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Sample records for exposure translating pharmacokinetics

  1. Reconstructing Exposures from Biomarkers using Exposure-Pharmacokinetic Modeling - A Case Study with Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for a short half-life chemical, carbaryl, were characterized using the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), an exposure model, and a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CARES was...

  2. TOLUENE EXPERIMENTAL EXPOSURES IN HUMANS: PHARMACOKINETICS AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene Experimental Exposures in Humans:
    Pharmacokinetics and Behavioral Effects
    (Ongoing Research)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    Human subjects will be exposed to 250 and 500 ppm toluene for one hour in the Human St...

  3. A Workflow to Investigate Exposure and Pharmacokinetic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) link adverse effects in individuals or populations to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using in vitro methods. Practical application of AOPs in chemical-specific risk assessment requires incorporation of knowledge on exposure, along with absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties of chemicals.Objectives: We developed a conceptual workflow to examine exposure and ADME properties in relation to an MIE. The utility of this workflow was evaluated using a previously established AOP, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition.Methods: Thirty chemicals found to inhibit human AChE in the ToxCast™ assay were examined with respect to their exposure, absorption potential, and ability to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Structures of active chemicals were compared against structures of 1,029 inactive chemicals to detect possible parent compounds that might have active metabolites.Results: Application of the workflow screened 10 “low-priority” chemicals of 30 active chemicals. Fifty-two of the 1,029 inactive chemicals exhibited a similarity threshold of ≥ 75% with their nearest active neighbors. Of these 52 compounds, 30 were excluded due to poor absorption or distribution. The remaining 22 compounds may inhibit AChE in vivo either directly or as a result of metabolic activation.Conclusions: The incorporation of exposure and ADME properties into the conceptual workflow e

  4. Multi-functional scaling methodology for translational pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic applications using integrated microphysiological systems (MPS).

    PubMed

    Maass, Christian; Stokes, Cynthia L; Griffith, Linda G; Cirit, Murat

    2017-03-07

    Microphysiological systems (MPS) provide relevant physiological environments in vitro for studies of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and biological mechanisms for translational research. Designing multi-MPS platforms is essential to study multi-organ systems. Typical design approaches, including direct and allometric scaling, scale each MPS individually and are based on relative sizes not function. This study's aim was to develop a new multi-functional scaling approach for integrated multi-MPS platform design for specific applications. We developed an optimization approach using mechanistic modeling and specification of an objective that considered multiple MPS functions, e.g., drug absorption and metabolism, simultaneously to identify system design parameters. This approach informed the design of two hypothetical multi-MPS platforms consisting of gut and liver (multi-MPS platform I) and gut, liver and kidney (multi-MPS platform II) to recapitulate in vivo drug exposures in vitro. This allows establishment of clinically relevant drug exposure-response relationships, a prerequisite for efficacy and toxicology assessment. Design parameters resulting from multi-functional scaling were compared to designs based on direct and allometric scaling. Human plasma time-concentration profiles of eight drugs were used to inform the designs, and profiles of an additional five drugs were calculated to test the designed platforms on an independent set. Multi-functional scaling yielded exposure times in good agreement with in vivo data, while direct and allometric scaling approaches resulted in short exposure durations. Multi-functional scaling allows appropriate scaling from in vivo to in vitro of multi-MPS platforms, and in the cases studied provides designs that better mimic in vivo exposures than standard MPS scaling methods.

  5. Eravacycline Pharmacokinetics and Challenges in Defining Humanized Exposure In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Monogue, Marguerite L.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the pharmacokinetic profile of eravacycline, a novel antibiotic of the tetracycline class, and determined the dose in an immunocompetent murine thigh infection model that would provide free-drug exposure similar to that observed in humans after the administration of 1 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h). Eravacycline demonstrated a nonlinear protein-binding profile. The 2.5-mg/kg i.v. q12h dose in mice resulted in an area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug of 1.64 mg · h/liter, which closely resembles the human exposure level. PMID:27353264

  6. A Translatable Predictor of Human Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Suchindran, Sunil; Nakamura, Mai; Chao, Nelson J.; Himburg, Heather; Minor, Kerry; Phillips, Gary; Ross, Joel; Abedi, Majid; Terbrueggen, Robert; Chute, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Terrorism using radiological dirty bombs or improvised nuclear devices is recognized as a major threat to both public health and national security. In the event of a radiological or nuclear disaster, rapid and accurate biodosimetry of thousands of potentially affected individuals will be essential for effective medical management to occur. Currently, health care providers lack an accurate, high-throughput biodosimetric assay which is suitable for the triage of large numbers of radiation injury victims. Here, we describe the development of a biodosimetric assay based on the analysis of irradiated mice, ex vivo-irradiated human peripheral blood (PB) and humans treated with total body irradiation (TBI). Interestingly, a gene expression profile developed via analysis of murine PB radiation response alone was inaccurate in predicting human radiation injury. In contrast, generation of a gene expression profile which incorporated data from ex vivo irradiated human PB and human TBI patients yielded an 18-gene radiation classifier which was highly accurate at predicting human radiation status and discriminating medically relevant radiation dose levels in human samples. Although the patient population was relatively small, the accuracy of this classifier in discriminating radiation dose levels in human TBI patients was not substantially confounded by gender, diagnosis or prior exposure to chemotherapy. We have further incorporated genes from this human radiation signature into a rapid and high-throughput chemical ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (CLPA) which was able to discriminate radiation dose levels in a pilot study of ex vivo irradiated human blood and samples from human TBI patients. Our results illustrate the potential for translation of a human genetic signature for the diagnosis of human radiation exposure and suggest the basis for further testing of CLPA as a candidate biodosimetric assay. PMID:25255453

  7. Comparison of the use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and a classical pharmacokinetic model for dioxin exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Emond, Claude; Michalek, Joel E; Birnbaum, Linda S; DeVito, Michael J

    2005-12-01

    In epidemiologic studies, exposure assessments of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) assume a fixed elimination rate. Recent data suggest a dose-dependent elimination rate for TCDD. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, which uses a body-burden-dependent elimination rate, was developed previously in rodents to describe the pharmacokinetics of TCDD and has been extrapolated to human exposure for this study. Optimizations were performed using data from a random selection of veterans from the Ranch Hand cohort and data from a human volunteer who was exposed to TCDD. Assessment of this PBPK model used additional data from the Ranch Hand cohort and a clinical report of two women exposed to TCDD. This PBPK model suggests that previous exposure assessments may have significantly underestimated peak blood concentrations, resulting in potential exposure misclassifications. Application of a PBPK model that incorporates an inducible elimination of TCDD may improve the exposure assessments in epidemiologic studies of TCDD.

  8. USE OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS TO ASSESS OCCUPATIONAL AND RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urinary biomarker measurements were analyzed using a dynamic pharmacokinetic model. The dynamic model provided the structure to link spot urine samples with corresponding exposure and absorbed dose. Data from both occupational and residential studies were analyzed. In the Agri...

  9. Emerging Insights for Translational Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Studies: Towards Prediction of Nose-to-Brain Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, Mitchel J R; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the potential added value of intranasal drug administration, preclinical studies to date have typically used the area under the curve (AUC) in brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to plasma following intranasal and intravenous administration to calculate measures of extent like drug targeting efficiencies (%DTE) and nose-to-brain transport percentages (%DTP). However, CSF does not necessarily provide direct information on the target site concentrations, while total brain concentrations are not specific to that end either as non-specific binding is not explicitly considered. Moreover, to predict nose-to-brain transport in humans, the use of descriptive analysis of preclinical data does not suffice. Therefore, nose-to-brain research should be performed translationally and focus on preclinical studies to obtain specific information on absorption from the nose, and distinguish between the different transport routes to the brain (absorption directly from the nose to the brain, absorption from the nose into the systemic circulation, and distribution between the systemic circulation and the brain), in terms of extent as well as rate. This can be accomplished by the use of unbound concentrations obtained from plasma and brain, with subsequent advanced mathematical modeling. To that end, brain extracellular fluid (ECF) is a preferred sampling site as it represents most closely the site of action for many targets. Furthermore, differences in nose characteristics between preclinical species and humans should be considered. Finally, pharmacodynamic measurements that can be obtained in both animals and humans should be included to further improve the prediction of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of intranasally administered CNS drugs in humans.

  10. In vitro to human in vivo translation - pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of quinidine.

    PubMed

    Polak, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The translational sciences aim to transfer results from basic research to the treatment of animals or patients. One of the approaches that could be utilized to achieve this goal is the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties using in silico methods. Such methodology, if properly applied, could help substantially reduce the use of animals in pre-clinical research. Here, quinidine was chosen as an example of a drug with cardiac effects and results of nine published clinical studies describing its PK (plasma concentration) and PD (QTcB/?QTcB) effects were mimicked by combination of the IVIVE platform Simcyp (pharmacokinetics prediction) with the ToxComp (cardiac effect prediction) system, based exclusively on in vitro data. The results show that reliable QT prediction is possible using the mechanistic IVIVE of the PK and PD effects. This can be considered a proof-of-concept that also could be applied as a drug safety evaluation procedure.

  11. In Vivo Rapid Assessment of Compound Exposure (RACE) for Profiling the Pharmacokinetics of Novel Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    McAnally, Danielle; Vicchiarelli, Michael; Siddiquee, Khandaker

    2013-01-01

    The RACE assay is an easy and efficient method for estimating the exposure of novel chemical probe compounds in mice. RACE is a truncated and compressed version of a traditional comprehensive in vivo pharmacokinetics study. The method uses a single standard formulation, dose, route of administration, and a small cohort of mice (n=4). Standardized protocols and an abbreviated sample collection scheme reduce the labor needed to perform both the in life and bioanalytical phases of the study. The procedure reduces the complexity of data analysis by eliminating all but one calculated pharmacokinetic parameter; estimated exposure (eAUC20-120), a parameter that is sufficient to rank order compounds based on exposure, but is also easily determined by most software using the simple trapezoidal rule. The RACE assay protocol is readily applicable to early/exploratory studies of most compounds, and is intended to be employed by laboratories with limited expertise in pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. PMID:23788556

  12. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic pipeline: translating anticancer drug pharmacology to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingyu; Gallo, James M

    2011-03-01

    Progress in an understanding of the genetic basis of cancer coupled to molecular pharmacology of potential new anticancer drugs calls for new approaches that are able to address key issues in the drug development process, including pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships. The incorporation of predictive preclinical PK/PD models into rationally designed early-stage clinical trials offers a promising way to relieve a significant bottleneck in the drug discovery pipeline. The aim of the current review is to discuss some considerations for how quantitative PK and PD analyses for anticancer drugs may be conducted and integrated into a global translational effort, and the importance of examining drug disposition and dynamics in target tissues to support the development of preclinical PK/PD models that can be subsequently extrapolated to predict pharmacologic characteristics in patients. In this article, we describe three different physiologically based (PB) PK modeling approaches, i.e., the whole-body PBPK model, the hybrid PBPK model, and the two-pore model for macromolecules, as well as their applications. General conclusions are that greater effort should be made to generate more clinical data that could validate scaled preclinical PB-PK/PD tumor-based models and, thus, stimulate a framework for preclinical to clinical translation. Finally, given the innovative techniques to measure tissue drug concentrations and associated biomarkers of drug responses, development of predictive PK/PD models will become a standard approach for drug discovery and development.

  13. Adjusting exposure limits for long and short exposure periods using a physiological pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M E; MacNaughton, M G; Clewell, H J; Paustenbach, D J

    1987-04-01

    The rationale for adjusting occupational exposure limits for unusual work schedules is to assure, as much as possible, that persons on these schedules are placed at no greater risk of injury or discomfort than persons who work a standard 8 hr/day, 40 hr/week. For most systemic toxicants, the risk index upon which the adjustments are made will be either peak blood concentration or integrated tissue dose, depending on what chemical's presumed mechanism of toxicity. Over the past ten years, at least four different models have been proposed for adjusting exposure limits for unusually short and long work schedules. This paper advocates use of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for determining adjustment factors for unusual exposure schedules, an approach that should be more accurate than those proposed previously. The PB-PK model requires data on the blood:air and tissue:blood partition coefficients, the rate of metabolism of the chemical, organ volumes, organ blood flows and ventilation rates in humans. Laboratory data on two industrially important chemicals--styrene and methylene chloride--were used to illustrate the PB-PK approach. At inhaled concentrations near their respective 8-hr Threshold Limit Value-Time-weighted averages (TLV-TWAs), both of these chemicals are primarily eliminated from the body by metabolism. For these two chemicals, the appropriate risk indexing parameters are integrated tissue dose or total amount of parent chemical metabolized. Since methylene chloride is metabolized to carbon monoxide, the maximum blood carboxyhemoglobin concentrations also might be useful as an index of risk for this chemical.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  15. Pharmacokinetics of nicotine in rats after multiple-cigarette smoke exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Rotenberg, K.S.; Adir, J.

    1983-06-15

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine and its major metabolites was evaluated in male rats after multiple-cigarette smoke exposure. A smoke-exposure apparatus was used to deliver cigarette smoke to the exposure chamber. The rats were exposed to smoke from a single cigarette every 8 hr for 14 days and to the smoke of a cigarette spiked with radiolabeled nicotine on the 15th day. Blood and urine samples were collected at timed intervals during the 10-min smoke-exposure period of the last cigarette and up to 48 hr thereafter. Nicotine, cotinine, and other polar metabolites were separated by thin-layer chromatography and quantified by liquid scintillation counting. The data were analyzed by computer fitting, and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters were compared to those observed after a single iv injection of nicotine and after a single-cigarette smoke exposure. The results indicated that the amount of nicotine absorbed from multiple-cigarette smoke was approximately 10-fold greater than that absorbed from a single cigarette. Also, unlike the single-cigarette smoke exposure experiment, nicotine plasma levels did not decay monotonically but increased after the 5th hr, and high plasma concentrations persisted for 30 hr. The rate and extent of the formation of cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, were decreased as compared with their values following a single-cigarette smoke exposure. It was concluded that nicotine or a constituent of tobacco smoke inhibits the formation of cotinine and may affect the biotransformation of other metabolites. Urinary excretion tended to support the conclusions that the pharmacokinetic parameters of nicotine and its metabolites were altered upon multiple as compared to single dose exposure.

  16. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in human exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The potential dose received by an individual during defined exposure situations can be determined using personal dosimeters or estimated by combining information on exposure scenarios with the environmental concentration (C.) of chemicals. With the latter approach, not only the potential dose but also the internal dose (i.e., amount of chemical that has been absorbed and available for interaction with receptors) and biologically-effective dose (i.e., amount of chemical that actually reaches the cellular sites where interaction with macromolecules occur) can be estimated if C. is provided as an input to PBPK models. These models are mathematical representations of the interrelationships among the critical determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals in biota. Since the compartments in this model correspond to biologically relevant tissues or tissue groups, the amount of chemical reaching specific target organ(s) can be estimated. Further, the PBPK models permit the use of biological monitoring data such as urinary levels of metabolites, hemoglobin adduct levels, and alveolar air concentrations, to reconstruct the exposure levels and scenarios for specific subgroups of populations. These models are also useful in providing estimates of target tissue dose in humans simultaneously exposed to chemicals in various media (air, water, soil, food) by different routes (oral, dermal, inhalation). Several examples of exposure assessment for volatile organic chemicals using PBPK models for mammals will be presented, and the strategies for development of these models for other classes of chemicals highlighted.

  17. Effect of In Vivo Nicotine Exposure on Chlorpyrifos Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Routine use of tobacco products may modify physiological and metabolic functions, including drug metabolizing enzymes, which may impact the pharmacokinetics of environmental contaminants. Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus (OP) insecticide that is bioactivated to chlorpyrifos-oxon, and manifests its neurotoxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated nicotine exposure on the pharmacokinetics of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine and also to determine the impact on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in plasma and brain. Animals were exposed to 7-daily doses of either 1 mg nicotine/kg or saline (sc), and to either a single oral dose of 35 mg CPF/kg or a repeated dose of 5 mg CPF/kg/day for 7 days. Groups of rats were then sacrificed at multiple time-points after receiving the last dose of CPF. Repeated nicotine and CPF exposures resulted in enhanced metabolism of CPF to TCPy, as evidenced by increases in the measured TCPy concentration and AUC in blood. However, there was no significant difference in the amount of TCPy (free or total) excreted in the urine. The extent of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was reduced due to nicotine co-exposure consistent with an increase in CYP450-mediated dearylation (detoxification) versus desulfuration. It was of interest to note that the impact of nicotine co-exposure was experimentally observed only after repeated CPF doses. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model simulations of CPF-oxon concentrations in blood and brain were predicted to be lower in nicotine treated groups, which were simulated by increasing the dearylation Vmax based upon previously conducted in vitro metabolism studies. These results were consistent with the experimental data. The current study demonstrated that repeated nicotine exposure could alter CPF metabolism in vivo, further modulating brain AChE inhibition.

  18. Effects of subchronic malathion exposure on the pharmacokinetic disposition of pefloxacin.

    PubMed

    Suresh Babu, N; Malik, J K; Rao, G S; Aggarwal, Manoj; Ranganathan, V

    2006-09-01

    Malathion is one of the most extensively used organophosphorus pesticides applied in agriculture, mosquito eradication and in the control of animal ectoparasites and human body lice. The widespread use of malathion has raised concern over its potential to cause untoward health effects in humans, animals and birds. Malathion inhibits cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and has the potential to alter pharmacokinetic profiles of therapeutic agents that are metabolized in the liver. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of subchronic exposure of malathion on the pharmacokinetic disposition of pefloxacin. Chickens were given either normal diet or malathion through food at a concentration of 1000ppm for 28 days. Subsequently, pefloxacin was administered either intravenously or orally (control) to birds fed normal diet and orally to malathion-exposed chickens at a dosage of 10mgkg(-1) body weight. Blood samples were drawn from the brachial vein at predetermined time intervals after drug administration. Plasma was separated and analyzed for pefloxacin by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The plasma concentration-time data were analyzed by non-compartmental techniques. Following intravenous administration of pefloxacin, elimination half-life (t(1/2β)), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and mean residence time (MRT) were 8.2±0.7h, 66±9μghml(-1) and 10.5±1.1h, respectively, and when the drug was administered orally, the respective values of pharmacokinetic parameters were 8.2±0.4h, 31±3.1μghml(-1) and 11.7±0.6h. Malathion exposure significantly increased maximum plasma drug concentration, t(1/2β), AUC and MRT of pefloxacin to 54, 22, 117 and 37% of control, respectively. These findings provide evidence that subchronic malathion exposure markedly influences the elimination kinetics of pefloxacin which may be due to malathion-mediated inhibition of metabolism of pefloxacin.

  19. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for developmental exposure to BDE-47 in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Emond, Claude; Raymer, James H.; Studabaker, William B.; Garner, C. Edwin; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2010-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used commercially as additive flame retardants and have been shown to transfer into environmental compartments, where they have the potential to bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans. Of the 209 possible PBDEs, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is usually the dominant congener found in human blood and milk samples. BDE-47 has been shown to have endocrine activity and produce developmental, reproductive, and neurotoxic effects. The objective of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BDE-47 in male and female (pregnant and non-pregnant) adult rats to facilitate investigations of developmental exposure. This model consists of eight compartments: liver, brain, adipose tissue, kidney, placenta, fetus, blood, and the rest of the body. Concentrations of BDE-47 from the literature and from maternal-fetal pharmacokinetic studies conducted at RTI International were used to parameterize and evaluate the model. The results showed that the model simulated BDE-47 tissue concentrations in adult male, maternal, and fetal compartments within the standard deviations of the experimental data. The model's ability to estimate BDE-47 concentrations in the fetus after maternal exposure will be useful to design in utero exposure/effect studies. This PBPK model is the first one designed for any PBDE pharmaco/toxicokinetic description. The next steps will be to expand this model to simulate BDE-47 pharmacokinetics and distributions across species (mice), and then extrapolate it to humans. After mouse and human model development, additional PBDE congeners will be incorporated into the model and simulated as a mixture.

  20. Setting safe acute exposure limits for halon replacement chemicals using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Vinegar, A; Jepson, G W; Cisneros, M; Rubenstein, R; Brock, W J

    2000-08-01

    Most proposed replacements for Halon 1301 as a fire suppressant are halogenated hydrocarbons. The acute toxic endpoint of concern for these agents is cardiac sensitization. An approach is described that links the cardiac endpoint as assessed in dogs to a target arterial concentration in humans. Linkage was made using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Monte Carlo simulations, which account for population variability, were used to establish safe exposure times at different exposure concentrations for Halon 1301 (bromotrifluoromethane), CF(3)I (trifluoroiodomethane), HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane), HFC-227ea (1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane), and HFC-236fa (1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane). Application of the modeling technique described here not only makes use of the conservative cardiac sensitization endpoint, but also uses an understanding of the pharmacokinetics of the chemical agents to better establish standards for safe exposure. The combined application of cardiac sensitization data and physiologically based modeling provides a quantitative approach, which can facilitate the selection and effective use of halon replacement candidates.

  1. Studying permethrin exposure in flight attendants using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Binnian; Isukapalli, Sastry S; Weisel, Clifford P

    2013-07-01

    Assessment of potential health risks to flight attendants from exposure to pyrethroid insecticides, used for aircraft disinsection, is limited because of (a) lack of information on exposures to these insecticides, and (b) lack of tools for linking these exposures to biomarker data. We developed and evaluated a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to assess the exposure of flight attendants to the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin attributable to aircraft disinsection. The permethrin PBPK model was developed by adapting previous models for pyrethroids, and was parameterized using currently available metabolic parameters for permethrin. The human permethrin model was first evaluated with data from published human studies. Then, it was used to estimate urinary metabolite concentrations of permethrin in flight attendants who worked in aircrafts, which underwent residual and pre-flight spray treatments. The human model was also applied to analyze the toxicokinetics following permethrin exposures attributable to other aircraft disinsection scenarios. Predicted levels of urinary 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), a metabolite of permethrin, following residual disinsection treatment were comparable to the measurements made for flight attendants. Simulations showed that the median contributions of the dermal, oral and inhalation routes to permethrin exposure in flight attendants were 83.5%, 16.1% and 0.4% under residual treatment scenario, respectively, and were 5.3%, 5.0% and 89.7% under pre-flight spray scenario, respectively. The PBPK model provides the capability to simulate the toxicokinetic profiles of permethrin, and can be used in the studies on human exposure to permethrin.

  2. Effect of in vivo nicotine exposure on chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Kwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most studied and widely used broad spectrum organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. The neurotoxicity of CPF results from inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) by its metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon), which subsequently leads to cholinergic hyperstimulation. The routine consumption of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products will modify a number of metabolic and physiological processes which may impact the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of other xenobiotics including pesticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of repeated ethanol and nicotine co-exposure on in vivo CPF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The major CPF metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine along with changes in plasma and brain AChE activities were measured in male Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. Animals were repeatedly treated with either saline or ethanol (1 g/kg/day, po) and nicotine (1 mg/kg/day, sc) in addition to CPF (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, po) for 7 days. Rats were sacrificed at times from 1 to 24 hr post-last dosing of CPF. There were apparent differences in blood TCPy pharmacokinetics following ethanol and nicotine pretreatments in both CPF dose groups, which showed higher TCPy peak concentrations and increased blood TCPy AUC in ethanol and nicotine groups over CPF-only (~1.8- and 3.8-fold at 1 and 5 mg CPF doses, respectively). Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities from both ethanol and nicotine-treated groups showed substantially less inhibition following repeated 5 mg CPF/kg dosing compared to CPF-only controls (96 ± 13 and 66 ± 7% of naïve at 4 hr post-last CPF dosing, respectively). Inhibition of brain AChE activities was minimal in both 1 mg CPF/kg/day dosing groups, but a similar trend indicating less inhibition following ethanol/nicotine pretreatment was apparent. No differences were observed in plasma ChE activities due to the combined alcohol and nicotine treatments. In vitro, CPF

  3. Pharmacokinetics of toxic chemicals in breast milk: use of PBPK models to predict infant exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, Rebecca A; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2002-01-01

    Factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic chemicals in the breast milk of nursing mothers include both chemical characteristics, such as lipophilicity, and physiologic changes during lactation. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can aid in the prediction of infant exposure via breast milk. Benefits of these quantitative models include the ability to account for changing maternal physiology and transfer kinetics, as well as the chemical-specific characteristics, in order to produce more accurate estimates of neonatal risk. A recently developed PBPK model for perchlorate and iodide kinetics in the lactating and neonatal rat demonstrates the utility of PBPK modeling in predicting maternal and neonatal distribution of these two compounds. This model incorporates time-dependent changes in physiologic characteristics and includes interactions between iodide and perchlorate that alter the distribution and kinetics of iodide. PMID:12055064

  4. Comparative chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics via multiple routes of exposure and vehicles of administration in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Campbell, James A; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L; Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S; Barr, Dana B; Timchalk, Charles

    2009-06-30

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a commonly used organophosphorus pesticide. A number of toxicity and mechanistic studies have been conducted in animals, where CPF has been administered via a variety of different exposure routes and dosing vehicles. This study compared chlorpyrifos (CPF) pharmacokinetics using oral, intravenous (IV), and subcutaneous (SC) exposure routes and corn oil, saline/Tween 20, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as dosing vehicles. Two groups of rats were co-administered target doses (5 mg/kg) of CPF and isotopically labeled CPF (L-CPF). One group was exposed by both oral (CPF) and IV (L-CPF) routes using saline/Tween 20 vehicle; whereas, the second group was exposed by the SC route using two vehicles, corn oil (CPF) and DMSO (L-CPF). A third group was only administered CPF by the oral route in corn oil. For all treatments, blood and urine time course samples were collected and analyzed for 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), and isotopically labeled 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (L-TCPy). Peak TCPy/L-TCPy concentrations in blood (20.2 micromol/l), TCPy/L-TCPy blood AUC (94.9 micromol/lh), and percent of dose excreted in urine (100%) were all highest in rats dosed orally with CPF in saline/Tween 20 and second highest in rats dosed orally with CPF in corn oil. Peak TCPy concentrations in blood were more rapidly obtained after oral administration of CPF in saline/Tween 20 compared to all other dosing scenarios (>1.5 h). These results indicate that orally administered CPF is more extensively metabolized than systemic exposures of CPF (SC and IV), and vehicle of administration also has an effect on absorption rates. Thus, equivalent doses via different routes and/or vehicles of administration could potentially lead to different body burdens of CPF, different rates of bioactivation to CPF-oxon, and different toxic responses. Simulations using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model for CPF are consistent with these possibilities

  5. Effect of temperature on the pharmacokinetics of benzocaine in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after bath exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Meinertz, J.R.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of benzocaine during bath exposures at 1 mg/L were determined in rainbow trout acclimated at 6 °C, 12 °C or 18 °C for at least 1 month. Individual fish were exposed to benzocaine in a recirculating system for 4 h and pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in a unique manner from the concentration of benzocaine in the bath water vs. time curve. Elimination from plasma was also determined after the 4 h exposure. The uptake clearance and metabolic clearance increased with increased acclimatization temperatures (uptake clearance 581 ± 179 mL/min/kg at 6 °C and 1154 ± 447 mL/ min/kg at 18 °C; metabolic clearance 15.2 ± 4.1 mL/min/kg at 6 °C and 22.3 ± 4.2 mL/min/kg at 18 °C). The apparent volume of distribution had a trend for increasing with temperature that was not significant at the 5% level (2369 ± 678 mL/kg at 6 °C to 3260 ± 1182 mL/kg at 18 °C). The elimination half-life of benzocaine in plasma was variable and did not differ significantly with temperature (60.8 ± 30.3 min at 6 °C to 35.9 ± 13.0 min at 12 °C). Elimination of benzocaine from rainbow trout is relatively rapid and even more rapid at higher acclimatization temperatures based on calculated metabolic clearances and measured plasma concentrations, but was not evident by measurement of terminal plasma half-lifes.

  6. Translational Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Tumor Growth Inhibition Supports Dose‐Range Selection of the Anti–PD‐1 Antibody Pembrolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Lindauer, A; Valiathan, CR; Mehta, K; Sriram, V; de Greef, R; Elassaiss‐Schaap, J

    2016-01-01

    Pembrolizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against programmed death 1 (PD‐1), has a manageable safety profile and robust clinical activity against advanced malignancies. The lowest effective dose for evaluation in further dose‐ranging studies was identified by developing a translational model from preclinical mouse experiments. A compartmental pharmacokinetic model was combined with a published physiologically based tissue compartment, linked to receptor occupancy as the driver of observed tumor growth inhibition. Human simulations were performed using clinical pharmacokinetic data, literature values, and in vitro parameters for drug distribution and binding. Biological and mathematical uncertainties were included in simulations to generate expectations for dose response. The results demonstrated a minimal increase in efficacy for doses higher than 2 mg/kg. The findings of the translational model were successfully applied to select 2 mg/kg as the lowest dose for dose‐ranging evaluations. PMID:27863176

  7. Linear pharmacokinetic models for evaluating unusual work schedules, exposure limits and body burdens of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, B.E.

    1988-05-01

    The adverse effects of workplace exposures to pollutants relate more accurately to the concentrations of pollutants in the body than in the environment. In many cases pharmacokinetic models may represent the external to internal concentration relationships with useful accuracy. Simplified equations are presented for stepwise calculations on a series of time-averaged, external concentrations to give a corresponding series of internal concentrations. Accurate results were obtained for averaging times not exceeding one-fourth of the biological half-life of the pollutant. A convenient measure of internal concentration is the external concentration that would be at in vivo equilibrium with it (termed biologically effective concentration). Three measures of damage burden are proposed, each appropriate for different toxic mechanisms. The calculations readily may be carried out on a programmable calculator or microcomputer. Illustrative examples show how unusual work schedules may be compared with an 8 hr/day, 5 days/week schedule and how appropriate short- and long-term exposure limits may be determined. Other examples, illustrated for lead, relate absorbed mass rates to body concentrations and body burdens in a two-compartment kinetic model. These calculations should provide a more accurate evaluation of fluctuating concentrations, which can be handled easily.

  8. Intravenous oxycodone for pain relief in the first stage of labour--maternal pharmacokinetics and neonatal exposure.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Merja; Franco, Maria Gonzalez; Raatikainen, Kaisa; Välitalo, Pyry; Sankilampi, Ulla; Heinonen, Seppo; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Kokki, Hannu

    2012-09-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy may change pharmacokinetics of compounds. Oxycodone is an increasingly used opioid agonist in acute pain management but its pharmacokinetics in labouring women has not been established. We studied the maternal pharmacokinetics and neonatal exposure of intravenous oxycodone for pain relief in the first stage of labour. The study was prospective, open-labelled and with a control group. After informed consent, 15 nulliparous parturients and newborns, and newborns in a control group were studied. In the study group, oxycodone boluses of 1 mg i.v., up to a cumulative dose of 5 mg, was administered when labour pain score was 5/10 or higher. As the control group, 30 other newborns after uncomplicated deliveries with no systemic opioids were assessed for the neonatal outcome. In the study group, maternal pharmacokinetics of oxycodone was measured from plasma concentrations during labour, and neonatal exposure was assessed from umbilical plasma samples using population pharmacokinetic methods. Maternal plasma oxycodone concentration decreased with a median half-life of 2.6 hr (range, 1.8-2.8). Oxycodone concentrations in the umbilical plasma 2.7 μg/l (0.3-14.5) were similar as in maternal plasma 2.4 (0.1-14.8) μg/l at the time of birth. No severe or unexpected adverse effects were noted. To conclude, firstly, maternal elimination half-life of i.v. oxycodone was significantly shorter than that reported in non-pregnant women, and secondly, maternal plasma oxycodone at the birth correlated well with neonatal umbilical concentrations and may, thus, be used as an estimate of neonatal exposure.

  9. Enhancing exposure-based therapy from a translational research perspective.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Stefan G

    2007-09-01

    Combining an effective psychological treatment with conventional anxiolytic medication is typically not more effective than unimodal therapy for treating anxiety disorders. However, recent advances in the neuroscience of fear reduction have led to novel approaches for combining psychological therapy and pharmacological agents. Exposure-based treatments in humans partly rely on extinction to reduce the fear response in anxiety disorders. Animal studies have shown that D-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the glycine recognition site of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor facilitates extinction learning. Similarly, recent human trials have shown that DCS enhances fear reduction during exposure therapy of some anxiety disorders. This article discusses the biological and psychological mechanisms of extinction learning and the therapeutic value of DCS as an augmentation strategy for exposure therapy. Areas of future research will be identified.

  10. Comparative pharmacokinetic study of the role of gender and developmental differences in occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it shows that physiological differences between men and women result in gender-specific exposures with respect to benzene. Second, it assesses the potential for a lactating woman's occupational and personal benzene exposure to impact a nursing infant's exposure, highlighting the possibility of subjecting an infant to the effects of industrial chemicals via breast feeding. This study employs physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to investigate the influence of physiological parameters and to evaluate the ability of inhaled benzene to transfer from mother to infant through breastmilk. The models are run through scenarios that simulate occupational, smoking, and background exposures. The gender comparison is facilitated by a sensitivity analysis. The blood/air partition coefficient and maximum velocity of metabolism were found to substantially impact model output. These values were both higher in women and caused an increase in the percentage of benzene metabolized in all of the exposure scenarios. The study of lactating women and infants is essentially theoretical. There is evidence that over 65% of an infant's benzene exposure can be attributed to contaminated breastmilk. A large portion of the ingested exposure can be eliminated by adjusting the mother's working or nursing schedule. Benzene, Physiologically based pharmacokinetics, PBPK.

  11. TREXMO: A Translation Tool to Support the Use of Regulatory Occupational Exposure Models.

    PubMed

    Savic, Nenad; Racordon, Dimitri; Buchs, Didier; Gasic, Bojan; Vernez, David

    2016-10-01

    Occupational exposure models vary significantly in their complexity, purpose, and the level of expertise required from the user. Different parameters in the same model may lead to different exposure estimates for the same exposure situation. This paper presents a tool developed to deal with this concern-TREXMO or TRanslation of EXposure MOdels. TREXMO integrates six commonly used occupational exposure models, namely, ART v.1.5, STOFFENMANAGER(®) v.5.1, ECETOC TRA v.3, MEASE v.1.02.01, EMKG-EXPO-TOOL, and EASE v.2.0. By enabling a semi-automatic translation between the parameters of these six models, TREXMO facilitates their simultaneous use. For a given exposure situation, defined by a set of parameters in one of the models, TREXMO provides the user with the most appropriate parameters to use in the other exposure models. Results showed that, once an exposure situation and parameters were set in ART, TREXMO reduced the number of possible outcomes in the other models by 1-4 orders of magnitude. The tool should manage to reduce the uncertain entry or selection of parameters in the six models, improve between-user reliability, and reduce the time required for running several models for a given exposure situation. In addition to these advantages, registrants of chemicals and authorities should benefit from more reliable exposure estimates for the risk characterization of dangerous chemicals under Regulation, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of CHemicals (REACH).

  12. Similarity of Bisphenol A Pharmacokinetics in Rhesus Monkeys and Mice: Relevance for Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julia A.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Drury, Bertram; Rottinghaus, George; Hunt, Patricia A.; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Laffont, Céline M.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Daily adult human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been estimated at < 1 μg/kg, with virtually complete first-pass conjugation in the liver in primates but not in mice. We measured unconjugated and conjugated BPA levels in serum from adult female rhesus monkeys and adult female mice after oral administration of BPA and compared findings in mice and monkeys with prior published data in women. Methods Eleven adult female rhesus macaques were fed 400 μg/kg deuterated BPA (dBPA) daily for 7 days. Levels of serum dBPA were analyzed by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (0.2 ng/mL limit of quantitation) over 24 hr on day 1 and on day 7. The same dose of BPA was fed to adult female CD-1 mice; other female mice were administered 3H-BPA at doses ranging from 2 to 100,000 μg/kg. Results In monkeys, the maximum unconjugated serum dBPA concentration of 4 ng/mL was reached 1 hr after feeding and declined to low levels by 24 hr, with no significant bioaccumulation after seven daily doses. Mice and monkeys cleared unconjugated serum BPA at virtually identical rates. We observed a linear (proportional) relationship between administered dose and serum BPA in mice. Conclusions BPA pharmacokinetics in women, female monkeys, and mice is very similar. By comparison with approximately 2 ng/mL unconjugated serum BPA reported in multiple human studies, the average 24-hr unconjugated serum BPA concentration of 0.5 ng/mL in both monkeys and mice after a 400 μg/kg oral dose suggests that total daily human exposure is via multiple routes and is much higher than previously assumed. PMID:20855240

  13. Population Pharmacokinetics and Exposure-Response Relationship of Carfilzomib in Patients With Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ou, Ying; Doshi, Sameer; Nguyen, Anh; Jonsson, Fredrik; Aggarwal, Sanjay; Rajangam, Kanya; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Stewart, A Keith; Badros, Ashraf; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Siegel, David; Jagannath, Sundar; Vij, Ravi; Niesvizky, Ruben; Graham, Richard; Visich, Jenn

    2016-12-07

    A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model and exposure-response (E-R) analysis was developed using data collected from 5 phase 1b/2 and 2 phase 3 studies in subjects with multiple myeloma. Subjects receiving intravenous infusion on 2 consecutive days each week for 3 weeks (days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16) in each cycle at doses ranging from 15 to 20/56 mg/m(2) (20 mg/m(2) in cycle 1 and, if tolerated, escalated to 56 mg/m(2) on day 8 of cycle 1). The population PK analysis indicated that among all the covariates tested, the only statistically significant covariate was body surface area on carfilzomib clearance; however, this covariate was unlikely to be clinically significant. Despite inclusion of different populations (relapsed or relapsed/refractory), treatments (carfilzomib monotherapy or combination therapy), infusion lengths (2 to 10 minutes or 30 minutes), and different doses, the E-R analysis of efficacy showed that after adjusting for baseline characteristics, higher area under the concentration-time curve was associated with improved overall response rate (ORR), from 15 to 20/56 mg/m(2) . No positive relationships between maximum concentration and ORR were identified, indicating that ORR would not be expected to be impacted by infusion length. For safety end points, no statistically significant relationship between exposure and increasing risk of adverse events was identified. The results of an E-R analysis provided strong support for a carfilzomib dose at 20/56 mg/m(2) as a 30-minute infusion for monotherapy and combination therapy. This article illustrates an example of application of E-R analysis to support labeling dose recommendation in the absence of extensive clinical data.

  14. COMPARISON OF THE USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL AND A CLASSICAL PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR DIOXIN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In epidemiological studies, exposure assessments to TCDD, known as a possible human carcinogen, assume mono or biphasic elimination rates. Recent data suggests a dose dependent elimination rate for TCDD. A PBPK model, which uses a body burden dependent elimination rate, was dev...

  15. Understanding variability in posaconazole exposure using an integrated population pharmacokinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Dolton, Michael J; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Burger, David M; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Posaconazole oral suspension is widely used for antifungal prophylaxis and treatment in immunocompromised patients, with highly variable pharmacokinetics reported in patients due to inconsistent oral absorption. This study aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics of posaconazole in adults and investigate factors that influence posaconazole pharmacokinetics byusing a population pharmacokinetic approach. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was undertaken for two posaconazole studies in patients and healthy volunteers. The influences of demographic and clinical characteristics, such as mucositis, diarrhea, and drug-drug interactions, on posaconazole pharmacokinetics were investigated using a stepwise forward inclusion/backwards deletion procedure. A total of 905 posaconazole concentration measurements from 102 participants were analyzed. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order oral absorption with lag time and first-order elimination best described posaconazole pharmacokinetics. Posaconazole relative bioavailability was 55% lower in patients who received posaconazole than in healthy volunteers. Coadministration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or metoclopramide, as well as the occurrence of mucositis or diarrhea, reduced posaconazole relative bioavailability by 45%, 35%, 58%, and 45%, respectively, whereas concomitant ingestion of a nutritional supplement significantly increased bioavailability (129% relative increase). Coadministration of rifampin or phenytoin increased apparent posaconazole clearance by more than 600%, with a smaller increase observed with fosamprenavir (34%). Participant age, weight, or sex did not significantly affect posaconazole pharmacokinetics. Posaconazole absorption was reduced by a range of commonly coadministered medicines and clinical complications, such as mucositis and diarrhea. Avoidance of PPIs and metoclopramide and administration with food or a nutritional supplement are effective strategies to increase posaconazole

  16. Application of pharmacokinetic modelling for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, P; Aylward, L L; Mumtaz, M

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and mono- and non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls (dioxin-like PCBs) are identified as a family or group of organic compounds known as 'dioxins' or dioxin-like chemicals (DLCs). The most toxic member of this group is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-(p)-dioxin (TCDD). Historically, DLCs have caused a variety of negative human health effects, but a disfiguring skin condition known as chloracne is the only health effect reported consistently. As part of translational research to make computerized models accessible to health risk assessors, the Concentration- and Age-Dependent Model (CADM) for TCDD was recoded in the Berkeley Madonna simulation language. The US Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's computational toxicology laboratory used the recoded model to predict TCDD tissue concentrations at different exposure levels. The model simulations successfully reproduced the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002 TCDD data in age groups from 6 to 60 years and older, as well as in other human datasets. The model also enabled the estimation of lipid-normalized serum TCDD concentrations in breastfed infants. The model performed best for low background exposures over time compared with a high acute poisoning case that could due to the large dose and associated liver toxicity. Hence, this model may be useful for interpreting human biomonitoring data as a part of an overall DLC risk assessment.

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A DERMAL EXPOSURE SYSTEM FOR PHARMACOKINETIC STUDIES OF ADMINISTERED AND AMBIENT WATER CONTAMINANTS: METHODS AND RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    INTRODUCTION: In order to investigate the pharmacokinetics of water-borne chemicals while eliminating exposures by other routes, a dermal exposure system was developed to expose the hand and forearm of human subjects. METHODS: The goal was, primarily, to study the dermal phar...

  18. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessment of the interrelationships between tesaglitazar exposure and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hamrén, Bengt; Ohman, K Peter; Svensson, Maria K; Karlsson, Mats O

    2012-09-01

    The effects of tesaglitazar on renal function (assessed as urinary clearance of 125I-sodium iothalamate or estimated by the modification of diet in renal disease formula) were studied in a 24-week open-label trial in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients randomized to daily doses of either tesaglitazar 2 mg or pioglitazone 45 mg. The aim of the analysis was to develop a population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model that could simultaneously describe the interrelationship between tesaglitazar exposure and reduction in renal function over time in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model could adequately describe the interplay between tesaglitazar and glomerular filtration rate. A one-compartment model in which the apparent clearance was influenced by glomerular filtration rate characterized the pharmacokinetics of tesaglitazar. An indirect-response model was used for the slow time course of change in glomerular filtration rate, which decreased from 100 to 78 mL/min/1.73m(2) after 12 weeks of treatment. All tesaglitazar-treated patients had a reduction in glomerular filtration rate, and available demographic variables could not explain differences in response. Patients treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor were more sensitive to tesaglitazar and had larger glomerular filtration rate decrease compared to nontreated patients. Approximately 8 weeks after discontinuing treatment, mean glomerular filtration rate had returned towards baseline. The model and data give valuable insights into the dynamic changes in glomerular filtration rate over time.

  19. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the equivalency of gavage, dietary, and drinking water exposure to manganese in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Foster, Melanie L; Bartnikas, Thomas B; Johnson, Laura C; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A; Keene, Athena M; Taylor, Michael D; Dorman, David C

    2015-06-01

    Concerns exist as to whether individuals may be at greater risk for neurotoxicity following increased manganese (Mn) oral intake. The goals of this study were to determine the equivalence of 3 methods of oral exposure and the rate (mg Mn/kg/day) of exposure. Adult male rats were allocated to control diet (10 ppm), high manganese diet (200 ppm), manganese-supplemented drinking water, and manganese gavage treatment groups. Animals in the drinking water and gavage groups were given the 10 ppm manganese diet and supplemented with manganese chloride (MnCl(2)) in drinking water or once-daily gavage to provide a daily manganese intake equivalent to that seen in the high-manganese diet group. No statistically significant difference in body weight gain or terminal body weights was seen. Rats were anesthetized following 7 and 61 exposure days, and samples of bile and blood were collected. Rats were then euthanized and striatum, olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, cerebellum, liver, spleen, and femur samples were collected for chemical analysis. Hematocrit was unaffected by manganese exposure. Liver and bile manganese concentrations were elevated in all treatment groups on day 61 (relative to controls). Increased cerebellum manganese concentrations were seen in animals from the high-manganese diet group (day 61, relative to controls). Increased (relative to all treatment groups) femur, striatum, cerebellum, frontal cortex, and olfactory bulb manganese concentrations were also seen following gavage suggesting that dose rate is an important factor in the pharmacokinetics of oral manganese. These data will be used to refine physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, extending their utility for manganese risk assessment by including multiple dietary exposures.

  20. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Equivalency of Gavage, Dietary, and Drinking Water Exposure to Manganese in F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Melanie L.; Bartnikas, Thomas B.; Johnson, Laura C.; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A.; Keene, Athena M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Dorman, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns exist as to whether individuals may be at greater risk for neurotoxicity following increased manganese (Mn) oral intake. The goals of this study were to determine the equivalence of 3 methods of oral exposure and the rate (mg Mn/kg/day) of exposure. Adult male rats were allocated to control diet (10 ppm), high manganese diet (200 ppm), manganese-supplemented drinking water, and manganese gavage treatment groups. Animals in the drinking water and gavage groups were given the 10 ppm manganese diet and supplemented with manganese chloride (MnCl2) in drinking water or once-daily gavage to provide a daily manganese intake equivalent to that seen in the high-manganese diet group. No statistically significant difference in body weight gain or terminal body weights was seen. Rats were anesthetized following 7 and 61 exposure days, and samples of bile and blood were collected. Rats were then euthanized and striatum, olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, cerebellum, liver, spleen, and femur samples were collected for chemical analysis. Hematocrit was unaffected by manganese exposure. Liver and bile manganese concentrations were elevated in all treatment groups on day 61 (relative to controls). Increased cerebellum manganese concentrations were seen in animals from the high-manganese diet group (day 61, relative to controls). Increased (relative to all treatment groups) femur, striatum, cerebellum, frontal cortex, and olfactory bulb manganese concentrations were also seen following gavage suggesting that dose rate is an important factor in the pharmacokinetics of oral manganese. These data will be used to refine physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, extending their utility for manganese risk assessment by including multiple dietary exposures. PMID:25724921

  1. Feasibility of Metabolic Parameter Estimation in Pharmacokinetic Models of Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a toxic chemical that was once used in degreasers and detergents, and some remnants of the chemical may be present in the water supply. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can assist in understanding resulting internal d...

  2. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  3. CO2 exposure as translational cross-species experimental model for panic

    PubMed Central

    Leibold, N K; van den Hove, D L A; Viechtbauer, W; Buchanan, G F; Goossens, L; Lange, I; Knuts, I; Lesch, K P; Steinbusch, H W M; Schruers, K R J

    2016-01-01

    The current diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are being challenged by the heterogeneity and the symptom overlap of psychiatric disorders. Therefore, a framework toward a more etiology-based classification has been initiated by the US National Institute of Mental Health, the research domain criteria project. The basic neurobiology of human psychiatric disorders is often studied in rodent models. However, the differences in outcome measurements hamper the translation of knowledge. Here, we aimed to present a translational panic model by using the same stimulus and by quantitatively comparing the same outcome measurements in rodents, healthy human subjects and panic disorder patients within one large project. We measured the behavioral–emotional and bodily response to CO2 exposure in all three samples, allowing for a reliable cross-species comparison. We show that CO2 exposure causes a robust fear response in terms of behavior in mice and panic symptom ratings in healthy volunteers and panic disorder patients. To improve comparability, we next assessed the respiratory and cardiovascular response to CO2, demonstrating corresponding respiratory and cardiovascular effects across both species. This project bridges the gap between basic and human research to improve the translation of knowledge between these disciplines. This will allow significant progress in unraveling the etiological basis of panic disorder and will be highly beneficial for refining the diagnostic categories as well as treatment strategies. PMID:27598969

  4. Serum Bisphenol A Pharmacokinetics and Prostate Neoplastic Responses following Oral and Subcutaneous Exposures in Neonatal Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Gail S.; Ye, Shu-Hua; Birch, Lynn; Ho, Shuk-mei; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines BPA pharmacokinetics in neonatal rats following s.c. injection or oral delivery of 10μg BPA/kg BW and compares susceptibility to estrogen-induced prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) following either exposure route. Serum BPA in PND3 rats was measured using HPLC-MS-MS. Free and total BPA at Cmax were 1.77 and 2.0 ng/ml, respectively following injection and 0.26 and 1.02 ng/ml, respectively following oral exposure. The AUC0-2 for free and total BPA was 4.1-fold and 1.8-fold greater, respectively, in s.c. versus oral delivery. While exposure route affected BPA metabolism, internal dosimetry following s.c. injection of 10μg BPA/kg BW is similar to BPA levels observed in humans. Prostates from aged rats given s.c. or oral BPA neonatally and T+E implants as adults exhibited nearly identical, heightened susceptibility to PIN incidence and score as compared to neonatal oil-controls. These findings on prostate health are directly relevant to humans at current BPA exposure levels. PMID:20887781

  5. Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin I...

  6. Inhibitory learning approaches to exposure therapy: A critical review and translation to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Ryan J; Abramowitz, Jonathan S

    2016-11-01

    The majority of treatment research on OCD has focused on pre/post treatment efficacy of exposure-based interventions, with less attention directed towards (a) understanding mechanisms of change, and (b) maximizing long-term effectiveness. Inhibitory learning theory (ILT) provides a novel foundation for understanding how exposure therapy reduces fear. Moreover, ILT is consistent with empirical evidence that raises questions about the more traditional (i.e., habituation) explanation for exposure therapy's efficacy. Yet ILT has yet to be applied to understanding the treatment of OCD and its heterogeneity. The current review is an examination of human experimental research on ILT that seeks to translate laboratory findings on fear extinction to exposure therapy across empirically established OCD symptom dimensions. We provide an up-to-date critical review of the existing evidence for a series of strategies derived from ILT that have been proposed for the treatment of fear, discuss the limitations of existing studies, and provide suggestions for future research within this rapidly accelerating area of study. We also offer conceptual considerations for applying these principles to the treatment of OCD symptom dimensions. A common theme is the idea of introducing "desirable difficulties" into the implementation of exposure in order to foster more durable long-term learning.

  7. A comparative pharmacokinetic estimate of mercury in U.S. Infants following yearly exposures to inactivated influenza vaccines containing thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Mitkus, Robert J; King, David B; Walderhaug, Mark O; Forshee, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    The use of thimerosal preservative in childhood vaccines has been largely eliminated over the past decade in the United States because vaccines have been reformulated in single-dose vials that do not require preservative. An exception is the inactivated influenza vaccines, which are formulated in both multidose vials requiring preservative and preservative-free single-dose vials. As part of an ongoing evaluation by USFDA of the safety of biologics throughout their lifecycle, the infant body burden of mercury following scheduled exposures to thimerosal preservative in inactivated influenza vaccines in the United States was estimated and compared to the infant body burden of mercury following daily exposures to dietary methylmercury at the reference dose established by the USEPA. Body burdens were estimated using kinetic parameters derived from experiments conducted in infant monkeys that were exposed episodically to thimerosal or MeHg at identical doses. We found that the body burden of mercury (AUC) in infants (including low birth weight) over the first 4.5 years of life following yearly exposures to thimerosal was two orders of magnitude lower than that estimated for exposures to the lowest regulatory threshold for MeHg over the same time period. In addition, peak body burdens of mercury following episodic exposures to thimerosal in this worst-case analysis did not exceed the corresponding safe body burden of mercury from methylmercury at any time, even for low-birth-weight infants. Our pharmacokinetic analysis supports the acknowledged safety of thimerosal when used as a preservative at current levels in certain multidose infant vaccines in the United States.

  8. Heat exposure of Cannabis sativa extracts affects the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Martin; Spinedi, Luca; Unfer-Grauwiler, Sandra; Bodmer, Michael; Surber, Christian; Luedi, Markus; Drewe, Juergen

    2012-05-01

    The most important psychoactive constituent of CANNABIS SATIVA L. is Δ (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol (CBD), another important constituent, is able to modulate the distinct unwanted psychotropic effect of THC. In natural plant extracts of C. SATIVA, large amounts of THC and CBD appear in the form of THCA-A (THC-acid-A) and CBDA (cannabidiolic acid), which can be transformed to THC and CBD by heating. Previous reports of medicinal use of cannabis or cannabis preparations with higher CBD/THC ratios and use in its natural, unheated form have demonstrated that pharmacological effects were often accompanied with a lower rate of adverse effects. Therefore, in the present study, the pharmacokinetics and metabolic profiles of two different C. SATIVA extracts (heated and unheated) with a CBD/THC ratio > 1 were compared to synthetic THC (dronabinol) in a double-blind, randomized, single center, three-period cross-over study involving 9 healthy male volunteers. The pharmacokinetics of the cannabinoids was highly variable. The metabolic pattern was significantly different after administration of the different forms: the heated extract showed a lower median THC plasma AUC (24 h) than the unheated extract of 2.84 vs. 6.59 pmol h/mL, respectively. The later was slightly higher than that of dronabinol (4.58 pmol h/mL). On the other hand, the median sum of the metabolites (THC, 11-OH-THC, THC-COOH, CBN) plasma AUC (24 h) was higher for the heated than for the unheated extract. The median CBD plasma AUC (24 h) was almost 2-fold higher for the unheated than for the heated extract. These results indicate that use of unheated extracts may lead to a beneficial change in metabolic pattern and possibly better tolerability.

