epidemiology and radiation biology can currently provide, and an understanding of the limitations of such information, individuals and organizations will be able to make more informed decisions regarding questions such as 1) how much shielding to install at medical facilities, 2) at

  15. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure: A Look at Scope and Limitations for Radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Mitchel, Ron E J

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations.

  16. The effects of intermittent high asbestos exposure (peak dose levels) on the lungs of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. M.; Beckett, S. T.; Bolton, R. E.; Donaldson, K.

    1980-01-01

    Four groups of rats were treated by inhalation with the UICC preparations of amosite or chrysotile in order to explore the effects of intermittent high dust concentrations (peak dosing). For each of the 2 asbestos types one group of rats was treated for 5 days each week, 7 h a day, for 1 year. Two other groups were treated with amosite or chrysotile at 5 times the previous dose for 1 day each week for 1 year. Results showed that the lung dust levels of both chrysotile or amosite in the lungs of rats after the 12-month inhalation period were similar regardless of whether "peak" or "even" dosing had been used. During the following 6 months, asbestos was cleared from the "peak" chrysotile group more slowly than the "even" chrysotile group but clearance from the "peak" amosite group was faster than that found after "even" dosing with amosite. Levels of early peribronchial fibrosis were generally lower for the "peak" dosing groups than for "even" dosing although levels of interstitial fibrosis were slightly higher following "peak" dosing. The incidence of pulmonary neoplasms did not differ between the "peak"-dosing and "even"-dosing experiments. These findings therefore give no indication that short periods of high dust exposure in an asbestos factory would result in a significantly greater hazard than would be indicated by the raised overall dust counts for the day in question. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7426382

  17. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: The most extreme effect of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure. For example, a very high exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  18. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  19. Motor Performance in Irradiated Rats as a Function of Radiation Source, Dose, and Time Since Exposure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    dose - response curve for each of the four times (1, 8, 15, and 22 days after irraditaion). The LD50/15 for the various exposures were found to be: X-rays, 1125 rads; electrons, 810 rads; protons, 675 rads; and neutrons, 265 rads.

  20. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  1. Linking Different Exposure Patterns to Internal Lung Dose for Heterogeneous Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air is a complex mixture of particles with different sizes and chemical compositions. Because potential health effects are known to be different for different size particles, specific dose of size-fractionated PM under realistic exposure con...

  2. Duration of Exposure and the Dose-Response Model of PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaysen, Debra; Rosen, Gerald; Bowman, Marilyn; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    A dose-response model underlies posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posits a relationship between event magnitude and clinical outcome. The present study examines whether one index of event magnitude--duration of exposure--contributes to risk of PTSD among female victims of sexual assault. Findings support a small but significant contribution…

  3. Safety and efficacy of low-dose, subacute exposure of mature ewes to sodium chlorate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the safety and efficacy of low-dose, subacute exposure of mature ewes to NaClO3 in the drinking water. Twenty-five ewes (BW = 62.5 ± 7.3 kg) were placed indoors in individual pens with ad libitum access to water and feed. After 7 d of adaptation, ewes were assigned ran...

  4. The impact of dosing interval in a novel tandem oral dosing strategy: enhancing the exposure of low solubility drug candidates in a preclinical setting.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; South, Sarah A; Wene, Steve P

    2011-01-01

    In drug discovery, time and resource constraints necessitate increasingly early decision making to accelerate or stop preclinical programs. Early discovery drug candidates may be potent inhibitors of new targets, but all too often exhibit poor pharmaceutical or pharmacokinetic properties that limit the in vivo exposure. Low solubility of a drug candidate often leads to poor oral bioavailability and poor dose linearity. This issue is more significant for efficacy and target safety studies where high drug exposures are desired. When solubility issues are confronted, enabling formulations are often required to improve the exposure. However, this approach often requires a substantial and lengthy investment to develop the formulation. Previously, we introduced a gastrointestinal (GI) transit time-based novel oral tandem dosing strategy that enhanced in vivo exposures in rats. In this study, a refined time interval versus dose theory was tested. The resulting in vivo exposures based on altering frequency and doses were compared, and significant impacts were found.

  5. Acute toxicity effects of Prunus avium fruit extract and selection of optimum dose against radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Sharma, K; Singh, Smita

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of different doses of the methanolic extract of the fruit pulp of Prunus avium (family Rosaceae), which is used ethno-medicinally for the treatment of various diseases, and to find out the optimal dose of Prunus avium extract against 10 Gy gamma-radiation exposure. To test acute toxicity in mice, different doses of PAE (Prunus avium fruit extract) were given orally for 15 consecutive days, after which the animals were observed for another 15 days; the LD50/15 of the methanolic extract was calculated to be 4.947 gm/kg body weight (b.wt). In optimum dose selection against radiation exposure, oral administration of 450 mg/kg b.wt/d of PAE for 15 consecutive days before exposure to 10 Gy of gamma-radiation was found to afford maximum protection in terms of body weight and survivability of the mice in comparison to other doses.

  6. Exposure-Response Analyses Supporting Ticagrelor Dosing Recommendation in Patients With Prior Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Röshammar, Daniel; Nyberg, Joakim; Andersson, Tomas; Stanski, Donald; Storey, Robert F; Hamrén, Bengt

    2016-11-18

    The relationships between drug exposure and the composite risk of cardiovascular (CV) death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke as well as the risk of TIMI major bleeding were estimated following long-term treatment with ticagrelor 60 or 90 mg twice daily in 20,942 patients with prior MI. These analyses support the primary reported efficacy and safety evaluations by showing that there were clear separations from placebo early in treatment with both doses, regardless of ticagrelor exposure, for both endpoints. In addition, the exposure-response analyses provided new insight into the contribution of individual exposure levels, rather than dose, as a predictor of events and accounted for differences in the baseline risk between patients. The predicted risks of CV death/MI/stroke were similar despite an increase in the median predicted ticagrelor average steady-state concentration from 606 nmol/L with ticagrelor 60 mg to 998 nmol/L with ticagrelor 90 mg (hazard ratios vs placebo of 0.83 and 0.81, respectively). The corresponding predicted risk of TIMI major bleeding slightly increased (hazard ratios vs placebo of 2.4 and 2.6, respectively). Apart from Japanese patients, showing a lower risk of CV death/MI/stroke, the response to ticagrelor was consistent across the study population, as supported by the combination of relatively flat exposure-response relationships in the studied exposure range, similar sensitivity to ticagrelor exposure, and small exposure differences. Consequently, the present analyses support the selection of the 60-mg dose for all demographic subgroups of patients studied.

  7. Western red cedar dust exposure and lung function: a dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Noertjojo, H K; Dimich-Ward, H; Peelen, S; Dittrick, M; Kennedy, S M; Chan-Yeung, M

    1996-10-01

    The relationship between levels of cumulative red cedar dust exposure and decline in lung function was explored in an 11-yr follow-up study of 243 sawmill workers who participated in at least two occasions. We also studied 140 office workers in a similar manner as control subjects. Workers with asthma were excluded from the analysis. During the period of the study, 916 personal and 216 area samples of dust were collected from the sawmill. Cumulative wood dust exposure was calculated for each sawmill worker according to the duration and exposure in each job, based on the geometric mean of all dust measurements for that job. Average daily dust exposure was calculated by dividing the total cumulative exposure by the number of days of work. Workers were divided into low-, medium-, and high-exposure groups with mean daily level of exposure of < 0.2, 0.2 to 0.4, and > 0.4 mg/m3, respectively. Sawmill workers had significantly greater declines in FEV1 and FVC compared with office workers adjusted for age, smoking, and initial lung function. A dose-response relationship was observed between the level of exposure and the annual decline in FVC. We conclude that exposure to Western red cedar dust is associated with a greater decline in lung function which may lead to development of chronic airflow limitation.

  8. Dose-Responsive Gene Expression Changes in Juvenile and Adult Mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus) After Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Horacio O.; Hu, Jianjun; Gaworecki, Kristen M.; Roling, Jonathan A.; Baldwin, William S.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Bain, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated arsenic's effects on mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus), while also examining what role that gender or exposure age might play. Adult male and female mummichogs were exposed to 172ppb, 575ppb, or 1,720ppb arsenic as sodium arsenite for 10 days immediately prior to spawning. No differences were noted in the number or viability of eggs between the groups, but there was a significant increase in deformities in 1,720ppb arsenic exposure group. Total RNA from adult livers or 6-week old juveniles was used to probe custom macroarrays for changes in gene expression. In females, 3% of the genes were commonly differentially expressed in the 172 and 575ppb exposure groups compared to controls. In the males, between 1.1-3% of the differentially expressed genes were in common between the exposure groups. Several genes, including apolipoprotein and serum amyloid precursor were commonly expressed in either a dose-responsive manner or were dose-specific, but consistent across genders. These patterns of regulation were confirmed by QPCR. These findings will provide us with a better understanding of the effects of dose, gender, and exposure age on the response to arsenic. PMID:20451245

  9. Repeated exposure to sublethal doses of the organophosphorus compound VX activates BDNF expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Jose M; Chang, Wenling E; Bah, Mariama J; Wright, Linnzi K M; Saviolakis, George A; Alagappan, Arun; Robison, Christopher L; Shah, Jinesh D; Meyerhoff, James L; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Midboe, Eric G; Lumley, Lucille A

    2012-04-01

    The highly toxic organophosphorus compound VX [O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]methylphosphonate] is an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Prolonged inhibition of AChE increases endogenous levels of acetylcholine and is toxic at nerve synapses and neuromuscular junctions. We hypothesized that repeated exposure to sublethal doses of VX would affect genes associated with cell survival, neuronal plasticity, and neuronal remodeling, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We examined the time course of BDNF expression in C57BL/6 mouse brain following repeated exposure (1/day × 5 days/week × 2 weeks) to sublethal doses of VX (0.2 LD(50) and 0.4 LD(50)). BDNF messenger RNA expression was significantly (p < 0.05) elevated in multiple brain regions, including the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 regions of the hippocampal formation, as well as the piriform cortex, hypothalamus, amygdala, and thalamus, 72 h after the last 0.4 LD(50) VX exposure. BDNF protein expression, however, was only increased in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Whether increased BDNF in response to sublethal doses of VX exposure is an adaptive response to prevent cellular damage or a precursor to impending brain damage remains to be determined. If elevated BDNF is an adaptive response, exogenous BDNF may be a potential therapeutic target to reduce the toxic effects of nerve agent exposure.

  10. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  11. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials.

  12. Quantitative assessment of inhalation exposure and deposited dose of aerosol from nanotechnology-based consumer sprays†

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenko, Yevgen; Lioy, Paul J.; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a quantitative assessment of inhalation exposure and deposited aerosol dose in the 14 nm to 20 μm particle size range based on the aerosol measurements conducted during realistic usage simulation of five nanotechnology-based and five regular spray products matching the nano-products by purpose of application. The products were also examined using transmission electron microscopy. In seven out of ten sprays, the highest inhalation exposure was observed for the coarse (2.5–10 μm) particles while being minimal or below the detection limit for the remaining three sprays. Nanosized aerosol particles (14–100 nm) were released, which resulted in low but measurable inhalation exposures from all of the investigated consumer sprays. Eight out of ten products produced high total deposited aerosol doses on the order of 101–103 ng kg−1 bw per application, ~85–88% of which were in the head airways, only <10% in the alveolar region and <8% in the tracheobronchial region. One nano and one regular spray produced substantially lower total deposited doses (by 2–4 orders of magnitude less), only ~52–64% of which were in the head while ~29–40% in the alveolar region. The electron microscopy data showed nanosized objects in some products not labeled as nanotechnology-based and conversely did not find nano-objects in some nano-sprays. We found no correlation between nano-object presence and abundance as per the electron microscopy data and the determined inhalation exposures and deposited doses. The findings of this study and the reported quantitative exposure data will be valuable for the manufacturers of nanotechnology-based consumer sprays to minimize inhalation exposure from their products, as well as for the regulators focusing on protecting the public health. PMID:25621175

  13. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  14. Methamphetamine exposure during pregnancy at pharmacological doses produces neurodevelopmental and behavioural effects in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    McDonnell-Dowling, Kate; Donlon, Michelle; Kelly, John P

    2014-06-01

    In recent years methamphetamine (MA) use has become more prevalent, and of particular concern is its growing popularity of MA among women of childbearing age. However, to date, studies examining MA effects on the developing offspring in laboratory animals are limited. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if in utero MA exposure in rats at pharmacological doses can have a negative impact on neonatal neurodevelopment and behaviour. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams (n=10 dams/group) received MA (0, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5mg/kg) once daily via oral gavage from gestational day 7 to 21. Maternal body weight, food and water consumption were recorded daily. A range of standard neurodevelopment parameters was examined in the offspring during the neonatal period. There were no neurodevelopmental deficits observed with offspring exposed to 0.625mg/kg MA, in fact, there were enhancements of neurodevelopment in some parameters at this low dose. However, exposure to the 1.25mg/kg MA dose resulted in significant impairments in surface righting reflex and forelimb grip in both sexes. Exposure to the 2.5mg/kg MA dose resulted in a significant reduction in ano-genital distance in males, and in both sexes resulted in delayed fur appearance and eye opening, impairments in surface righting reflex and negative geotaxis, and a reduction in body length. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that pharmacologically relevant doses of MA can have profound dose-related effects on neonatal outcome. If extrapolated to the clinical scenario this will give cause for concern regarding the risks associated with this drug of abuse at relatively low doses.

  15. RECONSTRUCTION OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES DUE TO MEDICAL EXPOSURES FOR MEMBERS OF THE TECHA RIVER COHORT

    SciTech Connect

    Shagina, N. B.; Golikov, V.; Degteva, M. O.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To describe a methodology for reconstruction of doses due to medical exposures for members of the Techa River Cohort (TRC) who received diagnostic radiation at the clinic of the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM) in 1952–2005. To calculate doses of medical exposure for the TRC members and compare with the doses that resulted from radioactive contamination of the Techa River. Material and Methods: Reconstruction of individual medical doses is based on data on x-ray diagnostic procedures available for each person examined at the URCRM clinics and values of absorbed dose in 12 organs per typical x-ray procedure calculated with the use of a mathematical phantom. Personal data on x-ray diagnostic examinations have been complied in the computerized “Registry of x-ray diagnostic procedures.” Sources of information are archival registry books from the URCRM x-ray room (available since 1956) and records on x-ray diagnostic procedures in patient-case histories (since 1952). The absorbed doses for 12 organs of interest have been evaluated per unit typical x-ray procedure with account taken of the x-ray examination parameters characteristic for the diagnostic machines used at the URCRM clinics. These parameters have been evaluated from published data on technical characteristics of the x-ray diagnostic machines used at the URCRM clinics in 1952–1988 and taken from the x-ray room for machines used at the URCRM in 1989–2005. Absorbed doses in the 12 organs per unit typical x-ray procedure have been calculated with use of a special computer code, EDEREX, developed at the Saint-Petersburg Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene after Professor P.V. Ramzaev. Individual accumulated doses of medical exposure have been calculated with a computer code, MEDS (Medical Exposure Dosimetry System), specifically developed at the URCRM. Results: At present, the “Registry of x-ray diagnostic procedures” contains information on individual x

  16. A Bayesian analysis of uncertainties on lung doses resulting from occupational exposures to uranium.

    PubMed

    Puncher, M; Birchall, A; Bull, R K

    2013-09-01

    In a recent epidemiological study, Bayesian estimates of lung doses were calculated in order to determine a possible association between lung dose and lung cancer incidence resulting from occupational exposures to uranium. These calculations, which produce probability distributions of doses, used the human respiratory tract model (HRTM) published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) with a revised particle transport clearance model. In addition to the Bayesian analyses, point estimates (PEs) of doses were also provided for that study using the existing HRTM as it is described in ICRP Publication 66. The PEs are to be used in a preliminary analysis of risk. To explain the differences between the PEs and Bayesian analysis, in this paper the methodology was applied to former UK nuclear workers who constituted a subset of the study cohort. The resulting probability distributions of lung doses calculated using the Bayesian methodology were compared with the PEs obtained for each worker. Mean posterior lung doses were on average 8-fold higher than PEs and the uncertainties on doses varied over a wide range, being greater than two orders of magnitude for some lung tissues. It is shown that it is the prior distributions of the parameters describing absorption from the lungs to blood that are responsible for the large difference between posterior mean doses and PEs. Furthermore, it is the large prior uncertainties on these parameters that are mainly responsible for the large uncertainties on lung doses. It is concluded that accurate determination of the chemical form of inhaled uranium, as well as the absorption parameter values for these materials, is important for obtaining unbiased estimates of lung doses from occupational exposures to uranium for epidemiological studies. Finally, it should be noted that the inferences regarding the PEs described here apply only to the assessments of cases provided for the epidemiological study, where central

  17. Assessment of the exposure to and dose from radon decay products in normally occupied homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.; Jensen, B.; Li, C.S.; Montassier, N.; Wasiolek, P.; Cavallo, A.J.; Gatsby, K.; Socolow, R.H.; James, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    The exposure to radon decay products has been assessed in seven homes in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. In two of the houses, there was a single individual who smoked cigarettes. There were a variety of heating and cooking appliances among these homes. These studies have provide 565 measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions in these houses. The median value for the equilibrium factor was 0.408 as compared with the previously employed value of 0.50. Using the recently adopted ICRP lung deposition and dosimetry model, the hourly equivalent lung dose rate per unit, radon exposure was estimated for each measured size distribution. Differences between houses with smokers present and absent were noted in the exposure conditions, but the resulting dose rate per unit of radon gas concentration was essentially the same for the two groups. Expressed in terms of ICRP`s unit of effective dose for members of the public, the mean dose rate conversion coefficient with respect to radon gas concentration found in this study was 3.8 nSv h{sup -} Bq{sup -} m{sup -3}. 26 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A Model of International Communication Media Appraisal and Exposure: A Comprehensive Test in Belize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David; Oliveira, Omar Souki

    A study constituted the fifth phase of a programmatic research effort designed to develop and test a model of international communications media exposure and appraisal. The model posits that three variables--editorial tone, communication potential, and utility--have positive determinant effects on these dependent variables. Research was carried…

  19. Neurotoxicity of chronic low-dose exposure to organic solvents: a skeptical review.

    PubMed

    Lees-Haley, P R; Williams, C W

    1997-11-01

    The health effects of long-term, low-level exposure to organic solvents have been studied for many years. While the volume of literature is great, definitive conclusions regarding chronic neurobehavioral effects of environmental exposure are premature. Methodological shortcomings in research preclude confidence in studies allegedly supporting a causal link between chronic low-dose solvent exposure and lasting neurobehavioral deficits. In this article, the shortcomings reviewed include selection bias in recruitment of research subjects, overreliance on subjective recall in determining levels and duration of exposure, between-study variability in kinds of solvents examined, variability in tests selected to assess neurobehavioral functioning, and diversity in reported findings. The implications of these for characterizing the state of organic solvent research are discussed.

  20. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: the most extreme effects of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less-severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more-severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  1. Metabolite profiles of rats in repeated dose toxicological studies after oral and inhalative exposure.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Bordag, N; Herold, M; Kamp, H; Krennrich, G; Looser, R; Ma-Hock, L; Mellert, W; Montoya, G; Peter, E; Prokudin, A; Spitzer, M; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Zbranek, R; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2016-07-25

    The MetaMap(®)-Tox database contains plasma-metabolome and toxicity data of rats obtained from oral administration of 550 reference compounds following a standardized adapted OECD 407 protocol. Here, metabolic profiles for aniline (A), chloroform (CL), ethylbenzene (EB), 2-methoxyethanol (ME), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and tetrahydrofurane (THF), dosed inhalatively for six hours/day, five days a week for 4 weeks were compared to oral dosing performed daily for 4 weeks. To investigate if the oral and inhalative metabolome would be comparable statistical analyses were performed. Best correlations for metabolome changes via both routes of exposure were observed for toxicants that induced profound metabolome changes. e.g. CL and ME. Liver and testes were correctly identified as target organs. In contrast, route of exposure dependent differences in metabolic profiles were noted for low profile strength e.g. female rats dosed inhalatively with A or THF. Taken together, the current investigations demonstrate that plasma metabolome changes are generally comparable for systemic effects after oral and inhalation exposure. Differences may result from kinetics and first pass effects. For compounds inducing only weak changes, the differences between both routes of exposure are visible in the metabolome.

  2. Development of wireless communication system in real-time internal radiation dose measurement system using magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Fumihiro; Shinohe, Kohta; Takura, Tetsuya; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Syogo; Sato, Tadakuni

    2009-04-01

    In radiation therapy, excessive radiation occurs because the actual delivered dose to the tumor is unknown. To overcome this problem, we need a system in which the delivered dose is measured inside the body, and the dose data are transmitted from the inside to the outside of the body. In this study, a wireless communication system, using magnetic fields was studied, and an internal circuit for obtaining radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was examined. As a result, a communication distance of 200 mm was obtained. An internal circuit was developed, and a signal transmission experiment was performed using the wireless communication system. As a result, the radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was transmitted over a communication distance of 200 mm, and the delivered dose was determined from the received signal.

  3. NEONATAL LOW- AND HIGH-DOSE EXPOSURE TO ESTRADIOL BENZOATE IN THE MALE RAT: I. EFFECTS ON THE PROSTATE GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neonatal Low- And High-Dose Exposure To Estradiol Benzoate In The Male Rat: 1. Effects On The Prostate Gland. Oliver Putz, Christian B. Schwartz, Steve Kim, Gerald A. LeBlanc Ralph L. Cooper, Gail S. Prins

    ABSTRACT
    Brief exposure of rats to high doses of natural estro...

  4. Toxicokinetics of the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane gamma: effect of dose, timing, route, repeated exposure, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Szabo, David T; Diliberto, Janet J; Hakk, Heldur; Huwe, Janice K; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2010-10-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane-gamma (γ-HBCD) is the predominate diastereoisomer in the commercial HBCD mixture used as a flame retardant in a wide variety of consumer products. Three main diastereoisomers, alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ), comprise the mixture. Despite the γ-diastereoisomer being the major diastereoisomer in the mixture and environmental samples, the α-diastereoisomer predominates human tissue and wildlife. This study was conducted to characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion parameters of γ-HBCD with respect to dose and time following a single acute exposure and repeated exposure in adult female C57BL/6 mice. Results suggest that 85% of the administered dose (3 mg/kg) was absorbed after po exposure. Disposition was dose independent and did not significantly change after 10 days of exposure. Liver was the major depot (< 0.3% of dose) 4 days after treatment followed by blood, fat, and then brain. γ-HBCD was rapidly metabolized and eliminated in the urine and feces. For the first time, in vivo stereoisomerization was observed of the γ-diastereoisomer to the β-diastereoisomer in liver and brain tissues and to the α- and β-diastereoisomer in fat and feces. Polar metabolites in the blood and urine were a major factor in determining the initial whole-body half-life (1 day) after a single po exposure. Elimination, both whole-body and from individual tissues, was biphasic. Initial half-lives were approximately 1 day, whereas terminal half-lives were up to 4 days, suggesting limited potential for γ-diastereoisomer bioaccumulation. The toxicokinetic behavior reported here has important implications for the extrapolation of toxicological studies of the commercial HBCD mixture to the assessment of risk.

  5. Continuous exposure to non-lethal doses of sodium iodate induces retinal pigment epithelial cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Ng, Tsz Kin; Brelén, Mårten Erik; Wu, Di; Wang, Jian Xiong; Chan, Kwok Ping; Yung, Jasmine Sum Yee; Cao, Di; Wang, Yumeng; Zhang, Shaodan; Chan, Sun On; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is the major cause of irreversible blindness and visual impairment in elderly population. We previously established a RPE degeneration model using an acute high dose sodium iodate to induce oxidative stress. Here we report findings on a prolonged treatment of low doses of sodium iodate on human RPE cells (ARPE-19). RPE cells were treated continuously with low doses (2–10 mM) of sodium iodate for 5 days. Low doses (2–5 mM) of sodium iodate did not reduce RPE cell viability, which is contrasting to cell apoptosis in 10 mM treatment. These low doses are sufficient to retard RPE cell migration and reduced expression of cell junction protein ZO-1. Phagocytotic activity of RPE cells was attenuated by sodium iodate dose-dependently. Sodium iodate also increased expression of FGF-2, but suppressed expression of IL-8, PDGF, TIMP-2 and VEGF. Furthermore, HTRA1 and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker proteins were downregulated, whereas PERK and LC3B-II proteins were upregulated after sodium iodate treatment. These results suggested that prolonged exposure to non-lethal doses of oxidative stress induces RPE cell dysfunctions that resemble conditions in AMD. This model can be used for future drug/treatment investigation on AMD. PMID:27849035

  6. Low-dose CT screening for lung cancer with automatic exposure control: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Shiho; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Tsuchiya, Ryosuke; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-07-01

    We conducted a study to determine optimal scan conditions for automatic exposure control (AEC) in computed tomography (CT) of low-dose chest screening in order to provide consistent image quality without increasing the collective dose. Using a chest CT phantom, we set CT-AEC scan conditions with a dose-reduction wedge (DR-Wedge) to the same radiation dose as those for low-tube current, fixed-scan conditions. Image quality was evaluated with the use of the standard deviation of the CT number, contrast-noise ratios (CNR), and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. At the same radiation dose, in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge, the SD of the CT number of each slice position was stable. The CNR values were higher at the lung apex and lung base under CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge than under standard scan conditions (p < 0.0002). In addition, ROC analysis of blind evaluation by four radiologists and three technologists showed that the image quality was improved for the lung apex (p < 0.009), tracheal bifurcation (p < 0.038), and lung base (p < 0.022) in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge. We achieved improvement of image quality without increasing the collective dose by using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge under low-dose scan conditions.

  7. EXPOSURE OF CULTURED MYOCYTES TO ZINC RESULTS IN ALTERED BEAT RATE AND INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cultured myocytes to zinc results in altered beat rate and intercellular communication

    Graff, Donald W, Devlin, Robert B, Brackhan, Joseph A, Muller-Borer, Barbara J, Bowman, Jill S, Cascio, Wayne E.

    Exposure to ambient air pollution particulate matter (...

  8. Evaluation of World Population-Weighted Effective Dose due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    After the release of the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR2000), it became commonly accepted that the world population-weighted effective dose due to cosmic-ray exposure is 0.38 mSv, with a range from 0.3 to 2 mSv. However, these values were derived from approximate projections of altitude and geographic dependences of the cosmic-ray dose rates as well as the world population. This study hence re-evaluated the population-weighted annual effective doses and their probability densities for the entire world as well as for 230 individual nations, using a sophisticated cosmic-ray flux calculation model in tandem with detailed grid population and elevation databases. The resulting world population-weighted annual effective dose was determined to be 0.32 mSv, which is smaller than the UNSCEAR’s evaluation by 16%, with a range from 0.23 to 0.70 mSv covering 99% of the world population. These values were noted to vary with the solar modulation condition within a range of approximately 15%. All assessed population-weighted annual effective doses as well as their statistical information for each nation are provided in the supplementary files annexed to this report. These data improve our understanding of cosmic-ray radiation exposures to populations globally. PMID:27650664

  9. Evaluation of World Population-Weighted Effective Dose due to Cosmic Ray Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-09-21

    After the release of the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR2000), it became commonly accepted that the world population-weighted effective dose due to cosmic-ray exposure is 0.38 mSv, with a range from 0.3 to 2 mSv. However, these values were derived from approximate projections of altitude and geographic dependences of the cosmic-ray dose rates as well as the world population. This study hence re-evaluated the population-weighted annual effective doses and their probability densities for the entire world as well as for 230 individual nations, using a sophisticated cosmic-ray flux calculation model in tandem with detailed grid population and elevation databases. The resulting world population-weighted annual effective dose was determined to be 0.32 mSv, which is smaller than the UNSCEAR's evaluation by 16%, with a range from 0.23 to 0.70 mSv covering 99% of the world population. These values were noted to vary with the solar modulation condition within a range of approximately 15%. All assessed population-weighted annual effective doses as well as their statistical information for each nation are provided in the supplementary files annexed to this report. These data improve our understanding of cosmic-ray radiation exposures to populations globally.

  10. Evaluation of World Population-Weighted Effective Dose due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-09-01

    After the release of the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR2000), it became commonly accepted that the world population-weighted effective dose due to cosmic-ray exposure is 0.38 mSv, with a range from 0.3 to 2 mSv. However, these values were derived from approximate projections of altitude and geographic dependences of the cosmic-ray dose rates as well as the world population. This study hence re-evaluated the population-weighted annual effective doses and their probability densities for the entire world as well as for 230 individual nations, using a sophisticated cosmic-ray flux calculation model in tandem with detailed grid population and elevation databases. The resulting world population-weighted annual effective dose was determined to be 0.32 mSv, which is smaller than the UNSCEAR’s evaluation by 16%, with a range from 0.23 to 0.70 mSv covering 99% of the world population. These values were noted to vary with the solar modulation condition within a range of approximately 15%. All assessed population-weighted annual effective doses as well as their statistical information for each nation are provided in the supplementary files annexed to this report. These data improve our understanding of cosmic-ray radiation exposures to populations globally.

  11. Dose-response Relationships between Mouse Allergen Exposure and Asthma Morbidity Among Urban Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Torjusen, Erika N.; Diette, Gregory B.; Breysse, Patrick N.; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean; Aloe, Charles; Matsui, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Home mouse allergen exposure is associated with asthma morbidity, but little is known about the shape of the dose-response relationship or the relevance of location of exposure within the home. Asthma outcome and allergen exposure data were collected every three months for 1 year in 150 urban children with asthma. Participants were stratified by mouse sensitization and relationships between continuous measures of mouse allergen exposure and outcomes of interest were analyzed. Every ten-fold increase in the bed mouse allergen level was associated with an 87% increase in the odds of any asthma-related health care use among mouse sensitized (OR (95% CI): 1.87 (1.21–2.88)), but not non-mouse sensitized participants. Similar relationships were observed for emergency department visit and unscheduled doctor visit among mouse sensitized participants. Kitchen floor and bedroom air mouse allergen concentrations were also associated with greater odds of asthma-related healthcare utilization; however, the magnitude of the association was less than that observed for bed mouse allergen concentrations. In this population of urban children with asthma, there is a linear dose-response relationship between mouse allergen concentrations and asthma morbidity among mouse-sensitized asthmatics. Bed and bedroom air mouse allergen exposure compartments may have a greater impact on asthma morbidity than other compartments. PMID:23067271

  12. Construction of new skin models and calculation of skin dose coefficients for electron exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2016-08-01

    The voxel-type reference phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), due to their limited voxel resolutions, cannot represent the 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer of the skin necessary for skin dose calculations. Alternatively, in ICRP Publication 116, the dose coefficients (DCs) for the skin were calculated approximately, averaging absorbed dose over the entire skin depth of the ICRP phantoms. This approximation is valid for highly-penetrating radiations such as photons and neutrons, but not for weakly penetrating radiations like electrons due to the high gradient in the dose distribution in the skin. To address the limitation, the present study introduces skin polygon-mesh (PM) models, which have been produced by converting the skin models of the ICRP voxel phantoms to a high-quality PM format and adding a 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer into the skin models. Then, the constructed skin PM models were implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code to calculate the skin DCs for external exposures of electrons. The calculated values were then compared with the skin DCs of the ICRP Publication 116. The results of the present study show that for high-energy electrons (≥ 1 MeV), the ICRP-116 skin DCs are, indeed, in good agreement with the skin DCs calculated in the present study. For low-energy electrons (< 1 MeV), however, significant discrepancies were observed, and the ICRP-116 skin DCs underestimated the skin dose as much as 15 times for some energies. Besides, regardless of the small tissue weighting factor of the skin ( w T = 0.01), the discrepancies in the skin dose were found to result in significant discrepancies in the effective dose, demonstarting that the effective DCs in ICRP-116 are not reliable for external exposure to electrons.

  13. Perinatal BPA exposure alters body weight and composition in a dose specific and sex specific manner: The addition of peripubertal exposure exacerbates adverse effects in female mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Beverly S; Paranjpe, Maneesha; DaFonte, Tracey; Schaeberle, Cheryl; Soto, Ana M; Obin, Martin; Greenberg, Andrew S

    2017-03-01

    Body weight (BW) and body composition were examined in CD-1 mice exposed perinatally or perinatally and peripubertally to 0, 0.25, 2.5, 25, or 250μg BPA/kg BW/day. Our goal was to identify the BPA dose (s) and the exposure window(s) that increased BW and adiposity, and to assess potential sex differences in this response. Both perinatal exposure alone and perinatal plus peripubertal exposure to environmentally relevant levels of BPA resulted in lasting effects on body weight and body composition. The effects were dose specific and sex specific and were influenced by the precise window of BPA exposure. The addition of peripubertal BPA exposure following the initial perinatal exposure exacerbated adverse effects in the females but appeared to reduce differences in body weight and body composition between control and BPA exposed males. Some effects of BPA on body weight and body composition showed a non-linear dose response.

  14. [The exposure dose of the sella turcica in panoramic dental radiography with an intraoral radiogenic source].

    PubMed

    Pastremoli, A; Cucchi, G; Ciminari, R

    1991-06-01

    Panoramic dental radiography using an intraoral X-ray source exposes critical organs, such as the crystalline and the thyroid, as well as organs of fundamental importance such as the pituitary gland, to X-rays. An experimental study was carried out to assess the exposure dose to the sella turcica during the radiological examination of the upper and lower dental arches using an X-ray source within the oral cavity. The comprehensive exposure dose for the upper and lower dental arches exceeded that found in orthopantomography (110 micro Gy/examination vs 47 micro Gy/examination) with errors which are respectively inferior to 15% and 30%. The authors conclude that the risk of provoking anatomical or functional changes of the pituitary gland is extremely remote using this type of examination.

  15. Behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities after exposure to low doses of high-energy iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Walter A.; Joseph, James A.; Rabin, Bernard M.

    Exposure of rats to high-energy iron particles (600 MeV/amu) has been found to alter behavior after doses as low as 10 rads. The performance of a task that measures upper body strength was significantly degraded after irradiation. In addition, an impairment in the regulation of dopamine release in the caudate nucleus (a motor center in the brain), lasting at least 6 months, was also found and correlated with the performance deficits. A general indication of behavioral toxicity and an index of nausea and emesis, the conditioned taste aversion, was also evident. The sensitivity to iron particles was 10-600 times greater than to gamma photons. These results suggest that behavioral and neurobiological damage may be a consequence of exposure to low doses of heavy particles and that this possibility should be extensively studied.

  16. Meta-analysis on occupational exposure to pesticides--neurobehavioral impact and dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Baron, Monika; Knapp, Guido; Schäper, Michael; van Thriel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While the health impact of high exposures to pesticides is acknowledged, the impact of chronic exposures in the absence of acute poisonings is controversial. A systematic analysis of dose-response relationships is still missing. Its absence may provoke alternative explanations for altered performances. Consequently, opportunities for health prevention in the occupational and environmental field may be missed. Objectives were (1) quantification of the neurotoxic impact of pesticides by an analysis of functional alterations in workers measured by neuropsychological performance tests, (2) estimates of dose-response relationships on the basis of exposure duration, and (3) exploration of susceptible subgroups. The meta-analysis employed a random effects model to obtain overall effects for individual performance tests. Twenty-two studies with a total of 1758 exposed and 1260 reference individuals met the inclusion criteria. At least three independent outcomes were available for twenty-six performance variables. Significant performance effects were shown in adults and referred to both cognitive and motor performances. Effect sizes ranging from dRE=-0.14 to dRE=-0.67 showed consistent outcomes for memory and attention. Relationships between effect sizes and exposure duration were indicated for individual performance variables and the total of measured performances. Studies on adolescents had to be analyzed separately due to numerous outliers. The large variation among outcomes hampered the analysis of the susceptibility in this group, while data on female workers was too scant for the analysis. Relationships exist between the impact of pesticides on performances and exposure duration. A change in test paradigms would help to decipher the impact more specifically. The use of biomarkers appropriate for lower exposures would allow a better prevention of neurotoxic effects due to occupational and environmental exposure. Intervention studies in adolescents seem warranted to

  17. Issues and approaches for ensuring effective communication on acceptable daily exposure (ADE) values applied to pharmaceutical cleaning.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael J; Faria, Ellen C; Hayes, Eileen P; Jolly, Robert A; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Molnar, Lance R; Naumann, Bruce D; Pecquet, Alison M; Shipp, Bryan K; Sussman, Robert G; Weideman, Patricia A

    2016-08-01

    This manuscript centers on communication with key stakeholders of the concepts and program goals involved in the application of health-based pharmaceutical cleaning limits. Implementation of health-based cleaning limits, as distinct from other standards such as 1/1000th of the lowest clinical dose, is a concept recently introduced into regulatory domains. While there is a great deal of technical detail in the written framework underpinning the use of Acceptable Daily Exposures (ADEs) in cleaning (for example ISPE, 2010; Sargent et al., 2013), little is available to explain how to practically create a program which meets regulatory needs while also fulfilling good manufacturing practice (GMP) and other expectations. The lack of a harmonized approach for program implementation and communication across stakeholders can ultimately foster inappropriate application of these concepts. Thus, this period in time (2014-2017) could be considered transitional with respect to influencing best practice related to establishing health-based cleaning limits. Suggestions offered in this manuscript are intended to encourage full and accurate communication regarding both scientific and administrative elements of health-based ADE values used in pharmaceutical cleaning practice. This is a large and complex effort that requires: 1) clearly explaining key terms and definitions, 2) identification of stakeholders, 3) assessment of stakeholders' subject matter knowledge, 4) formulation of key messages fit to stakeholder needs, 5) identification of effective and timely means for communication, and 6) allocation of time, energy, and motivation for initiating and carrying through with communications.

  18. Characterization of glycidol-hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of exposure and in vivo dose

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Hiroshi; Törnqvist, Margareta; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Kasamatsu, Toshio

    2014-03-15

    Hemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of exposure to reactive chemicals. Glycidol, an animal carcinogen, has been reported to form N-(2,3-dihydroxy-propyl)valine adducts to hemoglobin (diHOPrVal). To support the use of these adducts as markers of glycidol exposure, we investigated the kinetics of diHOPrVal formation and its elimination in vitro and in vivo. Five groups of rats were orally administered a single dose of glycidol ranging from 0 to 75 mg/kg bw, and diHOPrVal levels were measured 24 h after administration. A dose-dependent increase in diHOPrVal levels was observed with high linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.943). Blood sampling at different time points (1, 10, 20, or 40 days) from four groups administered glycidol at 12 mg/kg bw suggested a linear decrease in diHOPrVal levels compatible with the normal turnover of rat erythrocytes (life span, 61 days), with the calculated first-order elimination rate constant (k{sub el}) indicating that the diHOPrVal adduct was chemically stable. Then, we measured the second-order rate constant (k{sub val}) for the reaction of glycidol with N-terminal valine in rat and human hemoglobin in in vitro experiments with whole blood. The k{sub val} was 6.7 ± 1.1 and 5.6 ± 1.3 (pmol/g globin per μMh) in rat and human blood, respectively, indicating no species differences. In vivo doses estimated from k{sub val} and diHOPrVal levels were in agreement with the area under the (concentration–time) curve values determined in our earlier toxicokinetic study in rats. Our results indicate that diHOPrVal is a useful biomarker for quantification of glycidol exposure and for risk assessment. - Highlight: • Glycidol-hemoglobin adduct (diHOPrVal) was characterized for exposure evaluation. • We studied the kinetics of diHOPrVal formation and elimination in vitro and in vivo. • Dose dependent formation and chemical stability were confirmed in the rat study. • In vivo dose (AUC) of glycidol could be estimated from diHOPrVal levels

  19. Environmental exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation. Effects on early nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bellés, Montserrat; Gonzalo, Sergio; Serra, Noemí; Esplugas, Roser; Arenas, Meritxell; Domingo, José Luis; Linares, Victoria

    2017-03-31

    Nuclear accidents of tremendous magnitude, such as those of Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011), mean that individuals living in the contaminated areas are potentially exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the dose-response relationship for effects of low doses of radiation is not still established. The present study was aimed at investigating in mice the early effects of low-dose internal radiation exposure on the kidney. Adult male (C57BL/6J) mice were divided into three groups. Two groups received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of cesium ((137)Cs) with activities of 4000 and 8000Bq/kg bw. A third group (control group) received a single s.c. injection of 0.9% saline. To evaluate acute and subacute effects, mice (one-half of each group) were euthanized at 72h and 10 days post-exposure to (137)Cs, respectively. Urine samples were collected for biochemical analysis, including the measurement of F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) levels. Moreover, the concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a sensitive marker of oxidative DNA damage, were measured in renal tissue. Urinary excretion of total protein significantly increased at 72h in mice exposed to Cs4000. Uric acid and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) decreased significantly at both times post-exposure in animals exposed to Cs8000. After 72h and 10d of exposure to Cs4000, a significant increase in the γ-glutamil transferase (GGT) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities was observed. In turn, F2-IsoP levels increased -mainly in the Cs4000 group- at 72h post-exposure. Following irradiation ((137)Cs), the highest level of KIM-1 was corresponded to the Cs4000 group at 72h. Likewise, the main DNA damage was detected in mice exposed to Cs4000, mainly at 10d after irradiation. The alterations observed in several biomarkers suggest an immediate renal damage following exposure to low doses of IR (given as (137)Cs). Further investigations are required to clarify

  20. Calibration of exposure dose for nanoscale plasmonic lithography with microsized far-field spot patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dandan; Park, Changhoon; Jung, Howon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the reliability of a plasmonic lithography system for nanoscale device fabrication, a rapid calibration process is essentially required. The calibration needs a time-consuming process using an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure a number of nano-sized spot pattern widths recorded for the variation of the exposure dose. On the basis of the underlying mechanisms of a propagating field through a bowtie aperture, we conducted a theoretical study to derive a fitting equation to predict the widths of spot patterns in a near-field region compared with those in the far-field region. We obtained a calibration curve of the exposure dose to fit the width of spot pattern in the far-field region that is measureable using an optical microscope (OM). The validity of the rapid calibration process using an OM was verified by comparison between the calibration curves determined using AFM and OM, and the uncertainty between them was found to be 3.4%. The drift of the calibration curve was further explored to calculate the system stability of the plasmonic lithography technique, which was estimated to be  >93%. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the calibration curve is effective in the prediction of the exposure dose for nanoscale line patterning.

  1. Interpretation of the margin of exposure for genotoxic carcinogens - elicitation of expert knowledge about the form of the dose response curve at human relevant exposures.

    PubMed

    Boobis, Alan; Flari, Villie; Gosling, John Paul; Hart, Andy; Craig, Peter; Rushton, Lesley; Idahosa-Taylor, Ehi

    2013-07-01

    The general approach to risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens has been to advise reduction of exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable/practicable" (ALARA/P). However, whilst this remains the preferred risk management option, it does not provide guidance on the urgency or extent of risk management actions necessary. To address this, the "Margin of Exposure" (MOE) approach has been proposed. The MOE is the ratio between the point of departure for carcinogenesis and estimated human exposure. However, interpretation of the MOE requires implicit or explicit consideration of the shape of the dose-response curve at human relevant exposures. In a structured elicitation exercise, we captured expert opinion on available scientific evidence for low dose-response relationships for genotoxic carcinogens. This allowed assessment of: available evidence for the nature of dose-response relationships at human relevant exposures; the generality of judgments about such dose-response relationships; uncertainties affecting judgments on the nature of such dose-response relationships; and whether this last should differ for different classes of genotoxic carcinogens. Elicitation results reflected the variability in experts' views on the form of the dose-response curve for low dose exposure and major sources of uncertainty affecting the assumption of a linear relationship.

  2. Effects of Dose Frequency of Early Communication Intervention in Young Children With and Without Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Paul J.; Woynaroski, Tiffany G.; Fey, Marc E.; Warren, Steven F.

    2014-01-01

    This study involves a re-analysis of spoken vocabulary outcomes of children with intellectual disabilities who were randomly assigned to receive Milieu Communication Teaching (MCT) at low (one 1-hour session per week) or high (five 1-hour sessions per week) dose frequency over nine months (Fey, Yoder, Warren, & Bredin-Oja, in press). Non-Down syndrome (NDS) and Down syndrome (DS) subgroups were matched on intelligence, mental age, and chronological age. A growth model including intercept, slope, and quadratic revealed that children in the NDS group had significantly more growth in spoken vocabulary than children in the DS group independent of dose frequency manipulations. Subsequent etiological subgroup analyses demonstrated that in the DS subgroup, children receiving MCT at the higher dose frequency had more spoken vocabulary growth than children receiving MCT at the lower dose frequency. Subgroup analyses also supported our previous findings that high dose frequency of MCT yielded greater vocabulary production outcomes than low dose frequency for children who played functionally with a range of objects, regardless of etiology. PMID:24450319

  3. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  4. Gene expression-based dosimetry by dose and time in mice following acute radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D; Divine, George W; Grever, William E; Thomas, Robert A; Joiner, Michael C; Smolinski, Joseph M; Auner, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to (60)Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4-7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R(2)), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations.

  5. Gene Expression-Based Dosimetry by Dose and Time in Mice Following Acute Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, James D.; Divine, George W.; Grever, William E.; Thomas, Robert A.; Joiner, Michael C.; Smolinski, Joseph M.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to 60Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4–7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R2), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations. PMID:24358280

  6. Low‐Dose Bisphenol A Exposure: A Seemingly Instigating Carcinogenic Effect on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the world and the second most common fatal cancer in women. Epidemiological studies and clinical data have indicated that hormones, including estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin, play important roles in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most commonly used and thoroughly studied endocrine disruptors. It can be released from consumer products and deposited in the environment, thus creating potential for human exposure through oral, inhaled, and dermal routes. Some recent reviews have summarized the known mechanisms of endocrine disruptions by BPA in human diseases, including obesity, reproductive disorders, and birth defects. However, large knowledge gaps still exist on the roles BPA may play in cancer initiation and development. Evidence from animal and in vitro studies has suggested an association between increased incidence of breast cancer and BPA exposure at doses below the safe reference doses that are the most environmentally relevant. Most current studies have paid little attention to the cancer‐promoting properties of BPA at low doses. In this review, recent findings on the carcinogenic effects of low‐dose BPA on breast cancer and discussed possible biologic mechanisms are summarized. PMID:28251049

  7. Sublethal doses of imidacloprid disrupt sexual communication and host finding in a parasitoid wasp

    PubMed Central

    Tappert, Lars; Pokorny, Tamara; Hofferberth, John; Ruther, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides, but their use is subject of debate because of their detrimental effects on pollinators. Little is known about the effect of neonicotinoids on other beneficial insects such as parasitoid wasps, which serve as natural enemies and are crucial for ecosystem functioning. Here we show that sublethal doses of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid impair sexual communication and host finding in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Depending on the dose, treated females were less responsive to the male sex pheromone or unable to use it as a cue at all. Courtship behaviour of treated couples was also impeded resulting in a reduction of mating rates by up to 80%. Moreover, treated females were no longer able to locate hosts by using olfactory cues. Olfaction is crucial for the reproductive success of parasitoid wasps. Hence, sublethal doses of neonicotinoids might compromise the function of parasitoid wasps as natural enemies with potentially dire consequences for ecosystem services. PMID:28198464

  8. Sublethal doses of imidacloprid disrupt sexual communication and host finding in a parasitoid wasp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappert, Lars; Pokorny, Tamara; Hofferberth, John; Ruther, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides, but their use is subject of debate because of their detrimental effects on pollinators. Little is known about the effect of neonicotinoids on other beneficial insects such as parasitoid wasps, which serve as natural enemies and are crucial for ecosystem functioning. Here we show that sublethal doses of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid impair sexual communication and host finding in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Depending on the dose, treated females were less responsive to the male sex pheromone or unable to use it as a cue at all. Courtship behaviour of treated couples was also impeded resulting in a reduction of mating rates by up to 80%. Moreover, treated females were no longer able to locate hosts by using olfactory cues. Olfaction is crucial for the reproductive success of parasitoid wasps. Hence, sublethal doses of neonicotinoids might compromise the function of parasitoid wasps as natural enemies with potentially dire consequences for ecosystem services.

  9. Sublethal doses of imidacloprid disrupt sexual communication and host finding in a parasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Tappert, Lars; Pokorny, Tamara; Hofferberth, John; Ruther, Joachim

    2017-02-15

    Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides, but their use is subject of debate because of their detrimental effects on pollinators. Little is known about the effect of neonicotinoids on other beneficial insects such as parasitoid wasps, which serve as natural enemies and are crucial for ecosystem functioning. Here we show that sublethal doses of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid impair sexual communication and host finding in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. Depending on the dose, treated females were less responsive to the male sex pheromone or unable to use it as a cue at all. Courtship behaviour of treated couples was also impeded resulting in a reduction of mating rates by up to 80%. Moreover, treated females were no longer able to locate hosts by using olfactory cues. Olfaction is crucial for the reproductive success of parasitoid wasps. Hence, sublethal doses of neonicotinoids might compromise the function of parasitoid wasps as natural enemies with potentially dire consequences for ecosystem services.

  10. Chronic exposure of low dose salinomycin inhibits MSC migration capability in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scherzad, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Froelich, Katrin; Rak, Kristen; Hagen, Rudolf; Taeger, Johannes; Bregenzer, Maximillian; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Salinomycin is a polyether antiprotozoal antibiotic that is used as a food additive, particularly in poultry farming. By consuming animal products, there may be a chronic human exposure to salinomycin. Salinomycin inhibits the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. As human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may differentiate into different mesenchymal cells, it thus appeared worthwhile to investigate whether chronic salinomycin exposure impairs the functional properties of MSC and induces genotoxic effects. Bone marrow MSC were treated with low-dose salinomycin (100 nM) (MSC-Sal) for 4 weeks, while the medium containing salinomycin was changed every other day. Functional changes were evaluated and compared to MSC without salinomycin treatment (MSC-control). MSC-Sal and MSC-control were positive for cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90), CD73 and CD44, and negative for CD34. There were no differences observed in cell morphology or cytoskeletal structures following salinomycin exposure. The differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was not counteracted by salinomycin, and proliferation capability was not inhibited following salinomycin exposure. The migration of MSC-Sal was attenuated significantly as compared to the MSC-control. There were no genotoxic effects after 4 weeks of salinomycin exposure. The present study shows an altered migration capacity as a sign of functional impairment of MSC induced by chronic salinomycin exposure. Further in vitro toxicological investigations, particularly with primary human cells, are required to understand the impact of chronic salinomycin consumption on human cell systems.

  11. Chronic exposure of low dose salinomycin inhibits MSC migration capability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    SCHERZAD, AGMAL; HACKENBERG, STEPHAN; FROELICH, KATRIN; RAK, KRISTEN; HAGEN, RUDOLF; TAEGER, JOHANNES; BREGENZER, MAXIMILLIAN; KLEINSASSER, NORBERT

    2016-01-01

    Salinomycin is a polyether antiprotozoal antibiotic that is used as a food additive, particularly in poultry farming. By consuming animal products, there may be a chronic human exposure to salinomycin. Salinomycin inhibits the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. As human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may differentiate into different mesenchymal cells, it thus appeared worthwhile to investigate whether chronic salinomycin exposure impairs the functional properties of MSC and induces genotoxic effects. Bone marrow MSC were treated with low-dose salinomycin (100 nM) (MSC-Sal) for 4 weeks, while the medium containing salinomycin was changed every other day. Functional changes were evaluated and compared to MSC without salinomycin treatment (MSC-control). MSC-Sal and MSC-control were positive for cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90), CD73 and CD44, and negative for CD34. There were no differences observed in cell morphology or cytoskeletal structures following salinomycin exposure. The differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was not counteracted by salinomycin, and proliferation capability was not inhibited following salinomycin exposure. The migration of MSC-Sal was attenuated significantly as compared to the MSC-control. There were no genotoxic effects after 4 weeks of salinomycin exposure. The present study shows an altered migration capacity as a sign of functional impairment of MSC induced by chronic salinomycin exposure. Further in vitro toxicological investigations, particularly with primary human cells, are required to understand the impact of chronic salinomycin consumption on human cell systems. PMID:26998269

  12. Biomonitoring of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Exposure and Dose in Farm Families

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Bruce H.; Mandel, Jack S.; Baker, Beth A.; Burns, Carol J.; Bartels, Michael J.; Acquavella, John F.; Gustin, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Objective We estimated 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) exposure and systemic dose in farm family members following an application of 2,4-D on their farm. Methods Farm families were recruited from licensed applicators in Minnesota and South Carolina. Eligible family members collected all urine during five 24-hr intervals, 1 day before through 3 days after an application of 2,4-D. Exposure profiles were characterized with 24-hr urine 2,4-D concentrations, which then were related to potential predictors of exposure. Systemic dose was estimated using the urine collections from the application day through the third day after application. Results Median urine 2,4-D concentrations at baseline and day after application were 2.1 and 73.1 μ g/L for applicators, below the limit of detection, and 1.2 μ g/L for spouses, and 1.5 and 2.9 μ g/L for children. The younger children (4–11 years of age) had higher median post-application concentrations than the older children (≥ 12 years of age) (6.5 vs. 1.9 μ g/L). The geometric mean systemic doses (micrograms per kilogram body weight) were 2.46 (applicators), 0.8 (spouses), 0.22 (all children), 0.32 (children 4–11 years of age), and 0.12 (children ≥ 12 years of age). Exposure to the spouses and children was primarily determined by direct contact with the application process and the number of acres treated. Multivariate models identified glove use, repairing equipment, and number of acres treated as predictors of exposure in the applicators. Conclusions We observed considerable heterogeneity of 2,4-D exposure among farm family members, primarily attributable to level of contact with the application process. Awareness of this variability and the actual magnitude of exposures are important for developing exposure and risk characterizations in 2,4-D–exposed agricultural populations. PMID:17431485

  13. Individual radiation exposure dose due to support activities at safe shelters in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Osanai, Minoru; Yoshino, Hironori; Hosokawa, Yoichiro; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Yamada, Masatoshi; Asari, Yasushi; Satoh, Kei; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    Immediately after the accidents in the nuclear power stations in Fukushima on March 11, the Japanese Government ordered the evacuation of the residents within a 20-km radius from the station on March 12, and asked various institutions to monitor the contamination levels of the residents. Hirosaki University, which is located 355 km north of Fukushima City, decided to send support staff to Fukushima. This report summarizes the results of the exposure of 13 individual teams from March 15 to June 20. The support teams surveyed more than 5,000 people during this period. Almost all subjects had external contamination levels of less than 13 kcpm on Geiger-Müller (GM) survey meter, which is categorized as "no contamination level." The 1(st) team showed the highest external exposure dose, but the 4(th) team onward showed no significant change. Subsequently, the internal radiation exposure was measured using a whole body counter that indicated undetectable levels in all staff members. Although the measured external radiation exposure dose cannot have serious biological effects on the health of an individual, a follow-up study of the residents in Fukushima and other regions where the radioactive material has spread will be required for a long time.

  14. [Dose-response curve in the study of the effects of exposure to crystalline silica].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, L; Cassano, F

    2003-01-01

    The cumulative exposure to crystalline silica (SiO2) implies a linear relation between duration of exposure and SiO2 concentration, not always suitable to working situations of the last decades. A more correct definition of dose-response curve has currently to consider also different characteristics of SiO2, specifically: possible short-term increases in environmental SiO2 concentration, different mineralogical and surface properties of natural silica polymorphs, age of SiO2 particles, presence of contaminants on the surface of silica particles or even in the respirable fraction of total dust, respirable dust concentration in which SiO2 is diluted and other conditions, also affecting the host, able to slow alveolar clearance and lengthen permanence time of particles in the lung. Many models of definition of cumulative exposure so conceived have been proposed. However, to define the occupational risk threshold to contract silicosis and other silica-related diseases a number of models of cumulative exposure, i.e. biologically effective dose of SiO2, are likely to be delineated that take into account only factors specifically present in different occupational situations.

  15. Individual Radiation Exposure Dose Due to Support Activities at Safe Shelters in Fukushima Prefecture

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Osanai, Minoru; Yoshino, Hironori; Hosokawa, Yoichiro; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Yamada, Masatoshi; Asari, Yasushi; Satoh, Kei; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    Immediately after the accidents in the nuclear power stations in Fukushima on March 11, the Japanese Government ordered the evacuation of the residents within a 20-km radius from the station on March 12, and asked various institutions to monitor the contamination levels of the residents. Hirosaki University, which is located 355 km north of Fukushima City, decided to send support staff to Fukushima. This report summarizes the results of the exposure of 13 individual teams from March 15 to June 20. The support teams surveyed more than 5,000 people during this period. Almost all subjects had external contamination levels of less than 13 kcpm on Geiger-Müller (GM) survey meter, which is categorized as “no contamination level.” The 1st team showed the highest external exposure dose, but the 4th team onward showed no significant change. Subsequently, the internal radiation exposure was measured using a whole body counter that indicated undetectable levels in all staff members. Although the measured external radiation exposure dose cannot have serious biological effects on the health of an individual, a follow-up study of the residents in Fukushima and other regions where the radioactive material has spread will be required for a long time. PMID:22114685

  16. Optimization of exposure parameters in digital tomosynthesis considering effective dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seungyeon; Choi, Sunghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Lee, Haenghwa; Lee, Donghoon; Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Jang, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis system (DTS), which scans an object in a limited angle, has been considered as an innovative imaging modality which can present lower patient dose than computed tomography and solve the problem of poor depth resolution in conventional digital radiography. Although it has many powerful advantages, only breast tomosynthesis system has been adopted in many hospitals. In order to reduce the patient dose while maintaining image quality, the acquisition conditions need to be studied. In this study, we analyzed effective dose and image qualities of chest phantom using commercialized universal chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) R/F system to study the optimized exposure parameters. We set 10 different acquisition conditions including the default acquisition condition by user manual of Shimadzu (100 kVp with 0.5 mAs). The effective dose was calculated from PCXMC software version 1.5.1 by utilizing the total X-ray exposure measured by ion chamber. The image quality was evaluated by signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) in the regions of interest (ROIs) pulmonary arteries at different axial in-plane. We analyzed a figure of merit (FOM) which considers both the effective dose and the SDNR in order to determine the optimal acquisition condition. The results indicated that the most suitable acquisition parameters among 10 conditions were condition 7 and 8 (120 kVp with 0.04 mAs and 0.1 mAs, respectively), which indicated lower effective dose while maintaining reasonable SDNRs and FOMs for three specified regions. Further studies are needed to be conducted for detailed outcomes in CDT acquisition conditions.

  17. COMMUNICATING THE RISKS OF PESTICIDE EXPOSURE TO AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the USEPA pesticide worker safety program are to protect human health and the environment by ensuring the competency of pesticide applicators to minimize pesticide exposure to occupational pesticide users and agricultural field workers, to assure use of pesticides, a...

  18. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  19. Ranking the contributions of commercial fish and shellfish varieties to mercury exposure in the United States: implications for risk communication.

    PubMed

    Groth, Edward

    2010-04-01

    Fish and shellfish have important nutritional benefits, and US per capita seafood consumption has increased substantially since 2002. Recent research has reinforced concerns about adverse effects of methylmercury exposure, suggesting that methylmercury doses associated with typical US rates of fish consumption may pose measurable risks, with no threshold. These converging trends create a need to improve risk communication about fish consumption and mercury. The analysis performed here identifies the relative importance of different fish and shellfish as sources of mercury in the US seafood supply and proposes improved consumer advice, so that the public can benefit from fish consumption while minimizing mercury exposure. I have quantified contributions to total mercury in the US seafood supply by 51 different varieties of fish and shellfish, then ranked and sorted the 51 varieties in terms of relative impact. Except for swordfish, most fish with the highest mercury levels are relatively minor contributors to total inputs. Tuna (canned light, canned albacore and fresh/frozen varieties) accounts for 37.4 percent of total mercury inputs, while two-thirds of the seafood supply and nine of the 11 most heavily consumed fish and shellfish are low or very low in mercury. Substantial improvement in risk communication about mercury in fish and seafood is needed; in particular, several population subsets need better guidance to base their seafood choices more explicitly on mercury content. I have sorted the 51 seafood varieties into six categories based on mercury levels, as a framework for improving risk communication in this regard.

  20. Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling as a Tool to Make the First Estimate of Safe Human Exposure Levels to Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Scully, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo Astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure ot lunar dust. Habitats for exploration, whether mobile of fixed must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. We have used a new technique we call Comparative Benchmark Dose Modeling to estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission.

  1. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  2. Doses under automatic exposure control (AEC) for direct digital radiographic (DDR) X-ray systems.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Louise; Faulkner, Ronan; Clancy, Conor; Gallagher, Aoife; Devine, Mark; Gorman, Dermot; O'Reilly, Geraldine; Dowling, Anita

    2011-09-01

    Current guidelines quote tolerances for automatic exposure control (AEC) device performance for X-ray systems as 'Baseline ± X %'. However, in the situation where a baseline figure has not yet been achieved, as in the case of commissioning assessments, this tolerance is not relevant. The purpose of this work is to provide mean doses for direct digital radiography (DDR) X-ray system, operating in AEC, against which comparisons can be made. Dose measurements have been recorded under AEC operation on 29 DDR detectors from three different manufacturers. Two different testing protocols were examined: (1) water equivalent phantoms in front of the DDR detector and (2) aluminium block at the tube head. The average patient exit dose, using the aluminium block was 4.6 μGy with the antiscatter grid in place and 4.0 μGy with the grid removed. Using the water phantoms, the average dose was measured at 17.1 μGy with the antiscatter grid in place and 5.4 μGy with grid removed. Based on these results, it is clear that different testing configurations significantly impact on the measured dose.

  3. Adverse reproductive effects of maternal low-dose melamine exposure during pregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ching Yan; Tang, Ling Ying; Li, Lu; Shum, Alisa Sau Wun; Fung, Kwok Pui; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2017-01-01

    Melamine is a heterocyclic, aromatic amine and nitrogen-enriched environmental toxicant, found in not only adulterated foodstuffs but also industrial household tableware and paints. Previous studies demonstrated adverse effects of high-dose melamine on human infants and pregnant animals, but effects of low-dose melamine on pregnancy have not been reported. In this study, reproductive effects of low-dose melamine were investigated in pregnant rats. Melamine in the range of 12.5-50 mg/kg was administered to pregnant rats at different gestational stages. Maternal weight gain was not significantly affected, and other maternal morbidity was not observed. Low-dose melamine exposure during pregnancy increased fetal size but reduced somite number in gastrulation (GD8.5-GD10.5) and organogenesis (GD10.5-GD16.5) periods, and increased incidence of stillbirth in whole gestational period (GD0.5 to delivery). Embryotoxicity of melamine was further confirmed by whole embryo culture in vitro that melamine retarded embryonic growth, impaired development of brain and heart, and induced open neural tube and atrioventricular defects with increased apoptosis. In conclusion, adverse reproductive effects of low-dose melamine during pregnancy were identified in the developing rat embryos and the perinatal effects of melamine were gestational and developmental stage dependent. Detailed hazard and risk assessment of melamine in reproduction system are warrant. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 131-138, 2017.

  4. Response of phytoplankton community to low-dose atrazine exposure combined with phosphorus fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Pannard, Alexandrine; Le Rouzic, Bertrand; Binet, Françoise

    2009-07-01

    The effects of atrazine on a controlled phytoplankton community derived from a natural freshwater wetland exposed to low doses of this photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide were examined. The community was exposed for 7 weeks to doses of 0.1, 1, and 10 microg L(-1) atrazine, combined with changes in nutrient concentration, and the photosynthetic activity, biomass, and community structure were noted during the experiment. Responses of the phytoplankton community were examined in terms of photosynthetic activity, biomass, and community structure. Significant effects of atrazine on the phytoplankton assemblage, in terms of primary production and community structure, were highlighted, even at doses as low as 1 and 0.1 microg L(-1), when associated with phosphorus fluctuations. The most abundant Chlorophyceae decreased in concentration with increasing atrazine dose, whereas cyanobacteria were more tolerant to atrazine, particularly with increased nutrient supply. The subinhibitory doses of atrazine used in the present study confirmed the higher sensitivity of long-term exposure of multispecies assemblages under resource competition. Our study supports the emerging hypothesis that the increasing prevalence of cyanobacterial blooms in European aquatic systems may result from a combination of unbalanced nutrient enrichment and selective pressures from multiple toxicants.

  5. Theoretical models and simulation codes to investigate bystander effects and cellular communication at low doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Mairani, A.; Nano, R.; Ottolenghi, A.

    Astronauts in space are continuously exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays During the last ten years the effects of low radiation doses have been widely re-discussed following a large number of observations on the so-called non targeted effects in particular bystander effects The latter consist of induction of cytogenetic damage in cells not directly traversed by radiation most likely as a response to molecular messengers released by directly irradiated cells Bystander effects which are observed both for lethal endpoints e g clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis and for non-lethal ones e g mutations and neoplastic transformation tend to show non-linear dose responses This might have significant consequences in terms of low-dose risk which is generally calculated on the basis of the Linear No Threshold hypothesis Although the mechanisms underlying bystander effects are still largely unknown it is now clear that two types of cellular communication i e via gap junctions and or release of molecular messengers into the extracellular environment play a fundamental role Theoretical models and simulation codes can be of help in elucidating such mechanisms In the present paper we will review different available modelling approaches including one that is being developed at the University of Pavia The focus will be on the different assumptions adopted by the various authors and on the implications of such assumptions in terms of non-targeted radiobiological damage and more generally low-dose

  6. Differential Response and Priming Dose Effect on the Proteome of Human Fibroblast and Stem Cells Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Monika; Haghdoost, Siamak; Gomolka, Maria; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Dietz, Anne; Kulka, Ulrike; Unger, Kristian; Babini, Gabriele; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Hornhardt, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that a mechanistic understanding of the cellular responses to low dose and dose rate may be valuable in reducing some of the uncertainties involved in current risk estimates for cancer- and non-cancer-related radiation effects that are inherited in the linear no-threshold hypothesis. In this study, the effects of low-dose radiation on the proteome in both human fibroblasts and stem cells were investigated. Particular emphasis was placed on examining: 1. the dose-response relationships for the differential expression of proteins in the low-dose range (40-140 mGy) of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation; and 2. the effect on differential expression of proteins of a priming dose given prior to a challenge dose (adaptive response effects). These studies were performed on cultured human fibroblasts (VH10) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The results from the VH10 cell experiments demonstrated that low-doses of low-LET radiation induced unique patterns of differentially expressed proteins for each dose investigated. In addition, a low priming radiation dose significantly changed the protein expression induced by the subsequent challenge exposure. In the ADSC the number of differentially expressed proteins was markedly less compared to VH10 cells, indicating that ADSC differ in their intrinsic response to low doses of radiation. The proteomic results are further discussed in terms of possible pathways influenced by low-dose irradiation.

  7. Survey on low-dose medical radiation exposure in occupational workers: the effect on hematological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J. K.; Cho, S. M.; Cho, J. H.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Lee, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the changes in the hematological index caused by low-dose medical radiation exposure in workers in a medical radiation-exposed environment. The cumulative dose was obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 9-year period, and the changes in hematological index count (red blood cells (RBCs), hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils) were examined in both the occupational workers and controls. In total, 370 occupational workers and 335 controls were compared. The analysis led to the following observations: (1) The average cumulative dose in males and females was 9.65±15.2 and 4.82±5.55 mSv, respectively. (2) In both males and females, there was a very low correlation between the occupation period and the cumulative dose (r<±0.25). (3) When the occupation period was longer, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the male workers and the RBC counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the workers and the eosinophil counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.01). (4) When the cumulative dose was large, the lymphocyte counts decreased in male workers and the platelet count was lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the lymphocyte count and RBC count were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). Abnormal distributions of some blood indices were observed in the occupational radiation workers compared with the controls. Attempts were made to limit radiation exposure to personnel, but the employees did not always follow the preset rules. Actually, the adverse effects of low-level radiation were attributed to probability. Overall, workers should obey the radiation protection regulations provided by the government and a national system of radiation protection is needed.

  8. Subchronic exposure of honeybees to sublethal doses of pesticides: effects on behavior.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Yassine; El Hassani, Adessalam K; Gary, Vincent; Armengaud, Catherine; Lambin, Michel; Gauthier, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory bioassays were conducted to evaluate the effects on honeybee behavior of sublethal doses of insecticides chronically administered orally or by contact. Emergent honeybees received a daily dose of insecticide ranging from one-fifth to one-five-hundredth of the median lethal dose (LD50) during 11 d. After exposure to fipronil (0.1 and 0.01 ng/bee), acetamiprid (1 and 0.1 microg/bee), or thiamethoxam (1 and 0.1 ng/bee), behavioral functions of honeybees were tested on day 12. Fipronil, used at the dose of 0.1 ng/bee, induced mortality of all honeybees after one week of treatment. As a result of contact treatment at 0.01 ng/bee, honeybees spent significantly more time immobile in an open-field apparatus and ingested significantly more water. In the olfactory conditioning paradigm, fipronil-treated honeybees failed to discriminate between a known and an unknown odorant. Thiamethoxam by contact induced either a significant decrease of olfactory memory 24 h after learning at 0.1 ng/bee or a significant impairment of learning performance with no effect on memory at 1 ng/bee. Responsiveness to antennal sucrose stimulation was significantly decreased for high sucrose concentrations in honeybees treated orally with thiamethoxam (1 ng/bee). The only significant effect of acetamiprid (administered orally, 0.1 microg/bee) was an increase in responsiveness to water. The neonicotinoids acetamiprid and thiamethoxam tested at the highest dose (one-tenth and one-fifth of their oral LD50, respectively) and fipronil at one-five-hundredth of LD50 have limited effects on the motor, sensory, and cognitive functions of the honeybee. Our data on the intrinsic toxicity of the compounds after chronic exposure have to be taken into account for evaluation of risk to honeybees in field conditions.

  9. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Mcnaughton, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air

  10. Low-dose mercury exposure in early life: relevance of thimerosal to fetuses, newborns and infants.

    PubMed

    Dórea, José G

    2013-01-01

    This review explores the different aspects of constitutional factors in early life that modulate toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of low-dose mercury resulting from acute ethylmercury (etHg) exposure in Thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCV). Major databases were searched for human and experimental studies that addressed issues related to early life exposure to TCV. It can be concluded that: a) mercury load in fetuses, neonates, and infants resulting from TCVs remains in blood of neonates and infants at sufficient concentration and for enough time to penetrate the brain and to exert a neurologic impact and a probable influence on neurodevelopment of susceptible infants; b) etHg metabolism related to neurodevelopmental delays has been demonstrated experimentally and observed in population studies; c) unlike chronic Hg exposure during pregnancy, neurodevelopmental effects caused by acute (repeated/cumulative) early life exposure to TCV-etHg remain unrecognized; and d) the uncertainty surrounding low-dose toxicity of etHg is challenging but recent evidence indicates that avoiding cumulative insults by alkyl-mercury forms (which include Thimerosal) is warranted. It is important to a) maintain trust in vaccines while reinforcing current public health policies to abate mercury exposure in infancy; b) generally support WHO policies that recommend vaccination to prevent and control existing and impending infectious diseases; and c) not confuse the 'need' to use a specific 'product' (TCV) by accepting as 'innocuous' (or without consequences) the presence of a proven 'toxic alkyl-mercury' (etHg) at levels that have not been proven to be toxicologically safe.

  11. USE OF EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) TO CONSTRUCT A PBPK /MODEL FOR CARBOFURAN WITH THE REPORTED EXPERIMENTAL DATA IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the relationships among carbofuran exposure, dose, and effects, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed for the rat using the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework.

  12. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ( PBPK/PD ) MODEL FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE AND RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) is a PBPK/PD modeling system that was developed by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). The ERDEM framework provides the flexibility either to use existing models and to build new PBPK and PBPK/PD models to address...

  13. Estimate of safe human exposure levels for lunar dust based on comparative benchmark dose modeling.

    PubMed

    James, John T; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Santana, Patricia A; Scully, Robert R

    2013-04-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure to lunar dust. The United States and other space faring nations intend to return to the moon for extensive exploration within a few decades. In the meantime, habitats for that exploration, whether mobile or fixed, must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. Herein we estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission. We instilled three respirable-sized (∼2 μ mass median diameter) lunar dusts (two ground and one unground) and two standard dusts of widely different toxicities (quartz and TiO₂) into the respiratory system of rats. Rats in groups of six were given 0, 1, 2.5 or 7.5 mg of the test dust in a saline-Survanta® vehicle, and biochemical and cellular biomarkers of toxicity in lung lavage fluid were assayed 1 week and one month after instillation. By comparing the dose--response curves of sensitive biomarkers, we estimated safe exposure levels for astronauts and concluded that unground lunar dust and dust ground by two different methods were not toxicologically distinguishable. The safe exposure estimates were 1.3 ± 0.4 mg/m³ (jet-milled dust), 1.0 ± 0.5 mg/m³ (ball-milled dust) and 0.9 ± 0.3 mg/m³ (unground, natural dust). We estimate that 0.5-1 mg/m³ of lunar dust is safe for periodic human exposures during long stays in habitats on the lunar surface.

  14. Specific metabolic fingerprint of a dietary exposure to a very low dose of endosulfan.

    PubMed

    Canlet, Cécile; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier, Roselyne; Molina, Jérôme; Métais, Benjamin; Blas-Y Estrada, Florence; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Like other persistent organochlorine pesticides, endosulfan residues have been detected in foods including fruit, vegetables, and fish. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of a dietary exposure to low doses of endosulfan from foetal development until adult age on metabolic homeostasis in mice and to identify biomarkers of exposure using an (1)H-NMR-based metabonomic approach in various tissues and biofluids. We report in both genders an increase in plasma glucose as well as changes in levels of factors involved in the regulation of liver oxidative stress, confirming the prooxidant activities of this compound. Some metabolic changes were distinct in males and females. For example in plasma, a decrease in lipid LDL and choline content was only observed in female. Lactate levels in males were significantly increased. In conclusion, our results show that metabolic changes in liver could be linked to the onset of pathologies like diabetes and insulin resistance. Moreover from our results it appears that the NMR-based metabonomic approach could be useful for the characterization in plasma of a dietary exposure to low dose of pesticide in human.

  15. Occupational exposure limits in the context of solvent mixtures, consumption of ethanol, and target tissue dose.

    PubMed

    Dennison, James E; Bigelow, Philip L; Andersen, Melvin E

    2004-09-01

    Individuals are exposed to mixtures, and never to single chemicals. Depending on the composition of the elements of mixtures, significant toxicological interactions between the components may occur. These interactions are complex and often difficult to predict, ranging from synergistic to additive and subadditive interactions. The nature of the interactions needs to be evaluated as the target tissue dose of the active form of each chemical. PBPK modeling is an effective tool for determining the target tissue dose and evaluating these interactions when data are available for model development. Some of the interactions are pharmacokinetic in nature, affecting the disposition of other chemicals in the body. Other interactions can be pharmacodynamic in nature, altering the effects that other chemicals have on the organism. For many organic solvents, these interactions occur principally at the level of the metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1). Many solvents are known to induce or inhibit CYP2E1, or both. Mixtures may be comprised of concomitant exposures to chemicals or from components encountered separately on-the-job, off-the-job, through the diet, and otherwise. Examples of mixtures where the exposure to separate components occurs off the job will be discussed, with special emphasis on ethanol consumption as a modifier of solvent pharmacokinetics. The present practice of the linear extrapolation of the toxicity of individual mixture components in the interpretation of occupational exposure limits will also be critiqued.

  16. LINK BETWEEN LOW-DOSE ENVIRONMENTALLY RELEVANT CADMIUM EXPOSURES AND ASTHENOZOOSPERMIA IN A RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Benoff, Susan; Auborn, Karen; Marmar, Joel L.; Hurley, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To define the mechanism(s) underlying an association between asthenozoospermia and elevated blood, seminal plasma and testicular cadmium levels in infertile human males using a rat model of environmentally relevant cadmium exposures. Setting University medical center andrology research laboratory. Animals Male Wistar rats (n = 60), documented to be sensitive to the testicular effects of cadmium. Interventions Rats were given ad libitum access to water supplemented with 14% sucrose and 0, 5, 50 or 100 mg/L cadmium for 1, 4 or 8 weeks being at puberty. Main outcome measure(s) Testicular cadmium levels were determined by atomic absorption, cauda epididymal sperm motility by visual inspection, and testicular gene expression by DNA microarray hybridization. Results Chronic, low dose cadmium exposures produced a time- and dose-dependent reduction in sperm motility. Transcription of genes regulated by calcium and expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel mRNA splicing variants were altered by cadmium exposure. Expression of calcium binding proteins involved in modulation of sperm motility was unaffected. Conclusions A causal relationship between elevated testicular cadmium and asthenozoospermia was identified. Aberrrant sperm motility was correlated with altered expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel isoforms found on the sperm tail, which regulate calcium and cadmium influx. PMID:18308070

  17. Mitochondrial proteomic alterations caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure in mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuemei; Wei, Gang; Huang, Zhijun; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yang, Xifei

    2016-11-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in neurotoxicity caused by exposure of various chemicals such as copper. However, the effects of long-term low-dose copper exposure on mitochondrial proteome remain unclear. In this study, we found the treatment of copper (0.13ppm copper sulfate in drinking water) for 12 months caused abnormal expression of a total of 13 mitochondrial proteins (7 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) as revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry in mouse cortex. Protein functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins mainly included apoptosis-associated proteins, axon guidance-associated proteins, axonogenesis-associated proteins and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. Among these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins, GRP75 (75kDa glucose-regulated protein) and GRP78 (78kDa glucose-regulated protein) were found to be significantly down-regulated as confirmed by Western-blot analysis. The down-regulation of GRP75 was shown to promote apoptosis. The down-regulation of GRP78/BiP could up-regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediators and thus cause apoptosis. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins such as GRP75 and GRP78 could be involved in neurotoxicity caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure and serve as potential molecular targets for the treatment of copper neurotoxicity.

  18. Utilizing a novel tandem oral dosing strategy to enhance exposure of low-solubility drug candidates in a preclinical setting.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; South, Sarah A; Foster, Kimberly A; Daniels, J Scott; Wene, Steve P; Albin, Lesley A; Thompson, David C

    2010-07-01

    Time and resource constraints necessitate increasingly early decision making to accelerate or stop preclinical drug discovery programs. Early discovery drug candidates may be potent inhibitors of new targets, but all too often exhibit poor pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic properties that limit the in vivo exposure. Low solubility of a drug candidate often leads to poor oral bioavailability and poor dose linearity that creates an issue for efficacy and target safety studies, where high drug exposures are desired. When solubility issues are encountered, enabling formulations are often used to improve the exposure. However, this approach often requires a substantial and lengthy investment to develop the formulation. In our study, two drug candidates with poor aqueous solubility were dosed in rats as simple suspension formulations using a novel tandem dosing strategy, which employs dosing orally in 2.5 h increments up to three times to simulate an oral infusion by avoiding saturation of absorption associated with bolus dosing. These compounds were also dosed using the same suspension formulations and a standard dosing strategy. The resulting in vivo exposures were compared. It was found that this novel tandem dosing strategy significantly improved the in vivo exposures.

  19. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letertre, Thierry; Monebhurrun, Vikass; Toffano, Zeno

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  20. A PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN WHO CONTACT CCA-TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL FOR THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE EXPOSURE SCENARIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a probabilistic exposure and dose assessment on the arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) components of Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives (SHEDS-Wood...

  1. The monetary value of the averted dose for public exposure assessed by the willingness to pay.

    PubMed

    Katona, Tünde; Kanyár, Béla; Eged, Katalin; Kis, Zoltan; Nényei, Arpád; Bodnár, Robert

    2003-05-01

    The monetary value of the unit averted collective dose at an individual reference dose (as alpha(base)-value) and the aversion against the high individual exposure were assessed by the WTP (Willingness To Pay) method. The original questionnaire and methodology were developed by the CEPN, France, for specialists in the nuclear field. Modifications to the questionnaire were introduced in 2000 to take into account the Hungarian aspects. In 2001, the questionnaire was further modified for use with the public in Hungary. The present paper refers to the results from the most recent studies on public exposure. The questionnaire was provided to 118 persons living in four different regions of Hungary, one near the U-mining site, one near a nuclear power plant, and two others far away from nuclear affected sites. Conversion of the questionnaire to be understandable by the public involved intensive modifications both in form and content. Only 83 to 86 respondents provided usable answers to questions related to the monetary value of the averted dose and the aversion coefficient. The alpha(base)-value was determined from the statistical value of life assessed by the willingness to pay of the respondents for the risk of fatal cancer averted. The mathematical form used to assess the aversion coefficient was a power function with respect to the individual dose, as already introduced in our earlier papers. The advantage of the power function is that the aversion coefficient is independent of the individual reference dose. According to the current results, the mean value of the lognormally distributed alpha-value at the individual reference dose (alpha(base)) takes 10,000 US dollars (person Sv)(-1) with large confidence bounds. The alpha(base)-value is about 50% higher than the alpha(base)-value estimated among the radiation specialists in Hungary, but 5-10 times less than the values obtained in highly developed countries like in France. The normally distributed aversion coefficient

  2. Exposure versus internal dose: Respiratory tract deposition modeling of inhaled asbestos fibers in rats and humans (Presentation Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to asbestos is associated with respiratory diseases, including asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. Internal fiber dose depends on fiber inhalability and orientation, fiber density, length and width, and various deposition mechanisms (DM). Species-specific param...

  3. Over-exposure correction in knee cone-beam CT imaging with automatic exposure control using a partial low dose scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Muller, Kerstin; Hsieh, Scott; Maier, Andreas; Gold, Garry; Levenston, Marc; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    C-arm-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems with flat-panel detectors are suitable for diagnostic knee imaging due to their potentially flexible selection of CT trajectories and wide volumetric beam coverage. In knee CT imaging, over-exposure artifacts can occur because of limitations in the dynamic range of the flat panel detectors present on most CBCT systems. We developed a straightforward but effective method for correction and detection of over-exposure for an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC)-enabled standard knee scan incorporating a prior low dose scan. The radiation dose associated with the low dose scan was negligible (0.0042mSv, 2.8% increase) which was enabled by partially sampling the projection images considering the geometry of the knees and lowering the dose further to be able to just see the skin-air interface. We combined the line integrals from the AEC and low dose scans after detecting over-exposed regions by comparing the line profiles of the two scans detector row-wise. The combined line integrals were reconstructed into a volumetric image using filtered back projection. We evaluated our method using in vivo human subject knee data. The proposed method effectively corrected and detected over-exposure, and thus recovered the visibility of exterior tissues (e.g., the shape and density of the patella, and the patellar tendon), incorporating a prior low dose scan with a negligible increase in radiation exposure.

  4. Data integration reveals key homeostatic mechanisms following low dose radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-15

    , ROS/RNS and DNA repair pathways detected • Low dose exposure alters metabolites involved in nitric oxide biosynthesis and wound healing. • Computationally predicted regulators of primary mechanisms were experimentally validated.

  5. Exposure to seismic survey alters blue whale acoustic communication.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Lucia; Clark, Christopher W

    2010-02-23

    The ability to perceive biologically important sounds is critical to marine mammals, and acoustic disturbance through human-generated noise can interfere with their natural functions. Sounds from seismic surveys are intense and have peak frequency bands overlapping those used by baleen whales, but evidence of interference with baleen whale acoustic communication is sparse. Here we investigated whether blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) changed their vocal behaviour during a seismic survey that deployed a low-medium power technology (sparker). We found that blue whales called consistently more on seismic exploration days than on non-exploration days as well as during periods within a seismic survey day when the sparker was operating. This increase was observed for the discrete, audible calls that are emitted during social encounters and feeding. This response presumably represents a compensatory behaviour to the elevated ambient noise from seismic survey operations.

  6. Collective radiation biodosimetry for dose reconstruction of acute accidental exposures: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Pass, B

    1997-01-01

    Quantification of the biologically relevant dose is required to establish cause and effect between radiation detriment or burden and important biological outcomes. Most epidemiologic studies of unanticipated radiation exposure fail to establish cause and effect because researchers have not been able to construct a valid quantification of dose for the exposed population. However, no one biodosimetric technique (biophysical or biological) meets all the requirements of an ideal dosimeter. This paper reviews how the collection of biodosimetric data for victims of radiation accidents can be used to create a dosimetric "gold standard." Particular emphasis is placed on the use of electron spin resonance, a standard for radiation accident dosimetry. As an example of this technique, a review will be presented of a previously reported study of an individual exposed to a 60Co sterilization source. PMID:9467051

  7. Severe Tardive Dystonia on Low Dose Short Duration Exposure to Atypical Antipsychotics: Factors Explored

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Nilanjan C.; Sheth, Shabina A.; Mehta, Ritambhara Y.; Dave, Kamlesh R.