  9. Using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to link urinary biomarker concentrations to dietary exposure of perchlorate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to perchlorate is widespread in the United States and many studies have attempted to character the perchlorate exposure by estimating the average daily intakes of perchlorate. These approaches provided population-based estimates, but did not provide individual-level exp...

  10. EXPOSURE RECONSTRUCTION FOR REDUCING UNCERTAINTY IN RISK ASSESSMENT: EXAMPLE USING MTBE BIOMARKERS AND SIMPLE PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse health risks from environmental agents are generally related to average (long term) exposures. We used results from a series of controlled human exposure tests and classical first order rate kinetics calculations to estimate how well spot measurements of methyl tertiary ...

  11. Phase 1 Study of Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of PTC299, an Inhibitor of Stress-Regulated Protein Translation.

    PubMed

    Weetall, Marla; Davis, Thomas; Elfring, Gary; Northcutt, Valerie; Cao, Liangxian; Moon, Young-Choon; Riebling, Peter; Dali, Mandar; Hirawat, Samit; Babiak, John; Colacino, Joseph; Almstead, Neil; Spiegel, Robert; Peltz, Stuart W

    2016-07-01

    PTC299 is a novel small molecule that specifically blocks the production of protein from selected mRNAs that under certain conditions use noncanonical ribosomal translational pathways. Hypoxia, oncogenic transformation, and viral infections limit normal translation and turn on these noncanonical translation pathways that are sensitive to PTC299. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) is an example of a transcript that is posttranscriptionally regulated. Single doses of PTC299 (0.03 to 3 mg/kg) were administered orally to healthy volunteers in a phase 1 single ascending-dose study. In a subsequent multiple ascending-dose study in healthy volunteers, multiple-dose regimens (0.3 to 1.2 mg/kg twice a day or 1.6 mg/kg 3 times a day for 7 days) were evaluated. PTC299 was well tolerated in these studies. As expected in healthy volunteers, mean plasma VEGF levels did not change. Increases in Cmax and AUC of PTC299 were dose-proportional. The target trough plasma concentration associated with preclinical efficacy was achieved within 7 days at doses of 0.6 mg/kg twice daily and above. These data demonstrate that PTC299 is orally bioavailable and well tolerated and support clinical evaluation of PTC299 in cancer, certain viral infections, or other diseases in which deregulation of translational control is a causal factor.

  12. Combined analysis of pharmacokinetic and efficacy data of preclinical studies with statins markedly improves translation of drug efficacy to human trials.

    PubMed

    van de Steeg, E; Kleemann, R; Jansen, H T; van Duyvenvoorde, W; Offerman, E H; Wortelboer, H M; Degroot, J

    2013-12-01

    Correct prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK) and the safety and efficacy of novel compounds based on preclinical data, is essential but often fails. In the current study, we aimed to improve the predictive value of ApoE*3Leiden (E3L) transgenic mice regarding the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of various statins in humans by combining pharmacokinetic with efficacy data. The efficacy of five currently marketed statins (atorvastatin, simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin) in hypercholesterolemic patients (low-density lipoprotein ≥ 160 mg/dl) was ranked based on meta-analysis of published human trials. Additionally, a preclinical combined PK efficacy data set for these five statins was established in E3L mice that were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 4 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of drug intervention in which statins were supplemented to the diet. Plasma and tissue levels of the statins were determined on administration of (radiolabeled) drugs (10 mg/kg p.o.). As expected, all statins reduced plasma cholesterol in the preclinical model, but a direct correlation between cholesterol lowering efficacy of the different statins in mice and in humans did not reach statistical significance (R(2) = 0.11, P < 0.57). It is noteworthy that, when murine data were corrected for effective liver uptake of the different statins, the correlation markedly increased (R(2) = 0.89, P < 0.05). Here we show for the first time that hepatic uptake of statins is related to their cholesterol-lowering efficacy and provide evidence that combined PK and efficacy studies can substantially improve the translational value of the E3L mouse model in the case of statin treatment. This strategy may also be applicable for other classes of drugs and other preclinical models.

  13. Clinical pharmacokinetics and exposure-toxicity relationship of a folate-Vinca alkaloid conjugate EC145 in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Sausville, Edward A; Klein, Patrick J; Morgenstern, David; Leamon, Christopher P; Messmann, Richard A; LoRusso, Patricia

    2009-12-01

    The clinical pharmacokinetics and exposure-toxicity relationship were determined for EC145, a conjugate of folic acid and the Vinca alkaloid desacetylvinblastine hydrazide (DAVLBH), in cancer patients. EC145 plasma concentration and toxicity data were obtained from a first-in-man phase I study and analyzed by nonlinear mixed effect modeling with NONMEM. EC145 concentration-time profile after intravenous administration was well described by a 2-compartment model with a first-order elimination process from the central compartment. BSA was identified as a significant covariate on EC145 clearance, accounting for 14.6% of interindividual variation on EC145 clearance. Population estimates for the clearance, steady-state volume of distribution, distribution, and elimination half-lives were 56.1 L/h, 26.1 L, 6 minutes, and 26 minutes, respectively. Constipation and peripheral neuropathy were the most common and clinically relevant toxicities. The clearance and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) were significant predictors for the incidence of EC145-induced constipation but not peripheral neuropathy. In conclusion, EC145 is rapidly distributed and eliminated in cancer patients. BSA is a statistically significant covariate on EC145 clearance, but its clinical relevance remains to be defined. EC145-induced constipation occurs at a higher frequency in the patients with lower EC145 clearance, where the drug exposure tends to be higher.

  14. Data gaps limit the translational potential of preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Robin J; Ehlers, Michael D

    2016-01-06

    The absence of mouse pharmacokinetic reference data hinders translation. An analysis of recent literature highlights a systematic lack of discussion regarding rationale for the selection of dosing paradigms in preclinical studies, and in particular for neuroscience studies in which the lack of brain penetration can limit target-organ exposure. We propose solutions to improve study design.

  15. Bisphenol A (BPA) pharmacokinetics with daily oral bolus or continuous exposure via silastic capsules in pregnant rhesus monkeys: Relevance for human exposures.

    PubMed

    Vom Saal, Frederick S; VandeVoort, Catherine A; Taylor, Julia A; Welshons, Wade V; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Hunt, Patricia A

    2014-06-01

    We measured serum dBPA in non-pregnant and pregnant female rhesus monkeys, fetuses and amniotic fluid. dBPA was administered by a daily oral bolus or sc implantation of Silastic capsules; both resulted in daily average serum unconjugated dBPA concentrations of <1ng/ml. We observed lower serum concentrations of unconjugated dBPA in pregnant females relative to pre-pregnancy values, and generally lower concentrations in fetal serum than in maternal serum. Differences in pharmacokinetics of dBPA were evident between pre-pregnancy, early and late pregnancy, likely reflecting changes in maternal, fetal and placental physiology. The serum ratio of conjugated to unconjugated dBPA after continuous sc release of dBPA was similar to values reported in human biomonitoring studies and markedly lower than with oral administration, suggesting oral bolus exposure is not an appropriate human exposure model. We report elsewhere that there were numerous adverse effects on fetuses exposed to very low serum dBPA in these studies.

  16. Bioenergetic and pharmacokinetic model for exposure of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karasov, W.H.; Kenow, K.P.; Meyer, M.W.; Fournier, F.

    2007-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was used to predict food intake of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks as a function of body mass during development, and a pharmacokinetics model, based on first-order kinetics in a single compartment, was used to predict blood Hg level as a function of food intake rate, food Hg content, body mass, and Hg absorption and elimination. Predictions were tested in captive growing chicks fed trout (Salmo gairdneri) with average MeHg concentrations of 0.02 (control), 0.4, and 1.2 ??g/g wet mass (delivered as CH3HgCl). Predicted food intake matched observed intake through 50 d of age but then exceeded observed intake by an amount that grew progressively larger with age, reaching a significant overestimate of 28% by the end of the trial. Respiration in older, nongrowing birds probably was overestimated by using rates measured in younger, growing birds. Close agreement was found between simulations and measured blood Hg, which varied significantly with dietary Hg and age. Although chicks may hatch with different blood Hg levels, their blood level is determined mainly by dietary Hg level beyond approximately two weeks of age. The model also may be useful for predicting Hg levels in adults and in the eggs that they lay, but its accuracy in both chicks and adults needs to be tested in free-living birds. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  17. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS OF IN VITRO PHARMACOKINETIC DATA AND EXPOSURE INFORMATION FOR THE TOXCAST PHASE II CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Momentum has been growing in Toxicology to assess the utility of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays in the determination of chemical testing priorities. However, in vitro potencies determined in these assays do not consider in vivo bioavailability, clearance or exposure estim...

  18. Enhancement of Exposure and Reduction of Elimination for Paeoniflorin or Albiflorin via Co-Administration with Total Peony Glucosides and Hypoxic Pharmacokinetics Comparison.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weizhe; Zhao, Yan; Qin, Yi; Ge, Beikang; Gong, Wenwen; Wu, Yingting; Li, Xiaorong; Zhao, Yuming; Xu, Pingxiang; Xue, Ming

    2016-07-01

    There is evidence suggesting that herbal extracts demonstrate greater bioactivities than their isolated constituents at an equivalent dose. This phenomenon could be attributed to the absence of interacting substances present in the extracts. By measuring the pharmacokinetic parameters of paeoniflorin (PF) and albiflorin (AF) after being orally administered to rats in isolated form, in combination with each other and within total peony glucosides (TPG), respectively, the current study aimed to identify positive pharmacokinetic interactions between components of peony radix extracts. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic profiles of PF and AF under normoxia and hypoxia were also investigated and compared. In order to achieve these goals, a highly sensitive and reproducible ultra-peformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method was developed and validated for simultaneously quantitation of PF and AF in rat plasma. This study found that compared with that of single component (PF/AF), the exposure of PF in rat plasma after combination administration or TPG administration was significantly increased, meanwhile the elimination of PF/AF was remarkably reduced. It was also noticed that AUC and Cmax of PF in hypoxia rats were significantly decreased compared with that of normaxia rats, suggesting that there was a decreased exposure of PF in rats under hypoxia. The current study, for the first time, revealed the pharmacokinetic interactions between PF/AF and other constitutes in TGP and the pharmacokinetic profiles of PF and AF under hypoxia. In view of the current findings, it could be supposed that the clinical performance of total peony glucosides would be better than that of single constitute (PF/AF). The outcomes of this animal study are expected to serve as a basis for development of clinical guidelines on total peony glucosides usage.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of IDX184, a liver-targeted oral prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, in the monkey and formulation optimization for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan-Zhou, Xin-Ru; Mayes, Benjamin A; Rashidzadeh, Hassan; Gasparac, Rahela; Smith, Steven; Bhadresa, Sanjeev; Gupta, Kusum; Cohen, Marita Larsson; Bu, Charlie; Good, Steven S; Moussa, Adel; Rush, Roger

    2016-10-01

    IDX184 is a phosphoramidate prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, developed to treat patients infected with hepatitis C virus. A mass balance study of radiolabeled IDX184 and pharmacokinetic studies of IDX184 in portal vein-cannulated monkeys revealed relatively low IDX184 absorption but higher exposure of IDX184 in the portal vein than in the systemic circulation, indicating >90 % of the absorbed dose was subject to hepatic extraction. Systemic exposures to the main metabolite, 2'-methylguanosine (2'-MeG), were used as a surrogate for liver levels of the pharmacologically active entity 2'-MeG triphosphate, and accordingly, systemic levels of 2'-MeG in the monkey were used to optimize formulations for further clinical development of IDX184. Capsule formulations of IDX184 delivered acceptable levels of 2'-MeG in humans; however, the encapsulation process introduced low levels of the genotoxic impurity ethylene sulfide (ES), which necessitated formulation optimization. Animal pharmacokinetic data guided the development of a tablet with trace levels of ES and pharmacokinetic performance equal to that of the clinical capsule in the monkey. Under fed conditions in humans, the new tablet formulation showed similar exposure to the capsule used in prior clinical trials.

  20. Use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of methylmercury to estimate exposures in US women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bruce C; Hack, C Eric; Clewell, Harvey J

    2007-08-01

    A Bayesian approach, implemented using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis, was applied with a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of methylmercury (MeHg) to evaluate the variability of MeHg exposure in women of childbearing age in the U.S. population. The analysis made use of the newly available National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) blood and hair mercury concentration data for women of age 16-49 years (sample size, 1,582). Bayesian analysis was performed to estimate the population variability in MeHg exposure (daily ingestion rate) implied by the variation in blood and hair concentrations of mercury in the NHANES database. The measured variability in the NHANES blood and hair data represents the result of a process that includes interindividual variation in exposure to MeHg and interindividual variation in the pharmacokinetics (distribution, clearance) of MeHg. The PBPK model includes a number of pharmacokinetic parameters (e.g., tissue volumes, partition coefficients, rate constants for metabolism and elimination) that can vary from individual to individual within the subpopulation of interest. Using MCMC analysis, it was possible to combine prior distributions of the PBPK model parameters with the NHANES blood and hair data, as well as with kinetic data from controlled human exposures to MeHg, to derive posterior distributions that refine the estimates of both the population exposure distribution and the pharmacokinetic parameters. In general, based on the populations surveyed by NHANES, the results of the MCMC analysis indicate that a small fraction, less than 1%, of the U.S. population of women of childbearing age may have mercury exposures greater than the EPA RfD for MeHg of 0.1 microg/kg/day, and that there are few, if any, exposures greater than the ATSDR MRL of 0.3 microg/kg/day. The analysis also indicates that typical exposures may be greater than previously estimated from food consumption surveys, but that the variability

  1. Predicting HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Efficacy for Women using a Preclinical Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Angela; Ho, Phong T.; Denton, Paul W.; Garrett, Katy L.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Swartz, Glenn; O’Neill, Cynthia; Veronese, Fulvia; Kashuba, Angela D.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) relies on adherence and may also depend on the route of HIV acquisition. Clinical studies of systemic tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) PrEP revealed reduced efficacy in women compared to men with similar degrees of adherence. To select the most effective PrEP strategies, preclinical studies are critically needed to establish correlations between drug concentrations (pharmacokinetics [PK]) and protective efficacy (pharmacodynamics [PD]). We utilized an in vivo preclinical model to perform a PK-PD analysis of systemic TDF PrEP for vaginal HIV acquisition. TDF PrEP prevented vaginal HIV acquisition in a dose-dependent manner. PK-PD modeling of tenofovir (TFV) in plasma, female reproductive tract tissue, cervicovaginal lavage fluid and its intracellular metabolite (TFV diphosphate) revealed that TDF PrEP efficacy was best described by plasma TFV levels. When administered at 50 mg/kg, TDF achieved plasma TFV concentrations (370 ng/ml) that closely mimicked those observed in humans and demonstrated the same risk reduction (70%) previously attained in women with high adherence. This PK-PD model mimics the human condition and can be applied to other PrEP approaches and routes of HIV acquisition, accelerating clinical implementation of the most efficacious PrEP strategies. PMID:28145472

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics of Obinutuzumab (GA101) in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Exposure-Response in CLL.

    PubMed

    Gibiansky, E; Gibiansky, L; Carlile, D J; Jamois, C; Buchheit, V; Frey, N

    2014-10-29

    Treatment regimens involving obinutuzumab (GA101) demonstrated increased efficacy to rituximab in clinical trials for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties and the exposure-response relationships of obinutuzumab still need to be fully described. Data from four clinical trials of obinutuzumab were analyzed to describe the PK properties in patients with NHL or CLL and the pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in patients with CLL. A population PK model with linear time-dependent clearance described the obinutuzumab concentration-time course. Diagnosis, baseline tumor size (BSIZ), body weight, and gender were the main covariates affecting obinutuzumab exposure. In patients with CLL, exposure was not associated with safety but showed positive trends of correlation with efficacy. Although efficacy correlated positively with exposure, since both efficacy and exposure correlated negatively with BSIZ, it was not possible to determine with certainty whether it would be beneficial to adjust the dose according to BSIZ.

  3. Design and evaluation of a novel series of 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitors with low systemic exposure, relationship between pharmacokinetic properties and ocular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fouchet, Marie-Hélène; Donche, Frédéric; Martin, Christelle; Bouillot, Anne; Junot, Christophe; Boullay, Anne-Bénédicte; Potvain, Florent; Magny, Sylvie Demaria; Coste, Hervé; Walker, Max; Issandou, Marc; Dodic, Nérina

    2008-06-01

    We describe the discovery of novel potent inhibitors of 2,3-oxidosqualene:lanosterol cyclase inhibitors (OSCi) from a focused pharmacophore-based screen. Optimization of the most tractable hits gave a series of compounds showing inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis at 2mg/kg in the rat with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles. Two compounds were selected for toxicological study in the rat for 21 days in order to test the hypothesis that low systemic exposure could be used as a strategy to avoid the ocular side effects previously described with OSCi. We demonstrate that for this series of inhibitors, a reduction of systemic exposure is not sufficient to circumvent cataract liabilities.

  4. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Andrade, E L; Bento, A F; Cavalli, J; Oliveira, S K; Schwanke, R C; Siqueira, J M; Freitas, C S; Marcon, R; Calixto, J B

    2016-12-12

    The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics), absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND) application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose.

  5. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, E.L.; Bento, A.F.; Cavalli, J.; Oliveira, S.K.; Schwanke, R.C.; Siqueira, J.M.; Freitas, C.S.; Marcon, R.; Calixto, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics), absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND) application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose. PMID:27982281

  6. No Need for Lopinavir Dose Adjustment during Pregnancy: a Population Pharmacokinetic and Exposure-Response Analysis in Pregnant and Nonpregnant HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Aksana Kaefer; Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Taylor, Graham P.; Patterson, Kristine B.; Nilius, Angela M.; Klein, Cheri Enders

    2015-01-01

    Lopinavir-ritonavir is frequently prescribed to HIV-1-infected women during pregnancy. Decreased lopinavir exposure has been reported during pregnancy, but the clinical significance of this reduction is uncertain. This analysis aimed to evaluate the need for lopinavir dose adjustment during pregnancy. We conducted a population pharmacokinetic analysis of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations collected from 84 pregnant and 595 nonpregnant treatment-naive and -experienced HIV-1-infected subjects enrolled in six clinical studies. Lopinavir-ritonavir doses in the studies ranged between 400/100 and 600/150 mg twice daily. In addition, linear mixed-effect analysis was used to compare the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h (AUC0–12) and concentration prior to dosing (Cpredose) in pregnant women and nonpregnant subjects. The relationship between lopinavir exposure and virologic suppression in pregnant women and nonpregnant subjects was evaluated. Population pharmacokinetic analysis estimated 17% higher lopinavir clearance in pregnant women than in nonpregnant subjects. Lopinavir clearance values postpartum were 26.4% and 37.1% lower than in nonpregnant subjects and pregnant women, respectively. As the tablet formulation was estimated to be 20% more bioavailable than the capsule formulation, no statistically significant differences between lopinavir exposure in pregnant women receiving the tablet formulation and nonpregnant subjects receiving the capsule formulation were identified. In the range of lopinavir AUC0–12 or Cpredose values observed in the third trimester, there was no correlation between lopinavir exposure and viral load or proportion of subjects with virologic suppression. Similar efficacy was observed between pregnant women and nonpregnant subjects receiving lopinavir-ritonavir at 400/100 mg twice daily. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic results support the use of a lopinavir-ritonavir 400/100-mg twice-daily dose during pregnancy

  7. Drug-drug interactions for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase substrates: a pharmacokinetic explanation for typically observed low exposure (AUCi/AUC) ratios.

    PubMed

    Williams, J Andrew; Hyland, Ruth; Jones, Barry C; Smith, Dennis A; Hurst, Susan; Goosen, Theunis C; Peterkin, Vincent; Koup, Jeffrey R; Ball, Simon E

    2004-11-01

    Glucuronidation is a listed clearance mechanism for 1 in 10 of the top 200 prescribed drugs. The objective of this article is to encourage those studying ligand interactions with UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) to adequately consider the potential consequences of in vitro UGT inhibition in humans. Spurred on by interest in developing potent and selective inhibitors for improved confidence around UGT reaction phenotyping, and the increased availability of recombinant forms of human UGTs, several recent studies have reported in vitro inhibition of UGT enzymes. In some cases, the observed potency of UGT inhibitors in vitro has been interpreted as having potential relevance in humans via pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Although there are reported examples of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions for UGT substrates, exposure increases of the aglycone are rarely greater than 100% in the presence of an inhibitor relative to its absence (i.e., AUCi/AUC < or = 2). This small magnitude in change is in contrast to drugs primarily cleared by cytochrome P450 enzymes, where exposures have been reported to increase as much as 35-fold on coadministration with an inhibitor (e.g., ketoconazole inhibition of CYP3A4-catalyzed terfenadine metabolism). In this article the evidence for purported clinical relevance of potent in vitro inhibition of UGT enzymes will be assessed, taking the following into account: in vitro data on the enzymology of glucuronide formation from aglycone, pharmacokinetic principles based on empirical data for inhibition of metabolism, and clinical data on the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of drugs primarily cleared by glucuronidation.

  8. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  9. Uso de los Datos de Biomonitoreo para Informar sobre la Evaluacion Infantil (American translation is: USING BIOMONITORING DATA TO INFORM EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT IN CHILDREN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discussing the challenges associated with estimating and interpreting toxicant exposures and health risks from biomonitoring data. This extended abstract was translated in Spanish and published in Acta Toxicologica Argentina.

  10. Preserved pharmacokinetic exposure and distinct glycemic effects of insulin degludec and liraglutide in IDegLira, a fixed-ratio combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Christoph; Bode, Bruce; Ingwersen, Steen Hvass; Jacobsen, Lisbeth Vestergård; Poulsen, Pernille

    2015-12-01

    Insulin degludec/liraglutide (IDegLira) is a novel fixed-ratio combination of the basal insulin insulin degludec (IDeg) and liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 analog. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics of IDegLira were assessed versus its components. A single-dose, randomized, 4-period crossover clinical pharmacology study in healthy subjects compared the bioavailability of IDegLira with its monocomponents. Dose proportionality, covariate effects on exposure, and exposure-response for change in glycated hemoglobin were analyzed based on data from a randomized treat-to-target phase 3 study in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Overall, the PK properties of IDeg and liraglutide were preserved for IDegLira. Liraglutide exposure was lower when dosed as IDegLira but met the criterion for equivalence. No relevant deviations from dose proportionality for the IDegLira components were observed. Covariate effects on exposure were consistent with previous results. Glycemic response to IDegLira was larger than with IDeg or liraglutide alone, reflecting their distinct glucose-lowering effects throughout the dose/exposure range.

  11. Experimental strategy for translational studies of organophosphorus pesticide neurotoxicity based on real-world occupational exposures to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Lein, Pamela J; Bonner, Matthew R; Farahat, Fayssal M; Olson, James R; Rohlman, Diane S; Fenske, Richard A; Lattal, K Matthew; Lasarev, Michael R; Galvin, Kit; Farahat, Taghreed M; Anger, W Kent

    2012-08-01

    Translational research is needed to understand and predict the neurotoxic consequences associated with repeated occupational exposures to organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). In this report, we describe a research strategy for identifying biomarkers of OP neurotoxicity, and we characterize pesticide application workers in Egypt's Menoufia Governorate who serve as our anchor human population for developing a parallel animal model with similar exposures and behavioral deficits and for examining the influence of human polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 (CYP) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) enzymes on OP metabolism and toxicity. This population has previously been shown to have high occupational exposures and to exhibit a broad range of neurobehavioral deficits. In addition to observational studies of work practices in the field, questionnaires on demographics, lifestyle and work practices were administered to 146 Egyptian pesticide application workers applying pesticides to the cotton crop. Survey results indicated that the application workforce uses standard operating procedures and standardized equipment provided by Egypt's Ministry of Agriculture, which provides a workforce with a stable work history. We also found that few workers report using personal protective equipment (PPE), which likely contributes to the relatively high exposures reported in these application workers. In summary, this population provides a unique opportunity for identifying biomarkers of OP-induced neurotoxicity associated with occupational exposure.

  12. Effects on Pharmacokinetics of Propranolol and Other Factors in Rats After Acute Exposure to High Altitude at 4,010 m.

    PubMed

    Wenbin, Li; Rong, Wang; Hua, Xie; Juanhong, Zhang; Xiaoyu, Wu; Zhengping, Jia

    2015-05-01

    A series of pathological, physiological, and biochemical changes, even anatomical histological changes happen while humans arrive at the high plateau region from plain area. There is a certain relationship between the body's compensatory or decompensated adjustments to the environment and the changes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. The objective of the study is to observe the effects of acute exposure to high altitude at 4,010 m on pharmacokinetics of propranolol in rats, and to provide basis and new ideas to adjust drug dosage and administration, so as to promote rational drug use in high altitude. 28 healthy male wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, group A and B which were in plain area; group C and D which were acutely exposed to high altitude by aviation; group A and C were used for pharmacokinetics determination of propranolol, while group B and D had no drug administration for physiological and pathological changes research at high altitude. The pharmacokinetics of propranolol significantly changed; area under curve, C max (the peak concentration), mean residence time, and t 1/2 (the biological half-life) increased significantly by 481.72, 398.94, 44.87, and 58.77 %, respectively; clearance and V (apparent volume of distribution) decreased by 81.50 and 70.56 %, respectively, after acute exposure to high altitude at 4,010 m; Analytic results show that pH, buffer base, base excess, ctCO2 (content of total carbon dioxide), sO2 (oxygen saturation of arterial blood), pO2 (oxygen tension of arterial blood), and cNa(+) severely decreased by 2.43, 630.00, 311.00, 11.48, 91.38, 76.22, and 2.82 %, respectively, while pCO2 (carbon dioxide tension of arterial blood) and cCl(-) significantly increased by 47.40 and 6.76 %. Lactate dehydrogenase and total protein significantly decreased by 58.44 and 26.82 %, while total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase severely increased by 338 and 24.94 % after acute exposure to high

  13. A tissue dose-based comparative exposure assessment of manganese using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling-The importance of homeostatic control for an essential metal.

    PubMed

    Gentry, P Robinan; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Fuller, William G; Sulsky, Sandra I; Greene, Tracy B; Clewell, Harvey J; Andersen, Melvin E; Roels, Harry A; Taylor, Michael D; Keene, Athena M

    2017-02-22

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model (Schroeter et al., 2011) was applied to simulate target tissue manganese (Mn) concentrations following occupational and environmental exposures. These estimates of target tissue Mn concentrations were compared to determine margins of safety (MOS) and to evaluate the biological relevance of applying safety factors to derive acceptable Mn air concentrations. Mn blood concentrations measured in occupational studies permitted verification of the human PBPK models, increasing confidence in the resulting estimates. Mn exposure was determined based on measured ambient air Mn concentrations and dietary data in Canada and the United States (US). Incorporating dietary and inhalation exposures into the models indicated that increases in target tissue concentrations above endogenous levels only begin to occur when humans are exposed to levels of Mn in ambient air (i.e. >10μg/m(3)) that are far higher than those currently measured in Canada or the US. A MOS greater than three orders of magnitude was observed, indicating that current Mn air concentrations are far below concentrations that would be required to produce the target tissue Mn concentrations associated with subclinical neurological effects. This application of PBPK modeling for an essential element clearly demonstrates that the conventional application of default factors to "convert" an occupational exposure to an equivalent continuous environmental exposure, followed by the application of safety factors, is not appropriate in the case of Mn. PBPK modeling demonstrates that the relationship between ambient Mn exposures and dose-to-target tissue is not linear due to normal tissue background levels and homeostatic controls.

  14. DNA damage and translational response during detoxification from copper exposure in a wild population of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, Paola; Gaglio, Matteo; Bellamoli, Francesco; Viero, Gabriella; Lencioni, Valeria

    2017-04-01

    Copper is one of the predominant components of pesticides employed in agriculture and known to be highly toxic once it reaches aquatic organisms. The impact of sublethal concentrations of this metal on wild insects is not yet completely understood. Studies addressing alterations in different levels of gene expression are still lacking. We previously demonstrated that in a wild population of Chironomus riparius, HSP and CYP families of genes were up-regulated at the transcriptional level after copper exposure. Here, we analyse the impact of copper at the genomic, translational and protein functional level, obtaining a comprehensive picture of the molecular reply to this metal. We studied genotoxicity in C. riparius larvae by Comet Assay, the translational response by polysomal profiling and the detoxification capacity by the CYP450 enzymes activity. Fourth-instar larvae from a mountain stream polluted by agricultural land run-off (NE-Italy) were exposed for 3 h copper concentrations ≤ LC50. We report DNA damage induced by copper, even at sublethal levels, as demonstrated by significant increases in all the comet parameters at concentrations ≥1 mg L(-1). By estimating the transcript-specific translational efficiency, we observe a specific up-regulation of CYP4G. Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of CYP450 enzymes is increased at all sublethal copper concentrations, confirming the role of this protein family in the detoxification processes. Surprisingly, the HSP transcripts are up-regulated at the transcriptional level, but these changes are buffered at the translational level suggesting the existence of still unknown post-transcriptional controls that may be connected to survival processes.

  15. INTEGRATED PROBABILISTIC AND DETERMINISTIC MODELING TECHNIQUES IN ESTIMATING EXPOSURE TO WATER-BORNE CONTAMINANTS: PART 2 PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Total Exposure Model (TEM) uses deterministic and stochastic methods to estimate the exposure of a person performing daily activities of eating, drinking, showering, and bathing. There were 250 time histories generated, by subject with activities, for the three exposure ro...

  16. Integration of pharmacokinetic and NRF2 system biology models to describe reactive oxygen species production and subsequent glutathione depletion in liver microfluidic biochips after flutamide exposure.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Eric; Hamon, Jeremy; Legendre, Audrey; Bois, Frederic Y

    2014-10-01

    We present a systems biology analysis of rat primary hepatocytes response after exposure to 10 μM and 100 μM flutamide in liver microfluidic biochips. We coupled an in vitro pharmacokinetic (PK) model of flutamide to a system biology model of its reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and scavenging by the Nrf2 regulated glutathione production. The PK model was calibrated using data on flutamide kinetics, hydroxyflutamide and glutathione conjugates formation in microfluidic conditions. The parameters of Nrf2-related gene activities and the subsequent glutathione depletion were calibrated using microarray data from our microfluidic experiments and literature information. Following a 10 μM flutamide exposure, the model predicted a recovery time to baseline levels of glutathione (GSH) and ROS in agreement with our experimental observations. At 100 μM, the model predicted that metabolism saturation led to an important accumulation of flutamide in cells, a high ROS production and complete GSH depletion. The high levels of ROS predicted were consistent with the necrotic switch observed by transcriptomics, and the high cell mortality we had experimentally observed. The model predicted a transition between recoverable GSH depletion and deep GSH depletion at about 12.5 μM of flutamide (single perfusion exposure). Our work shows that in vitro biochip experiments can provide supporting information for complex in silico modeling including data from extra cellular and intra cellular levels. We believe that this approach can be an efficient strategy for a global integrated methodology in predictive toxicology.

  17. A Workflow to Investigate Exposure and Pharmacokinetic Influences on High-Throughput in Vitro Chemical Screening Based on Adverse Outcome Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Martin B.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Chang, Daniel T.; Edwards, Stephen W.; Brooks, Raina; Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; El-Masri, Hisham; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) link adverse effects in individuals or populations to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using in vitro methods. Practical application of AOPs in chemical-specific risk assessment requires incorporation of knowledge on exposure, along with absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties of chemicals. Objectives We developed a conceptual workflow to examine exposure and ADME properties in relation to an MIE. The utility of this workflow was evaluated using a previously established AOP, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Methods Thirty chemicals found to inhibit human AChE in the ToxCast™ assay were examined with respect to their exposure, absorption potential, and ability to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Structures of active chemicals were compared against structures of 1,029 inactive chemicals to detect possible parent compounds that might have active metabolites. Results Application of the workflow screened 10 “low-priority” chemicals of 30 active chemicals. Fifty-two of the 1,029 inactive chemicals exhibited a similarity threshold of ≥ 75% with their nearest active neighbors. Of these 52 compounds, 30 were excluded due to poor absorption or distribution. The remaining 22 compounds may inhibit AChE in vivo either directly or as a result of metabolic activation. Conclusions The incorporation of exposure and ADME properties into the conceptual workflow eliminated 10 “low-priority” chemicals that may otherwise have undergone additional, resource-consuming analyses. Our workflow also increased confidence in interpretation of in vitro results by identifying possible “false negatives.” Citation Phillips MB, Leonard JA, Grulke CM, Chang DT, Edwards SW, Brooks R, Goldsmith MR, El-Masri H, Tan YM. 2016. A workflow to investigate exposure and pharmacokinetic influences on high-throughput in vitro chemical screening based on adverse outcome pathways. Environ

  18. Exposure to early adversity: Points of cross-species translation that can lead to improved understanding of depression

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSEN, SUSAN L.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between developmental exposure to adversity and affective disorders is reviewed. Adversity discussed herein includes physical and sexual abuse, neglect, or loss of a caregiver in humans. While these stressors can occur at any point during development, the unique temporal relationship to specific depressive symptoms was the focus of discussion. Further influences of stress exposure during sensitive periods can vary by gender and duration of abuse as well. Data from animal studies are presented to provide greater translational and causal understanding of how sensitive periods, different types of psychosocial stressors, and sex interact to produce depressive-like behaviors. Findings from maternal separation, isolation rearing, chronic variable stress, and peer–peer rearing paradigms clarify interpretation about how various depressive behaviors are influenced by age of exposure. Depressive behaviors are broken down into the following categories: mood and affect, anhedonia, energy, working memory, sleep–wake, appetite changes, suicide, and general malaise. Cross-species evidence from humans, nonhuman primates, rats, and mice within each of these categories is discussed. In conclusion, sensitive periods for affective-related behaviors (anxiety, mood, and controllability) occur earlier in life, while other aspects of depression are associated with adversity later during adolescence. PMID:25997766

  19. The Use of In Vitro Data and Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Predict Drug Metabolite Exposure: Desipramine Exposure in Cytochrome P4502D6 Extensive and Poor Metabolizers Following Administration of Imipramine.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Callegari, Ernesto; Obach, R Scott

    2016-10-01

    Major circulating drug metabolites can be as important as the drugs themselves in efficacy and safety, so establishing methods whereby exposure to major metabolites following administration of parent drug can be predicted is important. In this study, imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, and its major metabolite desipramine were selected as a model system to develop metabolite prediction methods. Imipramine undergoes N-demethylation to form the active metabolite desipramine, and both imipramine and desipramine are converted to hydroxylated metabolites by the polymorphic enzyme CYP2D6. The objective of the present study is to determine whether the human pharmacokinetics of desipramine following dosing of imipramine can be predicted using static and dynamic physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from in vitro input data for CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer (EM) and poor metabolizer (PM) populations. The intrinsic metabolic clearances of parent drug and metabolite were estimated using human liver microsomes (CYP2D6 PM and EM) and hepatocytes. Passive diffusion clearance of desipramine, used in the estimation of availability of the metabolite, was predicted from passive permeability and hepatocyte surface area. The predicted area under the curve (AUCm/AUCp) of desipramine/imipramine was 12- to 20-fold higher in PM compared with EM subjects following i.v. or oral doses of imipramine using the static model. Moreover, the PBPK model was able to recover simultaneously plasma profiles of imipramine and desipramine in populations with different phenotypes of CYP2D6. This example suggested that mechanistic PBPK modeling combined with information obtained from in vitro studies can provide quantitative solutions to predict in vivo pharmacokinetics of drugs and major metabolites in a target human population.

  20. Effect of Short-Term Drinking Water Exposure to Dichloroacetate on its Pharmacokinetics and Oral Bioavailability in Human Volunteers: A Stable Isotope Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R.; Shangraw, Robert E.

    2006-06-21

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) is a by-product of drinking water disinfection, a known rodent hepatocarcinogen and is also used therapeutically to treat a variety of metabolic disorders in humans. We measured DCAA bioavailability in 16 human volunteers (8 male, 8 female) after simultaneous administration of oral and iv DCAA doses. Volunteers consumed DCAA-free bottled water for 2 weeks to wash out background effects of DCAA. Subsequently, each subject drank 12C-DCAA (2 mg/kg) in 500 ml water over three minutes. Five minutes after the start of the 12C-DCAA consumption, 13C-labeled DCAA (0.3 mg/kg) was administered iv over 20 seconds, and plasma 12C/13C-DCAA concentrations measured at predetermined time points over 4 h. Volunteers subsequently consumed DCAA 0.02 mg/kg/day in 500 ml water for 14 consecutive days to simulate a low-level chronic DCAA intake. Afterwards, the 12C/13C-DCAA administrations was repeated. Study endpoints were calculation of AUC0??, apparent volume of distribution (Vss), total body clearance (Clb), plasma elimination half-life (t?,?), oral absorption rate (Ka), and oral bioavailability. Oral bioavailability was estimated from dose-adjusted AUC ratios, and by using a compartmental pharmacokinetic model after simultaneous fitting of oral and iv DCAA concentration-time profiles. DCAA bioavailability had large inter-individual variation, ranging from 28 ? 100 %. In the absence of prior DCAA intake, there were no significant differences (p>0.05) in any pharmacokinetic parameters between male and female volunteers, although there was a trend that women absorbed DCAA was more rapidly (increased Ka), and cleared DCAA more slowly (decreased Clb), than men. Only women were affected by previous 14 d DCAA exposure, which increased the AUC0?? for both oral and i.v. DCAA doses (P<0.04; 0.014 respectively) with a corresponding decrease in the Clb.

  1. Alterations in cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of elvitegravir in response to ethanol exposure in HIV-1 infected monocytic (U1) cells

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Sinha, Namita; Lukka, Pradeep B.; Meibohm, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol consumption is negatively associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and general health in HIV positive individuals. Previously, we demonstrated ethanol-mediated alterations to metabolism of elvitegravir (EVG) in human liver microsomes. In the current study, we investigated ethanol influence on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of EVG in HIV infected monocytic (U1) cells. U1 cells were treated with 5 μM EVG, 2 μM Cobicistat (COBI), a booster drug, and 20 mM ethanol for up to 24 hours. EVG, HIV p24 levels, alterations in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, MRP1, and MDR1 protein expressions were measured. Presence of ethanol demonstrated a significant effect on the total exposures of both EVG and EVG in combination with COBI. Ethanol also increased the HIV replication despite the presence of drugs and this elevated HIV replication was reduced in the presence of MRP1 and MDR1 inhibitors. Consequently, a slight increase in EVG concentration was observed in the presence of MRP1 inhibitor but not with MDR1 inhibitor. Furthermore, CYP3A4, MRP1 and MDR1 protein levels were significantly induced in treatment groups which included ethanol compared to those with no treatment. In summary, these findings suggest that Ethanol reduces intra cellular EVG exposure by modifying drug metabolism and transporter protein expression. This study provides valuable evidence for further investigation of ethanol effects on the intracellular concentration of EVG in ex vivo or in vivo studies. PMID:28231276

  2. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ( PBPK/PD ) MODEL FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE AND RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) is a PBPK/PD modeling system that was developed by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). The ERDEM framework provides the flexibility either to use existing models and to build new PBPK and PBPK/PD models to address...

  3. Age-dependent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response in preweanling rats following oral exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.; Kousba, Ahmed A.

    2006-03-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to CPF-oxon and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. The pharmacokinetics of CPF, TCP, and the extent of blood (plasma/RBC), and brain ChE inhibition in rats were determined on postnatal days (PND) -5, -12, and -17 following oral gavage administration of 1 and 10 mg CPF/kg of body weight. For all neonatal ages the blood TCP exceeded the CPF concentration, and within each age group there was no evidence of non-linear kinetics over the dose range evaluated. Younger animals demonstrated a greater sensitivity to ChE inhibition as evident by the dose- and age-dependent inhibition of plasma, RBC, and brain ChE. Of particular importance was the observation that even in rats as young as PND-5, the CYP450 metabolic capacity was adequate to metabolize CPF to both TCP and CPF-oxon based on the detection of TCP in blood and extensive ChE inhibition (biomarker of CPF-oxon) at all ages. In addition, the increase in the blood TCP concentration ({approx}3-fold) in PND-17 rats relative to the response in the younger animals, and the higher blood concentrations of CPF in neonatal rats (1.7 to 7.5-fold) relative to adults was consistent with an increase in CYP450 metabolic capacity with age. This is the first reported study that evaluated both the pharmacokinetics of the parent pesticide, the major metabolite and the extent of ChE inhibition dynamics in the same animals as a function of neonatal age. The results suggest that in the neonatal rat, CPF was rapidly absorbed and metabolized, and the extent of metabolism was age-dependent.

  4. Metabolite pharmacokinetics of soman, sarin, and GF in rats and biological monitoring of exposure to toxic organophosphorus agents

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, M.L.; McMonagle, J.D.; Dolzine, T.W.; Gresham, V.C.

    1993-05-13

    This study reports on the pharmacokinetics of the elimination of the metabolites of three toxic organophosphorus compounds (Soman, sarin, and GF). Urine, blood, and lung tissue were collected from rats dosed via subcutaneous route at 75 ug/Kg. Urinary excretion of the metabolite was the major elimination route for these three compounds. The major differences among them were primarily the extent and rate of excretion. The hydrolyzed form, alkylmethylphosphonic acid, was the single major metabolite formed and excreted in urine by a nonsaturable mechanism. Nearly total recoveries of the given doses for sarin and GF in metabolite form were obtained from the urine. The terminal elimination half-lives in urine were 6 and 15 hours for sarin and GF, respectively. Soman metabolite showed a biphasic elimination curve with terminal half-lives of 24 and 14 hours approximately. Soman was excreted at a slower rate with a recovery of only about 60%. Lung was the major organ of accumulation for soman. In blood the toxic agents were concentrated more in red blood cells than in plasma.

  5. Repeated Exposure to D-Amphetamine Decreases Global Protein Synthesis and Regulates the Translation of a Subset of mRNAs in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Anne; Boubaker-Vitre, Jihane; Cutando, Laura; Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Puighermanal, Emma; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Repeated psychostimulant exposure induces persistent gene expression modifications that contribute to enduring changes in striatal GABAergic spiny projecting neurons (SPNs). However, it remains unclear whether changes in the control of mRNA translation are required for the establishment of these durable modifications. Here we report that repeated exposure to D-amphetamine decreases global striatal mRNA translation. This effect is paralleled by an enhanced phosphorylation of the translation factors, eIF2α and eEF2, and by the concomitant increased translation of a subset of mRNAs, among which the mRNA encoding for the activity regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, also known as activity regulated gene 3.1 (Arc/Arg3.1). The enrichment of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA in the polysomal fraction is accompanied by a robust increase of Arc/Arg3.1 protein levels within the striatum. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that this increase occurred preferentially in D1R-expressing SPNs localized in striosome compartments. Our results suggest that the decreased global protein synthesis following repeated exposure to D-amphetamine favors the translation of a specific subset of mRNAs in the striatum. PMID:28119566

  6. THE UNIQUE VALUE OF BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ESTIMATING PHARMACOKINETIC RATE CONSTANTS AND BODY BURDEN FROM ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detection of breath odor is the oldest of the medical diagnostic techniques, blood and urine biomarker measurements are the current "gold standard" for modern exposure and health assessments. Of late, it has been recognized that collecting exhaled breath is an attractiv...

  7. A pharmacokinetic model of cis- and trans-permethrin disposition in rats and humans with aggregate exposure application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permethrin is a broad-spectrum pyrethroid insecticide and among the most widely used insecticides in homes and crops. Managing the risks for pesticides such as permethrin depends on the ability to consider diverse exposure scenarios and their relative risks. Physiologically-base...

  8. A PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ESTIMATING EXPOSURE OF AMERICANS TO DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS IN THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Empirical evidence suggests that exposure of Americans to dioxin-like compounds was low during the early decades of the 20th century, then increased during the 1940s and 1950s reaching a peak in the 1960s and 1970s, and progressively decreased to lower levels in the 1980s and 199...

  9. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George D.; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  10. Pharmacokinetic and Genomic Effects of Arsenite in Drinking Water on Mouse Lung in a 30-Day Exposure.

    PubMed

    Chilakapati, Jaya; Wallace, Kathleen; Hernandez-Zavala, Araceli; Moore, Tanya; Ren, Hongzu; Kitchin, Kirk T

    2015-01-01

    The 2 objectives of this subchronic study were to determine the arsenite drinking water exposure dependent increases in female C3H mouse liver and lung tissue arsenicals and to characterize the dose response (to 0, 0.05, 0.25, 1, 10, and 85 ppm arsenite in drinking water for 30 days and a purified AIN-93M diet) for genomic mouse lung expression patterns. Mouse lungs were analyzed for inorganic arsenic, monomethylated, and dimethylated arsenicals by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy. The total lung mean arsenical levels were 1.4, 22.5, 30.1, 50.9, 105.3, and 316.4 ng/g lung tissue after 0, 0.05, 0.25, 1, 10, and 85 ppm, respectively. At 85 ppm, the total mean lung arsenical levels increased 14-fold and 131-fold when compared to either the lowest noncontrol dose (0.05 ppm) or the control dose, respectively. We found that arsenic exposure elicited minimal numbers of differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 77, 38, 90, 87, and 87 DEGs) after 0.05, 0.25, 1, 10, and 85 ppm, respectively, which were associated with cardiovascular disease, development, differentiation, apoptosis, proliferation, and stress response. After 30 days of arsenite exposure, this study showed monotonic increases in mouse lung arsenical (total arsenic and dimethylarsinic acid) concentrations but no clear dose-related increases in DEG numbers.

  11. Effect of short-term drinking water exposure to dichloroacetate on its pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability in human volunteers: a stable isotope study.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Irvin R; Shangraw, Robert E

    2006-07-01

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) is a by-product of drinking water disinfection, is a known rodent hepatocarcinogen, and is also used therapeutically to treat a variety of metabolic disorders in humans. We measured DCAA bioavailability in 16 human volunteers (eight men, eight women) after simultaneous administration of oral and iv DCAA doses. Volunteers consumed DCAA-free bottled water for 2 weeks to wash out background effects of DCAA. Subsequently, each subject consumed (12)C-DCAA (2 mg/kg) dissolved in 500 ml water over a period of 3 min. Five minutes after the start of the (12)C-DCAA consumption, (13)C-labeled DCAA (0.3 mg/kg) was administered iv over 20 s and plasma (12)C/(13)C-DCAA concentrations measured at predetermined time points over 4 h. Volunteers subsequently consumed for 14 consecutive days DCAA 0.02 microg/kg/day dissolved in 500 ml water to simulate a low-level chronic DCAA intake. Afterward, the (12)C/(13)C-DCAA administrations were repeated. Study end points were calculation of AUC(0-->infinity), apparent volume of distribution (V(ss)), total body clearance (Cl(b)), plasma elimination half-life (t((1/2),beta)), oral absorption rate (K(a)), and oral bioavailability. Oral bioavailability was estimated from dose-adjusted AUC ratios and by using a compartmental pharmacokinetic model after simultaneous fitting of oral and iv DCAA concentration-time profiles. DCAA bioavailability had large interindividual variation, ranging from 27 to 100%. In the absence of prior DCAA intake, there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in any pharmacokinetic parameters between male and female volunteers, although there was a trend that women absorbed DCAA more rapidly (increased K(a)), and cleared DCAA more slowly (decreased Cl(b)), than men. Only women were affected by previous 14-day DCAA exposure, which increased the AUC(0-->infinity) for both oral and iv DCAA doses (p < 0.04 and p < 0.014, respectively) with a corresponding decrease in the Cl(b).

  12. Performance Assessment and Translation of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models from acslX™ to Berkeley Madonna™, MATLAB®, and R language: Oxytetracycline and Gold Nanoparticles as Case Examples.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; He, Chunla; Jin, Shiqiang; Yang, Raymond S H; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-04-08

    Many physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for environmental chemicals, drugs, and nanomaterials have been developed to aid risk and safety assessments using acslXTM. However, acslXTM has been rendered sunset since November 2015. Alternative modeling tools and tutorials are needed for future PBPK applications. This forum article aimed to: (1) demonstrate the performance of four PBPK modeling software packages (acslXTM, Berkeley MadonnaTM, MATLAB®, and R language) tested using two existing models (oxytetracycline and gold nanoparticles); (2) provide a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion from acslXTM to Berkeley MadonnaTM, MATLAB®, and R language; (3) discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each software package in the implementation of PBPK models in toxicology, and (4) share our perspective about future direction in this field. Simulation results of plasma/tissue concentrations/amounts of oxytetracycline and gold from different models were compared visually and statistically with linear regression analyses. Simulation results from the original models were correlated well with results from the recoded models, with time-concentration/amount curves nearly superimposable and determination coefficients of 0.86-1.00. Step-by-step explanations of the recoding of the models in different software programs are provided in the Supplementary Data. In summary, this article presents a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion for a small molecule and a nanoparticle among four software packages, and a performance comparison of these software packages in PBPK model implementation. This tutorial helps beginners learn PBPK modeling, provides suggestions for selecting a suitable tool for future projects, and may lead to the transition from acslXTM to alternative modeling tools.

  13. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern. PMID:26512724

  14. The Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Carprofen, Flunixin and Phenylbutazone in the Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) following Oral Exposure.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Tamsyn; Cromarty, Duncan; Duncan, Neil; Wolter, Kerri; Naidoo, Vinny

    2015-01-01

    The following study evaluates the overt toxic potential of carprofen (CRP), flunixin (FXN) and phenylbutazone (PBZ) in Old world vultures in relation to historic toxicity data for diclofenac and ketoprofen, with the Cape vulture (Gyps coprotheres) being the indicator species. The toxic potential of a single oral dose of CRP (11.5 mg/kg), FXN (1 mg/kg),PBZ (1.7 mg/kg) or water was evaluated by means of a four-way parallel study (n = 2), as means of ascertaining if these drugs were as toxic as diclofenac in the vulture. No unscheduled deaths or pathological lesions were noted following exposure. Clinical signs of lethargy and depression were, however, noted in one CRP, two FXN and one PBZ treated birds. Mild reversible inhibition of UA excretion was evident in all three groups, although UA remained within the population reference interval in contrast to the effects previously described for diclofenac and ketoprofen. All treatment groups had a drug concentration responsive increase in alanine transferase activity. CRP, FXN and PBZ were characterised by a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of 1051.8 ± 620.7 ng/ml, 335.9 ± 36.3 ng/ml and 11150 ± 2474.9 ng/ml at 4 ± 4.3, 0.45 ± 0.02 and 5.3 ± 5.2 hours (Tmax) respectively and a half-life of elimination of 13.3 ±5, 1.8±1 and 18.7 ±11.4 hours respectively. While we could not demonstrate a lethal effect of the tested substances, the presence of toxic clinical signs, clinical pathological changes and/or long half-lives of elimination suggests that all three drugs have a potential for toxicity in a larger population or on repeat administration. In conclusion while the studied substances were not as overtly toxic as diclofenac, they are of safety concern.

  15. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  16. Vorinostat with sustained exposure and high solubility in poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) micelle nanocarriers: characterization and effects on pharmacokinetics in rat serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Elham A; Zhao, Yunqi; Meshali, Mahasen M; Remsberg, Connie M; Borg, Thanaa M; Foda, Abdel Monem M; Takemoto, Jody K; Sayre, Casey L; Martinez, Stephanie E; Davies, Neal M; Forrest, M Laird

    2012-10-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, known as vorinostat, is a promising anticancer drug with a unique mode of action; however, it is plagued by low water solubility, low permeability, and suboptimal pharmacokinetics. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) micelles of vorinostat were developed. Vorinostat's pharmacokinetics in rats was investigated after intravenous (i.v.) (10 mg/kg) and oral (p.o.) (50 mg/kg) micellar administrations and compared with a conventional polyethylene glycol 400 solution and methylcellulose suspension. The micelles increased the aqueous solubility of vorinostat from 0.2 to 8.15 ± 0.60 and 10.24 ± 0.92 mg/mL at drug to nanocarrier ratios of 1:10 and 1:15, respectively. Micelles had nanoscopic mean diameters of 75.67 ± 7.57 and 87.33 ± 8.62 nm for 1:10 and 1:15 micelles, respectively, with drug loading capacities of 9.93 ± 0.21% and 6.91 ± 1.19%, and encapsulation efficiencies of 42.74 ± 1.67% and 73.29 ± 4.78%, respectively. The micelles provided sustained exposure and improved pharmacokinetics characterized by a significant increase in serum half-life, area under curve, and mean residence time. The micelles reduced vorinostat clearance particularly after i.v. dosing. Thus, PEG-b-PLA micelles significantly improved the p.o. and i.v. pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of vorinostat, which warrants further investigation.

  17. Vorinostat with Sustained Exposure and High Solubility in Poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) Micelle Nanocarriers: Characterization and Effects on Pharmacokinetics in Rat Serum and Urine

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Elham A.; Zhao, Yunqi; Meshali, Mahasen M.; Remsberg, Connie M.; Borg, Thanaa M.; Foda, Abdel Monem M.; Takemoto, Jody K.; Sayre, Casey; Martinez, Stephanie; Davies, Neal M.; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, known as vorinostat, is a promising anti-cancer drug with a unique mode of action; however, it is plagued by low water solubility, low permeability, and suboptimal pharmacokinetics. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) micelles of vorinostat were developed. Vorinostat’s pharmacokinetics in rats were investigated after intravenous (i.v.) (10 mg/kg) and oral (50 mg/kg) micellar administrations and compared to a conventional PEG400 solution and methylcellulose suspension. The micelles increased the aqueous solubility of vorinostat from 0.2 mg/ml to 8.15 ± 0.60 mg/ml and 10.24 ± 0.92 mg/ml at drug to nanocarrier ratios of 1:10 and 1:15, respectively. Micelles had nanoscopic mean diameters of 75.67 ± 7.57 nm and 87.33 ± 8.62 nm for 1:10 and 1:15 micelles, respectively, with drug loading capacities of 9.93 ± 0.21% and 6.91 ± 1.19 %, and encapsulation efficiencies of 42.74 ± 1.67% and 73.29 ± 4.78%, respectively. The micelles provided sustained exposure and improved pharmacokinetics characterized by a significant increase in serum half-life, area under curve, and mean residence time. The micelles reduced vorinostat clearance particularly after i.v. dosing. Thus, PEG-b-PLA micelles significantly improved the oral and intravenous pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of vorinostat, which warrants further investigation. PMID:22806441

  18. [Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Goullé, J-P; Saussereau, E; Lacroix, C

    2008-08-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis. Smoking is currently most common use of cannabis. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The variability of THC in plant material which has significantly increased in recent years leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. This variability of THC content has an important impact on drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacology. After smoking THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level near 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is eliminated quickly from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, which is responsible for its pharmacologic effects. Body fat then serves as a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetics explains the noncorrelation between THC blood level and clinical effects as is observed for ethanol. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20 and 100% of parent, respectively). The elimination of THC and its many metabolites, mainly THC-COOH, occurs via the feces and urine for several weeks. Thus, to confirm abstinence, urine THC-COOH analysis would be a useful tool. A positive result could be checked by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry THC blood analysis, indicative of a recent cannabis exposure.

  19. Optimization of human dose prediction by using quantitative and translational pharmacology in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bueters, Tjerk; Gibson, Christopher; Visser, Sandra A G

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective article, we explain how quantitative and translational pharmacology, when well-implemented, is believed to lead to improved clinical candidates and drug targets that are differentiated from current treatment options. Quantitative and translational pharmacology aims to build and continuously improve the quantitative relationship between drug exposure, target engagement, efficacy, safety and its interspecies relationship at every phase of drug discovery. Drug hunters should consider and apply these concepts to develop compounds with a higher probability of interrogating the clinical biological hypothesis. We offer different approaches to set an initial effective concentration or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target in man and to predict human pharmacokinetics that determine together the predicted human dose and dose schedule. All concepts are illustrated with ample literature examples.

  20. Integration of Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models with Adverse Outcome Pathways and Environmental Exposure Models to Screen for Environmental Hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Life-stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to include descriptions of several life-stage events such as pregnancy, fetal development, the neonate and child growth. The overall modeling strategy was used for in vitro to in vivo (IVIVE) extrapolat...

  1. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC (PBPK/PD) MODEL FOR ESTIMATION OF CUMULATIVE RISK FROM EXPOSURE TO THREE N-METHYL CARBAMATES: CARBARYL, ALDICARB, AND CARBOFURAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for a mixture of N-methyl carbamate pesticides was developed based on single chemical models. The model was used to compare urinary metabolite concentrations to levels from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHA...

  2. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics utilizing unbound target tissue exposure as part of a disposition-based rationale for lead optimization of benzoxaboroles in the treatment of Stage 2 Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Wring, Stephen; Gaukel, Eric; Nare, Bakela; Jacobs, Robert; Beaudet, Beth; Bowling, Tana; Mercer, Luke; Bacchi, Cyrus; Yarlett, Nigel; Randolph, Ryan; Parham, Robin; Rewerts, Cindy; Platner, Jacob; Don, Robert

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This review presents a progression strategy for the discovery of new anti-parasitic drugs that uses in vitro susceptibility, time-kill and reversibility measures to define the therapeutically relevant exposure required in target tissues of animal infection models. The strategy is exemplified by the discovery of SCYX-7158 as a potential oral treatment for stage 2 (CNS) Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT). A critique of current treatments for stage 2 HAT is included to provide context for the challenges of achieving target tissue disposition and the need for establishing pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) measures early in the discovery paradigm. The strategy comprises 3 stages. Initially, compounds demonstrating promising in vitro activity and selectivity for the target organism over mammalian cells are advanced to in vitro metabolic stability, barrier permeability and tissue binding assays to establish that they will likely achieve and maintain therapeutic concentrations during in-life efficacy studies. Secondly, in vitro time-kill and reversibility kinetics are employed to correlate exposure (based on unbound concentrations) with in vitro activity, and to identify pharmacodynamic measures that would best predict efficacy. Lastly, this information is used to design dosing regimens for pivotal pharmacokinetic-pharmacodyamic studies in animal infection models.

  3. Translations and Translators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nida, Eugene A.

    1979-01-01

    The necessity for stylistic appropriateness in translation as well as correct content is discussed. To acquire this skill, translators must be trained in stylistics through close examination of their own language and must have practice in translating for different audiences at different levels. (PMJ)

  4. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling of immune, reproductive and carcinogenic effects from contaminant exposure in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) across the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Rune; Gustavson, Kim; Sonne, Christian; Desforges, Jean-Pierre; Rigét, Frank F; Pavlova, Viola; McKinney, Melissa A; Letcher, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) consume large quantities of seal blubber and other high trophic marine mammals and consequently have some of the highest tissue concentrations of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) among Arctic biota. In the present paper we carried out a risk quotient (RQ) evaluation on OHC-exposed polar bears harvested from 1999 to 2008 and from 11 circumpolar subpopulations spanning from Alaska to Svalbard in order to evaluate the risk of OHC-mediated reproductive effects (embryotoxicity, teratogenicity), immunotoxicity and carcinogenicity (genotoxicity). This RQ evaluation was based on the Critical Body Residue (CBR) concept and a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modelling (PBPK) approach using OHC concentrations measured in polar bear adipose or liver tissue. The range of OHC concentrations within polar bear populations were as follows for adipose, sum polychlorinated biphenyls ∑PCBs (1797-10,537 ng/g lw), sum methylsulphone-PCB ∑MeSO2-PCBs (110-672 ng/g lw), sum chlordanes ∑CHLs (765-3477 ng/g lw), α-hexachlorocyclohexane α-HCH (8.5-91.3 ng/g lw), β-hexachlorocyclohexane β-HCH (65.5-542 ng/g lw), sum chlorbenzenes ∑ClBzs (145-304 ng/g lw), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane ∑DDTs (31.5-206 ng/g lw), dieldrin (69-249 ng/g lw), polybrominated diphenyl ethers ∑PBDEs (4.6-78.4 ng/g lw). For liver, the perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) concentrations ranged from 231-2792 ng/g ww. The total additive RQ from all OHCs ranged from 4.3 in Alaska to 28.6 in East Greenland bears for effects on reproduction, immune health and carcinogenicity, highlighting the important result that the toxic effect threshold (i.e. RQ>1) was exceeded for all polar bear populations assessed. PCBs were the main contributors for all three effect categories, contributing from 70.6% to 94.3% of the total risk and a RQ between 3.8-22.5. ∑MeSO2-PCBs were the second highest effect contributor for reproductive and immunological effects (0.17

  5. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models in Chemical Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Moiz; Fisher, Jeffrey; Blount, Benjamin; Ruiz, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting “in silico” tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application—health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The “human PBPK model toolkit” is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:22523493

  6. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for ethyl tertiary-butyl ether and tertiary-butyl alcohol in rats: Contribution of binding to α2u-globulin in male rats and high-exposure nonlinear kinetics to toxicity and cancer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Borghoff, Susan J; Ring, Caroline; Banton, Marcy I; Leavens, Teresa L

    2017-05-01

    In cancer bioassays, inhalation, but not drinking water exposure to ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE), caused liver tumors in male rats, while tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA), an ETBE metabolite, caused kidney tumors in male rats following exposure via drinking water. To understand the contribution of ETBE and TBA kinetics under varying exposure scenarios to these tumor responses, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed based on a previously published model for methyl tertiary-butyl ether, a structurally similar chemical, and verified against the literature and study report data. The model included ETBE and TBA binding to the male rat-specific protein α2u-globulin, which plays a role in the ETBE and TBA kidney response observed in male rats. Metabolism of ETBE and TBA was described as a single, saturable pathway in the liver. The model predicted similar kidney AUC0-∞ for TBA for various exposure scenarios from ETBE and TBA cancer bioassays, supporting a male-rat-specific mode of action for TBA-induced kidney tumors. The model also predicted nonlinear kinetics at ETBE inhalation exposure concentrations above ~2000 ppm, based on blood AUC0-∞ for ETBE and TBA. The shift from linear to nonlinear kinetics at exposure concentrations below the concentration associated with liver tumors in rats (5000 ppm) suggests the mode of action for liver tumors operates under nonlinear kinetics following chronic exposure and is not relevant for assessing human risk. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Translation of associative learning models into extinction reminders delivered via mobile phones during cue exposure interventions for substance use.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Zachary; Kutlu, Munir G

    2014-09-01

    Despite experimental findings and some treatment research supporting the use of cues as a means to induce and extinguish cravings, interventions using cue exposure have not been well integrated into contemporary substance abuse treatments. A primary problem with exposure-based interventions for addiction is that after learning not to use substances in the presence of addiction cues inside the clinic (i.e., extinction), stimuli in the naturalistic setting outside the clinic may continue to elicit craving, drug use, or other maladaptive conditioned responses. For exposure-based substance use interventions to be efficacious, new approaches are needed that can prevent relapse by directly generalizing learning from the therapeutic setting into naturalistic settings associated with a high risk for relapse. Basic research suggests that extinction reminders (ERs) can be paired with the context of learning new and more adaptive conditioned responses to substance abuse cues in exposure therapies for addiction. Using mobile phones and automated dialing and data collection software, ERs can be delivered in everyday high-risk settings to inhibit conditioned responses to substance-use-related stimuli. In this review, we describe how associative learning mechanisms (e.g., conditioned inhibition) can inform how ERs are conceptualized, learned, and implemented to prevent substance use when delivered via mobile phones. This approach, exposure with portable reminders of extinction, is introduced as an adjunctive intervention that uses brief automated ERs between clinic visits when individuals are in high-risk settings for drug use.

  8. Translation of Associative Learning Models into Extinction Reminders Delivered via Mobile Phones During Cue Exposure Interventions for Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, M. Zachary; Kutlu, Munir G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite experimental findings and some treatment research supporting the use of cues as a means to induce and extinguish cravings, interventions using cue exposure have not been well integrated into contemporary substance abuse treatments. A primary problem with exposure-based interventions for addiction is that after learning not to use substances in the presence of addiction cues inside the clinic (i.e., extinction), stimuli in the naturalistic setting outside the clinic may continue to elicit craving, drug use, or other maladaptive conditioned responses. For exposure-based substance use interventions to be efficacious, new approaches are needed that can prevent relapse by directly generalizing learning from the therapeutic setting into naturalistic settings associated with a high-risk for relapse. Basic research suggests that extinction reminders (ERs) can be paired with the context of learning new and more adaptive conditioned responses to substance abuse cues in exposure therapies for addiction. Using mobile phones and automated dialing and data collection software, ERs can be delivered in everyday high-risk settings to inhibit conditioned responses to substance use-related stimuli. In this review, we describe how associative learning mechanisms (e.g., conditioned inhibition) can inform how ERs are conceptualized, learned, and implemented to prevent substance use when delivered via mobile phones. This approach, exposure with portable reminders of extinction, is introduced as an adjunctive intervention that uses brief automated ERs between clinic visits when individuals are in high-risk settings for drug use. PMID:25134055

  9. Efficacy of the GluK1/AMPA Receptor Antagonist LY293558 against Seizures and Neuropathology in a Soman-Exposure Model without Pretreatment and its Pharmacokinetics after Intramuscular Administration

    PubMed Central

    Apland, James P.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Green, Carol E.; Swezey, Robert; Yang, Chun; Qashu, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Control of brain seizures after exposure to nerve agents is imperative for the prevention of brain damage and death. Animal models of nerve agent exposure make use of pretreatments, or medication administered within 1 minute after exposure, in order to prevent rapid death from peripheral toxic effects and respiratory failure, which then allows the testing of anticonvulsant compounds. However, in a real-case scenario of an unexpected attack with nerve agents, pretreatment would not be possible, and medical assistance may not be available immediately. To determine if control of seizures and survival are still possible without pretreatment or immediate pharmacologic intervention, we studied the anticonvulsant efficacy of the GluK1 (GluR5)/α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist (3S,4aR,6R,8aR)-6-[2-(1(2)H-tetrazole-5-yl)ethyl]decahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY293558) in rats that did not receive any treatment until 20 minutes after exposure to the nerve agent soman. We injected LY293558 intramuscularly, as this would be the most likely route of administration to humans. LY293558 (15 mg/kg), injected along with atropine and the oxime HI-6 at 20 minutes after soman exposure, stopped seizures and increased survival rate from 64% to 100%. LY293558 also prevented neuronal loss in the amygdala and hippocampus, and reduced neurodegeneration in a number of brain regions studied 7 days after soman exposure. Analysis of the LY293558 pharmacokinetics after intramuscular administration showed that this compound readily crosses the blood–brain barrier. There was good correspondence between the time course of seizure suppression by LY293558 and the brain levels of the compound. PMID:23042954

  10. Validation and Application of Pharmacokinetic Models for Interspecies Extrapolations in Toxicity Risk Assessments of Volatile Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-21

    GROUP SUB-GROUP Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model Saturable metab- olism, Respiratory eliminationi Ialocarbon Inhalation expo- sure, H...nlocarbon oral exposure, Interspecles extrapolations, Pharmacokinetics , l,l,]-trichloroethane, 1,l-dichloroethylene, 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if...necessary and identify by block number) In pursuit of the goal of establishing a scientific basis for the interspecies extrapo- lation of pharmacokinetic

  11. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL TO ESTIMATE ABSORBED CARBARYL DOSE IN CHILDREN AFTER TURF APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to investigate exposure scenarios of children to carbaryl following turf application. Physiological, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters describing the fate and effects of carbaryl in rats were scaled ...

  12. MOVING FROM EXTERNAL EXPOSURE CONCENTRATION TO INTERNAL DOSE: DURATION EXTRAPOLATION BASED ON PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC-MODEL DERIVED ESTIMATES OF INTERNAL DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential human health risk(s) from exposure to chemicals under conditions for which adequate human or animal data are not available must frequently be assessed. Exposure scenario is particularly important for the acute neurotoxic effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)...

  13. Alteration at translational but not transcriptional level of transferrin receptor expression following manganese exposure at the blood-CSF barrier in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G. Jane; Zhao Qiuqu; Zheng Wei . E-mail: wzheng@purdue.edu

    2005-06-01

    Manganese exposure alters iron homeostasis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), possibly by acting on iron transport mechanisms localized at the blood-brain barrier and/or blood-CSF barrier. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that manganese exposure may change the binding affinity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) to mRNAs encoding transferrin receptor (TfR), thereby influencing iron transport at the blood-CSF barrier. A primary culture of choroidal epithelial cells was adapted to grow on a permeable membrane sandwiched between two culture chambers to mimic blood-CSF barrier. Trace {sup 59}Fe was used to determine the transepithelial transport of iron. Following manganese treatment (100 {mu}M for 24 h), the initial flux rate constant (K {sub i}) of iron was increased by 34%, whereas the storage of iron in cells was reduced by 58%, as compared to controls. A gel shift assay demonstrated that manganese exposure increased the binding of IRP1 and IRP2 to the stem loop-containing mRNAs. Consequently, the cellular concentrations of TfR proteins were increased by 84% in comparison to controls. Assays utilizing RT-PCR, quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, and nuclear run off techniques showed that manganese treatment did not affect the level of heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) encoding TfR, nor did it affect the level of nascent TfR mRNA. However, manganese exposure resulted in a significantly increased level of TfR mRNA and reduced levels of ferritin mRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that manganese exposure increases iron transport at the blood-CSF barrier; the effect is likely due to manganese action on translational events relevant to the production of TfR, but not due to its action on transcriptional, gene expression of TfR. The disrupted protein-TfR mRNA interaction in the choroidal epithelial cells may explain the toxicity of manganese at the blood-CSF barrier.

  14. Decreased exposure to sunitinib due to concomitant administration of ifosfamide: results of a phase I and pharmacokinetic study on the combination of sunitinib and ifosfamide in patients with advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hamberg, P; Steeghs, N; Loos, W J; van de Biessen, D; den Hollander, M; Tascilar, M; Verweij, J; Gelderblom, H; Sleijfer, S

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to define the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of sunitinib combined with two different infusion schedules of ifosfamide. Methods: Patients with advanced solid tumours, good performance score, good organ function, and no standard therapy available were eligible. Continuous once daily sunitinib, in escalating doses per cohort, was combined with ifosfamide, 9 g m−2 for 3 days or 6 g m−2 for 5 days, administered every 3 weeks. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) assessments were performed. Results: With growth-factor support, the MTD of sunitinib combined with either ifosfamide schedule was 12.5 mg in 32 patients enrolled. Neutropenia-related adverse events were dose-limiting toxicities. Sunitinib did not affect ifosfamide PK. Ifosfamide significantly decreased exposure to sunitinib and increased exposure to its metabolite, SU12662. No consistent changes in PD parameters were observed. Conclusion: With growth-factor support, the MTD of sunitinib with both ifosfamide schedules was 12.5 mg. Ifosfamide produced decreased sunitinib blood levels because of CYP3A induction. As PK interactions cannot explain the relatively low sunitinib doses that can be combined with ifosfamide, synergy in toxicity is likely. Whether this also holds true for anti-tumour activity needs to be further explored. PMID:20485286

  15. Insights into drug discovery from natural medicines using reverse pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haiping; Zheng, Xiao; Wang, Guangji

    2014-04-01

    Natural medicines (NMs) are indispensable sources for the development of modern drugs. However, the targets for most natural compounds are unknown and the current pharmacokinetic evaluation systems developed for target-defined drugs may not be directly applicable to NM-based drug discovery, which is a major hindrance in bringing natural compounds to the clinic. Here, we propose the concept of 'reverse pharmacokinetics' and discuss how a 'reverse pharmacokinetics' perspective could help clarify key questions in modern drug discovery from NMs with validated clinical benefits, thereby strengthening the translational potential. Reverse pharmacokinetics can provide physiologically relevant clues to the target identification and mechanistic study of NMs, which may also innovate drug discovery for complex diseases. We anticipate that an evolving deep understanding of the novel mode of action of natural compounds with a reverse pharmacokinetic insight may improve discovery of both single ingredient and multiple-component modern drugs from NMs.

  16. The effects of stress exposure on prefrontal cortex: Translating basic research into successful treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arnsten, Amy F.T.; Raskind, Murray A.; Taylor, Fletcher B.; Connor, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the neurobiology of the stress response in animals has led to successful new treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in humans. Basic research has found that high levels of catecholamine release during stress rapidly impair the top-down cognitive functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), while strengthening the emotional and habitual responses of the amygdala and basal ganglia. Chronic stress exposure leads to dendritic atrophy in PFC, dendritic extension in the amygdala, and strengthening of the noradrenergic (NE) system. High levels of NE release during stress engage low affinity alpha-1 adrenoceptors, (and likely beta-1 adrenoceptors), which rapidly reduce the firing of PFC neurons, but strengthen amygdala function. In contrast, moderate levels of NE release during nonstress conditions engage higher affinity alpha-2A receptors, which strengthen PFC, weaken amygdala, and regulate NE cell firing. Thus, either alpha-1 receptor blockade or alpha-2A receptor stimulation can protect PFC function during stress. Patients with PTSD have signs of PFC dysfunction. Clinical studies have found that blocking alpha-1 receptors with prazosin, or stimulating alpha-2A receptors with guanfacine or clonidine can be useful in reducing the symptoms of PTSD. Placebo-controlled trials have shown that prazosin is helpful in veterans, active duty soldiers and civilians with PTSD, including improvement of PFC symptoms such as impaired concentration and impulse control. Open label studies suggest that guanfacine may be especially helpful in treating children and adolescents who have experienced trauma. Thus, understanding the neurobiology of the stress response has begun to help patients with stress disorders. PMID:25436222

  17. Using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic-guided "body-on-a-chip" systems to predict mammalian response to drug and chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jong Hwan; Srinivasan, Balaji; Esch, Mandy Brigitte; McLamb, William T; Bernabini, Catia; Shuler, Michael L; Hickman, James J

    2014-09-01

    The continued development of in vitro systems that accurately emulate human response to drugs or chemical agents will impact drug development, our understanding of chemical toxicity, and enhance our ability to respond to threats from chemical or biological agents. A promising technology is to build microscale replicas of humans that capture essential elements of physiology, pharmacology, and/or toxicology (microphysiological systems). Here, we review progress on systems for microscale models of mammalian systems that include two or more integrated cellular components. These systems are described as a "body-on-a-chip", and utilize the concept of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in the design. These microscale systems can also be used as model systems to predict whole-body responses to drugs as well as study the mechanism of action of drugs using PBPK analysis. In this review, we provide examples of various approaches to construct such systems with a focus on their physiological usefulness and various approaches to measure responses (e.g. chemical, electrical, or mechanical force and cellular viability and morphology). While the goal is to predict human response, other mammalian cell types can be utilized with the same principle to predict animal response. These systems will be evaluated on their potential to be physiologically accurate, to provide effective and efficient platform for analytics with accessibility to a wide range of users, for ease of incorporation of analytics, functional for weeks to months, and the ability to replicate previously observed human responses.

  18. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling.

    PubMed

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property-distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics.

  19. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Predictions of Tramadol Exposure Throughout Pediatric Life: an Analysis of the Different Clearance Contributors with Emphasis on CYP2D6 Maturation.

    PubMed

    T'jollyn, Huybrecht; Snoeys, Jan; Vermeulen, An; Michelet, Robin; Cuyckens, Filip; Mannens, Geert; Van Peer, Achiel; Annaert, Pieter; Allegaert, Karel; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Boussery, Koen

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the retrospective evaluation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) techniques used to mechanistically predict clearance throughout pediatric life. An intravenous tramadol retrograde PBPK model was set up in Simcyp® using adult clearance values, qualified for CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP2B6, and renal contributions. Subsequently, the model was evaluated for mechanistic prediction of total, CYP2D6-related, and renal clearance predictions in very early life. In two in vitro pediatric human liver microsomal (HLM) batches (1 and 3 months), O-desmethyltramadol and N-desmethyltramadol formation rates were compared with CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 activity, respectively. O-desmethyltramadol formation was mediated only by CYP2D6, while N-desmethyltramadol was mediated in part by CYP3A4. Additionally, the clearance maturation of the PBPK model predictions was compared to two in vivo maturation models (Hill and exponential) based on plasma concentration data, and to clearance estimations from a WinNonlin® fit of plasma concentration and urinary excretion data. Maturation of renal and CYP2D6 clearance is captured well in the PBPK model predictions, but total tramadol clearance is underpredicted. The most pronounced underprediction of total and CYP2D6-mediated clearance was observed in the age range of 2-13 years. In conclusion, the PBPK technique showed to be a powerful mechanistic tool capable of predicting maturation of CYP2D6 and renal tramadol clearance in early infancy, although some underprediction occurs between 2 and 13 years for total and CYP2D6-mediated tramadol clearance.

  20. A workflow to investigate exposure and pharmacokinetic influences on high-throughput in vitro chemical screening based on adverse outcome pathways, OpenTox USA 2015 Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOP) link known population outcomes to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using high-throughput in vitro methods. Practical application of AOPs in chemical-specific risk assessment requires consideration of exposure and absorption,...

  1. Simulation of differential drug pharmacokinetics under heat and exercise stress using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Peng, Henry T; Cheung, Bob; Edginton, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Under extreme conditions of heat exposure and exercise stress, the human body undergoes major physiological changes. Perturbations in organ blood flows, gastrointestinal properties, and vascular physiology may impact the body's ability to absorb, distribute, and eliminate drugs. Clinical studies on the effect of these stressors on drug pharmacokinetics demonstrate that the likelihood of pharmacokinetic alteration is dependent on drug properties and the intensity of the stressor. The objectives of this study were to use literature data to quantify the correlation between exercise and heat exposure intensity to changing physiological parameters and further, to use this information for the parameterization of a whole-body, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the purposes of determining those drug properties most likely to demonstrate altered drug pharmacokinetics under stress. Cardiac output and most organ blood flows were correlated with heart rate using regression analysis. Other altered parameters included hematocrit and intravascular albumin concentration. Pharmacokinetic simulations of intravenous and oral administration of hypothetical drugs with either a low or high value of lipophilicity, unbound fraction in plasma, and unbound intrinsic hepatic clearance demonstrated that the area under the curve of those drugs with a high unbound intrinsic clearance was most affected (up to a 130% increase) following intravenous administration, whereas following oral administration, pharmacokinetic changes were smaller (<40% increase in area under the curve) for all hypothetical compounds. A midazolam physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was also used to demonstrate that simulated changes in pharmacokinetic parameters under exercise and heat stress were generally consistent with those reported in the literature.

  2. Central nervous system pharmacokinetics of the Mdr1 P-glycoprotein substrate CP-615,003: intersite differences and implications for human receptor occupancy projections from cerebrospinal fluid exposures.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Tseng, Elaine; Nelson, Frederick R; Rollema, Hans; French, Jonathan L; Kaplan, Irina V; Horner, Weldon E; Gibbs, Megan A

    2007-08-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) distribution and transport mechanisms of the investigational drug candidate CP-615,003 (N-[3-fluoro-4-[2-(propylamino)ethoxy]phenyl]-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-4-oxo-1H-indole-3-carboxamide) and its active metabolite CP-900,725 have been characterized. Brain distribution of CP-615,003 and CP-900,725 was low in rats and mice (brain-to-serum ratio < 0.2). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-to-serum ratios of CP-615,003 were 6- to 8-fold lower than the plasma unbound fraction in rats and dogs. In vitro, CP-615,003 displayed quinidine-like efflux in MDR1-expressing Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. The brain-to-serum ratio of CP-615,003 in mdr1a/1b (-/-) mice was approximately 7 times that in their wild-type counterparts, confirming that impaired CNS distribution was explained by P-gp efflux transport. In contrast, P-gp efflux did not explain the impaired CNS penetration of CP-900,725. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to characterize rat brain extracellular fluid (ECF) distribution. Interestingly, the ECF-to-serum ratio of the P-gp substrate CP-615,003 was 7-fold below the CSF-to-serum ratio, whereas this disequilibrium was not observed for CP-900,725. In a clinical study, steady-state CSF exposures were measured after administration of 100 mg of CP-615,003 b.i.d. The human CSF-to-plasma ratios of CP-615,003 and CP-900,725 were both approximately 10-fold below their ex vivo plasma unbound fractions, confirming impaired human CNS penetration. Preliminary estimates of CNS receptor occupancy from human CSF concentrations were sensitive to assumptions regarding the magnitude of the CSF-ECF gradient for CP-615,003 in humans. In summary, this case provides an example of intersite differences in CNS pharmacokinetics of a P-gp substrate and potential implications for projection of human CNS receptor occupancy of transporter substrates from CSF pharmacokinetic data when direct imaging-based approaches are not feasible.

  3. Deriving therapies for children with primary CNS tumors using pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation of cerebral microdialysis data.

    PubMed

    Jacus, M O; Throm, S L; Turner, D C; Patel, Y T; Freeman, B B; Morfouace, M; Boulos, N; Stewart, C F

    2014-06-16

    The treatment of children with primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors continues to be a challenge despite recent advances in technology and diagnostics. In this overview, we describe our approach for identifying and evaluating active anticancer drugs through a process that enables rational translation from the lab to the clinic. The preclinical approach we discuss uses tumor subgroup-specific models of pediatric CNS tumors, cerebral microdialysis sampling of tumor extracellular fluid (tECF), and pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation to overcome challenges that currently hinder researchers in this field. This approach involves performing extensive systemic (plasma) and target site (CNS tumor) pharmacokinetic studies. Pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation of the data derived from these studies are then used to inform future decisions regarding drug administration, including dosage and schedule. Here, we also present how our approach was used to examine two FDA approved drugs, simvastatin and pemetrexed, as candidates for new therapies for pediatric CNS tumors. We determined that due to unfavorable pharmacokinetic characteristics and insufficient concentrations in tumor tissue in a mouse model of ependymoma, simvastatin would not be efficacious in further preclinical trials. In contrast to simvastatin, pemetrexed was advanced to preclinical efficacy studies after our studies determined that plasma exposures were similar to those in humans treated at similar tolerable dosages and adequate unbound concentrations were found in tumor tissue of medulloblastoma-bearing mice. Generally speaking, the high clinical failure rates for CNS drug candidates can be partially explained by the fact that therapies are often moved into clinical trials without extensive and rational preclinical studies to optimize the transition. Our approach addresses this limitation by using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of data generated from appropriate in vivo models to

  4. Deriving Therapies for Children with Primary CNS Tumors Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulation of Cerebral Microdialysis Data

    PubMed Central

    Jacus, M.O.; Throm, S.L.; Turner, D.C.; Patel, Y.T.; Freeman, B.B.; Morfouace, M.; Boulos, N.; Stewart, C. F.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of children with primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors continues to be a challenge despite recent advances in technology and diagnostics. In this overview, we describe our approach for identifying and evaluating active anticancer drugs through a process that enables rational translation from the lab to the clinic. The preclinical approach we discuss uses tumor subgroup-specific models of pediatric CNS tumors, cerebral microdialysis sampling of tumor extracellular fluid (tECF), and pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation to overcome challenges that currently hinder researchers in this field. This approach involves performing extensive systemic (plasma) and target site (CNS tumor) pharmacokinetic studies. Pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation of the data derived from these studies are then used to inform future decisions regarding drug administration, including dosage and schedule. Here, we also present how our approach was used to examine two FDA approved drugs, simvastatin and pemetrexed, as candidates for new therapies for pediatric CNS tumors. We determined that due to unfavorable pharmacokinetic characteristics and insufficient concentrations in tumor tissue in a mouse model of ependymoma, simvastatin would not be efficacious in further preclinical trials. In contrast to simvastatin, pemetrexed was advanced to preclinical efficacy studies after our studies determined that plasma exposures were similar to those in humans treated at similar tolerable dosages and adequate unbound concentrations were found in tumor tissue of medulloblastoma-bearing mice. Generally speaking, the high clinical failure rates for CNS drug candidates can be partially explained by the fact that therapies are often moved into clinical trials without extensive and rational preclinical studies to optimize the transition. Our approach addresses this limitation by using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of data generated from appropriate in vivo models to

  5. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  6. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-03-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials.

  7. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Afatinib.

    PubMed

    Wind, Sven; Schnell, David; Ebner, Thomas; Freiwald, Matthias; Stopfer, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Afatinib is an oral, irreversible ErbB family blocker that covalently binds to the kinase domains of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human EGFRs (HER) 2, and HER4, resulting in irreversible inhibition of tyrosine kinase autophosphorylation. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with advanced solid tumours have shown that once-daily afatinib has time-independent pharmacokinetic characteristics. Maximum plasma concentrations of afatinib are reached approximately 2-5 h after oral administration and thereafter decline, at least bi-exponentially. Food reduces total exposure to afatinib. Over the clinical dose range of 20-50 mg, afatinib exposure increases slightly more than dose proportional. Afatinib metabolism is minimal, with unchanged drug predominantly excreted in the faeces and approximately 5 % in urine. Apart from the parent drug afatinib, the major circulation species in human plasma are the covalently bound adducts to plasma protein. The effective elimination half-life is approximately 37 h, consistent with an accumulation of drug exposure by 2.5- to 3.4-fold based on area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) after multiple dosing. The pharmacokinetic profile of afatinib is consistent across a range of patient populations. Age, ethnicity, smoking status and hepatic function had no influence on afatinib pharmacokinetics, while females and patients with low body weight had increased exposure to afatinib. Renal function is correlated with afatinib exposure, but, as for sex and body weight, the effect size for patients with severe renal impairment (approximately 50 % increase in AUC) is only mildly relative to the extent of unexplained interpatient variability in afatinib exposure. Afatinib has a low potential as a victim or perpetrator of drug-drug interactions, especially with cytochrome P450-modulating agents. However, concomitant treatment with potent inhibitors or inducers of the P-glycoprotein transporter can affect the

  8. Pharmacokinetic enhancers in HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kajal B; Wang, Kun; Delille, Cecile; Otofokun, Igho; Acosta, Edward P

    2014-10-01

    Maximal and durable viral load suppression is one of the most important goals of HIV therapy and is directly related to adequate drug exposure. Protease inhibitors (PIs), an important component of the antiretroviral armada, were historically associated with poor oral bioavailability and high pill burden. However, because the PIs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A enzymes, intentional inhibition of these enzymes leads to higher drug exposure, lower pill burden, and therefore simplified dosing schedules with this class of drug. This is the basis of pharmacokinetic enhancement. In HIV therapy, two pharmacokinetic enhancers or boosting agents are used: ritonavir and cobicistat. Both agents inhibit CYP3A4, with cobicistat being a more specific CYP inhibitor than ritonavir. Unlike ritonavir, cobicistat does not have antiretroviral activity. Cobicistat has been evaluated in clinical trials and was recently approved in the USA as a fixed-dose combination with the integrase inhibitor, elvitegravir and two nucleos(t)ide analogs. Additional studies are examining cobicistat in fixed-dose combinations with various PIs. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of these agents and clinically relevant drug regimens and ongoing trials. Studies with elvitegravir and the novel PI TMC319011 are also discussed.

  9. Translation Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2004-10-01

    Translation matrices together with rotation and boost matrices combine to represent spacetime symmetry transformations. A brief introduction to some of the properties of some not-so-well-known translation and momentum matrices is presented.

  10. Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for in vivo inhalation gas uptake data exposure in female B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.V.; Caldwell, J.C.

    2010-05-01

    Dichloromethane (DCM, methylene chloride) is a lipophilic volatile compound readily absorbed and then metabolized to several metabolites that may lead to chronic toxicity in different target organs. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are useful tools for calculation of internal and target organ doses of parent compound and metabolites. PBPK models, coupled with in vivo inhalation gas-uptake data, can be useful to estimate total metabolism. Previously, such an approach was used to make predictions regarding the metabolism and to make subsequent inferences of DCM's mode of action for toxicity. However, current evidence warrants re-examination of this approach. The goal of this work was to examine two different hypotheses for DCM metabolism in mice. One hypothesis describes two metabolic pathways: one involving cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and a second glutathione (GSH). The second metabolic hypothesis describes only one pathway mediated by CYP2E1 that includes multiple binding sites. The results of our analysis show that the in vivo gas-uptake data fit both hypotheses well and the traditional analysis of the chamber concentration data is not sufficient to distinguish between them. Gas-uptake data were re-analyzed by construction of a velocity plot as a function of increasing DCM initial concentration. The velocity (slope) analysis revealed that there are two substantially different phases in velocity, one rate for lower exposures and a different rate for higher exposures. The concept of a 'metabolic switch,' namely that due to conformational changes in the enzyme after one site is occupied - a different metabolic rate is seen - is also consistent with the experimental data. Our analyses raise questions concerning the importance of GSH metabolism for DCM. Recent research results also question the importance of this pathway in the toxicity of DCM. GSH-related DNA adducts were not formed after in vivo DCM exposure in mice and DCM-induced DNA damage has

  11. Attributed Translations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P. M.; Rosenkrantz, D. J.; Stearns, R. E.

    Attributed translation grammars are introduced as a means of specifying a translation from strings of input symbols to strings of output symbols. Each of these symbols can have a finite set of attributes, each of which can take on a value from a possibly infinite set. Attributed translation grammars can be applied in depth to practical compiling problems.

  12. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice.

  13. Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling for in vivo inhalation gas uptake data exposure in female B6C3F1 mice *

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloromethane (DCM, methylene chloride) is a lipophilic volatile compound readily absorbed and then metabolized to several metabolites that may lead to chronic toxicity in different target organs. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are useful tools used for cal...

  14. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  15. High Throughput Pharmacokinetics for Environmental Chemicals (FutureToxII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models are critical to determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. For bioactivity identified in vitro (e.g. ToxCast) – hazardous or not – PK models can forecast exposure thresholds, below which no significant bio...

  16. Pharmacokinetics and Exposure-response Relationship of Golimumab in Patients with Moderately-to-Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis: Results from Phase 2/3 PURSUIT Induction and Maintenance Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenhua; Marano, Colleen W.; Strauss, Richard; Zhang, Hongyan; Johanns, Jewel; Zhou, Honghui; Davis, Hugh M.; Reinisch, Walter; Feagan, Brian G.; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sandborn, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: To assess golimumab pharmacokinetics [PK] and exposure-response [ER] in adults with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis [UC] from the Program of Ulcerative Colitis Research Studies Utilizing an Investigational Treatment [PURSUIT] studies. Methods: We analysed golimumab PK and ER data of patients with moderate-to-severe UC from the PURSUIT-subcutaneous induction [N = 1064] and maintenance [N = 464] studies. Induction analyses evaluated serum golimumab concentration [SGC] and efficacy data through Week [wk] 6 following subcutaneous doses at wk0 and wk2; maintenance analyses assessed data through wk54 following 4-weekly dosing. ER relationships were assessed using trend, logistic regression, and receiver-operating-characteristic curve analyses. Results: Median SGCs peaked at induction wk2 for golimumab 100/50mg, 200/100mg, and 400/200mg. Wk6 median SGCs were 0.78, 1.78, and 4.01 μg/ml, respectively. SGCs were sustained, reaching steady state approximately 8wks after golimumab maintenance commenced [wk14 of golimumab] regardless of induction dose. Median trough SGCs from maintenance wks8–44 ranged from 0.69 to 0.83 µg/ml [50 mg] and 1.33–1.58 µg/ml [100 mg]. SGCs were approximately dose proportional, and higher SGCs were associated with higher efficacy response rates during induction and maintenance. Factors associated with golimumab exposure were body weight, antibody-to-golimumab status, serum albumin, alkaline phosphatase, faecal markers, C-reactive protein, and pancolitis. SGCs of 2.5 µg/ml [induction wk6] and 1.4 µg/ml [maintenance steady-state trough] are potential target concentrations. Immunomodulators had no apparent impact on SGC with golimumab 100mg, whereas drug levels were slightly higher with golimumab 50mg with vs without immunomodulators. Conclusions: SGCs are approximately dose proportional, and a positive SGC-efficacy relationship exists during induction/maintenance golimumab treatment of adult UC patients. Optimal SGC

  17. Raltegravir Pharmacokinetics during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Watts, D. Heather; Stek, Alice; Best, Brookie M.; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Cressey, Tim R.; Aweeka, Francesca; Lizak, Patty; Kreitchmann, Regis; Burchett, Sandra K.; Shapiro, David E.; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Smith, Elizabeth; Mirochnick, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the pharmacokinetics (pk) of raltegravir in HIV-infected women during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT 1026s is an on-going prospective study of antiretroviral pk during pregnancy (NCT00042289). Women receiving 400 mg raltegravir twice daily in combination antiretroviral therapy had intensive steady state 12-hour pk profiles performed during pregnancy and at 6–12 weeks postpartum. Targets were trough concentration above 0.035 µg/mL, the estimated tenth percentile in non-pregnant historical controls. Results Median raltegravir AUC was 6.6 µg*hr/mL for second trimester (n= 16), 5.4 µg*hr/mL for third trimester (n=41), and 11.6 µg*hr/mL postpartum (n= 38) (p=0.03 pp vs 2nd trimester, p=0.001 pp vs third trimester). Trough concentrations were above the target in 69%, 80%, and 79% of second trimester, third trimester and postpartum subjects respectively, with wide variability (<0.010–0.917 µg/mL), and no significant difference between third trimester and postpartum trough concentrations was detected. The median ratio of cord blood/maternal raltegravir concentrations was 1.5. HIV RNA levels were < 400 copies/mL in 92% of women at delivery. Adverse events included elevated liver transaminases in one woman and vomiting in one. All infants with known status are HIV-uninfected. Conclusions Median raltegravir AUC was reduced by approximately 50% during pregnancy; trough concentrations were frequently below target both during late pregnancy and postpartum. Raltegravir readily crossed the placenta. High rates of viral suppression at delivery and the lack of a clear relationship between raltegravir concentration and virologic effect in nonpregnant adults suggest that despite the decreased exposure during pregnancy, a higher dose is not necessary. PMID:25162818

  18. Validation and Application of Pharmacokinetic Models for Interspecies Extrapolations in Toxicity Risk Assessments of Volatile Organics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-23

    intake ( ADI ) for several short-chain aliphatic halocarbon VOCs (Federal Register, 1984). Unfortunately, there is a limited pharmacokinetic and...exposures, single oral bolus administration, and gastric infusion of PER. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) computer simulation model was...PHARHAGOKINETICS OF INHLED DCE IN RATS -,I. STUDIES OF THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF INGESTED TRI, TCE, DGE VII. EVALUATION OF THE RELATIVE ROLE OF PROPENSITY FOR

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Hiemenz, John; Ma, Lei; Keirns, James J; Buell, Donald N; Drusano, George L

    2008-03-01

    We performed population pharmacokinetic analysis of micafungin in adult patients treated with doses between 12.5 and 200 mg/day. Our analysis identified a breakpoint patient weight of 66.3 kg above which serum clearance increased by approximately 50%. Patients with weight >66.3 kg may need larger doses to achieve similar exposures to those <66.3 kg. However, the clinical implications are still unknown.

  20. Ethanol Pharmacokinetics in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Kraft, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol has been used for years in neonatal and infant liquid medications, yet the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of ethanol in this vulnerable population have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness of ethanol use as an excipient in neonatal and infant medications and to provide insight, based on the available evidence, into clearance rates of ethanol in babies. We also discuss ethanol pharmacokinetics in adults, theoretical pharmacokinetic changes in neonates and infants as it may apply to ethanol disposition, and case reports involving ethanol exposure in neonates and infants. Materials and methods This study was a narrative review in which relevant papers were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed with the key words ethanol, infant, and newborninfant. Results It remains unclear what ethanol exposure is safe for neonates and infants. The Food and Drug Administration and American Academy of Pediatrics have both taken action, by either setting limits of ethanol content in over-the-counter medications or by recommending restricted exposure to ethanol-containing pediatric formulations. Conclusions Until the short- and long-term health effects of chronic ethanol administration can be further characterized, ethanol-containing medications should be used with caution. PMID:25379066

  1. Obstetric Pharmacokinetic Dosing Studies are Urgently Needed

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shelley A.; Best, Brookie M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is common and increasing. Physiologic changes during pregnancy may significantly alter the overall systemic drug exposure, necessitating dose changes. A search of PubMed for pharmacokinetic clinical trials showed 494 publications during pregnancy out of 35,921 total pharmacokinetic published studies (1.29%), from the late 1960s through August 31, 2013. Closer examination of pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women published since 2008 (81 studies) revealed that about a third of the trials were for treatment of acute labor and delivery issues, a third included studies of infectious disease treatment during pregnancy, and the remaining third were for varied ante-partum indications. Approximately, two-thirds of these recent studies were primarily funded by government agencies worldwide, one-quarter were supported by private non-profit foundations or combinations of government and private funding, and slightly <10% were supported by pharmaceutical industry. As highlighted in this review, vast gaps exist in pharmacology information and evidence for appropriate dosing of medications in pregnant women. This lack of knowledge and understanding of drug disposition throughout pregnancy place both the mother and the fetus at risk for avoidable therapeutic misadventures – suboptimal efficacy or excess toxicity – with medication use in pregnancy. Increased efforts to perform and support obstetric dosing and pharmacokinetic studies are greatly needed. PMID:24575394

  2. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  3. Rabbit as an animal model for intravitreal pharmacokinetics: Clinical predictability and quality of the published data.

    PubMed

    Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2015-08-01

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice in drug delivery to the retina and/or choroid. Rabbit is the most commonly used animal species in intravitreal pharmacokinetics, but it has been criticized as being a poor model of human eye. The critique is based on some anatomical differences, properties of the vitreous humor, and observed differences in drug concentrations in the anterior chamber after intravitreal injections. We have systematically analyzed all published information on intravitreal pharmacokinetics in the rabbit and human eye. The analysis revealed major problems in the design of the pharmacokinetic studies. In this review we provide advice for study design. Overall, the pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution, half-life) in the human and rabbit eye have good correlation and comparable absolute values. Therefore, reliable rabbit-to-man translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics should be feasible. The relevant anatomical and physiological parameters in rabbit and man show only small differences. Furthermore, the claimed discrepancy between drug concentrations in the human and rabbit aqueous humor is not supported by the data analysis. Based on the available and properly conducted pharmacokinetic studies, the differences in the vitreous structure in rabbits and human patients do not lead to significant pharmacokinetic differences. This review is the first step towards inter-species translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics. More information is still needed to dissect the roles of drug delivery systems, disease states, age and ocular manipulation on the intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbit and man. Anyway, the published data and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the rabbit is a useful animal model in intravitreal pharmacokinetics.

  4. Binary translation using peephole translation rules

    DOEpatents

    Bansal, Sorav; Aiken, Alex

    2010-05-04

    An efficient binary translator uses peephole translation rules to directly translate executable code from one instruction set to another. In a preferred embodiment, the translation rules are generated using superoptimization techniques that enable the translator to automatically learn translation rules for translating code from the source to target instruction set architecture.

  5. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  6. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  7. A CONSISTENT APPROACH FOR THE APPLICATION OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING IN CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling provides important capabilities for improving the reliability of the extrapolations across dose, species, and exposure route that are generally required in chemical risk assessment regardless of the toxic endpoint being consid...

  8. SYMBOLS IN PHARMACOKINETICS1

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Malcolm; Tucker, Geoffrey

    1982-01-01

    To encourage uniformity in the presentation of pharmacokinetic data, a general nomenclature has been developed. The system has wide application. Flexibility is achieved through the use of general variables, constants, qualifying terms and subscripts. Yet, through the use of implied terms, the symbols describing many common variables and constants are simple.

  9. Lumping in pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Brochot, Céline; Tóth, János; Bois, Frédéric Y

    2005-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models simplify biological complexity by dividing the body into interconnected compartments. The time course of the chemical's amount (or concentration) in each compartment is then expressed as a system of ordinary differential equations. The complexity of the resulting system of equations can rapidly increase if a precise description of the organism is needed. However, difficulties arise when the PK model contains more variables and parameters than comfortable for mathematical and computational treatment. To overcome such difficulties, mathematical lumping methods are new and powerful tools. Such methods aim at reducing a differential system by aggregating several variables into one. Typically, the lumped model is still a differential equation system, whose variables are interpretable in terms of variables of the original system. In practice, the reduced model is usually required to satisfy some constraints. For example, it may be necessary to keep state variables of interest for prediction unlumped. To accommodate such constraints, constrained lumping methods have are also available. After presenting the theory, we study, here, through practical examples, the potential of such methods in toxico/pharmacokinetics. As a tutorial, we first simplify a 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model by symbolic lumping. We then explore the reduction of a 6-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for 1,3-butadiene with numerical constrained lumping. The lumping methods presented here can be easily automated, and are applicable to first-order ordinary differential equation systems.

  10. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  11. Pharmacokinetics of a pyrethroid insecticide mixture in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used and co-occur in the environment, in residences and day care facilities. Pharmacokinetic models of pyrethroids and assessment of risk from their exposure would be better informed if data are derived from studies using chemical mixtures. The objecti...

  12. Effect of N-methyl deuteration on metabolism and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinfang; Pang, Xuehai; Li, Liang; Dai, Xiaojian; Diao, Xingxing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Dafang; Wang, Yingwei; Chen, Yuanwei

    2016-01-01

    Background The replacement of hydrogen with deuterium invokes a kinetic isotope effect. Thus, this method is an attractive way to slow down the metabolic rate and modulate pharmacokinetics. Purpose Enzalutamide (ENT) acts as a competitive inhibitor of the androgen receptor and has been approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2012. To attenuate the N-demethylation pathway, hydrogen atoms of the N–CH3 moiety were replaced by the relatively stable isotope deuterium, which showed similar pharmacological activities but exhibited favorable pharmacokinetic properties. Methods We estimated in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters for ENT and its deuterated analog (d3-ENT). For in vitro studies, intrinsic primary isotope effects (KH/KD) were determined by the ratio of intrinsic clearance (CLint) obtained for ENT and d3-ENT. The CLint values were obtained by the substrate depletion method. For in vivo studies, ENT and d3-ENT were orally given to male Sprague Dawley rats separately and simultaneously to assess the disposition and metabolism of them. We also investigated the main metabolic pathway of ENT by comparing the rate of oxidation and hydrolysis in vitro. Results The in vitro CLint (maximum velocity/Michaelis constant [Vmax/Km]) of d3-ENT in rat and human liver microsomes were 49.7% and 72.9% lower than those of the non-deuterated compound, corresponding to the KH/KD value of ~2. The maximum observed plasma concentration, Cmax, and area under the plasma concentration -time curve from time zero to the last measurable sampling time point (AUC0–t) were 35% and 102% higher than those of ENT when orally administered to rats (10 mg/kg). The exposure of the N-demethyl metabolite M2 was eightfold lower, whereas that of the amide hydrolysis metabolite M1 and other minor metabolites was unchanged. The observed hydrolysis rate of M2 was at least ten times higher than that of ENT and d3-ENT

  13. USE OF EXPOSURE-RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) FOR ASSESSMENT OF AGGREGATE EXPOSURE OF INFANT AND CHILDREN TO N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed within the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework to investigate selected exposure inputs related to recognized exposure scenarios of infants and children to N-methyl carbamate pesticides as spec...

  14. Circulating factors induce coronary endothelial cell activation following exposure to inhaled diesel exhaust and nitrogen dioxide in humans: Evidence from a novel translational in vitro model**

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vascular toxicity of inhaled agents may be caused by soluble factors that are released into the systemic circulation. To confirm this in a straightforward manner, we obtained plasma from healthy human volunteers before and after exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and nitrogen di...

  15. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nianhang; Zhou, Simon; Palmisano, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Lenalidomide is a lead therapeutic in multiple myeloma and deletion 5q myelodysplastic syndromes and shows promising activities in other hematologic malignancies. This article presents a comprehensive review of the clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lenalidomide. Oral lenalidomide is rapidly and highly absorbed (>90 % of dose) under fasting conditions. Food affects oral absorption, reducing area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) by 20 % and maximum concentration (C max) by 50 %. The increase in AUC and C max is dose proportional, and interindividual variability in plasma exposure is low to moderate. Lenalidomide distributes into semen but is undetectable 3 days after stopping treatment. Biotransformation of lenalidomide in humans includes chiral inversion, trivial hydroxylation, and slow non-enzymatic hydrolysis. Approximately 82 % of an oral dose is excreted as lenalidomide in urine within 24 h. Lenalidomide has a short half-life (3-4 h) and does not accumulate in plasma upon repeated dosing. Its pharmacokinetics are consistent across patient populations, regardless of the type of hematologic malignancy. Renal function is the only important factor affecting lenalidomide plasma exposure. Lenalidomide has no QT prolongation risk at approved doses, and higher plasma exposure to lenalidomide is associated with increased risk of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Despite being a weak substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro, lenalidomide does not have clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with P-gp substrates/inhibitors in controlled studies. The AUC-matched dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment at the start of therapy. No dose adjustment for lenalidomide is needed on the basis of age, ethnicity, mild hepatic impairment, or drug-drug interactions.

  16. Pharmacokinetic consequences of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a wide range of physiological and biochemical changes, including disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function, fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory dynamics, and organ blood flow, as well as hormonal and metabolic perturbations. Any of these changes can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of in-flight medication. That spaceflight may alter bioavailability was proposed when drugs prescribed to alleviate space motion sickness (SMS) had little therapeutic effect. Characterization of the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of operationally critical medications is crucial for their effective use in flight; as a first step, we sought to determine whether drugs administered in space actually reach the site of action at concentrations sufficient to elicit the therapeutic response.