    2017-01-01

    Tardive dystonia (TD) is a serious side effect of antipsychotic medications, more with typical antipsychotics, that is potentially irreversible in affected patients. Studies show that newer atypical antipsychotics have a lower risk of TD. As a result, many clinicians may have developed a false sense of security when prescribing these medications. We report a case of 20-year-old male with hyperthymic temperament and borderline intellectual functioning, who developed severe TD after low dose short duration exposure to atypical antipsychotic risperidone and then olanzapine. The goal of this paper is to alert the reader to be judicious and cautious before using casual low dose second generation antipsychotics in patient with no core psychotic features, hyperthymic temperament, or borderline intellectual functioning suggestive of organic brain damage, who are more prone to develop adverse effects such as TD and monitor the onset of TD in patients taking atypical antipsychotics. PMID:28250568

  8. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L/sub 50/ in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD/sub 50/s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively.

  9. In Vivo Human Time-Exposure Study of Orally Dosed Commercial Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Mark A.; Radwanski, Przemyslaw; Hadlock, Greg C.; Stoddard, Greg; Shaaban, Akram; Falconer, Jonathan; Grainger, David W.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human biodistribution, bioprocessing and possible toxicity of nanoscale silver receives increasing health assessment. Methods We prospectively studied commercial 10- and 32-ppm nanoscale silver particle solutions in a single-blind, controlled, cross-over, intent-to-treat, design. Healthy subjects (n=60) underwent metabolic, blood counts, urinalysis, sputum induction, and chest and abdomen magnetic resonance imaging. Silver serum and urine content was determined. Results No clinically important changes in metabolic, hematologic, or urinalysis measures were identified. No morphological changes were detected in the lungs, heart or abdominal organs. No significant changes were noted in pulmonary reactive oxygen species or pro-inflammatory cytokine generation. Conclusion In vivo oral exposure to these commercial nanoscale silver particle solutions does not prompt clinically important changes in human metabolic, hematologic, urine, physical findings or imaging morphology. Further study of increasing time exposure and dosing of silver nanoparticulate silver, and observation of additional organ systems is warranted to assert human toxicity thresholds. PMID:23811290

  10. [The status of the progeny of male rats subjected to low-dose external gamma irradiation exposure].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E P; Kononenko, V V; Galian, S P; Vernidub, I V; Topchiĭ, I G

    1996-01-01

    In studies on 120 mature males of Wistar rats and 252 female rats of the same line, 20-day-old fetuses and 974 young rats of the first generation, anomalies of antenatal and postnatal development were found after exposure of spermatids and spermatozoa to gamma-radiation in doses 0.25-1.0 Gy. After exposure of male rats to radiation in dose 0.25 Gy, reliable delay of pelvic bone ossification was observed as compared to the control.

  11. Low-dose, Chronic Exposure to Silver Nanoparticles Causes Mild Mitochondrial Alterations in the Liver of Sprague-Dawley Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0032 Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rat 5a...alterations were found in heart and kidney levels, and despite the fact that the alterations found in liver mitochondria did not appear to compromise ATP

  12. Changes in the Dose-Response Relationship of One Toxicant Under Simultaneous Exposure to Another Toxicant.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, B A; Panov, V G; Varaksin, A N; Minigalieva, I A; Privalova, L I; Sutunkova, M P

    2016-01-01

    We considered, in general form for a 2(2) full factorial experiment, linear approximations of the organism's dose-response relationship for some factors operating alone and modification of this relationship by another factor operating in the background. A typological classification of such modifications is suggested. An analysis of the outcomes obtained in a number of subchronic animal experiments on rats in which this response was assessed by changes in a large number of biomedical indices revealed that all theoretically possible variants (types) of the modification under consideration are actually observed depending on a specific index and specific harmful exposure. Statistical significance estimation procedures are formulated for each of them.

  13. Radiation Exposure During Uterine Artery Embolization: Effective Measures to Minimize Dose to the Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Scheurig-Muenkler, Christian; Powerski, Maciej J.; Mueller, Johann-Christoph; Kroencke, Thomas J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeEvaluation of patient radiation exposure during uterine artery embolization (UAE) and literature review to identify techniques minimizing required dose.MethodsA total of 224 of all included 286 (78 %) women underwent UAE according to a standard UAE-protocol (bilateral UAE from unilateral approach using a Rösch inferior mesenteric and a microcatheter, no aortography, no ovarian artery catheterization or embolization) and were analyzed for radiation exposure. Treatment was performed on three different generations of angiography systems: (I) new generation flat-panel detector (N = 108/151); (II) classical image amplifier and pulsed fluoroscopy (N = 79/98); (III) classical image amplifier and continuous fluoroscopy (N = 37/37). Fluoroscopy time (FT) and dose-area product (DAP) were documented. Whenever possible, the following dose-saving measures were applied: optimized source-object, source-image, and object-image distances, pulsed fluoroscopy, angiographic runs in posterior-anterior direction with 0.5 frames per second, no magnification, tight collimation, no additional aortography.ResultsIn a standard bilateral UAE, the use of the new generation flat-panel detector in group I led to a significantly lower DAP of 3,156 cGy × cm{sup 2} (544–45,980) compared with 4,000 cGy × cm{sup 2} (1,400–13,000) in group II (P = 0.033). Both doses were significantly lower than those of group III with 8,547 cGy × cm{sup 2} (3,324–35,729; P < 0.001). Other reasons for dose escalation were longer FT due to difficult anatomy or a large leiomyoma load, additional angiographic runs, supplementary ovarian artery embolization, and obesity.ConclusionsThe use of modern angiographic units with flat panel detectors and strict application of methods of radiation reduction lead to a significantly lower radiation exposure. Target DAP for UAE should be kept below 5,000 cGy × cm{sup 2}.

  14. Gene expression profiling in the fetal cardiac tissue after folate and low dose trichloroethylene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Patricia T.; Manziello, Ann; Howard, Jamie; Palbykin, Brittany; Runyan, Raymond B.; Selmin, Ornella

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies show gene expression alterations in rat embryo hearts and cell lines that correspond to the cardio-teratogenic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) in animal models. One potential mechanism of TCE teratogenicity may be through altered regulation of calcium homeostatic genes with a corresponding inhibition of cardiac function. It has been suggested that TCE may interfere with the folic acid/methylation pathway in liver and kidney and alter gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms. According to this hypothesis, folate supplementation in the maternal diet should counteract TCE effects on gene expression in the embryonic heart. Approach To identify transcriptional targets altered in the embryonic heart after exposure to TCE, and possible protective effects of folate, we used DNA microarray technology to profile gene expression in embryonic mouse hearts with maternal TCE exposure and dietary changes in maternal folate. Results Exposure to low doses of TCE (10ppb) caused extensive alterations in transcripts encoding proteins involved in transport, ion channel, transcription, differentiation, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis. Exogenous folate did not offset the effects of TCE exposure on normal gene expression and both high and low levels of folate produced additional significant changes in gene expression. Conclusions A mechanism where TCE induces a folate deficiency does not explain altered gene expression patterns in the embryonic mouse heart. The data further suggest that use of folate supplementation, in the presence of this toxin, may be detrimental and non-protective of the developing embryo. PMID:19813261

  15. Bisphenol A exposure at an environmentally relevant dose induces meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; Li, Renyan; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Wu, Hongjuan; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Whether environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may induce reproductive disorders is still controversial but certain studies have reported that BPA may cause meiotic abnormalities in C. elegans and female mice. However, little is known about the effect of BPA on meiosis in adult males. To determine whether BPA exposure at an environmentally relevant dose could induce meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats, we exposed 9-week-old male Wistar rats to BPA by gavage at 20 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 60 consecutive days. We found that BPA significantly increased the proportion of stage VII seminiferous epithelium and decreased the proportion of stage VIII. Consequently, spermiation was inhibited and spermatogenesis was disrupted. Further investigation revealed that BPA exposure delayed meiosis initiation in the early meiotic stage and induced the accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the late meiotic stage. The latter event subsequently activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (ATM). Our results suggest that long-term exposure to BPA may lead to continuous meiotic abnormalities and ultimately put mammalian reproductive health at risk.

  16. A Dose-Response Study of Arsenic Exposure and Markers of Oxidative Damage in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Kristin N.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Ilievski, Vesna; Oka, Julie; Calancie, Larissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Levy, Diane; Siddique, Abu; Alam, Shafiul; Mey, Jacob L.; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure and markers of oxidative damage in Bangladeshi adults. Methods We recruited 378 participants drinking from wells assigned to five water arsenic exposure categories; the distribution of subjects was as follows: 1) <10 μg/L (n=76); 2) 10–100 μg/L (n=104); 3) 101–200 μg/L (n=86); 4) 201–300 μg/L (n=67); and 5) > 300 μg/L (n=45). Arsenic concentrations were measured in well water, as well as in urine and blood. Urinary 8-oxo-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and plasma protein carbonyls were measured to assess oxidative damage. Results None of our measures of arsenic exposure were significantly associated with protein carbonyl or 8-oxo-dG levels. Conclusions We found no evidence to support a significant relationship between chronic exposure to arsenic-contaminated drinking water and biomarkers of oxidative damage among Bangladeshi adults. PMID:24854259

  17. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1994-05-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  18. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either {alpha}-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  19. Development and Evaluation of a New Air Exchange Rate Algorithm for the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    between-home and between-city variability in residential pollutant infiltration. This is likely a result of differences in home ventilation, or air exchange rates (AER). The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model is a population exposure model that uses a pro...

  20. The High-Throughput Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model (SHEDS-HT) & The Chemical and Products Database (CPDat)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model – High-Throughput (SHEDS-HT) is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency research tool for predicting screening-level (low-tier) exposures to chemicals in consumer products. This course will present an overview of this m...

  1. Communicating their individual results to participants in an environmental exposure study: Insights from clinical ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, W.; Kosatsky, T. |

    1999-02-01

    A study measuring the uptake of chemical contaminants among sport fishers who consume fish caught in the St. Lawrence river is currently being conducted in Montreal, Canada. In this study, blood, hair, and urine collected from local sport fishers is being tested for heavy metals and persistent organochlorine chemicals. The objective of this study was to formulate a framework for determining what information to communicate to individual subjects of a study measuring biomarkers of exposure, consistent with the principles of ethical clinical and research practice. Methods consisted of review of the scope of environmental exposure studies, including the use of biomarker measurement in clinical medicine and environmental research and the relevant principles of clinical ethics and research practice. An exposure biomarker study is designed to elucidate constitutional, behavioral, and environmental determinants of tissue concentrations of exogenous substances. Ethical clinical and research practice, aiming to maximize autonomy and beneficence and to minimize harm, requires that study findings concerning the determinants of exposure be communicated to study participants. In addition, investigators should reference clinical action levels beyond which individual biomarker results are routinely communicated to participants. When biomarkers have no known relation to risk, or when levels fall below action levels, it may be preferable not co communicate individual results, if this arrangement has been formalized at the time of informed consent.

  2. Methamphetamine Exposure, Iron Deficiency, and Implications for Cognitive-Communicative Function: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Lynette R.; Heiss, Cynthia J.; White, Letitia; Kaf, Wafaa A.; Becker, Alan; Schindler, Jessica B.; Dion, Nancy; Oswalt, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) exposure during fetal development has the potential to adversely affect the development of multiple organ systems. An interdisciplinary case study of a 4-year 11-month-old child born to a mother addicted to meth revealed significant cognitive and communicative delays. Possible meth-related consequences for these delays…

  3. Looking through "Northern Exposure" at Jewish American Identity and the Communication Theory of Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Faulkner, Sandra L.; Meyer, C. R.; Niles, TA; Golden, Doug; Cutler, Melanie

    2002-01-01

    Explores Jewish American identity from a communication theory of identity perspective. Analyzes six episodes of the television program "Northern Exposure" for their representation of Jewish American identity, and explains how the episodes were then shown to 26 Jewish Americans. Notes that the study focused on a communal representation of this…

  4. Compensating measured intra-wafer ring oscillator stage delay with intra-wafer exposure dose corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Staf; Nackaerts, Axel; Dusa, Mircea; Carpaij, Rene; Vandenberghe, Geert; Finders, Jo

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to use measurements on real working devices to derive more information than typically measured by the classic line-width measurement techniques. The first part of the paper will discuss the principle of the measurements with a ring oscillator, a circuit used to measure the speed of elementary logic gates. These measurements contribute to the understanding of the exact timing dependencies in circuits, which is of utmost importance for the design and simulation of these circuits. When connecting an odd number of digital inverting stages in a ring, the circuit has no stable digital state but acts as an analog oscillator with the oscillation frequency dependent on the analog propagation delay of the signals through the stages. By varying some conditions during a litho step, the delay change caused by the process condition change can be measured very accurately. The response of the ring oscillator delay to exposure dose is measured and presented in this paper together with a comparison of measured line-width values of the poly gate lines. The second part of the paper will focus on improving the intra-wafer variation of the stage delay. A number of ring oscillators are put in a design at different slit and scan locations. 200mm wafers are processed with 48 full dies present. From the intra-wafer delay fingerprint and the dose sensitivity of the delay an intra-wafer dose correction, also called a dose recipe, is calculated. This dose recipe is used on the scanner to compensate for effects that are the root cause for the delay profile; including reticle and processing such as track, etch and annealing.

  5. Characterization of exposure and dose of man made vitreous fiber in experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, R D; Miiller, W C; Christensen, D R; Anderson, R; Hesterberg, T W

    1994-01-01

    The use of fibrous test materials in in vivo experiments introduces a number of significant problems not associated with nonfibrous particulates. The key to all aspects of the experiment is the accurate characterization of the test material in terms of fiber length, diameter, particulate content, and chemistry. All data related to fiber properties must be collected in a statistically sound manner to eliminate potential bias. Procedures similar to those outlined by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) or the World Health Organization (WHO) must be the basis of any fiber characterization. The test material to which the animal is exposed must be processed to maximize the amount of respirable fiber and to minimize particulate content. The complex relationship among the characteristics of the test material, the properties of the delivery system, and the actual dose that reaches the target tissue in the lung makes verification of dose essential. In the case of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF), dose verification through recovery of fiber from exposed animals is a complex task. The potential for high fiber solubility makes many of the conventional techniques for tissue preservation and digestion inappropriate. Processes based on the minimum use of aggressive chemicals, such as cold storage and low temperature ashing, are potentially useful for a wide range of inorganic fibers. Any processes used to assess fiber exposure and dose must be carefully validated to establish that the chemical and physical characteristics of the fibers have not been changed and that the dose to the target tissue is completely and accurately described. PMID:7882912

  6. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society

    PubMed Central

    Langie, Sabine A.S.; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H.; Brown, Dustin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K.; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A.; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome’s integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  7. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society.

    PubMed

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H; Brown, Dustin G; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis.

  8. A method for calculating Bayesian uncertainties on internal doses resulting from complex occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Puncher, M; Birchall, A; Bull, R K

    2012-08-01

    Estimating uncertainties on doses from bioassay data is of interest in epidemiology studies that estimate cancer risk from occupational exposures to radionuclides. Bayesian methods provide a logical framework to calculate these uncertainties. However, occupational exposures often consist of many intakes, and this can make the Bayesian calculation computationally intractable. This paper describes a novel strategy for increasing the computational speed of the calculation by simplifying the intake pattern to a single composite intake, termed as complex intake regime (CIR). In order to assess whether this approximation is accurate and fast enough for practical purposes, the method is implemented by the Weighted Likelihood Monte Carlo Sampling (WeLMoS) method and evaluated by comparing its performance with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The MCMC method gives the full solution (all intakes are independent), but is very computationally intensive to apply routinely. Posterior distributions of model parameter values, intakes and doses are calculated for a representative sample of plutonium workers from the United Kingdom Atomic Energy cohort using the WeLMoS method with the CIR and the MCMC method. The distributions are in good agreement: posterior means and Q(0.025) and Q(0.975) quantiles are typically within 20 %. Furthermore, the WeLMoS method using the CIR converges quickly: a typical case history takes around 10-20 min on a fast workstation, whereas the MCMC method took around 12-72 hr. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed.

  9. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry.

  10. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  11. Perchlorate exposure from infant formula and comparisons with the perchlorate reference dose.

    PubMed

    Schier, Joshua G; Wolkin, Amy F; Valentin-Blasini, Lisa; Belson, Martin G; Kieszak, Stephanie M; Rubin, Carol S; Blount, Benjamin C

    2010-05-01

    Perchlorate exposure may be higher in infants compared with older persons, due to diet (infant formula) and body weight versus intake considerations. Our primary objective was to quantitatively assess perchlorate concentrations in commercially available powdered infant formulas (PIFs). Secondary objectives were: (1) to estimate exposure in infants under different dosing scenarios and compare them with the perchlorate reference dose (RfD); (2) estimate the perchlorate concentration in water used for preparing PIFs that would result in a dose exceeding the RfD; and (3) estimate iodine intakes from PIFs. We quantified perchlorate levels in three samples (different lot numbers) of reconstituted PIF (using perchlorate-free water) from commercial brands of PIF in each of the following categories: bovine milk-based with lactose, soy-based, bovine milk-based but lactose-free, and elemental (typically consisting of synthetic amino acids). Exposure modeling was conducted to determine whether the RfD might be exceeded in 48 dosing scenarios that were dependent on age, centile energy intake per unit of body weight, body weight percentile, and PIF perchlorate concentration. We obtained three different samples in each of the five brands of bovine- and soy-based PIF, three different samples in each of the three brands of lactose-free PIF, and three different samples in two brands of elemental PIF. The results were as follows: bovine milk-based with lactose (1.72 microg/l, range: 0.68-5.05); soy-based (0.21 microg/l, range: 0.10-0.44); lactose-free (0.27 microg/l, range: 0.03-0.93); and elemental (0.18 microg/l, range: 0.08-0.4). Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher concentration of perchlorate (P<0.05) compared with all. Perchlorate was a contaminant of all commercially available PIFs tested. Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher perchlorate concentration perchlorate than soy, lactose-free, and elemental PIFs. The perchlorate Rf

  12. Assessment of organ absorbed doses and estimation of effective doses from pediatric anthropomorphic phantom measurements for multi-detector row CT with and without automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Hervé J; Robilliard, Magalie; Savignoni, Alexia; Pierrat, Noelle; Gaboriaud, Geneviève; De Rycke, Yann; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aubert, Bernard; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to measure organ absorbed doses from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) on pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, calculate the corresponding effective doses, and assess the influence of automatic exposure control (AEC) in terms of organ dose variations. Four anthropomorphic phantoms (phantoms represent the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child) were scanned with a four-channel MDCT coupled with a z-axis-based AEC system. Two CT torso protocols were compared: a first protocol without AEC and constant tube current-time product and a second protocol with AEC using age-adjusted noise indices. Organ absorbed doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). Effective doses were calculated according to the tissue weighting factors of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (). For fixed mA acquisitions, organ doses normalized to the volume CT dose index in a 16-cm head phantom (CTDIvol16) ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 and effective doses ranged from 8.4 to 13.5 mSv. For the newborn-equivalent phantom, the AEC-modulated scan showed almost no significant dose variation compared to the fixed mA scan. For the 1-, 5- and 10-y equivalent phantoms, the use of AEC induced a significant dose decrease on chest organs (ranging from 61 to 31% for thyroid, 37 to 21% for lung, 34 to 17% for esophagus, and 39 to 10% for breast). However, AEC also induced a significant dose increase (ranging from 28 to 48% for salivary glands, 22 to 51% for bladder, and 24 to 70% for ovaries) related to the high density of skull base and pelvic bones. These dose increases should be considered before using AEC as a dose optimization tool in children.

  13. Parent-child drug communication: pathway from parents' ad exposure to youth's marijuana use intention.

    PubMed

    Huansuriya, Thipnapa; Siegel, Jason T; Crano, William D

    2014-01-01

    The authors combined the 2-step flow of communication model and the theory of planned behavior to create a framework to evaluate the effectiveness of a set of advertisements from the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign promoting parent-child drug communication. The sample consisted of 1,349 pairs of parents and children who responded to the first and second annual rounds of the National Survey of Parents and Youth, and 1,276 pairs from Rounds 3 and 4. Parents' exposure to the campaign reported at Round 1 was indirectly associated with youth's lowered intentions to use marijuana at Round 2. Ad exposure was associated with positive changes in parental attitudes toward drug communication and perceived social approval of antidrug communications. These two beliefs, along with perceived behavioral control, predicted parents' intentions to discuss drugs with their children. Parental intentions to discuss drugs reported at Round 1 were associated with youth's report of actual drug communication with their parents at Round 2. Frequency and breadth of the topics in parent-child drug communication were associated with less positive attitudes toward marijuana use among youth who spoke with their parents. Together, the child's attitudes toward marijuana use and perceived ability to refuse marijuana use predicted youth's intentions to use marijuana. The proposed model fit well with the data and was replicated in a parallel analysis of the data from Rounds 3 and 4. Implications for future antidrug media campaign efforts are discussed.

  14. Dose, exposure time, and resolution in Serial X-ray Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Starodub, D; Rez, P; Hembree, G; Howells, M; Shapiro, D; Chapman, H N; Fromme, P; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Doak, R B; Spence, J C

    2007-03-22

    Using detailed simulation and analytical models, the exposure time is estimated for serial crystallography, where hydrated laser-aligned proteins are sprayed across a continuous synchrotron beam. The resolution of X-ray diffraction microscopy is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered prior to sample damage. In the proposed Serial Crystallography method, the damage problem is addressed by distributing the total dose over many identical hydrated macromolecules running continuously in a single-file train across a continuous X-ray beam, and resolution is then limited only by the available fluxes of molecules and X-rays. Orientation of the diffracting molecules is achieved by laser alignment. We evaluate the incident X-ray fluence (energy/area) required to obtain a given resolution from (1) an analytical model, giving the count rate at the maximum scattering angle for a model protein, (2) explicit simulation of diffraction patterns for a GroEL-GroES protein complex, and (3) the frequency cut off of the transfer function following iterative solution of the phase problem, and reconstruction of a density map in the projection approximation. These calculations include counting shot noise and multiple starts of the phasing algorithm. The results indicate the number of proteins needed within the beam at any instant for a given resolution and X-ray flux. We confirm an inverse fourth power dependence of exposure time on resolution, with important implications for all coherent X-ray imaging. We find that multiple single-file protein beams will be needed for sub-nanometer resolution on current third generation synchrotrons, but not on fourth generation designs, where reconstruction of secondary protein structure at a resolution of 7 {angstrom} should be possible with short (below 100 s) exposures.

  15. The increase in animal mortality risk following exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is not linear quadratic with dose

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Benjamin M.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Grdina, David J.; Woloschak, Gayle E.; Aravindan, Natarajan

    2015-12-09

    The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII), which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bomb survivors (DDREFLSS). As a result, it was calculated by applying a linear-quadratic dose response model to data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and a limited number of animal studies.

  16. The increase in animal mortality risk following exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is not linear quadratic with dose

    DOE PAGES

    Haley, Benjamin M.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Grdina, David J.; ...

    2015-12-09

    The US government regulates allowable radiation exposures relying, in large part, on the seventh report from the committee to estimate the Biological Effect of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII), which estimated that most contemporary exposures- protracted or low-dose, carry 1.5 fold less risk of carcinogenesis and mortality per Gy than acute exposures of atomic bomb survivors. This correction is known as the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor for the life span study of atomic bomb survivors (DDREFLSS). As a result, it was calculated by applying a linear-quadratic dose response model to data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and a limitedmore » number of animal studies.« less

  17. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chin-Mei Chang-Liu

    1995-06-01

    Experiments examined the effects of radiation dose-rate and protein synthesis inhibition expression of cytoskeletal and matrix elements in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for neutrons when comparing expression of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin genes. Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin-mRNA following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of actin mRNA. Cycloheximide abrogated induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to radiation. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Some Behavioral Effects of Exposure to Low Doses of Fe-56 Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Joseph, James A.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Future missions in space (such as a mission to Mars) will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth. As a result, astronauts will be exposed to radiation qualities and doses that differ from those experienced in low earth orbit, including exposure to heavy particles, such as Fe-56, which are a component of cosmic rays. Although the hazards of exposure to heavy particles are often minimized, they can affect neural functioning, and as a consequence, behavior. Unless the effects of exposure to cosmic rays can somehow be reduced, their effects on the brain throughout long duration flights could be disastrous. In the extreme case, it is possible that the effects of cosmic rays on space travelers could result in symptomatology resembling that of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases or of advancing age, including significant cognitive and/or motor impairments. Because successful operations in space depend in part on the performance capabilities of astronauts, such impairments could jeopardize their ability to satisfy mission requirements, as well as have long-term consequences on the health of astronauts. As such, understanding the nature and extent of this risk may be vital to the effective performance and possibly the survival of astronauts during future missions in space.

  19. Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Mcnaughton, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  20. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1993-12-31

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements ({gamma}- and {beta}-actin and {alpha}-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either a-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Cycloheximide, however, repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposures. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation and that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons.

  1. Homework "Dose," Type, and Helpfulness as Predictors of Clinical Outcomes in Prolonged Exposure for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Andrew A; Kline, Alexander C; Graham, Belinda; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Mello, Patricia G; Feeny, Norah C; Zoellner, Lori A

    2017-03-01

    Homework is often viewed as central to prolonged exposure (PE) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but its relationship with treatment outcome is not well understood. We evaluated homework type, dose, and patients' perceptions of helpfulness as predictors of symptom change and posttreatment outcomes in PE. Patients with chronic PTSD received PE in a randomized clinical trial. Independent evaluators assessed PTSD severity at pre- and posttreatment. Patients reported homework adherence and perceived helpfulness at the beginning of each session, separately for in vivo and imaginal exposure assignments. These variables were examined as predictors of change in PTSD symptoms, PTSD remission, and good end-state functioning (GESF; low PTSD, depression, and anxiety) at posttreatment. Higher imaginal homework adherence predicted greater symptom improvement between sessions and across treatment, as well as twice the odds of achieving remission and GESF. Patients who were at least moderately adherent to imaginal homework assignments (two or more times a week) reported more symptom gains than those who were least adherent but did not differ from those who were most adherent. In vivo adherence was not consistently associated with better outcome, perhaps due to heterogeneity in form and function of weekly assignments. Higher ratings of helpfulness of both types of homework predicted greater symptom improvement from pre- to posttreatment and between sessions. Overall, imaginal exposure homework may complement in-session exposures by enhancing key change processes, though perfect adherence is not necessary. Patients' perceptions of helpfulness may reflect buy-in or perceived match between homework completion and functional impairment. Clinically, in addition to targeting adherence to homework assignments, querying about perceived helpfulness and adjusting assignments appropriately may help augment clinical gains.

  2. Pulmonary Injury after Combined Exposures to Low-Dose Low-LET Radiation and Fungal Spores

    PubMed Central

    Marples, B.; Downing, L.; Sawarynski, K. E.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Williams, J. P.; Martinez, A. A.; Wilson, G. D.; Sims, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to infectious microbes is a likely confounder after a nuclear terrorism event. In combination with radiation, morbidity and mortality from an infection may increase significantly. Pulmonary damage after low-dose low-LET irradiation is characterized by an initial diffuse alveolar inflammation. By contrast, inhaled fungal spores produce localized damage around pulmonary bronchioles. In the present study, we assessed lung injury in C57BL/6 mice after combined exposures to whole-body X radiation and inhaled fungal spores. Either animals were exposed to Aspergillus spores and immediately irradiated with 2 Gy, or the inoculation and irradiation were separated by 8 weeks. Pulmonary injury was assessed at 24 and 48 h and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 weeks later using standard H&E-stained sections and compared with sham-treated age-matched controls. Immunohistochemistry for invasive inflammatory cells (macrophages, neutrophils and B and T lymphocytes) was performed. A semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary injury was made using three distinct parameters: local infiltration of inflammatory cells, diffuse inflammation, and thickening and distortion of alveolar architecture. Radiation-induced changes in lung architecture were most evident during the first 2 weeks postexposure. Fungal changes were seen over the first 4 weeks. Simultaneous combined exposures significantly increased the duration of acute pulmonary damage up to 24 weeks (P < 0.01). In contrast, administration of the fungus 8 weeks after irradiation did not produce enhanced levels of acute pulmonary damage. These data imply that the inhalation of fungal spores at the time of a radiation exposure alters the susceptibility of the lungs to radiation-induced injury. PMID:21275606

  3. AXAIR: A Computer Code for SAR Assessment of Plume-Exposure Doses from Potential Process-Accident Releases to Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pillinger, W.L.

    2001-05-17

    This report describes the AXAIR computer code which is available to terminal users for evaluating the doses to man from exposure to the atmospheric plume from postulated stack or building-vent releases at the Savannah River Plant. The emphasis herein is on documentation of the methodology only. The total-body doses evaluated are those that would be exceeded only 0.5 percent of the time based on worst-sector, worst-case meteorological probability analysis. The associated doses to other body organs are given in the dose breakdowns by radionuclide, body organ and pathway.

  4. Equivalent Lung Dose and Systemic Exposure of Budesonide/Formoterol Combination via Easyhaler and Turbuhaler

    PubMed Central

    Sairanen, Ulla; Haikarainen, Jussi; Korhonen, Jani; Vahteristo, Mikko; Fuhr, Rainard; Kirjavainen, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Easyhaler® device-metered dry powder inhaler containing budesonide and formoterol fumarate dihydrate (hereafter formoterol) for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been developed. The current approvals of the product in Europe were based on several pharmacokinetic (PK) bioequivalence (BE) studies, and in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) modeling. Methods: Four PK studies were performed to compare the lung deposition and total systemic exposure of budesonide and formoterol after administration of budesonide/formoterol Easyhaler and the reference product, Symbicort Turbuhaler. The products were administered concomitantly with oral charcoal (lung deposition) and in two of the studies also without charcoal (total systemic exposure). Demonstration of BE for lung deposition (surrogate marker for efficacy) and non-inferiority for systemic exposure (surrogate marker for safety) were considered a proof of therapeutic equivalence. In addition, IVIVC models were constructed to predict study outcomes with different reference product fine particle doses (FPDs). Results: In the first pivotal study, the exposure and lung dose via Easyhaler were higher compared to the reference product (mean comparison estimates between 1.07 and 1.28) as the FPDs of the reference product batch were low. In the following studies, reference product batches with higher FPDs were utilized. In the second pivotal study, non-inferiority of Easyhaler compared to Turbuhaler was shown in safety and BE in efficacy for all other parameters except the formoterol AUCt. In the fourth study where two reference batches were compared to each other and Easyhaler, budesonide/formoterol Easyhaler was bioequivalent with one reference batch but not with the other having the highest FPDs amongst the 28 reference batches studied. In the IVIVC based study outcome predictions, the test product was bioequivalent with great proportion of the reference batches. For the

  5. Fetal Exposure to Moderate Ethanol Doses: Heightened Operant Responsiveness elicited by Ethanol-Related Reinforcers

    PubMed Central

    March, Samanta M.; Abate, Paula; Spear, Norman E.; Molina, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposure to moderate ethanol doses during late gestation modifies postnatal ethanol palatability and ingestion. The use of Pavlovian associative procedures, has indicated that these prenatal experiences broaden the range of ethanol doses capable of supporting appetitive conditioning. Recently, a novel operant technique aimed at analyzing neonatal predisposition to gain access to ethanol has been developed. Experiment 1 tested the operant conditioning technique for developing rats described by Arias et al. (2007) and Bordner et al. (2008). In Experiment 2 we analyzed changes in the disposition to gain access to ethanol as a result of moderate prenatal exposure to the drug. Methods In Experiment 1 newborn pups were intraorally cannulated and placed in a supine position that allowed access to a touch-sensitive sensor. Paired pups received an intraoral administration of a given reinforcer (milk or quinine) contingent upon physical contact with the sensor. Yoked controls received similar reinforcers only when Paired pups activated the circuit. In Experiment 2, natural reinforcers (water or milk) as well as ethanol (3% or 6 % v/v) or an ethanol-related reinforcer (sucrose compounded with quinine) were tested. In this Experiment pups had been exposed to water or ethanol (1 or 2 g/kg) during gestational days 17–20. Results Experiment 1 confirmed previous results showing that 1-day-old pups rapidly learn an operant task to gain access to milk, but not to gain access to a bitter tastant. Experiment 2 showed that water and milk were highly reinforcing across prenatal treatments. Furthermore, general activity during training was not affected by prenatal exposure to ethanol. Most importantly, prenatal ethanol exposure facilitated conditioning when the reinforcer was 3% v/v ethanol or a psychophysical equivalent of ethanol’s gustatory properties (sucrose-quinine). Conclusions The present results suggest that late prenatal experience with ethanol changes

  6. Longitudinal study of radiation exposure in computed tomography with an in-house developed dose monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renger, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.

    2013-03-01

    During the last decades, the reduction of radiation exposure especially in diagnostic computed tomography is one of the most explored topics. In the same time, it seems challenging to quantify the long-term clinical dose reduction with regard to new hardware as well as software solutions. To overcome this challenge, we developed a Dose Monitoring System (DMS), which collects information from PACS, RIS, MPPS and structured reports. The integration of all sources overcomes the weaknesses of single systems. To gather all possible information, we integrated an optical character recognition system to extract, for example, information from the CT-dose-report. All collected data are transferred to a database for further evaluation, e.g., for calculations of effective as well as organ doses. The DMS provides a single database for tracking all essential study and patient specific information across different modality as well as different vendors. As an initial study, we longitudinally investigated the dose reduction in CT examination when employing a noise-suppressing reconstruction algorithm. For this examination type a significant long-term reduction in radiation exposure is reported, when comparing to a CT-system with standard reconstruction. In summary our DMS tool not only enables us to track radiation exposure on daily bases but further enables to analyses the long term effect of new dose saving strategies. In the future the statistical analyses of all retrospective data, which are available in a modern imaging department, will provide a unique overview of advances in reduction of radiation exposure.

  7. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Ryan P; Bellamy, Michael B; Eckerman, Keith F

    2011-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  8. Lung toxicity determination by in vitro exposure at the air liquid interface with an integrated online dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, S.; Krebs, T.; Weiss, C.; Paur, H.-R.

    2009-05-01

    Epidemiological studies show an association between the concentration of ultrafine particles in the atmosphere and the rate of mortality or morbidity due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. For the quantitative assessment of the toxicity of airborne nanoparticles the dose-response relationship is tested in in vitro test systems using bioassays of cell cultures as sensor. For the air-liquid interface exposure of cell cultures towards aerosols the Karlsruhe exposure system was developed. The human lung cell cultures are exposed in VITROCELL® system modules with a constant flow of the conditioned aerosol. After exposure the cells are analyzed to measure the biological responses such as viability, inflammatory or oxidative stress. For the determination of the dose response relationship the accurate knowledge of the deposited particle mass is essential. A new online method is developed in the Karlsruhe exposure system: the sensor of a quartz crystal microbalance is placed in an exposure chamber instead of the membrane insert and exposed to the aerosol in the same way as the cell cultures. The deposited mass per area unit is monitored as a function of exposure time showing a linear relationship for a constant aerosol flow with defined particle concentration. A comparison of this new dose signal to a dosimetry method using fluorescein sodium particles shows a very good correlation between the sensor signal of the quartz crystal microbalance and the deposited mass on the membranes shown by spectroscopy. This system for the first time provides an online dose measurement for in vitro experiments with nanoparticles.

  9. Impact of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphisms on voriconazole dosing and exposure in adult patients with invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Fabien; Duflot, Thomas; Woillard, Jean-Baptiste; Metsu, David; Pereira, Tony; Compagnon, Patricia; Morisse-Pradier, Hélène; El Kholy, Mona; Thiberville, Luc; Stojanova, Jana; Thuillez, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Voriconazole (VCZ) use is limited by its narrow therapeutic range and significant interpatient variability in exposure. This study aimed to assess (i) the impact of CYP2C19 genotype on VCZ exposure and (ii) the doses required to achieve the therapeutic range in adult patients with invasive fungal infections (IFIs). Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of VCZ, based on trough concentration measurement, and CYP2C19 genotyping were used to guide VCZ dosing in Caucasian patients with IFIs. The two common polymorphisms in Caucasians (CYP2C19*2 and *17), associated with decreased or increased CYP2C19 activity, respectively, were correlated with the daily VCZ dose, pharmacokinetic parameters and concentration-to-dose ratio. In total, 111 trough concentration measurements from 35 genotyped patients were analysed using linear mixed-effect models. The mean VCZ doses required to achieve target concentrations were significantly higher in CYP2C19*17 carriers compared with CYP2C19*1/*1 individuals (P<0.001): 2.57±0.25mg/kg twice daily in CYP2C19*1/*1 patients versus 3.94±0.39mg/kg and 6.75±0.54mg/kg in *1/*17 and *17/*17 patients, respectively. In addition, exposure to VCZ correlated with the CYP2C19*17 variant. Indices of exposure for CYP2C19*2 carriers were in line with the functional effect of this polymorphism compared with CYP2C19*1/*1 individuals, however comparisons of doses required to achieve target concentrations were not statistically different. The CYP2C19*17 allele predicted both VCZ exposure and dose required to achieve effective and non-toxic concentrations. CYP2C19 genotyping appears useful to guide VCZ initial dosing when coupled with TDM and to explain subtherapeutic concentrations frequently observed in clinical practice.

  10. A modeling framework for estimating children's residential exposure and dose to chlorpyrifos via dermal residue contact and nondietary ingestion.

    PubMed Central

    Zartarian, V G; Ozkaynak, H; Burke, J M; Zufall, M J; Rigas, M L; Furtaw, E J

    2000-01-01

    To help address the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, a physically based probabilistic model has been developed to quantify and analyze dermal and nondietary ingestion exposure and dose to pesticides. The Residential Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Pesticides (Residential-SHEDS) simulates the exposures and doses of children contacting residues on surfaces in treated residences and on turf in treated residential yards. The simulations combine sequential time-location-activity information from children's diaries with microlevel videotaped activity data, probability distributions of measured surface residues and exposure factors, and pharmacokinetic rate constants. Model outputs include individual profiles and population statistics for daily dermal loading, mass in the blood compartment, ingested residue via nondietary objects, and mass of eliminated metabolite, as well as contributions from various routes, pathways, and media. To illustrate the capabilities of the model framework, we applied Residential-SHEDS to estimate children's residential exposure and dose to chlorpyrifos for 12 exposure scenarios: 2 age groups (0-4 and 5-9 years); 2 indoor pesticide application methods (broadcast and crack and crevice); and 3 postindoor application time periods (< 1, 1-7, and 8-30 days). Independent residential turf applications (liquid or granular) were included in each of these scenarios. Despite the current data limitations and model assumptions, the case study predicts exposure and dose estimates that compare well to measurements in the published literature, and provides insights to the relative importance of exposure scenarios and pathways. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10856023

  11. Acute radiation enteritis caused by dose-dependent radiation exposure in dogs: experimental research.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Xu, Liu; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2014-12-01

    Accidental or intended radiation exposure in mass casualty settings presents a serious and on-going threat. The development of mitigating and treating agents requires appropriate animal models. Unfortunately, the majority of research on radiation enteritis in animals has lacked specific assessments and targeted therapy. Our study showed beagle dogs, treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for abdominal irradiation, were administered single X-ray doses of 8-30 Gy. The degree of intestinal tract injury for all of the animals after radiation exposure was evaluated with regard to clinical syndrome, endoscopic findings, histological features, and intestinal function. The range of single doses (8 Gy, 10-14 Gy, and 16-30 Gy) represented the degree of injury (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Acute radiation enteritis included clinical syndrome with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, hemafecia, and weight loss; typical endoscopic findings included edema, bleeding, mucosal abrasions, and ulcers; and intestinal biopsy results revealed mucosal necrosis, erosion, and loss, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and congestion. Changes in serum diamine oxides (DAOs) and d-xylose represented intestinal barrier function and absorption function, respectively, and correlated with the extent of damage (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively). We successfully developed a dog model of acute radiation enteritis, thus obtaining a relatively objective evaluation of intestinal tract injury based on clinical performance and laboratory examination. The method of assessment of the degree of intestinal tract injury after abdominal irradiation could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for acute radiation enteritis.

  12. The inverse dose-rate effect and the extrapolation of radon risk estimates from exposures of miners to low-level exposures in homes

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkin, J.S. )

    1994-04-01

    This letter is written in response to a paper in which the author discusses the inverse dose-rate dependence of oncogenic transformation by high-LET radiation. The author asserts that, as a consequence, the extrapolation of results from miners exposed to high levels of radon daughters could overestimate the risk due to environmental exposures. By using a model increased cell sensitivity in one part of the cell cycle, the author assumes an inverse dose-rate effect should occur only at high doses, but the author of this letter points out that this does not imply a lower risk per unit dose at low doses. According to this letter, the existence of an inverse dose-rate effect for high-LET radiation provides no grounds for projecting lower lung cancer risks per unit exposure at environmental radon levels than at the higher radon level in mines. Failure to adjust for any inverse dose-rate effect in the studies of miners can only lead to an underestimation of the environmental risk.

  13. Determination of photon conversion factors relating exposure and dose for several extremity phantom designs

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Eichner, F.N.; Reece, W.D.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents the results of measurements of dosimetric properties of simple extremity phantoms suitable for use in extremity dosimeter performance testing. Two sizes of phantoms were used in this study. One size represented the forearm or lower leg and the other size represented the finger or toe. For both phantom sizes, measurements were performed on solid plastic phantoms and on phantoms containing simulated bone material to determine the effect of backscattered radiations from the bone on the surface dose. Exposure-to-dose conversion factors (C/sub x/ factors) were determined for photon energies ranging from 16 to 1250 keV (average for /sup 60/Co). The effect of the presence of a phantom was also measured for a /sup 90/Sr//sup 90/Y source. Significant differences in the measured C/sub x/ factors were found among the phantoms investigated. The factors for the finger-sized phantoms were uniformly less than for the arm-sized phantoms.