  17. Antifungal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lepak, Alexander J; Andes, David R

    2014-11-10

    Successful treatment of infectious diseases requires choice of the most suitable antimicrobial agent, comprising consideration of drug pharmacokinetics (PK), including penetration into infection site, pathogen susceptibility, optimal route of drug administration, drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, and drug toxicity. Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies consider these variables and have been useful in drug development, optimizing dosing regimens, determining susceptibility breakpoints, and limiting toxicity of antifungal therapy. Here the concepts of antifungal PK/PD studies are reviewed, with emphasis on methodology and application. The initial sections of this review focus on principles and methodology. Then the pharmacodynamics of each major antifungal drug class (polyenes, flucytosine, azoles, and echinocandins) is discussed. Finally, the review discusses novel areas of pharmacodynamic investigation in the study and application of combination therapy.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of levodopa.

    PubMed

    Contin, Manuela; Martinelli, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews the clinically relevant determinants of levodopa peripheral pharmacokinetics and main observed changes in the levodopa concentration-effect relationship with Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Available clinically practical strategies to optimise levodopa pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are briefly discussed. Levodopa shows particular pharmacokinetics including an extensive presystemic metabolism, overcome by the combined use of extracerebral inhibitors of the enzyme L: -amino acid decarboxylase and rapid absorption in the proximal small bowel by a saturable facilitated transport system shared with other large neutral amino acids. Drug transport from plasma to the brain is mediated by the same carriers operating in the intestinal mucosa. The main strategies to assure reproducibility of both intestinal absorption and delivery to the brain, and the clinical effect include standardization of levodopa dosing with respect to meal times and a controlled dietary protein intake. Levodopa plasma half-life is very short, resulting in marked plasma drug concentration fluctuations which are matched, as the disease progresses, to swings in the therapeutic response ("wearing-off" phenomena). "Wearing-off" phenomena can also be associated, at the more advanced disease stages, with a "negative", both parkinsonism-exacerbating and dyskinetic effect of levodopa at low, subtherapeutic plasma concentrations. Dyskinesias may also be related to high-levodopa, excessive plasma concentrations. Recognition of the different levodopa toxic response patterns can be difficult on a clinical basis alone and simultaneous monitoring of the levodopa concentration-effect relationship may prove useful to disclose the underlying mechanism and in planning the correct management. Clinically practical strategies to optimise levodopa pharmacokinetics, and possibly its therapeutic response, include liquid drug solutions, controlled release formulations and the use of inhibitors

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of exenatide

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present analysis was to develop a core population pharmacokinetic model for the pharmacokinetic properties of immediate‐release (IR) exenatide, which can be used in subsequent analyses of novel sustained‐release formulations. Methods Data from eight clinical trials, evaluating a wide range of doses and different administration routes, were available for analysis. All modelling and simulations were conducted using the nonlinear mixed‐effect modelling program NONMEM. External model validation was performed using data from the phase III clinical trials programme through standard visual predictive checks. Results The pharmacokinetics of IR exenatide was described by a two‐compartment model, and the absorption of subcutaneous exenatide was described with a sequential zero‐order rate constant followed by a saturable nonlinear absorption process. Drug elimination was characterized by two parallel routes (linear and nonlinear), with significant relationships between renal function and the linear elimination route, and between body weight and volume of distribution. For a subject with normal renal function, the linear clearance was estimated to be 5.06 l hr−1. The nonlinear elimination was quantified with a Michaelis–Menten constant (K m) of 567 pg ml−1 and a maximum rate of metabolism (V max) of 1.6 μg h−1. For subcutaneous administration, 37% of the subcutaneous dose is absorbed via the zero‐order process, and the remaining 63% via the nonlinear pathway. Conclusions The present analysis provides a comprehensive population pharmacokinetic model for exenatide, expanding the elimination process to include both linear and nonlinear components, providing a suitable platform for a broad range of concentrations and patient conditions that can be leveraged in future modelling efforts of sustained‐release exenatide formulations. PMID:27650681

  20. Pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C

    1997-12-01

    Grepafloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic which is rapidly absorbed in healthy volunteers following oral dosing. It reaches peak plasma levels around 2 h after administration, then declines bi-exponentially, with an extended half-life of around 12 h. Grepafloxacin is eliminated primarily through metabolism and is excreted mainly in the faeces. Renal clearance accounts for only 10-15% of the administered dose. Grepafloxacin plasma concentrations increase disproportionately with increasing doses, but this is unlikely to be of clinical significance over the range of therapeutic doses. The rate and extent of absorption are not affected by food or elevated intragastric pH. The pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin are affected by gender, with these differences relating to variations in body weight. No effect of age on the pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin was found. Renal impairment does not affect grepafloxacin pharmacokinetics, whereas peak plasma concentrations, areas under plasma concentration-time curves and renal excretion are increased in patients with hepatic impairment. Grepafloxacin can be co-administered with warfarin and theophylline, though reduction of the theophylline dose is necessary. Following oral administration, higher grepafloxacin concentrations are achieved in lung and genital tissues than in serum, indicating its potential in the treatment of respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases. In addition, it exceeds therapeutically effective levels in bile and gall-bladder tissues, and accumulates in polymorphonuclear leucocytes such that it may be useful against intracellular pathogens.

  1. Systematic Assessment of the Benefits and Caveats in Mining Microbial Post-Translational Modifications from Shotgun Proteomic Data; Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromate Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2008-01-01

    Microbes are known to regulate both gene expression and protein activity through the use of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Common PTMs involved in cellular signaling and gene control include methylations, acetylations, and phosphorylations; whereas oxidations have been implicated as an indicator for stress. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative bacterium that demonstrates both respiratory versatility and the ability to sense and adapt to diverse environmental conditions. The dataset used in this study consisted of tandem mass spectra derived from mid-log phase aerobic cultures of S. oneidensis shocked either with or without 1 mM chromate [Cr(VI)]. In this study, three algorithms (DBDigger, Sequest, and InsPecT) were evaluated for their ability to scrutinize shotgun proteomic data for evidence of PTMs. The use of conservative scoring filters for peptides or proteins versus creating a sub-database first from a non-modification search was evaluated with DBDigger. The use of higher scoring filters for peptide identifications was found to result in optimal identifications of PTM peptides with a 2% false discovery rate (FDR) for the total dataset using the DBDigger algorithm. However, the FDR climbs to about 50% when considering PTM peptides only. Sequest was evaluated as a method for confirming PTM peptides putatively identified using DBDigger; however, there was a low identification rate (~25%) for the searched spectra. InsPecT was found to have a lower FDR (~9%) than DBDigger for PTM peptides. Comparisons between InsPecT and DBDigger were made with respect to both the FDR and PTM peptide identifications. As a demonstration of this approach, a number of S. oneidensis chemotaxis proteins as well as low-abundance signal transduction proteins were identified as being post-translationally modified in response to chromate challenge.

  2. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Paracetamol Uptake and Clearance in Zebrafish Larvae: Expanding the Allometric Scale in Vertebrates with Five Orders of Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Kantae, Vasudev; Krekels, Elke H.J.; Ordas, Anita; González, Oskar; van Wijk, Rob C.; Harms, Amy C.; Racz, Peter I.; van der Graaf, Piet H.; Spaink, Herman P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) are increasingly used to translate findings regarding drug efficacy and safety from in vitro-based assays to vertebrate species, including humans. However, the limited understanding of drug exposure in this species hampers its implementation in translational research. Using paracetamol as a paradigm compound, we present a novel method to characterize pharmacokinetic processes in zebrafish larvae, by combining sensitive bioanalytical methods and nonlinear mixed effects modeling. The developed method allowed quantification of paracetamol and its two major metabolites, paracetamol-sulfate and paracetamol-glucuronide in pooled samples of five lysed zebrafish larvae of 3 days post-fertilization. Paracetamol drug uptake was quantified to be 0.289 pmole/min and paracetamol clearance was quantified to be 1.7% of the total value of the larvae. With an average volume determined to be 0.290 μL, this yields an absolute clearance of 2.96 × 107 L/h, which scales reasonably well with clearance rates in higher vertebrates. The developed methodology will improve the success rate of drug screens in zebrafish larvae and the translation potential of findings, by allowing the establishment of accurate exposure profiles and thereby also the establishment of concentration–effect relationships. PMID:27632065

  3. A bacterial transgene for catalase protects translation of d1 protein during exposure of salt-stressed tobacco leaves to strong light.

    PubMed

    Al-Taweel, Khaled; Iwaki, Toshio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murata, Norio; Wadano, Akira

    2007-09-01

    During photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII) in cyanobacteria, salt stress inhibits the repair of photodamaged PSII and, in particular, the synthesis of the D1 protein (D1). We investigated the effects of salt stress on the repair of PSII and the synthesis of D1 in wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Xanthi') and in transformed plants that harbored the katE gene for catalase from Escherichia coli. Salt stress due to NaCl enhanced the photoinhibition of PSII in leaf discs from both wild-type and katE-transformed plants, but the effect of salt stress was less significant in the transformed plants than in wild-type plants. In the presence of lincomycin, which inhibits protein synthesis in chloroplasts, the activity of PSII decreased rapidly and at similar rates in both types of leaf disc during photoinhibition, and the observation suggests that repair of PSII was protected by the transgene-coded enzyme. Incorporation of [(35)S]methionine into D1 during photoinhibition was inhibited by salt stress, and the transformation mitigated this inhibitory effect. Northern blotting revealed that the level of psbA transcripts was not significantly affected by salt stress or by the transformation. Our results suggest that salt stress enhanced photoinhibition by inhibiting repair of PSII and that the katE transgene increased the resistance of the chloroplast's translational machinery to salt stress by scavenging hydrogen peroxide.

  4. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability of fluindione in octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Comets, Emmanuelle; Diquet, Bertrand; Legrain, Sylvie; Huisse, Marie-Geneviève; Godon, Alban; Bruhat, Corinne; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Delpierre, Sandrine; Duval, Xavier; Berrut, Gilles; Verstuyft, Céline; Aumont, Marie-Claude; Mentré, France

    2012-01-01

    In the PREPA observational study, we investigated the factors influencing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability in the response to fluindione, an oral anticoagulant drug, in a general population of octogenarians inpatients. Measurements of fluindione concentrations and INR (International Normalised Ratio) were obtained from 131 inpatients initiating fluindione treatment. Treatment was adjusted according to routine clinical practice. The data was analysed using non-linear mixed effect models, and the parameters were estimated using MONOLIX 3.2. The pharmacokinetics of fluindione was monocompartmental, while the evolution of INR was modelled according to a turnover model (inhibition of vitamin K recycling). Interindividual variability was very large. Clearance decreased with age and with prior administration of cordarone. Patients who underwent surgery before the study had lower IC50, leading to an increased sensitivity to fluindione. Pharmacokinetic exposure is substantially increased in elderly patients, warranting a lower dose of fluindione. PMID:22472992

  5. A PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ESTIMATING ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Empirical evidence suggests that exposure of Americans to dioxin-like compounds was low during the early decades of the 20th century, then increased during the 1940s and 1950s reaching a peak in the 1960s and 1970s, and progressively decreased to lower levels in the 1980s and 1990s. Such evidence includes dioxin analysis of carbon-dated sediment cores of lakes and rivers, preserved meat samples from different decades of the 20th century, and limited body burden measurements of dioxin-like compounds. Pinsky and Lorber (1998) summarized studies measuring 2,3,7,8-TCDD in blood and adipose tissue finding a range of 10-20 pg/g (ppt) lipid during the 1970s, and 2-10 ppt lipid during the 1980s. This study reviews body burdens of dioxin toxic equivalents, TEQs, to find a range from about 50-80 ppt lipid during the 1970s, 30-50 ppt lipid during the 1980s, and 10-20 ppt lipid during the 1990s (TEQs comprised of the 17 dioxin and furan congeners only). Pinsky and Lorber (1998) investigated historical exposure trends for 2,3,7,8-TCDD by using a single-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model. The current study extends this prior effort by modeling dioxin TEQs instead of the single compound, 2,3,7,8-TCDD. TEQs are modeled as though they are a single compound, in contrast to an approach where the individual dioxin and furan congeners are modeled separately. It was found that body burdens of TEQs during the 1970s, 80s, and 90s could be modeled by assuming a histor

  6. Clinical pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2004-01-01

    Since 1989, eight new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been licensed for clinical use. Levetiracetam is the latest to be licensed and is used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of adult patients with partial seizures with or without secondary generalisation that are refractory to other established first-line AEDs. Pharmacokinetic studies of levetiracetam have been conducted in healthy volunteers, in adults, children and elderly patients with epilepsy, and in patients with renal and hepatic impairment. After oral ingestion, levetiracetam is rapidly absorbed, with peak concentration occurring after 1.3 hours, and its bioavailability is >95%. Co-ingestion of food slows the rate but not the extent of absorption. Levetiracetam is not bound to plasma proteins and has a volume of distribution of 0.5-0.7 L/kg. Plasma concentrations increase in proportion to dose over the clinically relevant dose range (500-5000 mg) and there is no evidence of accumulation during multiple administration. Steady-state blood concentrations are achieved within 24-48 hours. The elimination half-life in adult volunteers, adults with epilepsy, children with epilepsy and elderly volunteers is 6-8, 6-8, 5-7 and 10-11 hours, respectively. Approximately 34% of a levetiracetam dose is metabolised and 66% is excreted in urine unmetabolised; however, the metabolism is not hepatic but occurs primarily in blood by hydrolysis. Autoinduction is not a feature. As clearance is renal in nature it is directly dependent on creatinine clearance. Consequently, dosage adjustments are necessary for patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. To date, no clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions between AEDs and levetiracetam have been identified. Similarly, levetiracetam does not interact with digoxin, warfarin and the low-dose contraceptive pill; however, adverse pharmacodynamic interactions with carbamazepine and topiramate have been demonstrated. Overall, the pharmacokinetic characteristics of

  7. Fractional dynamics pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Verotta, Davide

    2010-06-01

    While an increasing number of fractional order integrals and differential equations applications have been reported in the physics, signal processing, engineering and bioengineering literatures, little attention has been paid to this class of models in the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) literature. One of the reasons is computational: while the analytical solution of fractional differential equations is available in special cases, it this turns out that even the simplest PKPD models that can be constructed using fractional calculus do not allow an analytical solution. In this paper, we first introduce new families of PKPD models incorporating fractional order integrals and differential equations, and, second, exemplify and investigate their qualitative behavior. The families represent extensions of frequently used PK link and PD direct and indirect action models, using the tools of fractional calculus. In addition the PD models can be a function of a variable, the active drug, which can smoothly transition from concentration to exposure, to hyper-exposure, according to a fractional integral transformation. To investigate the behavior of the models we propose, we implement numerical algorithms for fractional integration and for the numerical solution of a system of fractional differential equations. For simplicity, in our investigation we concentrate on the pharmacodynamic side of the models, assuming standard (integer order) pharmacokinetics.

  8. Pharmacokinetic study of Noni fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Issell, Brian F; Franke, Adrian; Fielding, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Many different products containing Noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit extracts are sold throughout the world for health restoration and maintenance. Despite a large business enterprise fueling Noni's popularity, there is a lack of standardization of products and no scientific evidence of Noni's clinical efficacy and safety. There is also no evidence to indicate an optimal therapeutic dose or dosing interval. In an initial volunteer, scopoletin was identified as a bioactive marker of Noni exposure and a candidate for product standardization and pharmacokinetic studies. Subsequently, capsules containing the whole freeze-dried fruit of Noni were orally administered to nine healthy volunteers (3 per group) at doses of 1,500 mg (3 × 500 mg), 2,000 mg (4 × 500 mg) and 2,500 mg (5 × 500 mg). Plasma and urine samples were obtained from each subject prior to dosing and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after dosing. Concentrations of scopoletin were determined by HPLC with PDA (scanning at 200-700 nm) and MS detection. Scopoletin rapidly enters the plasma after Noni ingestion, maintaining levels in the range of 0.5 to 5 ng/mL for at least 8 h after dosing. Scopoletin bioavailability appears to be low, with significant intersubject variability. We conclude that scopoletin can be used as a relatively specific marker of Noni exposure in the blood and particularly in urine when its pharmacokinetics is considered appropriately.

  9. [Pharmacokinetics of carbapenems].

    PubMed

    Suchánková, H; Rychlíčková, J; Urbánek, K

    2012-06-01

    Carbapenems, beta-lactam antibiotics, are ideal candidates for the treatment of serious nosocomial infections including sepsis for their exceptionally broad antibacterial spectrum and high efficiency. They are administered parenterally by intravenous infusion. Carbapenems penetrate well and rapidly into many different tissue compartments and the interstitial fluid. They are metabolized by renal dihydropeptidase-1. Therefore, imipenem must be co-administered with an inhibitor of dihydropeptidase-1. Other carbapenems registered in the Czech Republic (meropenem, ertapenem and doripenem) are more stable to this enzyme. Carbapenems are mainly eliminated via the kidneys and dose adjustment in patients with renal impairment is necessary. The elimination half-life of most carbapenems is around 1 hour with the exception of ertapenem, with 3.8-hour half-life, which allows its once-daily use. Carbapenems are a group of antibiotics with time-dependent effect. Their typical pharmaceutical property is a limited stability in solution after dilution. Administration in the prolonged infusion appears to be a convenient strategy to achieve higher efficiency. Pharmacokinetic parameters of carbapenems may vary individually, especially in critically ill patients and those treated by renal replacement therapy. Therefore, individualization of dosing regimens based on knowledge of pharmacokinetic parameters of individual patients may be useful.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of an Elevated Dosage of Micafungin in Premature Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P Brian; Walsh, Thomas J; Hope, William; Arrieta, Antonio; Takada, Akitsugu; Kovanda, Laura L; Kearns, Gregory L; Kaufman, David; Sawamoto, T; Buell, Donald N; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2009-01-01

    Background Determining the safety and pharmacokinetics of antifungal agents in neonates is important. A previous single-dose pharmacokinetic study of micafungin in neonates demonstrated that doses of 0.75 to 3 mg/kg produced lower plasma micafungin concentrations than in older patients because of increased apparent plasma clearance of micafungin in neonates. The primary objective of this study was to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of an increased (15 mg/kg/day) dose of micafungin. Methods A repeated dose, open-label pharmacokinetic and safety trial of intravenous micafungin in 12 preterm neonates > 48 hours of life with suspected systemic infections. Neonates received 15 mg/kg/day of micafungin for 5 days. Blood samples were drawn relative to either the fourth or fifth dose. Systemic exposure was assessed by examination of the plasma area under the curve. Results The median birth weight and gestational age of the neonates were 775 g and 27 weeks, respectively. No adverse events related to micafungin were detected. The mean area under the curve and clearance for the cohort was 437.5 μg · h/mL and 0.575 mL/min/kg, respectively. The calculated clearance and volume of distribution for neonates was greater than that observed in older children and adults. Conclusions These data suggest that 15 mg/kg dosing in premature neonates corresponds to an exposure of approximately 5 mg/kg in adults. No adverse events related to micafungin were observed. PMID:19319022

  11. Translator's preface.

    PubMed

    Lamiell, James T

    2013-08-01

    Presents a preface from James T. Lamiell, who translates Wilhelm Wundt's Psychology's Struggle for Existence (Die Psychologie im Kampf ums Dasein), in which Wundt advised against the impending divorce of psychology from philosophy, into English. Lamiell comments that more than a decade into the 21st century, it appears that very few psychologists have any interest at all in work at the interface of psychology and philosophy. He notes that one clear indication of this is that the Society for Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, which is Division 24 of the American Psychological Association (APA), remains one of the smallest of the APA's nearly 60 divisions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Elucidating the Plasma and Liver Pharmacokinetics of Simeprevir in Special Populations Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modelling.

    PubMed

    Snoeys, Jan; Beumont, Maria; Monshouwer, Mario; Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, Sivi

    2016-11-29

    The disposition of simeprevir (SMV) in humans is characterised by cytochrome P450 3A4 metabolism and hepatic uptake by organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1/3 (OATP1B1/3). This study was designed to investigate SMV plasma and liver exposure upon oral administration in subjects infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), in subjects of Japanese or Chinese origin, subjects with organ impairment and subjects with OATP genetic polymorphisms, using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling. Simulations showed that compared with healthy Caucasian subjects, SMV plasma exposure was 2.4-, 1.7-, 2.2- and 2.0-fold higher, respectively, in HCV-infected Caucasian subjects, in healthy Japanese, healthy Chinese and subjects with severe renal impairment. Further simulations showed that compared with HCV-infected Caucasian subjects, SMV plasma exposure was 1.6-fold higher in HCV-infected Japanese subjects. In subjects with OATP1B1 genetic polymorphisms, no noteworthy changes in SMV pharmacokinetics were observed. Simulations suggested that liver concentrations in Caucasians with HCV are 18 times higher than plasma concentrations.

  13. APPLICATION OF IN VITRO BIOTRANSFORMATION DATA AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING TO RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse biological effects of toxic substances are dependent upon the exposure concentration and the duration of exposure. Pharmacokinetic models can quantitatively relate the external concentration of a toxicant in the environment to the internal dose of the toxicant in the ...

  14. Application of in Vitro Biotransformation Data and Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse biological effects of toxic substances are dependent upon the exposure concentration and the duration of exposure. Pharmacokinetic models can quantitatively relate the external concentration of a toxicant in the environment to the internal dose of the toxicant in the ...

  15. Russian Translation.

    PubMed

    O'dette, R E

    1957-03-29

    This discussion has described the status of the large United States program for translation from the Russian. A partial description of what is being done or planned, and by whom, has been provided as a guide for those who wish to follow the subject further. The urge to pass on useful information has necessarily restricted the space which might also have been profitably devoted to the philosophic aspects of the problem. Although it is not said with any sense of pride in achievement-because much more remains to be done than has been done-it would seem fair to describe the current national translation activity, including all contributions to it, as a phenomenon. Phenomena in scientific communication are not common: a full appreciation of their significance requires more analysis than results from a simple listing of their outward characteristics. But a few observations might be made in conclusion. Most United States scientists probably feel that, as a nation, we are and should be world leaders in science, even though this feeling is neither nurtured nor expressed in a spirit of violent competition. If this assumption is allowed, the point which seems to remain is that the United States will not retain its position casually. Our scientists expect to maintain an awareness of the scientific achievements and failures of the other nations of the world. But we must especially become more aware of the advances of Soviet science, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The evidence points toward this last conclusion, regardless of whether one is concerned with the production of ideas or things, increase in man's knowledge of himself and his environment, conflict between idealisms, or simply the national security.

  16. Translating Translations: Selecting and Using Translated Early Childhood Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Rosa Milagros; Lee, Sung Yoon; Valdivia, Rebeca; Zhang, Chun

    2001-01-01

    This article provides early intervention professionals with strategies for selecting and using translated materials. It stresses the importance of considering both the intended audience of the material and the quality of the translation itself. The article notes that many Web-based translator programs fail to capture the idiomatic usage or…

  17. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus.

  18. Clinical pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Ron J; Huitema, Alwin D R; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2010-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used in the treatment of various diseases for over 20 years and combine high specificity with generally low toxicity. Their pharmacokinetic properties differ markedly from those of non-antibody-type drugs, and these properties can have important clinical implications. mAbs are administered intravenously, intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Oral administration is precluded by the molecular size, hydrophilicity and gastric degradation of mAbs. Distribution into tissue is slow because of the molecular size of mAbs, and volumes of distribution are generally low. mAbs are metabolized to peptides and amino acids in several tissues, by circulating phagocytic cells or by their target antigen-containing cells. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from degradation by binding to protective receptors (the neonatal Fc-receptor [FcRn]), which explains their long elimination half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Population pharmacokinetic analyses have been applied in assessing covariates in the disposition of mAbs. Both linear and nonlinear elimination have been reported for mAbs, which is probably caused by target-mediated disposition. Possible factors influencing elimination of mAbs include the amount of the target antigen, immune reactions to the antibody and patient demographics. Bodyweight and/or body surface area are generally related to clearance of mAbs, but clinical relevance is often low. Metabolic drug-drug interactions are rare for mAbs. Exposure-response relationships have been described for some mAbs. In conclusion, the parenteral administration, slow tissue distribution and long elimination half-life are the most pronounced clinical pharmacokinetic characteristics of mAbs.

  19. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Chlorpyrifos versus its Major Metabolites Following Oral Administration in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Campbell, James A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Barr, Dana; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-31

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a commonly used diethylphosphorothionate organophosphorus (OP) insecticide. Diethylphosphate (DEP), diethylthiophosphate (DETP) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) are products of in vivo metabolism and environmental degradation of CPF and are routinely measured in urine as biomarkers of exposure. Hence, urinary biomonitoring of TCPy, DEP and DETP may be reflective of an individual’s contact with both the parent pesticide and exposure to these metabolites. In the current study, simultaneous dosing of 13C- or 2H- isotopically labeled CPF (13Clabeled CPF, 5 13C on the TCPy ring; or 2H-labeled CPF, diethyl-D10 (deuterium labeled) on the side chain) were exploited to directly compare the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of CPF with TCPy, and DETP. Individual metabolites were co-administered (oral gavage) with the parent compound at equal molar doses (14 μmol/kg; ~5mg/kg CPF). The key objective in the current study was to quantitatively evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the individual metabolites relative to their formation following a dose of CPF. Major differences in the pharmacokinetics between CPF and metabolites doses were observed within the first 3 h of exposure, due to the required metabolism of CPF to initially form TCPy and DETP. Nonetheless, once a substantial amount of CPF has been metabolized (≥ 3 h post-dosing) pharmacokinetics for both treatment groups and metabolites were very comparable. Urinary excretion rates for orally administered TCPy and DETP relative to 13C-CPF or 2H-CPF derived 13C-TCPy and 2H-DETP were consistent with blood pharmacokinetics, and the urinary clearance of metabolite dosed groups were comparable with the results for the 13C- and 2H-CPF groups. Since the pharmacokinetics of the individual metabolites were not modified by co-exposure to 3 CPF; it suggests that environmental exposure to low dose mixtures of pesticides and metabolites will not impact the pharmacokinetics of either.

  20. Phthalates: European regulation, chemistry, pharmacokinetic and related toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ventrice, Pasquale; Ventrice, Domenica; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-07-01

    Phthalates are chemicals widely used in industry and the consequences for human health caused by exposure to these agents are of significant current interest. Phthalate toxicity targets the reproductive and respiratory systems primarily, but they also may be involved in the processes of carcinogenesis and even in autism spectrum disorders. This article discusses the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in organ toxicity of phthalates; furthermore, pharmacokinetic, chemistry and the European regulation are summarized.

  1. Relevance of pharmacokinetic parameters in animal models of methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Cho, A K; Melega, W P; Kuczenski, R; Segal, D S

    2001-02-01

    Although the behavioral consequences of methamphetamine (METH) abuse have been extensively documented, a more precise and thorough understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms still requires the use of animal models. To study these biochemical processes in experimental animals requires consideration for the broad range of human METH abuse patterns and the many factors that have been identified to profoundly influence the behavioral and neurochemical effects of exposure to METH-like stimulants. One potentially critical issue relates to pharmacokinetic differences between the species. In this review, METH plasma pharmacokinetic profiles after single and multiple dose intravenous METH administration are compared for the rat and human. Significant differences in elimination half-life between the two species (t1/2: rat-70 min, human-12 h) result in markedly dissimilar profiles of METH exposure. However, the plasma profile of a human METH binge pattern can be approximated in the rat by increasing METH dose frequency. Consideration of METH pharmacokinetics in animal models should permit a closer simulation of the temporal profile of METH exposure in the human CNS and should provide further insight into the mechanisms contributing to the addiciton and psychopathology associated with METH abuse.

  2. Methods to identify and characterize developmental neurotoxicity for human health risk assessment. III: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, D C; Allen, S L; Byczkowski, J Z; Claudio, L; Fisher, J E; Fisher, J W; Harry, G J; Li, A A; Makris, S L; Padilla, S; Sultatos, L G; Mileson, B E

    2001-01-01

    We review pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that should be considered in the design and interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity studies. Toxicologic effects on the developing nervous system depend on the delivered dose, exposure duration, and developmental stage at which exposure occurred. Several pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) govern chemical disposition within the dam and the nervous system of the offspring. In addition, unique physical features such as the presence or absence of a placental barrier and the gradual development of the blood--brain barrier influence chemical disposition and thus modulate developmental neurotoxicity. Neonatal exposure may depend on maternal pharmacokinetic processes and transfer of the xenobiotic through the milk, although direct exposure may occur through other routes (e.g., inhalation). Measurement of the xenobiotic in milk and evaluation of biomarkers of exposure or effect following exposure can confirm or characterize neonatal exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models that incorporate these and other determinants can estimate tissue dose and biologic response following in utero or neonatal exposure. These models can characterize dose--response relationships and improve extrapolation of results from animal studies to humans. In addition, pharmacologic data allow an experimenter to determine whether exposure to the test chemical is adequate, whether exposure occurs during critical periods of nervous system development, whether route and duration of exposure are appropriate, and whether developmental neurotoxicity can be differentiated from direct actions of the xenobiotic. PMID:11250810

  3. Pharmacokinetics and derivation of an anticancer dosing regimen for the novel anti-cancer agent isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ), a NQO1 bioactivatable molecule, in the domestic felid species.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Alycen P; Francis, Joshua M; Pajak, Malgorzata; Parkinson, Elizabeth I; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Rosol, Thomas J; Brown, Megan E; London, Cheryl A; Dirikolu, Levent; Hergenrother, Paul J; Fan, Timothy M

    2016-12-14

    Isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ) is a selective substrate for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), an enzyme overexpressed in many solid tumors. Following activation by NQO1, IB-DNQ participates in a catalytic futile reduction/reoxidation cycle with consequent toxic reactive oxygen species generation within the tumor microenvironment. To elucidate the potential of IB-DNQ to serve as a novel anticancer agent, in vitro studies coupled with in vivo pharmacokinetic and toxicologic investigations in the domestic felid species were conducted to investigate the tractability of IB-DNQ as a translationally applicable anticancer agent. First, using feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as a comparative cancer model, expressions of NQO1 were characterized in not only human, but also feline OSCC tissue microarrays. Second, IB-DNQ mediated cytotoxicity in three immortalized feline OSCC cell lines were studied under dose-dependent and sequential exposure conditions. Third, the feasibility of administering IB-DNQ at doses predicted to achieve cytotoxic plasma concentrations and biologically relevant durations of exposure were investigated through pharmacokinetic and tolerability studies in healthy research felines. Intravenous administration of IB-DNQ at 1.0-2.0 mg/kg achieved peak plasma concentrations and durations of exposure reaching or exceeding predicted in vitro cytotoxic concentrations. Clinical adverse side effects including ptyalism and tachypnea exhibited during and post-IV infusion of IB-DNQ were transient and tolerable. Additionally, IB-DNQ administration did not produce acute or delayed-onset unacceptable hematologic, non-hematologic, or off-target oxidative toxicities. Collectively, the findings reported here within provide important safety and pharmacokinetic data to support the continued development of IB-DNQ as a novel anticancer strategy for NQO1 expressing cancers.

  4. Metoprolol Dose Equivalence in Adult Men and Women Based on Gender Differences: Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses and publications over the past 15 years have provided evidence showing there are considerable gender differences in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol. Throughout this time, there have not been any research articles proposing a gender stratified dose-adjustment resulting in an equivalent total drug exposure. Metoprolol pharmacokinetic data was obtained from a previous publication. Data was modeled using nonlinear mixed effect modeling using the MONOLIX software package to quantify metoprolol concentration–time data. Gender-stratified dosing simulations were conducted to identify equivalent total drug exposure based on a 100 mg dose in adults. Based on the pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations, a 50 mg dose in adult women provides an approximately similar metoprolol drug exposure to a 100 mg dose in adult men. PMID:28035289

  5. Pharmacokinetics and PBPK Models

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A.

    2010-07-01

    Since the landmark report Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (NRC 1993), children at all stages of development, from fertilization through postnatal maturation, have explicitly been identified as an area of emphasis in human health risk assessments. Exposure to drugs or chemicals at any point in development has the potential for causing irreversible changes that can be unique to each stage of development (Grabowski and Daston 1983; Rodier 1978; Wilson 1973). While exposures of a developing embryo or fetus are mediated by the mother, postnatal exposures consist of maternal influences via breastfeeding as well as environmental factors (Figure 1). As a result, risk assessments for developmental toxicity must consider the sources as well as timing of potential exposures to adequately protect children when they may be the most exposed or the most sensitive to adverse consequences (NRC 1993).

  6. Translation Theory and Translation Studies in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Qin

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is a comparative study of "translation theory" and "translation studies" in China and the West. Its focus is to investigate whether there is translation theory in the Chinese tradition. My study begins with an examination of the debate in China over whether there has already existed a system of translation…

  7. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intrathecal ziconotide in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel; Drass, Michael; Ellis, David; Mayo, Martha; McGuire, Dawn; O'Connell, Damian; Hale, Victoria; Chao, Stella

    2003-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ziconotide were assessed over a 48-hour period following intrathecal (i.t.) administration (1, 5, 7.5, or 10 micrograms) to 22 patients with chronic, nonmalignant pain. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained over a 24-hour period. Analgesic efficacy was monitored using Visual Analog Scale of Pain Intensity (VASPI) and Category Pain Relief Scores (CPRS) measurements. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated by noncompartmental methods. Plasma ziconotide data were insufficient for PK calculations. In CSF, the median half-life of ziconotide was 4.5 hours. The median CSF clearance and volume of distribution were 0.26 mL/min and 99 mL, respectively. CSF pharmacokinetics of ziconotide were linear, based on cumulative exposure and peak CSF concentrations. A dose-related analgesia was observed. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic efficacy and safety analyses showed that higher CSF ziconotide concentrations were generally associated with analgesia and increased incidence of nervous system adverse events following a 1-hour i.t. infusion.

  9. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Antiretroviral Drugs in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, John C.; Erlandson, Kristine Mace

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy has enabled HIV infected persons to reach older ages in high numbers. Hepatic and renal changes that normally occur with advancing age occur earlier and with higher incidence in HIV-infected individuals. A limited number of prospective controlled studies have demonstrated small reductions (17% to 41%) in lopinavir, atazanavir, and lamivudine clearance in older versus younger adults. A much larger number of retrospective studies in adults (age range ~20 to 60 years), including all antiretroviral drugs, have evaluated age as a covariate for pharmacokinetics. Most studies did not detect substantial associations between drug exposures and age. Areas Covered This review summarizes antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics in older persons. The authors review articles from PubMed (search terms: elderly, antiretroviral, pharmacokinetics) in addition to the bibliographies of those selected. Expert Opinion The evidence to date does not support major pharmacokinetic changes in adults between ~20 and 60 years of age. However, additional prospective, well-controlled studies are needed in more persons > 60 years, including those with frailty and comorbidities, with assessment of unbound drug clearance, and incorporation of adherence, pharmacogenetics, and concomitant medications. Until then, guidelines for drug-drug interactions and dosing in renal and hepatic impairment should be followed in older HIV infected individuals. PMID:23514375

  10. Pharmacokinetic study of sulbactomax.

    PubMed

    Payasi, Anurag; Chaudhary, Manu; Gupta, Ankush; Dwivedi, Vivek Kumar; Bhatnagar, Anuj

    2010-08-01

    We have evaluated pharmacokinetics of a fixed dose combination (FDC) of ceftriaxone and sulbactam (2:1) or sulbactomax in eight healthy volunteers. A 1.5 g dose of sulbactomax, 1 g dose of ceftriaxone and 0.5 g sulbactam were given intravenously in a balanced two-ways cross-over study. Serially collected plasma sample was analyzed for ceftriaxone and sulbactam by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean peaks of ceftriaxone and sulbactam concentrations in plasma were 152.06+/-6.65 microg/ml and 21.32+/-1.80 microg/ml, respectively and plasma half-lives for ceftriaxone and sulbactam were 5.2+/-0.35 hr and 0.94+/-0.038 hr, respectively. The AUC0-24 for ceftriaxone and sulbactam was 760.16+/-27.68 microg.hr/ml and 20.74+/-2.34 microg.hr/ml, respectively, with elimination rate constant of 0.133+/-0.009 hr(-1) and 0.732+/-0.029 hr(-1), respectively. The kinetics of ceftriaxone and sulbactum did not change in combination as compared to the alone treatment. Also, concentration of the ceftriaxone after 24 hr is higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the most of the gram positive and gram negative bacteria indicating that one dose in a day is sufficient to treat the disease caused by these organisms.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Dvorchik, Barry; Arbeit, Robert D; Chung, Julia; Liu, Susan; Knebel, William; Kastrissios, Helen

    2004-08-01

    Data from subjects in nine phase 1 (n = 153) and six phase 2/3 (n = 129) clinical trials were combined to identify factors contributing to interindividual variability in daptomycin pharmacokinetics (PK). Over 30 covariates were considered. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination provided the best fit for data on daptomycin concentrations in plasma over time. In the final population PK model, daptomycin plasma clearance (CL) was a function of renal function, body temperature, and sex. Of these factors, renal function contributed most significantly to interindividual variability. CL varied linearly with the estimated creatinine clearance. CL among dialysis subjects was approximately one-third that of healthy subjects (0.27 versus 0.81 liter/h). CL in females was 80% that in males; however, in clinical trials, the outcome was not affected by sex and therefore this effect is not considered clinically meaningful. The relationship with body temperature should be interpreted cautiously since the analysis included only a limited number of subjects who were hyperthermic. The volume of distribution of the peripheral compartment (V2) and intercompartmental clearance (Q) were linearly related to body weight. V2 increased approximately twofold in the presence of an acute infection. No factors were identified that significantly impacted V1. This analysis supports the dosing of daptomycin on a milligram-per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis and suggests that modified dosing regimens are indicated for patients with severe renal disease and for those undergoing dialysis.

  12. RECONSTRUCTING EXPOSURE SCENARIOS USING DOSE BIOMARKERS - AN APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use Bayesian uncertainty analysis to explore how to estimate pollutant exposures from biomarker concentrations. The growing number of national databases with exposure data makes such an analysis possible. They contain datasets of pharmacokinetic biomarkers for many polluta...

  13. RECONSTRUCTING POPULATION EXPOSURES FROM DOSE BIOMARKERS: INHALATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-established toxicological tool designed to relate exposure to a target tissue dose. The emergence of federal and state programs for environmental health tracking and the availability of exposure monitoring through bi...

  14. Impact of inhalational exposure to ethanol fuel on the pharmacokinetics of verapamil, ibuprofen and fluoxetine as in vivo probe drugs for CYP3A, CYP2C and CYP2D in rats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Juciane Lauren Cavalcanti; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Pereira, Maria Paula Marques; Capela, Jorge Manuel Vieira; de Moraes, Natália Valadares; Lepera, José Salvador

    2015-10-01

    Occupational toxicology and clinical pharmacology integration will be useful to understand potential exposure-drug interaction and to shape risk assessment strategies in order to improve occupational health. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of exposure to ethanol fuel on in vivo activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes CYP3A, CYP2C and CYP2D by the oral administration of the probe drugs verapamil, ibuprofen and fluoxetine. Male Wistar rats exposed to filtered air or to 2000 ppm ethanol in a nose-only inhalation chamber during (6 h/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks) received single oral doses of 10 mg/kg verapamil or 25 mg/kg ibuprofen or 10 mg/kg fluoxetine. The enantiomers of verapamil, norverapamil, ibuprofen and fluoxetine in plasma were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The area under the curve plasma concentration versus time extrapolated to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) was calculated using the Gauss-Laguerre quadrature. Inhalation exposure to ethanol reduces the AUC of both verapamil (approximately 2.7 fold) and norverapamil enantiomers (>2.5 fold), reduces the AUC(0-∞) of (+)-(S)-IBU (approximately 2 fold) and inhibits preferentially the metabolism of (-)-(R)-FLU. In conclusion, inhalation exposure of ethanol at a concentration of 2 TLV-STEL (6 h/day for 6 weeks) induces CYP3A and CYP2C but inhibits CYP2D in rats.

  15. Evaluation of microdosing to assess pharmacokinetic linearity in rats using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balani, Suresh K; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Qian, Mark G; Costa, Arnaldo O; Daniels, J Scott; Yang, Hua; Shimoga, Prakash R; Wu, Jing-Tao; Gan, Liang-Shang; Lee, Frank W; Miwa, Gerald T

    2006-03-01

    The microdosing strategy allows for early assessment of human pharmacokinetics of new chemical entities using more limited safety assessment requirements than those requisite for a conventional phase I program. The current choice for evaluating microdosing is accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) due to its ultrasensitivity for detecting radiotracers. However, the AMS technique is still expensive to be used routinely and requires the preparation of radiolabeled compounds. This report describes a feasibility study with conventional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology for oral microdosing assessment in rats, a commonly used preclinical species. The nonlabeled drugs fluconazole and tolbutamide were studied because of their similar pharmacokinetics characteristics in rats and humans. We demonstrate that pharmacokinetics can be readily characterized by LC-MS/MS at a microdose of 1 microg/kg for these molecules in rats, and, hence, LC-MS/MS should be adequate in human microdosing studies. The studies also exhibit linearity in exposure between the microdose and >or=1000-fold higher doses in rats for these drugs, which are known to show a linear dose-exposure relationship in the clinic, further substantiating the potential utility of LC-MS/MS in defining pharmacokinetics from the microdose of drugs. These data should increase confidence in the use of LC-MS/MS in microdose pharmacokinetics studies of new chemical entities in humans. Application of this approach is also described for an investigational compound, MLNX, in which the pharmacokinetics in rats were determined to be nonlinear, suggesting that MLNX pharmacokinetics at microdoses in humans also might not reflect those at the therapeutic doses. These preclinical studies demonstrate the potential applicability of using traditional LC-MS/MS for microdose pharmacokinetic assessment in humans.

  16. [Elements of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Piette, F; Soubrie, C

    1990-05-21

    A knowledge of pharmacokinetic data is particularly important with drugs that have a narrow margin of safety. Exhaustive pre-marketing pharmacokinetic investigations and pharmacokinetic studies in populations are the two principal means of acquiring such knowledge. Although popular, the concept of half-life which decreases with age for many drugs is insufficient to calculate dosage in elderly people. Measurements of creatinine clearance provide an almost mathematical approach to the dosage of drugs that are excreted exclusively by the kidneys. In contrast, changes in hepatic metabolism with age and pathology are difficult to evaluate, and their consequences are often vaguely perceived. Our knowledge of relationships between age and pharmacodynamics is still in infancy. Owing to the wide consumption of medicine by elderly people, drug interactions are frequent at all stages, including absorption, metabolization, transport and site of action.

  17. RATE Exposure Assessment Modules - EXA 408, EXA 409

    EPA Science Inventory

    EXA 408 – Interpreting Biomonitoring Data and Using Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Exposure Assessment Widespread acceptance and use of the CDC's National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) database, which, among other things, reports measured concentrations of...

  18. Literature in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Mary Ellen

    An examination of literature in translation is vital to literary interpretation and, ultimately, essential to mutual understanding among peoples from different cultures. Teaching translations requires consideration of linguistic, social, and temporal areas. Translations require alterations in language since languages never translate precisely from…

  19. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  20. Modified renal function in pregnancy: impact on emtricitabine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Valade, Elodie; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Dabis, François; Arrivé, Elise; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Benaboud, Sihem; Fauchet, Floris; Bouazza, Naïm; Foissac, Frantz; Urien, Saïk; Hirt, Déborah

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aims were to describe emtricitabine (FTC) pharmacokinetics in a large population of pregnant women during the different trimesters of pregnancy, and to explain FTC pharmacokinetic variability during pregnancy. Methods FTC plasma concentrations were measured in 103 non-pregnant and 83 pregnant women, including women in the different trimesters of pregnancy and on the day of delivery. A total of 457 plasma concentrations were available for analysis. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with Monolix 4.1.3. Results FTC pharmacokinetics was best described by a two compartment model. The effect of creatinine clearance on apparent elimination clearance (CL/F) was significant. CL/F in pregnant women was significantly higher compared with non-pregnant women (geometric mean 24.1 vs 20.5 l h−1, P < 0.001), reflecting a modified renal function. FTC daily exposures (AUC) during pregnancy were lower than AUC in non-pregnant women, regardless of the trimester of pregnancy. FTC AUC geometric means were 8.38 mg l−1 h in the second trimester of pregnancy, 8.16 mg l−1 h in the third trimester of pregnancy, 8.30 mg l−1 h on the day of delivery and 9.77 mg l−1 h in non-pregnant women. FTC concentrations 24 h after administration were lower in pregnant women compared with non-pregnant women (0.054 vs. 0.079 mg l−1, P < 0.001) but still above the inhibitory concentration 50%. Conclusions FTC CL/F was increased by 18% during pregnancy, reflecting a modified renal function with 50% increase in estimated glomerular filtration rate. However, the impact of this modified renal function on FTC pharmacokinetics was not sufficiently large to consider dose adjustments during pregnancy. PMID:24995851

  1. Human Microdosing with Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene and Metabolites by UPLC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madeen, Erin P; Ognibene, Ted J; Corley, Richard A; McQuistan, Tammie J; Henderson, Marilyn C; Baird, William M; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Ken W; Williams, David E

    2016-10-17

    Metabolism is a key health risk factor following exposures to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), an IARC classified 2A probable human carcinogen. Human exposure to PAHs occurs primarily from the diet in nonsmokers. However, little data is available on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans of high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 aromatic rings), including DBC. We previously determined the pharmacokinetics of DBC in human volunteers orally administered a microdose (29 ng; 5 nCi) of [(14)C]-DBC by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis of total [(14)C] in plasma and urine. In the current study, we utilized a novel "moving wire" interface between ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and AMS to detect and quantify parent DBC and its major metabolites. The major [(14)C] product identified in plasma was unmetabolized [(14)C]-DBC itself (Cmax = 18.5 ±15.9 fg/mL, Tmax= 2.1 ± 1.0 h), whereas the major metabolite was identified as [(14)C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12-diol (Cmax= 2.5 ±1.3 fg/mL, Tmax= 1.8 h). Several minor species of [(14)C]-DBC metabolites were also detected for which no reference standards were available. Free and conjugated metabolites were detected in urine with [(14)C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12,13,14-tetraol isomers identified as the major metabolites, 56.3% of which were conjugated (Cmax= 35.8 ± 23.0 pg/pool, Tmax = 6-12 h pool). [(14)C]-DBC-11,12-diol, of which 97.5% was conjugated, was also identified in urine (Cmax = 29.4 ± 11.6 pg/pool, Tmax = 6-12 h pool). Parent [(14)C]-DBC was not detected in urine. This is the first data set to assess metabolite profiles and associated pharmacokinetics of a carcinogenic PAH in human volunteers at an environmentally relevant dose, providing the data necessary for translation of high dose animal models to humans for translation of environmental health risk assessment.

  2. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linagliptin.

    PubMed

    Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Retlich, Silke; Friedrich, Christian

    2012-07-01

    attainment of steady state. The majority of linagliptin is eliminated as parent compound, demonstrating that metabolism plays a minor role in the overall pharmacokinetics in humans. The main, pharmacologically inactive S-3-hydroxypiperidinyl metabolite accounted for approximately 17% of the total drug-related compounds in plasma. Linagliptin is eliminated primarily in faeces, with only around 5% of the oral therapeutic dose excreted in the urine at steady state. Linagliptin potently inhibits DPP-4 (inhibition constant 1 nmol/L), and trough drug concentrations achieved with therapeutic dosing inhibit >80% of plasma DPP-4 activity, the threshold associated with maximal antihyperglycaemic effects in animal models. There are no clinically relevant alterations in linagliptin pharmacokinetics resulting from renal impairment, hepatic impairment, coadministration with food, race, body weight, sex or age. In vitro, linagliptin is a weak substrate and weak inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) but not of other CYP isozymes or ATP-binding cassette transporters. Clinical studies have revealed no relevant drug interactions when coadministered with other drugs commonly prescribed to patients with type 2 diabetes, including the narrow therapeutic index drugs warfarin and digoxin. Linagliptin plasma exposure is reduced by potent inducers of CYP3A4 or P-gp. Linagliptin has demonstrated a large safety window (>100-fold the recommended daily dose) and clinically relevant antihyperglycaemic effects in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part I: Program Implementation and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, David C.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Roper, Jerry M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding environmental manganese exposure since high exposures have been associated with neurological disorders. The USA Environmental Protection Agency most recent human health risk assessment of inhaled manganese conducted in 1993 identified specific areas of uncertainty regarding manganese pharmacokinetics. This led to the development of a test rule under the USA Clean Air Act that required the generation of pharmacokinetic information on the inorganic manganese combustion products of the organometallic fuel additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). The Alternative Tier 2 testing program for MMT, described in this paper, has yielded substantial pharmacokinetic data and has enabled the generation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for manganese. These models are capable of predicting tissue manganese concentrations across a variety of dose routes, levels, and durations while accounting for factors such as age, gender, and reproductive status, enabling the consideration of tissue dosimetry in future risk assessments. PMID:22545047

  4. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  5. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2015-05-19

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  6. Pharmacokinetics in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Mayersohn, M

    1994-01-01

    Animals undergo substantial changes in many physiologic and biochemical functions as a natural consequence of aging. In the absence of disease or other pathologic conditions, these changes occur in a gradual manner with time (generally expressed as a fractional or percentage change in that function per year or decade). Furthermore, for any given function and at any given chronologic age, there is large variation in that function among individuals. Given the increase in life expectancy, the substantial increase in the number of elderly (and aged elderly) in the population, and the escalating costs of health care, there is great interest in learning more about the risks associated with aging as a result of toxic exposure. Are the elderly at greater risk than younger adults to the toxic effects of drugs and environmental exposure? Is the elderly population an inherently more sensitive one? PMID:7737036

  7. Nanoparticle Drug Loading as a Design Parameter to Improve Docetaxel Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kevin S.; Schorzman, Allison N.; Finniss, Mathew C.; Bowerman, Charles J.; Peng, Lei; Luft, J. Christopher; Madden, Andrew; Wang, Andrew Z.; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) drug loading is one of the key defining characteristics of a NP formulation. However, the effect of NP drug loading on therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics has not been thoroughly evaluated. Herein, we characterized the efficacy, toxicity and pharmacokinetic properties of NP docetaxel formulations that have differential drug loading but are otherwise identical. Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®), a soft-lithography fabrication technique, was used to formulate NPs with identical size, shape and surface chemistry, but with variable docetaxel loading. The lower weight loading (9%-NP) of docetaxel was found to have a superior pharmacokinetic profile and enhanced efficacy in a murine cancer model when compared to that of a higher docetaxel loading (20%-NP). The 9%-NP docetaxel increased plasma and tumor docetaxel exposure and reduced liver, spleen and lung exposure when compared to that of 20%-NP docetaxel. PMID:23899444

  8. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  9. A pharmacokinetic comparison of two voriconazole formulations and the effect of CYP2C19 polymorphism on their pharmacokinetic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyewon; Lee, Howard; Han, HyeKyung; An, Hyungmi; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Yong Jin; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Jang, In-Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose SYP-1018 is a lyophilized polymeric nanoparticle formulation of voriconazole that is under development for intravenous dosing. This study compared the pharmacokinetic and tolerability profiles of SYP-1018 with those of Vfend®, the marketed formulation of voriconazole. The effect of CYP2C19 polymorphism on the voriconazole pharmacokinetics was also evaluated. Methods An open-label, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence crossover study was conducted in 52 healthy male volunteers, who randomly received a single intravenous infusion of either of the two voriconazole formulations at 200 mg. Blood samples were collected up to 24 hours after drug administration for pharmacokinetic analysis. The plasma concentrations of voriconazole were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using a noncompartmental method. CYP2C19 genotype was identified in 51 subjects. Results The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of SYP-1018 to Vfend® was 0.99 (0.93–1.04) for the maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) and 0.97 (0.92–1.01) for the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) from dosing to the last quantifiable concentration (AUClast). Nineteen homozygous extensive metabolizers (EMs, *1/*1), 19 intermediate metabolizers (IMs, *1/*2 or *1/*3), and ten poor metabolizers (PMs, *2/*2, *2/*3, or *3/*3) were identified, and the pharmacokinetic comparability between SYP-1018 and Vfend® was also noted when analyzed separately by genotype. The systemic exposure to voriconazole was greatest in the PM group, followed by the IM, and then the EM groups. Furthermore, the intrasubject variability for Cmax and AUClast was greater in IMs and PMs than in EMs. No serious adverse event occurred, and both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion SYP-1018 had comparable pharmacokinetic and tolerability profiles to Vfend® after a single intravenous infusion. CYP2C19 genotype affected not only the

  10. Pharmacokinetics of zidovudine dosed twice daily according to World Health Organization weight bands in Ugandan HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Fillekes, Quirine; Kendall, Lindsay; Kitaka, Sabrina; Mugyenyi, Peter; Musoke, Philippa; Ndigendawani, Milly; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Mutsa; Gibb, Diana M; Burger, David; Walker, Ann Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Data on zidovudine pharmacokinetics in children dosed using World Health Organization weight bands are limited. About 45 HIV-infected, Ugandan children, 3.4 (2.6-6.2) years, had intensive pharmacokinetic sampling. Geometric mean zidovudine AUC0-12h was 3.0 h.mg/L, which is higher than previously observed in adults, and was independently higher in those receiving higher doses, younger and underweight children. Higher exposure was also marginally associated with lower hemoglobin.

  11. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR TOLUENE IN THE LONG EVANS RAT: BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhaled toluene was developed for Long-Evans rats as a component of an exposure-dose-response (EDR) model for volatile organic compounds. The PBPK model was needed to link airborne toluene exposure to its concentration in b...

  12. Pharmacokinetics of moxidectin and doramectin in goats.

    PubMed

    Escudero, E; Carceles, C M; Diaz, M S; Sutra, J F; Galtier, P; Alvinerie, M

    1999-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic behaviour of doramectin after a single subcutaneous administration and moxidectin following a single subcutaneous or oral drench were studied in goats at a dosage of 0.2 mg kg(-1). The drug plasma concentration-time data were analysed by compartmental pharmacokinetics and non-compartmental methods. Maximum plasma concentrations of moxidectin were attained earlier and to a greater extent than doramectin (shorter t(max) and greater C(max) and AUC than doramectin). MRT of doramectin (4.91 +/- 0.07 days) was also significantly shorter than that of moxidectin (12.43 +/- 1.28 days). Then, the exposure of animals to doramectin in comparison with moxidectin was significantly shorter. The apparent absorption rate of moxidectin was not significantly different after oral and subcutaneous administration but the extent of absorption, reflected in the peak concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), of the subcutaneous injection (24.27 +/- 1.99 ng ml(-1) and 136.72 +/- 7.35 ng d ml(-1) respectively) was significantly greater than that of the oral administration (15.53 +/- 1.27 ng ml(-1) and 36.72 +/- 4.05 ng d ml(-1) respectively). The mean residence time (MRT) of moxidectin didn't differ significantly when administered orally or subcutaneously. Therefore low oral bioavailability and the early emergence of resistance in this minor species may be related. These results deserve to be correlated with efficacy studies for refining dosage requirements of endectocides in this species.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of metoprolol during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Rachel J; Eyal, Sara; Easterling, Thomas R; Caritis, Steve N; Venkataraman, Raman; Hankins, Gary; Rytting, Erik; Thummel, Kenneth; Kelly, Edward J; Risler, Linda; Phillips, Brian; Honaker, Matthew T; Shen, Danny D; Hebert, Mary F

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of metoprolol during pregnancy and lactation. Serial plasma, urine, and breast milk concentrations of metoprolol and its metabolite, α-hydroxymetoprolol, were measured over 1 dosing interval in women treated with metoprolol (25-750 mg/day) during early pregnancy (n = 4), mid-pregnancy (n = 14), and late pregnancy (n = 15), as well as postpartum (n = 9) with (n = 4) and without (n = 5) lactation. Subjects were genotyped for CYP2D6 loss-of-function allelic variants. Using paired analysis, mean metoprolol apparent oral clearance was significantly higher in mid-pregnancy (361 ± 223 L/h, n = 5, P < .05) and late pregnancy (568 ± 273 L/h, n = 8, P < .05) compared with ≥3 months postpartum (200 ± 131 and 192 ± 98 L/h, respectively). When the comparison was limited to extensive metabolizers (EMs), metoprolol apparent oral clearance was significantly higher during both mid- and late pregnancy (P < .05). Relative infant exposure to metoprolol through breast milk was <1.0% of maternal weight-adjusted dose (n = 3). Because of the large, pregnancy-induced changes in metoprolol pharmacokinetics, if inadequate clinical responses are encountered, clinicians who prescribe metoprolol during pregnancy should be prepared to make aggressive changes in dosage (dose and frequency) or consider using an alternate beta-blocker.

  14. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; Liu, Dongyang; Jusko, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is an array of immune responses to infection and injury. It results from a complex immune cascade and is the basis of many chronic diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. Numerous mathematical models have been developed to describe the disease progression and effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. This review illustrates the state of the art in modeling the effects of diverse drugs for treating inflammation, describes relevant biomarkers amenable to modeling, and summarizes major advantages and limitations of the published pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models. Simple direct inhibitory models are often used to describe in vitro effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. Indirect response models are more mechanism based and have been widely applied to the turnover of symptoms and biomarkers. These, along with target-mediated and transduction models, have been successfully applied to capture the PK/PD of many anti-inflammatory drugs and describe disease progression of inflammation. Biologics have offered opportunities to address specific mechanisms of action, and evolve small systems models to quantitatively capture the underlying physiological processes. More advanced mechanistic models should allow evaluation of the roles of some key mediators in disease progression, assess drug interactions, and better translate drug properties from in vitro and animal data to patients. PMID:23140121

  15. Verapamil effect on phenytoin pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Alvariza, Silvana; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta; Rosillo de la Torre, Argelia; Orozco Suárez, Sandra; Rocha, Luisa

    2013-11-01

    Efflux transporter and enzyme overexpression can be induced by certain antiepileptic drugs. Phenytoin (PHT) is at the same time substrate and inducer of CYP2C isoenzymes and efflux carriers. Its inductive effect has been postulated to be concentration and time-dependent. Since verapamil (VPM) is a well known substrate and inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, its administration could modify PHT systemic exposure. The objective of this work was to determine if single doses (40mg/kg) of VPM might change PHT body fate in the same way when given at the beginning or several days after 100mg/kg of PHT daily doses were started. Both drugs were administered intraperitoneally to female Sprague Dawley rats. VPM increased plasma PHT concentrations after one day of treatment, while a decrease in PHT plasma exposure was observed when VPM was added at the fifth day of the antiepileptic treatment. These results suggested that VPM would have different impact on PHT pharmacokinetics, depending on the level of expression of both efflux transporters and enzymes. Before the hepatic cells could acquire a high content of enzymes due to the inductive effect of PHT dosing, VPM decreased the predominant intestinal clearance of PHT. But, once the enzymatic machinery at the hepatocyte became more important than that at the intestine, although ineffective because of the high hepatobiliary efflux transporter overexpression, VPM blockade from the liver resulted in an increased total PHT clearance.

  16. In vitro and in vivo experimental data for pyrethroid pharmacokinetic models: the case of bifenthrin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic synthetic pesticides. Exposure to pyrethroids has increased due to declining use of other classes of pesticides. Our studies are focused on generating in vitro and in vivo data for the development of pharmacokinetic models for pyrethroids. Us...

  17. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture ...

  18. Translation between representation languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbaalen, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    A capability for translating between representation languages is critical for effective knowledge base reuse. A translation technology for knowledge representation languages based on the use of an interlingua for communicating knowledge is described. The interlingua-based translation process consists of three major steps: translation from the source language into a subset of the interlingua, translation between subsets of the interlingua, and translation from a subset of the interlingua into the target language. The first translation step into the interlingua can typically be specified in the form of a grammar that describes how each top-level form in the source language translates into the interlingua. In cases where the source language does not have a declarative semantics, such a grammar is also a specification of a declarative semantics for the language. A methodology for building translators that is currently under development is described. A 'translator shell' based on this methodology is also under development. The shell has been used to build translators for multiple representation languages and those translators have successfully translated nontrivial knowledge bases.

  19. To Apply Microdosing or Not? Recommendations to Single Out Compounds with Non-Linear Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bosgra, Sieto; Vlaming, Maria L H; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2016-01-01

    Microdosing studies allow clinical investigation of pharmacokinetics earlier in drug development, before all high-dose safety concerns have been sorted out. Furthermore, microdosing allows inclusion of target groups that are inadmissible in high-dose phase I trials. A potential concern when considering a microdosing study is that a particular drug candidate may display non-linear pharmacokinetics. Saturation of, for example, membrane transport or metabolism at exposure levels between the microdose and therapeutic dose may limit the predictivity of high-dose pharmacokinetics from microdose observations. Guidance on the likelihood of appreciable non-linear pharmacokinetics based on preclinical information can be helpful in staging the clinical phase and the place of microdosing in it. We present a decision tree that evaluates concerns about non-linearities raised in the preclinical phase and their potential impact on the proportionality between microdose and intended therapeutic dose as predicted from preclinical information. The expected maximum concentrations at relevant sites are estimated by non-compartmental methods. These are compared with dissolution, Michaelis constants for active or enzymatic processes, and binding protein concentrations to assess the potential saturation of the processes below therapeutic doses. The decision tree was applied to ten published cases comparing microdose and therapeutic dose pharmacokinetics, for which concerns about non-linear pharmacokinetics were raised a priori. The decision tree was able to discriminate cases showing substantial non-linearities from cases displaying dose-proportional pharmacokinetics. The recommendations described in this paper may be useful in deciding whether a microdosing study is a sensible option to gain early insight in clinical pharmacokinetics of drug candidates.

  20. Semi-mechanistic physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of clinical glibenclamide pharmacokinetics and drug-drug-interactions.

    PubMed

    Greupink, Rick; Schreurs, Marieke; Benne, Marina S; Huisman, Maarten T; Russel, Frans G M

    2013-08-16

    We studied if the clinical pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of the sulfonylurea-derivative glibenclamide can be simulated via a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach. To this end, a glibenclamide PBPK-model was build in Simcyp using in vitro physicochemical and biotransformation data of the drug, and was subsequently optimized using plasma disappearance data observed after i.v. administration. The model was validated against data observed after glibenclamide oral dosing, including DDIs. We found that glibenclamide pharmacokinetics could be adequately modeled if next to CYP metabolism an active hepatic uptake process was assumed. This hepatic uptake process was subsequently included in the model in a non-mechanistic manner. After an oral dose of 0.875 mg predicted Cmax and AUC were 39.7 (95% CI:37.0-42.7)ng/mL and 108 (95% CI: 96.9-120)ng/mLh, respectively, which is in line with observed values of 43.6 (95% CI: 37.7-49.5)ng/mL and 133 (95% CI: 107-159)ng/mLh. For a 1.75 mg oral dose, the predicted and observed values were 82.5 (95% CI:76.6-88.9)ng/mL vs 91.1 (95% CI: 67.9-115.9) for Cmax and 224 (95% CI: 202-248) vs 324 (95% CI: 197-451)ng/mLh for AUC, respectively. The model correctly predicted a decrease in exposure after rifampicin pre-treatment. An increase in glibenclamide exposure after clarithromycin co-treatment was predicted, but the magnitude of the effect was underestimated because part of this DDI is the result of an interaction at the transporter level. Finally, the effects of glibenclamide and fluconazol co-administration were simulated. Our simulations indicated that co-administration of this potent CYP450 inhibitor will profoundly increase glibenclamide exposure, which is in line with clinical observations linking the glibenclamide-fluconazol combination to an increased risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, glibenclamide pharmacokinetics and its CYP-mediated DDIs can be simulated via PBPK-modeling. In addition, our

  1. Determinants of translation ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Tamar; Prior, Anat; Eddington, Chelsea M.; Arêas da Luz Fontes, Ana B.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguity in translation is highly prevalent, and has consequences for second-language learning and for bilingual lexical processing. To better understand this phenomenon, the current study compared the determinants of translation ambiguity across four sets of translation norms from English to Spanish, Dutch, German and Hebrew. The number of translations an English word received was correlated across these different languages, and was also correlated with the number of senses the word has in English, demonstrating that translation ambiguity is partially determined by within-language semantic ambiguity. For semantically-ambiguous English words, the probability of the different translations in Spanish and Hebrew was predicted by the meaning-dominance structure in English, beyond the influence of other lexical and semantic factors, for bilinguals translating from their L1, and translating from their L2. These findings are consistent with models postulating direct access to meaning from L2 words for moderately-proficient bilinguals. PMID:27882188

  2. Identifying the translational gap in the evaluation of drug-induced QTc interval prolongation

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Anne SY; Dubois, Vincent FS; Danhof, Meindert; Sturkenboom, Miriam CJM; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Aims Given the similarities in QTc response between dogs and humans, dogs are used in pre-clinical cardiovascular safety studies. The objective of our investigation was to characterize the PKPD relationships and identify translational gaps across species following the administration of three compounds known to cause QTc interval prolongation, namely cisapride, d, l-sotalol and moxifloxacin. Methods Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from experiments in conscious dogs and clinical trials were included in this analysis. First, pharmacokinetic modelling and deconvolution methods were applied to derive drug concentrations at the time of each QT measurement. A Bayesian PKPD model was then used to describe QT prolongation, allowing discrimination of drug-specific effects from other physiological factors known to alter QT interval duration. A threshold of ≥10 ms was used to explore the probability of prolongation after drug administration. Results A linear relationship was found to best describe the pro-arrhythmic effects of cisapride, d,l-sotalol and moxifloxacin both in dogs and in humans. The drug-specific parameter (slope) in dogs was statistically significantly different from humans. Despite such differences, our results show that the probability of QTc prolongation ≥10 ms in dogs nears 100% for all three compounds at the therapeutic exposure range in humans. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the slope of PKPD relationship in conscious dogs may be used as the basis for the prediction of drug-induced QTc prolongation in humans. Furthermore, the risk of QTc prolongation can be expressed in terms of the probability associated with an increase ≥10 ms, allowing direct inferences about the clinical relevance of the pro-arrhythmic potential of a molecule. PMID:23351036

  3. Utility of Oatp1a/1b-knockout and OATP1B1/3-humanized mice in the study of OATP-mediated pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution: case studies with pravastatin, atorvastatin, simvastatin, and carboxydichlorofluorescein.

    PubMed

    Higgins, J William; Bao, Jing Q; Ke, Alice B; Manro, Jason R; Fallon, John K; Smith, Philip C; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2014-01-01

    Although organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)-mediated hepatic uptake is generally conserved between rodents and humans at a gross pharmacokinetic level, the presence of three major hepatic OATPs with broad overlap in substrate and inhibitor affinity, and absence of rodent-human orthologs preclude clinical translation of single-gene knockout/knockin findings. At present, changes in pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of pravastatin, atorvastatin, simvastatin, and carboxydichlorofluorescein were studied in oatp1a/1b-knockout mice lacking the three major hepatic oatp isoforms, and in knockout mice with liver-specific knockin of human OATP1B1 or OATP1B3. Relative to wild-type controls, oatp1a/1b-knockout mice exhibited 1.6- to 19-fold increased intravenous and 2.1- to 115-fold increased oral drug exposure, due to 33%-75% decreased clearance, 14%-60% decreased volume of distribution, and ≤74-fold increased oral bioavailability, with the magnitude of change depending on the contribution of oatp1a/1b to pharmacokinetics. Hepatic drug distribution was 4.2- to 196-fold lower in oatp1a/1b-knockout mice; distributional attenuation was less notable in kidney, brain, cardiac, and skeletal muscle. Knockin of OATP1B1 or OATP1B3 partially restored control clearance, volume, and bioavailability values (24%-142% increase, ≤47% increase, and ≤77% decrease vs. knockout, respectively), such that knockin pharmacokinetic profiles were positioned between knockout and wild-type mice. Consistent with liver-specific humanization, only hepatic drug distribution was partially restored (1.3- to 6.5-fold increase vs. knockout). Exposure and liver distribution changes in OATP1B1-humanized versus knockout mice predicted the clinical impact of OATP1B1 on oral exposure and contribution to human hepatic uptake of statins within 1.7-fold, but only after correcting for human/humanized mouse liver relative protein expression factor (OATP1B1 = 2.2, OATP1B3 = 0.30).

  4. Translational ecology for hydrogeology.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, William H

    2013-01-01

    Translational ecology--a special discipline aimed to improve the accessibility of science to policy makers--will help hydrogeologists contribute to the solution of pressing environmental problems. Patterned after translational medicine, translational ecology is a partnership to ensure that the right science gets done in a timely fashion, so that it can be communicated to those who need it.

  5. Generalizing Word Lattice Translation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. Keywords: word lattice translation, phrase-based and hierarchical...introduce in reordering models. Our experiments evaluating the approach demonstrate substantial gains for Chinese -English and Arabic -English translation. 15...Section 4 presents two applications of the noisier channel paradigm, demonstrating substantial performance gains in Arabic -English and Chinese -English

  6. For "Translation and Theories"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Lili

    2009-01-01

    Translation studies stem from comparative literature and contrastive analysis. It involves the transfer of messages between two different language systems and cultures, and Munday (2001, p.1) notes that translation "by its nature" "is multilingual and also interdisciplinary". Translation subjects are the texts in various…

  7. Machine Translation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajis, Katie

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics and capabilities of existing machine translation systems were examined and procurement recommendations were developed. Four systems, SYSTRAN, GLOBALINK, PC TRANSLATOR, and STYLUS, were determined to meet the NASA requirements for a machine translation system. Initially, four language pairs were selected for implementation. These are Russian-English, French-English, German-English, and Japanese-English.

  8. Workshop in Translating Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Michael; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A workshop dealing with literature in translation took place in 1974 at the German Department of the University of Cincinnati. This is a report on its procedures and methods. The workshop dealt with discussion of texts, translation of texts, critique of existing translations and interpretation of content. (TL)

  9. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C.; Voelker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer’s clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:26247959

  10. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C; Voelker, Michael

    2015-08-03

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer's clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and RC Circuit Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cock, Mieke De; Janssen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Most introductory physics courses include a chapter on RC circuits in which the differential equations for the charging and discharging of a capacitor are derived. A number of papers in this journal describe lab experiments dealing with the measurement of different parameters in such RC circuits. In this contribution, we report on a lab experiment we developed for students majoring in pharmacy, using RC circuits to simulate a pharmacokinetic process.

  12. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  13. [Dalbavancin: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters].

    PubMed

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Reis, Joana

    2017-01-01

    Dalbavancin is a new lipoglycopeptide antibiotic whose structure influences its pharmacokinetic profile. It is not absorbed after oral administration and is therefore administered intravenously. It is distributed through intracellular fluid, reaching adequate concentrations in the skin, bone, blister fluid and synovial fluid. Plasma protein binding is very high. Concentrations in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are inadequate. Excretion is through non-microsomal metabolism with inactive metabolites and through the kidneys by glomerular filtration. Dalbavancin is eliminated slowly, as shown by its clearance value and its terminal elimination half-life, which exceeds 300 hours. This means that adequate concentrations of the drug remain in plasma and tissues for a prolonged period and explains the dosing regimen: a first dose of 1g followed 7 days later by a 500mg dose. The pharmacokinetics are linear and show little intra- and interindividual variability. There are no pharmacokinetic interactions. Dose adjustment is not required for patients with mild or moderate renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance ≥ 30 to 79ml/min). Dosage adjustment is not required in patients regularly receiving elective haemodialysis (3 times/week) and the drug can be administered without consideration of haemodialysis times. In patients with chronic renal insufficiency, whose creatinine clearance is < 30ml/min and who are not regularly receiving elective haemodialysis, the recommended dose should be reduced to 750mg per week, followed 1 week later by 375mg. Dosage adjustment does not seem necessary in patients with liver failure or in older patients. There is no information on the most appropriate dosage in children. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics parameter that best describes the effectiveness of dalbavancin is the ratio between the area under the curve and the minimum inhibitory concentration.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. PMID:26452316

  15. Pharmacokinetics of Amphotericin B Colloidal Dispersion in Critically Ill Patients with Cholestatic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Stefan; Überlacher, Elisabeth; Schöfmann, Julia; Stienecke, Eva; Dunzendorfer, Stefan; Joannidis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of lipid-bound and liberated amphotericin B (AMB) was assessed in 11 critically ill patients with cholestatic liver disease (CSLD) and in 9 subjects with normal liver function treated with AMB colloidal dispersion (ABCD). Exposure to lipid-bound AMB was higher in patients with CSLD. Levels of liberated AMB were elevated by CSLD only after the first dose, whereas its pharmacokinetics was unaffected at steady state. The standard dosage of ABCD is probably adequate for patients with CSLD. PMID:22850517

  16. Gestation Time-Dependent Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous (+)-Methamphetamine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah; Laurenzana, Elizabeth; Hendrickson, Howard; Gentry, W. Brooks

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in (+)-methamphetamine (METH) disposition during late rat pregnancy could lead to increased vulnerability to acute METH effects. The disposition of a single 1 mg/kg i.v. METH dose was studied during early (gestation day 7, GD7) and late (GD21) gestation. Results showed gestation time-dependent pharmacokinetics, characterized by a significantly higher area under the METH serum concentration versus time curve and a lower clearance on GD21 (p < 0.05; total, renal, and nonrenal clearance). The terminal elimination half-life (t1/2λz) of METH and (+)-amphetamine (AMP; a pharmacologically active metabolite of METH) were not different on GD7, but by GD21, AMP t1/2λz was 37% longer than METH t1/2λz (p < 0.05). To identify the mechanism for AMP metabolite changes, intravenous AMP pharmacokinetics on GD21 were compared with AMP metabolite pharmacokinetics after intravenous METH. The intravenous AMP t1/2λz was significantly shorter than metabolite AMP t1/2λz (p < 0.05), which suggested AMP metabolite formation (not elimination) was the rate-limiting process. To understand the medical consequence of METH use during late-stage pregnancy, timed-pregnant rats received an intravenous dose of saline or METH (1, 3, or 5.6 mg/kg) on GD21, 0 to 2 days antepartum. Although one rat died and another had stillbirths at term after the 5.6-mg/kg dose, the pharmacokinetic values for all of the other animals were not significantly different. In conclusion, late-gestational clearance reductions lengthen METH exposure time, possibly increasing susceptibility to adverse effects, including death. PMID:21632964

  17. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of axitinib in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, May; Poland, Bill; Brennan, Meghan; Hee, Brian; Pithavala, Yazdi K; Amantea, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    AIMS Axitinib is a potent and selective second generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2 and 3 approved for second line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. The objectives of this analysis were to assess plasma pharmacokinetics and identify covariates that may explain variability in axitinib disposition following single dose administration in healthy volunteers. METHODS Plasma concentration–time data from 337 healthy volunteers in 10 phase I studies were analyzed, using non-linear mixed effects modelling (nonmem) to estimate population pharmacokinetic parameters and evaluate relationships between parameters and food, formulation, demographic factors, measures of renal and hepatic function and metabolic genotypes (UGT1A1*28 and CYP2C19). RESULTS A two compartment structural model with first order absorption and lag time best described axitinib pharmacokinetics. Population estimates for systemic clearance (CL), central volume of distribution (Vc), absorption rate constant (ka) and absolute bioavailability (F) were 17.0 l h−1, 45.3 l, 0.523 h−1 and 46.5%, respectively. With axitinib Form IV, ka and F increased in the fasted state by 207% and 33.8%, respectively. For Form XLI (marketed formulation), F was 15% lower compared with Form IV. CL was not significantly influenced by any of the covariates studied. Body weight significantly affected Vc, but the effect was within the estimated interindividual variability for Vc. CONCLUSIONS The analysis established a model that adequately characterizes axitinib pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers. Vc was found to increase with body weight. However, no change in plasma exposures is expected with change in body weight; hence no dose adjustment is warranted. PMID:23834452

  18. Gestation time-dependent pharmacokinetics of intravenous (+)-methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah; Laurenzana, Elizabeth; Hendrickson, Howard; Gentry, W Brooks; Owens, S Michael

    2011-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in (+)-methamphetamine (METH) disposition during late rat pregnancy could lead to increased vulnerability to acute METH effects. The disposition of a single 1 mg/kg i.v. METH dose was studied during early (gestation day 7, GD7) and late (GD21) gestation. Results showed gestation time-dependent pharmacokinetics, characterized by a significantly higher area under the METH serum concentration versus time curve and a lower clearance on GD21 (p < 0.05; total, renal, and nonrenal clearance). The terminal elimination half-life (t(1/2λz)) of METH and (+)-amphetamine (AMP; a pharmacologically active metabolite of METH) were not different on GD7, but by GD21, AMP t(1/2λz) was 37% longer than METH t(1/2λz) (p < 0.05). To identify the mechanism for AMP metabolite changes, intravenous AMP pharmacokinetics on GD21 were compared with AMP metabolite pharmacokinetics after intravenous METH. The intravenous AMP t(1/2λz) was significantly shorter than metabolite AMP t(1/2λz) (p < 0.05), which suggested AMP metabolite formation (not elimination) was the rate-limiting process. To understand the medical consequence of METH use during late-stage pregnancy, timed-pregnant rats received an intravenous dose of saline or METH (1, 3, or 5.6 mg/kg) on GD21, 0 to 2 days antepartum. Although one rat died and another had stillbirths at term after the 5.6-mg/kg dose, the pharmacokinetic values for all of the other animals were not significantly different. In conclusion, late-gestational clearance reductions lengthen METH exposure time, possibly increasing susceptibility to adverse effects, including death.

  19. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself.

  20. The Role of Translation in Commercial French Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vande Berg, Camille Kennedy

    While the exclusive use of French in commercial language courses has the advantage of maximizing student exposure to the target language, it also has the disadvantage of eliminating translation from pedagogical activities. However, translation can be a valuable instructional tool both for helping students assimilate the vocabulary and concepts of…

  1. Quantitative systems pharmacology: a promising approach for translational pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gadkar, K; Kirouac, D; Parrott, N; Ramanujan, S

    Biopharmaceutical companies have increasingly been exploring Quantitative Systems Pharmacology (QSP) as a potential avenue to address current challenges in drug development. In this paper, we discuss the application of QSP modeling approaches to address challenges in the translational of preclinical findings to the clinic, a high risk area of drug development. Three cases have been highlighted with QSP models utilized to inform different questions in translational pharmacology. In the first, a mechanism based asthma model is used to evaluate efficacy and inform biomarker strategy for a novel bispecific antibody. In the second case study, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling model is used to make translational predictions on clinical response and evaluate novel combination therapies. In the third case study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model it used to guide administration of oseltamivir in pediatric patients.

  2. Effect of diabetes mellitus on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drugs.

    PubMed

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh; Puzanovova, Martina

    2012-08-01

    The effects of diabetes mellitus on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs have been well described in experimental animal models; however, only minimal data exist for humans and the current knowledge regarding the effects of diabetes on these properties remains unclear. Nevertheless, it has been observed that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs are changed in subjects with diabetes. It has been reported that diabetes may affect the pharmacokinetics of various drugs by affecting (i) absorption, due to changes in subcutaneous adipose blood flow, muscle blood flow and gastric emptying; (ii) distribution, due to non-enzymatic glycation of albumin; (iii) biotransformation, due to regulation of enzymes/transporters involved in drug biotransformation; and (iv) excretion, due to nephropathy. Previously published data also suggest that diabetes-mediated changes in the pharmacokinetics of a particular drug cannot be translated to others. Although clinical studies exploring the effect of diabetes on pharmacodynamics are still very limited, there is evidence that disease-mediated effects are not limited only to pharmacokinetics but also alter pharmacodynamics. However, for many drugs it remains unclear whether these influences reflect diabetes-mediated changes in pharmacokinetics rather than pharmacodynamics. In addition, even though diabetes-mediated pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics might be anticipated, it is important to study the effect on each drug and not generalize from observed data. The available data indicate that there is a significant variability in drug response in diabetic subjects. The discrepancies between individual clinical studies as well as between ex vivo and clinical studies are probably due to (i) the restricted and focused population of subjects in clinical studies; (ii) failure to consider type, severity and duration of the disease; (iii) histopathological characteristics generally being missing; and (iv) other factors

  3. Tyramine pharmacokinetics and reduced bioavailability with food.

    PubMed

    VanDenBerg, Chad M; Blob, Lawrence F; Kemper, Eva M; Azzaro, Albert J

    2003-06-01

    Tyramine challenge studies have demonstrated that it requires approximately twice the amount of tyramine administered with a meal compared to administration after a fast to elicit the same effect, suggesting a reduction in bioavailability of tyramine when administered with food. The pharmacokinetics of tyramine when administered in a fasted versus a fed state were studied. A single 200-mg dose of tyramine was administered orally to healthy subjects both after an overnight fast and during a meal. Systemic exposure to tyramine was reduced by 53% (p < 0.05), and the maximum concentration of tyramine was reduced by 72% (p < 0.05) when the dose was administered during a meal. Tyramine maximum serum concentration was observed between 20 minutes and 1 hour when the dose was administered after an overnight fast and appeared to be delayed and/or prolonged by administration during a meal. Tyramine oral clearance was 135 +/- 55.4 L/min, maximum observed serum concentration was 37.7 +/- 26.01 ng/mL, and tyramine elimination half-life was 0.533 (range: 0.330-0.668) hours after administration to fasted subjects. Tyramine bioavailability was significantly reduced when administered with a meal compared to after a fast. The results suggest that larger amounts of dietary tyramine will be required to induce a pressor response equivalent to that following encapsulated tyramine administered in the fasted state.

  4. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Bosutinib.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Richat; Hsyu, Poe-Hirr

    2016-10-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative stem cell disorder. Bosutinib is an oral, once-daily SRC/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor with very potent inhibitory activity. Bosutinib is effective against all phases of intolerant or resistant Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML that do not harbor the T315I or V299LABL kinase domain mutations. Peak plasma concentrations of bosutinib occur at 4-6 h following oral administration, and dose-proportional increases in exposure are observed at doses ranging from 200 to 800 mg. Absorption of bosutinib increases with food. Bosutinib is distributed extensively into the tissues. It is highly plasma protein bound (94 %) and is primarily metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 3A4. Bosutinib is well tolerated overall and has a unique but manageable toxicity profile. This article provides a review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction data on bosutinib in healthy subjects, patients with CML, and special populations.

  5. An integrated pharmacokinetics ontology and corpus for text mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug pharmacokinetics parameters, drug interaction parameters, and pharmacogenetics data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in the literature. Without appropriate pharmacokinetics ontology and a well annotated pharmacokinetics corpus, it will be difficult to develop text mining tools for pharmacokinetics data collection from the literature and pharmacokinetics data integration from multiple databases. Description A comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology was constructed. It can annotate all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. It covers all drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK-corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK-corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK-corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions. PMID:23374886

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of rifapentine and its primary desacetyl metabolite in South African tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Grant; Wilkins, Justin; McFadyen, Lynn; McIlleron, Helen; Smith, Peter; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifapentine (RFP) and 25-desacetyl RFP in a South African pulmonary tuberculosis patient population. Special reference was made to studying the influence of previous exposure to rifampin (RIF) and the variability in pharmacokinetic parameters between patients and between occasions and the influence of different covariates. Patients were included in the study if they had been receiving first-line antimycobacterial therapy (rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol) for not less than 4 weeks and not more than 6 weeks and were divided into three RFP dosage groups based on weight: 600 mg, <45 kg; 750 mg, 46 to 55 kg; and 900 mg, >55 kg. Participants received a single oral dose of RFP together with concomitant antimycobacterial agents, excluding RIF, on study days 1 and 5 after they ingested a soup-based meal. The RFP and 25-desacetyl RFP concentration-time data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effect modeling using NONMEM. The pharmacokinetics of the parent drug were modeled separately, and the individual pharmacokinetic parameters were used as inputs for the 25-desacetyl RFP pharmacokinetic model. A one-compartment disposition model was found to best describe the data for both the parent and the metabolite, and the metabolite was assumed to be formed only from the central compartment of the parent drug. Prior treatment with RIF did not alter the pharmacokinetics of RFP but appeared to increase the excretion of 25-desacetyl RFP in a nonlinear fashion. The RFP oral clearance and volume of distribution were found to increase by 0.049 liter/h and 0.691 liter, respectively, with a 1-kg increase from the median weight of 50 kg. The oral clearance of 25-desacetyl RFP was found to be 35% lower in female patients. The model developed here describes the population pharmacokinetics of RFP and its primary metabolite in tuberculosis patients and includes the effects of prior administration with RIF and

  7. Population Pharmacokinetics of Rifapentine and Its Primary Desacetyl Metabolite in South African Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Grant; Wilkins, Justin; McFadyen, Lynn; McIlleron, Helen; Smith, Peter; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifapentine (RFP) and 25-desacetyl RFP in a South African pulmonary tuberculosis patient population. Special reference was made to studying the influence of previous exposure to rifampin (RIF) and the variability in pharmacokinetic parameters between patients and between occasions and the influence of different covariates. Patients were included in the study if they had been receiving first-line antimycobacterial therapy (rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol) for not less than 4 weeks and not more than 6 weeks and were divided into three RFP dosage groups based on weight: 600 mg, <45 kg; 750 mg, 46 to 55 kg; and 900 mg, >55 kg. Participants received a single oral dose of RFP together with concomitant antimycobacterial agents, excluding RIF, on study days 1 and 5 after they ingested a soup-based meal. The RFP and 25-desacetyl RFP concentration-time data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effect modeling using NONMEM. The pharmacokinetics of the parent drug were modeled separately, and the individual pharmacokinetic parameters were used as inputs for the 25-desacetyl RFP pharmacokinetic model. A one-compartment disposition model was found to best describe the data for both the parent and the metabolite, and the metabolite was assumed to be formed only from the central compartment of the parent drug. Prior treatment with RIF did not alter the pharmacokinetics of RFP but appeared to increase the excretion of 25-desacetyl RFP in a nonlinear fashion. The RFP oral clearance and volume of distribution were found to increase by 0.049 liter/h and 0.691 liter, respectively, with a 1-kg increase from the median weight of 50 kg. The oral clearance of 25-desacetyl RFP was found to be 35% lower in female patients. The model developed here describes the population pharmacokinetics of RFP and its primary metabolite in tuberculosis patients and includes the effects of prior administration with RIF and

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of abacavir in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Fauchet, Floris; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Préta, Laure-Helene; Valade, Elodie; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Urien, Saik; Hirt, Déborah

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, a population approach was used to describe abacavir (ABC) pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected pregnant and nonpregnant women. A total of 266 samples from 150 women were obtained. No covariate effect (from age, body weight, pregnancy, or gestational age) on ABC pharmacokinetics was found. Thus, it seems unnecessary to adapt the ABC dosing regimen during pregnancy.

  9. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  10. Applying pharmacokinetics to veterinary clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Trepanier, Lauren A

    2013-09-01

    This article describes clinical examples in which pharmacokinetic parameters can be used to optimize veterinary patient care. Specific applications include extrapolating drug dosages, optimizing therapy with therapeutic drug monitoring, interpreting pharmacokinetic information provided by drug labels and pharmaceutical companies, and adjusting drug dosages in patients with hepatic or renal failure.

  11. Applications of physiologic pharmacokinetic modeling in carcinogenic risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Krewski, D; Withey, J R; Ku, L F; Andersen, M E

    1994-01-01

    The use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models has been proposed as a means of estimating the dose of the reactive metabolites of carcinogenic xenobiotics reaching target tissues, thereby affording an opportunity to base estimates of potential cancer risk on tissue dose rather than external levels of exposure. In this article, we demonstrate how a PBPK model can be constructed by specifying mass-balance equations for each physiological compartment included in the model. In general, this leads to a system of nonlinear partial differential equations with which to characterize the compartment system. These equations then can be solved numerically to determine the concentration of metabolites in each compartment as functions of time. In the special case of a linear pharmacokinetic system, we present simple closed-form expressions for the area under the concentration-time curves (AUC) in individual tissue compartments. A general relationship between the AUC in blood and other tissue compartments is also established. These results are of use in identifying those parameters in the models that characterize the integrated tissue dose, and which should therefore be the primary focus of sensitivity analyses. Applications of PBPK modeling for purposes of tissue dosimetry are reviewed, including models developed for methylene chloride, ethylene oxide, 1,4-dioxane, 1-nitropyrene, as well as polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and furans. Special considerations in PBPK modeling related to aging, topical absorption, pregnancy, and mixed exposures are discussed. The linkage between pharmacokinetic models used for tissue dosimetry and pharmacodynamic models for neoplastic transformation of stem cells in the target tissue is explored. PMID:7737040

  12. Reporting guidelines for population pharmacokinetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kevin; Mehrotra, Nitin; Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Kastrissios, Helen; Patel, Bela; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Jadhav, Pravin; Wang, Yaning; Byon, Wonkyung

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a consolidated set of guiding principles for reporting of population pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses based on input from a survey of practitioners as well as discussions between industry, consulting and regulatory scientists. The survey found that identification of population covariate effects on drug exposure and support for dose selection (where population PK frequently serves as preparatory analysis to exposure-response modeling) are the main areas of influence for population PK analysis. The proposed guidelines consider two main purposes of population PK reports (1) to present key analysis findings and their impact on drug development decisions, and (2) as documentation of the analysis methods for the dual purpose of enabling review of the analysis and facilitating future use of the models. This work also identified two main audiences for the reports: (1) a technically competent group responsible for in-depth review of the data, methodology, and results, and (2) a scientifically literate, but not technically adept group, whose main interest is in the implications of the analysis for the broader drug development program. We recommend a generalized question-based approach with six questions that need to be addressed throughout the report. We recommend eight sections (Synopsis, Introduction, Data, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, Appendix) with suggestions for the target audience and level of detail for each section. A section providing general expectations regarding population PK reporting from a regulatory perspective is also included. We consider this an important step towards industrialization of the field of pharmacometrics such that non-technical audience also understands the role of pharmacometrics analyses in decision making. Population PK reports were chosen as representative reports to derive these recommendations; however, the guiding principles presented here are applicable for all pharmacometric reports

  13. Pharmacokinetic interaction between telaprevir and methadone.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, Rolf; Verboven, Peter; Vandevoorde, Ann; Vinck, Petra; Snoeys, Jan; Boogaerts, Griet; De Paepe, Els; Van Solingen-Ristea, Rodica; Witek, James; Garg, Varun

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody is present in most patients enrolled in methadone maintenance programs. Therefore, interactions between the HCV protease inhibitor telaprevir and methadone were investigated. The pharmacokinetics of R- and S-methadone were measured after administration of methadone alone and after 7 days of telaprevir (750 mg every 8 h [q8h]) coadministration in HCV-negative subjects on stable, individualized methadone therapy. Unbound R-methadone was measured in predose plasma samples before and during telaprevir coadministration. Safety and symptoms of opioid withdrawal were evaluated throughout the study. In total, 18 subjects were enrolled; 2 discontinued prior to receiving telaprevir. The minimum plasma concentration in the dosing interval (C(min)), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from h 0 (time of administration) to 24 h postdose (AUC(0-24)) for R-methadone were reduced by 31%, 29%, and 29%, respectively, in the presence of telaprevir. The AUC0-24 ratio of S-methadone/R-methadone was not altered. The median unbound percentage of R-methadone increased by 26% in the presence of telaprevir. The R-methadone median (absolute) unbound C(min) values in the absence (10.63 ng/ml) and presence (10.45 ng/ml) of telaprevir were similar. There were no symptoms of opioid withdrawal and no discontinuations due to adverse events. In summary, exposure to total R-methadone was reduced by approximately 30% in the presence of telaprevir, while the exposure to unbound R-methadone was unchanged. No symptoms of opioid withdrawal were observed. These results suggest that dose adjustment of methadone is not required when initiating telaprevir treatment. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00933283.).

  14. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E.; Unwin, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from −0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. PMID:27001806

  15. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for bisphenol A in pregnant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Yuko; Matsuyama, Wakoto; Wada, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Junko; Chan, Melissa Pui Ling; Nakayama, Aki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2007-10-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used to produce polymers for food contact and other applications, so there is potential for oral exposure of humans to trace amounts via ingestion. To date, no physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been located for BPA in pregnant mice with or without fetuses. An estimate by a mathematical model is essential since information on humans is difficult to obtain experimentally. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of our experiment following single oral administration of BPA to pregnant mice. The risk assessment of bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of human offspring is an important issue. There have been limited data on the exposure level of human fetuses to BPA (e.g. BPA concentration in cord blood) and no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in humans with or without fetuses. In the present study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the pharmacokinetics of BPA in a pregnant mouse with the prospect of future extrapolation to humans. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of an experiment we executed on pregnant mice following single oral administration of BPA. The model could describe the rapid transfer of BPA through the placenta to the fetus and the slow disappearance from fetuses. The simulated time courses after three-time repeated oral administrations of BPA by the constructed model fitted well with the experimental data, and the simulation for the 10 times lower dose was also consistent with the experiment. This suggested that the PBPK model for BPA in pregnant mice was successfully verified and is highly promising for extrapolation to humans who are expected to be exposed more chronically to lower doses.

  16. Trusted Translation Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, Yacine; Serhani, Mohamed Adel; Campbell, Piers; Mathew, Sujith Samuel

    Administering multilingual Web sites and applications reliably, involves interconnected and multipart tasks, where trust in the involved parties and content translation sources is paramount. Published Web sites may reflect content from databases, content management systems and other repositories to manage related Web content. But a Web site mirrored wholly or selectively onto a target language version requires streamlined trusted processes. Traditionally, files are translated and transferred via FTP, e-mail, or other communication means. Similarly, translation instructions are communicated between involved parties through verbal instruction, e-mail, and instruction files lead to a variety of inconsistencies and lack of trust in the translation process. This paper proposes a Web service approach to streamline the translation processes and an integration of trust properties in the proposed translation Web services. Web Services have been instrumental in handling problems inherent to systems integration, allowing web-based systems to converse and communicate data automatically. The OASIS Translation Web Services Technical Committee has released a standard way for Web Services to serve the translation and localization business. This article proposes a framework to centralize translation services at a reputable source providing a workflow and a mechanism to quantify service trust. An implementation of the framework is also described in the context of a localization case study.

  17. Obstetric analgesia. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J

    1986-01-01

    All drugs used in obstetric analgesia are more or less lipophilic, their site of action is in the central nervous system, and they have good membrane penetrability in the fetomaternal unit. Thus the dose and method of administration as well as the duration of treatment are important clinical determinants of drug effects in the fetus and newborn. In the past, too much emphasis has been placed on fetomaternal blood concentration ratios of different agents; it is now appreciated that the extent of fetal tissue distribution and the neonatal elimination rate are pharmacokinetically much more important. Extensive fetal tissue distribution is reflected in a low fetomaternal drug concentration ratio, which may be followed by prolonged neonatal elimination of the drug. Currently, the most effective and safest method for obstetric analgesia is regional epidural administration of bupivacaine or lignocaine (lidocaine); only low doses are needed and the newborn is able to handle these agents efficiently. On the basis of pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioural assessments, inhalational anaesthetic agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine (meperidine) or benzodiazepines. Intermittent administration and fast pulmonary elimination of inhalational agents ensure that long-lasting residual effects are unlikely to occur. The kinetics of epidural and intrathecal opiates explain the problems associated with their use in obstetrics. Among the newer drugs used in obstetric analgesia, the properties of meptazinol and isoflurane appear interesting and these agents warrant further study. All drugs used in obstetric analgesia have a potentially detrimental effect on the neonate and, therefore, knowledge of fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetics is of importance to the clinician.

  18. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics model for melatonin--effects of light and routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Bouak, Fethi; Vartanian, Oshin; Cheung, Bob

    2013-12-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed using MATLAB Simulink(®) to predict diurnal variations of endogenous melatonin with light as well as pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin via different routes of administration. The model was structured using whole body, including pineal and saliva compartments, and parameterized based on the literature values for endogenous melatonin. It was then optimized by including various intensities of light and various dosage and formulation of melatonin. The model predictions generally have a good fit with available experimental data as evaluated by mean squared errors and ratios between model-predicted and observed values considering large variations in melatonin secretion and pharmacokinetics as reported in the literature. It also demonstrates the capability and usefulness in simulating plasma and salivary concentrations of melatonin under different light conditions and the interaction of endogenous melatonin with the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin. Given the mechanistic approach and programming flexibility of MATLAB Simulink(®), the PBPK model could provide predictions of endogenous melatonin rhythms and pharmacokinetic changes in response to environmental (light) and experimental (dosage and route of administration) conditions. Furthermore, the model may be used to optimize the combined treatment using light exposure and exogenous melatonin for maximal phase advances or delays.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of therapeutic proteins: Advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Xu, Xin; Theil, Frank-Peter; Khawli, Leslie A; Leach, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), as well as toxicity profiles of therapeutic proteins in animals and humans, which have been in commercial development for more than three decades. However, in the PK arena, many fundamental questions remain to be resolved. Investigative and bioanalytical tools need to be established to improve the translation of PK data from animals to humans, and from in vitro assays to in vivo readouts, which would ultimately lead to a higher success rate in drug development. In toxicology, it is known, in general, what studies are needed to safely develop therapeutic proteins, and what studies do not provide relevant information. One of the major complicating factors in nonclinical and clinical programs for therapeutic proteins is the impact of immunogenicity. In this review, we will highlight the emerging science and technology, as well as the challenges around the pharmacokinetic- and safety-related issues in drug development of mAbs and other therapeutic proteins. PMID:22558487

  1. Microdosing: the new pharmacokinetic paradigm?

    PubMed

    Zanni, Guido R; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2006-10-01

    Numerous market factors have converged to create a need for change in the drug development process. Public scrutiny, high failure rates for investigational agents, and concern about the use of animals in research, are just a few. In response, some changes in this process are being made. Microdosing--administering very small, radiolabeled doses of investigational agents to humans--is one change that has the potential to save time and money. It is used to elucidate the pharmacokinetic profile of agents. Not all experts agree that it will live up to its promise, but the potential is great.

  2. Human Microdosing with Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Dibenzo[ def,p ]chrysene and Metabolites by UPLC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Madeen, Erin P.; Ognibene, Ted J.; Corley, Richard A.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Baird, William M.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Ken W.; Williams, David E.

    2016-10-17

    Metabolism is a key health risk factor following exposures to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), an IARC classified 2A probable human carcinogen. Human exposure to PAHs occurs primarily from the diet in non-smokers. However, little data is available on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans of high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 aromatic rings), including DBC. We previously determined the pharmacokinetics of DBC in human volunteers orally administered a micro-dose (29 ng; 5 nCi) of [14C]-DBC by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis of total [14C] in plasma and urine. In the current study, we utilized a novel “moving wire” interface between ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and AMS to detect and quantify parent DBC and its major metabolites. The major [14C] product identified in plasma was unmetabolized [14C]-DBC itself, (Cmax= 18.5 ± 15.9 fg/mL, Tmax= 2.1 ± 1.0 h), whereas the major metabolite was identified as [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12-diol (Cmax= 2.5 ± 1.3 fg/mL, Tmax= 1.8 h). Several minor species of [14C]-DBC metabolites were also detected for which no reference standards were available. Free and conjugated metabolites were detected in urine with [14C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12,13,14-tetraol isomers identified as the major metabolites, 56.3% of which were conjugated (Cmax= 35.8 ± 23.0 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). [14C]-DBC-11,12-diol, of which 97.5% was conjugated, was also identified in urine (Cmax= 29.4 ± 11.6 pg/pool, Tmax= 6-12 h pool). Parent [14C]-DBC was not detected in urine. This is the first dataset to assess metabolite profiles and associated pharmacokinetics of a carcinogenic PAH in human volunteers at an environmentally relevant dose, providing the data necessary for translation of high dose animal models to humans for translation of environmental health risk assessment.

  3. USE OF EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) TO CONSTRUCT A PBPK /MODEL FOR CARBOFURAN WITH THE REPORTED EXPERIMENTAL DATA IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the relationships among carbofuran exposure, dose, and effects, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed for the rat using the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework.

  4. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC INTERACTION FOR A BINARY MIXTURE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND DIAZINON IN THE RAT

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.; Hinman, Melissa N.; Busby, Andrea L.; Kousba, Ahmed A.

    2005-05-15

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) are two commonly used organophosphorus (OP) insecticides and potential exists for concurrent exposures. The primary neurotoxic effects from OP pesticide exposures result from the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by their oxon metabolites. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic impact of acute binary exposures to CPF and DZN in rats were evaluated in this study. Rats were orally administered CPF, DZN or a CPF/DZN mixture (0, 15, 30 or 60 mg/kg) and blood (plasma and RBC), and brain were collected at 0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h post-dosing, urine was also collected at 24 h. Chlorpyrifos, DZN and their respective metabolites 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP) were quantified in blood and/or urine and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition was measured in brain, RBCs and plasma. Co-exposure to CPF/DZN at 15/15 mg/kg, did not appreciably alter the pharmacokinetics of CPF, DZN or their metabolites in blood; whereas, a 60/60 mg/kg dose resulted in a transient increase in Cmax, AUC, and decreased clearance of both compounds, likely due to competition between CPF and DZN for CYP450 metabolism. At lower doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental exposures, the pharmacokinetics were linear. A dose-dependent inhibition of ChE was noted in tissues for both the single and co-exposures. The overall potency for ChE inhibition was greater for CPF than DZN and the binary mixture response appeared to be strongly influenced by CPF. A comparison of the ChE binary response at the low dose (15 mg/kg), where there were no apparent pharmacokinetic interactions, suggested that the overall ChE response was additive. These are the first reported experiments we are aware of that characterize both the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between CPF and DZN in the rat, and will be used to further develop a binary physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic

  5. Translation Ambiguity but Not Word Class Predicts Translation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Anat; Kroll, Judith F.; Macwhinney, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of word class and translation ambiguity on cross-linguistic representation and processing. Bilingual speakers of English and Spanish performed translation production and translation recognition tasks on nouns and verbs in both languages. Words either had a single translation or more than one translation. Translation…

  6. Examining English-German Translation Ambiguity Using Primed Translation Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddington, Chelsea M.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Many words have more than one translation across languages. Such "translation-ambiguous" words are translated more slowly and less accurately than their unambiguous counterparts. We examine the extent to which word context and translation dominance influence the processing of translation-ambiguous words. We further examine how these factors…

  7. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data used to calibrate these published models can act as valuable starting points for model development of new chemicals with similar molecular structures. A knowledgebase for published PBPK-related articles was compiled to support PBPK model construction for new chemicals based on their close analogues within the knowledgebase, and a web-based interface was developed to allow users to query those close analogues. A list of 689 unique chemicals and their corresponding 1751 articles was created after analysis of 2,245 PBPK-related articles. For each model, the PMID, chemical name, major metabolites, species, gender, life stages and tissue compartments were extracted from the published articles. PaDEL-Descriptor, a Chemistry Development Kit based software, was used to calculate molecular fingerprints. Tanimoto index was implemented in the user interface as measurement of structural similarity. The utility of the PBPK knowledgebase and web-based user interface was demonstrated using two case studies with ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Our PBPK knowledgebase is a novel tool for ranking chemicals based on similarities to other chemicals associated with existi

  8. Grepafloxacin: pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration.

    PubMed

    Wise, Richard

    1998-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic and tissue penetration studies of grepafloxacin, a new broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone, show that it has useful properties for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Grepafloxacin has a volume of distribution that is larger than those of many of the other fluoroquinolones and is concentrated in alveolar macrophages, bronchial mucosa and epithelial lining fluid to a greater extent than are certain other fluoroquinolones. Grepafloxacin concentrations achieved in plasma after a 400-mg oral dose are well in excess of those required to inhibit the respiratory pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Streptococcus pneumoniae is also covered for most of the dosing interval, but at normal dose levels grepafloxacin might not inhibit Enterococcus faecalis. The maximum plasma concentrations and area under the concentration---time curve achieved with grepafloxacin suggest that it will be effective for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. The pharmacokinetics of fluoroquinolones are among their most useful properties. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate whether the differences between grepafloxacin and the other fluoroquinolones are of therapeutic significance.