  14. Low-Dose Oxygen Enhances Macrophage-Derived Bacterial Clearance following Cigarette Smoke Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bain, William G; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Mandke, Pooja; Gans, Jonathan H; D'Alessio, Franco R; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K; Aggarwal, Neil R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, smoking-related lung disease. Patients with COPD frequently suffer disease exacerbations induced by bacterial respiratory infections, suggestive of impaired innate immunity. Low-dose oxygen is a mainstay of therapy during COPD exacerbations; yet we understand little about whether oxygen can modulate the effects of cigarette smoke on lung immunity. Methods. Wild-type mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 5 weeks, followed by intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) and 21% or 35-40% oxygen. After two days, lungs were harvested for PAO1 CFUs, and bronchoalveolar fluid was sampled for inflammatory markers. In culture, macrophages were exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen (40%) for 24 hours and then incubated with PAO1, followed by quantification of bacterial phagocytosis and inflammatory markers. Results. Mice exposed to 35-40% oxygen after cigarette smoke and PAO1 had improved survival and reduced lung CFUs and inflammation. Macrophages from these mice expressed less TNF-α and more scavenger receptors. In culture, macrophages exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen also demonstrated decreased TNF-α secretion and enhanced phagocytosis of PAO1 bacteria. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate a novel, protective role for low-dose oxygen following cigarette smoke and bacteria exposure that may be mediated by enhanced macrophage phagocytosis.

  15. Minimum ion-beam exposure-dose determination for chemically amplified resist from printed dot matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Bruenger, W. H.; Leung, K.; Lee, Y.; Hudek, P.; Rangelow, I. W.; Stangl, G.

    1999-11-01

    Matrices of 90 nm dots have been printed into high-sensitivity positive resist (UVII HS, Shipley) with an ion projection system (IMS Vienna) to investigate the influence of shot noise on the printing probability of dots. Dot defect probability increases with diminishing ion dose following a Poisson distribution which demonstrates that shot noise is the dominating effect. The minimum ion numbers per dot to generate 50% defect probability are N{sub crit}=115 for standard resist treatment. This corresponds to N=165 for smaller defect probabilities of 10{sup -4}. Resist sensitivity was decreased with postexposure bake temperatures of 110 degree sign C instead of 140 degree sign C to improve the resolution capability of the resist. Under these conditions, and an additional resist top coat, N{sub crit}=130 ions per dot have been measured. The article demonstrates that ion projection lithography is not limited by shot noise at minimum resolution elements of 90 nm diam. The corresponding exposure doses are 0.3 {mu}C/cm2. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  16. Radon Sources and Associated Risk in Terms of Exposure and Dose

    PubMed Central

    Vogiannis, Efstratios G.; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Radon concerns the international scientific community from the early twentieth century, initially as radium emanation and nearly the second half of the century as a significant hazard to human health. The initial brilliant period of its use as medicine was followed by a period of intense concern for its health effects. Miners in Europe and later in the U.S were the primary target groups surveyed. Nowadays, there is a concrete evidence that radon and its progeny can cause lung cancer (1). Human activities may create or modify pathways increasing indoor radon concentration compared to outdoor background. These pathways can be controlled by preventive and corrective actions (2). Indoor radon and its short-lived progeny either attached on aerosol particles or free, compose an air mixture that carries a significant energy amount [Potential Alpha-Energy Concentration (PAEC)]. Prior research at that topic focused on the exposure on PAEC and the dose delivered by the human body or tissues. Special mention was made to the case of water workers due to inadequate data. Furthermore, radon risk assessment and relevant legislation for the dose delivered by man from radon and its progeny has been also reviewed. PMID:25601905

  17. Comparative toxicity of low dose tributyltin chloride on serum, liver, lung and kidney following subchronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sumonto; Gera, Ruchi; Singh, Vikas; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2014-02-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) pollution is rampant worldwide and is a growing threat due to its bio-accumulative property. Isolated studies of TBT toxicity on different organs are available but consolidated information is greatly lacking. We planned this study to delineate the effect of subchronic (1 month) exposure to low dose TBT-chloride (TBTC) (1 and 5 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. Total tin concentration was found to be significantly increased in liver, kidney and blood, and marginally in lungs. Organo-somatic indices were seen to be altered with little effect on serum biochemical markers (liver and kidney function, and general parameters). Reactive oxygen species but not lipid peroxidation content was observed to be significantly elevated both in the tissues and serum. TBTC was found to act as a hyperlipidemic agent and it also affected heme biosynthetic pathway. Hematological analysis showed that TBTC exposure resulted in minor alterations in RBC parameters. Histological studies demonstrated marked tissue damage in all the 3 organs. Calcium inhibitors (BAPTA-AM, EGTA) and antioxidants (NAC, C-PC) significantly restored TBTC induced loss in cell viability, under ex-vivo conditions. Antioxidants were evidently more efficient in comparison to the calcium inhibitors, implying major role of oxidative stress pathways in TBTC toxicity.

  18. Biomarkers of internal dose for the assessment of environmental exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; D'Errico, Maria Nicolà; Fustinoni, Silvia; Drago, Ignazio; Barbieri, Anna; Sabatini, Laura; Carrieri, Mariella; Apostoli, Pietro; Soleo, Leonardo

    2011-10-01

    The urinary excretion of t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA) and urinary benzene and the influence of a smoking habit and of exposure to urban traffic on the urinary excretion of these biomarkers were investigated in 137 male adults from the general population. All subjects were not occupationally exposed to benzene and resident in two cities in Puglia (Southern-Italy). Environmental exposure to benzene was measured using passive personal samplers. The biomarkers t,t-MA, SPMA and urinary benzene were determined in urine samples collected from each subject at the end of the environmental sampling. The percentage of cases above the limit of detection was higher for SPMA and urinary benzene in smokers than in non-smokers, and for airborne benzene and urinary benzene in subjects exposed to urban traffic. Airborne benzene was correlated with the time spent in urban traffic during the environmental sampling. Among the biomarkers, urinary benzene was found to be correlated with airborne benzene only in non-smokers, and with the time spent in urban traffic, both in smokers and non-smokers considered together, and in non-smokers only. Finally, multiple regression analysis showed that the urinary excretion of all the biomarkers was dependent on the number of cigarettes smoked per day and, for urinary benzene, also on the time spent in urban traffic. In conclusion, urinary benzene seems to be a more valid biomarker than t,t-MA and SPMA to assess environmental exposure to extremely low concentrations of benzene. Cigarette smoking prevailed over traffic exhaust fumes in determining the internal dose of benzene.

  19. Median infectious dose (ID₅₀) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolate MN-184 via aerosol exposure.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Timothy D; Wang, Chong; Hoff, Steven J; Kittawornrat, Apisit; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2011-08-05

    The median infectious dose (ID(50)) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus isolate MN-184 was determined for aerosol exposure. In 7 replicates, 3-week-old pigs (n=58) respired 10l of airborne PRRS virus from a dynamic aerosol toroid (DAT) maintained at -4°C. Thereafter, pigs were housed in isolation and monitored for evidence of infection. Infection occurred at virus concentrations too low to quantify by microinfectivity assays. Therefore, exposure dose was determined using two indirect methods ("calculated" and "theoretical"). "Calculated" virus dose was derived from the concentration of rhodamine B monitored over the exposure sequence. "Theoretical" virus dose was based on the continuous stirred-tank reactor model. The ID(50) estimate was modeled on the proportion of pigs that became infected using the probit and logit link functions for both "calculated" and "theoretical" exposure doses. Based on "calculated" doses, the probit and logit ID(50) estimates were 1 × 10(-0.13)TCID(50) and 1 × 10(-0.14)TCID(50), respectively. Based on "theoretical" doses, the probit and logit ID(50) were 1 × 10(0.26)TCID(50) and 1 × 10(0.24)TCID(50), respectively. For each point estimate, the 95% confidence interval included the other three point estimates. The results indicated that MN-184 was far more infectious than PRRS virus isolate VR-2332, the only other PRRS virus isolate for which ID(50) has been estimated for airborne exposure. Since aerosol ID(50) estimates are available for only these two isolates, it is uncertain whether one or both of these isolates represent the normal range of PRRS virus infectivity by this route.

  20. Cytogenetic dose-response in vitro for biological dosimetry after exposure to high doses of gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A; Maznyk, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    The dose response for dicentrics plus centric rings and total unstable chromosome-type aberrations was studied in the first mitoses of cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to doses of ∼2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 16 and 20 Gy of acute (60)Со gamma-rays. A dose-dependent increase of aberration yield was accompanied by a tendency to the underdispersion of dicentrics and centric rings among cells distributions compared with Poisson statistics at doses ≥6 Gy. The formal fitting of the data to a linear-quadratic model resulted in an equation with the linear and quadratic coefficients ranged 0.098-0.129×cell(-1)×Gy(-1) and 0.039-0.034×cell(-1)×Gy(-2), respectively, depending on the fitting method. The actual radiation-induced aberration yield was markedly lower than expected from a calibration curve, generated earlier within a lower dose range. Interlaboratory variations in reported dicentric yields induced by medium-to-high radiation doses in vitro are discussed.

  1. Gestational and lactational exposure to low-dose bisphenol A increases Th17 cells in mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shimeng; Li, Yun; Li, Yingpei; Zhu, Qixing; Jiang, Jianhua; Wu, Changhao; Shen, Tong

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) can cause immune disorders throughout the life span. However, the biological basis for these immune disorders is poorly understood and the effects of exposure to BPA on Th17 development are unknown. The present study sought to characterize alterations of Th17 cells in childhood and adulthood following gestational and lactational exposure to environmentally relevant low-dose of BPA and the underlying mechanisms. Pregnant dams were exposed to BPA (10, 100 or 1000nM) via drinking water from gestational day (GD) 0 to postnatal day (PND) 21. At PNDs 21 and 42, offspring mice were anesthetized, blood was obtained for cytokine assay and spleens were collected for Th17 cell frequency and RORγt mRNA expression analysis. Perinatal exposure to low-dose BPA resulted in a dose-dependent and gender-specific persistent rise in Th17 cells accompanied by an increase of RORγt mRNA expression in the offsprings. The contents of major Th17 cell-derived cytokines (IL-17 and IL-21) and those essential for Th17 cell differentiation (IL-6 and IL-23) were also increased compared to those in controls. These changes were more pronounced in female than in male offsprings. However, perinatal exposure to low-dose BPA had little effect on serum TGF-β, another key regulator for Th17 cell development. Our results suggest that gestational and lactational exposure to a low-dose of BPA can affect Th17 cell development via an action on its transcription factor and the regulatory cytokines. These findings provide novel insight into sustained immune disorders by BPA exposure during development.

  2. Long-term health effects of persistent exposure to low-dose lr192 gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Zujun; Li, Li; Xiao, Zhifang; Liu, Zenghui; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Hui; Su, Lei; Xiao, Yang

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of persistent low-dose iridium-192 (Ir192) exposure on immunological function, chromosome aberration and the telomerase activity of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs), in order to increase clinical knowledge of the late effects of persistent low-dose Ir192 gamma-ray exposure. Patients (n=54) accidentally exposed to persistent low-dose Ir192 were included in this 10-year follow-up study. Clinical symptoms, peripheral blood, bone marrow, cellular and humoral immune status, chromosome aberrations and the telomerase activity of BMNCs were analyzed in this study. Exposure to low-dose Ir192 resulted in different degrees of clinical symptoms and significantly lowered complement C3 and C4 levels, CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell levels, the lymphocyte transformation rate and the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. It also led to increases in peripheral blood and bone marrow abnormality rates, chromosome aberration rate and BMNC telomerase activity. Exposure to persistent low-dose Ir192 radiation resulted in different degrees of immune dysfunction, and abnormalities of blood cells and bone marrow, which recovered within 1-3 years. Chromosome aberrations were observed to take 5-10 years to recover. However, it would take >10 years for the telomerase activity of BMNCs to be reduced to normal levels. A prolonged follow-up time is required in order to monitor clonal proliferative diseases such as leukemia.

  3. Long-term health effects of persistent exposure to low-dose lr192 gamma-rays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongbo; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Zujun; Li, Li; Xiao, Zhifang; Liu, Zenghui; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Hui; Su, Lei; Xiao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of persistent low-dose iridium-192 (Ir192) exposure on immunological function, chromosome aberration and the telomerase activity of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs), in order to increase clinical knowledge of the late effects of persistent low-dose Ir192 gamma-ray exposure. Patients (n=54) accidentally exposed to persistent low-dose Ir192 were included in this 10-year follow-up study. Clinical symptoms, peripheral blood, bone marrow, cellular and humoral immune status, chromosome aberrations and the telomerase activity of BMNCs were analyzed in this study. Exposure to low-dose Ir192 resulted in different degrees of clinical symptoms and significantly lowered complement C3 and C4 levels, CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell levels, the lymphocyte transformation rate and the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. It also led to increases in peripheral blood and bone marrow abnormality rates, chromosome aberration rate and BMNC telomerase activity. Exposure to persistent low-dose Ir192 radiation resulted in different degrees of immune dysfunction, and abnormalities of blood cells and bone marrow, which recovered within 1–3 years. Chromosome aberrations were observed to take 5–10 years to recover. However, it would take >10 years for the telomerase activity of BMNCs to be reduced to normal levels. A prolonged follow-up time is required in order to monitor clonal proliferative diseases such as leukemia. PMID:27698774

  4. A study on quantitative analysis of exposure dose caused by patient depending on time and distance in nuclear medicine examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. S.; Cho, J. H.; Shin, S. G.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Chung, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated possible actions that can help protect against and reduce radiation exposure by measuring the exposure dose for each type of isotope that is used frequently in nuclear medicine before performing numerical analysis of the effective half-life based on the measurement results. From July to August in 2010, the study targeted 10, 6 and 5 people who underwent an 18F-FDG (fludeoxyglucose) positron emission tomography (PET) scan, 99mTc-HDP bone scan, and 201Tl myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan, respectively, in the nuclear medicine department. After injecting the required medicine into the subjects, a survey meter was used to measure the dose depending on the distance from the heart and time elapsed. For the 18F-FDG PET scan, the dose decreased by approximately 66% at 90 min compared to that immediately after the injection and by 78% at a distance of 1 m compared to that at 0.3 m. In the 99mTc-HDP bone scan, the dose decreased by approximately 71% in 200 min compared to that immediately after the injection and by approximately 78% at a distance of 1 m compared to that at 0.3 m. In the 201Tl myocardial SPECT scan, the dose decreased by approximately 30% in 250 min compared to that immediately after the injection and by approximately 55% at a distance of 1 m compared to that at 0.3 m. In conclusion, the dose decreases by a large margin depending on the distance and time. In conclusion, this study measured the exposure doses by isotopes, distance from the heart and exposure time, and found that the doses were reduced significantly according the distance and the time.

  5. Changes in mammary histology and transcriptome profiles by low-dose exposure to environmental phenols at critical windows of development.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Kalpana; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Lambertini, Luca; Wetmur, James; Manservisi, Fabiana; Falcioni, Laura; Panzacchi, Simona; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals has been linked to altered mammary development and cancer risk at high doses using animal models. Effects at low doses comparable to human exposure remain poorly understood, especially during critical developmental windows. We investigated the effects of two environmental phenols commonly used in personal care products - methyl paraben (MPB) and triclosan (TCS) - on the histology and transcriptome of normal mammary glands at low doses mimicking human exposure during critical windows of development. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed during perinatal, prepubertal and pubertal windows, as well as from birth to lactation. Low-dose exposure to MPB and TCS induced measurable changes in both mammary histology (by Masson's Trichrome Stain) and transcriptome (by microarrays) in a window-specific fashion. Puberty represented a window of heightened sensitivity to MPB, with increased glandular tissue and changes of expression in 295 genes with significant enrichment in functions such as DNA replication and cell cycle regulation. Long-term exposure to TCS from birth to lactation was associated with increased adipose and reduced glandular and secretory tissue, with expression alterations in 993 genes enriched in pathways such as cholesterol synthesis and adipogenesis. Finally, enrichment analyses revealed that genes modified by MPB and TCS were over-represented in human breast cancer gene signatures, suggesting possible links with breast carcinogenesis. These findings highlight the issues of critical windows of susceptibility that may confer heightened sensitivity to environmental insults and implicate the potential health effects of these ubiquitous environmental chemicals in breast cancer.

  6. The relationship between ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and objectively measured personal UVR exposure dose is modified by season and latitude.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Lucas, R M; Harrison, S; van der Mei, I; Armstrong, B K; Nowak, M; Brodie, A; Kimlin, M G

    2014-12-01

    Despite the widespread use of ambient ultraviolet radiation (UVR) as a proxy measure of personal exposure to UVR, the relationship between the two is not well-defined. This paper examines the effects of season and latitude on the relationship between ambient UVR and personal UVR exposure. We used data from the AusD Study, a multi-centre cross-sectional study among Australian adults (18-75 years), where personal UVR exposure was objectively measured using polysulphone dosimeters. Data were analysed for 991 participants from 4 Australian cities of different latitude: Townsville (19.3°S), Brisbane (27.5°S), Canberra (35.3°S) and Hobart (42.8°S). Daily personal UVR exposure varied from 0.01 to 21 Standard Erythemal Doses (median = 1.1, IQR: 0.5-2.1), on average accounting for 5% of the total available ambient dose. There was an overall positive correlation between ambient UVR and personal UVR exposure (r = 0.23, p < 0.001). However, the correlations varied according to season and study location: from strong correlations in winter (r = 0.50) and at high latitudes (Hobart, r = 0.50; Canberra, r = 0.39), to null or even slightly negative correlations, in summer (r = 0.01) and at low latitudes (Townsville, r = -0.06; Brisbane, r = -0.16). Multiple regression models showed significant effect modification by season and location. Personal exposure fraction of total available ambient dose was highest in winter (7%) and amongst Hobart participants (7%) and lowest in summer (1%) and in Townsville (4%). These results suggest season and latitude modify the relationship between ambient UVR and personal UVR exposure. Ambient UVR may not be a good indicator for personal exposure dose under some circumstances.

  7. Study parameters influencing NOAEL and LOAEL in toxicity feeding studies for pesticides: exposure duration versus dose decrement, dose spacing, group size and chemical class.

    PubMed

    Zarn, Jürg A; Engeli, Barbara E; Schlatter, Josef R

    2011-11-01

    The effect of exposure duration on no observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) and lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAEL) in rodent pesticide feeding studies was evaluated. Ratios of NOAEL (and LOAEL), expressed as pesticide concentrations in feed, were calculated from subacute to subchronic, subchronic to chronic and subacute to chronic studies. There was no statistical significant effect of exposure duration on ratio distributions. Whereas geometric means of ratios were in a narrow range of 1.1-2.5, the geometric standard deviations and 95th percentiles increased with dose spacing of the involved studies. With the exception of carbamates, the chemical class of pesticides had no influence on the ratio distributions. However, the number of animals in the shorter-term study of ratio couples being ≤ 1 was statistically significantly higher than in ratio couples being >1. Ratios ≤ 1 may be partly explained by the dose decrement over time observed in feeding studies applying the test substances in constant concentrations. The dose decrement possibly converts initially toxic doses to less toxic doses beyond the subacute phase. Ratios >1 seem to be caused predominantly by differences in study design parameters. In dietary risk assessment, the acceptable daily intake (ADI) is compared to pesticide intake estimates based on mean food consumption (i.e. the so called theoretical maximum daily intake, TMDI) being orders of magnitude lower than actual food consumption on eating occasions for certain food commodities. As subacute, subchronic and chronic NOAEL (and LOAEL), expressed as pesticide concentration in feed did not differ statistically significantly, the TMDI as benchmark for the ADI may underestimate the significance of the toxicity of subacute exposure.

  8. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  9. Skin wound trauma, following high-dose radiation exposure, amplifies and prolongs skeletal tissue loss.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua M; Swift, Sibyl N; Smith, Joan T; Kiang, Juliann G; Allen, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the detrimental effects of non-lethal, high-dose (whole body) γ-irradiation on bone, and the impact that radiation combined with skin trauma (i.e. combined injury) has on long-term skeletal tissue health. Recovery of bone after an acute dose of radiation (RI; 8 Gy), skin wounding (15-20% of total body skin surface), or combined injury (RI+Wound; CI) was determined 3, 7, 30, and 120 days post-irradiation in female B6D2F1 mice and compared to non-irradiated mice (SHAM) at each time-point. CI mice demonstrated long-term (day 120) elevations in serum TRAP 5b (osteoclast number) and sclerostin (bone formation inhibitor), and suppression of osteocalcin levels through 30 days as compared to SHAM (p<0.05). Radiation-induced reductions in distal femur trabecular bone volume fraction and trabecular number through 120 days post-exposure were significantly greater than non-irradiated mice (p<0.05) and were exacerbated in CI mice by day 30 (p<0.05). Negative alterations in trabecular bone microarchitecture were coupled with extended reductions in cancellous bone formation rate in both RI and CI mice as compared to Sham (p<0.05). Increased osteoclast surface in CI animals was observed for 3 days after irradiation and remained elevated through 120 days (p<0.01). These results demonstrate a long-term, exacerbated response of bone to radiation when coupled with non-lethal wound trauma. Changes in cancellous bone after combined trauma were derived from extended reductions in osteoblast-driven bone formation and increases in osteoclast activity.

  10. Effects of low-dose alcohol exposure on simulated merchant ship piloting by maritime cadets.

    PubMed

    Howland, J; Rohsenow, D J; Cote, J; Gomez, B; Mangione, T W; Laramie, A K

    2001-03-01

    The US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulates on-the-job alcohol use by operators of certain categories of commercial transport. For aircraft, trains, and commercial vessels, operators are subject to sanctions for having > or = 0.04 g% blood alcohol concentration (BAC). This study examines the effects of alcohol (between 0.04 and 0.05 g% BAC) on simulated merchant ship handling. A two-group randomized factorial design was used to compare beverage alcohol to placebo while controlling for baseline performance on a previous day. The study was conducted in the Maritime Simulation Center at Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME. Participants were 38 volunteer deck officer cadets in their junior or senior year, at least 21 years of age, with previous experience on a bridge simulator. Following a baseline trial on Day 1, on Day 2 participants were randomized to receive alcohol (0.6 g/kg for males and 0.5 g/kg for females) or placebo. After allowing time for absorption, participants completed a bridge simulator task. For baseline and performance trials, participants were randomized to one of four bridge simulator scenarios, each representing passage of a fully loaded container vessel through a channel with commercial traffic. The aggregate scenario score given by blinded maritime educators measured performance. A main effect for alcohol was found indicating that performance was significantly impaired by this low dose of alcohol relative to performance in the placebo condition. These findings are consistent with current federal regulations that limit low-dose alcohol exposure for the operators of commercial transport vehicles. Further research is required to determine effects at lower BACs.

  11. Dose-response of Listeria monocytogenes after oral exposure in pregnant guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Denita; Irvin, Elizabeth A; Chmielewski, Revis A; Frank, Joseph F; Smith, Mary A

    2007-05-01

    Listeriosis, a severe disease that results from exposure to the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, is responsible for approximately 2500 illnesses and 500 deaths in the United States each year. Pregnant women are 20 times more likely to develop listeriosis than the general population, with adverse pregnancy outcomes that include spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, and neonatal meningitis. The objective of this study was to determine an infective dose that resulted in stillbirths and infectivity of selected tissues in pregnant guinea pigs. Pregnant guinea pigs were exposed orally on gestation day 35 to 10(4) to 10(8) L. monocytogenes CFU in sterile whipping cream. L. monocytogenes was recovered at 64, 73, 90, and 100% from the livers of animals infected with 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) CFU, respectively. In dams exposed to > or =10(6) CFU, L. monocytogenes was cultured from 50% of the spleen samples and 33% of the gallbladder samples. Eleven of 34 dams infected with > or =10(6) CFU delivered stillborn pups. L. monocytogenes was cultured from the placenta, liver, and brain tissue of all stillbirths. Dams that delivered nonviable fetuses after treatment with > or =10(7) L. monocytogenes CFU had fecal samples positive for L. monocytogenes at every collection posttreatment. On the basis of a log-logistic model, the dose that adversely affected 50% of the pregnancies was approximately 10(7) L. monocytogenes CFU compared with that estimated from a human outbreak of 106 CFU. Listeriosis in pregnant guinea pigs can result in stillbirths, and the overall disease is similar to that described in nonhuman primates and in humans.

  12. Measurements of environmental radiation exposure dose rates at selected sites in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, W C; Penna-Franca, E; Ribeiro, C C; Nogueira, A R; Londres, H; Oliveira, A E

    1981-12-01

    Two types of portable instruments were developed by the former Health and Safety Laboratory of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to characterize external gamma radiation fields and to estimate individual exposure dose rates from major natural or fission radionuclides distributed in the soil: a pressurized ionization chamber and a NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer. The two instruments were used to measure environmental radiation exposure rates at three distinct geological areas of Brazil: - in the towns of Guarapari and Meaípe located on the monazite sand belt, ES. - on the vicinities of the uranium mine of Poços de Caldas, MG. - around the site of the Brazilian first nuclear power plant, in Angra dos Reis, RJ. The radiometric survey demonstrated once more the usefulness and versatility of the two instruments used. The measurements around the nuclear installations of Poços de Caldas and Angra dos Reis, allowed a rapid assessment of the local radiation background and its variability, as well as the selection of stations for the routine monitoring program. Radioactive anomalies were detected and characterized previously to the start of plant operations. The survey in Guarapari and Meaípe confirmed the results obtained by Roser and Cullen in 1958 and 1962, except on sites where considerable changes took place since then. The spectrometric measurements gave estimations of the relative proportion of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in the ground and also indications on the homogeneity of their distribution in the soil.

  13. Acute exposure to acid fog: influence of breathing pattern on effective dose.

    PubMed

    Bowes, S M; Francis, M; Laube, B L; Frank, R

    1995-02-01

    Concern about the possible adverse health effects of acid fog has been fed by two observations: air pollution disasters earlier in this century were typically associated with fog, and current samples of fog water can be strongly acid. To study the acute effects of acid fog on the lung, the authors generated a monodisperse 10 microM MMAD aerosol of H2SO4 with a pH of 2.0 and a nominal concentration of 500 micrograms/m3. They exposed seven healthy young men on alternate days to acid or control equiosmolar NaCl aerosol during 40 min of resting ventilation and 20 min of exercise; the latter was sufficiently intense to induce oronasal breathing. Exposure was by means of a head dome, a head-only exposure device that permitted continuous measurement (unfettered breathing) of Vr, f, VE, and the onset and persistence of oronasal breathing. In this article the authors compare the relative importance of parameters contributing to the between-subject variability in estimated hydrogen ion dose to the lower airways (H+LAW), based on analysis of variance. Physiologic parameters accounted for 70% of the variability, of which 34% was due to differences in duration of oronasal breathing (tON) and 36% to differences in ventilation rate during oronasal breathing (VE(ON)); inhaled hydrogen ion concentration [H+], the environmental parameter, contributed only 30%. Minute ventilation at the time of transition from nasal to oronasal breathing varied significantly among subjects even if normalized to FVC, an index of lung size.

  14. Response to the External Peer Review of the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM) Version 3.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a human exposure model for assessing the variability and uncertainty in population exposures to particulate matter, called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM). SHEDS-P...

  15. Dose-additivity modeling for acute and repeated exposure to a mixture of N-methycarbamate Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of N-methylcarbamate pesticides is attributed to the reversible inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes in the central and peripheral nervous system. The inhibition of ChE following a single exposure to this class of pesticides has been modeled using a dose-additi...

  16. QUANTIFYING AGGREGATE CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHILDREN USING A PHYSICALLY-BASED TWO-STAGE MONTE CARLO PROBABILISTIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help address the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, a physically-based, two-stage Monte Carlo probabilistic model has been developed to quantify and analyze aggregate exposure and dose to pesticides via multiple routes and pathways. To illustrate model capabilities and ide...

  17. Progress in Assessing Air Pollutant Risks from In Vitro Exposures: Matching Ozone Dose and Effect in Human Air Way Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro exposures to air pollutants could, in theory, facilitate a rapid and detailed assessment of molecular mechanisms of toxicity. However, it is difficult to ensure that the dose of a gaseous pollutant to cells in tissue culture is similar to that of the same cells during in...

  18. Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Occupations Associated with Low-Dose Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Bollati, Valentina; Albetti, Benedetta; Byun, Hyang-Min; Bonzini, Matteo; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cocco, Pierluigi; Satta, Giannina; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Cipolla, Massimo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background: Benzene is an established leukemogen at high exposure levels. Although low-level benzene exposure is widespread and may induce oxidative damage, no mechanistic biomarkers are available to detect biological dysfunction at low doses. Objectives: Our goals were to determine in a large multicenter cross-sectional study whether low-level benzene is associated with increased blood mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn, a biological oxidative response to mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction) and to explore potential links between mtDNAcn and leukemia-related epigenetic markers. Methods: We measured blood relative mtDNAcn by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 341 individuals selected from various occupational groups with low-level benzene exposures (> 100 times lower than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration/European Union standards) and 178 referents from three Italian cities (Genoa, Milan, Cagliari). Results: In each city, benzene-exposed participants showed higher mtDNAcn than referents: mtDNAcn was 0.90 relative units in Genoa bus drivers and 0.75 in referents (p = 0.019); 0.90 in Milan gas station attendants, 1.10 in police officers, and 0.75 in referents (p-trend = 0.008); 1.63 in Cagliari petrochemical plant workers, 1.25 in referents close to the plant, and 0.90 in referents farther from the plant (p-trend = 0.046). Using covariate-adjusted regression models, we estimated that an interquartile range increase in personal airborne benzene was associated with percent increases in mtDNAcn equal to 10.5% in Genoa (p = 0.014), 8.2% (p = 0.008) in Milan, 7.5% in Cagliari (p = 0.22), and 10.3% in all cities combined (p < 0.001). Using methylation data available for the Milan participants, we found that mtDNAcn was associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation (–2.41%; p = 0.007) and p15 hypermethylation (+15.95%, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Blood MtDNAcn was increased in persons exposed to low benzene levels, potentially reflecting mitochondrial

  19. Biodosimetry for High-Dose Exposures Based on Dicentric Analysis in Lymphocytes Released from the G2-Block by Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Karachristou, Ioanna; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki; Pantelias, Gabriel; Thanassoulas, Angelos; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Terzoudi, Georgia I

    2016-12-01

    High-dose assessments using the conventional dicentric assay are essentially restricted to doses up to 5 Gy and only to lymphocytes that succeed to proceed to first post-exposure mitosis. Since G2-checkpoint activation facilitates DNA damage recognition and arrest of damaged cells, caffeine is used to release G2-blocked lymphocytes overcoming the mitotic index and dicentric yield saturation problems, enabling thus dicentric analysis even at high-dose exposures. Using the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique with telomere and centromere peptide nucleic acid probes, the released lymphocytes, identified as metaphases with decondensed chromosomes following 1.5 h caffeine treatment, show increased yield of dicentrics compared to that obtained in lymphocytes that reach metaphase without G2-checkpoint abrogation by caffeine. Here, a 3-h caffeine/colcemid co-treatment before harvesting at 55 h post-exposure is used so that the dicentric analysis using Giemsa staining is based predominantly on lymphocytes released from the G2-block, increasing thus dicentric yield and enabling construction of a dose-response calibration curve with improved precision of high-dose estimates.

  20. Exposure to ionizing radiation reveals global dose- and time-dependent changes in the urinary metabolome of rat

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tytus D.; Tyburski, John B.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Kalinich, John F.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    The potential for exposures to ionizing radiation has increased in recent years. Although advances have been made, understanding the global metabolic response as a function of both dose and exposure time is challenging considering the complexity of the responses. Herein we report our findings on the dose- and time-dependency of the urinary response to ionizing radiation in the male rat using radiation metabolomics. Urine samples were collected from adult male rats, exposed to 0.5 to 10 Gy γ–radiation, both before from 6 to 72 h following exposures. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and deconvoluted mass chromatographic data were initially analyzed by principal component analysis. However, the breadth and complexity of the data necessitated the development of a novel approach to summarizing biofluid constituents after exposure, called Visual Analysis of Metabolomics Package (VAMP). VAMP revealed clear urine metabolite profile differences to as little as 0.5 Gy after 6 h exposure. Via VAMP, it was discovered that the response to radiation exposure found in rat urine is characterized by an overall net down-regulation of ion excretion with only a modest number of ions excreted in excess over pre-exposure levels. Our results show both similarities and differences with the published mouse urine response and a dose- and time-dependent net decrease in urine ion excretion associated with radiation exposure. These findings mark an important step in the development of minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. VAMP should have general applicability in metabolomics to visualize overall differences and trends in many sample sets. PMID:26557048

  1. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm{sup 2}, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 {+-} 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without

  2. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Loera, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined. PMID:26885512

  3. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Hernandez, Alberto J; Loera, Miriam J; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined.

  4. Annual solar UV exposure and biological effective dose rates on the Martian surface.

    PubMed

    Patel, M R; Bérces, A; Kerékgyárto, T; Rontó, Gy; Lammer, H; Zarnecki, J C

    2004-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) environment of Mars has been investigated to gain an understanding of the variation of exposure throughout a Martian year, and link this flux to biological effects and possible survival of organisms at the Martian surface. To gain an idea of how the solar UV radiation varies between different regions, including planned landing sites of two future Mars surface missions, we modelled the total solar UV surface flux throughout one Martian year for two different dust scenarios. To understand the degree of solar UV stress on micro-organisms and/or molecules essential for life on the surface of Mars, we also calculated the biologically effective dose (BED) for T7 and Uracil in relevant wavelength regions at the Martian surface as a function of season and latitude, and discuss the biological survival rates in the presence of Martian solar UV radiation. High T7/Uracil BED ratios indicate that even at high latitudes where the UV flux is significantly reduced, the radiation environment is still hostile for life due to the persisting UV-C component of the flux.

  5. Probabilistic modelling of exposure doses and implications for health risk characterization: glycoalkaloids from potatoes.

    PubMed

    Ruprich, J; Rehurkova, I; Boon, P E; Svensson, K; Moussavian, S; Van der Voet, H; Bosgra, S; Van Klaveren, J D; Busk, L

    2009-12-01

    Potatoes are a source of glycoalkaloids (GAs) represented primarily by alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine (about 95%). Content of GAs in tubers is usually 10-100 mg/kg and maximum levels do not exceed 200 mg/kg. GAs can be hazardous for human health. Poisoning involve gastrointestinal ailments and neurological symptoms. A single intake of >1-3 mg/kg b.w. is considered a critical effect dose (CED). Probabilistic modelling of acute and chronic (usual) exposure to GAs was performed in the Czech Republic, Sweden and The Netherlands. National databases on individual consumption of foods, data on concentration of GAs in tubers (439 Czech and Swedish results) and processing factors were used for modelling. Results concluded that potatoes currently available at the European market may lead to acute intakes >1 mg GAs/kg b.w./day for upper tail of the intake distribution (0.01% of population) in all three countries. 50 mg GAs/kg raw unpeeled tubers ensures that at least 99.99% of the population does not exceed the CED. Estimated chronic (usual) intake in participating countries was 0.25, 0.29 and 0.56 mg/kg b.w./day (97.5% upper confidence limit). It remains unclear if the incidence of GAs poisoning is underreported or if assumptions are the worst case for extremely sensitive persons.

  6. [Alteration of thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of endocrine disruptor DDT].

    PubMed

    Iaglova, N V; Iaglov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous substances that exhibit hormone-like action and consequently disrupt homeostatic action of endogenous hormones. DDT is the most common disruptor. The objective was to evaluate changes in thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of DDT. The experiment was performed on male Wistar rats. The rats were given DDT at doses of 1.89±0.86 мg/kg/day and 7.77±0.17 мg/kg/day for 6 and 10 weeks. Dose dependent increase of serum total thyroxine, total triiodthyronine, and thyroid peroxidase was revealed after 6 weeks exposure. After 10 weeks free thyroxine secretion was reduced. Such alterations of the thyroid status are typical for iodine deficient goiter. The data obtained indicate that the main mechanism of DDT action includes disruption of thyroxine secretion by thyrocytes, but not inhibition of deiodinase activity and decrease of blood thyroid binding proteins.

  7. Defining the optimal dose of rifapentine for pulmonary tuberculosis: Exposure-response relations from two phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Savic, R M; Weiner, M; MacKenzie, W R; Engle, M; Whitworth, W C; Johnson, J L; Nsubuga, P; Nahid, P; Nguyen, N V; Peloquin, C A; Dooley, K E; Dorman, S E

    2017-01-25

    Rifapentine is a highly active antituberculosis antibiotic with treatment-shortening potential; however, exposure-response relations and the dose needed for maximal bactericidal activity have not been established. We used pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data from 657 adults with pulmonary tuberculosis participating in treatment trials to compare rifapentine (n = 405) with rifampin (n = 252) as part of intensive-phase therapy. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses were performed with nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Time to stable culture conversion of sputum to negative was determined in cultures obtained over 4 months of therapy. Rifapentine exposures were lower in participants who were coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus, black, male, or fasting when taking drug. Rifapentine exposure, large lung cavity size, and geographic region were independently associated with time to culture conversion in liquid media. Maximal treatment efficacy is likely achieved with rifapentine at 1,200 mg daily. Patients with large lung cavities appear less responsive to treatment, even at high rifapentine doses.

  8. Improving Environmental Health Literacy and Justice through Environmental Exposure Results Communication

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D.; Brody, Julia Green; Lothrop, Nathan; Loh, Miranda; Beamer, Paloma I.; Brown, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the short- and long-term impacts of a biomonitoring and exposure project and reporting personal results back to study participants is critical for guiding future efforts, especially in the context of environmental justice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate learning outcomes from environmental communication efforts and whether environmental health literacy goals were met in an environmental justice community. We conducted 14 interviews with parents who had participated in the University of Arizona’s Metals Exposure Study in Homes and analyzed their responses using NVivo, a qualitative data management and analysis program. Key findings were that participants used the data to cope with their challenging circumstances, the majority of participants described changing their families’ household behaviors, and participants reported specific interventions to reduce family exposures. The strength of this study is that it provides insight into what people learn and gain from such results communication efforts, what participants want to know, and what type of additional information participants need to advance their environmental health literacy. This information can help improve future report back efforts and advance environmental health and justice. PMID:27399755

  9. DNA Damage Following Pulmonary Exposure by Instillation to Low Doses of Carbon Black (Printex 90) Nanoparticles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Saber, Anne T; Bengtson, Stefan; Jackson, Petra; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    We previously observed genotoxic effects of carbon black nanoparticles at low doses relative to the Danish Occupational Exposure Limit (3.5 mg/m3). Furthermore, DNA damage occurred in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in the absence of inflammation, indicating that inflammation is not required for the genotoxic effects of carbon black. In this study, we investigated inflammatory and acute phase response in addition to genotoxic effects occurring following exposure to nanoparticulate carbon black (NPCB) at even lower doses. C57BL/6JBomTac mice were examined 1, 3, and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.67, 2, 6, and 162 µg Printex 90 NPCB and vehicle. Cellular composition and protein concentration was evaluated in BAL fluid as markers of inflammatory response and cell damage. DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung, and liver tissue were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. The pulmonary acute phase response was analyzed by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Instillation of the low doses of NPCB induced a slight neutrophil influx one day after exposure. Pulmonary exposure to small doses of NPCB caused an increase in DNA strand breaks in BAL cells and lung tissue measured using the comet assay. We interpret the increased DNA strand breaks occurring following these low exposure doses of NPCB as DNA damage caused by primary genotoxicity in the absence of substantial inflammation, cell damage, and acute phase response. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:41–49, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society PMID:25042074

  10. Cancer and non-cancer brain and eye effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background According to a fundamental law of radiobiology (“Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau”, 1906), the brain is a paradigm of a highly differentiated organ with low mitotic activity, and is thus radio-resistant. This assumption has been challenged by recent evidence discussed in the present review. Results Ionizing radiation is an established environmental cause of brain cancer. Although direct evidence is lacking in contemporary fluoroscopy due to obvious sample size limitation, limited follow-up time and lack of focused research, anecdotal reports of clusters have appeared in the literature, raising the suspicion that brain cancer may be a professional disease of interventional cardiologists. In addition, although terminally differentiated neurons have reduced or mild proliferative capacity, and are therefore not regarded as critical radiation targets, adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb, and is important for mood, learning/memory and normal olfactory function, whose impairment is a recognized early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases. The head doses involved in radiotherapy are high, usually above 2 Sv, whereas the low-dose range of professional exposure typically involves lifetime cumulative whole-body exposure in the low-dose range of < 200 mSv, but with head exposure which may (in absence of protection) arrive at a head equivalent dose of 1 to 3 Sv after a professional lifetime (corresponding to a brain equivalent dose around 500 mSv). Conclusions At this point, a systematic assessment of brain (cancer and non-cancer) effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiologists and staff is needed. PMID:22540409

  11. Using electron beam radiation to simulate the dose distribution for whole body solar particle event proton exposure

    PubMed Central

    Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Avery, Stephen; Kennedy, Ann R.; McDonough, James

    2013-01-01

    As a part of the near solar system exploration program, astronauts may receive significant total body proton radiation exposures during a solar particle event (SPE). In the Center for Acute Radiation Research (CARR), symptoms of the acute radiation sickness syndrome induced by conventional radiation are being compared to those induced by SPE-like proton radiation, to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of SPE protons. In an SPE, the astronaut’s whole body will be exposed to radiation consisting mainly of protons with energies below 50 MeV. In addition to providing for a potentially higher RBE than conventional radiation, the energy distribution for an SPE will produce a relatively inhomogeneous total body dose distribution, with a significantly higher dose delivered to the skin and subcutaneous tissues than to the internal organs. These factors make it difficult to use a 60Co standard for RBE comparisons in our experiments. Here, the novel concept of using megavoltage electron beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation is described. In these studies, Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the dose distribution of electron beam radiation in small mammals such as mice and ferrets as well as large mammals such as pigs. These studies will help to better define the topography of the time-dose-fractionation versus biological response landscape for astronaut exposure to an SPE. PMID:20725839

  12. Using electron beam radiation to simulate the dose distribution for whole body solar particle event proton exposure.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Keith A; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Avery, Stephen; Kennedy, Ann R; McDonough, James

    2010-11-01

    As a part of the near solar system exploration program, astronauts may receive significant total body proton radiation exposures during a solar particle event (SPE). In the Center for Acute Radiation Research (CARR), symptoms of the acute radiation sickness syndrome induced by conventional radiation are being compared to those induced by SPE-like proton radiation, to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of SPE protons. In an SPE, the astronaut's whole body will be exposed to radiation consisting mainly of protons with energies below 50 MeV. In addition to providing for a potentially higher RBE than conventional radiation, the energy distribution for an SPE will produce a relatively inhomogeneous total body dose distribution, with a significantly higher dose delivered to the skin and subcutaneous tissues than to the internal organs. These factors make it difficult to use a (60)Co standard for RBE comparisons in our experiments. Here, the novel concept of using megavoltage electron beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation is described. In these studies, Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the dose distribution of electron beam radiation in small mammals such as mice and ferrets as well as large mammals such as pigs. These studies will help to better define the topography of the time-dose-fractionation versus biological response landscape for astronaut exposure to an SPE.