  9. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  10. Translation as Literary Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    di Stefano, B. Follkart

    1982-01-01

    It is proposed that literary translation is intrinsically an act of literary criticism. This theory is illustrated by discussion of specific problems in translating Sartre's "La Nausee" and Leonard Forest's "Le pays de la Sagouine," especially the use of verb tense. (MSE)

  11. Terminology, a Translational Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Helga

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of qualified terminology and its implications for terminological activity. Argues that students have to learn how to organize their terminological activity. Suggests that translation is a special kind of intercultural communication and is an indispensable part of translational action. Argues that terminology be examined…

  12. Computer Aids to Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krollmann, Friedrich

    1981-01-01

    Describes the structure and modes of operation of the Bundessprachenamt's (BSprA: Federal Office of Languages of the Federal Republic of Germany) terminology data bank as an aid to translation. Analyzes advantages and disadvantages of each user mode, and discusses probable developments in the immediate future of machine-aided translation. (MES)

  13. Semantics via Machine Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, P. T.

    1977-01-01

    Recent experiments in machine translation have given the semantic elements of collocation in Russian more objective criteria. Soviet linguists in search of semantic relationships have attempted to devise a semantic synthesis for construction of a basic language for machine translation. One such effort is summarized. (CHK)

  14. Translations toward Connected Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Mark; Leikin, Roza

    2010-01-01

    The translation principle allows students to solve problems in different branches of mathematics and thus to develop connectedness in their mathematical knowledge. Successful application of the translation principle depends on the classroom mathematical norms for the development of discussions and the comparison of different solutions to one…

  15. Idioms and Back Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The challenges of intercultural communication are an integral part of many undergraduate business communication courses. Marketing gaffes clearly illustrate the pitfalls of translation and underscore the importance of a knowledge of the culture with which one is attempting to communicate. A good way to approach the topic of translation pitfalls in…

  16. Advanced Translation Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokkan, Elizabeth

    1980-01-01

    The process of translating demands an attempt to draw on contextual knowledge on all relevant areas of society: literature and the study of society together with the use of idiomatic language. Students can be shown this by direct translations which appear incomprehensible. English-to-Norwegian-to-English examples are given. (Author/PJM)

  17. The Problems of Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntsman, Jeffrey F.

    The problems confronting the translator of American Indian literature are immense. The history of European Indian relations has obscured many original Indian values and attitudes and has substituted a set of simplistic and unreal Anglo attitudes that translators must transcend. Unlike most Western literature, Indian literature does not instruct,…

  18. Plurality in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farahzad, Farzaneh

    This paper discusses factors contributing to differing translations of the same source text, arguing that translation occurs on a continuum rather than having absolute criteria and procedures. Issues examined include the formal properties of the text, the text's "invariant core of meaning," stability in the semantic elements of the text, the text…

  19. A Translation Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadie, Jacqueline

    1999-01-01

    Encourages readers to look at traditional translation activities in a positive and innovative light. A detailed lesson plan is offered, showing how back translation can be exploited with a monolingual class, whether or not the teacher speaks the students' mother tongue. (Author/VWL)

  20. Creativity, Culture and Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaee, Siamak; Wan Yahya, Wan Roselezam; Babaee, Ruzbeh

    2014-01-01

    Some scholars (Bassnett-McGuire, Catford, Brislin) suggest that a good piece of translation should be a strict reflection of the style of the original text while some others (Gui, Newmark, Wilss) consider the original text untranslatable unless it is reproduced. Opposing views by different critics suggest that translation is still a challenging…

  1. Translation as (Global) Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Bruce; Tetreault, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores translation as a useful point of departure and framework for taking a translingual approach to writing engaging globalization. Globalization and the knowledge economy are putting renewed emphasis on translation as a key site of contest between a dominant language ideology of monolingualism aligned with fast capitalist…

  2. Students' Differentiated Translation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how students translate between mathematical representations is of both practical and theoretical importance. This study examined students' processes in their generation of symbolic and graphic representations of given polynomial functions. The purpose was to investigate how students perform these translations. The result of the study…

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to determine the dose of ST-246 to protect against smallpox in humans.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Janet M; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J F; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E; Honeychurch, Kady M; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a "material threat" and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population.

  4. PHARMACOKINETIC PROFILES OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID IN MICE AFTER CHRONIC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is highly persistent in humans, with serum half-life estimates of 2.3 to 3.8 years. In the mouse, elimination of PFOA appears to be first-order after a single oral administration, with serum half-life estimates of 16 days for females and 22 days for ...

  5. PROcEED: Probabilistic reverse dosimetry approaches for estimating exposure distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    As increasing amounts of biomonitoring survey data become available, a new discipline focused on converting such data into estimates of chemical exposures has developed. Reverse dosimetry uses a pharmacokinetic model along with measured biomarker concentrations to determine the p...

  6. POLIBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS: A CASE STUDY FOR APPLICATION OF BIOMONITORING DATA TO CHARACTERIZE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence and steady increase in environmental and human concentrations of PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) has heightened interest in the potential toxicological consequences of these chemicals. Currently available data on exposure, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and biom...

  7. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TCE USING THE DOSE EXPOSURE ESTIMATING MODEL (DEEM) IN ACSL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ACSL-based Dose Exposure Estimating Model(DEEM) under development by EPA is used to perform art uncertainty analysis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PSPK) model of trichloroethylene (TCE). This model involves several circulating metabolites such as trichloroacet...

  8. Life-Stage PBPK Models for Multiple Routes of Ethanol Exposure in the Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly blended with gasoline (10% ethanol) in the US, and higher ethanol concentrations are being considered. While the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of orally-ingested ethanol are widely reported, comparable work is limited for inhalation exposure (IE), particularly...

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetics of the phosphate binder lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Damment, Stephen J P; Pennick, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is considered to be the most potent of a new generation of noncalcium phosphate binders used to treat hyperphosphataemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD), a condition associated with progressive bone and cardiovascular pathology and a markedly elevated risk of death. Its phosphate-binding action involves ionic binding and precipitation of insoluble complexes within the lumen of the intestine, thereby preventing absorption of dietary phosphate. While pharmacokinetics have little relevance to the efficacy of lanthanum carbonate, they are of fundamental importance when it comes to evaluating safety. When administered as lanthanum carbonate, the oral bioavailability of lanthanum is low (approximately 0.001%). The small absorbed fraction is excreted predominantly in bile, with less than 2% being eliminated by the kidneys. Predictably, therefore, plasma exposure and pharmacokinetics have been shown to be similar in healthy human volunteers and CKD stage 5 patients. With almost complete plasma protein binding, free lanthanum concentrations in patients at steady state are <3 pg/mL. These properties greatly reduce systemic exposure, tissue deposition and the potential for adverse effects. While lanthanum has a variety of calcium-like actions in vitro, there is little or no evidence that these occur in vivo. This paradox is explained by the very low concentrations of circulating free lanthanum ions, which are many orders of magnitude lower than reported effect concentrations in vitro. Safety pharmacology and toxicology evaluations have failed to reveal any significant calcium-like actions in vivo, despite inclusion of high intravenous doses in some cases.Lanthanum carbonate has a low propensity to cause systemic drug interactions due to its poor absorption. However, the higher concentrations present in the gastrointestinal tract can form chelates with some drugs, such as fluoroquinolones, and reduce their absorption. The improved understanding of the

  10. Human urine and plasma concentrations of bisphenol A extrapolated from pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Takamori; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Makiko; Shida, Satomi; Nishiyama, Sayako; Takano, Ryohji; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to extrapolate to humans the pharmacokinetics of estrogen analog bisphenol A determined in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Higher plasma concentrations and urinary excretions of bisphenol A glucuronide (a primary metabolite of bisphenol A) were observed in chimeric mice than in control mice after oral administrations, presumably because of enterohepatic circulation of bisphenol A glucuronide in control mice. Bisphenol A glucuronidation was faster in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. These findings suggest a predominantly urinary excretion route of bisphenol A glucuronide in chimeric mice with humanized liver. Reported human plasma and urine data for bisphenol A glucuronide after single oral administration of 0.1mg/kg bisphenol A were reasonably estimated using the current semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model extrapolated from humanized mice data using algometric scaling. The reported geometric mean urinary bisphenol A concentration in the U.S. population of 2.64μg/L underwent reverse dosimetry modeling with the current human semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model. This yielded an estimated exposure of 0.024μg/kg/day, which was less than the daily tolerable intake of bisphenol A (50μg/kg/day), implying little risk to humans. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling will likely prove useful for determining the species-dependent toxicological risk of bisphenol A.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and derivation of an anticancer dosing regimen for PAC-1, a preferential small molecule activator of procaspase-3, in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Pamela W; Schmit, Joanna M; Peterson, Quinn P; West, Diana C; Hsu, Danny C; Novotny, Chris J; Dirikolu, Levent; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Garrett, Laura D; Hergenrother, Paul J; Fan, Timothy M

    2011-10-01

    PAC-1 is a preferential small molecule activator of procaspase-3 and has potential to become a novel and effective anticancer agent. The rational development of PAC-1 for translational oncologic applications would be advanced by coupling relevant in vitro cytotoxicity studies with pharmacokinetic investigations conducted in large mammalian models possessing similar metabolism and physiology as people. In the present study, we investigated whether concentrations and exposure durations of PAC-1 that induce cytotoxicity in lymphoma cell lines in vitro can be achievable in healthy dogs through a constant rate infusion (CRI) intravenous delivery strategy. Time- and dose-dependent procaspase-3 activation by PAC-1 with subsequent cytotoxicity was determined in a panel of B-cell lymphoma cells in vitro. The pharmacokinetics of PAC-1 administered orally or intravenously was studied in 6 healthy dogs using a crossover design. The feasibility of maintaining steady state plasma concentration of PAC-1 for 24 or 48 h that paralleled in vitro cytotoxic concentrations was investigated in 4 healthy dogs. In vitro, PAC-1 induced apoptosis in lymphoma cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The oral bioavailability of PAC-1 was relatively low and highly variable (17.8 ± 9.5%). The achievement and maintenance of predicted PAC-1 cytotoxic concentrations in normal dogs was safely attained via intravenous CRI lasting for 24 or 48 h in duration. Using the dog as a large mammalian model, PAC-1 can be safely administered as an intravenous CRI while achieving predicted in vitro cytotoxic concentrations.

  12. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolate in patients with autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Abd Rahman, Azrin N; Tett, Susan E; Staatz, Christine E

    2013-05-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active drug moiety of mycophenolate, is a potent immunosuppressant agent, which is increasingly being used in the treatment of patients with various autoimmune diseases. An understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolate in this population should assist the clinician with rational dosage decisions. This review aims to provide an overview of the published literature on the clinical pharmacokinetics of mycophenolate in autoimmune disease and a briefer summary of current pharmacodynamic knowledge, and to identify areas of potential future research in this field. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE databases as well as bibliographies of relevant articles and 'on-line early' pages of key journals. Twenty-six pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of mycophenolate in people with autoimmune disease were identified and appraised. Twenty-two of these studies used non-compartmental analysis techniques and four used population modelling methods to estimate mycophenolate pharmacokinetic parameters. Seven studies linked mycophenolate exposure to treatment outcomes. Only four studies measured free (unbound) as well as total mycophenolate exposure and only two studies characterised MPA disposition following enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) administration. Across all studies MPA displayed erratic and complex pharmacokinetics with substantial between-subject variability. Based on total drug measurement, the dose-normalised MPA area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 to 12 h post-dose (AUC12) varied at least five- to ten-fold between subjects. Typical values for apparent oral clearance (CL/F) of MPA during nonlinear mixed-effects modelling ranged from 8.3 to 25.3 L/h. Patient renal function, serum albumin levels, sex, ethnicity, food intake, concurrent administration of interacting drugs such as antacids, metal-containing medications and proton pump inhibitors and

  13. Theory of Test Translation Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Backhoff, Eduardo; Contreras-Nino, Luis Angel

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present a theory of test translation whose intent is to provide the conceptual foundation for effective, systematic work in the process of test translation and test translation review. According to the theory, translation error is multidimensional; it is not simply the consequence of defective translation but an inevitable fact…

  14. [Application of morpheme translation method in english translation of TCM].

    PubMed

    Diao, Xiang; Hu, You-Ping

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, application of morpheme translation method in English translation of TCM was introduced, and its superiorities and limitations were analyzed in order to promote the standardization and improve the confused current status of the English translation of TCM.

  15. Use of novel inhalation kinetic studies to refine physiologically-based-pharmacokinetic models for ethanol in non-pregnant and pregnant rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure induces a variety of concentration-dependent neurological and developmental effects in the rat. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to predict the inhalation exposure concentrations necessary to produce blood EtOH concentrat...

  16. Pharmacokinetics of indomethacin in poultry.

    PubMed

    Cristòfol, C; Valladares, J E; Martí, G; Arboix, M

    2000-01-01

    Indomethacin (INDO) is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug widely used since the 1970s. The pharmacokinetic behavior of INDO (2 mg/kg) has been studied after intravenous (i.v.) and oral administration to broiler chickens. After i.v. administration, a first fast distribution phase and a later and slower elimination phase were observed. The elimination half-life and mean residence time (MRT) obtained were 1.0 hr and 0.8 hr, respectively. After oral administration, a flip-flop phenomenon was observed giving an elimination half-life and MRT approximately three times and six times higher, respectively, than the i.v. administration. The plasma concentrations after oral administration were sustained during 8-10 hr, giving an antinflammatory cover over the dose producing 50% of maximal effect during this time period.

  17. Oxazepam pharmacokinetics in thyroid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, A K; Khir, A S; Bewsher, P D; Hawksworth, G M

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oxazepam, a drug mainly eliminated by a single step glucuronidation reaction, were studied in seven hyperthyroid and six hypothyroid patients before and after treatment. Oxazepam elimination half-life was shorter and apparent oral clearance higher in untreated hyperthyroid patients than after treatment. There was no significant change in oxazepam elimination in hypothyroid subjects. Time to peak concentration (tmax) was reduced in the hyperthyroid state. Hypothyroidism had no significant effect on tmax. Serum bilirubin concentration was lower in the patients while hyperthyroid before treatment than when euthyroid and also lower than in the hypothyroid patients. There was no significant correlation between serum bilirubin concentrations and oxazepam elimination. These results suggest that glucuronyl transferase activity is increased in hyperthyroidism but is not altered in most patients with hypothyroidism. The extent of increase in glucuronyl transferase activity is similar to that produced by enzyme inducing drugs. PMID:6419761

  18. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  19. PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC (PBPK/PD) MODEL FOR PREDICTING THE DERMAL DOSE AND DISPOSITION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are particularly suited for interpretation of cumulative risk via the dermal route for which aggregate exposure must be assessed for chemicals having a common mechanism of toxicity. To this end, a quantita...

  20. Circulating factors induce coronary endothelial ceIl activation foIlowing exposure to inhaled diesel exhaust and nitrogen dioxide in humans :Evidence from a novel translational in vitro model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vascular toxicity of inhaled agents may be caused by soluble factors that are released into the systemic circulation. To confirm this in a straightforward manner, we obtained plasma from healthy human volunteers before and after exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and nitrogen di...

  1. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of bisoprolol.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Thomas, P; Whiting, B

    1989-07-01

    The technique of population pharmacokinetic analysis was employed to study the variability in the dose concentration relationship of bisoprolol during its clinical development. The influence of demographic factors on the variability of clearance was investigated in 3 different populations: group I, patients (including an elderly group) with essential hypertension receiving multiple oral doses of bisoprolol 10 or 20mg for 3 months; group II, patients with different degrees of renal impairment and healthy controls; and group III, patients with different types of hepatic impairment and healthy controls. Patients and controls in groups II and III received only a single oral dose of bisoprolol 10mg. The 3 data sets were analysed separately, using a non-linear mixed effects model (the NONMEM program). A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption described the data adequately. The typical values of volume of central compartment, volume of distribution at steady-state and the absorption rate constant for the 3 populations were: for group I, 68L, 235L, and 0.7h-1; for group II, 28L, 179L, and 0.3h-1; and for group III, 55L, 256L, and 0.4h-1, respectively. Plasma clearance was related to age in group I, to serum creatinine in group II and to aspartate transaminase activity in group III. The 68% confidence limits for clearance and elimination half-life were 8.2 to 21.5 L/h and 7.6 to 19.7h, respectively, for 50-year-old patients in group I. The analysis predicted that progressive increases in serum creatinine or aspartate transaminase activity will result in only a 50% reduction of clearance.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of conivaptan use in patients with severe hepatic impairment

    PubMed Central

    Marbury, Thomas; Fox, Jerry; Kaelin, Byron; Pavliv, Leo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Conivaptan is an intravenous dual V1A/V2 vasopressin antagonist approved for the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia. Earlier studies showed that patients with moderate liver disease could be safely treated with conivaptan by reducing the dose by 50%, whereas patients with mild hepatic impairment needed no dose adjustment. The objective of this Phase 1, open-label study was to assess the pharmacokinetics, protein binding, and safety of 48 h of conivaptan infusion in individuals with severe hepatic impairment. Patients and methods Eight subjects with severe hepatic impairment (Child–Pugh score 10–15) and nine subjects with normal liver function were enrolled. Intravenous conivaptan (20 mg) was given as a 30 min loading dose on Day 1 followed by two consecutive 20 mg continuous infusions over 24 h each. Subjects were monitored for adverse events and changes in clinical laboratory parameters. Plasma and urine pharmacokinetic samples were collected at defined times. Subjects were followed through Study Day 5. Results Hepatically impaired individuals exhibited higher concentrations of plasma conivaptan throughout the treatment period. Overall exposure, as measured by area under the plasma conivaptan concentration-time curve from time zero through infinity (AUCINF), was ~60% higher in impaired individuals compared to those with normal liver function. Terminal elimination half-life was slightly longer in impaired subjects (12 h) as compared to normal subjects (9 h), and clearance was 65% higher in subjects with normal liver function, while urinary excretion was higher in impaired individuals. Albumin levels directly, and alkaline phosphatase inversely, correlated with conivaptan clearance. Conclusion A 20 mg conivaptan loading dose given >30 min followed by two daily infusions of 20 mg each was well tolerated by patients with severe hepatic impairment as monitored by adverse events and clinical laboratory values. Based on pharmacokinetic data

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics of an amorphous solid dispersion tablet of elacridar.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Emilia; Verheijen, Remy B; Huitema, Alwin D R; van Tellingen, Olaf; Schellens, Jan H M; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Beijnen, Jos H; Steeghs, Neeltje

    2017-02-01

    Elacridar is an inhibitor of the permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and is a promising absorption enhancer of drugs that are substrates of these drug-efflux transporters. However, elacridar is practically insoluble in water, resulting in low bioavailability which currently limits its clinical application. We evaluated the in vitro dissolution and clinical pharmacokinetics of a novel amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) tablet containing elacridar. The dissolution from ASD tablets was compared to that from a crystalline powder mixture in a USP type II dissolution apparatus. The pharmacokinetics of the ASD tablet were evaluated in an exploratory clinical study at oral doses of 25, 250, or 1000 mg in 12 healthy volunteers. A target Cmax was set at ≥ 200 ng/mL based on previous clinical data. The in vitro dissolution from the ASD tablet was 16.9 ± 3.7 times higher compared to that from a crystalline powder mixture. Cmax and AUC0-∞ increased linearly with dose over the explored range. The target Cmax of ≥ 200 ng/mL was achieved at the 1000-mg dose level. At this dose, the Cmax and AUC0-∞ were 326 ± 67 ng/mL and 13.4 ± 8.6 · 10(3) ng · h/mL, respectively. In summary, the ASD tablet was well tolerated, resulted in relevant pharmacokinetic exposure, and can be used for proof-of-concept clinical studies.

  4. Maraviroc Pharmacokinetics in HIV-1–Infected Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Colbers, Angela; Best, Brookie; Schalkwijk, Stein; Wang, Jiajia; Stek, Alice; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Hawkins, David; Taylor, Graham; Kreitchmann, Regis; Burchett, Sandra; Haberl, Annette; Kabeya, Kabamba; van Kasteren, Marjo; Smith, Elizabeth; Capparelli, Edmund; Burger, David; Mirochnick, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected women during pregnancy and post partum. Methods. HIV-infected pregnant women receiving maraviroc as part of clinical care had intensive steady-state 12-hour pharmacokinetic profiles performed during the third trimester and ≥2 weeks after delivery. Cord blood samples and matching maternal blood samples were taken at delivery. The data were collected in 2 studies: P1026 (United States) and PANNA (Europe). Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Results. Eighteen women were included in the analysis. Most women (12; 67%) received 150 mg of maraviroc twice daily with a protease inhibitor, 2 (11%) received 300 mg twice daily without a protease inhibitor, and 4 (22%) had an alternative regimen. The geometric mean ratios for third-trimester versus postpartum maraviroc were 0.72 (90% confidence interval, .60–.88) for the area under the curve over a dosing interval (AUCtau) and 0.70 (0.58–0.85) for the maximum maraviroc concentration. Only 1 patient showed a trough concentration (Ctrough) below the suggested target of 50 ng/mL, both during pregnancy and post partum. The median ratio of maraviroc cord blood to maternal blood was 0.33 (range, 0.03–0.56). The viral load close to delivery was <50 copies/mL in 13 women (76%). All children were HIV negative at testing. Conclusions. Overall maraviroc exposure during pregnancy was decreased, with a reduction in AUCtau and maximum concentration of about 30%. Ctrough was reduced by 15% but exceeded the minimum Ctrough target concentration. Therefore, the standard adult dose seems sufficient in pregnancy. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00825929 and NCT000422890. PMID:26202768

  5. A PHARMACOKINETIC PROGRAM (PKFIT) FOR R

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to create a nonlinear regression (including a genetic algorithm) program (R script) to deal with data fitting for pharmacokinetics (PK) in R environment using its available packages. We call this tool as PKfit.

  6. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 {mu}g/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chairat, Kalayanee; Jittamala, Podjanee; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study were to compare the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and its active antiviral metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese individuals and to determine the effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate. Methods The population pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were evaluated in 12 obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg m−2) and 12 non‐obese (BMI <30 kg m−2) Thai adult volunteers receiving a standard dose of 75 mg and a double dose of 150 mg in a randomized sequence. Concentration–time data were collected and analysed using nonlinear mixed‐effects modelling. Results The pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were described simultaneously by first‐order absorption, with a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir, followed by a metabolism compartment and a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir carboxylate. Creatinine clearance was a significant predictor of oseltamivir carboxylate clearance {3.84% increase for each 10 ml min−1 increase in creatinine clearance [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.178%, 8.02%]}. Obese individuals had an approximately 25% (95% CI 24%, 28%) higher oseltamivir clearance, 20% higher oseltamivir volume of distribution (95% CI 19%, 23%) and 10% higher oseltamivir carboxylate clearance (95% CI 9%, 11%) compared with non‐obese individuals. However, these altered pharmacokinetic properties were small and did not change the overall exposure to oseltamivir carboxylate. Conclusions The results confirmed that a dose adjustment for oseltamivir in obese individuals is not necessary on the basis of its pharmacokinetics. PMID:26810861

  9. Life is translation

    PubMed Central

    Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary origin of translation represents one of the key questions that Carl Woese addressed in his work. Here we give a personal account of his results in this area and the effect they have had on the field. PMID:24572678

  10. Lost in Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lass, Wiebke; Reusswig, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Lost in Translation? Introducing Planetary Boundaries into Social Systems. Fritz Reusswig, Wiebke Lass Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries by interdisciplinary science efforts is a challenging task—and a risky one, as the 1972 Limits to Growth publication has shown. Even if we may be assured that scientific understanding of underlying processes of the Earth system has significantly improved since then, the challenge of translating these findings into the social systems of the planet remains crucial for any kind of action, and in many respects far more challenging. We would like to conceptualize what could also be termed a problem of coupling social and natural systems as a nested set of social translation processes, well aware of the limited applicability of the language-related translation metaphor. Societies must, first, perceive these boundaries, and they have to understand their relevance. This includes, among many other things, the organization of transdisciplinary scientific cooperation. They will then have to translate this understood perception into possible actions, i.e. strategies for different local bodies, actors, and institutional settings. This implies a lot of 'internal' translation processes, e.g. from the scientific subsystem to the mass media, the political and the economic subsystem. And it implies to develop subsystem-specific schemes of evaluation for these alternatives, e.g. convincing narratives, cost-benefit analyses, or ethical legitimacy considerations. And, finally, societies do have to translate chosen action alternatives into monitoring and evaluation schemes, e.g. for agricultural production or renewable energies. This process includes the continuation of observing and re-analyzing the planetary boundary concept itself, as a re-adjustment of these boundaries in the light of new scientific insights cannot be excluded. Taken all together, societies may well

  11. Translation readthrough mitigation.

    PubMed

    Arribere, Joshua A; Cenik, Elif S; Jain, Nimit; Hess, Gaelen T; Lee, Cameron H; Bassik, Michael C; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-06-30

    A fraction of ribosomes engaged in translation will fail to terminate when reaching a stop codon, yielding nascent proteins inappropriately extended on their C termini. Although such extended proteins can interfere with normal cellular processes, known mechanisms of translational surveillance are insufficient to protect cells from potential dominant consequences. Here, through a combination of transgenics and CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing in Caenorhabditis elegans, we demonstrate a consistent ability of cells to block accumulation of C-terminal-extended proteins that result from failure to terminate at stop codons. Sequences encoded by the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) were sufficient to lower protein levels. Measurements of mRNA levels and translation suggested a co- or post-translational mechanism of action for these sequences in C. elegans. Similar mechanisms evidently operate in human cells, in which we observed a comparable tendency for translated human 3′ UTR sequences to reduce mature protein expression in tissue culture assays, including 3′ UTR sequences from the hypomorphic ‘Constant Spring’ haemoglobin stop codon variant. We suggest that 3′ UTRs may encode peptide sequences that destabilize the attached protein, providing mitigation of unwelcome and varied translation errors.

  12. Translation Readthrough Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Arribere, Joshua A.; Cenik, Elif S.; Jain, Nimit; Hess, Gaelen T.; Lee, Cameron H.; Bassik, Michael C.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2016-01-01

    A fraction of ribosomes engaged in translation will fail to terminate when reaching a stop codon, yielding nascent proteins inappropriately extended on their C-termini. Although such extended proteins can interfere with normal cellular processes, known mechanisms of translational surveillance are insufficient to protect cells from potential dominant consequences. Through a combination of transgenics and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in C. elegans, we demonstrate a consistent ability of cells to block accumulation of C-terminal extended proteins that result from failure to terminate at stop codons. 3’UTR-encoded sequences were sufficient to lower protein levels. Measurements of mRNA levels and translation suggested a co- or post-translational mechanism of action for these sequences in C. elegans. Similar mechanisms evidently operate in human cells, where we observed a comparable tendency for translated human 3’UTR sequences to reduce mature protein expression in tissue culture assays, including 3' sequences from the hypomorphic “Constant Spring” hemoglobin stop codon variant. We suggest 3’UTRs may encode peptide sequences that destabilize the attached protein, providing mitigation of unwelcome and varied translation errors. PMID:27281202

  13. Pharmacokinetics of oral amantadine in greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Norkus, C; Rankin, D; Warner, M; KuKanich, B

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in greyhound dogs after oral administration. Five healthy greyhound dogs were used. A single oral dose of 100 mg amantadine hydrochloride (mean dose 2.8 mg/kg as amantadine hydrochloride) was administered to nonfasted subjects. Blood samples were collected at predetermined time points from 0 to 24 h after administration, and plasma concentrations of amantadine were measured by liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Amantadine was well tolerated in all dogs with no adverse effects observed. The mean (range) amantadine CMAX was 275 ng/mL (225-351 ng/mL) at 2.6 h (1-4 h) with a terminal half-life of 4.96 h (4.11-6.59 h). The results of this study can be used to design dosages to assess multidose pharmacokinetics and dosages designed to achieve targeted concentrations in order to assess the clinical effects of amantadine in a variety of conditions including chronic pain. Further studies should also assess the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in other dog breeds or using population pharmacokinetics studies including multiple dog breeds to assess potential breed-specific differences in the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in dogs.

  14. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic analysis of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Hattori, K; Shinsei, M; Matsunaga, N; Iizasa, H; Sasabe, H; Akiyama, H; Miyanmoto, G; Nakashima, E

    2000-09-01

    Grepafloxacin (GPFX) is a synthetic new quinolone antimicrobial agent that possesses an extensive tissue distribution and exhibits a strong antibacterial activity in vivo. In this study, the tissue distribution characteristics of GPFX were examined using tissue concentration-time profiles following intravenous administration to rats. Subsequently, the pharmacokinetics of GPFX were analyzed based on the physiological pharmacokinetic model. The tissue-to-plasma partition coefficients (Kp) of GPFX in rats were high in all tissues except brain. A pharmacokinetic model for rabbits, monkeys and dogs was constructed using the tissue-to-plasma free concentration ratio (Kp,f) of GPFX in rats to simulate the GPFX concentration-time profile in plasma following intravenous administration of GPFX to each animal. The calculation-derived concentrations correlated well with the experimentally-derived data, suggesting that there are no interspecies differences in the high tissue distribution characteristics of GPFX. The clearance rates of GPFX in humans were predicted from the pharmacokinetic parameters of rats, rabbits, monkeys and dogs by an animal scale-up method and a pharmacokinetic model for humans was constructed. The GPFX concentration-time profiles in plasma, following oral administration of GPFX to humans, were predicted within 0.5-1.0 h of mean absorption time and the calculation-derived results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Thus, it is suggested that the concentration-time profile in plasma and all human organs can be predicted from the pharmacokinetic data of animals.

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of hyperthermic intraperitoneal oxaliplatin-induced neutropenia in subjects with peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Belén; Nalda-Molina, Ricardo; Bretcha-Boix, Pere; Escudero-Ortíz, Vanesa; Duart, Maria José; Carbonell, Vicente; Sureda, Manuel; Rebollo, José Pascual; Farré, Josep; Brugarolas, Antonio; Pérez-Ruixo, Juan José

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and the time course of the neutropenia-induced by hyperthermic intraperitoneal oxaliplatin (HIO) after cytoreductive surgery in cancer patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Data from 30 patients who received 360 mg/m(2) of HIO following cytoreductive surgery were used for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. The oxaliplatin plasma concentrations were characterized by an open two-compartment pharmacokinetic model after first-order absorption from peritoneum to plasma. An oxaliplatin-sensitive progenitor cell compartment was used to describe the absolute neutrophil counts in blood. The reduction of the proliferation rate of the progenitor cells was modeled by a linear function of the oxaliplatin plasma concentrations. The typical values of oxaliplatin absorption and terminal half-lives were estimated to be 2.2 and 40 h, with moderate interindividual variability. Oxaliplatin reduced the proliferation rate of the progenitor cells by 18.2% per mg/L. No patient's covariates were related to oxaliplatin PK/PD parameters. Bootstrap and visual predictive check evidenced the model was deemed appropriate to describe oxaliplatin pharmacokinetics and the incidence and severity of neutropenia. A peritoneum oxaliplatin exposure of 65 and 120 mg·L/h was associated with a 20% and 33% incidence of neutropenia grade 4. The time course of neutropenia following HIO administration was well described by the semiphysiological PK/PD model. The maximum tolerated peritoneum oxaliplatin exposure is 120 mg L/h and higher exposures should be avoided in future studies. We suggest the prophylactic use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for patients treated with HIO exposure higher than 65 mg L/h.

  16. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Famciclovir in Infants and Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis in Infants and Children ▿

    PubMed Central

    Blumer, Jeffrey; Rodriguez, Adib; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Sallas, William; Kaiser, Guenther; Hamed, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    A multicenter, open-label study evaluated the single-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of a pediatric oral famciclovir (prodrug of penciclovir) formulation in infants aged 1 to 12 months with suspicion or evidence of herpes simplex virus infection. Individualized single doses of famciclovir based on the infant's body weight ranged from 25 to 175 mg. Eighteen infants were enrolled (1 to <3 months old [n = 8], 3 to <6 months old [n = 5], and 6 to 12 months old [n = 5]). Seventeen infants were included in the pharmacokinetic analysis; one infant experienced immediate emesis and was excluded. Mean Cmax and AUC0-6 values of penciclovir in infants <6 months of age were ∼3- to 4-fold lower than those in the 6- to 12-month age group. Specifically, mean AUC0-6 was 2.2 μg·h/ml in infants aged 1 to <3 months, 3.2 μg·h/ml in infants aged 3 to <6 months, and 8.8 μg·h/ml in infants aged 6 to 12 months. These data suggested that the dose administered to infants <6 months was less than optimal. Eight (44.4%) infants experienced at least one adverse event with gastrointestinal events reported most commonly. An updated pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted, which incorporated the data in infants from the present study and previously published data on children 1 to 12 years of age. An eight-step dosing regimen was derived that targeted exposure in infants and children 6 months to 12 years of age to match the penciclovir AUC seen in adults after a 500-mg dose of famciclovir. PMID:20160046

  17. Methamphetamine blood concentrations in human abusers: application to pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K; Harvey, Dennis; Laćan, Goran

    2007-04-01

    Characterization of methamphetamine's (METH) dose-dependent effects on brain neurochemistry may represent a critical component for better understanding the range of resultant behavioral pathologies. Most human studies, however, have assessed only the effects of long term, high dose METH abuse (e.g., greater than 1000 mg/day) in individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for METH dependence. Yet, for the majority of METH abusers, their patterns of METH exposure that consist of lower doses remain less well-characterized. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 105 individuals detained by police for possible criminal activity and testing positive for stimulants by EMIT assay. METH blood concentrations were subsequently quantified by GC-MS and were predominantly in the low micromolar range (0.1-11.1 microM), with median and mean values of 1.3 microM (0.19 mg/l) and 2 microM (0.3 mg/l), respectively. Pharmacokinetic calculations based on these measured values were used to estimate initial METH body burdens, the median value being 52 mg. Modeling a 52 mg dose for a 4 day-METH maintenance exposure pattern of 4 doses/day at 4 h intervals showed that blood concentrations remained between 1 and 4 microM during this period. Collectively, these data present evidence for a METH exposure pattern distinct from high dose-METH abuse and provide the rationale for assessing potential brain pathology associated with such lower dose-METH exposure.

  18. Drug Dosing in Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Current Pharmacokinetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Harskamp-van Ginkel, Margreet W.; Hill, Kevin D.; Becker, Kristian; Testoni, Daniela; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Gonzalez, Daniel; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Siegel, David A.; Banks, Patricia; Watt, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obesity affects nearly one sixth of U.S. children and results in alterations to body composition and physiology that can affect drug disposition, possibly leading to therapeutic failure or toxicity. The depth of available literature regarding obesity’s effect on drug safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and dosing in obese children is unknown. OBJECTIVE To perform a systematic literature review describing the current evidence of the effect of obesity on drug disposition in children. EVIDENCE REVIEW We searched the Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases (January 1970–December 2012) and included studies if they contained clearance, volume of distribution, or drug concentration data in obese children (age ≤18 years). We compared exposure and weight-normalized volume of distribution and clearance between obese and non-obese children. We explored the relationship between drug physicochemical properties and clearance and volume of distribution. FINDINGS Twenty studies met inclusion criteria and contained pharmacokinetic data for 21 drugs. The median number of obese children studied per drug was 10 (range 1–112), ages ranged from 0–29 years. Dosing schema varied and were based on a fixed dose (n=6, 29%), body weight (n=10, 48%), and body surface area (n=4, 19%). Clinically significant pharmacokinetic alterations were observed in obese children for 65% (11/17) of studied drugs. Pharmacokinetic alterations resulted in substantial differences in exposure between obese and non-obese children for 38% (5/13) of drugs. We found no association between drug lipophilicity or Biopharmaceutical Drug Disposition Classification System class and changes in volume of distribution or clearance due to obesity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Consensus is lacking on the most appropriate weight-based dosing strategy. Prospective pharmacokinetic trials in obese children are needed to ensure therapeutic efficacy and enhance drug safety. PMID:25961828

  19. Pharmacokinetic modeling of ascorbate diffusion through normal and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C M; Hicks, Kevin O

    2014-12-01

    Ascorbate is delivered to cells via the vasculature, but its ability to penetrate into tissues remote from blood vessels is unknown. This is particularly relevant to solid tumors, which often contain regions with dysfunctional vasculature, with impaired oxygen and nutrient delivery, resulting in upregulation of the hypoxic response and also the likely depletion of essential plasma-derived biomolecules, such as ascorbate. In this study, we have utilized a well-established multicell-layered, three-dimensional pharmacokinetic model to measure ascorbate diffusion and transport parameters through dense tissue in vitro. Ascorbate was found to penetrate the tissue at a slightly lower rate than mannitol and to travel via the paracellular route. Uptake parameters into the cells were also determined. These data were fitted to the diffusion model, and simulations of ascorbate pharmacokinetics in normal tissue and in hypoxic tumor tissue were performed with varying input concentrations, ranging from normal dietary plasma levels (10-100 μM) to pharmacological levels (>1 mM) as seen with intravenous infusion. The data and simulations demonstrate heterogeneous distribution of ascorbate in tumor tissue at physiological blood levels and provide insight into the range of plasma ascorbate concentrations and exposure times needed to saturate all regions of a tumor. The predictions suggest that supraphysiological plasma ascorbate concentrations (>100 μM) are required to achieve effective delivery of ascorbate to poorly vascularized tumor tissue.

  20. Oral, subcutaneous, and intravenous pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Quimby, J M; Lake, R C; Hansen, R J; Lunghofer, P J; Gustafson, D L

    2014-08-01

    Ondansetron is a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that is an effective anti-emetic in cats. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats. Six cats with normal complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis received 2 mg oral (mean 0.43 mg/kg), subcutaneous (mean 0.4 mg/kg), and intravenous (mean 0.4 mg/kg) ondansetron in a cross-over manner with a 5-day wash out. Serum was collected prior to, and at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after administration of ondansetron. Ondansetron concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic modeling and dose interval modeling were performed. Repeated measures anova was used to compare parameters between administration routes. Bioavailability of ondansetron was 32% (oral) and 75% (subcutaneous). Calculated elimination half-life of ondansetron was 1.84 ± 0.58 h (intravenous), 1.18 ± 0.27 h (oral) and 3.17 ± 0.53 h (subcutaneous). The calculated elimination half-life of subcutaneous ondansetron was significantly longer (P < 0.05) than oral or intravenous administration. Subcutaneous administration of ondansetron to healthy cats is more bioavailable and results in a more prolonged exposure than oral administration. This information will aid management of emesis in feline patients.

  1. Improved dose linearity of cyclosporine pharmacokinetics from a microemulsion formulation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, E A; Kovarik, J M; van Bree, J B; Tetzloff, W; Grevel, J; Kutz, K

    1994-02-01

    The pharmacokinetic dose proportionality and relative bioavailability of cyclosporine from a microemulsion formulation (Sandimmune Neoral) were compared to those of the commercial formulation (Sandimmune) over the dosage range 200 to 800 mg. Single oral administrations were given as soft gelatin capsules in an open randomized study with 48 healthy volunteers. Whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations were determined by a specific monoclonal radioimmunoassay. In comparison to Sandimmune, the absorption rate (maximum concentration) and systemic availability (area under the curve) of cyclosporine were greater for Sandimmune Neoral at all dose levels investigated. The area under the curve for Sandimmune increased in a less than proportional manner with respect to dose, whereas that for Sandimmune Neoral was consistent with linear pharmacokinetics. Because of this difference, no global assessment of relative bioavailability could be performed. The relative bioavailability of cyclosporine from Sandimmune Neoral ranged from 174 to 239% compared to Sandimmune, depending on the dose level. The improvements in oral bioavailability and dose linearity of cyclosporine exposure after administration as Sandimmune Neoral should facilitate more accurate dosage titration in the clinical setting.

  2. Tacrolimus pharmacokinetics in Hispanic children after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cherala, G; Munar, M Y; Naher, A; Al-Uzri, A

    2011-12-01

    Ethnic differences in drug pharmacokinetics are well recognized including that for tacrolimus (TAC) in adult subjects. However, similar knowledge among pediatric populations is missing. Our limited retrospective study compares steady-state pharmacokinetics of TAC in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic children. Serial blood samples were collected and whole blood concentrations of TAC were measured using radioimmunoassay. Compared with non-Hispanic children, Hispanic children had lower measures of drug exposure (maximum drug concentration [Cmax] and area under the drug concentration-time curve [AUC0-∞]), higher volume of distribution, and faster clearance. Interestingly, only in Hispanic children, significant correlations were found between body weight and clearance, age and volume of distribution, and Schwartz estimated glomerular filtration rate and half-life. In conclusion, our study suggests that ethnic differences exist between Hispanic and non-Hispanic children in TAC PK, and based on our preliminary findings, either a higher or more frequent TAC dosing may be required for effective immunosuppression therapy in Hispanic children.

  3. The Impact of Translators' Academic Experience on Their Translation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varzande, Mohsen; Jadidi, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Translators differ from each other in many ways in terms of their knowledge and professional conditions that may directly influence their translation. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of translators' academic experience on their translation quality. Following a "causal-comparative study", a sample of 100 male and…

  4. The Effect of Translators' Emotional Intelligence on Their Translation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varzande, Mohsen; Jadidi, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Translators differ from each other in many ways in terms of their knowledge, professional and psychological conditions that may directly influence their translation. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of translators' Emotional Intelligence on their translation quality. Following a "causal-comparative study," a sample of…

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Low and Maintenance Dose Valganciclovir in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, C. E.; Penzak, S. R.; Alfaro, R. M.; Wesley, R.; Daniels, C. E.; Hale, D.; Kirk, A. D.; Mannon, R. B.

    2008-01-01

    Valganciclovir is commonly used for cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis in renal transplant patients. A fixed dose of 900 mg daily is typically recommended, however, there has never been a formal pharmacokinetic study comparing various doses in renal transplant patients. We therefore compared the pharmacokinetic characteristics of intravenous ganciclovir (IV GCV) and oral ganciclovir (GCV) with two different doses of valganciclovir (VGCV) in an open-label crossover study. Ten adult kidney recipients participated in a four-phase crossover treatment schedule of IV GCV (2.5 mg/kg every 12 h), VGCV (900 mg daily), VGCV (450 mg daily) and oral GCV (1000 mg Q8 H). IV GCV and oral VGCV 900 mg daily achieved similar values for AUC0–24 (median 60.63 vs. 62.86 μg/h/mL). Oral VGCV 450 mg achieved comparable AUC0–24 values as oral GCV 1000 mg Q8 H (median AUC0–24 35.9 vs. 29.04 μg/h/mL). Oral VGCV 900 mg daily provided systemic GCV exposure similar to IV GCV and confirms PV 16 000 study results. Further, VGCV 450 mg daily provided comparable systemic exposure versus oral GCV. Due to its favorable pharmacokinetic profile, data herein suggest that VGCV can be used in the early post-kidney transplant period, and that 450 mg daily provides ample drug exposure for effective CMV prophylaxis in kidney transplant patients. PMID:18444933

  6. Pharmacokinetics and safety of eszopiclone in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Zhao, X L; Wei, M J; Wang, S M; Zhou, H; Guo, S J; Zhang, P

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic characters of eszopiclone (CAS: 138729-47-2) after single and multiple-dose oral administration in healthy adult Chinese volunteers.In single-dose study, 12 subjects were given oral administrations of 1.5, 3 and 6 mg eszopiclone in an open-label, randomized, crossover fashion. In multiple-dose study, 8 subjects were given 3 mg eszopiclone once daily consecutively for 7 days. Blood samples were collected over 24 h and plasma eszopiclone were determined using a validated liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) assay. The safety and tolerability of eszopiclone was evaluated by adverse events recording, physical examination, laboratory testing, vital signs, and 12-lead ECG findings.The main pharmacokinetic parameters of eszopiclone after single-dose administration were as follows: doses of 1.5, 3 and 6 mg; Cmax of 18.08±4.65, 38.29±15.41 and 76.38±23.34 ng/ml; Tmax of 0.94±0.39, 1.04±0.63 and 1.08±0.51 h; AUC0-24 of 110.90±23.06, 227.36±62.41 and 504.10±140.13 ng*h/ml; elimination half-lives of 5.84±1.03, 5.53±1.91 and 6.17±1.23 h. After multiple-dose administration, the steady-state levels of eszopiclone were achieved by the 4th day, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were Css_max at 33.43±5.63 ng/ml and AUCss (0-24) at 263.30±51.21 ng*h/ml. The most common adverse event was bitter or abnormal taste. All the adverse events were judged as mild to moderate and resolved without any medication.The pharmacokinetic character of eszopiclone is linear and dose-proportional over the range of 1.5-6 mg. The systemic exposure does not accumulate with once-daily administrations. Eszopiclone appears to have good safety and is well tolerated.

  7. Allopregnanolone Preclinical Acute Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies to Predict Tolerability and Efficacy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Solinsky, Christine M.; Loya, Carlos M.; Salituro, Francesco G.; Rodgers, Kathleen E.; Bauer, Gerhard; Rogawski, Michael A.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal), intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios) at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) and maximally tolerated doses (MTD) in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ≥40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg/kg. The

  8. Assessing pharmacokinetic variability directly induced by drug intake behaviour through development of a feeding behaviour-pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Petit-Jetté, C E; Gohore Bi, D; Fenneteau, F; Del Castillo, J R E; Nekka, F

    2008-04-07

    Variability in drug intake is increasingly recognized as a major source of variability in drug response. The non-uniform access to medicated feed, influenced by swine individual feeding behaviour, is a determinant of antibiotic exposure, recalling the intrinsic similarity with human compliance to drug regimens. In this paper, we developed a feeding behaviour-pharmacokinetic (FBPK) model of in-feed chlortetracycline (CTC) and established, in a definite way, the effect of feeding behaviour and its induced pharmacokinetic (PK) variability. Based on reported animal behaviour, we mathematically formulated swine feeding behaviour by incorporating its main characteristics: intense feeding periods that repeat on a daily basis and random feeding periods of free access to feed, along with growth stage factors. This behaviour model was then integrated into a PK model of CTC. Moreover, we analysed the effect of each feeding behaviour component and assessed the corresponding PK variability. We have been able to delineate the impact of different feeding behaviour components and characterize the induced PK variability. We have compared different therapeutic assumptions to our model and shown that random features underlying the feeding behaviour have dramatic influence on the PK variability. A practical tool to adopt the dosing regimen in terms of dose and age has been proposed. The method developed here can be generalized to other therapeutic contexts and incorporated into medical practice, particularly to make long-term projections of drug-intake behaviour, to explain possible treatment failure and guide practitioners in adjusting the dosing regimen.

  9. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefanie; Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-10-19

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.).

  10. Moxifloxacin population pharmacokinetics in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and the effect of intermittent high-dose rifapentine.

    PubMed

    Zvada, Simbarashe P; Denti, Paolo; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Meredith, Sandra; van As, Danelle; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem; Wiesner, Lubbe; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas; McIlleron, Helen M

    2012-08-01

    We described the population pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin and the effect of high-dose intermittent rifapentine in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who were randomized to a continuation-phase regimen of 400 mg moxifloxacin and 900 mg rifapentine twice weekly or 400 mg moxifloxacin and 1,200 mg rifapentine once weekly. A two-compartment model with transit absorption best described moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics. Although rifapentine increased the clearance of moxifloxacin by 8% during antituberculosis treatment compared to that after treatment completion without rifapentine, it did not result in a clinically significant change in moxifloxacin exposure.

  11. Moxifloxacin Population Pharmacokinetics in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis and the Effect of Intermittent High-Dose Rifapentine

    PubMed Central

    Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Denti, Paolo; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Meredith, Sandra; van As, Danelle; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem; Wiesner, Lubbe; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.; Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We described the population pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin and the effect of high-dose intermittent rifapentine in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who were randomized to a continuation-phase regimen of 400 mg moxifloxacin and 900 mg rifapentine twice weekly or 400 mg moxifloxacin and 1,200 mg rifapentine once weekly. A two-compartment model with transit absorption best described moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics. Although rifapentine increased the clearance of moxifloxacin by 8% during antituberculosis treatment compared to that after treatment completion without rifapentine, it did not result in a clinically significant change in moxifloxacin exposure. PMID:22585223

  12. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.) PMID:26482301

  13. Translation: Aids, Robots, and Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreyewsky, Alexander

    1981-01-01

    Examines electronic aids to translation both as ways to automate it and as an approach to solve problems resulting from shortage of qualified translators. Describes the limitations of robotic MT (Machine Translation) systems, viewing MAT (Machine-Aided Translation) as the only practical solution and the best vehicle for further automation. (MES)

  14. Translation: Elements of a Craft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiderson, Mazin A.

    An overview of the skills, techniques, tools, and compensation of language translators and interpreters is offered. It begins with a definition of translation and a brief history of translation in the western world. Basic principles of translation dating back to Roman writers are also outlined. A five-step process in producing a good translation…

  15. Impact of Renal Impairment on the Pharmacokinetics of Apremilast and Metabolite M12.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Simon; Assaf, Mahmoud; Nissel, Jim; Palmisano, Maria

    2016-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of apremilast and its major metabolite M12 were evaluated in subjects with varying degrees of renal impairment. Men and women with renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 60-89 mL/min [mild, n = 8], 30-59 mL/min [moderate, n = 8], or <30 mL/min [severe, n = 8]) or demographically healthy matched (control) subjects (n = 24) received a single oral dose of apremilast 30 mg. Plasma apremilast and metabolite M12 concentrations were determined, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from samples obtained predose and up to 72 hours postdose. In subjects with mild to moderate renal impairment, apremilast pharmacokinetic profiles were similar to healthy matched subjects. In subjects with severe renal impairment, apremilast elimination was significantly slower, and exposures based on area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve from time zero extrapolated to infinity and maximum observed plasma concentration were increased versus healthy matched subjects. Metabolite M12 pharmacokinetic profiles for subjects with mild renal impairment were similar to those of the healthy matched subjects; however, they were increased in both the moderate and severe renally impaired subjects. Dose reduction of apremilast is recommended in individuals with severe renal impairment, but not in those with mild to moderate renal impairment.

  16. Impact of Renal Impairment on the Pharmacokinetics of Apremilast and Metabolite M12

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Simon; Assaf, Mahmoud; Nissel, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The pharmacokinetics of apremilast and its major metabolite M12 were evaluated in subjects with varying degrees of renal impairment. Men and women with renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 60‒89 mL/min [mild, n = 8], 30‒59 mL/min [moderate, n = 8], or <30 mL/min [severe, n = 8]) or demographically healthy matched (control) subjects (n = 24) received a single oral dose of apremilast 30 mg. Plasma apremilast and metabolite M12 concentrations were determined, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from samples obtained predose and up to 72 hours postdose. In subjects with mild to moderate renal impairment, apremilast pharmacokinetic profiles were similar to healthy matched subjects. In subjects with severe renal impairment, apremilast elimination was significantly slower, and exposures based on area under the plasma concentration‐versus‐time curve from time zero extrapolated to infinity and maximum observed plasma concentration were increased versus healthy matched subjects. Metabolite M12 pharmacokinetic profiles for subjects with mild renal impairment were similar to those of the healthy matched subjects; however, they were increased in both the moderate and severe renally impaired subjects. Dose reduction of apremilast is recommended in individuals with severe renal impairment, but not in those with mild to moderate renal impairment. PMID:27870479

  17. Pharmacokinetic characterization of baclofen in patients with chronic kidney disease: dose adjustment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Vlavonou, Raphaël; Perreault, Marc M; Barrière, Olivier; Shink, Eric; Tremblay, Pierre-Olivier; Larouche, Richard; Pichette, Vincent; Tanguay, Mario

    2014-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of baclofen is well delineated in subjects with normal kidney function (KF); however, pharmacokinetics data in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not and dosage recommendations remain empirical. The effects of CKD on baclofen pharmacokinetics were assessed through a multi-center, open-label, single 5-mg dose, pharmacokinetics study. The KF was measured as the creatinine clearance (CrCL) calculated with the Cockroft-Gault (C-G) equation or as the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using subjects' CKD-EPI equation. Subjects were assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on their CrCL (>80 mL/min, 50-80 mL/min; 30-50 mL/min and <30 mL/min). Cmax was not statistically different between the groups, while AUC and T1/2el increased, and CL/F decreased, with increasing severity of CKD. Baclofen's oral clearance and CrCL were statistically significantly correlated, and the trend was the same when classifying subjects either with the CKD-EPI or C-G equations. Linear equations using KF as variable were set to recommend individual dose reduction in CKD patients. Results suggest a mean dose reduction of 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 in patients with mild, moderate, and severe CKD respectively, in order to achieve baclofen exposure comparable to that observed in healthy subjects.

  18. Opioid gene expression changes and post-translational histone modifications at promoter regions in the rat nucleus accumbens after acute and repeated 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) exposure.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Palmisano, Martina; Carboni, Lucia; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2016-12-01

    The recreational drug of abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) has been shown to produce neurotoxic damage and long-lasting changes in several brain areas. In addition to the involvement of serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems, little information exists about the contribution of nociceptin/orphaninFQ (N/OFQ)-NOP and dynorphin (DYN)-KOP systems in neuronal adaptations evoked by MDMA. Here we investigated the behavioral and molecular effects induced by acute (8mg/kg) or repeated (8mg/kg twice daily for seven days) MDMA exposure. MDMA exposure affected body weight gain and induced hyperlocomotion; this latter effect progressively decreased after repeated administration. Gene expression analysis indicated a down-regulation of the N/OFQ system and an up-regulation of the DYN system in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), highlighting an opposite systems regulation in response to MDMA exposure. Since histone modifications have been strongly associated to the addiction-related maladaptive changes, we examined two permissive (acH3K9 and me3H3K4) and two repressive transcription marks (me3H3K27 and me2H3K9) at the pertinent opioid gene promoter regions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that acute MDMA increased me3H3K4 at the pN/OFQ, pDYN and NOP promoters. Following acute and repeated treatment a significant decrease of acH3K9 at the pN/OFQ promoter was observed, which correlated with gene expression results. Acute treatment caused an acH3K9 increase and a me2H3K9 decrease at the pDYN promoter which matched its mRNA up-regulation. Our data indicate that the activation of the DYNergic stress system together with the inactivation of the N/OFQergic anti-stress system contribute to the neuroadaptive actions of MDMA and offer novel epigenetic information associated with MDMA abuse.

  19. Development of an integrated population pharmacokinetic model for oral levetiracetam in populations of various ages and ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Toublanc, Nathalie; Lacroix, Brigitte D; Yamamoto, Junichi

    2014-01-01

      Levetiracetam [E Keppra(®)] is a second generation antiepileptic drug for different types of epilepsy in adults and children ≥1 month. The objective is to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam in Japanese children and adults as well as North American children, the purpose being to explore potential dosing recommendations in Japanese children. Levetiracetam plasma concentration-time data were obtained from Japanese adult and pediatric clinical studies. The data were analyzed through non-linear mixed effects modelling. The model was used to perform simulations and compare the exposure in Japanese children and adults. It was subsequently extended to North American children through an external validation. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and first-order elimination adequately described the data. The exposure parameters determined based on the simulations in children were well within the adult range. The external validation against historical data from North American children was successful. The integrated population pharmacokinetic model provided a good description of the data, confirming the similarity of levetiracetam pharmacokinetics in these various populations. In Japanese children, a target dose of 10 to 30 mg/kg twice daily ensures the same exposure as the recommended dose in Japanese adults of 500 to 1,500 mg twice daily.