  13. DEPDOSE: An interactive, microcomputer based program to calculate doses from exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground

    SciTech Connect

    Beres, D.A.; Hull, A.P.

    1991-12-01

    DEPDOSE is an interactive, menu driven, microcomputer based program designed to rapidly calculate committed dose from radionuclides deposited on the ground. The program is designed to require little or no computer expertise on the part of the user. The program consisting of a dose calculation section and a library maintenance section. These selections are available to the user from the main menu. The dose calculation section provides the user with the ability to calculate committed doses, determine the decay time needed to reach a particular dose, cross compare deposition data from separate locations, and approximate a committed dose based on a measured exposure rate. The library maintenance section allows the user to review and update dose modifier data as well as to build and maintain libraries of radionuclide data, dose conversion factors, and default deposition data. The program is structured to provide the user easy access for reviewing data prior to running the calculation. Deposition data can either be entered by the user or imported from other databases. Results can either be displayed on the screen or sent to the printer.

  14. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy: the effect of oral exposure dose on attack rate and incubation period in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wells, G A H; Konold, T; Arnold, M E; Austin, A R; Hawkins, S A C; Stack, M; Simmons, M M; Lee, Y H; Gavier-Widén, D; Dawson, M; Wilesmith, J W

    2007-04-01

    The dose-response of cattle exposed to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent is an important component of modelling exposure risks for animals and humans and thereby, the modulation of surveillance and control strategies for BSE. In two experiments calves were dosed orally with a range of amounts of a pool of brainstems from BSE-affected cattle. Infectivity in the pool was determined by end-point titration in mice. Recipient cattle were monitored for clinical disease and, from the incidence of pathologically confirmed cases and their incubation periods (IPs), the attack rate and IP distribution according to dose were estimated. The dose at which 50 % of cattle would be clinically affected was estimated at 0.20 g brain material used in the experiment, with 95 % confidence intervals of 0.04-1.00 g. The IP was highly variable across all dose groups and followed a log-normal distribution, with decreasing mean as dose increased. There was no evidence of a threshold dose at which the probability of infection became vanishingly small, with 1/15 (7 %) of animals affected at the lowest dose (1 mg).

  15. Influence of age, sex and calendar year on lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose from diagnostic radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Meiboom, Merle Friederike; Weitmann, Kerstin; Terschüren, Claudia; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the relevance of different factors influencing lifetime accumulated red bone marrow dose, such as calendar year, age and sex. The lifetime dose was estimated for controls interviewed in person (N = 2811, 37.5% women) of the population-based representative Northern Germany Leukemia and Lymphoma Study. Data were assessed in standardized computer-assisted personal interviews. The calculation of doses is based on a comprehensive quantification model including calendar year, sex, kind of examination, and technical development. In multivariate regression models the annual red bone marrow dose was analyzed depending on age, sex and calendar year to consider simultaneously temporal changes in radiologic practice and individual risk factors. While the number of examinations continuously rises over time, the dose shows two peaks around 1950 and after 1980. Men are exposed to higher doses than woman. Until 1970 traditional examinations like conventional and mass screening examinations caused the main dose. They were then replaced by technically advanced examinations mainly computed tomography and cardiac catheter. The distribution of the red bone marrow dose over lifetime depends highly on the technical standards and radiation protection survey. To a lesser extent it is influenced by age and sex of the subjects. Thus epidemiological studies concerning the assessment of radiation exposure should consider the calendar year in which the examination was conducted.

  16. Evidence for Radiation Hormesis After In Vitro Exposure of Human Lymphocytes to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation§

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Scott, Bobby R.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that adding a very small gamma-ray dose to a small alpha radiation dose can completely suppress lung cancer induction by alpha radiation (a gamma-ray hormetic effect). Here we investigated the possibility of gamma-ray hormesis during low-dose neutron irradiation, since a small contribution to the total radiation dose from neutrons involves gamma rays. Using binucleated cells with micronuclei (micronucleated cells) among in vitro monoenergetic-neutron-irradiated human lymphocytes as a measure of residual damage, we investigated the influence of the small gamma-ray contribution to the dose on suppressing residual damage. We used residual damage data from previous experiments that involved neutrons with five different energies (0.22-, 0.44-, 1.5-, 5.9-, and 13.7-million electron volts [MeV]). Corresponding gamma-ray contributions to the dose were approximately 1%, 1%, 2%, 6%, and 6%, respectively. Total absorbed radiation doses were 0, 10, 50, and 100 mGy for each neutron source. We demonstrate for the first time a protective effect (reduced residual damage) of the small gamma-ray contribution to the neutron dose. Using similar data for exposure to gamma rays only, we also demonstrate a protective effect of 10 mGy (but not 50 or 100 mGy) related to reducing the frequency of micronucleated cells to below the spontaneous level. PMID:18846261

  17. Association of Chromosome Translocation Rate with Low Dose Occupational Radiation Exposures in U.S. Radiologic Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.; Kwon, Deukwoo; Doi, Kazataka; Simon, Steven L.; Preston, Dale L.; Doody, Michele M.; Lee, Terrence; Miller, Jeremy S.; Kampa, Diane M.; Bhatti, Parveen; Tucker, James D.; Linet, Martha S.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are a well-recognized biological marker of radiation exposure and cancer risk. However, there is uncertainty about the lowest dose at which excess translocations can be detected, and whether there is temporal decay of induced translocations in radiation-exposed populations. Dosimetric uncertainties can substantially alter the shape of dose-response relationships; although regression-calibration methods have been used in some datasets, these have not been applied in radio-occupational studies, where there are also complex patterns of shared and unshared errors that these methods do not account for. In this article we evaluated the relationship between estimated occupational ionizing radiation doses and chromosome translocation rates using fluorescent in situ hybridization in 238 U.S. radiologic technologists selected from a large cohort. Estimated cumulative red bone marrow doses (mean 29.3 mGy, range 0–135.7 mGy) were based on available badge–dose measurement data and on questionnaire-reported work history factors. Dosimetric assessment uncertainties were evaluated using regression calibration, Bayesian and Monte Carlo maximum likelihood methods, taking account of shared and unshared error and adjusted for overdispersion. There was a significant dose response for estimated occupational radiation exposure, adjusted for questionnaire-based personal diagnostic radiation, age, sex and study group (5.7 translocations per 100 whole genome cell equivalents per Gy, 95% CI 0.2, 11.3, P = 0.0440). A significant increasing trend with dose continued to be observed for individuals with estimated doses <100 mGy. For combined estimated occupational and personal-diagnostic-medical radiation exposures, there was a borderline-significant modifying effect of age (P 0.0704), but little evidence (P > 0.5) of temporal decay of induced translocations. The three methods of analysis to adjust for dose uncertainty gave similar results. In summary, chromosome

  18. Association of chromosome translocation rate with low dose occupational radiation exposures in U.S. radiologic technologists.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Kwon, Deukwoo; Doi, Kazataka; Simon, Steven L; Preston, Dale L; Doody, Michele M; Lee, Terrence; Miller, Jeremy S; Kampa, Diane M; Bhatti, Parveen; Tucker, James D; Linet, Martha S; Sigurdson, Alice J

    2014-07-01

    Chromosome translocations are a well-recognized biological marker of radiation exposure and cancer risk. However, there is uncertainty about the lowest dose at which excess translocations can be detected, and whether there is temporal decay of induced translocations in radiation-exposed populations. Dosimetric uncertainties can substantially alter the shape of dose-response relationships; although regression-calibration methods have been used in some datasets, these have not been applied in radio-occupational studies, where there are also complex patterns of shared and unshared errors that these methods do not account for. In this article we evaluated the relationship between estimated occupational ionizing radiation doses and chromosome translocation rates using fluorescent in situ hybridization in 238 U.S. radiologic technologists selected from a large cohort. Estimated cumulative red bone marrow doses (mean 29.3 mGy, range 0-135.7 mGy) were based on available badge-dose measurement data and on questionnaire-reported work history factors. Dosimetric assessment uncertainties were evaluated using regression calibration, Bayesian and Monte Carlo maximum likelihood methods, taking account of shared and unshared error and adjusted for overdispersion. There was a significant dose response for estimated occupational radiation exposure, adjusted for questionnaire-based personal diagnostic radiation, age, sex and study group (5.7 translocations per 100 whole genome cell equivalents per Gy, 95% CI 0.2, 11.3, P = 0.0440). A significant increasing trend with dose continued to be observed for individuals with estimated doses <100 mGy. For combined estimated occupational and personal-diagnostic-medical radiation exposures, there was a borderline-significant modifying effect of age (P = 0.0704), but little evidence (P > 0.5) of temporal decay of induced translocations. The three methods of analysis to adjust for dose uncertainty gave similar results. In summary, chromosome

  19. Assessment of the Technologies for Molecular Biodosimetry for Human Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Symposium: Agenda and Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Matthew A.; Ramakrishnan, Narayani

    2009-11-16

    In the event of a radiological accident, the rapid evaluation of the individual absorbed dose is paramount to discriminate those individuals who must receive medical attention. New research with genomic- and proteomic-wide tools is showing that within minutes to hours after exposure to ionizing radiation the cellular machinery is modified. For example: large-scale changes occur in the gene expression profiles involving a broad variety of cellular pathways after a wide range of both low dose (<10 cGy) and high dose (>10 cGy) ionizing radiation exposures. Symposium 12 was organized to address a wide range of biological effects using the latest technologies. To address current models following ionizing radiation exposure, methods in biodosimetry and dose effects the symposia featured a general overview titled “Model Systems and Current Approaches in Biodosimetry” by Matthew A. Coleman, from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a talk entitled “Brief Overview of Biodosimetry Projects in the NIH Rad/Nuc Program” by Dr. Narayani Ramakrishnan, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. These two talk set the tone for issues in data and model integration as well as addressing the national need for robust technologies for biological dosimetry. The report continues with more description of the presentations, along with the agenda and abstracts of the papers presented.

  20. Comparative MicroRNA Expression Patterns in Fibroblasts after Low and High Doses of Low-LET Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Olivier C.; Xu, Suying; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu; Wang, Eugenia

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation causes DNA damage to cells, and provokes a plethora of cellular responses controlled by unique gene-directed signaling pathways. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (22-nucleotide), non-coding RNAs which functionally silence gene expression by either degrading the messages or inhibiting translation. Here we investigate radiation-dependent changes in these negative regulators by comparing the expression patterns of all 462 known human miRNAs in fibroblasts, after exposure to low (0.1 Gy) or high (2 Gy) doses of X-rays at 30 min, 2, 6 and 24 hrs post-treatment. The expression patterns of microRNAs after low and high doses of radiation show a similar qualitative down-regulation trend at early (0.5 hr) and late (24 hr) time points, with a quantitatively steeper slope following the 2 Gy exposures. Interestingly, an interruption of this downward trend is observed after the 2 Gy exposure, i.e. a significant up-regulation of microRNAs at 2 hrs, then reverting to the downward trend by 6 hrs; this interruption at the intermediate time point was not observed with the 0.1 Gy exposure. At the early time point (0.5 hr), candidate gene targets of selected down-regulated microRNAs, common to both 0.1 and 2 Gy exposures, were those functioning in chromatin remodeling. Candidate target genes of unique up-regulated microRNAs seen at a 2 hr intermediate time point, after the 2 Gy exposure only, are those involved in cell death signaling. Finally, putative target genes of down-regulated microRNAs seen at the late (24 hr) time point after either doses of radiation are those involved in the up-regulation of DNA repair, cell signaling and homeostasis. Thus we hypothesize that after radiation exposure, microRNAs acting as hub negative regulators for unique signaling pathways needed to be down-regulated so as to de-repress their target genes for the proper cellular responses, including DNA repair and cell maintenance. The unique microRNAs up-regulated at 2 hr after 2

  1. Arsenic exposure and bladder cancer: quantitative assessment of studies in human populations to detect risks at low doses.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Joyce S; Alexander, Dominik D; Perez, Vanessa; Mink, Pamela J

    2014-03-20

    While exposures to high levels of arsenic in drinking water are associated with excess cancer risk (e.g., skin, bladder, and lung), exposures at lower levels (e.g., <100-200 µg/L) generally are not. Lack of significant associations may result from methodological issues (e.g., inadequate statistical power, exposure misclassification), or a different dose-response relationship at low exposures, possibly associated with a toxicological mode of action that requires a sufficient dose for increased tumor formation. The extent to which bladder cancer risk for low-level arsenic exposure can be statistically measured by epidemiological studies was examined using an updated meta-analysis of bladder cancer risk with data from two new publications. The summary relative risk estimate (SRRE) for all nine studies was elevated slightly, but not significantly (1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-1.21, p-Heterogeneity [p-H]=0.543). The SRRE among never smokers was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.66-1.08, p-H=0.915), whereas the SRRE was positive and more heterogeneous among ever smokers (1.18; 95% CI: 0.97-1.44, p-H=0.034). The SRRE was statistically significantly lower than relative risks predicted for never smokers in the United States based on linear extrapolation of risks from higher doses in southwest Taiwan to arsenic water exposures >10 µg/L for more than one-third of a lifetime. By contrast, for all study subjects, relative risks predicted for one-half of lifetime exposure to 50 µg/L were just above the upper 95% CI on the SRRE. Thus, results from low-exposure studies, particularly for never smokers, were statistically inconsistent with predicted risk based on high-dose extrapolation. Additional studies that better characterize tobacco use and stratify analyses of arsenic and bladder cancer by smoking status are necessary to further examine risks of arsenic exposure for smokers.

  2. What Have "Omics" Taught Us about the Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-04-27

    There is a plethora of data available on the DNA damages associated with exposures to ionizing radiation and the subsequent cellular responses. Indeed, much of radiation research has focused on these initial insults and induced responses, particularly DNA repair, cell signaling pathways, cell cycle checkpoint control, mutation induction, chromosomal rearrangements, transformation and apoptosis etc. While many of these endpoints correlate with exposure dose, few, if any, provide substantive information on human health risk(s) associated with radiation exposure. Here the contribution of recent advances in high throughput ‘omics technologies are evaluated to examine what they have taught us about health risk(s) to humans associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.

  3. Negative effects of low dose atrazine exposure on the development of effective immunity to FV3 in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Sifkarovski, Jason; Grayfer, Leon; De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Lawrence, B Paige; Robert, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    The recent dramatic increase of the prevalence and range of amphibian host species and populations infected by ranaviruses such as Frog Virus 3 (FV3) raises concerns about the efficacies of amphibian antiviral immunity. In this context, the potential negative effects of water contaminants such as the herbicide atrazine, at environmentally relevant levels, on host antiviral immunity remains unclear. Here we describe the use of the amphibian Xenopus laevis as an ecotoxicology platform to elucidate the consequences of exposure to ecologically relevant doses of atrazine on amphibian antiviral immunity. X. laevis were exposed at tadpole and adult stages as well as during metamorphosis to atrazine (range from 0.1 to 10.0 ppb) prior to infection with FV3. Quantitative analysis of gene expression revealed significant changes in the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α and the antiviral type I IFN gene in response to FV3 infection. This was most marked in tadpoles that were exposed to atrazine at doses as low 0.1 ppb. Furthermore, atrazine exposure significantly compromised tadpole survival following FV3 infections. In contrast, acute atrazine exposure of mature adult frogs did not induce detectable effects on anti-FV3 immunity, but adults that were exposed to atrazine during metamorphosis exhibited pronounced defects in FV3-induced TNF-α gene expression responses and slight diminution in type I IFN gene induction. Thus, even at low doses, atrazine exposure culminates in impaired development of amphibian antiviral defenses.

  4. Low-dose exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) increases susceptibility to testicular autoimmunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Shuichi; Naito, Munekazu; Kuramasu, Miyuki; Ogawa, Yuki; Terayama, Hayato; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) induces spermatogenic disturbance (SD) through oxidative stress, and affects the immune system by acting as an adjuvant. Recently, we reported that in mice, a low dose of DEHP, which did not affect spermatogenesis, was able to alter the testicular immune microenvironment. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) can be induced by repeated immunization with testicular antigens, and its pathology is characterized by production of autoantibodies and SD. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a low-dose DEHP on the susceptibility of mice to EAO. The exposure to DEHP-containing feed (0.01%) caused a modest functional damage to the blood-testis barrier (BTB) with an increase in testicular number of interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-positive cells and resulted in the production of autoantibodies targeting haploid cells, but did not affect spermatogenesis. While only single immunization with testicular antigens caused very mild EAO, the concurrent DEHP exposure induced severe EAO with significant increases in number of interferon gamma-positive cells and macrophages, as well as lymphocytic infiltration and serum autoantibody titer accompanied by severe SD. To summarize, the exposure of mice to the low-dose DEHP does not induce significant SD, but it may cause an increase in IFN-γ positive cells and modest functional damage to the BTB in the testis. These changes lead to an autoimmune response against haploid cell autoantigens, resulting in increased susceptibility to EAO.

  5. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Dewji, S.; Bellamy, M.; Hertel, N.; ...

    2015-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to estimate dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered 131I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with 131I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensivemore » effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the 131I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of 131I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after 131I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  6. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with {sup 131}I thyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dewji, S. Bellamy, M.; Leggett, R.; Eckerman, K.; Hertel, N.; Sherbini, S.; Saba, M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Estimated dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered {sup 131}I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with {sup 131}I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensive effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the {sup 131}I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of {sup 131}I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after {sup 131}I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  7. An animal model to study health effects during continuous low-dose exposure to the nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Rocksén, David; Elfsmark, Daniel; Heldestad, Victoria; Wallgren, Karin; Cassel, Gudrun; Göransson Nyberg, Ann

    2008-08-19

    In the present study, we have developed an animal model to study long-term health effects of continuous exposure of toxic chemical agents, in awake, freely moving rats. The aim was to evaluate the effect of low-dose exposure of the nerve agent VX, and to find specific biomarkers for intoxication. To exclude the influence of stress, we used an implanted radio-telemetric device for online registration of physiological parameters, and an osmotic pump, implanted subcutaneously, for continuous exposure of the toxic agent. Our results showed that the lowest observable effect dose of VX in Wistar rats was 5 microg/kg/24 h, after continuous exposure by the osmotic pump. Although we observed significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in blood and a significant decrease in body weight gain at this dose, no change in blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory rate was registered. However, a significant decrease in the thyroid hormone, free T4, was measured in blood after 8 weeks, indicating that low doses of VX might affect the thyroid function. Rats given repeated daily injections were more sensitive to VX and needed only 1/10 of the concentration to reach a similar level of AChE inhibition, compared to animals exposed by the osmotic pump. Moreover, the results showed that exposure of VX in our experimental design, does not induce an increase in corticosterone blood levels. Thus, the model used in this investigation renders minimal stress and will not cause unnecessary pain to the animals, indicating that this model could be a useful tool to study long-term effects of various toxic substances in freely moving rats.

  8. LOW-DOSE AIRBORNE ENDOTOXIN EXPOSURE ENHANCES BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS TO INHALED ALLERGEN IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endotoxin exposure has been associated with both protection against development of TH2-immune responses during childhood and exacerbation of asthma in persons who already have allergic airway inflammation.1 Occupational and experimental inhalation exposures to endotoxin have been...

  9. RECONSTRUCTING EXPOSURE SCENARIOS USING DOSE BIOMARKERS - AN APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use Bayesian uncertainty analysis to explore how to estimate pollutant exposures from biomarker concentrations. The growing number of national databases with exposure data makes such an analysis possible. They contain datasets of pharmacokinetic biomarkers for many polluta...

  10. MODELED ESTIMATES OF CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE FOR THE MINNESOTA AND ARIZONA NHEXAS POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a probabilistic, multimedia, multipathway exposure model and assessment for chlorpyrifos developed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS). The model was constructed using available information prior to completion of the NHEXAS stu...

  11. ASSESSING MULTIMEDIA/MULTIPATHWAY EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC USING A MECHANISTIC SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of case studies is presented focusing on multimedia/multipathway population exposures to arsenic, employing the Population Based Modeling approach of the MENTOR (Modeling Environment for Total Risks) framework. This framework considers currently five exposure routes: i...

  12. A NEW SEMI-EMPIRICAL AMBIENT TO EFFECTIVE DOSE CONVERSION MODEL FOR THE PREDICTIVE CODE FOR AIRCREW RADIATION EXPOSURE (PCAIRE).

    PubMed

    Dumouchel, T; McCall, M; Lemay, F; Bennett, L; Lewis, B; Bean, M

    2016-12-01

    The Predictive Code for Aircrew Radiation Exposure (PCAIRE) is a semi-empirical code that estimates both ambient dose equivalent, based on years of on-board measurements, and effective dose to aircrew. Currently, PCAIRE estimates effective dose by converting the ambient dose equivalent to effective dose (E/H) using a model that is based on radiation transport calculations and on the radiation weighting factors recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 60. In this study, a new semi-empirical E/H model is proposed to replace the existing transport calculation models. The new model is based on flight data measured using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). The measured flight TEPC data are separated into a low- and a high-lineal-energy spectrum using an amplitude-weighted (137)Cs TEPC spectrum. The high-lineal-energy spectrum is determined by subtracting the low-lineal-energy spectrum from the measured flight TEPC spectrum. With knowledge of E/H for the low- and high-lineal-energy spectra, the total E/H is estimated for a given flight altitude and geographic location. The semi-empirical E/H model also uses new radiation weighting factors to align the model with the most recent ICRP 103 recommendations. The ICRP 103-based semi-empirical effective dose model predicts that there is a ∼30 % reduction in dose in comparison with the ICRP 60-based model. Furthermore, the ambient dose equivalent is now a more conservative dose estimate for jet aircraft altitudes in the range of 7-13 km (FL230-430). This new semi-empirical E/H model is validated against E/H predicted from a Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code simulation of cosmic ray propagation through the Earth's atmosphere. Its implementation allows PCAIRE to provide an accurate semi-empirical estimate of the effective dose.

  13. Exposing Exposure: Enhancing Patient Safety through Automated Data Mining of Nuclear Medicine Reports for Quality Assurance and Organ Dose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Ichiro; Wasser, Elliot J.; Warden, Graham I.; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate an open-source informatics toolkit capable of creating a radiation exposure data repository from existing nuclear medicine report archives and to demonstrate potential applications of such data for quality assurance and longitudinal patient-specific radiation dose monitoring. Materials and Methods: This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Informed consent was waived. An open-source toolkit designed to automate the extraction of data on radiopharmaceuticals and administered activities from nuclear medicine reports was developed. After iterative code training, manual validation was performed on 2359 nuclear medicine reports randomly selected from September 17, 1985, to February 28, 2011. Recall (sensitivity) and precision (positive predictive value) were calculated with 95% binomial confidence intervals. From the resultant institutional data repository, examples of usage in quality assurance efforts and patient-specific longitudinal radiation dose monitoring obtained by calculating organ doses from the administered activity and radiopharmaceutical of each examination were provided. Results: Validation statistics yielded a combined recall of 97.6% ± 0.7 (95% confidence interval) and precision of 98.7% ± 0.5. Histograms of administered activity for fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose and iodine 131 sodium iodide were generated. An organ dose heatmap which displays a sample patient’s dose accumulation from multiple nuclear medicine examinations was created. Conclusion: Large-scale repositories of radiation exposure data can be extracted from institutional nuclear medicine report archives with high recall and precision. Such repositories enable new approaches in radiation exposure patient safety initiatives and patient-specific radiation dose monitoring. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22627599

  14. Passive dosing versus solvent spiking for controlling and maintaining hydrophobic organic compound exposure in the Microtox® assay.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kilian E C; Jeong, Yoonah; Kim, Jongwoon

    2015-11-01

    Microbial toxicity bioassays such as the Microtox® test are ubiquitously applied to measure the toxicity of chemicals and environmental samples. In many ways their operation is conducive to the testing of organic chemicals. They are of short duration, use glass cuvettes and take place at reduced temperatures in medium lacking sorbing components. All of these are expected to reduce sorptive and volatile losses, but particularly for hydrophobic organics the role of such losses in determining the bioassay response remains unclear. This study determined the response of the Microtox® test when using solvent spiking compared to passive dosing for introducing the model hydrophobic compounds acenaphthene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene. Compared to solvent spiking, the apparent sensitivity of the Microtox® test with passive dosing was 3.4 and 12.4 times higher for acenaphthene and phenanthrene, respectively. Furthermore, fluoranthene only gave a consistent response with passive dosing. Benzo(a)pyrene did not result in a response with either spiking or passive dosing even at aqueous solubility. Such differences in the apparent sensitivity of the Microtox® test can be traced back to the precise definition of the dissolved exposure concentrations and the buffering of losses with passive dosing. This highlights the importance of exposure control even in simple and short-term microbial bioassays such as the Microtox® test.

  15. A macroscopic and microscopic study of radon exposure using Geant4 and MCNPX to estimate dose rates and DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Akker, Mary Evelyn

    Radon is considered the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Epidemiological studies have been conducted in miner cohorts as well as general populations to estimate the risks associated with high and low dose exposures. There are problems with extrapolating risk estimates to low dose exposures, mainly that the dose-response curve at low doses is not well understood. Calculated dosimetric quantities give average energy depositions in an organ or a whole body, but morphological features of an individual can affect these values. As opposed to human phantom models, Computed Tomography (CT) scans provide unique, patient-specific geometries that are valuable in modeling the radiological effects of the short-lived radon progeny sources. Monte Carlo particle transport code Geant4 was used with the CT scan data to model radon inhalation in the main bronchial bifurcation. The equivalent dose rates are near the lower bounds of estimates found in the literature, depending on source volume. To complement the macroscopic study, simulations were run in a small tissue volume in Geant4-DNA toolkit. As an expansion of Geant4 meant to simulate direct physical interactions at the cellular level, the particle track structure of the radon progeny alphas can be analyzed to estimate the damage that can occur in sensitive cellular structures like the DNA molecule. These estimates of DNA double strand breaks are lower than those found in Geant4-DNA studies. Further refinements of the microscopic model are at the cutting edge of nanodosimetry research.

  16. A mouse model of cytogenetic analysis to evaluate caesium137 radiation dose exposure and contamination level in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Roch-Lefèvre, Sandrine; Martin-Bodiot, Cécile; Grégoire, Eric; Desbrée, Aurélie; Roy, Laurence; Barquinero, Joan Francesc

    2016-03-01

    In case of external overexposure to ionizing radiation, an estimation of its genotoxic effects on exposed individuals can be made retrospectively by the measurement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations on circulating lymphocytes. Compared with external irradiation, intakes of radionuclides may, however, lead to specific features influencing dose distribution at the scale of body, of tissue or even of cell. Therefore, in case of internal contamination by radionuclides, experimental studies, particularly using animal models, are required to better understand mechanisms of their genotoxic effects and to better estimate the absorbed dose. The present study was designed to evaluate a cytogenetic method in mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes that would allow determination of yields and complexities of chromosome aberrations after low-dose rate exposure to (137)Cs delivered in vitro either by irradiation or by contamination. By using M-FISH analysis, we compared the low-dose rate responses observed in mouse to the high-dose rate responses observed both in mouse and in human. Promising similarities between the two species in the relative biological effect evaluation show that our cytogenetic model established in mouse might be useful to evaluate various radiation exposures, particularly relevant in case of intakes of radionuclides.

  17. Direct and indirect tasks on assessment of dose and time distributions and thresholds of acute radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Osovets, S V; Azizova, T V; Day, R D; Wald, N; Moseeva, M B

    2012-02-01

    Mathematical methods were developed to construct dose and time distributions and their associated risks and threshold values for lethal and non-lethal effects of acute radiation exposure to include mortality and incidence, prodromal vomiting, and agranulocytosis. A new distribution (T-model) was obtained to describe time parameters of acute radiation syndrome such as the latency period, time to onset of vomiting, and time to initiation of agranulocytosis. Based on the dose and time distributions, the parameter translation method was defined using an orthogonal regression, which allows one to solve for these distributions in the case of acute radiation exposure. The assessment of threshold doses was performed for some effects of acute radiation syndrome: for the latency period, ∼6-8 Gy absorbed dose and ∼0.7-0.9 h time to onset of vomiting; and for incidence (agranulocytosis), ∼2-3 Gy absorbed dose and ∼2-3 h time to onset of vomiting. The obtained new formula for assessment of radiation risk is applicable to the time parameters of acute radiation syndrome.

  18. Dosimetric models of the eye and lens of the eye and their use in assessing dose coefficients for ocular exposures.

    PubMed

    Bolch, W E; Dietze, G; Petoussi-Henss, N; Zankl, M

    2015-06-01

    Based upon recent epidemiological studies of ocular exposure, the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in ICRP Publication 118 states that the threshold dose for radiation-induced cataracts is now considered to be approximately 0.5 Gy for both acute and fractionated exposures. Consequently, a reduction was also recommended for the occupational annual equivalent dose to the lens of the eye from 150 mSv to 20 mSv, averaged over defined periods of 5 years. To support ocular dose assessment and optimisation, Committee 2 included Annex F within ICRP Publication 116 . Annex F provides dose coefficients - absorbed dose per particle fluence - for photon, electron, and neutron irradiation of the eye and lens of the eye using two dosimetric models. The first approach uses the reference adult male and female voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. The second approach uses the stylised eye model of Behrens et al., which itself is based on ocular dimensional data given in Charles and Brown. This article will review the data and models of Annex F with particular emphasis on how these models treat tissue regions thought to be associated with stem cells at risk.

  19. Dose-Response Relationship between Inorganic Arsenic Exposure and Lung Cancer among Arseniasis Residents with Low Methylation Capacity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Hsu, Ling-I; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-12-22

    Background Exposure to inorganic arsenic (InAs) has been documented as a risk factor for lung cancer. This study examined the association between InAs exposure, its metabolism, and lung cancer occurrence. Methods We followed 1300 residents from an arseniasis area in Taiwan, determined urinary InAs metabolites, and identified 39 lung cancer cases. Cox proportional hazard model was performed. Results The results demonstrated that participants with either the primary methylation index (monomethylarsonic acid [MMA]/InAs) or the secondary methylation index (dimethylarsinic acid[DMA]/MMA) lower than their respective median values were at a higher risk of lung cancer (hazard ratios from 3.41 to 4.66) than those with high methylation capacity. The incidence density of lung cancer increased from 79.9/100000 (year-1) to 467.4/100000 (year-1) for residents with low methylation capacity and from 0 to 158.5/100000 (year-1) for residents with high methylation capacity when the arsenic exposure dose increased from 2-10 ppb to ≥200 ppb, respectively. The analyses revealed a dose-response relationship between lung cancer occurrence and increasing arsenic concentrations in drinking water as well as cumulative arsenic exposure (monotonic trend test; P < .05 and P < .05, respectively) among the residents with low methylation capacity. The relationship between arsenic exposure and lung cancer among high methylaters was not statistically significant. Conclusions Hypomethylation responses to InAs exposure may dose-dependently increase lung cancer occurrence. Impact The high-risk characteristics observed among those exposed should be considered in future preventive medicine and research on arsenic carcinogenesis.

  20. OVERVIEW, PRACTICAL TIPS AND POTENTIAL PITFALLS OF USING AUTOMATIC EXPOSURE CONTROL IN CT: SIEMENS CARE DOSE 4D.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Marcus

    2016-06-01

    Today, computed tomography (CT) systems routinely use automatic exposure control (AEC), which modulates the tube current. However, for optimal use, there are several aspects of an AEC system that need to be considered. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the Siemens CARE Dose 4D AEC system, discuss practical tips and demonstrate potential pitfalls. Two adult anthropomorphic phantoms were examined using two different Siemens CT systems. When optimising the CT radiation dose and image quality, the projection angle of the localiser, patient centring, protocol selection, scanning direction and the use of protective devices requires special attention.

  1. Experimental investigation of radiation effect on erbium-ytterbium co-doped fiber amplifier for space optical communication in low-dose radiation environment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Li, Mi; Tan, Liying; Zhou, Yanping; Yu, Siyuan; Ran, Qiwen

    2009-08-31

    High power erbium-ytterbium co-doped fiber amplifier (EYDFA) has been radiated to the dose of 50 krad at the dose rate of 40 rad/s. Some key parameters have been measured to investigate the radiation effect on the EYDFA for space optical communication. Considering the dose of 50 krad is big enough to the most of low-dose radiation environment, these experimental results will be a good reference for the low-dose inter-satellite optical communication designers.

  2. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes), in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Results A novel air-liquid interface cell exposure system (ALICE) for nanoparticles in liquids is presented and validated. The ALICE generates a dense cloud of droplets with a vibrating membrane nebulizer and utilizes combined cloud settling and single particle sedimentation for fast (~10 min; entire exposure), repeatable (<12%), low-stress and efficient delivery of nanoparticles, or dissolved substances, to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Validation with various types of nanoparticles (Au, ZnO and carbon black nanoparticles) and solutes (such as NaCl) showed that the ALICE provided spatially uniform deposition (<1.6% variability) and had no adverse effect on the viability of a widely used alveolar human epithelial-like cell line (A549). The cell deposited dose can be controlled with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) over a dynamic range of at least 0.02-200 μg/cm2. The cell-specific deposition efficiency is currently limited to 0.072 (7.2% for two commercially available 6-er transwell plates), but a deposition efficiency of up to 0.57 (57%) is possible for better cell coverage of the exposure chamber. Dose-response measurements with ZnO nanoparticles (0.3-8.5 μg/cm2) showed significant differences in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-8) and oxidative stress (HO-1) markers when comparing submerged and air-liquid interface exposures. Both exposure methods showed no cellular response below 1 μg/cm2 ZnO, which indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are not toxic at occupationally allowed exposure levels. Conclusion The ALICE

  3. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate intravaginal ring protects high-dose depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques from multiple SHIV exposures.

    PubMed

    Smith, James M; Srinivasan, Priya; Teller, Ryan S; Lo, Yungtai; Dinh, Chuong T; Kiser, Patrick F; Herold, Betsy C

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical HIV prevention models use either a single high-dose viral challenge in depot medroxyprogesterone acetate-treated macaques or repeated viral challenges in cycling macaques. We tested the efficacy of an intravaginal tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) ring in a model combining repeated 30-mg injections of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate every 6 weeks with vaginal viral challenges weekly for 12 weeks. Twelve macaques were randomized to TDF or placebo rings. All placebo macaques became infected after a median of 2 exposures, whereas only 1 TDF macaque became infected at the eighth exposure (P = 0.0012). The TDF ring provides durable protection in a stringent challenge model.

  4. Neurobehavioral effect of chronic and bolus doses of methylmercury following prenatal exposure in C57BL/6 weanling mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jacky; Inskip, Mike; Newhook, Deborah; Messier, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Several studies with animals have shown that even low and medium prenatal and postnatal exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) can result in locomotor, motor coordination and learning deficits. However, some behavioural effects of MeHg remain controversial and the methods to model human MeHg exposure in animal still remain to be optimized. We investigated the neurobehavioral effects of two different patterns of MeHg exposure. MeHg was given mixed in palatable food that mice readily ate. For the first pattern (chronic group), C57BL/6 mice dams were given 1.4 microg/g body weight (BW)/day (n=20) throughout gestation mixed in palatable food. For the second pattern (bolus) dams were given 6.0 microg/g BW/day mixed in palatable food on gestation day 12 and 16 together with a lower chronic dose of 0.85 microg/g BW/day mixed in palatable food on all remaining gestation days (n=20). Day 12 and 16 were chosen because neuron proliferation and the start of migration for many brain regions occur during that period. Behavioural testing on weanling animals started at 8 weeks. Both the chronic and bolus groups showed an impairment of working memory and visual spatial ability in the radial arm maze task. Other tests did not provide clear evidence that methylmercury exposure had significant adverse effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination or emotional reactivity. However, the chronic groups had a tendency for lower performance in most tests including activity in Skinner box and open field trials, as well as a higher number of anxiety-like behaviors. Chronic exposure to lower levels of MeHg combined to acute exposure with high levels of a few days during gestation appears to be less damaging than chronic exposure to slightly higher levels without acute MeHg exposure even though, equal amounts were administered during gestation. Possibly, as indicated by preliminary data, the relatively larger impact of chronic administration of a higher daily dose could be the consequence of a

  5. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: the challenge ahead.

    PubMed

    Goodson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Carpenter, David O; Gilbertson, Michael; Manaf Ali, Abdul; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Lasfar, Ahmed; Carnero, Amancio; Azqueta, Amaya; Amedei, Amedeo; Charles, Amelia K; Collins, Andrew R; Ward, Andrew; Salzberg, Anna C; Colacci, Annamaria; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Berg, Arthur; Barclay, Barry J; Zhou, Binhua P; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Baglole, Carolyn J; Dong, Chenfang; Mondello, Chiara; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Naus, Christian C; Yedjou, Clement; Curran, Colleen S; Laird, Dale W; Koch, Daniel C; Carlin, Danielle J; Felsher, Dean W; Roy, Debasish; Brown, Dustin G; Ratovitski, Edward; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Corsini, Emanuela; Rojas, Emilio; Moon, Eun-Yi; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Darroudi, Firouz; Martin, Francis L; Van Schooten, Frederik J; Goldberg, Gary S; Wagemaker, Gerard; Nangami, Gladys N; Calaf, Gloria M; Williams, Graeme; Wolf, Gregory T; Koppen, Gudrun; Brunborg, Gunnar; Lyerly, H Kim; Krishnan, Harini; Ab Hamid, Hasiah; Yasaei, Hemad; Sone, Hideko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Salem, Hosni K; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Park, Hyun Ho; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R; Scovassi, A Ivana; Klaunig, James E; Vondráček, Jan; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Wise, John Pierce; Whitfield, Jonathan R; Woodrick, Jordan; Christopher, Joseph A; Ochieng, Josiah; Martinez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Weisz, Judith; Kravchenko, Julia; Sun, Jun; Prudhomme, Kalan R; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Moorwood, Kim; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Soucek, Laura; Jian, Le; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Li, Lin; Gulliver, Linda; McCawley, Lisa J; Memeo, Lorenzo; Vermeulen, Louis; Leyns, Luc; Zhang, Luoping; Valverde, Mahara; Khatami, Mahin; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Chapellier, Marion; Williams, Marc A; Wade, Mark; Manjili, Masoud H; Lleonart, Matilde E; Xia, Menghang; Gonzalez, Michael J; Karamouzis, Michalis V; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Vaccari, Monica; Kuemmerle, Nancy B; Singh, Neetu; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; van Larebeke, Nik; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Krishnakumar, P K; Vadgama, Pankaj; Marignani, Paola A; Ghosh, Paramita M; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Thompson, Patricia A; Dent, Paul; Heneberg, Petr; Darbre, Philippa; Sing Leung, Po; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Cheng, Qiang Shawn; Robey, R Brooks; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Roy, Rabindra; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Sinha, Ranjeet K; Mehta, Rekha; Vento, Renza; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Nahta, Rita; Castellino, Robert C; Palorini, Roberta; Abd Hamid, Roslida; Langie, Sabine A S; Eltom, Sakina E; Brooks, Samira A; Ryeom, Sandra; Wise, Sandra S; Bay, Sarah N; Harris, Shelley A; Papagerakis, Silvana; Romano, Simona; Pavanello, Sofia; Eriksson, Staffan; Forte, Stefano; Casey, Stephanie C; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Lee, Tae-Jin; Otsuki, Takemi; Chen, Tao; Massfelder, Thierry; Sanderson, Thomas; Guarnieri, Tiziana; Hultman, Tove; Dormoy, Valérian; Odero-Marah, Valerie; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Engström, Wilhelm; Decker, William K; Bisson, William H; Rojanasakul, Yon; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Hu, Zhiwei

    2015-06-01

    Lifestyle factors are responsible for a considerable portion of cancer incidence worldwide, but credible estimates from the World Health Organization and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) suggest that the fraction of cancers attributable to toxic environmental exposures is between 7% and 19%. To explore the hypothesis that low-dose exposures to mixtures of chemicals in the environment may be combining to contribute to environmental carcinogenesis, we reviewed 11 hallmark phenotypes of cancer, multiple priority target sites for disruption in each area and prototypical chemical disruptors for all targets, this included dose-response characterizations, evidence of low-dose effects and cross-hallmark effects for all targets and chemicals. In total, 85 examples of chemicals were reviewed for actions on key pathways/mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Only 15% (13/85) were found to have evidence of a dose-response threshold, whereas 59% (50/85) exerted low-dose effects. No dose-response information was found for the remaining 26% (22/85). Our analysis suggests that the cumulative effects of individual (non-carcinogenic) chemicals acting on different pathways, and a variety of related systems, organs, tissues and cells could plausibly conspire to produce carcinogenic synergies. Additional basic research on carcinogenesis and research focused on low-dose effects of chemical mixtures needs to be rigorously pursued before the merits of this hypothesis can be further advanced. However, the structure of the World Health Organization International Programme on Chemical Safety 'Mode of Action' framework should be revisited as it has inherent weaknesses that are not fully aligned with our current understanding of cancer biology.

  6. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: the challenge ahead

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, William H.; Lowe, Leroy; Carpenter, David O.; Gilbertson, Michael; Manaf Ali, Abdul; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Lasfar, Ahmed; Carnero, Amancio; Azqueta, Amaya; Amedei, Amedeo; Charles, Amelia K.; Collins, Andrew R.; Ward, Andrew; Salzberg, Anna C.; Colacci, Anna Maria; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Berg, Arthur; Barclay, Barry J.; Zhou, Binhua P.; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Dong, Chenfang; Mondello, Chiara; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Naus, Christian C.; Yedjou, Clement; Curran, Colleen S.; Laird, Dale W.; Koch, Daniel C.; Carlin, Danielle J.; Felsher, Dean W.; Roy, Debasish; Brown, Dustin G.; Ratovitski, Edward; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Corsini, Emanuela; Rojas, Emilio; Moon, Eun-Yi; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Darroudi, Firouz; Martin, Francis L.; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Goldberg, Gary S.; Wagemaker, Gerard; Nangami, Gladys N.; Calaf, Gloria M.; Williams, Graeme P.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Koppen, Gudrun; Brunborg, Gunnar; Lyerly, H. Kim; Krishnan, Harini; Ab Hamid, Hasiah; Yasaei, Hemad; Sone, Hideko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Salem, Hosni K.; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Park, Hyun Ho; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Klaunig, James E.; Vondráček, Jan; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Wise, John Pierce; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Christopher, Joseph A.; Ochieng, Josiah; Martinez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Weisz, Judith; Kravchenko, Julia; Sun, Jun; Prudhomme, Kalan R.; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.; Moorwood, Kim; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Soucek, Laura; Jian, Le; D’Abronzo, Leandro S.; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Li, Lin; Gulliver, Linda; McCawley, Lisa J.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Vermeulen, Louis; Leyns, Luc; Zhang, Luoping; Valverde, Mahara; Khatami, Mahin; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Chapellier, Marion; Williams, Marc A.; Wade, Mark; Manjili, Masoud H.; Lleonart, Matilde E.; Xia, Menghang; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J.; Karamouzis, Michalis V.; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Vaccari, Monica; Kuemmerle, Nancy B.; Singh, Neetu; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; van Larebeke, Nik; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Krishnakumar, P.K.; Vadgama, Pankaj; Marignani, Paola A.; Ghosh, Paramita M.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Thompson, Patricia A.; Dent, Paul; Heneberg, Petr; Darbre, Philippa; Leung, Po Sing; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Cheng, Qiang (Shawn); Robey, R.Brooks; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Roy, Rabindra; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Sinha, Ranjeet K.; Mehta, Rekha; Vento, Renza; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Nahta, Rita; Castellino, Robert C.; Palorini, Roberta; Hamid, Roslida A.; Langie, Sabine A.S.; Eltom, Sakina E.; Brooks, Samira A.; Ryeom, Sandra; Wise, Sandra S.; Bay, Sarah N.; Harris, Shelley A.; Papagerakis, Silvana; Romano, Simona; Pavanello, Sofia; Eriksson, Staffan; Forte, Stefano; Casey, Stephanie C.; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Lee, Tae-Jin; Otsuki, Takemi; Chen, Tao; Massfelder, Thierry; Sanderson, Thomas; Guarnieri, Tiziana; Hultman, Tove; Dormoy, Valérian; Odero-Marah, Valerie; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Rathmell, W.Kimryn; Engström, Wilhelm; Decker, William K.; Bisson, William H.; Rojanasakul, Yon; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Hu, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle factors are responsible for a considerable portion of cancer incidence worldwide, but credible estimates from the World Health Organization and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) suggest that the fraction of cancers attributable to toxic environmental exposures is between 7% and 19%. To explore the hypothesis that low-dose exposures to mixtures of chemicals in the environment may be combining to contribute to environmental carcinogenesis, we reviewed 11 hallmark phenotypes of cancer, multiple priority target sites for disruption in each area and prototypical chemical disruptors for all targets, this included dose-response characterizations, evidence of low-dose effects and cross-hallmark effects for all targets and chemicals. In total, 85 examples of chemicals were reviewed for actions on key pathways/mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Only 15% (13/85) were found to have evidence of a dose-response threshold, whereas 59% (50/85) exerted low-dose effects. No dose-response information was found for the remaining 26% (22/85). Our analysis suggests that the cumulative effects of individual (non-carcinogenic) chemicals acting on different pathways, and a variety of related systems, organs, tissues and cells could plausibly conspire to produce carcinogenic synergies. Additional basic research on carcinogenesis and research focused on low-dose effects of chemical mixtures needs to be rigorously pursued before the merits of this hypothesis can be further advanced. However, the structure of the World Health Organization International Programme on Chemical Safety ‘Mode of Action’ framework should be revisited as it has inherent weaknesses that are not fully aligned with our current understanding of cancer biology. PMID:26106142

  7. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Activation of Dendritic Cells and Neutrophils Depends on the Dose and Time of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Boon Huat

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) to activate DC and neutrophils and modulate T cell activation and the impact of bacterial dose on these responses. Murine bone marrow derived DC or neutrophils were stimulated with LGG at ratios of 5 : 1, 10 : 1, and 100 : 1 (LGG : cells) and DC maturation (CD40, CD80, CD86, CD83, and MHC class II) and cytokine production (IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) were examined after 2 h and 18 h coculture and compared to the ability of BCG (the present immunotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer) to stimulate these cells. A 2 h exposure to 100 : 1 (high dose) or an 18 h exposure to 5 : 1 or 10 : 1 (low dose), LGG : cells, induced the highest production of IL-12 and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC II on DC. In DCs stimulated with LGG activated neutrophils IL-12 production decreased with increasing dose. LGG induced 10-fold greater IL-12 production than BCG. T cell IFNγ and IL-2 production was significantly greater when stimulated with DC activated with low dose LGG. In conclusion, DC or DC activated with neutrophils exposed to low dose LGG induced greater Th1 polarization in T cells and this could potentially exert stronger antitumor effects. Thus the dose of LGG used for immunotherapy could determine treatment efficacy. PMID:27525288

  8. Trophic transfer of nano-TiO2 in a paddy microcosm: A comparison of single-dose versus sequential multi-dose exposures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung In; Park, Hyung-Geun; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Nam, D H; Yeo, Min-Kyeong

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, replicated paddy microcosm systems were used to investigate the environmental fate and trophic transfer of titanium nanoparticles (NPs) over a period of 14 days. Most TiO2 NPs immediately settled down in the sediment, and high accumulations of nano TiO2 in the sandy loam sediment and biofilm were observed. The test organisms (quillworts, water dropworts, duckweeds, biofilms, river snails, and Chinese muddy loaches) and environmental media (freshwater, sandy loam sediment) were exposed to sequential low doses (2 mg/L at 1 h, 4 days, and 9 days) or a single high-dose (6 mg/L) of TiO2 NPs. The bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of nano-TiO2 in biofilms, quillworts, duckweeds, and Chinese muddy loaches were higher in the sequential multi-dose group than in the single-dose group. Chinese muddy loaches showed higher bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) over their prey than river snails. The difference in the carbon isotope ratios between Chinese muddy loaches and river snails was less than 2‰, and an approximately 4‰ difference in the stable nitrogen isotope ratio was observed in the two aquatic predators from their major prey (e.g., biofilms or particulate organic matter). The trophic levels between biofilms and river snails and between biofilms and Chinese muddy loaches were 2.8 and 2.4 levels, respectively. These results indicate that these two predators consumed biofilm and other alternative preys at a higher level than biofilm. Although the trophic transfer rates of TiO2 are generally low, relatively higher biomagnification factors (BMFs) were found in Chinese muddy loaches (0.04-0.05) than in river snails (0.01-0.02). These results suggest that TiO2 NPs show greater movement in the sediment than in the water and that TiO2 NPs can be retained through aquatic food chains more after a sequential low-dose exposure than after a single high-dose exposure.

  9. Sublinear response in lacZ mutant frequency of Muta™ Mouse spermatogonial stem cells after low dose subchronic exposure to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Walker, Mike; Sivathayalan, Ahalya; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The transgenic rodent mutation assay was used to compare the dose-response relationship of lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in spermatogonial stem cells exposed acutely or subchronically to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Muta(™) Mouse males were exposed orally to 0, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg ENU for acute exposures and 0, 1, 2, or 5 mg/(kg day) for 28-day subchronic exposures. LacZ MF was measured in sperm collected 70 days post-exposure to target spermatogonial stem cells. Dose-response data were fit to linear, quadratic, exponential, or power models. Acute exposure resulted in a dose-dependent increase in MF that was significant (P < 0.05) at all doses tested and was best described by a quadratic dose-response model that was linear in the low dose range. In contrast, similar total doses fragmented over a 28-day subchronic exposure only resulted in a significant increase in lacZ MF at the highest dose tested. Therefore, the subchronic no observable genotoxic effect level (NOGEL) was 2 mg/(kg day) (or 56 mg/kg total dose). The subchronic dose-response was best described by the exponential and power models, which were sublinear in the low dose range. Benchmark dose lower confidence limits (BMDLs) for acute and subchronic exposure were 3.0 and 1.0 mg/(kg day) (or 27.4 mg/kg total dose), respectively. These findings are supportive of a saturable DNA repair mechanism as the mutagenic mode of action for ENU in spermatogonia and imply that sufficiently low exposures would not cause appreciable genotoxic effects over background. This may have important implications for the quantitative risk assessment of germ cell mutagens.

  10. Radioactivity levels of limestone and gypsum used as building raw materials in Turkey and estimation of exposure doses.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Seref

    2010-08-01

    The natural radionuclide contents of limestone and gypsum samples used as building raw materials in Turkey were measured by means of gamma spectrometer system with HPGe detector. The measured activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K radionuclide were compared with the reported data from other countries. Radium equivalent activity and internal hazard index, absorbed gamma dose rate in indoor due to the external exposure and corresponding annual effective dose were determined to estimate the exposure risk arising due to the use of these raw materials. This study has shown that examined gypsum and limestone raw materials do not pose any excess radiological health problem and are safe for use in the construction of buildings.

  11. Characterization of anxiety-related responses in male rats following prolonged exposure to therapeutic doses of oral methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Britton, Gabrielle B; Bethancourt, José A

    2009-10-01

    Increases in the rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis and the prescribed use of methylphenidate (MPH) in recent years have raised concerns over the potential effects of early MPH exposure on brain structure and function in adulthood. Animal studies have shown that long-term MPH exposure can modify anxiety-related behaviors and related neural circuitry in adulthood. The present study employed a battery of behavioral tests and repeated testing to assess the long-term effects of MPH exposure on anxious responding. Male Wistar rats beginning on post-natal day 27 were exposed to 4 or 7 weeks of twice daily MPH administration at doses of 2, 3, or 5 mg/kg. MPH was administered orally and on weekdays only in order to approximate drug treatment in clinical populations. Behavioral testing began 18 days following the last drug administration. Our results indicate that prolonged oral MPH treatment at therapeutic doses has little or no enduring effects on anxious behaviors. However, a comparison of MPH groups that received treatment for 4 or 7 weeks suggests that the two treatment periods influenced anxious behaviors in observably different manners in adulthood; namely, a more prolonged period of exposure produced less anxiety relative to the shorter period of MPH exposure as indicated by behaviors in the light-dark transition, elevated plus-maze, and fear conditioning tests. These findings were interpreted as evidence of the importance of considering length of drug exposure in pre-clinical studies aimed at investigating the effects of MPH exposure in ADHD populations.

  12. Model-based determination of abatacept exposure in support of the recommended dose for Japanese rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mayumi; Imai, Yasuhiko; Hiraoka, Masaki; Ito, Kiyomi; Roy, Amit

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide support for a body weight-tiered dosing regimen by characterizing abatacept pharmacokinetics (PK) and the relationship between exposure and the ACR20 (American College of Rheumatology criteria for 20% improvement) response in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A population PK model was developed using NONMEM with 2,535 samples from 344 Japanese RA patients in two clinical trials. The exposure-response relationship was characterized using a Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) logistic regression model, with time-varying actual trough concentrations and ACR20 responder rates over 6 months in a randomized, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial for stable methotrexate. Abatacept exposure was well characterized using a linear, two-compartment model, in which body weight and the empirically calculated glomerular filtration rate were significant covariates for clearance. The ACR20 response model was developed by examining the quasi-likelihood information criterion, and the cumulative logit in the final model was specified by the log-transformed trough concentration. The predicted ACR20 responder rate was consistent with the actual values in the clinical trial and this model revealed trough concentrations higher than the recommended body weight-tiered dose are unlikely to result in substantial increases in clinical efficacy. Considering that ACR20 is a longitudinal binary variable and the response to RA treatment is delayed, the GEE model was useful for predicting the probability of an ACR20 response. In conclusion, the same dosing regimen as non-Japanese patients is recommended because a body weight-tiered dosing regimen achieves similar exposures across the wide range of body weight.

  13. Light exposure at night, sleep duration, melatonin, and breast cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Shui; Deng, Qin; Fan, Wen-Yan; Wang, Wei-Ye; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from observational studies on light at night (LAN) exposure, sleep duration, endogenous melatonin levels, and risk for breast cancer in women is conflicting. This led us to conduct a dose-response analysis of published observational data. Pertinent studies were identified by searching Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE through April 2013. The dose-response relationship between sleep duration, urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels, and breast cancer was assessed using the restricted cubic spline model and by multivariate random-effects metaregression. A separate meta-analysis was also carried out to calculate the relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer for the comparable categories or highest levels of exposure versus the lowest levels. Twelve case-control and four cohort studies were included in the analysis. High artificial LAN exposure is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer (RR=1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23), but not ambient LAN exposure (RR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.78-1.07). The summary RR for breast cancer is 1.00 (95% CI: 0.995-1.01) for an increment of 1 h of sleep per night. No significant dose-response relationship between sleep duration and breast cancer was found either for the linearity test (Ptrend=0.725) or for the nonlinearity (Ptrend=0.091) test. An increasein of 15 ng/mg creatinine in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin is associated with a 14% reduced risk for breast cancer (RR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95), with a linear dose-response trend (Ptrend=0.003). There was no evidence of substantial heterogeneity or publication bias in the analysis. Our study adds to the evidence of LAN breast cancer theory. Further research in this area is warranted.

  14. Spatial Prediction of Coxiella burnetii Outbreak Exposure via Notified Case Counts in a Dose-Response Model.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Russell J; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E E; Hackert, Volker; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Teunis, Peter F M; Waller, Lance A

    2017-01-01

    We develop a novel approach to study an outbreak of Q fever in 2009 in the Netherlands by combining a human dose-response model with geostatistics prediction to relate probability of infection and associated probability of illness to an effective dose of Coxiella burnetii. The spatial distribution of the 220 notified cases in the at-risk population are translated into a smooth spatial field of dose. Based on these symptomatic cases, the dose-response model predicts a median of 611 asymptomatic infections (95% range: 410, 1,084) for the 220 reported symptomatic cases in the at-risk population; 2.78 (95% range: 1.86, 4.93) asymptomatic infections for each reported case. The low attack rates observed during the outbreak range from (Equation is included in full-text article.)to (Equation is included in full-text article.). The estimated peak levels of exposure extend to the north-east from the point source with an increasing proportion of asymptomatic infections further from the source. Our work combines established methodology from model-based geostatistics and dose-response modeling allowing for a novel approach to study outbreaks. Unobserved infections and the spatially varying effective dose can be predicted using the flexible framework without assuming any underlying spatial structure of the outbreak process. Such predictions are important for targeting interventions during an outbreak, estimating future disease burden, and determining acceptable risk levels.

  15. Dose-dependent biodistribution of prenatal exposure to rutile-type titanium dioxide nanoparticles on mouse testis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo-Irie, Miyoko; Uchida, Hiroki; Mastuzawa, Shotaro; Yoshida, Yasuko; Shinkai, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Yokota, Satoshi; Oshio, Shigeru; Takeda, Ken

    2014-02-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), believed to be inert and safe, are used in many products especially rutile-type in cosmetics. Detection, localization, and count of nanoparticles in tissue sections are of considerable current interest. Here, we evaluate the dose-dependent biodistribution of rutile-type nano-TiO2 exposure during pregnancy on offspring testes. Pregnant mice were subcutaneously injected five times with 0.1 ml of sequentially diluted of nano-TiO2 powder, 35 nm with primary diameter, suspensions (1, 10, 100, or 1,000 μg/ml), and received total doses of 0.5, 5, 50, and 500 μg, respectively. Prior to injection, the size distribution of nano-TiO2 was analyzed by dynamic light scattering measurement. The average diameter was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The most diluted concentration, 1 μg/ml suspension, contained small agglomerates averaging 193.3 ± 5.4 nm in diameter. The offspring testes were examined at 12 weeks postpartum. Individual particle analysis in testicular sections under scanning and transmission electron microscopy enabled us to understand the biodistribution. The correlation between nano-TiO2 doses injected to pregnant mice, and the number of agglomerates in the offspring testes was demonstrated to be dose-dependent by semiquantitative evaluation. However, the agglomerate size was below 200 nm in the testicular sections of all recipient groups, independent from the injected dose during pregnancy.

  16. Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-03-26

    A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

  17. Development of a dose-controlled multiculture cell exposure chamber for efficient delivery of airborne and engineered nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimakopoulou, Akrivi; Daskalos, Emmanouil; Lewinski, Nastassja; Riediker, Michael; Papaioannou, Eleni; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.

    2013-04-01

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to engineered nanoparticles as well as to soot emitted by Diesel engines, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies that simulate the respiratory system and facilitate associated biological and toxicological tests. The objective of the present work was the further advancement of a Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) into a dose-controlled system for efficient delivery of nanoparticles to cells. It was validated with various types of nanoparticles (Diesel engine soot aggregates, engineered nanoparticles for various applications) and with state-of-the-art nanoparticle measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of nanoparticles on the cell cultures. The dose of nanoparticles to which cell cultures are being exposed was evaluated in the normal operation of the in vitro cell culture exposure chamber based on measurements of the size specific nanoparticle collection efficiency of a cell free device. The average efficiency in delivering nanoparticles in the MEC was approximately 82%. The nanoparticle deposition was demonstrated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Analysis and design of the MEC employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and true to geometry representations of nanoparticles with the aim to assess the uniformity of nanoparticle deposition among the culture wells. Final testing of the dose-controlled cell exposure system was performed by exposing A549 lung cell cultures to fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. Delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles was demonstrated by visualization of the nanoparticle fluorescence in the cell cultures following exposure. Also monitored was the potential of the aerosolized nanoparticles to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g. free radicals and peroxides generation), thus expressing the oxidative stress of the cells which can cause extensive cellular damage or damage on DNA.

  18. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  19. HARMONIZATION AND COMMUNICATION OF PBPK MODELS USING THE EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATION MODEL (ERDEM) SYSTEM: TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the trichloroethylene (TCE) risk assessment for the Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, and Office of Water, NERL and NCEA are developing an updated physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The PBPK modeling effort ...

  20. HARMONIZATION AND COMMUNICATION OF PBPK MODELS USING THE EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE MODEL (ERDEM) SYSTEM: TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the trichloroethylene (TCE) risk assessment for the Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, and Office of Water, NERL and NCEA are developing an updated physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The PBPK modeling effor...

  1. Manganese Exposure and Cognition Across the Lifespan: Contemporary Review and Argument for Biphasic Dose-Response Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Vollet, Kaitlin; Haynes, Erin N; Dietrich, Kim N

    2016-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential micronutrient and potential neurotoxicant. This dual role underlies a growing body of literature demonstrating that Mn exhibits a biphasic dose-response relationship with neurocognitive outcomes. We reviewed recent epidemiologic studies from 2007 to 2016 that investigated the relationship between Mn exposure and cognitive outcomes across the lifespan: early life, school-aged children, and adulthood. In total, 27 research articles were included in this review: 12 pediatric and 15 adult studies (10 occupational and five environmental exposures). The majority of these studies provided evidence of the negative effects of Mn exposure on cognition. The pediatric literature provides evidence that both high and low levels of Mn are negatively associated with intellectual development. Future Mn research should include examination of non-linear relationships and multiple neurotoxicants across the lifespan and particularly during critical developmental windows.

  2. Evaluation of exposure dose reduction in multislice CT coronary angiography (MS-CTA) with prospective ECG-gated helical scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takamasa; Tsuyuki, Masaharu; Okumura, Miwa; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Takase, Shinichi

    2008-03-01

    A novel low-dose ECG-gated helical scan method to investigate coronary artery diseases was developed. This method uses a high pitch for scanning (based on the patient's heart rate) and X-rays are generated only during the optimal cardiac phases. The dose reduction was obtained using a two-level approach: 1) To use a 64-slice CT scanner (Aquilion, Toshiba, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan) with a scan speed of 0.35 s/rot. to helically scan the heart at a high pitch based on the patient's heart rate. By changing the pitch from the conventional 0.175 to 0.271 for a heart rate of 60 bpm, the exposure dose was reduced to 65%. 2) To employ tube current gating that predicts the timing of optimal cardiac phases from the previous cardiac cycle and generates X-rays only during the required cardiac phases. The combination of high speed scanning with a high pitch and appropriate X-ray generation only in the cardiac phases from 60% to 90% allows the exposure dose to be reduced to 5.6 mSv for patients with a heart rate lower than 65 bpm. This is a dose reduction of approximately 70% compared to the conventional scanning method recommended by the manufacturer when segmental reconstruction is considered. This low-dose protocol seamlessly allows for wide scan ranges (e.g., aortic dissection) with the benefits of ECG-gated helical scanning: smooth continuity for longitudinal direction and utilization of data from all cardiac cycles.

  3. Low doses of glyphosate change the response of soybean to later glyphosate exposures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stimulatory effect of low doses of toxic substances is known as hormesis. Many herbicides that cause severe injury to plants at recommended rates, promote growth or have other stimulatory effects at very low doses. The objective of this study was to evaluate glyphosate-induced hormesis in soyb...

  4. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Maiellaro, Marília; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Gimenes Júnior, João Antônio; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2014-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment. - Highlights: • Formaldehyde exposure does not cause lung inflammation in pregnant rats. • Formaldehyde exposure suppresses allergic lung inflammation in the offspring. • Formaldehyde exposure induces oxidative stress in uterine environment.

  5. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-09-30

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  6. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-01-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  7. Novel dosing strategies increase exposures of the potent antituberculosis drug rifapentine but are poorly tolerated in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kelly E; Savic, Radojka M; Park, Jeong-Gun; Cramer, Yoninah; Hafner, Richard; Hogg, Evelyn; Janik, Jennifer; Marzinke, Mark A; Patterson, Kristine; Benson, Constance A; Hovind, Laura; Dorman, Susan E; Haas, David W

    2015-01-01

    Rifapentine is a potent antituberculosis drug currently in phase III trials. Bioavailability decreases with increasing dose, yet high daily exposures are likely needed to improve efficacy and shorten the tuberculosis treatment duration. Further, the limits of tolerability are poorly defined. The phase I multicenter trial in healthy adults described here investigated two strategies to increase rifapentine exposures: dividing the dose or giving the drug with a high-fat meal. In arm 1, rifapentine was administered at 10 mg/kg of body weight twice daily and 20 mg/kg once daily, each for 14 days, separated by a 28-day washout; the dosing sequence was randomized. In arm 2, 15 mg/kg rifapentine once daily was given with a high-fat versus a low-fat breakfast. Sampling for pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on days 1 and 14. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. This trial was stopped early for poor tolerability and because of safety concerns. Of 44 subjects, 20 discontinued prematurely; 11 of these discontinued for protocol-defined toxicity (a grade 3 or higher adverse event or grade 2 or higher rifamycin hypersensitivity). Taking rifapentine with a high-fat meal increased the median steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to 24 h (AUC0-24ss) by 31% (relative standard error, 6%) compared to that obtained when the drug was taken with a low-fat breakfast. Dividing the dose increased exposures substantially (e.g., 38% with 1,500 mg/day). AUC0-24ss was uniformly higher in our study than in recent tuberculosis treatment trials, in which toxicity was rare. In conclusion, two strategies to increase rifapentine exposures, dividing the dose or giving it with a high-fat breakfast, successfully increased exposures, but toxicity was common in healthy adults. The limits of tolerability in patients with tuberculosis remain to be defined. (AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5311 has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no

  8. Novel Dosing Strategies Increase Exposures of the Potent Antituberculosis Drug Rifapentine but Are Poorly Tolerated in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Radojka M.; Park, Jeong-Gun; Cramer, Yoninah; Hafner, Richard; Hogg, Evelyn; Janik, Jennifer; Marzinke, Mark A.; Patterson, Kristine; Benson, Constance A.; Hovind, Laura; Dorman, Susan E.; Haas, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Rifapentine is a potent antituberculosis drug currently in phase III trials. Bioavailability decreases with increasing dose, yet high daily exposures are likely needed to improve efficacy and shorten the tuberculosis treatment duration. Further, the limits of tolerability are poorly defined. The phase I multicenter trial in healthy adults described here investigated two strategies to increase rifapentine exposures: dividing the dose or giving the drug with a high-fat meal. In arm 1, rifapentine was administered at 10 mg/kg of body weight twice daily and 20 mg/kg once daily, each for 14 days, separated by a 28-day washout; the dosing sequence was randomized. In arm 2, 15 mg/kg rifapentine once daily was given with a high-fat versus a low-fat breakfast. Sampling for pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on days 1 and 14. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. This trial was stopped early for poor tolerability and because of safety concerns. Of 44 subjects, 20 discontinued prematurely; 11 of these discontinued for protocol-defined toxicity (a grade 3 or higher adverse event or grade 2 or higher rifamycin hypersensitivity). Taking rifapentine with a high-fat meal increased the median steady-state area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to 24 h (AUC0–24ss) by 31% (relative standard error, 6%) compared to that obtained when the drug was taken with a low-fat breakfast. Dividing the dose increased exposures substantially (e.g., 38% with 1,500 mg/day). AUC0–24ss was uniformly higher in our study than in recent tuberculosis treatment trials, in which toxicity was rare. In conclusion, two strategies to increase rifapentine exposures, dividing the dose or giving it with a high-fat breakfast, successfully increased exposures, but toxicity was common in healthy adults. The limits of tolerability in patients with tuberculosis remain to be defined. (AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5311 has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration

  9. EXPOSURE-DOSE-RESPONSE MODELING OF THE NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessments based on exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are hampered by the complexities of exposure scenarios, a lack of data regarding the mode of action of the VOCs, and uncertainties about extrapolating from animal data to human health risk. We are developing ...

  10. Probabilistic Modeling of Dietary Arsenic Exposure and Dose and Evaluation with 2003-2004 NHANES Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary exposure from food to toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in the general U.S. population has not been well studied. The goal of this research was to quantify dietary arsenic As exposure and analyze the major contributors to total As (tAs) and iAs. Another objective was to com...

  11. [The dose-response of unstable chromosome exchanges in lymphocytes of cancer patients undergone whole-body fractionated gamma-rays exposure at the total dose 1.15 Gy].

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Vorobtsova, I E; Zharinov, G M

    2010-01-01

    The dose-response of unstable chromosome exchanges (UCE) in lymphocytes of 4 cancer patients undergone whole-body fractionated gamma-rays exposure (at the daily dose of 0.115 Gy up to the total dose 1.15 Gy) was compared with corresponding dose-response for lymphocytes of the same patients, irradiated in vitro at the same dose range. In vivo irradiation yielded lower frequency of UCE on the dose unit than in vitro irradiation. It was shown that the in vivo dose-response curve gives more adequate dose estimation than in vitro one. This curve could be used for reconstruction of absorbed dose in the cases of analogous character of in-controlled irradiation of people.

  12. [Effect of long-term exposure to low dose gamma-irradiation on the rat thyroid status].

    PubMed

    Nadol'nik, L I; Netsetskaia, Z V; Vinogradov, V V

    2004-01-01

    The effect of long-term exposure to low-dose external radiation on the rat thyroid status was studied. The experiments were carried out on Wistar female rats. The single doses absorbed were 0.1; 0.25; 0.5 Gy. The rats were irradiated 20 times (5 days x 4 weeks). The animals were decapitated after 1, 30 and 180 days following the last irradiation. Blood serum was assayed for content of thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) radioimmunologically. The liver was spectrophotometrically assayed for thyroid-induced NADP-malatedehydrogenase (NADP-MDH). It was shown that the long-term 0.5-Gy irradiation of the animals induced a decrease in blood T4 and T3 concentrations 1.34-1.71-fold and 1.24-1.43-fold after 1, 30 and 180 days, respectively. The T3 level was diminished most pronouncedly after 1 day, whereas that of T4--after 30 days following the exposure. With the doses of 0.1 and 0.25 Gy absorbed, the T4 and T3 concentration remained unchanged throughout all the periods studied. The activity of NADP-MDH was decreased 1.55-2.46-fold in all the experimental animals, and it was held decreased after 180 days (1.43-1.50-fold) in 0.25- and 0.5-Gy-irradiated groups, which indicates a disturbance in thyroid hormone metabolism in rats exposed chronically to low-dose radiation. After 180 days, the experimental animals experienced an elevation of thyroid gland weight on 15-20%. The thyroid status disturbance seemed to be due to both inhibited T4 and T3 biosynthesis in thyroid and disturbed hormone peripheral metabolism under radiation exposure.

  13. Validation of a precision radiochromic film dosimetry system for quantitative two-dimensional imaging of acute exposure dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, J F; Low, D A; Mutic, S; Markman, J; Kirov, A S; Nussbaum, G H; Williamson, J F

    2000-10-01

    We present an evaluation of the precision and accuracy of image-based radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry performed using a commercial RCF product (Gafchromic MD-55-2, Nuclear Associates, Inc.) and a commercial high-spatial resolution (100 microm pixel size) He-Ne scanning-laser film-digitizer (Personal Densitometer, Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) as an optical density (OD) imaging system. The precision and accuracy of this dosimetry system are evaluated by performing RCF imaging dosimetry in well characterized conformal external beam and brachytherapy high dose-rate (HDR) radiation fields. Benchmarking of image-based RCF dosimetry is necessary due to many potential errors inherent to RCF dosimetry including: a temperature-dependent time evolution of RCF dose response; nonuniform response of RCF; and optical-polarization artifacts. In addition, laser-densitometer imaging artifacts can produce systematic OD measurement errors as large as 35% in the presence of high OD gradients. We present a RCF exposure and readout protocol that was developed for the accurate dosimetry of high dose rate (HDR) radiation sources. This protocol follows and expands upon the guidelines set forth by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 55 report. Particular attention is focused on the OD imaging system, a scanning-laser film digitizer, modified to eliminate OD artifacts that were not addressed in the AAPM Task Group 55 report. RCF precision using this technique was evaluated with films given uniform 6 MV x-ray doses between 1 and 200 Gy. RCF absolute dose accuracy using this technique was evaluated by comparing RCF measurements to small volume ionization chamber measurements for conformal external-beam sources and an experimentally validated Monte Carlo photon-transport simulation code for a 192Ir brachytherapy source. Pixel-to-pixel standard deviations of uniformly irradiated films were less than 1% for doses between 10 and 150 Gy; between 1% and 5% for lower

  14. Sex-specific epigenetic disruption and behavioral changes following low-dose in utero bisphenol A exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kundakovic, Marija; Gudsnuk, Kathryn; Franks, Becca; Madrid, Jesus; Miller, Rachel L.; Perera, Frederica P.; Champagne, Frances A.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic endocrine disruptor widely used in the production of plastics. Increasing evidence indicates that in utero BPA exposure affects sexual differentiation and behavior; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. We hypothesized that BPA may disrupt epigenetic programming of gene expression in the brain. Here, we provide evidence that maternal exposure during pregnancy to environmentally relevant doses of BPA (2, 20, and 200 µg/kg/d) in mice induces sex-specific, dose-dependent (linear and curvilinear), and brain region-specific changes in expression of genes encoding estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ) and estrogen-related receptor-γ in juvenile offspring. Concomitantly, BPA altered mRNA levels of epigenetic regulators DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and DNMT3A in the juvenile cortex and hypothalamus, paralleling changes in estrogen-related receptors. Importantly, changes in ERα and DNMT expression in the cortex (males) and hypothalamus (females) were associated with DNA methylation changes in the ERα gene. BPA exposure induced persistent, largely sex-specific effects on social and anxiety-like behavior, leading to disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Although postnatal maternal care was altered in mothers treated with BPA during pregnancy, the effects of in utero BPA were not found to be mediated by maternal care. However, our data suggest that increased maternal care may partially attenuate the effects of in utero BPA on DNA methylation. Overall, we demonstrate that low-dose prenatal BPA exposure induces lasting epigenetic disruption in the brain that possibly underlie enduring effects of BPA on brain function and behavior, especially regarding sexually dimorphic phenotypes. PMID:23716699

  15. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2012-03-01

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² was determined to be about 500 mSv.

  16. A Dose-Response Relationship between Organic Mercury Exposure from Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Geier, David A.; Hooker, Brian S.; Kern, Janet K.; King, Paul G.; Sykes, Lisa K.; Geier, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    A hypothesis testing case-control study evaluated concerns about the toxic effects of organic-mercury (Hg) exposure from thimerosal-containing (49.55% Hg by weight) vaccines on the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs). Automated medical records were examined to identify cases and controls enrolled from their date-of-birth (1991–2000) in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) project. ND cases were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), specific developmental delay, tic disorder or hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood. In addition, putative non-thimerosal-related outcomes of febrile seizure, failure to thrive and cerebral degenerations were examined. The cumulative total dose of Hg exposure from thimerosal-containing hepatitis B vaccine (T-HBV) administered within the first six months of life was calculated. On a per microgram of organic-Hg basis, PDD (odds ratio (OR) = 1.054), specific developmental delay (OR = 1.035), tic disorder (OR = 1.034) and hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood (OR = 1.05) cases were significantly more likely than controls to receive increased organic-Hg exposure. By contrast, none of the non-thimerosal related outcomes were significantly more likely than the controls to have received increased organic-Hg exposure. Routine childhood vaccination may be an important public health tool to reduce infectious disease-associated morbidity/mortality, but the present study significantly associates organic-Hg exposure from T-HBV with an increased risk of an ND diagnosis. PMID:25198681

  17. A dose-response relationship between organic mercury exposure from thimerosal-containing vaccines and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Geier, David A; Hooker, Brian S; Kern, Janet K; King, Paul G; Sykes, Lisa K; Geier, Mark R

    2014-09-05

    A hypothesis testing case-control study evaluated concerns about the toxic effects of organic-mercury (Hg) exposure from thimerosal-containing (49.55% Hg by weight) vaccines on the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs). Automated medical records were examined to identify cases and controls enrolled from their date-of-birth (1991-2000) in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) project. ND cases were diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), specific developmental delay, tic disorder or hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood. In addition, putative non-thimerosal-related outcomes of febrile seizure, failure to thrive and cerebral degenerations were examined. The cumulative total dose of Hg exposure from thimerosal-containing hepatitis B vaccine (T-HBV) administered within the first six months of life was calculated. On a per microgram of organic-Hg basis, PDD (odds ratio (OR) = 1.054), specific developmental delay (OR = 1.035), tic disorder (OR = 1.034) and hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood (OR = 1.05) cases were significantly more likely than controls to receive increased organic-Hg exposure. By contrast, none of the non-thimerosal related outcomes were significantly more likely than the controls to have received increased organic-Hg exposure. Routine childhood vaccination may be an important public health tool to reduce infectious disease-associated morbidity/mortality, but the present study significantly associates organic-Hg exposure from T-HBV with an increased risk of an ND diagnosis.

  18. On the use of quality factors and fluence to dose rate conversion in human radiation exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondhaus, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that various combinations of numbers and factors arrive at estimates of dose and dose effectiveness from values of fluence; but as yet it has not been possible to use biological data with the same degree of precision to estimate the physical data. It would seem that the most reasonable way to use the human data that exist is to apply them as far as possible to the human animal as a whole.

  19. Foetal dose conversion coefficients for ICRP-compliant pregnant models from idealised proton exposures

    PubMed Central

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2009-01-01

    Protection of pregnant women and their foetus against external proton irradiations poses a unique challenge. Assessment of foetal dose due to external protons in galactic cosmic rays and as secondaries generated in aircraft walls is especially important during high-altitude flights. This paper reports a set of fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the foetus and its brain for external monoenergetic proton beams of six standard configurations (the antero-posterior, the postero-anterior, the right lateral, the left lateral, the rotational and the isotropic). The pregnant female anatomical definitions at each of the three gestational periods (3, 6 and 9 months) are based on newly developed RPI-P series of models whose organ masses were matched within 1% with the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference values. Proton interactions and the transport of secondary particles were carefully simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) and the phantoms consisting of several million voxels at 3 mm resolution. When choosing the physics models in the MCNPX, it was found that the advanced Cascade-Exciton intranuclear cascade model showed a maximum of 9% foetal dose increase compared with the default model combination at intermediate energies below 5 GeV. Foetal dose results from this study are tabulated and compared with previously published data that were based on simplified anatomy. The comparison showed a strong dependence upon the source geometry, energy and gestation period: the dose differences are typically less than 20% for all sources except ISO where systematically 40–80% of higher doses were observed. Below 200 MeV, a larger discrepancy in dose was found due to the Bragg peak shift caused by different anatomy. The tabulated foetal doses represent the latest and most detailed study to date offering a useful set of data to improve radiation protection dosimetry against external protons. PMID:19246483

  20. Early Postnatal Lipopolysaccharide Exposure Leads to Enhanced Neurogenesis and Impaired Communicative Functions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xuemei; Roller, Anna; Carter, Kathleen; Paul, Ian; Bhatt, Abhay J.; Lin, Rick C. S.; Fan, Lir-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal infection is a well-identified risk factor for a number of neurodevelopmental disorders, including brain white matter injury (WMI) and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The underlying mechanisms by which early life inflammatory events cause aberrant neural, cytoarchitectural, and network organization, remain elusive. This study is aimed to investigate how systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation affects microglia phenotypes and early neural developmental events in rats. We show here that LPS exposure at early postnatal day 3 leads to a robust microglia activation which is characterized with mixed microglial proinflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotypes. More specifically, we found that microglial M1 markers iNOS and MHC-II were induced at relatively low levels in a regionally restricted manner, whereas M2 markers CD206 and TGFβ were strongly upregulated in a sub-set of activated microglia in multiple white and gray matter structures. This unique microglial response was associated with a marked decrease in naturally occurring apoptosis, but an increase in cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus. LPS exposure also leads to a significant increase in oligodendrocyte lineage population without causing discernible hypermyelination. Moreover, LPS-exposed rats exhibited significant impairments in communicative and cognitive functions. These findings suggest a possible role of M2-like microglial activation in abnormal neural development that may underlie ASD-like behavioral impairments. PMID:27723799

  1. EXPOSURES AND INTERNAL DOSES OF TRIHALOMETHANES IN HUMANS: MULTI-ROUTE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM DRINKING WATER (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) has released a final report that presents and applies a method to estimate distributions of internal concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in humans resulting from a residential drinking water exposure. The report presen...

  2. MODELING OF CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE, DOSE, AND BIOMARKER USING NHEXAS MINNESOTA CHILDREN'S DATA

    EPA Science Inventory


    Data from the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) are now becoming available. For the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos, available data for NHEXAS Minnesota children include concentrations in air, food, beverages, water, house dust (transferable surf...

  3. Repeated Exposure to Sublethal Doses of the Organophosphorus Compound VX Activates BDNF Expression in Mouse Brain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    cresyl/-4 H-1: 3: 2-benzodioxa- phosphorin-2-oxide (CBDP) on organophosphate poisoning and its therapy. Arch. Toxicol. 42, 207–216. French, S. J... organophosphates or other environmental insults, have a greater FIG. 4. Mice that received repeated exposure to low levels of VX (0.2 LD50 and 0.4 LD50...to neuro- behavioral deficits and neuropathology. Although exposure to organophosphates such as pesticides has been shown to affect the expression of

  4. Insecticidal efficacy of abamectin against three stored-product insect pests: influence of dose rate, temperature, commodity, and exposure interval.

    PubMed

    Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Athanassiou, Christos G; Vayias, Basileios J; Mihail, Spyridon B; Tomanović, Zeljko

    2009-06-01

    The insecticidal efficacy of abamectin against adults of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), Sitophilus oryzae (L.), and Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val was assessed under laboratory conditions. The efficacy of abamectin was assessed on two commodities (wheat, Triticum aestivum L. and maize, Zea mays L.) and two temperatures (25 and 30 degrees C). The dose rates used were 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ppm. Mortality of the exposed adults in the treated grains was measured after 7, 14 and 21 d (= days), whereas progeny production was assessed 60 d later. Increase of dose rate, exposure interval, and temperature enhanced the efficacy of abamectin. Noticeable mortality was noted for all species after 21 d of exposure, although for S. oryzae, mortality was very high even at 7 d. For dose rates higher than 0.5 ppm, the efficacy of abamectin was higher in maize than in wheat against all species tested. Finally, progeny production was measured for all three species on commodities treated with 0.01 and 0.1 ppm of abamectin.

  5. Chronic exposure of adult rats to low doses of methylmercury induced a state of metabolic deficit in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hang-Kin; Wong, Ming-Hung; Chan, Hing-Man; Lo, Samuel Chun-Lap

    2013-11-01

    Because of the ever-increasing bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in the marine food chain, human consumers are exposed to low doses of MeHg continually through seafood consumption. Epidemiological studies strongly suggest that chronic prenatal exposure to nanomolar of MeHg has immense negative impacts on neurological development in neonates. However, effects of chronic exposure to low doses (CELDs) of MeHg in adult brains on a molecular level are unknown. The current study aims to investigate the molecular effects of CELD of MeHg on adult somatosensory cortex in a rat model using proteomic techniques. Young adult rats were fed with a low dose of MeHg (40 μg/kg body weight/day) for a maximum of 12 weeks. Whole proteome expression of the somatosensory cortex (S1 area) of normal rats and those with CELD to MeHg were compared. Levels of MeHg, total calcium, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and pyruvate were also measured. Comparative proteomic studies of the somatosensory cortexes revealed that 94 proteins involved in the various metabolic processes (including carbohydrate metabolism, generation of precursors for essential metabolites, energy, proteins, cellular components for morphogenesis, and neurotransmission) were down-regulated. Consequently, levels of important end products of active metabolism including ATP, pyruvate, and total calcium were also found to be significantly reduced concomitantly. Our results showed that CELD of MeHg induced a state of metabolic deficit in the somatosensory cortex of adult rats.