  20. In Vitro Measurements of Metabolism for Application in Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, John C.; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-04-01

    Abstract Human risk and exposure assessments require dosimetry information. Species-specific tissue dose response will be driven by physiological and biochemical processes. While metabolism and pharmacokinetic data are often not available in humans, they are much more available in laboratory animals; metabolic rate constants can be readily derived in vitro. The physiological differences between laboratory animals and humans are known. Biochemical processes, especially metabolism, can be measured in vitro and extrapolated to account for in vivo metabolism through clearance models or when linked to a physiologically based biological (PBPK) model to describe the physiological processes, such as drug delivery to the metabolic organ. This review focuses on the different organ, cellular, and subcellular systems that can be used to measure in vitro metabolic rate constants and how that data is extrapolated to be used in biokinetic modeling.

  1. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of liposomal drugs.

    PubMed

    Song, Gina; Wu, Huali; Yoshino, Keisuke; Zamboni, William C

    2012-09-01

    Various attempts to increase the therapeutic index of the drug while minimizing side effects have been made in drug delivery systems. Among several promising strategies, liposomes represent an advanced technology to target active molecules to the site of action. Rapid clearance of circulating liposomal drugs administered intravenously has been a critical issue because circulation time in the blood affects drug exposure at the target site. The clinical use of liposomal drugs is complicated by large intra- and interindividual variability in their pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). Thus, it is important to understand the factors affecting the PK/PD of the liposomal formulation of drugs and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the variability in the PK/PD of liposomal drugs. In this review article, we describe the characteristics of liposome formulations and discuss the effects of various factors, including liposome-associated factors, host-associated factors, and treatment on the PK/PD of liposomal agents.

  2. Incorporation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in the evaluation of solubility requirements for the salt selection process: a case study using phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Wong, Harvey

    2013-10-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, salt is commonly used to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly soluble compounds. Currently, there is a limited understanding on the solubility requirement for salts that will translate to improvement in oral exposure. Despite the obvious need, there is very little research reported in this area mainly due to the complexity of such a system. To our knowledge, no report has been published to guide this important process and salt solubility requirement still remains unanswered. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling offers a means to dynamically integrate the complex interplay of the processes determining oral absorption. A sensitivity analysis was performed using a PBPK model describing phenytoin to determine a solubility requirement for phenytoin salts needed to achieve optimal oral bioavailability for a given dose. Based on the analysis, it is predicted that phenytoin salts with solubility greater than 0.3 mg/mL would show no further increases in oral bioavailability. A salt screen was performed using a variety of phenytoin salts. The piperazine and sodium salts showed the lowest and highest aqueous solubility and were tested in vivo. Consistent with our analysis, we observed no significant differences in oral bioavailability for these two salts despite an approximate 60 fold difference in solubility. Our study illustrates that higher solubility salts sometimes provide no additional improvements in oral bioavailability and PBPK modeling can be utilized as an important tool to provide guidance to the salt selection and define a salt solubility requirement.

  3. Development of a Rat Plasma and Brain Extracellular Fluid Pharmacokinetic Model for Bupropion and Hydroxybupropion Based on Microdialysis Sampling, and Application to Predict Human Brain Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Thomas I F H; Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Rollema, Hans; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Administration of bupropion [(±)-2-(tert-butylamino)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)propan-1-one] and its preformed active metabolite, hydroxybupropion [(±)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-propanyl)amino]-1-propanone], to rats with measurement of unbound concentrations by quantitative microdialysis sampling of plasma and brain extracellular fluid was used to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetics model to describe the blood-brain barrier transport of both substances. The population model revealed rapid equilibration of both entities across the blood-brain barrier, with resultant steady-state brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio estimates of 1.9 and 1.7 for bupropion and hydroxybupropion, respectively, which is thus indicative of a net uptake asymmetry. An overshoot of the brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio at early time points was observed with bupropion; this was modeled as a time-dependent uptake clearance of the drug across the blood-brain barrier. Translation of the model was used to predict bupropion and hydroxybupropion exposure in human brain extracellular fluid after twice-daily administration of 150 mg bupropion. Predicted concentrations indicate that preferential inhibition of the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters by the metabolite, with little to no contribution by bupropion, would be expected at this therapeutic dose. Therefore, these results extend nuclear imaging studies on dopamine transporter occupancy and suggest that inhibition of both transporters contributes significantly to bupropion's therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Translational Educational Research

    PubMed Central

    Issenberg, S. Barry; Cohen, Elaine R.; Barsuk, Jeffrey H.; Wayne, Diane B.

    2012-01-01

    Medical education research contributes to translational science (TS) when its outcomes not only impact educational settings, but also downstream results, including better patient-care practices and improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has demonstrated its role in achieving such distal results. Effective TS also encompasses implementation science, the science of health-care delivery. Educational, clinical, quality, and safety goals can only be achieved by thematic, sustained, and cumulative research programs, not isolated studies. Components of an SBME TS research program include motivated learners, curriculum grounded in evidence-based learning theory, educational resources, evaluation of downstream results, a productive research team, rigorous research methods, research resources, and health-care system acceptance and implementation. National research priorities are served from translational educational research. National funding priorities should endorse the contribution and value of translational education research. PMID:23138127

  5. Translating and Transforming Care

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Alex; Moore, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how the Disability Living Allowance claim form, used in the United Kingdom to allocate £13 billion of disability benefits, translates and transforms disability and care. Twenty-two people with acquired brain injury and their main informal caregivers (n = 44) were video-recorded filling in the disability claim form. Participants disagreed on 26% of the questions, revealing two types of problems. Translation problems arose as participants struggled to provide categorical responses to ambiguous questions and were unable to report contextual variability in care needs or divergences of perception. Transformation problems arose as participants resisted the way in which the form positioned them, forcing them to conceptualize their relationship in terms of dependency and burden. The disability claim form co-opts claimants to translate care and disability into bureaucratically predefined categories, and it transforms the care relationship that it purports to document. PMID:25792487

  6. Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, John R.; Collard, Harold R.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution exposure is a well-established risk factor for several adverse respiratory outcomes, including airways diseases and lung cancer. Few studies have investigated the relationship between air pollution and interstitial lung disease (ILD) despite many forms of ILD arising from environmental exposures. There are potential mechanisms by which air pollution could cause, exacerbate, or accelerate the progression of certain forms of ILD via pulmonary and systemic inflammation as well as oxidative stress. This article will review the current epidemiologic and translational data supporting the plausibility of this relationship and propose a new conceptual framework for characterizing novel environmental risk factors for these forms of lung disease. PMID:25846532

  7. Pharmacokinetics Application in Biophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Philippe; Lemoigne, Yves

    Among the available computerised tomography devices, the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has the advantage to be sensitive to pico-molar concentrations of radiotracers inside living matter. Devices adapted to small animal imaging are now commercially available and allow us to study the function rather than the structure of living tissues by in vivo analysis. PET methodology, from the physics of electron-positron annihilation to the biophysics involved in tracers, is treated by other authors in this book. The basics of coincidence detection, image reconstruction, spatial resolution and sensitivity are discussed in the paper by R. Ott. The use of compartment analysis combined with pharmacokinetics is described here to illustrate an application to neuroimaging and to show how parametric imaging can bring insight on the in vivo bio-distribution of a radioactive tracer with small animal PET scanners. After reporting on the use of an intracerebral β+ radiosensitive probe (βP), we describe a small animal PET experiment used to measure the density of 5HT 1 a receptors in rat brain.

  8. Leptin pharmacokinetics in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, Robin C; Agnew, Linda L; Smart, Neil A; McFarlane, James R

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of leptin in mammals has not been studied in detail and only one study has examined more than one time point in non-mutant mice and this was in a female mice. This is the first study to describe leptin distribution over a detailed time course in normal male mice. A physiologic dose (12 ng) of radiolabelled leptin was injected into adult male mice via the lateral tail vein and tissues were dissected out and measured for radioactivity over a time course of up to two hours. Major targets were the digestive tract, kidneys, skin and lungs. The brain was not a major target, and 0.15% of the total dose was recovered from the brain 5 min after administration. Major differences appear to exist in the distribution of leptin between the male and female mice, indicating a high degree of sexual dimorphism. Although the half-lives were similar between male and female mice, almost twice the proportion of leptin was recovered from the digestive tract of male mice in comparison to that reported previously for females. This would seem to indicate a major difference in leptin distribution and possibly function between males and females. PMID:27998953

  9. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics in pediatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C B; Koup, J R; Opheim, K E; Adelman, L A; Levy, J; Stull, T L; Clausen, C; Smith, A L

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of piperacillin were studied in 15 pediatric patients (age range, 3.3 to 14.3 years). Piperacillin was administered in a dosage of 1.5 +/- 0.4 g/m2 (mean +/- standard deviation) every 4 to 6 h. Peak serum concentrations ranged from 69 to 354 micrograms/ml. The mean elimination half-life was 37.0 +/- 13.3 min, which is shorter than that observed in most adults with normal renal function. The mean elimination half-life in three patients with renal impairment was 60.1 +/- 12.4 min, and the mean ratio of renal clearance to total clearance was 0.57. These results suggest a significant nonrenal elimination of piperacillin. Based on these data, a dosage of 1.5 g/m2 given as a 30-min infusion every 4 h is suggested for children with normal renal function. For patients with renal impairment, the daily dosage could be calculated as follows: corrected dose = normal dose x (0.35 + [0.65 x (ClCr/0.06)]), where ClCr is the creatinine clearance expressed as liters per minute per square meter. PMID:6215893

  10. Automatic translation among spoken languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Sharon M.; Costigan, Kelly

    1994-02-01

    The Machine Aided Voice Translation (MAVT) system was developed in response to the shortage of experienced military field interrogators with both foreign language proficiency and interrogation skills. Combining speech recognition, machine translation, and speech generation technologies, the MAVT accepts an interrogator's spoken English question and translates it into spoken Spanish. The spoken Spanish response of the potential informant can then be translated into spoken English. Potential military and civilian applications for automatic spoken language translation technology are discussed in this paper.

  11. Automatic translation among spoken languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Sharon M.; Costigan, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    The Machine Aided Voice Translation (MAVT) system was developed in response to the shortage of experienced military field interrogators with both foreign language proficiency and interrogation skills. Combining speech recognition, machine translation, and speech generation technologies, the MAVT accepts an interrogator's spoken English question and translates it into spoken Spanish. The spoken Spanish response of the potential informant can then be translated into spoken English. Potential military and civilian applications for automatic spoken language translation technology are discussed in this paper.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine in pregnant baboons (Papio spp.).

    PubMed

    Shoulson, Rivka L; Stark, Raymond L; Garland, Marianne

    2014-11-01

    Fluoxetine is used to treat a number of psychiatric conditions in humans and behavioral problems in animals. Its use in pregnancy must balance maternal benefit with potential risk to the fetus. Knowledge of adult and fetal drug disposition can assist clinicians in selecting therapy that minimizes adverse effects to the fetus. Nonhuman primate models are used frequently in drug dose-translation studies, and pregnancy in baboons has many similarities to human pregnancy. Accordingly, pharmacokinetic analysis of a series of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine administrations to pregnant baboons was performed. The mean maternal baboon steady-state clearance of fluoxetine (42 mL/min/kg) was considerably higher than that in humans. Norfluoxetine, the major active metabolite, had a higher metabolite-to-drug ratio (8.7) than that found in humans, particularly with oral dosing. These results are consistent with more extensive metabolism in baboons than in humans and leads to a higher clearance than would be expected from allometric scaling. Fetal-to-maternal fluoxetine and norfluoxetine ratios under steady-state conditions were similar to those in humans, with fetal concentrations of fluoxetine 42% and norfluoxetine 47% of maternal concentrations. The fetal clearance of fluoxetine (303 ± 176 mL/min) and norfluoxetine (450 mL/min) exceeded reported placental blood flow. Understanding these species-associated differences in metabolism is a prerequisite to extrapolating data between species. Nonetheless, nonhuman primates are likely to remain valuable models for pharmacokinetic studies during pregnancy, particularly those directed toward fetal neurodevelopmental effects. Our results also are applicable to determining appropriate dosing of nonhuman primates in clinical settings.

  13. Prospective, Controlled Study of Acyclovir Pharmacokinetics in Obese Patients.

    PubMed

    Turner, R Brigg; Cumpston, Aaron; Sweet, Michael; Briggs, Frank; Slain, Douglas; Wen, Sijin; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi; Petros, William

    2016-01-11

    The current recommendations for intravenous (i.v.) acyclovir dosing in obese patients suggest using ideal body weight (IBW) rather than total body weight (TBW). To our knowledge, no pharmacokinetic analysis has validated this recommendation. This single-dose pharmacokinetic study was conducted in an inpatient oncology population. Enrollment was conducted by 1:1 matching of obese patients (>190% of IBW) to normal-weight patients (80 to 120% of IBW). All patients received a single dose of i.v. acyclovir, 5 mg/kg, infused over 60 min. Consistent with current recommendations, IBW was used for obese patients and TBW for normal-weight patients. Serial plasma concentrations were obtained and compared. Seven obese and seven normal-weight patients were enrolled, with mean body mass indexes of 45.0 and 22.5 kg/m(2), respectively. Systemic clearance was substantially higher in the obese than normal-weight patients (mean, 19.4 ± 5.3 versus 14.3 ± 5.4 liters/h; P = 0.047). Area under the concentration-time curve was lower in the obese patients (15.2 ± 2.9 versus 24.0 ± 9.4 mg · h/liter; P = 0.011), as was maximum concentration (5.8 ± 0.9 versus 8.2 ± 1.3 mg/liter; P = 0.031). Utilization of IBW for dose calculation of i.v. acyclovir in obese patients leads to lower systemic exposure than dosing by TBW in normal-weight patients. While not directly evaluated in this study, utilization of an adjusted body weight for dose determination appears to more closely approximate the exposure seen in normal-weight patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01714180.).

  14. Understanding pharmacokinetics to improve tuberculosis treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan; Heysell, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death from a curable infectious disease; drug-resistant TB threatens to dismantle all prior gains in global control. Suboptimal circulating anti-TB drug concentrations can lead to lack of cure and acquired drug resistance. Areas covered This review will introduce pharmacokinetic parameters for key anti-TB drugs, as well as the indications and limitations of measuring these parameters in clinical practice. Current and novel methodologies for delivering anti-TB pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data are highlighted and gaps in operational research described. Expert opinion Individual pharmacokinetic variability is commonplace, underappreciated and difficult to predict without therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Pharmacokinetic thresholds associated with poor TB treatment outcome in drug-susceptible TB have recently been described and may now guide the application of TDM, but require validation in a variety of settings and comorbidities. Dried blood spots for TDM and prepackaged multidrug plates for minimum inhibitory concentration testing will overcome barriers of accessibility and represent areas for innovation. Operationalizing pharmacokinetics has the potential to improve TB outcomes in the most difficult-to-treat forms of the disease such as multidrug resistance. Clinical studies in these areas are eagerly anticipated and we expect will better define the rational introduction of novel therapeutics. PMID:24597717

  15. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  16. The Practical Value of Translation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komissarov, Vilen

    1985-01-01

    Discusses why translation theory has had an inadequate impact on translation practice and gives specific examples of ways in which translation theory can provide the translator with general principles and methods of translating idioms. (SED)

  17. Tilt and Translation Motion Perception during Pitch Tilt with Visual Surround Translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, Brita M.; Harm, Deborah L.; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2006-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Previous studies suggest that multisensory integration is critical for discriminating linear accelerations arising from tilt and translation head motion. Visual input is especially important at low frequencies where canal input is declining. The NASA Tilt Translation Device (TTD) was designed to recreate postflight orientation disturbances by exposing subjects to matching tilt self motion with conflicting visual surround translation. Previous studies have demonstrated that brief exposures to pitch tilt with foreaft visual surround translation produced changes in compensatory vertical eye movement responses, postural equilibrium, and motion sickness symptoms. Adaptation appeared greatest with visual scene motion leading (versus lagging) the tilt motion, and the adaptation time constant appeared to be approximately 30 min. The purpose of this study was to compare motion perception when the visual surround translation was inphase versus outofphase with pitch tilt. The inphase stimulus presented visual surround motion one would experience if the linear acceleration was due to foreaft self translation within a stationary surround, while the outofphase stimulus had the visual scene motion leading the tilt by 90 deg as previously used. The tilt stimuli in these conditions were asymmetrical, ranging from an upright orientation to 10 deg pitch back. Another objective of the study was to compare motion perception with the inphase stimulus when the tilts were asymmetrical relative to upright (0 to 10 deg back) versus symmetrical (10 deg forward to 10 deg back). Twelve subjects (6M, 6F, 22-55 yrs) were tested during 3 sessions separated by at least one week. During each of the three sessions (out-of-phase asymmetrical, in-phase asymmetrical, inphase symmetrical), subjects were exposed to visual surround translation

  18. Chronic exposure to free fatty acid reduces pancreatic beta cell insulin content by increasing basal insulin secretion that is not compensated for by a corresponding increase in proinsulin biosynthesis translation.

    PubMed Central

    Bollheimer, L C; Skelly, R H; Chester, M W; McGarry, J D; Rhodes, C J

    1998-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell normally maintains a stable balance among insulin secretion, insulin production, and insulin degradation to keep optimal intracellular stores of the hormone. Elevated levels of FFA markedly enhance insulin secretion; however, the effects of FFA on insulin production and intracellular stores remain unclear. In this study, twofold elevation in total circulating FFA effected by infusion of lard oil and heparin into rats for 6 h under normoglycemic conditions resulted in a marked elevation of circulating insulin levels evident after 4 h, and a 30% decrease in pancreatic insulin content after a 6-h infusion in vivo. Adding 125 muM oleate to isolated rat pancreatic islets cultured with 5.6 mM glucose caused a 50% fall in their insulin content over 24 h, coupled with a marked enhancement of basal insulin secretion. Both effects of fatty acid were blocked by somatostatin. In contrast to the stimulatory effects of oleate on insulin secretion, glucose-induced proinsulin biosynthesis was inhibited by oleate up to 24 h, but was unaffected thereafter. This result was in spite of a two- to threefold oleate-induced increase in preproinsulin mRNA levels, underscoring the importance of translational regulation of proinsulin biosynthesis in maintaining beta cell insulin stores. Collectively, these results suggest that chronically elevated FFA contribute to beta cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of NIDDM by significantly increasing the basal rate of insulin secretion. This increase in turn results in a decrease in the beta cell's intracellular stores that cannot be offset by commensurate FFA induction of proinsulin biosynthesis. PMID:9486980

  19. The effects of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of naloxegol.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh; She, Fahua; Sostek, Mark

    2014-12-01

    The impact of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of a 25-mg oral dose of naloxegol was examined in patients with renal impairment classified as moderate, severe, or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and compared with healthy subjects (n = 8/group). Geometric mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was increased in patients with moderate (1.7-fold) or severe (2.2-fold) impairment, and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) were elevated in patients with moderate (1.1-fold) or severe (1.8-fold) impairment. These findings were driven by higher exposures in two patients in each of the moderate and severe impairment groups; exposures in all other patients were similar to the control group. Overall exposures in ESRD patients were similar and Cmax was 29% lower versus normal subjects. Renal impairment minimally affected other plasma pharmacokinetic parameters. As renal clearance was a minor component of total clearance, exposure to naloxegol was unaffected by the degree of renal impairment, with no correlation between either AUC or Cmax and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Hemodialysis was an ineffective means to remove naloxegol. Naloxegol was generally well tolerated in all groups. Renal impairment could adversely affect clearance by hepatic and gut metabolism, resulting in the increased exposures observed in outliers of the moderate and severe renal impairment groups.

  20. Maternal Pharmacokinetics and Fetal Disposition of (±)-Citalopram during Mouse Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are commonly prescribed in the treatment of depression, their use during pregnancy leads to fetal drug exposures. According to recent reports, such exposures could affect fetal development and long-term offspring health. A central question is how pregnancy-induced physical and physiological changes in mothers, fetuses, and the placenta influence fetal SSRI exposures during gestation. In this study, we examined the effects of gestational stage on the maternal pharmacokinetics and fetal disposition of the SSRI (±)-citalopram (CIT) in a mouse model. We determined the maternal and fetal CIT serum concentration–time profiles following acute maternal administration on gestational days (GD)14 and GD18, as well as the fetal brain drug disposition. The results show that pregnancy affects the pharmacokinetics of CIT and that maternal drug clearance increases as gestation progresses. The data further show that CIT and its primary metabolite desmethylcitalopram (DCIT) readily cross the placenta into the fetal compartment, and fetal exposure to CIT exceeds that of the mother during gestation 2 h after maternal administration. Enzymatic activity assays revealed that fetal drug metabolic capacity develops in late gestation, resulting in elevated circulating and brain concentrations of DCIT at embryonic day (E)18. Fetal exposure to the SSRI CIT in murine pregnancy is therefore influenced by both maternal gestational stage and embryonic development, suggesting potential time-dependent effects on fetal brain development. PMID:26765210

  1. Machine Aids to Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkmann, Karl-Heinz

    1981-01-01

    Describes the TEAM Program System of the Siemens Language Services Department, particularly the main features of its terminology data bank. Discusses criteria to which stored terminology must conform and methods of data bank utilization. Concludes by summarizing the consequences that machine-aided translation development has had for the…

  2. [Topics for translational research].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    This report focused on translational research presented in ASBMR 2015 held in Seattle, WA in October 2015. Comorbidity with chronic diseases such as diabetes and chronic kidney disease and the relationship between skeletal and extraskeltal tissues give us more complexed pathophysiological issues to be clarified in superaged society.

  3. "Rose Blanche" in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stan, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This comparative study focuses on three editions of "Rose Blanche," Roberto Innocenti's picturebook portrayal of a young girl who discovers a Nazi concentration camp on the outskirts of her German city. The original text, written in French by Christophe Gallaz to accompany Innocenti's illustrations, was translated into English and published in the…

  4. Translating Dyslexia across Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Lisa A.; Manglani, Monica; Escalona, Nicholas; Cysner, Jessica; Hamilton, Rachel; Pfaffmann, Jeffrey; Johnson, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Direct relationships between induced mutation in the "DCDC2" candidate dyslexia susceptibility gene in mice and changes in behavioral measures of visual spatial learning have been reported. We were interested in determining whether performance on a visual-spatial learning and memory task could be translated across species (study 1) and…

  5. Translation and Transliteration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanakaraj, S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Makes a case for using transliteration in order to avoid wholesale translation of new words from the natural sciences and technology into Indian languages. Proposes introduction of the Roman alphabet (in a modified form), so that the Indian languages can accommodate new loans within their own phonetic systems without any substantial changes. (SR)

  6. Rhythm in Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Renlun

    2008-01-01

    This research is an attempt at the elucidation of the significance of rhythmic in translations. According to Eugene A. Nada's functional equivalence, the comprehensive effect which the receptors of the versions get should be the same as the one the readers of the original get, and since rhythm is an integral part of the style, rhythm should be…

  7. Grammatical Gender in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordag, Denisa; Pechmann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In three experiments native speakers of Czech translated bare nouns and gender-marked adjective + noun phrases into German, their second language (L2). In Experiments 1-3 we explored the so-called gender interference effect from first language (L1) as observed in previous picture naming studies (naming latencies were longer when the L1 noun and…

  8. UHV piezoelectric translator

    SciTech Connect

    Oversluizen, T.; Watson, G.

    1985-01-01

    A UHV compatible piezoelectric translator has been developed to correct for angular misalignments in the crysals of a UHV x-ray monochromator. The unit is small, bakeable to 150/sup 0/C, and uses only ceramic materials for insulation. We report on the construction details, vacuum compatibility, mechanical properties, and uses of the device.

  9. Cultural Knowledge in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olk, Harald

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study exploring the influence of cultural knowledge on the translation performance of German students of English. Found that the students often lacked sufficient knowledge about British culture to deal with widely-used cultural concepts. Findings suggest that factual reference sources have an important role to play in translation…

  10. Lost in the Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Karl

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for working with translators in training situations include meeting them beforehand, identifying their comfort level, clearing jokes, giving them copies of handouts, acknowledging their presence, trying a brief introduction in the local language, speaking slowly, and using simple sentence structure. (JOW)

  11. Methods for identifying translational researchers.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Mary K; Johnson, Timothy; Welch, Eric W

    2014-03-01

    There is currently no generally accepted method for identifying the community of translational researchers when evaluating Clinical and Translational Science Centers. We use data from the multiyear evaluation of the University of Illinois at Chicago Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) to investigate the complexities of reliably identifying translational researchers. We use three methods to identify translational researchers: (1) participating in CCTS services and programs; (2) self-identifying as a translational researcher; and (3) engaging in activities that are characteristic of translational science. We find little overlap of these differently defined research groups. We conclude with a discussion of how the findings suggest challenges for evaluating translational science programs and the need for better definition, communication, and demonstration of translational science for scientists and evaluators.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  13. Optimisation of immunosuppressive therapy using pharmacokinetic principles.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J

    1992-11-01

    Clinical experience with immunosuppressive therapy is more extensive in the area of preventing the rejection of transplanted organs than in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Among the many pharmacological agents presently in use, only prednisone (or methylprednisolone) and cyclosporin require dosage individualisation. Sources of interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetics of prednisone have been identified and are guiding the selection of individual dosage rates. As an alternative, a single timed concentration can determine an apparent value for prednisone clearance from which an individual dosage can be calculated. In contrast, numerous sources of inter- and intraindividual variability in cyclosporin pharmacokinetics prevent the easy selection of safe and effective starting dose rates. Indeed, test doses of cyclosporin followed by series of blood samples and the calculation of individual pharmacokinetic parameters are needed to assure successful immunosuppression right from the start. Furthermore, only continued monitoring sustains immunotherapy vis-à-vis intraindividual variability and a narrow therapeutic range of cyclosporin concentrations.

  14. Effect of silibinin on the pharmacokinetics of pyrazinamide and pyrazinoic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jhy-Wen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2007-09-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is widely used in combination with other drugs in chemotherapy for tuberculosis. However, the dose-related liver injury is the main adverse effect of PZA and its metabolite [pyrazinoic acid (PA)]. Silibinin is the main flavonoid extracted from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), and it displays hepatoprotective properties. This study investigates the pharmacokinetics of PZA and PA and their interaction with silibinin in rats. The parallel study design was divided into six groups: PZA alone, PZA + long-term silibinin exposure, PZA + concomitant short-term silibinin exposure, PA alone, PA + long-term silibinin exposure, and PA + concomitant short-term silibinin exposure groups. The results indicate that the distribution ratio of PZA from bile to blood [area under the curve (AUC)(bile)/AUC(blood)] in the PZA + long-term silibinin exposure and PZA + concomitant short-term silibinin exposure groups was also not significantly different when compared with the PZA alone group. However, the bile-to-blood distribution ratio of PA was significantly decreased in the PA + long-term silibinin exposure and the PA + concomitant short-term silibinin exposure groups. On PZA administration, the blood, but not bile, levels of PA were markedly increased in the PZA + long-term silibinin exposure and PZA + concomitant short-term silibinin exposure groups, but the bile-to-blood ratio of PA was decreased. These results suggest that the excretion pathway of PA may be blocked by silibinin through xanthine oxidase and hepatobiliary excretion.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, D J; Lashev, L D; Yanev, S G; Pandova, B

    2007-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin (EFL) and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin (CIP) was investigated in 7-8 month old turkeys (6 birds per sex). EFL was administered intravenously (i.v.) and orally (p.o.) at a dose 10 mg kg(-1) body weight. Blood was taken prior to and at 0.17, 0.33, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 24 h following drug administration. The concentrations of EFL and CIP in blood serum were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Serum concentrations versus time were analysed by a noncompartmental analysis. The elimination half-live and the mean residence time of EFL after i.v. injection for the serum were after oral administration 6.64+/-0.90 h, 8.96+/-1.18 h and 6.92+/-0.97 h, 11.91+/-1.87 h, respectively. After single p.o. administration, EFL was absorbed slowly (MAT=2.76+/-0.48 h) with time to reach maximum serum concentrations of 6.33+/-2.54 h. Maximum serum concentrations was 1.23+/-0.30 microg mL(-1). Oral bioavailability for for EFL after oral administration was found to be 69.20+/-1.49%. The ratios C(max)/MIC and AUC(0 --> 24)/MIC were respectively from 161.23+/-5.9 h to 12.90+/-0.5 h for the pharmacodynamic predictor C(max)/MIC, and from 2153.44+/-66.6 h to 137.82+/-4.27 h for AUC(0 --> 24)/MIC, for the different clinically significant microorganisms, whose values for MIC varies from 0.008 microg L(-1) to 0.125 microg mL(-1).

  16. Pharmacokinetics of amantadine in cats.

    PubMed

    Siao, K T; Pypendop, B H; Stanley, S D; Ilkiw, J E

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in cats, after both i.v. and oral administration. Six healthy adult domestic shorthair female cats were used. Amantadine HCl (5 mg/kg, equivalent to 4 mg/kg amantadine base) was administered either intravenously or orally in a crossover randomized design. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to amantadine administration, and at various times up to 1440 min following intravenous, or up to 2880 min following oral administration. Plasma amantadine concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and plasma amantadine concentration-time data were fitted to compartmental models. A two-compartment model with elimination from the central compartment best described the disposition of amantadine administered intravenously in cats, and a one-compartment model best described the disposition of oral amantadine in cats. After i.v. administration, the apparent volume of distribution of the central compartment and apparent volume of distribution at steady-state [mean ± SEM (range)], and the clearance and terminal half-life [harmonic mean ± jackknife pseudo-SD (range)] were 1.5 ± 0.3 (0.7-2.5) L/kg, 4.3 ± 0.2 (3.7-5.0) L/kg, 8.2 ± 2.1 (5.9-11.4) mL·min/kg, and 348 ± 49 (307-465) min, respectively. Systemic availability [mean ± SEM (range)] and terminal half-life after oral administration [harmonic mean ± jackknife pseudo-SD (range)] were 130 ± 11 (86-160)% and 324 ± 41 (277-381) min, respectively.

  17. Naproxen pharmacokinetics in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Upton, R A; Williams, R L; Kelly, J; Jones, R M

    1984-01-01

    While naproxen pharmacokinetics appear to be altered in the presence of both diminished renal and hepatic function, the degree to which naproxen disposition might be influenced in the elderly by concurrent alteration in these functions is not obvious. Total plasma clearance/bioavailability (CL/F) of naproxen after a single 375 mg oral dose was found to be less in a group of 10 healthy men between 66 and 81 years of age than in 10 healthy men between 22 and 39 years (0.318 +/- 0.078, 0.416 +/- 0.061 l/h). At steady state (375 mg, 12 hourly), however, CL/F was statistically indistinguishable between the two groups. The fraction of naproxen unbound to plasma protein was doubled in elderly subjects, both at peak and trough drug concentrations. The lowered protein binding tended to obscure a 50% decrement in the intrinsic clearance of naproxen in the elderly as estimated by unbound clearance/bioavailability (213 +/- 64, 396 +/- 155 l/h). As a result, mean steady-state plasma concentrations of naproxen were indistinguishable between the elderly and young (64.2 +/- 8.5, 58.2 +/- 8.1 mg/l) but the elderly generated twice the mean steady-state unbound plasma drug concentration (0.157 +/- 0.039, 0.0859 +/- 0.0212 mg/l). Since it is the unbound drug concentration which appears in general to relate more closely to pharmacological and toxic effect, it may be advisable to reduce naproxen doses by half in the elderly, pending plasma drug concentration-response studies in this age group. If a similar perturbation with age occurs in benoxaprofen protein binding as was observed with naproxen, benoxaprofen intrinsic clearance in the elderly might be only one quarter of that in younger individuals; a factor which may contribute to the toxicity of this drug in the elderly. PMID:6487459

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the injectable formulation of methadone hydrochloride and methadone in lipid nanocarriers administered orally to horses.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, N; Luna, S P; Dalla Costa, T; Pimenta, E L; Detoni, C B; Guterres, S S; Puoli Filho, J N; Pantoja, J C; Pigatto, M C

    2017-01-16

    We investigated the thermal, electrical and mechanical antinociceptive and physiological effects (heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, head height and abdominal auscultation score), and pharmacokinetics, of 0.5 mg/kg of the injectable formulation (ORAL) or nanoparticulated methadone (NANO) given orally, in six adult mares, using a crossover, blind and prospective design. Repeated-measure models were used to compare parametric data between and within treatments, followed by Tukey's test. Nonparametric data were analysed with Wilcoxon signed-rank, adjusted by Bonferroni tests. Blood samples were also collected up to 6 h after dosing for plasma drug quantification by LC-MS/MS. Methadone pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental and compartmental approaches. There were no differences in pharmacodynamic parameters. No statistical differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters from noncompartmental analysis for both groups, except a significant decrease in peak plasma concentration, increase in apparent volume of distribution per fraction absorbed (Vdss /F) and increased mean residence time (MRT) for NANO. One-compartment open model with first order elimination best described the pharmacokinetic profiles for both groups. Neither ORAL nor NANO administered orally to horses produced antinociception. The nanoencapsulated formulation of methadone given orally to horses did not improve methadone pharmacokinetic parameters or increased systemic body exposure to methadone.

  19. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics Study of R- and S-Enantiomers of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, AR-42 (NSC 731438), in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Xie, Zhiliang; Jones, William P; Wei, Xiaohui Tracey; Liu, Zhongfa; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K; Wang, Jiang; Coss, Christopher C; Chen, Ching-Shih; Marcucci, Guido; Garzon, Ramiro; Covey, Joseph M; Phelps, Mitch A; Chan, Kenneth K

    2016-05-01

    AR-42, a new orally bioavailable, potent, hydroxamate-tethered phenylbutyrate class I/IIB histone deacetylase inhibitor currently is under evaluation in phase 1 and 2 clinical trials and has demonstrated activity in both hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. This report focuses on the preclinical characterization of the pharmacokinetics of AR-42 in mice and rats. A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay has been developed and applied to the pharmacokinetic study of the more active stereoisomer, S-AR-42, when administered via intravenous and oral routes in rodents, including plasma, bone marrow, and spleen pharmacokinetics (PK) in CD2F1 mice and plasma PK in F344 rats. Oral bioavailability was estimated to be 26 and 100% in mice and rats, respectively. R-AR-42 was also evaluated intravenously in rats and was shown to display different pharmacokinetics with a much shorter terminal half-life compared to that of S-AR-42. Renal clearance was a minor elimination pathway for parental S-AR-42. Oral administration of S-AR-42 to tumor-bearing mice demonstrated high uptake and exposure of the parent drug in the lymphoid tissues, spleen, and bone marrow. This is the first report of the pharmacokinetics of this novel agent, which is now in early phase clinical trials.

  20. Interspecies pharmacokinetics as applied to the hard drug photosensitizing agent meta(tetrahydroxphenyl)chlorin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronn, Avigdor M.; Lofgren, Lennart A.; Westerborn, Anders

    1996-01-01

    Having successfully completed an extensive three year study of the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of m-THPC as a photosensitizer in three different animal models (rabbit, dog and nude rats) we began a phase one human trial in two centers. At the Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden ten patients were selected for the treatment of bronchial, prostate, skin, laryngeal and nasopharyngeal tumors while at Long Island Jewish Medical Center Hospital four patients were treated for laryngeal cancers. These studies were designed to study the optimal parameters for human treatment and as such relied on data from the animal studies mentioned above. De-escalating drug doses of 0.3, 0.15, 0.075 and 0.0375 mg/kg were chosen and the pharmacokinetics of the patients plasma, tumor and adjacent healthy tissues were measured spectrofluorometrically following chemical extraction of the drug. The half life of the drug in our Cotton tail rabbit model was measured as 24.7 hours as opposed to the human half life of 44.5 hours within the studied dosing range. This illustrates the extreme care that must be exercised before translating animal pharmacokinetics data to human dosing decision.

  1. The posology of oseltamivir in infants with influenza infection using a population pharmacokinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kamal, M A; Acosta, E P; Kimberlin, D W; Gibiansky, L; Jester, P; Niranjan, V; Rath, B; Clinch, B; Sánchez, P J; Ampofo, K; Whitley, R; Rayner, C R

    2014-09-01

    Infants are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality due to influenza. Until recently, few data were available with which to optimize oseltamivir dosing in this high-risk population. Here, data for 133 infants were pooled from two prospective pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic safety studies to develop a population pharmacokinetic model. A three-compartment model with allometric scaling of all clearance and volume parameters described the disposition of oseltamivir and its carboxylate metabolite (OC). Weight dependence, OC clearance, and volume of distribution increased linearly with age. Analyses showed no association between OC exposure and viral clearance, the development of resistance (phenotypic/genotypic), normalization of body temperature, or safety endpoints. Pharmacokinetic bridging showed that a 3 mg/kg dose yielded acceptable OC exposure and good tolerability while minimizing the risk of underexposure and resistance/treatment failure. These pharmacological analyses formed the basis of the US Food and Drug Administration's recent approval of oseltamivir treatment for infants with influenza aged as young as 2 weeks.

  2. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  3. Effect of food and antacids on the pharmacokinetics of pirfenidone in older healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Rubino, C M; Bhavnani, S M; Ambrose, P G; Forrest, A; Loutit, J S

    2009-08-01

    Pirfenidone is a small, synthetic molecule under investigation for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In an open-label, single-dose crossover study, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of pirfenidone were investigated with or without food and antacids in healthy adult volunteers. Concentrations of pirfenidone and its metabolites in plasma and urine were determined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and candidate pharmacokinetic models were fit to plasma data using weighted, non-linear regression. The effect of food and antacids on pirfenidone exposure was evaluated by determining 'equivalence' using FDA guidelines. Adverse events were recorded by site personnel and classified by investigators on the basis of severity and relationship to study drug. Sixteen subjects yielded 64 pharmacokinetic profiles. The best fit was achieved using a five-compartment, linear model with an allowance for direct conversion to the primary metabolite (5-carboxy-pirfenidone). Coadministration with food decreased the rate and, to a lesser degree, the extent of pirfenidone absorption of absorption. Analysis of adverse events revealed a correlation between pirfenidone C(max) and the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events, suggesting that food may reduce the risk of certain adverse events associated with pirfenidone. Administration of pirfenidone with food has a modest effect on overall exposure but results in lower peak concentrations, which may improve tolerability.

  4. [Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Beck, S; Wicha, S G; Kloft, C; Kees, M G

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic agents are crucial pillars in intensive care medicine and must be used rationally and sensibly. In the case of critically ill patients optimal dosing with respect to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles (PK/PD) can be vital. Preclinical results demonstrated important differences between antibiotic classes and gave rise to differing clinical dosing strategies, e.g. high dose once daily regimens for aminoglycosides or extended/continuous infusion of betalactams. Critically ill patients with altered pharmacokinetic parameters and infections by pathogens with low susceptibility are most likely to benefit from PK/PD-guided therapy.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of three different injectable zuclopenthixol preparations.

    PubMed

    Aaes-Jørgensen, T

    1989-01-01

    1. The zuclopenthixol concentrations in serum has been investigated in man and dog after injection of three different zuclopenthixol preparations. These were zuclopenthixol dihydrochloride in aqueous solution, zuclopenthixol acetate in oil and zuclopenthixol decanoate in oil. 2. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the three injectable zuclopenthixol preparations are very different. Maximum serum levels are obtained after about 1 hour for zuclopenthixol dihydrochloride, after 36 hours for zuclopenthixol acetate and after one week for zuclopenthixol decanoate. 3. The different pharmacokinetics of the three injectable zuclopenthixol preparations are reflected in their clinical properties.

  6. Effects of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid on the pharmacokinetics of valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo-Yun; Huh, Wooseong; Jung, Jin Ah; Yoo, Hye Min; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Jung-Ryul

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is mainly metabolized via glucuronide, which is hydrolyzed by β-glucuronidase and undergoes enterohepatic circulation. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC) administration leads to decreased levels of β-glucuronidase-producing bacteria, suggesting that these antibiotics could interrupt enterohepatic circulation and thereby alter the pharmacokinetics of VPA. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of AMC on the pharmacokinetics of VPA. This was an open-label, two-treatment, one-sequence study in 16 healthy volunteers. Two treatments were evaluated; treatment VPA, in which a single dose of VPA 500 mg was administered, and treatment AMC + VPA, in which multiple doses of AMC 500/125 mg were administered three times daily for 7 days and then a single dose of VPA was administered. Blood samples were collected up to 48 hours. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods. Fifteen subjects completed the study. Systemic exposures and peak concentrations of VPA were slightly lower with treatment AMC + VPA than with treatment VPA (AUClast, 851.0 h·mg/L vs 889.6 h·mg/L; Cmax, 52.1 mg/L vs 53.0 mg/L). There were no significant between-treatment effects on pharmacokinetics (95% confidence interval [CI]) of AUClast and Cmax (95.7 [85.9–106.5] and 98.3 [91.6–105.6], respectively). Multiple doses of AMC had no significant effects on the pharmacokinetics of VPA; thus, no dose adjustment is necessary. PMID:26309401

  7. The Sheep as a Model of Preclinical Safety and Pharmacokinetic Evaluations of Candidate Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, David; Dias, Nicola; Holding, Jeremy; Muntendam, Alex; Oostebring, Freddy; Dreier, Peter; Rohan, Lisa; Nuttall, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    When developing novel microbicide products for the prevention of HIV infection, the preclinical safety program must evaluate not only the active pharmaceutical ingredient but also the product itself. To that end, we applied several relatively standard toxicology study methodologies to female sheep, incorporating an assessment of the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and local toxicity of a dapivirine-containing human vaginal ring formulation (Dapivirine Vaginal Ring-004). We performed a 3-month general toxicology study, a preliminary pharmacokinetic study using drug-loaded vaginal gel, and a detailed assessment of the kinetics of dapivirine delivery to plasma, vaginal, and rectal fluid and rectal, vaginal, and cervical tissue over 28 days of exposure and 3 and 7 days after removal of the ring. The findings of the general toxicology study supported the existing data from both preclinical and clinical studies in that there were no signs of toxicity related to dapivirine. In addition, the presence of the physical dapivirine ring did not alter local or systemic toxicity or the pharmacokinetics of dapivirine. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the dapivirine ring produced significant vaginal tissue levels of dapivirine. However, no dapivirine was detected in cervical tissue samples using the methods described here. Plasma and vaginal fluid levels were lower than those in previous clinical studies, while there were detectable dapivirine levels in the rectal tissue and fluid. All tissue and fluid levels tailed off rapidly to undetectable levels following removal of the ring. The sheep represents a very useful model for the assessment of the safety and pharmacokinetics of microbicide drug delivery devices, such as the vaginal ring. PMID:25845860

  8. Translation in Language Teaching: Insights from Professional Translator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carreres, Angeles; Noriega-Sanchez, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The past three decades have seen vast changes in attitudes towards translation, both as an academic discipline and as a profession. The insights we have gained in recent years, in particular in the area of professional translator training, call for a reassessment of the role of translation in language teaching. Drawing on research and practices in…

  9. Lost in Translation: Examining Translation Errors Associated with Mathematical Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Stiff, Lee V.; Bosse, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Translation errors and conceptual misunderstandings made by students translating among graphical, tabular, and symbolic representations of linear functions were examined. The study situated student errors in the context of the "Translation-Verification Model" developed specifically for the purpose of explaining student behavior during the process…

  10. A Writer's Thoughts on Translation and Always Living in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosin, Marjorie; Jones, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how it feels to be a poet who writes in Spanish and has her work translated, examining the author's immigration experiences and noting the translator's contributions in making her work accessible across languages, borders, and cultures. Explains that writing in Spanish is a gesture of survival, and translation allows her memories to…

  11. UCLA Translational Biomarker Development Program (UTBD)

    SciTech Connect

    Czernin, Johannes

    2014-09-01

    The proposed UTBD program integrates the sciences of diagnostic nuclear medicine and (radio)chemistry with tumor biology and drug development. UTBD aims to translate new PET biomarkers for personalized medicine and to provide examples for the use of PET to determine pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) drug properties. The program builds on an existing partnership between the Ahmanson Translational Imaging Division (ATID) and the Crump Institute of Molecular Imaging (CIMI), the UCLA Department of Chemistry and the Division of Surgical Oncology. ATID provides the nuclear medicine training program, clinical and preclinical PET/CT scanners, biochemistry and biology labs for probe and drug development, radiochemistry labs, and two cyclotrons. CIMI provides DOE and NIH-funded training programs for radio-synthesis (START) and molecular imaging (SOMI). Other participating entities at UCLA are the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Division of Surgical Oncology. The first UTBD project focuses on deoxycytidine kinase, a rate-limiting enzyme in nucleotide metabolism, which is expressed in many cancers. Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) positive tumors can be targeted uniquely by two distinct therapies: 1) nucleoside analog prodrugs such as gemcitabine (GEM) are activated by dCK to cytotoxic antimetabolites; 2) recently developed small molecule dCK inhibitors kill tumor cells by starving them of nucleotides required for DNA replication and repair. Since dCK-specific PET probes are now available, PET imaging of tumor dCK activity could improve the use of two different classes of drugs in a wide variety of cancers.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, and withdrawal period of amoxicillin sodium in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yong; Awji, Elias Gebru; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and withdrawal period of amoxicillin sodium in olive flounder and its activity against pathogenic bacteria of olive flounder were investigated. 2. Intramuscular administration (12.5 or 125 mg/kg, n = 160) and HPLC analysis of sera were used. 3. Rapid absorption (Tmax 2.6 and 2.2 h), prolonged action (terminal half-life, 15.52 and 10.42 h; MRT, 18.79 and 14.44 h), and dose-proportional exposure (AUC0-∞, 273.69 and 2755.37 h. μg/ml) were observed after 12.5 and 125 mg/kg doses. 4. The withdrawal period of amoxicillin sodium from muscle plus skin of olive flounder (n =40, water temperature, 23 °C) was 12 d (276 degree days). 5. Amoxicillin sodium had small MICs against Streptococcus iniae (0.008-0.06 μg/ml) and Streptococcus parauberis (0.03-1.0 μg/ml), whereas higher concentrations were required to inhibit Edwardsiella tarda isolates (0.06-16 μg/ml). 6. While large AUC0-24 h/MIC90 and Cmax/MIC90 ratios were obtained for S. iniae and S. parauberis, with drug concentrations in serum greater than MICs for the entire dosing interval (T > MIC90 of 100%), the lower dose (12.5 mg/kg) could not achieve target values of the PK-pharmacodynamic (PD) indices for E. tarda isolates, suggesting the need for higher doses to combat pathogenic bacteria with large MICs.

  13. Translational Research in Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyengar, M. Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Bernstam, Elmer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's role in medical translational research, and the importance in research for space exploration. The application of medical research for space exploration translates to health care in space medicine, and on earth.

  14. On Literal Translation of English Idioms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Linli

    2009-01-01

    There are six translation tactics in translating English idioms into Chinese: literal translation, compensatory translation, free translation, explanational translation, borrowing, integrated approach. Each tactic should be reasonably employed in the process of translating, so as to keep the flavor of the original English idioms as well as to…

  15. Translational benchmark risk analysis

    PubMed Central

    Piegorsch, Walter W.

    2010-01-01

    Translational development – in the sense of translating a mature methodology from one area of application to another, evolving area – is discussed for the use of benchmark doses in quantitative risk assessment. Illustrations are presented with traditional applications of the benchmark paradigm in biology and toxicology, and also with risk endpoints that differ from traditional toxicological archetypes. It is seen that the benchmark approach can apply to a diverse spectrum of risk management settings. This suggests a promising future for this important risk-analytic tool. Extensions of the method to a wider variety of applications represent a significant opportunity for enhancing environmental, biomedical, industrial, and socio-economic risk assessments. PMID:20953283

  16. The mechanism of translation

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Translation of the genetic code on the ribosome into protein is a process of extraordinary complexity, and understanding its mechanism has remained one of the major challenges even though x-ray structures have been available since 2000. In the past two decades, single-particle cryo-electron microscopy has contributed a major share of information on structure, binding modes, and conformational changes of the ribosome during its work cycle, but the contributions of this technique in the translation field have recently skyrocketed after the introduction of a new recording medium capable of detecting individual electrons. As many examples in the recent literature over the past three years show, the impact of this development on the advancement of knowledge in this field has been transformative and promises to be lasting. PMID:28344776

  17. Using Dried Blood Spot Sampling to Improve Data Quality and Reduce Animal Use in Mouse Pharmacokinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-01-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 µL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal—often to a single collection per mouse—thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 µL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study. PMID:25836959

  18. Modulation of the pharmacokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles and their fates in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Youn-Joung; Chung, Hea-Eun; Yoo, Nan-Hui; Lee, Jeong-A.; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the effects of particle size (20 nm or 70 nm) and surface charge (negative or positive) on the pharmacokinetics, tissue distributions, and excretion of ZnO nanoparticles were examined following the administration of a single oral dose to rats. Pharmacokinetic profiles and biodistributions were not affected by particle size or gender. However, ZnO (-) particles were markedly more absorbed by the systemic circulation than ZnO (+) particles. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles differed from those of zinc ions, as evidenced by the low dissolution (13-14%) of ZnO nanoparticles under gastric conditions. The kidneys, liver, and lungs were found to be target organs. However, the major biological fate of ZnO nanoparticles in tissues was the ionic form, not the particulate form, and this was independent of exposure routes (oral and intravenous). Particle size was only found to affect excretion kinetics, and 20 nm particles were more rapidly eliminated. Most nanoparticles were excreted via the biliary and fecal routes, but a small amount of the nanoparticles was excreted via urine. The study shows that surface charge, rather than particle size or gender, is the critical modulator of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ZnO nanoparticles.In the present study, the effects of particle size (20 nm or 70 nm) and surface charge (negative or positive) on the pharmacokinetics, tissue distributions, and excretion of ZnO nanoparticles were examined following the administration of a single oral dose to rats. Pharmacokinetic profiles and biodistributions were not affected by particle size or gender. However, ZnO (-) particles were markedly more absorbed by the systemic circulation than ZnO (+) particles. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles differed from those of zinc ions, as evidenced by the low dissolution (13-14%) of ZnO nanoparticles under gastric conditions. The kidneys, liver, and lungs were found to be target organs. However

  19. Pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled tungsten ((188)W) in male Sprague-Dawley rats following acute sodium tungstate inhalation.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Pheona M; Leavens, Teresa L; Wagner, Dean J; Olabisi, Ayodele O; Struve, Melanie F; Wong, Brian A; Tewksbury, Earl; Chapman, Gail D; Dorman, David C

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol cloud formation may occur when certain tungsten munitions strike hard targets, placing military personnel at increased risk of exposure. Although the pharmacokinetics of various forms of tungsten have been studied in animals following intravenous and oral administration, tungsten disposition following inhalation remains incompletely characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of inhaled tungstate (WO(4)) in rats. Male, 16-wk-old, CD rats (n = 7 rats/time point) underwent a single, 90-min, nose-only exposure to an aerosol (mass median aerodynamic diameter [MMAD] 1.50 mum ) containing 256 mg W/m(3) as radiolabeled sodium tungstate (Na(2)(188)WO(4)). (188)W tissue concentrations were determined at 0, 1, 3, 7, and 21 days postexposure by gamma spectrometry. The thyroid and urine had the highest (188)W levels postexposure, and urinary excretion was the primary route of (188)W elimination. The pharmacokinetics of tungsten in most tissues was best described with a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with initial phase half-lives of approximately 4 to 6 h and a longer terminal phase with half-lives of approximately 6 to 67 days. The kidney, adrenal, spleen, femur, lymph nodes, and brain continued to accumulate small amounts of tungsten as reflected by tissue:blood activity ratios that increased throughout the 21-day period. At day 21 all tissues except the thyroid, urine, lung, femur, and spleen had only trace levels of (188)W. Data from this study can be used for development and refinement of pharmacokinetic models for tungsten inhalation exposure in environmental and occupational settings.

  20. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Michael, O S

    2015-06-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED).