  6. Absence of effects on the rat sperm quality after subacute exposure to low doses of fungicide prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Marciana; Pessin, Alessandra; Zanutto, Mirella Rossitto; Perobelli, Juliana Elaine; Guerra, Marina Trevizan; Banzato, Thais Petrochelli; Borges, Cibele dos Santos; Kempinas, Wilma De Grava

    2015-01-01

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is a fungicide and androgen-receptor antagonist used worldwide in horticulture and agriculture. Pre- and perinatal exposure to this pesticide during sexual differentiation is deleterious for male offspring. Since data on the effects of PCZ on epididymal functions are scarce, and because sperm maturation occurs in this organ, the present investigation aimed to determine whether low PCZ doses administered to rats during the phase of sperm transit through the epididymis might affect the morphophysiology of this organ and sperm quality. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned to 4 different groups: 0 (control, vehicle) or 10, 15, or 30 mg/kg bw/d PCZ diluted in corn oil administered orally for 4 consecutive days. Morphofunctional parameters of the male reproductive tract, hormone concentrations, sperm evaluations, and fertility and histopathologic analysis of testis and epididymis were assessed. There were no statistically significant differences between treated and control groups in relation to all evaluated parameters. Data demonstrated show that PCZ exposure for a brief 4-d exposure and low doses did not produce reproductive toxicity or compromise sperm quality in adult rats.

  7. Aberrant cell divisions in root meristeme of maize following exposure to X-rays low doses compared to similar effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Capraru, G.; Racuciu, M.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-04-01

    The response of maize to radiation exposure was investigated by two cytogenetic methods considering the importance of the geno-toxic effect for environmental and agricultural purposes. Uniform genophond seeds, freshly germinated, were exposed to relatively low radiation doses using a radiotherapy X-ray applicator from a hospital irradiation device and to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field with about 10 mT magnetic induction (generated within laboratory assembled electromagnetic coils). Radicular meristeme tissue aliquots were prevailed for cytogenetic investigation based on microscopic observations and cell counting. Microscope slides were prepared following a specific procedure (squash technique and Feulgen method based on modified Carr reactive coloration). Mitotic index as well as chromosomal aberration percentage were calculated for more than 30,000 cells taken into account. From a qualitative viewpoint, chromosomal aberrations such as interchromatidian bridges, lagging and expelled chromosomes and multipolar divisions were evidenced - no distinct situation for either ionizing radiation or electromagnetic field being identified. The main quantitative difference consisted in the increased mitotic index for electromagnetic exposure increased times compared with the diminished mitotic index in the case of low X-ray doses.

  8. Dose conversion coefficients for photon exposure of the human eye lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, R.; Dietze, G.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several papers dealing with the eye lens dose have been published, because epidemiological studies implied that the induction of cataracts occurs even at eye lens doses of less than 500 mGy. Different questions were addressed: Which personal dose equivalent quantity is appropriate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens? Is a new definition of the dose quantity Hp(3) based on a cylinder phantom to represent the human head necessary? Are current conversion coefficients from fluence to equivalent dose to the lens sufficiently accurate? To investigate the latter question, a realistic model of the eye including the inner structure of the lens was developed. Using this eye model, conversion coefficients for electrons have already been presented. In this paper, the same eye model—with the addition of the whole body—was used to calculate conversion coefficients from fluence (and air kerma) to equivalent dose to the lens for photon radiation from 5 keV to 10 MeV. Compared to the values adopted in 1996 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the new values are similar between 40 keV and 1 MeV and lower by up to a factor of 5 and 7 for photon energies at about 10 keV and 10 MeV, respectively. Above 1 MeV, the new values (calculated without kerma approximation) should be applied in pure photon radiation fields, while the values adopted by the ICRP in 1996 (calculated with kerma approximation) should be applied in case a significant contribution from secondary electrons originating outside the body is present.

  9. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C.; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Our goal here was to identify dose and temporal dependent radiation responses in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. Direct sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts following exposure to 0.1, 2 and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation at 3 and 8 hours. These doses include a low dose in the range of some medical diagnostic procedures (0.1 Gy), a dose typically received during radiotherapy (2.0 Gy) and a lethal dose (10 Gy). These doses could be received after an intentional or accidental radiation exposure and biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage exposed individuals. A total of 1701 genes were deemed to be significantly affected by high dose radiation exposure with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. A group of 29 genes including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA, and AEN were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at multiple time points. A much larger group of up regulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after a 10 Gy exposure. At high doses, down regulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a handful of genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy exposure using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to the high dose exposures. Differential regulation of PLK1 signaling at low and high doses was confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results indicate that some alterations in gene expression are qualitatively different at low and high doses of radiation in this model system.

  10. Assessment of gamma dose rates from terrestrial exposure in Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Dragović, S; Janković, Lj; Onjia, A

    2006-01-01

    The gamma dose rates due to naturally occuring terrestrial radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were calculated based on their activities in soil samples, determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. A total of 140 soil samples from 21 different regions of Serbia and Montenegro were collected. The gamma dose rates ranged from 7.40 to 29.7 nGy h(-1) for (226)Ra, from 12.9 to 46.5 nGy h(-1) for (232)Th and from 12.5 to 37.1 nGy h(-1) for (40)K. The total absorbed gamma dose rate due to these radionuclides varied from 34.5 to 97.6 nGy h(-1) with mean of 66.8 nGy h(-1). Assuming a 20% occupancy factor, the corresponding annual effective dose varied from 4.23 x 10(-5) to 11.9 x 10(-5) Sv with mean of 8.19 x 10(-5) Sv, i.e. the dose was lower than world wide average value. According to the values of external hazard index (mean: 0.39) obtained in this study, the radiation hazard was found to be insignificant for population living in the investigated area.

  11. Hair 32P measurement for body dose mapping in non-fatal exposures to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Mianji, Fereidoun A; Jafari, Sheyda; Zaryouni, Saiedeh; Hajizadeh, Bardia

    2015-03-01

    Dosimetry bioassay methods are the backbone of a personal dosimetry in criticality accidents. Although methods like hair dosimetry and the use of activation foils (e.g., (32)S) have been employed for decades, capabilities of different techniques, effects of hair type and neutron spectrum on the dose response, sensitivity and uncertainties of different techniques, etc., need more investigations. For this reason, the use of the (32)S(n,p)(32)P reaction and hair samples for estimating non-fatal doses from fast neutrons was studied. The experiments were carried out with the hair samples attached on a RANDO phantom in a Cf-252 neutron field, in the dose range of about 0.05-1.15 Gy. In addition, the adequate post-accident preparation for hair samples including optimum conditioning and timing were investigated. Experimental results prove the good sensitivity and merit of the method for neutron quantification in the mentioned dose range for which other bioassay methods are of poor resolution and sensitivity. A rough estimation of the dose-response curve for Iranian hair was also derived.

  12. Evaluation of the radiation dose to a phantom for various X-ray exposure factors performed using the dose area product in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, D. C.; Chung, W. K.; Dong, K. R.; Lee, J. W.; Choi, J. W.; Goo, E. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, S. G.; Cho, J. H.; Chung, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the dose area product (DAP) in digital radiography by using a DAP meter to determine the X-ray exposure. Pediatric X-ray examinations can be obtained for any radiographic examinations using the selected radiographic examination parameters (kVp and mAs), the DAP information recorded. The best peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) at a fixed tube voltage of 70 kVp was obtained at tube currents of 20 and 32 mA, whereas the best PSNR at a fixed tube current of 25 mA was obtained at a tube voltage of 73 kVp. The fixed tube voltage of 70 kVp and the fixed tube current of 25 mA could help to obtain the best image quality and depict the spatial resolution of an anthropomorphic torso phantom radiographic examination. The normalized data over the DAP were provided to determine the patient dose from radiography.

  13. USE OF PBPK MODELS FOR ASSESSING ABSORBED DOSE AND CHE INHIBITION FROM AGGREGATE EXPOSURE OF INFANTS AND CHILDREN TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiological pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling framework has been established to assess cumulative risk of dose and injury of infants and children to organophosphorus (OP) insecticides from aggregate sources and routes. Exposure inputs were drawn from all reasonable sources, pr...

  14. Radiation exposure and dose estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars sprint mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Qualls, Garry D.; Gates, Michele M.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual manned mission to Mars is analyzed in order to estimate potential ionizing radiation doses that may be incurred by crew members during the course of the mission. The scenario is set for a journey during the solar active period and includes a brief stay on the Martian surface. Propulsion is assumed to be provided by nuclear thermal rocket power, and estimates of the dose contributions from the reactors are included. However, due to effective shielding of the reactors by large propellant tanks, it is found that the incurred doses are principally due to the charged particle natural environment. Recent data (August-December 1989) for large solar proton events are used to simulate the flame environment, while standard models are used for the trapped particle and galactic cosmic ray contributions. Shield effectiveness for several candidate materials are investigated.

  15. Neonatal exposure to a moderate dose of ionizing radiation causes behavioural defects and altered levels of tau protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Buratovic, Sonja; Stenerlöw, Bo; Fredriksson, Anders; Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve; Viberg, Henrik; Eriksson, Per

    2014-12-01

    Medical use of ionizing radiation (IR) has great benefits for treatment and diagnostic imaging, but procedures as computerized tomography (CT) may deliver a significant radiation dose to the patient. Recently, awareness has been raised about possible non-cancer consequences from low dose exposure to IR during critical phases of perinatal and/or neonatal brain development. In the present study neonatal NMRI mice were whole body irradiated with a single dose of gamma radiation (0; 350 and 500 mGy) on postnatal day 10 (PND 10). At 2 and 4 months of age, mice of both sexes were observed for spontaneous behaviour in a novel home environment. The neuroproteins CaMKII, GAP-43, synaptophysin and total tau in male mouse cerebral cortex and hippocampus were analysed 24h post-irradiation and in adults at 6 months of age exposed to 0 or 500 mGy on PND 10. A significantly dose-response related deranged spontaneous behaviour in 2- and 4-month-old mice was observed, where both males and females displayed a modified habituation, indicating reduced cognitive function. The dose of 350 mGy seems to be a tentative threshold. Six-month-old male mice showed a significantly increased level of total tau in cerebral cortex after irradiation to 500 mGy compared to controls. This demonstrates that a single moderate dose of IR, given during a defined critical period of brain development, is sufficient to cause persistently reduced cognitive function. Moreover, an elevation of tau protein was observed in male mice displaying reduced cognitive function.

  16. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Gola, Anna; Tzoulaki, Ioanna

    2009-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1) concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  17. Exposure to Sublethal Doses of Fipronil and Thiacloprid Highly Increases Mortality of Honeybees Previously Infected by Nosema ceranae

    PubMed Central

    Vidau, Cyril; Diogon, Marie; Aufauvre, Julie; Fontbonne, Régis; Viguès, Bernard; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Texier, Catherine; Biron, David G.; Blot, Nicolas; El Alaoui, Hicham; Belzunces, Luc P.; Delbac, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Background The honeybee, Apis mellifera, is undergoing a worldwide decline whose origin is still in debate. Studies performed for twenty years suggest that this decline may involve both infectious diseases and exposure to pesticides. Joint action of pathogens and chemicals are known to threaten several organisms but the combined effects of these stressors were poorly investigated in honeybees. Our study was designed to explore the effect of Nosema ceranae infection on honeybee sensitivity to sublethal doses of the insecticides fipronil and thiacloprid. Methodology/Finding Five days after their emergence, honeybees were divided in 6 experimental groups: (i) uninfected controls, (ii) infected with N. ceranae, (iii) uninfected and exposed to fipronil, (iv) uninfected and exposed to thiacloprid, (v) infected with N. ceranae and exposed 10 days post-infection (p.i.) to fipronil, and (vi) infected with N. ceranae and exposed 10 days p.i. to thiacloprid. Honeybee mortality and insecticide consumption were analyzed daily and the intestinal spore content was evaluated 20 days after infection. A significant increase in honeybee mortality was observed when N. ceranae-infected honeybees were exposed to sublethal doses of insecticides. Surprisingly, exposures to fipronil and thiacloprid had opposite effects on microsporidian spore production. Analysis of the honeybee detoxification system 10 days p.i. showed that N. ceranae infection induced an increase in glutathione-S-transferase activity in midgut and fat body but not in 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activity. Conclusions/Significance After exposure to sublethal doses of fipronil or thiacloprid a higher mortality was observed in N. ceranae-infected honeybees than in uninfected ones. The synergistic effect of N. ceranae and insecticide on honeybee mortality, however, did not appear strongly linked to a decrease of the insect detoxification system. These data support the hypothesis that the combination of the increasing

  18. Effect of rare earth filtration on patient exposure, dose reduction, and image quality in oral panoramic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, D.A.; Washburn, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth intensifying screen material (Gd2O2S:Tb) was added to the standard Al filtration of an oral panoramic x-ray unit, resulting in a beam capable of achieving reductions in patient dose without a loss of image quality. The added rare earth filtration technique resulted in patient dose reductions of 21-56%, depending on anatomic sites, when compared to the conventional Al filtration technique. Films generated from both techniques were measured densitometrically and evaluated by a panel of practicing clinicians. Diagnostically significant differences were minimal. The results indicate that use of rare earth filters in oral panoramic radiography is an effective means of reducing exposures of dental patients to ionizing radiation.

  19. Closing the research loop: a risk-based approach for communicating results of air pollution exposure studies.

    PubMed Central

    Payne-Sturges, Devon C; Schwab, Margo; Buckley, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Communities have long been concerned about the environmental health and environmental quality of their neighborhoods. Community-based exposure assessments have the potential to be an effective way to address these concerns. The success of such studies depends critically on the effective translation and communication of study results back to the study participants and the community. In this article we describe the communication approach applied as part of the South Baltimore Community Exposure Study. Specifically, in conjunction with collecting measurements, we asked the community to define questions they wanted answered and the way in which they wanted to receive study results. To meet their needs, we applied the risk assessment framework. The approach we developed helped residents interpret exposure assessment measurements and gave them the raw materials to effect change in their community. The risk-based approach to presenting participant and community results provides the means to move beyond traditional reporting of concentration values in three important ways. First, risk takes into consideration toxicity, thereby enabling a dialogue about community health concerns. Second, risk provides a common denominator so that exposure and risk can be compared and priorities identified. Third, exposure and risk can be summed, thereby meeting the community's need for information regarding cumulative exposure. This approach may be a useful model for other researchers conducting exposure assessments in response to community concerns. PMID:14698927

  20. Peripubertal Caffeine Exposure Impairs Longitudinal Bone Growth in Immature Male Rats in a Dose- and Time-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Young; Choi, Yuri; Kim, Jisook; Choi, Hyeonhae; Shin, Jiwon; Roh, Jaesook

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the dose- and time-dependent effects of caffeine consumption throughout puberty in peripubertal rats. A total of 85 male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: control and caffeine-fed groups with 20, 60, or 120 mg/kg/day through oral gavage for 10, 20, 30, or 40 days. Caffeine decreased body weight gain and food consumption in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by a reduction in muscle and body fat. In addition, it caused a shortening and lightening of leg bones and spinal column. The total height of the growth plate decreased sharply at 40 days in the controls, but not in the caffeine-fed groups, and the height of hypertrophic zone in the caffeine-fed groups was lower than in the control. Caffeine increased the height of the secondary spongiosa, whereas parameters related to bone formation, such as bone area ratio, thickness and number of trabeculae, and bone perimeter, were significantly reduced. Furthermore, serum levels of IGF-1, estradiol, and testosterone were also reduced by the dose of caffeine exposure. Our results demonstrate that caffeine consumption can dose- and time-dependently inhibit longitudinal bone growth in immature male rats, possibly by blocking the physiologic changes in body composition and hormones relevant to bone growth.

  1. FOOD CONSUMPTION PATTERNS OF THE OZYORSK POPULATION IN 1948-1966, IMPORTANT FOR ESTIMATING PERORAL COMPONENT OF INTERNAL EXPOSURE DOSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mokrov, Y.; Martyushov, V. Z.; Stukalov, Pavel M.; Ivanov, I. A.; Beregich, D. A.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2008-06-01

    Results of reconstruction of food consumption patterns are presented for the residents of Ozyorsk for the period of 1948-1966. The reconstruction was performed on the basis analysis of the archive data. The given period of time is characterized by maximum releases into the atmosphere from the Mayak PA sources, and, therefore, it is considered to be the most significant period for calculating peroral component contribution to effective exposure doses to the population. The paper describes main foodstuff suppliers (regions) and their economic indices, as well as delivery rates and consumption rates for most important foodstuffs (primarily whole milk).

  2. Exposure setup to test effects of wireless communications systems on the CNS.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, M; Spinelli, Y; Kuster, N

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an exposure setup designed for in vivo studies of possible effects on the central nervous system due to the electromagnetic exposure from handheld mobile communications equipment. The setup consists of a carousel on which 10 rats, each restrained in a radially positioned tube, are exposed to the electromagnetic field emanating from a dipole antenna at the center. The rats are positioned with their snouts at a distance of 35 mm from the dipole antenna. The tubes restrain the movement of the animals to such an extent as to allow for well defined exposure conditions, yet without totally immobilizing them. Numerical and experimental dosimetric analysis of the setup was conducted using rats weighing 250-300 g at a frequency of 900 MHz. A detailed rat phantom derived from MRI scans was developed for the numerical assessment with a commercially available code based on the finite integration technique. The results were validated by measurements of the temperature rise in selected points of a rat cadaver. The dosimetric analysis shows that the setup is eminently suitable for central nervous system studies. It enables well defined field strengths to be induced in the brain tissue, whereby the variations in the specific absorption rate averaged over the brain tissue caused by movement and varying animal sizes was shown to be less than +/-16%. The specific absorption rate distribution in the brain is nonhomogeneous but comparable to that induced in the brain of a human using a handheld wireless phone. The efficiency of the exposure is about 0.20+/-0.05 mW g(-1) for the brain average value per 100 mA feedpoint current. The whole-body average specific absorption rate is considerably lower, i.e., about half of that of the brain averaged value. In addition, the setup has been proven to be practical in use, and the stress levels caused by restraining the animals in this setup are deemed by neurologists and veterinary scientists to be very low.

  3. Effects of chronic exposure to low doses of trichloroethylene on steroid hormone and insulin levels in normal men.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, V H; Chia, S E; Ong, C N

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the serum levels of insulin and some adrenal steroid hormones in men chronically exposed to low doses of trichloroethylene (TCE). A total of 85 workers participated in this study. Each worker had urine collected and analyzed for trichloroacetic acids (UTCA) on the same day that a blood sample was taken for analyses of serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), androstenedione, cortisol, aldosterone, and insulin. The mean concentration of environmental TCE was 29.6 ppm and the mean UTCA was 22.4 mg/g creatinine (range 0.8-136.4). TCE exposure did not cause any significant changes to the adrenal steroid hormone productions. The results showed that UTCA was significantly correlated to serum insulin levels. Insulin and SHBG responded in tandem, with the highest levels found in workers exposed to TCE for less than 2 years; levels of both parameters were significantly lowered in those exposed for more than 2 years. A triphasic response in insulin levels to TCE, which depended on the duration of exposure, was noted. Initial exposure caused an acute rise in insulin levels. This was followed by a fall to normal levels in those exposed 2-4 years and then a slight rise in those exposed for more than 6 years. The mechanism for this pattern of response to TCE exposure is yet unknown. PMID:9417767

  4. Dose-response relationships of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and oxidative damage to DNA and lipid in coke oven workers.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Dan; Zhang, Wangzhen; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Kun; Guan, Lei; Hu, Die; Wu, Tangchun; Guo, Huan

    2013-07-02

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, but the dose-response relationships between exposure to PAHs and oxidative stress levels have not been established. In this study, we recruited 1333 male coke oven workers, monitored the levels of environmental PAHs, and measured internal PAH exposure biomarkers including 12 urinary PAH metabolites and plasma benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydotetrol-albumin (BPDE-Alb) adducts, as well as the two oxidative biomarkers urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α). We found that the total concentration of urinary PAH metabolites and plasma BPDE-Alb adducts were both significantly associated with increased 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α in both smokers and nonsmokers (all p < 0.05). This exposure-response effect was also observed for most PAH metabolites (all p(trend) < 0.01), except for 4-hydroxyphenanthrene and 8-OHdG (p(trend) = 0.108). Furthermore, it was shown that only urinary 1-hydroxypyrene has a significant positive association with both 8-OHdG and 8-iso-PGF2α after a Bonferroni correction (p < 0.005). Our results indicated that urinary ΣOH-PAHs and plasma BPDE-Alb adducts can result in significant dose-related increases in oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Furthermore, when a multianalyte method is unavailable, our findings demonstrate that urinary 1-hydroxypyrene is a useful biomarker for evaluating total PAHs exposure and assessing oxidative damage in coke oven workers.

  5. Hepatic and intestine alterations in mice after prolonged exposure to low oral doses of Microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Sedan, Daniela; Laguens, Martín; Copparoni, Guido; Aranda, Jorge Oswaldo; Giannuzzi, Leda; Marra, Carlos Alberto; Andrinolo, Darío

    2015-09-15

    Oral intake of Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is the principal route of exposure to this toxin, with prolonged exposure leading to liver damage of unspecific symptomatology. The aim of the present paper was therefore to investigate the liver and intestine damage generated by prolonged oral exposure to low MC-LR doses (50 and 100 μg MC-LR/kg body weight, administrated every 48 h during a month) in a murine model. We found alterations in TBARS, SOD activity and glutathione content in liver and intestine of mice exposed to both doses of MC-LR. Furthermore, the presence of MC-LR was detected in both organs. We also found hepatic steatosis (3.6 ± 0.6% and 15.3 ± 1.6%) and a decrease in intraepithelial lymphocytes (28.7 ± 5.0% and 44.2 ± 8.7%) in intestine of 50- and 100-μg MC-LR/kg treated animals, respectively. This result could have important implications for mucosal immunity, since intraepithelial lymphocytes are the principal effectors of this system. Our results indicate that prolonged oral exposure at 50 μg MC-LR/kg every 48 h generates significant damage not only in liver but also in intestine. This finding calls for a re-appraisal of the currently accepted NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level), 40 μg MC-LR/kg body weight, used to derive the guideline value for MC-LR in drinking water.

  6. Exposure to a low dose of bisphenol A during fetal life or in adulthood alters maternal behavior in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Palanza, Paola L; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Parmigiani, Stefano; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2002-01-01

    Maternal behavior in mammals is the result of a complex interaction between the lactating dam and her developing offspring. Slight perturbations of any of the components of the mother-infant interaction may result in alterations of the behavior of the mother and/or of the offspring. We studied the effects of exposure of female CD-1 mice to the estrogenic chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during fetal life and/or in adulthood during the last part of pregnancy on subsequent maternal behavior. Pregnant females were fed daily doses of corn oil (controls) or 10 microg/kg body weight BPA during gestation days 14-18. As adults, the prenatally treated female offspring were time-mated and again fed either corn oil (controls) or the same doses of BPA on gestation days 14-18, resulting in four treatment groups: controls, prenatal BPA exposure, adult BPA exposure, and both prenatal and adult BPA exposure. Maternal behavior was then observed on postnatal days 2-15 and reflex responses were examined in the offspring. Dams exposed to BPA either as fetuses or in adulthood spent less time nursing their pups and more time out of the nest compared with the control group. Females exposed to BPA both as fetuses and in adulthood did not significantly differ from controls. No alterations in postnatal reflex development were observed in the offspring of the females exposed to BPA. The changes seen in maternal behavior may be the result of a direct effect of BPA on the neuroendocrine substrates underlying the initiation of maternal behavior. PMID:12060838

  7. Estimating safe human exposure levels for lunar dust using benchmark dose modeling of data from inhalation studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Scully, Robert R; Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T

    2013-12-01

    The pulmonary toxicity of airborne lunar dust was assessed in rats exposed by nose-only inhalation to 0, 2.1, 6.8, 20.8 and 60.6 mg/m3 of respirable size lunar dust. Rats were exposed for 6 h/d, 5 d/week, for 4 weeks (120 h). Biomarkers of toxicity were assessed in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) collected at 1 d, 1 week, 4 weeks or 13 weeks post-exposure for a total of 76 endpoints. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis was conducted on endpoints that appeared to be sensitive to dose. The number of endpoints that met criteria for modeling was 30. This number was composed of 13 endpoints that produced data suitable for parametric analysis and 17 that produced non-normal data. Mean BMD values determined from models generated from non-normal data were lower but not significantly different from the mean BMD of models derived from normally distributed data. Thus BMDs ranged from a minimum of 10.4 (using the average BMD from all 30 modeled endpoints) to a maximum of 16.6 (using the average BMD from the most restricted set of models). This range of BMDs yields safe exposure estimate (SEE) values of 0.6 and 0.9 mg/m3, respectively, when BMDs are extrapolated to humans, using a species factor of 3 and extrapolated from a 1-month exposure to an anticipated 6-month lunar surface exposure. This estimate is very similar to a no-observable-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) determined from the same studies (0.4 mg/m3) and a SEE derived from a study of rats that were intratracheally instilled with lunar dusts (0.5-1.0 mg/m3).

  8. Reaction rate theory of radiation exposure:Effects of dose rate on mutation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Masako; Nakamura, Issei; Manabe, Yuichiro

    2014-03-01

    We revisit the linear no threshold (LNT) hypothesis deduced from the prominent works done by H. J. Muller for the DNA mutation induced by the artificial radiation and by W. L. Russell and E. M. Kelly for that of mega-mouse experiments, developing a new kinetic reaction theory. While the existing theoretical models primarily rely on the dependence of the total dose D on the mutation frequency, the key ingredient in our theory is the dose rate d(t) that accounts for decrease in the mutation rate during the time course of the cellular reactions. The general form for the mutation frequency with the constant dose rate d is simply expressed as, dFm(t)/dt = A - BFm(t) , with A =a0 +a1(d +deff) and B =b0 +b1(d +deff) . We discuss the solution for a most likely case with B > 0 ; Fm(t) = [A/B -Fm(0) ] (1 -e-Bt) +Fm(0) with the control value Fm(0) . We show that all the data of mega-mouse experiments by Russel with different dose rates fall on the universal scaling function Φ(τ) ≡ [Fm(τ) -Fm(0) ]/[ A / B -Fm(0) ] = 1 - exp(- τ) with scaled time τ = Bt . The concept of such a scaling rule provides us with a strong tool to study different species in a unified manner.

  9. WHAT DO EXPOSURE AND DOSIMETRY STUDIES TELL US ABOUT THE DOSE TO SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) in the air is known to cause adverse health effects, particularly in elderly subjects with respiratory and cardiopulmonary disease. Although observed health effects are likely caused by multiple factors, the respiratory dose is one factor of particular con...

  10. Predictive Dose-Based Estimation of Systemic Exposure Multiples in Mouse and Monkey Relative to Human for Antisense Oligonucleotides With 2′-O-(2-Methoxyethyl) Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosie Z; Grundy, John S; Henry, Scott P; Kim, Tae-Won; Norris, Daniel A; Burkey, Jennifer; Wang, Yanfeng; Vick, Andrew; Geary, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of species differences and systemic exposure multiples (or ratios) in toxicological animal species versus human is an ongoing exercise during the course of drug development. The systemic exposure ratios are best estimated by directly comparing area under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUCs), and sometimes by comparing the dose administered, with the dose being adjusted either by body surface area (BSA) or body weight (BW). In this study, the association between AUC ratio and the administered dose ratio from animals to human were studied using a retrospective data-driven approach. The dataset included nine antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with 2′-O-(2-methoxyethyl) modifications, evaluated in two animal species (mouse and monkey) following single and repeated parenteral administrations. We found that plasma AUCs were similar between ASOs within the same species, and are predictable to human exposure using a single animal species, either mouse or monkey. Between monkey and human, the plasma exposure ratio can be predicted directly based on BW-adjusted dose ratios, whereas between mouse and human, the exposure ratio would be nearly fivefold lower in mouse compared to human based on BW-adjusted dose values. Thus, multiplying a factor of 5 for the mouse BW-adjusted dose would likely provide a reasonable AUC exposure estimate in human at steady-state. PMID:25602582

  11. A study on the dependence of exposure dose reduction and image evaluation on the distance from the dental periapical X-ray machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Kyu-Ji; Shin, Jae-Woo; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Lim, Chang-Seon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the exposure dose from a periapical X-ray machine is an important aim in dental radiography. Although the radiation exposure dose is generally low, any radiation exposure is harmful to the human body. Therefore, this study developed a method that reduces the exposure dose significantly compared to that encountered in a normal procedure, but still produces an image with a similar resolution. The correlation between the image resolution and the exposure dose of the proposed method was examined with increasing distance between the dosimeter and the X-ray tube. The results were compared with those obtained from the existing radiography method. When periapical radiography was performed once according to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the measured skin surface dose was low at 7 mGy or below. In contrast, the skin surface dose measured using the proposed method was only 1.57 mGy, showing a five-fold reduction. These results suggest that further decreases in dose might be achieved using the proposed method.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF THE EXPOSURE TO AND DOSE FROM RADON DECAY PRODUCTS IN NORMALLY OCCUPIED HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an assessment of the exposure to radon decay products in seven houses in northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada. n two houses, a single individual smoked cigarettes. ariety of heating and cooking appliances were in the houses. hese studies provided 5...

  13. CHANGES IN THE RAT EEG SPECTRA AND CORE TEMPERATURE AFTER EXPOSURE TO DIFFERENT DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our previous study showed that single exposure to 25 mg/kg (p.o.) of organophsphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CHP) led to significant alterations in all EEG frequency bands within 0.1-50 Hz range, reduction in core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). The alterations in EEG pe...

  14. GENE EXPRESSION DOSE-RESPONSE IN THE MOUSE BLADDER FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO ARSENATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The association between drinking water exposures to inorganic arsenic and life-threatening tumors in the human is strongest for bladder cancer. Moreover, a working model for the pathogenesis of human bladder cancer has been developed. To investigate the mode of action for inorgan...

  15. PROPOSED MODELS FOR ESTIMATING RELEVANT DOSE RESULTING FROM EXPOSURES BY THE GASTROINTESTINAL ROUTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simple first-order intestinal absorption commonly used in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic(PBPK) models can be made to fit many clinical administrations but may not provide relevant information to extrapolate to real-world exposure scenarios for risk assessment. Small hydr...

  16. USING DOSE ADDITION TO ESTIMATE CUMULATIVE RISKS FROM EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 requires the EPA to consider the cumulative risk from exposure to multiple chemicals that have a common mechanism of toxicity. Three methods, hazard index (HI), point-of-departure index (PODI), and toxicity equivalence factor (TEF), ...

  17. Electron spin resonance analysis of tooth enamel does not indicate exposures to large radiation doses in a large proportion of distally-exposed A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Cullings, Harry M; Miyazawa, Chuzo; Nakamura, Nori

    2011-01-01

    The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to two different types of radiation exposure; one was direct and brief and the other was indirect and persistent. The latter (so-called exposure to residual radiation) resulted from the presence of neutron activation products in the soil, or from fission products present in the fallout. Compared with the doses from direct exposures, estimations of individual doses from residual radiation have been much more complicated, and estimates vary widely among researchers. The present report bases its conclusions on radiation doses recorded in tooth enamel from survivors in Hiroshima. Those survivors were present at distances of about 3 km or greater from the hypocenter at the time of the explosion, and have DS02 estimated doses (direct exposure doses) of less than 5 mGy (and are regarded as control subjects). Individual doses were estimated by measuring CO(2)(-) radicals in tooth enamel with the electron spin resonance (ESR; or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR) method. The results from 56 molars donated by 49 survivors provided estimated doses which vary from -200 mGy to 500 mGy, and the median dose was 17 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles are -54 mGy and 137 mGy, respectively) for the buccal parts and 13 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles: -49 mGy and 87 mGy, respectively) for the lingual parts of the molars. Three molars had ESR-estimated doses of 300 to 400 mGy for both the buccal and lingual parts, which indicates possible exposures to excess doses of penetrating radiation, although the origin of such radiation remains to be determined. The results did not support claims that a large fraction of distally-exposed survivors received large doses (e.g. 1 Gy) of external penetrating radiation resulting from residual radiation.

  18. In Utero Exposure to Low-Dose Alcohol Induces Reprogramming of Mammary Development and Tumor Risk in MMTV-erbB-2 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhikun; Blackwelder, Amanda J.; Lee, Harry; Zhao, Ming; Yang, Xiaohe

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that prenatal exposure to environmental factors may modify breast cancer risk later in life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol on mammary development and tumor risk. Pregnant MMTV-erbB-2 mice were exposed to alcohol (6 g/kg/day) between day 13 and day 19 of gestation, and the female offspring were examined for tumor risk. Whole mount analysis indicated that in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol induced significant increases in ductal extension at 10 weeks of age. Molecular analysis showed that in utero alcohol exposure induced upregulation of ERα signaling and activation of Akt and Erk1/2 in pubertal mammary glands. However, enhanced signaling in the EGFR/erbB-2 pathway appeared to be more prominent in 10-week-old glands than did signaling in the other pathways. Interestingly, tumor development in mice with in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol was slightly delayed compared to control mice, but tumor multiplicity was increased. The results indicate that in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol induces the reprogramming of mammary development by mechanisms that include altered signaling in the estrogen receptor (ER) and erbB-2 pathways. The intriguing tumor development pattern might be related to alcohol dose and exposure conditions, and warrants further investigation. PMID:25853264

  19. Adaptive hormetic response of pre-exposure of mouse brain with low-dose 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray on growth hormone (GH) and body weight induced by subsequent high-dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Qingming; Liu, Bing; Li, Wenjian; Li, Xiaoda; Duan, Xin; Yuan, Zhigang; Zhou, Guangming; Min, Fengling

    2006-01-01

    The brain of the Kun-Ming strain mice were irradiated with 0.05 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray as the pre-exposure dose, and were then irradiated with 2 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray as challenging irradiation dose at 4 h after per-exposure. Body weight and serum growth hormone (GH) concentration were measured at 35th day after irradiation. The results showed that irradiation of mouse brain with 2 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray significantly diminished mouse body weight and level of serum GH. The relative biological effectiveness values of a 2 Gy dose of 12C 6+ ion calculated with respect to 60Co γ-ray were 1.47 and 1.34 for body weight and serum GH concentration, respectively. Pre-exposure with a low-dose (0.05 Gy) of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray significantly alleviated reductions of mouse body weight and level of serum GH induced by a subsequent high-dose (2 Gy) irradiation. The data suggested that low-dose ionizing irradiation can induce adaptive hormetic responses to the harmful effects of pituitary by subsequent high-dose exposure.

  20. Rats avoid exposure to HVdc electric fields: a dose response study.

    PubMed

    Creim, J A; Lovely, R H; Weigel, R J; Forsythe, W C; Anderson, L E

    1993-01-01

    Rats, given the choice, avoid exposure to alternating current (ac) 60-Hz electric fields at intensities > or = 75 kV/m. This study investigated the generality of this behavior by studying the response of rats when exposed to high voltage direct current (HVdc) electric fields. Three hundred eighty male Long Evans rats were studied in 9 experiments with 40 rats per experiment and in one experiment with 20 rats to determine 1) if rats avoid exposure to HVdc electric fields of varying field strengths, and 2) if avoidance did occur, what role, if any, the concentration of air ions would have on the avoidance behavior. In all experiments a three-compartment glass shuttlebox was used; either the left or right compartment could be exposed to a combination of HVdc electric fields and air ions while the other compartment remained sham-exposed. The third, center compartment was a transition zone between exposure and sham-exposure. In each experiment, the rats were individually assessed in 1-h sessions where half of the rats (n = 20) had the choice to locomote between the two sides being exposed or sham-exposed, while the other half of the rats (n = 20) were sham-exposed regardless of their location, except in one experiment where there was no sham-exposed group. The exposure levels for the first six experiments were 80, 55, 42.5, 30, -36, and -55 kV/m, respectively. The air ion concentration was constant at 1.4 x 10(6) ions/cc for the four positive exposure levels and -1.4 x 10(6) ions/cc for the two negative exposure levels. Rats having a choice between exposure and non-exposure relative to always sham-exposed control animals significantly reduced the amount of time spent on the exposed side at 80 kV/m (P < .002) as they did at both 55 and -55 kV/m (P < .005). No significant differences between groups were observed at 42.5, 30, or -36 kV/m. To determine what role the air ion concentration might have had on the avoidance behavior at field strengths of 55 kV/m or greater, four

  1. Mechanisms of action for an anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high dose and dose-rate, low-linear energy transfer radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Maliev, V; Popov, D; Casey, R C; Jones, J A

    2007-01-01

    were irradiated with doses known to induce the development of cerebral (SRD-1), non-specific toxic effects (SRD-2), gastrointestinal (SRD-3) and hematological (bone marrow) (SRD-4) syndromes. Our results suggest that an anti-radiation vaccine can be developed for prophylactic use against radiation damage induced by acute exposure to significant doses of low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation for humans, including nuclear power workers, commercial and military pilots, cosmonauts/astronauts, nuclear-powered engine vessel operators and possibly even the civilian population in the case of a nuclear terrorism event.

  2. A Small Dose of HIV? HIV Vaccine Mental Models and Risk Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter A.; Seiden, Danielle S.; Roberts, Kathleen J.; Kakinami, Lisa; Duan, Naihua

    2009-01-01

    Existing knowledge and beliefs related to HIV vaccines provide an important basis for the development of risk communication messages to support future HIV vaccine dissemination. This study explored HIV vaccine mental models among adults from segments of the population disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Nine focus groups were conducted with…

  3. Evaluation of the dependence of the exposure dose on the attenuation correction in brain PET/CT scans using 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun-Jin; Jeong, Moon-Taeg; Jang, Seong-Joo; Choi, Nam-Gil; Han, Jae-Bok; Yang, Nam-Hee; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lee, Yun-Jong; Ryu, Young-Hwan; Choi, Sung-Hyun; Seong, Kyeong-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether scanning could be performed with minimum dose and minimum exposure to the patient after an attenuation correction. A Hoffman 3D Brain Phantom was used in BIO_40 and D_690 PET/CT scanners, and the CT dose for the equipment was classified as a low dose (minimum dose), medium dose (general dose for scanning) and high dose (dose with use of contrast medium) before obtaining the image at a fixed kilo-voltage-peak (kVp) and milliampere (mA) that were adjusted gradually in 17-20 stages. A PET image was then obtained to perform an attenuation correction based on an attenuation map before analyzing the dose difference. Depending on tube current in the range of 33-190 milliampere-second (mAs) when BIO_40 was used, a significant difference in the effective dose was observed between the minimum and the maximum mAs (p < 0.05). According to a Scheffe post-hoc test, the ratio of the minimum to the maximum of the effective dose was increased by approximately 5.26-fold. Depending on the change in the tube current in the range of 10-200 mA when D_690 was used, a significant difference in the effective dose was observed between the minimum and the maximum of mA (p < 0.05). The Scheffe posthoc test revealed a 20.5-fold difference. In conclusion, because effective exposure dose increases with increasing operating current, it is possible to reduce the exposure limit in a brain scan can be reduced if the CT dose can be minimized for a transmission scan.

  4. Analysis of Coupled Model Uncertainties in Source to Dose Modeling of Human Exposures to Ambient Air Pollution: a PM2.5 Case-Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative assessment of human exposures and health effects due to air pollution involve detailed characterization of impacts of air quality on exposure and dose. A key challenge is to integrate these three components on a consistent spatial and temporal basis taking into acco...

  5. Life-Span Exposure to Low Doses of Aspartame Beginning during Prenatal Life Increases Cancer Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soffritti, Morando; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Tibaldi, Eva; Esposti, Davide Degli; Lauriola, Michelina

    2007-01-01

    Background In a previous study conducted at the Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center of the European Ramazzini Foundation (CMCRC/ERF), we demonstrated for the first time that aspartame (APM) is a multipotent carcinogenic agent when various doses are administered with feed to Sprague-Dawley rats from 8 weeks of age throughout the life span. Objective The aim of this second study is to better quantify the carcinogenic risk of APM, beginning treatment during fetal life. Methods We studied groups of 70–95 male and female Sprague-Dawley rats administered APM (2,000, 400, or 0 ppm) with feed from the 12th day of fetal life until natural death. Results Our results show a) a significant dose-related increase of malignant tumor–bearing animals in males (p < 0.01), particularly in the group treated with 2,000 ppm APM (p < 0.01); b) a significant increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in males treated with 2,000 ppm (p < 0.05) and a significant dose-related increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in females (p < 0.01), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.01); and c) a significant dose-related increase in incidence of mammary cancer in females (p < 0.05), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results of this carcinogenicity bioassay confirm and reinforce the first experimental demonstration of APM’s multipotential carcinogenicity at a dose level close to the acceptable daily intake for humans. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that when life-span exposure to APM begins during fetal life, its carcinogenic effects are increased. PMID:17805418

  6. Data Integration Reveals Key Homeostatic Mechanisms Following Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time - with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24 – 72 hr). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress were measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 were experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation.

  7. alpha-Radiation dose at bronchial bifurcations of smokers from indoor exposure to radon progeny.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, E A

    1983-01-01

    Synergistic interactions of indoor radon progeny with the cigarette smoking process have been evaluated experimentally. Smoking enhances the air concentration of submicron particles and attached radon decay products. Fractionation in burning cigarettes gives rise to the association of radon progeny with large particles in mainstream cigarette smoke, which are selectively deposited in "hot spots" at bronchial bifurcations. Because smoke tars are resistant to dissolution in lung fluid, attached radon progeny undergo substantial radioactive decay at bifurcations before clearance. Radon progeny inhaled during normal breathing between cigarettes make an even larger contribution to the alpha-radiation dose at bifurcations. Progressive chemical and radiation damage to the epithelium at bifurcations gives rise to prolonged retention of insoluble 210Pb-enriched smoke particles produced by tobacco trichome combustion. The high incidence of lung cancer in cigarette smokers is attributed to the cumulative alpha-radiation dose at bifurcations from indoor radon and thoron progeny--218Po, 214Po, 212Po, and 212Bi--plus that from 210Po in 210Pb-enriched smoke particles. It is estimated that a carcinogenic alpha-radiation dose of 80-100 rads (1 rad = 0.01 J/kg = 0.01 Gy) is delivered to approximately equal to 10(7) cells (approximately equal to 10(6) cells at individual bifurcations) of most smokers who die of lung cancer. PMID:6572389

  8. Individual variations in the micronucleus assay for biological dosimetry after high dose exposure.

    PubMed

    Kacprzak, Justyna; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Lankoff, Anna; Müller, Wolfgang-Ulrich; Wojcik, Andrzej; Lisowska, Halina

    2013-08-30

    The micronucleus assay is widely used as a biological dosimeter. Due to an inhibitory effect of radiation on cell proliferation the assay yields satisfactory results only when the absorbed dose is below about 5Gy. In 2002 Müller and Rode suggested that a modified version of the test, based on the analysis of the ratio of trinucleated to tetranucleated cells and the frequency of micronuclei (Mn) in binucleated cells containing at least one Mn, can be applied to detect a dose reaching 15Gy (Mutat. Res. 502 (2002) 47-51). Their conclusion was based on the results of experiments with lymphocytes from one donor and nothing is known about the possible influence of individual variability on the applicability of the Mn test to detect high doses of radiation. The aim of the present study was to validate the modified micronucleus assay with lymphocytes of 5 donors. Their blood was exposed to 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy of (60)Co gamma rays. The levels of Mn and of cell proliferation were assessed using various approaches. A strong inter-individual variability was observed for all endpoints. The results clearly show that the assessment of cell proliferation is essential for the interpretation of results. Unfortunately, it was not possible to identify one single proliferation marker that gives all necessary information.

  9. Effect of exposure to low-dose [gamma] radiation during late organogenesis in the mouse fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, P.U.; Baskar, R.; Hande, M.P. )

    1994-04-01

    The adominal region of pregnant Swiss mice was exposed to 0.05 to 0.50 of [gamma] radiation on day 11.5 postcoitus. The animals were sacrificed on day 18 gestation and the fetuses were examined for mortality, growth retardation, changes in head size and brain weight, and incidence of microphthalmia. No marked increase in fetal mortality or growth retardation was observed below 0.25 Gy; the increase in these parameters was significant only at 0.50 Gy. A significant reduction in head size and brain weight and a significant increase in the incidence of microphthalmia were observed at doses above 0.15 Gy. Detectable levels of microcephaly and microphthalmia were evident even at 0.10 Gy. A linear dose response was seen for these effects in the dose range of 0.05 to 0.15 Gy. It is concluded that the late period of organogenesis in the mouse, especially between days 10 and 12 postcoitus, is a particularly sensitive phase in the development of the skull, brain and eye. 21 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Long-term exposure to a ‘safe’ dose of bisphenol A reduced protein acetylation in adult rat testes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Zuo, Xuezhi; He, Dongliang; Ding, Shibin; Xu, Fangyi; Yang, Huiqin; Jin, Xin; Fan, Ying; Ying, Li; Tian, Chong; Ying, Chenjiang

    2017-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a typical environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical, induces epigenetic inheritance. Whether histone acetylation plays a role in these effects of BPA is largely unknown. Here, we investigated histone acetylation in male rats after long-term exposure to a ‘safe’ dose of BPA. Twenty adult male rats received either BPA (50 μg/kg·bw/day) or a vehicle diet for 35 weeks. Decreased protein lysine-acetylation levels at approximately ~17 kDa and ~25 kDa, as well as decreased histone acetylation of H3K9, H3K27 and H4K12, were detected by Western blot analysis of testes from the treated rats compared with controls. Additionally, increased protein expression of deacetylase Sirt1 and reduced binding of Sirt1, together with increased binding of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) to caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a structural protein component of caveolar membranes, were detected in treated rats compared with controls. Moreover, decreased acetylation of Cav-1 was observed in the treated rats for the first time. Our study showed that long-term exposure to a ‘safe’ dose of BPA reduces histone acetylation in the male reproductive system, which may be related to the phenotypic paternal-to-offspring transmission observed in our previous study. The evidence also suggested that these epigenetic effects may be meditated by Sirt1 via competition with ERβ for binding to Cav-1. PMID:28067316

  11. Long-term exposure to a ‘safe’ dose of bisphenol A reduced protein acetylation in adult rat testes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zuo, Xuezhi; He, Dongliang; Ding, Shibin; Xu, Fangyi; Yang, Huiqin; Jin, Xin; Fan, Ying; Ying, Li; Tian, Chong; Ying, Chenjiang

    2017-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a typical environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical, induces epigenetic inheritance. Whether histone acetylation plays a role in these effects of BPA is largely unknown. Here, we investigated histone acetylation in male rats after long-term exposure to a ‘safe’ dose of BPA. Twenty adult male rats received either BPA (50 μg/kg·bw/day) or a vehicle diet for 35 weeks. Decreased protein lysine-acetylation levels at approximately ~17 kDa and ~25 kDa, as well as decreased histone acetylation of H3K9, H3K27 and H4K12, were detected by Western blot analysis of testes from the treated rats compared with controls. Additionally, increased protein expression of deacetylase Sirt1 and reduced binding of Sirt1, together with increased binding of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) to caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a structural protein component of caveolar membranes, were detected in treated rats compared with controls. Moreover, decreased acetylation of Cav-1 was observed in the treated rats for the first time. Our study showed that long-term exposure to a ‘safe’ dose of BPA reduces histone acetylation in the male reproductive system, which may be related to the phenotypic paternal-to-offspring transmission observed in our previous study. The evidence also suggested that these epigenetic effects may be meditated by Sirt1 via competition with ERβ for binding to Cav-1.

  12. [Introduction to a new definition of the standard of dose exposures and dose units by the German Industrial Norm DIN 6814, Part 3].

    PubMed

    Harder, D

    1985-02-01

    The recent draft of the DIN standard on dose quantities and dose units is presented in original version and explained by the chairman of the Working Committee Dosimetry. There are important modifications by the introduction of SI units, the new definitions of site dose and individual dose, characteristic dose rate and dose rate constant, as well as by corrections of the notions "secondary electron equilibrium and "free in air".

  13. Effects of low-dose exposure to pesticide mixture on physiological responses of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Geret, F; Burgeot, T; Haure, J; Gagnaire, B; Renault, T; Communal, P Y; Samain, J F

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effects on the physiology of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, of a mixture of pesticides containing 0.8 μg L(-1) alachlor, 0.6 μg L(-1) metolachlor, 0.7 μg L(-1) atrazine, 0.6 μg L(-1) terbuthylazine, 0.5 μg L(-1) diuron, 0.6 μg L(-1) fosetyl aluminum, 0.05 μg L(-1) carbaryl, and 0.7 μg L(-1) glyphosate for a total concentration of 4.55 μg L(-1) . The total nominal concentration of pesticides mixture corresponds to the pesticide concentrations in the shellfish culture area of the Marennes-Oleron basin. Two varieties of C. gigas were selected on the foreshore, based on their characteristics in terms of resistance to summer mortality, to assess the effects of the pesticide mixture after 7 days of exposure under controlled conditions. The early effects of the mixture were assessed using enzyme biomarkers of nitrogen metabolism (GS, glutamine synthetase), detoxification metabolism (GST, glutathione S-transferase), and oxidative stress (CAT, catalase). Sublethal effects on hemocyte parameters (phagocytosis and esterase activity) and DNA damages (DNA adducts) were also measured. Changes in metabolic activities were characterized by increases in GS, GST, and CAT levels on the first day of exposure for the "resistant" oysters and after 3-7 days of exposure for the "susceptible" oysters. The formation of DNA adducts was detected after 7 days of exposure. The percentage of hemocyte esterase-positive cells was reduced in the resistant oysters, as was the hemocyte phagocytic capacity in both oyster varieties after 7 days of exposure to the pesticide mixture. This study highlights the need to consider the low doses and the mixture of pesticides to evaluate the effects of these molecules on organisms.

  14. Dose-related gene expression changes in forebrain following acute, low-level chlorpyrifos exposure in neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Anamika; Liu Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-10-15

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 h following acute CPF exposure in 7-day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (registered) . Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276 to 905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NF{Kappa}B, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  15. Relation between dietary acrylamide exposure and biomarkers of internal dose in Canadian teenagers.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Benjamin; Ayotte, Pierre; Normandin, Louise; Gaudreau, Éric; Bienvenu, Jean-François; Fennell, Timothy R; Blanchet, Carole; Phaneuf, Denise; Lapointe, Caroline; Bonvalot, Yvette; Gagné, Michelle; Courteau, Marilène; Snyder, Rodney W; Bouchard, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a probable human carcinogen found in several foods. Little information is available regarding exposure of adolescents, a subgroup potentially consuming more AA-rich foods. We investigated the relationship between dietary AA intake and levels of biomarkers of exposure (urinary metabolites and hemoglobin adducts) in 195 non-smoking teenagers of Montreal Island aged 10-17 years. Dietary habits and personal characteristics were documented by questionnaire. AA and its metabolites were quantified in 12-h urine collections by LC-MS/MS. Hemoglobin adducts from 165 blood samples were also analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Most prevalent urinary metabolites were NACP and NACP-S, with respective geometric mean concentrations of 31.2 and 14.2 μmol/mol creatinine. Geometric mean concentrations of AAVal and GAVal (hemoglobin adducts of AA and glycidamide (GA) with N-terminal valine residues) were 45.4 and 45.6 pmol/g globin, respectively. AA intake during the 2 days before urine collection was a significant predictor of NACP+NACP-S urinary concentrations (P<0.0001). AA intakes during the month before blood collection (P<0.0001) and passive smoking (P<0.05) were associated with adduct levels. Levels of hemoglobin adducts were above biomonitoring equivalent values corresponding to a 1 × 10(-4) excess cancer risk, which may indicate the need to reduce AA exposure in the population.

  16. Obesity in the United States – Dysbiosis from Exposure to Low-Dose Antibiotics?

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Lee W.; Raphael, Eva; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in obesity prevalence in the United States in the last 20 years is unprecedented and not well explained. Here, we explore a hypothesis that the obesity epidemic may be driven by population-wide chronic exposures to low-residue antibiotics that have increasingly entered the American food chain over the same time period. We propose this hypothesis based on two recent bodies of published reports – (1) those that provide evidence for the spread of antibiotics into the American food chain, and (2) those that examine the relationship between the gut microbiota and body physiology. The livestock use of antimicrobial agents has sharply increased in the US over the same 20-year period of the obesity epidemic, especially with the expansion of intensified livestock production, such as the concentrated animal feeding operations. Observational and experimental studies support the idea that changes in the intestinal microbiota exert a profound effect on body physiology. We propose that chronic exposures to low-residue antimicrobial drugs in food could disrupt the equilibrium state of intestinal microbiota and cause dysbiosis that can contribute to changes in body physiology. The obesity epidemic in the United States may be partly driven by the mass exposure of Americans to food containing low-residue antimicrobial agents. While this hypothesis cannot discount the impact of diet and other factors associated with obesity, we believe studies are warranted to consider this possible driver of the epidemic. PMID:24392444

  17. Toxicogenomics analysis of mouse lung responses following exposure to titanium dioxide nanomaterials reveal their disease potential at high doses

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Luna; Wu, Dongmei; Johnston, Michael; William, Andrew; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) induce lung inflammation in experimental animals. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive toxicogenomic analysis of lung responses in mice exposed to six individual TiO2NPs exhibiting different sizes (8, 20 and 300nm), crystalline structure (anatase, rutile or anatase/rutile) and surface modifications (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) to investigate whether the mechanisms leading to TiO2NP-induced lung inflammation are property specific. A detailed histopathological analysis was conducted to investigate the long-term disease implications of acute exposure to TiO2NPs. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 18, 54, 162 or 486 µg of TiO2NPs/mouse via single intratracheal instillation. Controls were exposed to dispersion medium only. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were sampled on 1, 28 and 90 days post-exposure. Although all TiO2NPs induced lung inflammation as measured by the neutrophil influx in BALF, rutile-type TiO2NPs induced higher inflammation with the hydrophilic rutile TiO2NP showing the maximum increase. Accordingly, the rutile TiO2NPs induced higher number of differentially expressed genes. Histopathological analysis of lung sections on Day 90 post-exposure showed increased collagen staining and fibrosis-like changes following exposure to the rutile TiO2NPs at the highest dose tested. Among the anatase, the smallest TiO2NP of 8nm showed the maximum response. The anatase TiO2NP of 300nm was the least responsive of all. The results suggest that the severity of lung inflammation is property specific; however, the underlying mechanisms (genes and pathways perturbed) leading to inflammation were the same for all particle types. While the particle size clearly influenced the overall acute lung responses, a combination of small size, crystalline structure and hydrophilic surface contributed to the long-term pathological effects observed at the highest dose (486 µg/mouse). Although the dose at which the

  18. Exposure to low doses (20 cGy) of Hze results in spatial memory impairment in rats.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Richard; Johnson, Angela; Davis, Leslie; Green-Mitchell, Shamina; Chabriol, Olivia; Sanford, Larry; Drake, Richard

    INTRODUCTION. Current models predict that the astronauts on a mission to a deep space destination, such as Mars, will be exposed to 25 cGy of Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). The long-term consequence of exposure to such doses is largely unknown, but given that 1.3 Gy of X-rays has been reported to lead to long-term cognitive deficits (Shore et al, 1976) and that CGR have an RBE of 2-5, it is likely that the predicted 25 cGy of GCR will lead to defects in the cognitive ability of the astronauts during and after the mission. Our studies are designed to help define the GCR dose that will lead to defects in complex working memory, and also to elucidate the mechanisms whereby hadronic radiation diminishes neurocognitive function. The identification of such processes would provide an opportunity for post-mission surveillance, and hopefully will lead to intervention strategies that will ameliorate or attenuate GCR-induced neurocognitive deficits. MATERIALS METHODS. Four-week old male Wistar rats were exposed to either X-rays or 1 GeV 56Fe. At three or six months post exposure the performance of the rats in the Barnes' Maze (Spatial memory) was established. The duration and frequency of REM sleep was also monitored to determine if the neurocognitive deficits arose due to reduced memory consolidation as a result of diminished REM sleep. We used a novel, but maturing technique, called MALDI-MS imaging (or MALDI-MSI), to identify specific regions of the brain where the neuroproteome differs in rats that have developed spatial memory impairments. RESULTS. 11.5 Gy of X-rays led to reduced performance in the Barnes's maze. In contrast, exposure to 20 cGy of Hze (1 GeV 56Fe) resulted in a significant impairment of spatial memory performance as measured in the Barnes' Maze, which was manifested by an increase in relative escape latency REL over a 5 day testing period. Such an increase in REL could arise from the rats becoming less able, or perhaps less willing, to locate the

  19. Total effective dose equivalent assessment after exposure to high-level natural radiation using the RESRAD code.

    PubMed

    Ziajahromi, Shima; Khanizadeh, Meysam; Nejadkoorki, Farhad

    2014-03-01

    The current work reports the activity concentrations of several natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K) in Khak-Sefid area of Ramsar, Iran. An evaluation of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) from exposure to high-level natural radiations is also presented. Soil samples were analyzed using a high-purity germanium detector with 80 % relative efficiency. The TEDE was calculated on a land area of 40,000 m(2) with 1.5-m thickness of contaminated zone for the member of three critical groups of farmer, construction worker, and resident using Residual Radioactive Material Guidelines (RESRAD) modeling program. It was found that the mean activity concentrations (in Bq/kg) were 23,118 ± 468, 25.8 ± 2.3, and 402.6 ± 16.5 for (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K, respectively. The maximum calculated TEDE during 1,000 years was 107.1 mSv/year at year 90, 92.42 mSv/year at year 88, and 22.09 mSv/year at year 46 for farmer, resident, and construction worker scenarios, respectively. The maximum TEDE in farmer scenario can be reduced to the level below the dose limit of 1 mSv/year which is safe for public health using soil cover with thickness of 50 cm or more on the contaminated zone. According to RESRAD prediction, the TEDE received by individuals for all exposure scenarios considerably exceed the set dose limit, and it is mainly due to (226)Ra.

  20. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  1. Chronic exposure to manganese sulfate leads to adverse dose-dependent effects on the neurobehavioral ability of rats.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng; Chen, Kangcheng; Zou, Yunfeng; Shen, Yuefei; Xia, Bing; Liang, Guiqiang; Lv, Yingnan; Wang, Fenfen; Huang, Damin; Yang, Xiaobo

    2016-11-01

    Manganese sulfate is the main combustion product of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). Currently, little is known about the neurobehavioral consequences of chronic manganese sulfate exposure. In this study, rats were treated with 0, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 mg/kg MnSO4 ·H2 O for 24 consecutive weeks via intraperitoneal injection. During the treatment period, spatial learning-memory ability was measured using the Morris water maze (MWM). At the end of the exposure period, spontaneous motor behavior and emotional status, hippocampal histologic changes, and Hsp70 mRNA levels were measured using the open-field test (OFT), hematoxylin-eosin staining and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR), respectively. A dose-dependent decrease was noted in the spatial learning-memory ability and the spontaneous activities of rats (P < 0.05), and negative emotions differed significantly between the exposed groups and the control group (P < 0.05). Moreover, overt morphological changes in the hippocampuses of the exposed rats were detected. Cellular degeneration and death were also found. The Hsp70 mRNA levels of the hippocampal areas in the 20.0 mg/kg group (1.567 ± 0.236) were significantly increased compared with the control group (P < 0.05). These results suggest that chronic exposure to manganese sulfate can have adverse dose-dependent effects on rats' neurobehavioral ability, and the mechanism of abnormal hippocampal Hsp70 expression needs to be further explored. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1571-1579, 2016.

  2. Dose-response relation between exposure to two types of hand-arm vibration and sensorineural perception of vibration.

    PubMed Central

    Virokannas, H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--31 railway workers and 32 lumberjacks were examined to compare the dose-response relation between the exposure to two types of hand-arm vibration and the sensory disturbances in peripheral nerves as evaluated by the vibration perception thresholds (VPTs). METHODS--Clinical examinations were carried out that included measurements of the VPTs, and electroneuromyography (ENMG), and an inquiry to confirm the use of vibrating tools. Diseases of the central nervous system and neuropathies were checked by inquiry and a clinical examination, diabetes was excluded by a blood sample analysis, and the subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome confirmed with ENMG were excluded from the study. RESULTS--Lifetime use of hand held tamping machines (railway workers) and chain saws (lumberjacks) had a significant correlation with the VPTs at frequencies from 32 to 500 Hz. The increase of the VPTs (250 Hz) in relation to use of vibrating tools was 1.8-fold higher on average in the whole group and 2.3-fold higher in the young (< 45) railway workers who had used hand held tamping machines, than in the corresponding groups of lumberjacks, who had used chain saws, whereas the frequency weighted acceleration of vibration in tamping machines was fourfold. CONCLUSION--There was a significant dose-response relation between the exposure to hand-arm vibration and the VPTs. The VPTs as a function of the frequency weighted acceleration of vibration and the exposure to vibration gave promising results for assessment of the risk of damage to sensory nerves induced by vibration. PMID:7795756

  3. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring.

    PubMed

    Maiellaro, Marília; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Gimenes Júnior, João Antônio; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2014-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment.

  4. Effect of split dose TBI on hematopoietic stem-cell survival in combined radiation-drug exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Okunewick, J.P.; Buffo, M.J.; Kociban, D.L.

    1984-07-01

    Studies were carried out to determine if a priming dose of total body irradiation (TBI) given before the first drug exposure in chemo-radiation protocols similar to those used in marrow transplantation would reduce the survival of hematopoietic stem cells. The cytotoxic drugs employed were cyclophosphamide (CY) and piperazinedione (PIP), both of which are currently used in the clinic for ablation of the host marrow prior to transplantation therapy for leukemia. The effects were evaluated in a normal and a leukemic mouse model using the enodgenous colony-former technique. Splitting the TBI to give part of the total dose before the first dose of drug was found to enhance stem cell killing some instances, but not in others. When CY and PIP were combined together in the same protocol it was found that a simple inversion of the order of these two drugs could result in a six-fold difference in the extent of stem cell ablation achieved, indicating that with multiple drug protocols the drug sequencing itself could be equally important as the manner in which the radiation is given.

  5. Low-dose exposure to bisphenol A and replacement bisphenol S induces precocious hypothalamic neurogenesis in embryonic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Cassandra D.; Ibhazehiebo, Kingsley; Jeong, Joo-Hyun; Habibi, Hamid R.; Kurrasch, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous endocrine disruptor that is present in many household products, has been linked to obesity, cancer, and, most relevant here, childhood neurological disorders such as anxiety and hyperactivity. However, how BPA exposure translates into these neurodevelopmental disorders remains poorly understood. Here, we used zebrafish to link BPA mechanistically to disease etiology. Strikingly, treatment of embryonic zebrafish with very low-dose BPA (0.0068 μM, 1,000-fold lower than the accepted human daily exposure) and bisphenol S (BPS), a common analog used in BPA-free products, resulted in 180% and 240% increases, respectively, in neuronal birth (neurogenesis) within the hypothalamus, a highly conserved brain region involved in hyperactivity. Furthermore, restricted BPA/BPS exposure specifically during the neurogenic window caused later hyperactive behaviors in zebrafish larvae. Unexpectedly, we show that BPA-mediated precocious neurogenesis and the concomitant behavioral phenotype were not dependent on predicted estrogen receptors but relied on androgen receptor-mediated up-regulation of aromatase. Although human epidemiological results are still emerging, an association between high maternal urinary BPA during gestation and hyperactivity and other behavioral disturbances in the child has been suggested. Our studies here provide mechanistic support that the neurogenic period indeed may be a window of vulnerability and uncovers previously unexplored avenues of research into how endocrine disruptors might perturb early brain development. Furthermore, our results show that BPA-free products are not necessarily safer and support the removal of all bisphenols from consumer merchandise. PMID:25583509

  6. Subchronic exposure to low-doses of the nerve agent VX: physiological, behavioral, histopathological and neurochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Egoz, Inbal; Raveh, Lily; Allon, Nahum; Grauer, Ettie; Gilat, Eran; Weissman, Ben Avi

    2008-08-15

    The highly toxic organophosphorous compound VX [O-ethyl-S-(isoporopylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate] undergoes an incomplete decontamination by conventional chemicals and thus evaporates from urban surfaces, e.g., pavement, long after the initial insult. As a consequence to these characteristics of VX, even the expected low levels should be examined for their potential to induce functional impairments including those associated with neuronal changes. In the present study, we developed an animal model for subchronic, low-dose VX exposure and evaluated its effects in rats. Animals were exposed to VX (2.25 microg/kg/day, 0.05 LD(50)) for three months via implanted mini osmotic pumps. The rapidly attained continuous and marked whole-blood cholinesterase inhibition (approximately 60%), fully recovered 96 h post pump removal. Under these conditions, body weight, blood count and chemistry, water maze acquisition task, sensitivity to the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine, peripheral benzodiazepine receptors density and brain morphology as demonstrated by routine histopathology, remained unchanged. However, animals treated with VX showed abnormal initial response in an Open Field test and a reduction (approximately 30%) in the expression of the exocytotic synaptobrevin/vesicle associate membrane protein (VAMP) in hippocampal neurons. These changes could not be detected one month following termination of exposure. Our findings indicate that following a subchronic, low-level exposure to the chemical warfare agent VX some important processes might be considerably impaired. Further research should be addressed towards better understanding of its potential health ramifications and in search of optimal countermeasures.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at fire stations: firefighters' exposure monitoring and biomonitoring, and assessment of the contribution to total internal dose.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Slezakova, Klara; Alves, Maria José; Fernandes, Adília; Teixeira, João Paulo; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Morais, Simone

    2017-02-05

    This work characterizes levels of eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the breathing air zone of firefighters during their regular work shift at eight Portuguese fire stations, and the firefighters' total internal dose by six urinary monohydroxyl metabolites (OH-PAHs). Total PAHs (ΣPAHs) concentrations varied widely (46.4-428ng/m(3)), mainly due to site specificity (urban/rural) and characteristics (age and layout) of buildings. Airborne PAHs with 2-3 rings were the most abundant (63.9-95.7% ΣPAHs). Similarly, urinary 1-hydroxynaphthalene and 1-hydroxyacenaphthene were the predominant metabolites (66-96% ΣOH-PAHs). Naphthalene contributed the most to carcinogenic ΣPAHs (39.4-78.1%) in majority of firehouses; benzo[a]pyrene, the marker of carcinogenic PAHs, accounted with 1.5-10%. Statistically positive significant correlations (r≥0.733, p≤0.025) were observed between ΣPAHs and urinary ΣOH-PAHs for firefighters of four fire stations suggesting that, at these sites, indoor air was their major exposure source of PAHs. Firefighter's personal exposure to PAHs at Portuguese fire stations were well below the existent occupational exposure limits. Also, the quantified concentrations of post-shift urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in all firefighters were clearly lower than the benchmark level (0.5μmol/mol) recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

  8. Tumour induction in rats following exposure to short-term high dose aristolochic acid I.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Qiu, Qi; Li, Heng; Li, Lei-Shi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the carcinogenic activity of aristolochic acid I (AAI) in short-term high doses. Forty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups. A dose of 50 mg/kg/day AAI was administrated to rats in the experimental group by gavage consecutively for 3 days, while the control group received only distilled water, after which renal function and pathological changes were assessed. At day 8 post-treatment AAI had induced elevations of both plasma urea and creatinine, coupled with increased urine production, urinary proteins, glucose and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. At 1, 3 and 6 months post-treatment renal function and urinary parameters for the experimental group approached baseline values. However, tumours and preneoplastic proliferation were both observed at 6 months for the experimental group. The rate of occurrence of preneoplastic proliferation in the kidneys was 100% (14/14); the rate of occurrence of renal tumours was 28.6% (4/14), which included three mesenchymal tumours and one case of renal oncocytoma; the rate of occurrence of extrarenal tumours was 7.1% (1/14), which was a case of mammary duct carcinoma. Renal preneoplastic proliferation and renal tumours, as well as extrarenal tumours, were not observed in control rats during the 6 months. These results differ from previous reports in that tumours originating from both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues were found, which may be attributed to the duration of treatment and the dosage of the drug. These data indicate that AAI administered in an acute manner at high doses does in fact have carcinogenic properties.

  9. Developmental lead exposure attenuates methamphetamine dose-effect self-administration performance and progressive ratio responding in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Angelica; Valles, Rodrigo; Hart, Nigel; Bratton, Gerald R; Nation, Jack R

    2008-06-01

    Perinatal (gestation/lactation) lead exposure modifies the reinforcement efficacy of various psychoactive drugs (e.g., cocaine, opiates) across the phases of initial selection, use, and abuse [Nation J.R., Cardon A.L., Heard H.M., Valles R., Bratton G.R. Perinatal lead exposure and relapse to drug-seeking behavior in the rat: a cocaine reinstatement study. Psychopharmacol 2003;168: 236-243.; Nation J.R., Smith K.R., Bratton G.R. Early developmental lead exposure increases sensitivity to cocaine in a self-administration paradigm. Pharmacol Biochem Behave 2004; 77: 127-13; Rocha A., Valles R., Cardon A.L., Bratton G.R., Nation J.R. Enhanced acquisition of cocaine self-administration in rats developmentally exposed to lead. Neuropsychopharmacol 2005; 30: 2058-2064.]. However, changes in sensitivity to methamphetamine across the phases of drug abuse have not been examined in animals perinatally exposed to lead. Because the mainstream popularity of methamphetamine in the United States is increasing and lead exposure continues to be widespread, an examination of this drug and how it may be modified by perinatal exposure to lead is warranted. The studies reported here examined the effects of perinatal lead exposure on adult self-administration of intravenous (i.v.) methamphetamine across the maintenance phase of drug addiction. Experiment 1 examined dose-effect patterns in control and lead-exposed animals. Experiment 2 evaluated control and lead-exposed animals in a progressive ratio task. Female rats were administered a 16-mg lead or a control solution for 30 days prior to breeding with non-exposed males. Exposure continued through pregnancy and lactation and was discontinued at weaning (postnatal day [PND] 21). Animals born to control or lead-exposed dams received indwelling jugular catheters as adults (PND 70) and subsequently were randomly assigned to one of the two studies, using only one male rat per litter for each study. The data showed a general attenuation of

  10. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  11. Recognizing the importance of exposure-dose-response dynamics for ecotoxicity assessment: nitrofurazone-induced antioxidase activity and mRNA expression in model protozoan Euplotes vannus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yazhen; Liu, Shuxing; Lin, Xiaofeng; Li, Jiqiu; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2015-06-01

    The equivocality of dose-response relationships has, in practice, hampered the application of biomarkers as a means to evaluate environmental risk, yet this important issue has not yet been fully recognized or explored. This paper evaluates the potential of antioxidant enzymes in the ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for use as biomarkers. Dose-response dynamics, together with both the enzyme activity and the gene expression of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, were investigated when E. vannus were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations. Mathematical models were explored to characterize the dose-response profiles and, specifically, to identify any equivocality in terms of endpoint. Significant differences were found in both enzyme activity and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone, and the interactions between exposure dosage and duration were significant. Correlations between enzyme activity, mRNA expression, and nitrofurazone dose varied with exposure duration. Particularly, the dose-responses showed different dynamics depending on either endpoint or exposure duration. Our findings suggest that both the enzyme activity and the gene expression of the tested antioxidant enzymes can be used as biomarkers for ecotoxicological assessment on the premise of ascertaining appropriate dosage scope, exposure duration, endpoint, etc., which can be achieved by using dose-response dynamics.

  12. Effect of prenatal and postnatal exposure to therapeutic doses of chlorimipramine on emotionality in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Echandía, E L; Broitman, S T

    1983-01-01

    Prenatal administration of high doses of tricyclic antidepressants have been reported to produce teratogenic and behavioral effects in rat offspring. In the present work, behavioral abnormalities are described in offspring of rats treated with therapeutic doses of chlorimipramine (CIM) during pregnancy (CIM-P), lactation (CIM-L) and during the whole pregnancy-lactation period (CIM-PL). CIM-P treatment did not produce teratogenic effects, did not affect number or body weight of pups at birth and did not induce neonatal mortality. At 2 months of age, the CIM-P males showed a significant increase in digging and grooming (familiar environment test), a decrease in "exploration" (novel environment test) and a decrease in active social interactions (social behavior test). Females were more resistant than males to the prenatal CIM treatment. The results suggest increased emotionality in CIM-P pups. Some behavioral abnormalities were also observed in the tests performed at 4 months of age. CIM-L treatment had minor effects on litter behavior. CIM-PL treatment potentiated the effects of the CIM-P treatment. In the CIM-PL males, impairment of exploration of a novel environment still remained in the tests performed at 4 months of age. It is speculated that when prenatal brain development is altered by CIM, further postnatal treatment may impair compensatory processes occurring in early postnatal life.

  13. Fluoride occurrence and assessment of exposure dose of fluoride in shallow aquifers of Makur, Unnao district Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Nayak, A K; Sharma, Y K

    2009-09-01

    The water samples from the shallow aquifers of Makur, Unnao district, Uttar Pradesh, was analyzed for fluoride content (F( - )) and other water quality parameters such as pH, EC, CO(3) (2-), HCO(3) (-), Cl( - ), Na( + ), Ca(2 + ), Mg(2 + ) and RSC. It was found that the F( - ) concentration of water varied between 1.05 to 13.9 mgl( - 1) which exceeded the maximum desirable limits of 1.0 mgl( - 1) of F( - ) as laid down by BIS and 68% of water exceeded maximum permissible limits of 1.5 mgl( - 1) as prescribed by WHO. The correlation study of fluoride indicated that F( - ) has a significant (p < 0.05) positive relationship with pH (r = +0.59) and RSC (r = 0.54), while a significant negative correlation with Ca+Mg (r = -0.53) and Mg (r = -0.49). The exposure doses of fluoride in infants was found between 0.35 to 3.26 mg kg( - 1)day( - 1) (if dug well water was used) whereas 0.36 to 4.63 mg kg( - 1)day( - 1) (when shallow hand pumps) The exposure doses of water in case of children (20 kg body weight) varied between 0.157 to 1.47 mg kg( - 1)day( - 1) (for dugwell) and 0.162 to 2.08 mg kg( - 1)day( - 1) (for shallow hand pumps) whereas in case of adults (70 kg body weight), it varied between 0.09 to 0.839 mg kg( - 1)day( - 1) (for dugwell) and 0.092 to 1.19 mg kg( - 1)day( - 1) (shallow hand pumps) which is quite high against the standard value of 0.05 mg/kg/day which is the minimum risk level (MRL) calculated by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The maximum exposure dose to fluoride for adults in the study area found to be 23.8 times higher than the ATSDR's MRL.

  14. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-11-23

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m³ with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m³ and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated.

  15. [Rapid dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Repin, M V; Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    The probability of losses of different chromosome aberrations during the dicentric chromosome assay of metaphase cells with incomplete sets of chromosome centromeres was estimated using a mathematical model for low doses of ionizing radiation. A dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes without determination of the total amount of chromosome centromeres in cells without chromosome aberrations (rapid dicentric assay) has been proposed. The rapid dicentric analysis allows to register chromosome aberrations in full compliance with the conventional classification. The experimental data have shown no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes detected by rapid and classical dicentric chromosome assays of human lymphocytes exposed to 0.5 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays. The rate of the rapid dicentric assay was almost twice as high as that of the classical dicentric assay.

  16. Dose-response functions for the soiling of heritage materials due to air pollution exposure.

    PubMed

    Watt, John; Jarrett, David; Hamilton, Ron

    2008-08-01

    A set of materials (Portland limestone, white painted steel, white plastic and polycarbonate filter material) was exposed at locations in London, Athens and Krakow. Regular measurements of reflectance were taken over a period of twelve months. Co-located measurements of PM(10) concentrations were available. Based on these results, the relationship between soiling (measured as loss of reflectance) and ambient PM(10) concentrations was quantified leading to the development of dose-response functions for the soiling of materials. The results for limestone revealed too much scatter for a prediction to be made. Implications for air quality management and for the conservation of cultural heritage buildings are considered, including public acceptability and economic factors.

  17. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m3 with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m3 and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated. PMID:26610543

  18. Olanzapine depot exposure in male rats: Dose-dependent lipogenic effects without concomitant weight gain.

    PubMed

    Fernø, J; Ersland, K M; Duus, I H; González-García, I; Fossan, K O; Berge, R K; Steen, V M; Skrede, S

    2015-06-01

    Treatment with second-generation antipsychotic agents such as olanzapine frequently results in metabolic adverse effects, e.g. hyperphagia, weight gain and dyslipidaemia in patients of both genders. The molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic adverse effects are still largely unknown, and studies in rodents represent an important approach in their exploration. However, the validity of the rodent model is hampered by the fact that antipsychotics induce weight gain in female, but not male, rats. When administered orally, the short half-life of olanzapine in rats prevents stable plasma concentrations of the drug. We recently showed that a single intramuscular injection of long-acting olanzapine formulation yields clinically relevant plasma concentrations accompanied by several dysmetabolic features in the female rat. In the current study, we show that depot injections of 100-250 mg/kg olanzapine yielded clinically relevant plasma olanzapine concentrations also in male rats. In spite of transient hyperphagia, however, olanzapine resulted in weight loss rather than weight gain. The resultant negative feed efficiency was accompanied by a slight elevation of thermogenesis markers in brown adipose tissue for the highest olanzapine dose, but the olanzapine-related reduction in weight gain remains to be explained. In spite of the absence of weight gain, an olanzapine dose of 200mg/kg or above induced significantly elevated plasma cholesterol levels and pronounced activation of lipogenic gene expression in the liver. These results confirm that olanzapine stimulates lipogenic effects, independent of weight gain, and raise the possibility that endocrine factors may influence gender specificity of metabolic effects of antipsychotics in the rat.

  19. Voluntarily exposure to a single, high dose of probiotic Escherichia coli results in prolonged colonisation.

    PubMed

    Wassenaar, T M; Beimfohr, C; Geske, T; Zimmermann, K

    2014-12-01

    The ability of probiotic Escherichia coli to colonise the human gut was determined in a volunteer study following national (German) regulations. Five persons voluntarily took a single, high dose of Symbioflor®2, which contains 6 different probiotic E. coli genotypes, to assess tolerance of the product, after which presence of E. coli in their faeces was tested for a follow-up period of 30 weeks. Intake of the product did not result in severe side effect in any of the individuals, though mild side effects were observed. Stool analysis showed that the probiotic E. coli had colonised all five persons for a period of 10 to 30 weeks (mean: 18.7 weeks, median: 25.7 weeks). In two individuals there was evidence of competition between host E. coli and probiotic E. coli, while in two others total E. coli levels increased persistently with at least a factor of 10 as a result of the received dose. In one individual, who had lacked detectable levels of faecal E. coli at the start of the post-authorisation safety study, long-term colonisation was established, first by probiotic E. coli exclusively, which were later replaced by host E. coli strains. In four out of five individuals, total E. coli faecal counts were higher on average than at the start of the experiment, while in none total levels exceeded 5×107 cfu/g. When the specific genotypes of the 6 probiotic E. coli were analysed, it was found that one and the same common genotype was responsible for prolonged colonisation in all five individuals.

  20. Oral exposure to low-dose of nonylphenol impairs memory performance in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Shinichiro; Kuwahara, Rika; Kohara, Yumi; Uchida, Yutaro; Oku, Yushi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2015-02-01

    Nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE) is a non-ionic surfactant, that is degraded to short-chain NPE and 4-nonylphenol (NP) by bacteria in the environment. NP, one of the most common environmental endocrine disruptors, exhibits weak estrogen-like activity. In this study, we investigated whether oral administration of NP (at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg doses) affects spatial learning and memory, general activity, emotionality, and fear-motivated learning and memory in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. SD rats of both sexes were evaluated using a battery of behavioral tests, including an appetite-motivated maze test (MAZE test) that was used to assess spatial learning and memory. In the MAZE test, the time required to reach the reward in male rats treated with 0.5 mg/kg NP group and female rats administered 5 mg/kg NP was significantly longer than that for control animals of the corresponding sex. In other behavioral tests, no significant differences were observed between the control group and either of the NP-treated groups of male rats. In female rats, inner and ambulation values for animals administered 0.5 mg/kg NP were significantly higher than those measured in control animals in open-field test, while the latency in the group treated with 5 mg/kg NP was significantly shorter compared to the control group in step-through passive avoidance test. This study indicates that oral administration of a low-dose of NP slightly impairs spatial learning and memory performance in male and female rats, and alters emotionality and fear-motivated learning and memory in female rats only.

  1. Repeated exposure to moderate doses of ethanol augments hippocampal glutamate neurotransmission by increasing release

    PubMed Central

    Chefer, Vladimir; Meis, Jennifer; Wang, Grace; Kuzmin, Alexander; Bakalkin, Georgy; Shippenberg, Toni

    2013-01-01

    The present study used conventional and quantitative microdialysis to assess glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the hippocampal CA3 area of the rat following a moderate-dose ethanol treatment regimen. Male Wistar rats received 3.4 g/kg of ethanol or water for 6 days via gastric gavage. Microdialysis experiments commenced 2 days later. Basal and depolarization-induced glutamate overflow were significantly elevated in ethanol-treated animals. Basal and depolarization-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) overflow were unaltered. Quantitative no-net-flux microdialysis was used to determine if changes in dialysate glutamate levels following ethanol administration are due to an increase in release or a decrease in uptake.To confirm the validity of this method for quantifying basal glutamate dynamics, extracellular concentrations of glutamate and the extraction fraction, which reflects changes in analyte clearance, were quantified in response to retro-dialysis of the glutamate uptake blocker trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (tPDC). tPDC significantly decreased the extraction fraction for glutamate, resulting in augmented extracellular glutamate concentrations. Repeated ethanol administration did not alter the glutamate extraction fraction. However, extracellular glutamate concentrations were significantly elevated, indicating that glutamate release is increased as a consequence of repeated ethanol administration. These data demonstrate that repeated bouts of moderate ethanol consumption alter basal glutamate dynamics in the CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Basal glutamate release is augmented, whereas glutamate uptake is unchanged. Furthermore, they suggest that dysregulation of glutamate transmission in this region may contribute to the previously documented deficits in cognitive function associated with moderate dose ethanol use. PMID:21182572

  2. Effects of Communication Mode and Salience on Recasts: A First Exposure Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Yuksel, Dogan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study that investigated whether the extent to which learners benefit from recasts on two Turkish morphemes differ depending on communication mode--i.e. Face-to-Face Communication (F2FC) and text-based Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication (SCMC)--and/or the salience of the target structure (i.e. salient and…

  3. Public health activities for mitigation of radiation exposures and risk communication challenges after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Robert Svendsen, Erik; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Herein we summarize the public health actions taken to mitigate exposure of the public to radiation after the Fukushima accident that occurred on 11 March 2011 in order to record valuable lessons learned for disaster preparedness. Evacuations from the radiation-affected areas and control of the distribution of various food products contributed to the reduction of external and internal radiation exposure resulting from the Fukushima incident. However, risk communication is also an important issue during the emergency response effort and subsequent phases of dealiing with a nuclear disaster. To assist with their healing process, sound, reliable scientific information should continue to be disseminated to the radiation-affected communities via two-way communication. We will describe the essential public health actions following a nuclear disaster for the early, intermediate and late phases that will be useful for radiological preparedness planning in response to other nuclear or radiological disasters. PMID:25862700

  4. Public health activities for mitigation of radiation exposures and risk communication challenges after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Robert Svendsen, Erik; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    Herein we summarize the public health actions taken to mitigate exposure of the public to radiation after the Fukushima accident that occurred on 11 March 2011 in order to record valuable lessons learned for disaster preparedness. Evacuations from the radiation-affected areas and control of the distribution of various food products contributed to the reduction of external and internal radiation exposure resulting from the Fukushima incident. However, risk communication is also an important issue during the emergency response effort and subsequent phases of dealiing with a nuclear disaster. To assist with their healing process, sound, reliable scientific information should continue to be disseminated to the radiation-affected communities via two-way communication. We will describe the essential public health actions following a nuclear disaster for the early, intermediate and late phases that will be useful for radiological preparedness planning in response to other nuclear or radiological disasters.

  5. Processing of DNA damage after exposure to a single dose of fission spectrum neutrons takes 40 hours to complete

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the time course over a period of days of repair of chromosomal single-strand breaks (SSB) induced by a single dose of JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons in the DNA of human P3 epithelial teratocarcinoma cells. When the cells are allowed a period of repair incubation the breaks are totally sealed by 7 hours. But then following these initial repair the DNA is dismantled as evidenced by the reappearance of SSBs. This secondary breakage is almost as extensive as that caused by the original neutron exposure, with a maximum at 16-18 hours. Finally, the DNA is rejoined, regaining its original size by 40 hours after irradiation. The secondary repair phenomenon may have an editing function, or it many represent the processing of residual damage left unrepaired during the initial rejoining of the backbone breaks.

  6. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the agin