  1. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED). PMID:26807087

  2. Some statistical issues in modelling pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J K; Jones, B; Jarvis, P

    A fundamental assumption underlying pharmacokinetic compartment modelling is that each subject has a different individual curve. To some extent this runs counter to the statistical principle that similar individuals will have similar curves, thus making inferences to a wider population possible. In population pharmacokinetics, the compromise is to use random effects. We recommend that such models also be used in data rich situations instead of independently fitting individual curves. However, the additional information available in such studies shows that random effects are often not sufficient; generally, an autoregressive process is also required. This has the added advantage that it provides a means of tracking each individual, yielding predictions for the next observation. The compartment model curve being fitted may also be distorted in other ways. A widely held assumption is that most, if not all, pharmacokinetic concentration data follow a log-normal distribution. By examples, we show that this is not generally true, with the gamma distribution often being more suitable. When extreme individuals are present, a heavy-tailed distribution, such as the log Cauchy, can often provide more robust results. Finally, other assumptions that can distort the results include a direct dependence of the variance, or other dispersion parameter, on the mean and setting non-detectable values to some arbitrarily small value instead of treating them as censored. By pointing out these problems with standard methods of statistical modelling of pharmacokinetic data, we hope that commercial software will soon make more flexible and suitable models available.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  4. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Lambert, D; Bruguerolle, B; Saux, P; Freney, J; Fleurette, J; Meugnier, H; Gouin, F

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were studied in 12 intensive care patients, 6 of whom were under controlled mechanical ventilation. All patients had a creatinine clearance of greater than 80 ml/min per 1.73 m2. They were given 3 mg of ofloxacin per kg of body weight intravenously at a constant flow rate in 30 min twice a day for 7 days. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed on days 1 and 7. Between days 1 and 7, significant increases in the alpha (distribution) and beta (elimination) phase half-lives, the area under the serum concentration-time curve, and peak and trough levels in serum were observed, together with a marked decrease (greater than 50%) in total body clearance. Possible contributing factors for alteration of ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in ventilated patients were patient age, liver dysfunction, drug interaction, and drug accumulation in a deep compartment. This study shows that in intensive care patients the pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin differ from those reported for healthy volunteers. PMID:1929329

  5. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Matthaei, J; Brockmöller, J; Tzvetkov, M V; Sehrt, D; Sachse-Seeboth, C; Hjelmborg, J B; Möller, S; Halekoh, U; Hofmann, U; Schwab, M; Kerb, R

    2015-12-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of the variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors. Metoprolol and torsemide were intravenously administered to 44 monozygotic and 14 dizygotic twin pairs. Metoprolol area under the curve (AUC) varied 4.7-fold and torsemide AUC 3.5-fold. A very high fraction of AUC variations, 91% of metoprolol and 86% of torsemide, were found to be due to additive genetic effects. However, known genetic variants of CYP2D6, -2C9, and OATP1B1 explained only 39%, 2%, and 39% of that variation, respectively. Comparable results for genetically explained variation in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been found for other substrates of these enzymes earlier. These findings indicate that a substantial fraction of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated.

  6. Literary Translation: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cincotta, Madeleine Strong

    The nature of literary translation and ways in which it differs from other forms of translation are examined, looking at practical difficulties, challenges, and satisfaction in the profession of literary translation. The difficulties discussed include suggestions about how to get started, legal questions of copyright, and choice of text.…

  7. Discourse Analysis and the Translator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Margaret

    Discourse analysis, as an approach to text, provides the teacher, student, and professional translator with resources for achieving objectivity and for making and justifying translation decisions. It offers a strategy for relating the problems and processes and discourse and the specific concerns to the objectives of the translator. It can be…

  8. Knowledge Translation: Implications for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Colleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Translation theory originates in the field of applied linguistics and communication. The term knowledge translation has been adopted in health and other fields to refer to the exchange, synthesis, and application of knowledge. The logic model is a circular or iterative loop among various knowledge translation actors (knowledge producers and users)…

  9. The Measurement of Translation Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Variables that constitute translation ability are discussed, based on a two-year development and validation study of job-related tests of translation ability for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The project involved the development of two parallel forms of the Spanish into English Verbatim Translation Exam (SEVTE). (five references) (LB)

  10. Machine Translation for Academic Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui-chin; Chien, Paul Shih Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Due to the globalization trend and knowledge boost in the second millennium, multi-lingual translation has become a noteworthy issue. For the purposes of learning knowledge in academic fields, Machine Translation (MT) should be noticed not only academically but also practically. MT should be informed to the translating learners because it is a…

  11. Lexical Discourse Analysis in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khotaba, Eissa; Al Tarawneh, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Lexical Discourse very often depend on lexis. Lexical Discourse analysis, however, has not yet been given enough consideration of the phenomenon of translation. This paper investigates lexical discourse analysis in translation from one language to another. This qualitative study comprises 15 text translated by M.A. students at the Department of…

  12. Translational Implications of Tamil "Hamlets."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanakaraj, S.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of translation when teaching English as a Second Language in a Tamil context. Singles out the fencing episode in Shakespeare's "Hamlet" to illustrate the difficulties of translating cultural aspects. Concludes that successful translations of Shakespeare into Indian languages should involve collaboration between…

  13. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of desloratadine in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir K; Kantesaria, Bhavna; Wang, Zaiqi

    2007-10-01

    Desloratadine, a nonsedating histamine H(1)-receptor antagonist, is metabolized to 3-hydroxy (3-OH) desloratadine. Impaired hepatic function could result in increased exposure to desloratadine. This study assessed possible differences in the pharmacokinetics and safety of desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine in subjects (N = 21) with moderate hepatic dysfunction or normal liver function. Subjects were given desloratadine 5 mg once daily for 10 days and were assessed in several pharmacokinetic parameters. A similar degree of plasma protein binding to desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine was observed in healthy volunteers and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment. All subjects with hepatic impairment were normal metabolizers. Three subjects with normal liver function, all African American, were identified as poor metabolizers. Exposure to desloratadine in the poor metabolizers was 2.6- to 6.5-fold greater than in other subjects with normal liver function. Eleven treatment-related adverse events, all mild to moderate in severity, were reported. Results suggest that subjects with moderate hepatic impairment experienced a greater increase in desloratadine exposure than subjects with normal liver function. Poor metabolizers had more exposure to desloratadine than normal metabolizers with or without hepatic impairment. Desloratadine administered at a daily dose of 5 mg was well tolerated.

  14. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Artemether, Dihydroartemisinin, Lumefantrine, and Quinine in Pregnant Women with Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, Frank; Dhorda, Mehul; Jullien, Vincent; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J.; Guerin, Philippe J.; Piola, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy alters the pharmacokinetic properties of many drugs used in the treatment of malaria, usually resulting in lower drug exposures. This increases the risks of treatment failure, adverse outcomes for the fetus, and the development of resistance. The pharmacokinetic properties of artemether and its principal metabolite dihydroartemisinin (n = 21), quinine (n = 21), and lumefantrine (n = 26) in pregnant Ugandan women were studied. Lumefantrine pharmacokinetics in a nonpregnant control group (n = 17) were also studied. Frequently sampled patient data were evaluated with noncompartmental analysis. No significant correlation was observed between estimated gestational age and artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, or quinine exposures. Artemether/dihydroartemisinin and quinine exposures were generally low in these pregnant women compared to values reported previously for nonpregnant patients. Median day 7 lumefantrine concentrations were 488 (range, 30.7 to 3,550) ng/ml in pregnant women compared to 720 (339 to 2,150) ng/ml in nonpregnant women (P = 0.128). There was no statistical difference in total lumefantrine exposure or maximum concentration. More studies with appropriate control groups in larger series are needed to characterize the degree to which pregnant women are underdosed with current antimalarial dosing regimens. PMID:23917320

  15. Pharmacokinetic properties of artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, and quinine in pregnant women with uncomplicated plasmodium falciparum malaria in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Tarning, Joel; Kloprogge, Frank; Dhorda, Mehul; Jullien, Vincent; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J; Guerin, Philippe J; Piola, Patrice

    2013-10-01

    Pregnancy alters the pharmacokinetic properties of many drugs used in the treatment of malaria, usually resulting in lower drug exposures. This increases the risks of treatment failure, adverse outcomes for the fetus, and the development of resistance. The pharmacokinetic properties of artemether and its principal metabolite dihydroartemisinin (n = 21), quinine (n = 21), and lumefantrine (n = 26) in pregnant Ugandan women were studied. Lumefantrine pharmacokinetics in a nonpregnant control group (n = 17) were also studied. Frequently sampled patient data were evaluated with noncompartmental analysis. No significant correlation was observed between estimated gestational age and artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, or quinine exposures. Artemether/dihydroartemisinin and quinine exposures were generally low in these pregnant women compared to values reported previously for nonpregnant patients. Median day 7 lumefantrine concentrations were 488 (range, 30.7 to 3,550) ng/ml in pregnant women compared to 720 (339 to 2,150) ng/ml in nonpregnant women (P = 0.128). There was no statistical difference in total lumefantrine exposure or maximum concentration. More studies with appropriate control groups in larger series are needed to characterize the degree to which pregnant women are underdosed with current antimalarial dosing regimens.

  16. Population pharmacokinetics. Theory and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Whiting, B; Kelman, A W; Grevel, J

    1986-01-01

    Good therapeutic practice should always be based on an understanding of pharmacokinetic variability. This ensures that dosage adjustments can be made to accommodate differences in pharmacokinetics due to genetic, environmental, physiological or pathological factors. The identification of the circumstances in which these factors play a significant role depends on the conduct of pharmacokinetic studies throughout all stages of drug development. Advances in pharmacokinetic data analysis in the last 10 years have opened up a more comprehensive approach to this subject: early traditional small group studies may now be complemented by later population-based studies. This change in emphasis has been largely brought about by the development of appropriate computer software (NONMEM: Nonlinear Mixed Effects Model) and its successful application to the retrospective analysis of clinical data of a number of commonly used drugs, e.g. digoxin, phenytoin, gentamicin, procainamide, mexiletine and lignocaine (lidocaine). Success has been measured in terms of the provision of information which leads to increased efficiency in dosage adjustment, usually based on a subsequent Bayesian feedback procedure. The application of NONMEM to new drugs, however, raises a number of interesting questions, e.g. 'what experimental design strategies should be employed?' and 'can kinetic parameter distributions other than those which are unimodal and normal be identified?' An answer to the later question may be provided by an alternative non-parametric maximum likelihood (NPML) approach. Population kinetic studies generate a considerable amount of demographic and concentration-time data; the effort involved may be wasted unless sufficient attention is paid to the organisation and storage of such information. This is greatly facilitated by the creation of specially designed clinical pharmacokinetic data bases, conveniently stored on microcomputers. A move towards the adoption of population

  17. Sirolimus Pharmacokinetics in Early Postmyeloablative Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Rakesh K.; Han, Kelong; Wall, Donna A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bunin, Nancy; Grupp, Stephan A.; Mada, Sripal R.; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2014-01-01

    higher in patients receiving concomitant fluconazole therapy compared with those not receiving fluconazole (C0: 3.9 ± 2.5 versus 2.4 ± 1.5 ng/mL/mg, P = .030; C24: 4.8 ± 3.3 versus 2.5 ± 1.7 ng/mL/mg, P = .018). This pharmacokinetic study of sirolimus in pediatric patients documents a large interindividual variability in the exposure of sirolimus. Steady-state trough blood concentrations were correlated with drug exposure. Trough concentrations were higher with a concomitant use of fluconazole and were higher in Caucasian patients than in Hispanic patients. Oral clearance was greater in children age ≤12 years than in older children and adolescents. With therapeutic drug monitoring, the majority (79%) of sirolimus trough levels could be maintained within the target range (3–12 ng/mL). This study provides a rationale and support for dose adjustments of sirolimus based on steady-state blood concentrations aimed at achieving a target concentration to minimize toxicity and maximize therapeutic benefits in pediatric BMT recipients. PMID:23266742

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics of Pyronaridine in Pediatric Malaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayyoub, Amal; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Ramharter, Michael; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; Tekete, Mamadou; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Shin, Jang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Pyramax is a pyronaridine (PYR)-artesunate (PA) combination for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in adult and pediatric patients. A granule formulation of this combination is being developed for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria in pediatric patients. The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of PYR using a total of 1,085 blood PYR concentrations available from 349 malaria patients younger than 16 years of age with mild to moderate uncomplicated malaria and to confirm the dosing regimen for the pediatric granule formulation. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling using NONMEM software was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and inter- and intraindividual variability parameter estimates. The population pharmacokinetics of PYR were described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Allometric scaling was implemented to address the effect of body weight on clearance and volume parameters. The final parameter estimates of PYR apparent clearance (CL/F), central volume of distribution (V2/F), peripheral volume of distribution (V3/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F), and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 377 liters/day, 2,230 liters, 3,230 liters, 804 liters/day and 17.9 day−1, respectively. Covariate model building conducted using forward addition (P < 0.05) followed by backward elimination (P < 0.001) yielded two significant covariate-parameter relationships, i.e., age on V2/F and formulation on Ka. Evaluation of bootstrapping, visual predictive check, and condition number indicated that the final model displayed satisfactory robustness, predictive power, and stability. Simulations of PYR concentration-time profiles generated from the final model show similar exposures across pediatric weight ranges, supporting the proposed labeling for weight-based dosing of Pyramax granules. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00331136 [phase II study] and

  19. Effects of CYP3A4 inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of maraviroc in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Samantha; Russell, Deborah; Taylor-Worth, Richard J; Ridgway, Caroline E; Muirhead, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    plus TPV/r or placebo on days 1–8. Results All of the drugs/drug combinations tested (except for TPV/r) increased maraviroc exposure, albeit to different degrees of magnitude. SQV/r caused the largest increase in maraviroc exposure (8.3-fold increase in AUCτ), whereas RTV caused the smallest increase in maraviroc exposure (2.6-fold increase in AUCτ). Downward adjustment of the maraviroc dose in study 2 during co-administration of HIV protease inhibitors was able to compensate for the interactions. TPV/r had no clinically relevant effect on maraviroc exposure at steady state. There were no treatment-related serious adverse events or discontinuations due to adverse events in any of the studies, and most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity and resolved without intervention. Conclusions Potent CYP3A4 inhibitors, including ketoconazole and protease inhibitors (except TPV/r), increase maraviroc exposure. Downward adjustment of the maraviroc dose during co-administration with protease inhibitors can compensate for the interaction. TPV/r does not affect the steady-state pharmacokinetics of maraviroc, and hence no dose adjustment would be warranted. PMID:18333863

  20. Pharmacokinetic evaluation and antitumor activity of 2-methoxyestradiol nanosuspension.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuzhang; Zhu, Ling; Du, Bin; Shi, Xiufang; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Shuyu; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and antitumor activity of 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) nanosuspension relative to 2-ME solution both in vitro and in vivo. The pharmacokinetics of 2-ME administered either as a nanosuspension or as a solution were compared after I.V. administration to rats. In plasma, 2-ME nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (p < 0.01) reduced C(max) (1022.8 ± 467.4 ng/mL versus 2559.2 ± 775.8 ng/mL) and AUC(0-240min) (41566.8 ± 965.5 ng/mL min versus 79557.7 ± 256.2 ng/mL min), and a significantly (p < 0.01) greater volume of distribution (3.18-fold), clearance (1.85-fold), and elimination half-life (156.6 ± 33.5 min versus 70.0 ± 22.6 min) compared to the 2-ME solution. Methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay showed that nanosuspension could significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of 2-ME on EC9706 cells in vitro. After 72 h exposure, the IC(50) value of 2-ME nanosuspension was much lower than that of 2-ME solution (1.81 ± 0.15 μmol/L versus 4.14 ± 0.30 μmol/L). Studies on BALB/c mice with EC9706 solid tumors demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth following treatment with 2-ME nanosuspension than 2-ME solution at the same dosage. These results suggest that the delivery of 2-ME nanosuspension is a promising approach for the treatment of tumors.

  1. Etravirine Pharmacokinetics in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Nikki; Schalkwijk, Stein; Best, Brookie M.; Colbers, Angela; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Moltó, José; Stek, Alice M.; Taylor, Graham; Smith, Elizabeth; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Chakhtoura, Nahida; van Kasteren, Marjo; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Mirochnick, Mark; Burger, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study goal was to describe etravirine pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum in HIV-infected women. Methods: IMPAACT P1026s and PANNA are on-going, non-randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center phase-IV prospective studies in HIV-infected pregnant women. Intensive steady-state 12-h pharmacokinetic profiles were performed from 2nd trimester through postpartum. Etravirine was measured at two labs using validated ultra performance liquid chromatography (detection limits: 0.020 and 0.026 mcg/mL). Results: Fifteen women took etravirine 200 mg twice-daily. Etravirine AUC0–12 was higher in the 3rd trimester compared to paired postpartum data by 34% (median 8.3 vs. 5.3 mcg*h/mL, p = 0.068). Etravirine apparent oral clearance was significantly lower in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy compared to paired postpartum data by 52% (median 24 vs. 38 L/h, p = 0.025). The median ratio of cord blood to maternal plasma concentration at delivery was 0.52 (range: 0.19–4.25) and no perinatal transmission occurred. Conclusion: Etravirine apparent oral clearance is reduced and exposure increased during the third trimester of pregnancy. Based on prior dose-ranging and safety data, no dose adjustment is necessary for maternal health but the effects of etravirine in utero are unknown. Maternal health and infant outcomes should be closely monitored until further infant safety data are available. Clinical Trial registration: The IMPAACT protocol P1026s and PANNA study are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT00042289 and NCT00825929. PMID:27540363

  2. Moderate Hepatic Impairment Does Not Affect Doravirine Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Yee, Ka Lai; Liu, Rachael; Fan, Li; Sanchez, Rosa I; Auger, Patrice; Triantafyllou, Ilias; Stypinski, Daria; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Marbury, Thomas; Iwamoto, Marian

    2016-12-27

    Doravirine is a novel, potent, nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor currently in development for HIV-1 infection treatment. As a substrate for CYP3A-mediated metabolism, doravirine could potentially be affected by liver-function changes. As a portion of the HIV-1-infected population has varying degrees of liver impairment, we investigated the effect of moderate hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetic profile and tolerability of single-dose doravirine 100 mg in otherwise healthy subjects. A total of 16 subjects aged 44-64 years took part in the open-label, single-dose trial: 8 with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score, 7-9; 6 men, 2 women) and 8 healthy individuals (mean age and height matched with the impairment group; 6 men, 2 women). Subjects with hepatic impairment were required to have chronic, stable hepatic impairment with features of cirrhosis of any etiology. Blood sampling revealed that doravirine exposure was similar in both groups. The observed geometric least-squares mean ratio (90% confidence interval; moderately impaired/healthy subjects) was 0.99 (0.72-1.35) for AUC0-∞ , 0.93 (0.74-1.18) for AUC0-24 h , 0.90 (0.66-1.24) for Cmax , and 0.99 (0.74-1.33) for C24 h . Geometric mean apparent terminal t½ was ∼18 hours for both groups, whereas median Tmax was 2 hours (range, 1-6 hours) and 2.5 hours (range, 1-3 hours) for impaired and healthy individuals, respectively. In addition, doravirine was generally well tolerated. The results demonstrate that moderate hepatic impairment does not have a clinically meaningful effect on doravirine pharmacokinetics. Therefore, dose adjustment should not be necessary in patients with both HIV-1 and moderate hepatic impairment.

  3. A three-tiered approach for linking pharmacokinetic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The power of the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework arises from its utilization of pathway-based data to describe the initial interaction of a chemical with a molecular target (molecular initiating event; (MIE), followed by a progression through a series of key events that lead to an adverse outcome relevant for regulatory purposes. The AOP itself is not chemical specific, thus providing the biological context necessary for interpreting high throughput (HT) toxicity screening results. Application of the AOP framework and HT predictions in ecological and human health risk assessment, however, requires the consideration of chemical-specific properties that influence external exposure doses and target tissue doses. To address this requirement, a three-tiered approach was developed to provide a workflow for connecting biology-based AOPs to biochemical-based pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion; ADME), and then to chemical/human activity-based exposure pathways. This approach included: (1) The power of the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework arisesfrom its utilization of pathway-based data to describe the initial interaction of a chemical with a molecular target (molecular initiating event; (MIE), followed by a progression through a series of key events that lead to an adverse outcome relevant for regulatory purposes. The AOP itself is not chemical specific, thus providing the biological context necessary for interpreti

  4. Estimating exposure and dose to characterize health risks: the role of human tissue monitoring in exposure assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, K; Callahan, M A; Bryan, E F

    1995-01-01

    Exposure assessment is an integral part of health risk characterization. Exposure assessments typically address three critical aspects of exposure: the number of people exposed to the environmental toxicant, at specific concentrations, for the time period of interest; the resulting dose; and the relative contribution of important sources and pathways to exposure/dose. Because historically both "point-of-contact" measurements and information about dose and related pharmacokinetic processes have been lacking, exposure assessments have had to rely on construction of "scenarios" to estimate exposure and dose. This could change, however, as advances in development of biologic markers of exposure and dose make it possible to measure and interpret toxicant concentrations in accessible human tissues. The increasing availability of "biomarkers," coupled with improvements in pharmacokinetic understanding, present opportunities to estimate ("reconstruct") exposure from measurements of dose and knowledge of intake and uptake parameters. Human tissue monitoring, however, is not a substitute for more traditional methods of measuring exposure, but rather a complementary approach. A combination of exposure measurements and dose measurements provides the most credible scientific basis for exposure assessment. PMID:7635107

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS MONO- AND DI-METHYLATED METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate levels of arsenic and its metabolites in human tissues and urine after oral exposure to either arsenate (AsV) or arsnite (AsIII). The model consists of interconnected individual ...

  6. USE OF PBPK MODELS FOR ASSESSING ABSORBED DOSE AND CHE INHIBITION FROM AGGREGATE EXPOSURE OF INFANTS AND CHILDREN TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiological pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling framework has been established to assess cumulative risk of dose and injury of infants and children to organophosphorus (OP) insecticides from aggregate sources and routes. Exposure inputs were drawn from all reasonable sources, pr...

  7. Effect of pregnancy on emtricitabine pharmacokinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Stek, AM; Best, BM; Luo, W; Capparelli, E; Burchett, S; Hu, C; Li, H; Read, JS; Jennings, A; Barr, E; Smith, E; Rossi, SS; Mirochnick, M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to describe emtricitabine pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods The International Maternal Pediatric and Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT), formerly Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG), study P1026s is a prospective pharmacokinetic study of HIV-infected pregnant women taking antiretrovirals for clinical indications, including a cohort taking emtricitabine 200 mg once daily. Intensive steady-state 24-hour emtricitabine pharmacokinetic profiles were performed during the third trimester and 6–12 weeks postpartum, and on maternal and umbilical cord blood samples collected at delivery. Emtricitabine was measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry with a quantification limit of 0.0118 mg/L. The target emtricitabine area under the concentration versus time curve, from time 0 to 24 hours post dose (AUC0-24), was ≥7 mg h/L (≤30% reduction from the typical AUC of 10 mg h/L in nonpregnant historical controls). Third-trimester and postpartum pharmacokinetics were compared within subjects. Results Twenty-six women had pharmacokinetics assessed during the third trimester (median 35 weeks of gestation) and 22 postpartum (median 8 weeks postpartum). Mean [90% confidence interval (CI)] emtricitabine pharmacokinetic parameters during the third trimester vs. postpartum were, respectively: AUC: 8.0 (7.1–8.9) vs. 9.7 (8.6–10.9) mg h/L (P = 0.072); apparent clearance (CL/F): 25.0 (22.6–28.3) vs. 20.6 (18.4–23.2) L/h (P = 0.025); 24 hour post dose concentration (C24): 0.058 (0.037–0.063) vs. 0.085 (0.070–0.010) mg/L (P = 0.006). The mean cord:maternal ratio was 1.2 (90% CI 1.0–1.5). The viral load was <400 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL in 24 of 26 women in the third trimester, in 24 of 26 at delivery, and in 15 of 19 postpartum. Within-subject comparisons demonstrated significantly higher CL/F and significantly lower C24 during pregnancy; however, the C24 was well above the inhibitory

  8. Pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnection of herbal medicines and its potential solutions with cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Zhou, Fang; Lu, Meng; Ji, Wei; Niu, Fang; Zha, Weibin; Wu, Xiaolan; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji

    2012-06-01

    Recently, there is a global trend of using herbal medicines to treat various chronic diseases and promote health. But the controversy over the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines is a focus of attention, primarily because of the many unknown and unrevealed natures of herbal medicines, which strongly restricts their application and development. Pharmacokinetics is a bridge linking the herbal medicines and their pharmacological responses. It is assumed in traditional pharmacokinetics that an excellent drug should have appropriate pharmacokinetic behaviours and its pharmacological effect is related with plasma drug concentrations. However, most herbal medicines exhibit excellent pharmacological responses despite poor pharmacokinetic behaviours. As most drugs are intracellulartargeted, we put forward cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy, which is focused on the intracellular fate of drugs. This strategy could partially explain the marked pharmacological activities of herbal medicines from their intracellular pharmacokinetic behaviours, rather than their plasma concentrations. It is a helpful complementarity to traditional pharmacokinetics, and takes a potential role in the research and development of new herb-origined drugs. In this review, the pharmacokinetics-pharmacology disconnections of herbal medicines (such as ginseng, berberine and danshen) are retrospected. Then our proposed cellular pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic strategy, its characteristics, as well as its research procedures are described, followed by the subcellular distributions of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes which are the determinants of cellular pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics. Finally, our successful applications of cellular pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic strategy in elucidating ginsenoside Rh2 as an adjuvant agent and tanshinone IIA as an anticancer agent are illustrated.

  9. Magnetic translator bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard L. (Inventor); Downer, James R. (Inventor); Eisenhaure, David B. (Inventor); Hawkey, Timothy J. (Inventor); Johnson, Bruce G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system for enabling translational motion includes a carriage and a shaft for movably supporting the carriage; a first magnetic bearing fixed to one of the carriage and shaft and slidably received in a first channel of the other of the carriage and shaft. The first channel is generally U shaped with two side walls and a back wall. The magnetic bearing includes a pair of spaced magnetic pole pieces, each pole piece having a pair of electromagnetic coils mounted on poles on opposite ends of the pole piece proximate the side walls, and a third electromagnetic coil mounted on a pole of the pole piece proximate the backwall; a motion sensor for sensing translational motion along two axes and rotationally about three axes of the carriage and shaft relative to each other; and a correction circuit responsive to the sensor for generating a correction signal to drive the coils to compensate for any misalignment sensed between the carriage and the shaft.

  10. Fore–aft translation aftereffects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A general theme in sensory perception is that exposure to a stimulus makes it seem more neutral such that perception of subsequent stimuli is shifted in the opposite direction. The visual motion aftereffect (MAE) is an extensively studied example of this. Although similar effects have been described in other sensory systems, it has not previously been described in the vestibular system. Velocity storage has been extensively studied in the vestibular system and suggests a persistence of perception in the direction of the initial movement. The current study sought to determine how motion perception is influenced by prior movement in darkness. Thirteen human subjects (mean age 41, range 21–68) underwent whole-body fore–aft translation. The threshold of vestibular motion discrimination perception was measured using a single interval (1I) of motion lasting 0.5 s in which subjects identified their direction of motion as forward or backward using an adaptive staircase. The translation aftereffect (TAE) was measured in 2-interval (2I) experiments: The adapting stimulus moved 15 cm in 1.5 s (peak velocity 20 cm/s, peak acceleration 42 cm/s2). After a fixed inter-stimulus interval (ISI) of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 3 s, a second stimulus lasting 0.5 s was delivered and the subject identified the perceived direction of the second test stimulus. The test stimulus was determined using an adaptive staircase. The ISI was constant within the block, but adapting stimuli directions were randomly interleaved. During the 1I condition, the response bias was near zero in all subjects. With a 2I stimulus, 8 of 13 subjects demonstrated a significant bias. At an ISI of 0.5 s, a minority of subjects demonstrated a bias in the same direction as the adapter. When the ISI was 1, 1.5, or 3 s, all subjects who demonstrated a significant TAE had one in the opposite direction of the adapter, similar to that seen for MAE. When averaged across subjects, the TAE was significant with ISIs of 1.0 s and

  11. Found in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrol, Gareth; Conklin, Kathy; Gyllstad, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Formulaic language represents a challenge to even the most proficient of language learners. Evidence is mixed as to whether native and nonnative speakers process it in a fundamentally different way, whether exposure can lead to more nativelike processing for nonnatives, and how L1 knowledge is used to aid comprehension. In this study we…

  12. High prevalence of potential drug interactions affecting mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jaklič, Alenka; Collins, Carol J.; Mrhar, Aleš; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Locatelli, Igor; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) exposure is associated with clinical outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Various drug interaction studies, predominantly in healthy volunteers or solid organ transplant recipients, have identified medications which impact MPA pharmacokinetics. Recipients of nonmyeloablative HCT, however, have an increased burden of comorbidities, potentially increasing the number of concomitant medications and potential drug interactions (PDI) affecting MPA exposure. Thus, we sought to be the first to characterize these PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Materials and methods: We compiled PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics and characterized the prevalence of PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. A comprehensive literature evaluation of four databases and PubMed was conducted to identify medications with PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. Subsequently, a retrospective medication review was conducted to characterize the cumulative PDI burden, defined as the number of PDI for an individual patient over the first 21 days after allogeneic graft infusion, in 84 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Results: Of the 187 concomitant medications, 11 (5.9%) had a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. 87% of 84 patients had one PDI, with a median cumulative PDI burden of 2 (range 0 – 4). The most common PDI, in descending order, were cyclosporine, omeprazole and pantoprazole. Conclusion: Only a minority of medications (5.9%) have a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. However, the majority of nonmyeloablative HCT recipients had a PDI, with cyclosporine and the proton pump inhibitors being the most common. A better understanding of PDI and their management should lead to safer medication regimens for nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:23782584

  13. Population pharmacokinetics and dose optimisation of ritonavir-boosted atazanavir in Thai HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Punyawudho, Baralee; Thammajaruk, Narukjaporn; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Avihingsanon, Anchalee

    2017-03-01

    There is evidence that Thai patients receiving standard doses of ritonavir (RTV)-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) have high exposure to atazanavir (ATV) leading to a higher risk of toxicity. A lower dose of ATV/r may provide adequate exposure in this population. However, pharmacokinetic data on ATV/r in Thai patients required for dose adjustment are limited. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of ATV/r and to determine the influence of patient characteristics on ATV pharmacokinetics. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the proportion of patients achieving target ATV trough concentration (Ctrough) with the standard ATV/r dose of 300/100 mg and a low dose of 200/100 mg once daily (OD). A total of 127 Thai HIV-infected patients were included in this study. One random blood sample was collected to determine ATV and RTV concentrations at each clinic visit from 100 patients. Intensive data from 27 patients enrolled in previous studies were also included. Data were analysed using the non-linear mixed-effects modelling approach. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination and absorption lag time best described the data. The population mean clearance of ATV/r was 4.93 L/h in female patients and was 28.7% higher in male patients. Simulation results showed a higher proportion of patients achieving ATV Ctrough within the target range with ATV/r 200/100 mg compared with 300/100 mg. The 200/100 mg OD dose of ATV/r provides adequate ATV exposure in Thai HIV-infected patients. Therefore, a lower dose of ATV/r should be considered for Thai and Asian populations.

  14. The influence of dietary sodium content on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fimasartan.

    PubMed

    Gu, Namyi; Cho, Joo-Youn; Shin, Kwang-Hee; Jang, In-Jin; Rhee, Moo-Yong

    2016-01-01

    A low sodium diet enhances the hemodynamic effect of renin-angiotensin system blockers. It was suggested that the substrates of P-glycoprotein or cytochrome P450 3A4 were reduced on a high sodium diet. This study aimed to investigate the influence of high sodium diet on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fimasartan, which is a substrate of cytochrome P450 3A4 but not P-glycoprotein. The study design was a two-diet, two-period, two-sequence, randomized, open-label, and crossover with 1-week washout for diet. Eligible subjects were fed with either low sodium (50 mEq/day) diet or high sodium diet (300 mEq/day) for 7 days in the first hospitalization period and the other diet in the second period. On the seventh morning of each period, subjects received a single dose of fimasartan 60 mg in a fasted state. The serial plasma concentrations of fimasartan, serum aldosterone concentration (SAC), and plasma renin activity (PRA) were measured for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis. Sixteen subjects completed the study satisfying the compliance test for diets. Although the mean systemic exposure of fimasartan is slightly (≈10%) decreased on a high sodium diet, the difference was not statistically or clinically significant (P>0.05). The SAC and PRA after fimasartan administration were highly dependent on their baseline levels. The dietary sodium content influenced the baseline of SAC and PRA, but did not influence the ratio change of SAC and PRA after fimasartan treatment. The ratio change of SAC after fimasartan treatment was correlated to the systemic exposure of fimasartan (P<0.05), while the correlation between the ratio change of PRA after fimasartan treatment and the individual systemic exposure of fimasartan was not significant (P>0.05). In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics of fimasartan and ratio changes of SAC and PRA after fimasartan treatment were not significantly influenced by dietary sodium content.

  15. Artemisinin pharmacokinetics in healthy adults after 250, 500 and 1000 mg single oral doses.

    PubMed

    Ashton, M; Gordi, T; Trinh, N H; Nguyen, V H; Nguyen, D S; Nguyen, T N; Dinh, X H; Johansson, M; Le, D C

    1998-05-01

    Eight healthy male, Vietnamese subjects were administered 1 x 250, 2 x 250, and 4 x 250 mg artemisinin capsules in a cross-over design with randomized sequence with a 7-day washout period between administrations. The inter-individual variability in artemisinin pharmacokinetics was large with parameter coefficient of variation (CV) typically between 50-70%. The parameter with the smallest variability was the elimination half-life (CV approximately equal to 30-40%). Analysis of variance indicated also a large intra-subject variability. (CV, or = 24%) for the dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC/dose). The pharmacokinetic results suggested artemisinin to be subject to high pre-systemic extraction. Artemisinin half-life could not predict the extent of in vivo exposure to the drug, there being no correlation between half-life and oral clearance. Artemisinin oral plasma clearance was about 400 L h-1 exhibiting a slight decrease with dose, although the effect was weak. Thus results from studies using different artemisinin doses may, within the studied dose range, be compared without the complication of disproportionate changes in drug exposure with varying dose levels. Half-lives appeared to increase with dose. An observed period effect in the analysis of variance was tentatively associated with time-dependency in artemisinin pharmacokinetics. There was a high correlation between artemisinin plasma concentrations determined at various time-points after drug administration and the AUCs after the 500 and 1000 mg doses, but less so after the 250 mg dose. This may show a tentative approach to assess the systemic exposure of the patients to artemisinin from the determination of artemisinin plasma concentrations in one or two plasma samples only. Artemisinin was well tolerated with no apparent dose or time dependent effects on blood pressure, heart rate or body temperature.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of midazolam in chimeric mice with humanised livers.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Kristin; Pickup, Kathryn; Sarda, Sunil; Swales, John G; Morikawa, Yoshio; Schulz-Utermoehl, Timothy; Hutchison, Michael; Wilson, Ian D

    2012-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics and biotransformation of midazolam were investigated following single oral doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg to chimeric mice with humanised livers (PXB mice) and to severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice used as controls. Pharmacokinetic analysis, on whole blood, revealed rapid absorption of the administered midazolam with a higher C(max) in PXB compared to SCID. The exposure to 1'-hydroxymidazolam was approximately 14-fold greater than to midazolam in the SCID mice and close to equivalent in the PXB mice. The metabolism of midazolam in SCID mice was faster than in the PXB mice such that pharmacokinetic data for midazolam in SCID mice could not be generated from the lowest dose in these animals. Both oxidative and conjugative metabolic pathways were identified in the PXB mice. All the major circulating metabolites observed in humans; 1'-hydroxymidazolam, 4'-hydroxymidazolam, 1',4'-dihydroxymidazolam and 1'-hydroxymidazolam glucuronide, were detected in the blood of PXB mice. However, 4'-hydroxymidazolam and the 1'-hydroxymidazolam glucuronide were not detected in blood samples obtained from SCID mice. The midazolam metabolite profile in the PXB mouse was similar to that previously reported for human suggesting that the PXB mouse model can provide a model system for predicting circulating human metabolites.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered oseltamivir in healthy obese and nonobese Thai subjects.

    PubMed

    Jittamala, Podjanee; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Taylor, Walter Robert John; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Charunwattana, Prakaykaew; Panapipat, Salwaluk; White, Nicholas J; Day, Nicholas P J

    2014-01-01

    Oseltamivir is the most widely used anti-influenza drug. In the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, in which the influenza viruses were oseltamivir sensitive, obesity was identified as a risk factor for severe disease and unfavorable outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate, in obese and nonobese healthy subjects. A single-dose, randomized, two-sequence crossover study was conducted in 12 obese and 12 nonobese healthy Thai volunteers. Each volunteer was given 75 mg and 150 mg oseltamivir orally with an intervening washout period of more than 3 days. The pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were evaluated using a noncompartmental approach. The median (range) body mass indexes (BMIs) for obese subjects were 33.8 kg/m(2) (30.8 to 43.2) and 22.2 (18.8 to 24.2) for nonobese subjects. The pharmacokinetic parameters of oseltamivir carboxylate, the active metabolite of oseltamivir, were not significantly different between obese and nonobese subjects for both 75-mg and 150-mg doses. Both doses were well tolerated. Despite the lower dose per kilogram body weight in obese subjects, there was no significant difference in the exposure of oseltamivir carboxylate between the obese and nonobese groups. Standard dosing is appropriate for obese subjects. (The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT 01049763.).

  18. Effect of verapamil on the pharmacokinetics of pasireotide in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kornberger, Ruediger; Ting, Lillian S L; Tripathi, Anadya P; Rodrigues, Heidi; Nesheiwat, Dalal; Passos, Vanessa Q; Hu, Ke

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the drug-drug interaction between pasireotide SC and verapamil, a known P-glycoprotein inhibitor. Subjects received pasireotide SC (single dose, 600 μg) on day 1, and samples for pharmacokinetics evaluation were collected from days 1 to 8. Subjects received an oral dose of verapamil 240 mg/d for 10 days (days 15-24). On day 18, subjects also received pasireotide SC 600 μg. Pharmacokinetic sampling for pasireotide SC and verapamil was done during days 18 to 25 and days 15 to 21, respectively. Safety evaluations were performed throughout the study period, including a 30-day post-treatment follow-up. Pharmacokinetic profiles of pasireotide SC alone and in combination with verapamil sustained-release (SR) were superimposable with the geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval [CI]) of 0.98 (0.91-1.06) for C(max), 0.97 (0.90-1.04) for AUC(last), and 0.98 (0.92-1.05) for AUC(inf). Exploratory analyses showed a 17% (90% CI, 0.72-0.94) reduction in C(trough) and 31% (0.58-0.82) reduction in C(max) (8 hours post-dose) for verapamil SR with pasireotide SC versus verapamil alone. Pasireotide SC with or without verapamil was well tolerated. In conclusion, there was no change in the rate of pasireotide absorption and elimination or extent of exposure following concomitant administration with verapamil.

  19. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction between fexofenadine and fluvastatin mediated by organic anion-transporting polypeptides in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Fu; Lee, Beom-Jin; Lee, Wonjae; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2009-06-28

    This study aimed to examine the transporter-mediated drug interaction between fexofenadine and fluvastatin in rats. Compared to the control group given fluvastatin alone, the concurrent use of fexofenadine (10 or 20mg/kg) prior to the oral administration of fluvastatin (5mg/kg) decreased the systemic exposure of fluvastatin by 17-51% in rats. Consequently, the bioavailability of oral fluvastatin was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the presence of fexofenadine compared to that from the control group. Furthermore, the intravenous pharmacokinetics of fluvastatin (2mg/kg) was significantly altered by the pretreatment with fexofenadine (20mg/kg, p.o.). The plasma clearance of fluvastatin was reduced by 44% in the presence of fexofenadine. The effect of fluvastatin on the pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine was also investigated in rats. The pretreatment with fluvastatin (5 or 10mg/kg) decreased AUC and C(max) of oral fexofenadine (10mg/kg) by 47-53% and 28-60%, respectively, while it did not affect the intravenous pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine. Given that both fluvastatin and fexofenadine can interact with organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) expressed in intestine and liver, the present results suggest the potential drug interaction between fluvastatin and fexofenadine via the competition for the OATP-mediated cellular transport pathway during intestinal absorption and/or hepatic uptake of drugs.

  20. Effects of age and sex on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696, an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Langenickel, Thomas; Petruck, Jesika; Kode, Kiran; Rajman, Iris; Chandra, Priya; Zhou, Wei; Rebello, Sam; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    LCZ696, a novel angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, is in development for the treatment of heart failure. Administration of LCZ696 results in systemic exposure to sacubitril (inactive prodrug of LBQ657), LBQ657 (neprilysin inhibitor), and valsartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker). We investigated the potential effects of age and sex on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes (LBQ657 and valsartan) in an open-label, single oral dose (400 mg), parallel-group study in healthy subjects. Among 36 enrolled subjects, there were 19 male and 17 female subjects; 18 subjects were 18-45 years old (young), and 18 subjects were 65 years of age or older (elderly). Compared with young subjects, the AUCinf and T1/2 for LBQ657 were 42% and 30% greater, respectively, in elderly subjects. The Cmax for LBQ657 was similar between age groups. The AUCinf, Cmax, and T1/2 for valsartan were 30%, 24% greater, and 3.35 hours longer, respectively, in the elderly when compared with young subjects. All pharmacokinetic parameters of LCZ696 analytes (LBQ657 and valsartan) were similar between male and female subjects, indicating no effect on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes based on sex. Considering the magnitude of change and its clinical significance, dose adjustment based on age or sex is not considered necessary.

  1. Population Pharmacokinetics and Dose Optimization of Mycophenolic Acid in HCT Recipients Receiving Oral Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Mager, D E; Sandmaier, B M; Maloney, D G; Bemer, M J; McCune, J S

    2012-01-01

    We sought to create a population pharmacokinetic model for total mycophenolic acid (MPA), to study the effects of different covariates on MPA pharmacokinetics, to create a limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize MPA exposure (i.e., area under the curve or AUC) with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation, and to simulate an optimized dosing scheme for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. 4,496 MPA concentration-time points from 408 HCT recipients were analyzed retrospectively using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. MPA pharmacokinetics was characterized with a two-compartment model with first-order elimination and a time-lagged first-order absorption process. Concomitant cyclosporine and serum albumin were significant covariates. The median MPA clearance and volume of the central compartment were 24.2 L/hr and 36.4 L, respectively, for a 70 kg patient receiving tacrolimus with a serum albumin of 3.4 g/dL. Dosing simulations indicated that higher oral MMF doses are needed with concomitant cyclosporine, which increases MPA clearance by 33.8%. The optimal LSS was immediately before and at 0.25, 1.25, 2, and 4hr after oral MMF administration. MPA AUC in an individual HCT recipient can be accurately estimated using a five-sample LSS and maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation. PMID:23382105

  2. Population pharmacokinetics and dose optimization of mycophenolic acid in HCT recipients receiving oral mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Mager, D E; Sandmaier, B M; Maloney, D G; Bemer, M J; McCune, J S

    2013-04-01

    We sought to create a population pharmacokinetic model for total mycophenolic acid (MPA), to study the effects of different covariates on MPA pharmacokinetics, to create a limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize MPA exposure (i.e., area under the curve or AUC) with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation, and to simulate an optimized dosing scheme for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. Four thousand four hundred ninety-six MPA concentration-time points from 408 HCT recipients were analyzed retrospectively using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. MPA pharmacokinetics was characterized with a two-compartment model with first-order elimination and a time-lagged first-order absorption process. Concomitant cyclosporine and serum albumin were significant covariates. The median MPA clearance (CL) and volume of the central compartment were 24.2 L/hour and 36.4 L, respectively, for a 70 kg patient receiving tacrolimus with a serum albumin of 3.4 g/dL. Dosing simulations indicated that higher oral MMF doses are needed with concomitant cyclosporine, which increases MPA CL by 33.8%. The optimal LSS was immediately before and at 0.25 hours, 1.25 hours, 2 hours, and 4 hours after oral mycophenolate mofetil administration. MPA AUC in an individual HCT recipient can be accurately estimated using a five-sample LSS and maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation.

  3. Direct cell writing of 3D microorgan for in vitro pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Robert; Nam, Jae; Sun, Wei

    2008-06-01

    A novel targeted application of tissue engineering is the development of an in vitro pharmacokinetic model for drug screening and toxicology. An in vitro pharmacokinetic model is needed to realistically and reliably predict in vivo human response to drug administrations and potential toxic exposures. This paper details the fabrication process development and adaptation of microfluidic devices for the creation of such a physiologically relevant pharmacokinetic model. First, an automated syringe-based, layered direct cell writing (DCW) bioprinting process creates a 3D microorgan that biomimics the cell's natural microenvironment with enhanced functionality. Next, soft lithographic micropatterning techniques are used to fabricate a microscale in vitro device to house the 3D microorgan. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of the DCW process for freeform biofabrication of 3D cell-encapsulated hydrogel-based tissue constructs with defined reproducible patterns, direct integration of 3D constructs onto a microfluidic device for continuous perfusion drug flow, and characterization of 3D tissue constructs with predictable cell viability/proliferation outcomes and enhanced functionality over traditional culture methods.

  4. The Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Atezolizumab in Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stroh, Mark; Winter, Helen; Marchand, Mathilde; Claret, Laurent; Eppler, Steve; Ruppel, Jane; Abidoye, Oyewale; Teng, Siew Leng; Lin, Wan-Ting; Dayog, Sheila; Bruno, Rene; Jin, Jin; Girish, Sandhya

    2016-12-16

    Atezolizumab, a humanized immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody targeting human programmed death-ligand 1, is FDA-approved in metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC) and is being investigated in various malignancies. This analysis, based upon 906 patients from two Phase I and one Phase II mUC studies, is the first report of the clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of atezolizumab. Atezolizumab exhibited linear pharmacokinetics over a dose range of 1 - 20 mg/kg, including the labeled 1200 mg dose. The clearance, volume of distribution, and terminal half-life estimates from population pharmacokinetic (popPK) analysis of 0.200 L/day, 6.91 L, and 27 days, respectively, were as expected for an IgG1. Exposure-response analyses did not identify statistically-significant relationships with either objective response rate or adverse events of grade 3-5 or of special interest. None of the statistically-significant covariates from popPK (body weight, gender, anti-therapeutic antibody, albumin, and tumor burden) would require dose adjustment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychedelic 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine: metabolism, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and pharmacological actions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Wu; Jiang, Xi-Ling; Winter, Jerrold C; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2010-10-01

    5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) belongs to a group of naturally-occurring psychoactive indolealkylamine drugs. It acts as a nonselective serotonin (5-HT) agonist and causes many physiological and behavioral changes. 5-MeO-DMT is O-demethylated by polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) to an active metabolite, bufotenine, while it is mainly inactivated through the deamination pathway mediated by monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). 5-MeO-DMT is often used with MAO-A inhibitors such as harmaline. Concurrent use of harmaline reduces 5-MeO-DMT deamination metabolism and leads to a prolonged and increased exposure to the parent drug 5-MeO-DMT, as well as the active metabolite bufotenine. Harmaline, 5-MeO-DMT and bufotenine act agonistically on serotonergic systems and may result in hyperserotonergic effects or serotonin toxicity. Interestingly, CYP2D6 also has important contribution to harmaline metabolism, and CYP2D6 genetic polymorphism may cause considerable variability in the metabolism, pharmacokinetics and dynamics of harmaline and its interaction with 5-MeO-DMT. Therefore, this review summarizes recent findings on biotransformation, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacological actions of 5-MeO-DMT. In addition, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions between harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT, potential involvement of CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics, and risks of 5-MeO-DMT intoxication are discussed.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of oral ketorolac in the rat.

    PubMed

    Granados-Soto, V; Flores-Murrieta, F J

    1995-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ketorolac, a potent analgesic agent used for relief of moderate to severe pain, has been studied in rats who received oral doses of 1, 3.2 or 5.6 mg/kg of ketorolac tromethamine. Blood samples were obtained at selected times during 24 h after medication, and ketorolac concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. After administration of ketorolac, blood concentrations increased rapidly reaching a dose-dependent maximal concentration in about 20 min. Then, concentrations decayed with a half-life of about 6 h. A linear increase in Cmax and AUC as a function of the dose was observed, and not statistically significant difference was observed in AUC/dose or Cmax/dose between doses, indicating that pharmacokinetics of ketorolac is linear in the range of doses studied.

  7. Studies of the pharmacokinetic properties of nimorazole.

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, J.; Overgaard, M.; Timothy, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the hypoxic radio-sensitizer nimorazole were studied in 19 individuals after single oral doses of between 0.5-3.5 g. HPLC measurements showed, after a rapid absorption, a linear relationship between peak plasma concentration and given dose. Mean elimination half life was 3.1 h. A tendency to a dose-dependent variation in the apparent volume of distribution, total body clearance and elimination half life suggest non-linear pharmacokinetics of nimorazole. Tumour concentrations measured in 5 patients gave tumour/plasma ratios between 0.8-1.3. No toxicity was observed. The results indicate that nimorazole may have potential as a clinically useful hypoxic radiosensitizer. PMID:6871077

  8. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models for Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Plawecki, Martin H.; Han, Jae-Joon; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.; O'Connor, Sean J.

    2012-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models have been used to describe the distribution and elimination of ethanol after intravenous administration. These models have been used to estimate the ethanol infusion profile that is sufficient for achieving a prescribed breath ethanol concentration time course in individuals, providing a useful platform for several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic investigations. Mathematical foundations of these models are examined, including the derivation of an explicit set of governing equations in the form of a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These equations can then be used to formulate and refine parameter identification and control strategies. Finally, a framework in which models related to this model can be constructed and analyzed is described. PMID:19126448

  9. Whatever happened to cassette-dosing pharmacokinetics?

    PubMed

    Manitpisitkul, Prasarn; White, Ronald E

    2004-08-01

    Cassette dosing is a procedure that is used for rapidly assessing the pharmacokinetics of a series of discovery drug candidates by dosing a mixture of compounds rather than a single compound. Cassette dosing has advantages and disadvantages associated with its use, which leads to controversy about how and if it should be used. To assess the current practices of the pharmaceutical industry regarding cassette dosing, a survey of several pharmaceutical companies was conducted. Analysis of the survey revealed that opinion on this subject is divided within the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, it was determined that approximately only a half of those companies that perform in vivo pharmacokinetic screening use cassette dosing for this purpose.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drotaverine in humans.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, O O; Onyeji, C O; Ogundaini, A O; Olugbade, T A; Ogunbona, F A

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drotaverine was studied in 10 healthy volunteers after administration of single 80 mg oral and intravenous doses of the HCl salt of the drug, in a crossover fashion. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed for the unchanged drug by HPLC. The pharmacokinetic parameters, such as elimination half-life, plasma clearance, renal clearance and apparent volume of distribution, were not influenced by the route of drug administration. The drug was mainly eliminated by non-renal routes since renal clearance accounted for only 0.31 +/- 0.13% of the total plasma clearance. The absolute bioavailability was variable and ranged from 24.5-91% with a mean of 58.2 +/- 18.2% (mean +/- SD). It is suggested that the high variation in the bioavailability of drotaverine HCl after oral administration may result in significant interindividual differences in therapeutic response.

  11. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Extended-Infusion Piperacillin and Tazobactam in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Kyoung; Knoderer, Chad A.; Buenger, Lauren E.; Healy, Daniel P.; Dees, Jennifer; Crumby, Ashley S.; Kays, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam in children hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Seventy-two serum samples were collected at steady state from 12 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam at 100/12.5 mg/kg of body weight every 8 h infused over 4 h. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed using NONMEM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the piperacillin pharmacokinetic profiles for dosing regimens of 80 to 100 mg/kg of the piperacillin component given every 6 to 8 h and infused over 0.5, 3, or 4 h. The probability of target attainment (PTA) for a cumulative percentage of the dosing interval that the drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (TMIC) of ≥50% was calculated at MICs ranging from 0.25 to 64 mg/liter. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age, weight, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were 5 ± 3 years, 17 ± 6.2 kg, and 118 ± 41 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively. A one-compartment model with zero-order input and first-order elimination best fit the pharmacokinetic data for both drugs. Weight was significantly associated with piperacillin clearance, and weight and sex were significantly associated with tazobactam clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters (mean ± SD) for piperacillin and tazobactam were as follows: clearance, 0.22 ± 0.07 and 0.19 ± 0.07 liter/h/kg, respectively; volume of distribution, 0.43 ± 0.16 and 0.37 ± 0.14 liter/kg, respectively. All extended-infusion regimens achieved PTAs of >90% at MICs of ≤16 mg/liter. Only the 3-h infusion regimens given every 6 h achieved PTAs of >90% at an MIC of 32 mg/liter. For susceptible bacterial pathogens, piperacillin-tazobactam doses of ≥80/10 mg/kg given every 8 h and infused over 4 h achieve adequate pharmacodynamic exposures in critically ill children. PMID:26552978

  12. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Extended-Infusion Piperacillin and Tazobactam in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kristen; Chung, Eun Kyoung; Knoderer, Chad A; Buenger, Lauren E; Healy, Daniel P; Dees, Jennifer; Crumby, Ashley S; Kays, Michael B

    2015-11-09

    The study objective was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam in children hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Seventy-two serum samples were collected at steady state from 12 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam at 100/12.5 mg/kg of body weight every 8 h infused over 4 h. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed using NONMEM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate the piperacillin pharmacokinetic profiles for dosing regimens of 80 to 100 mg/kg of the piperacillin component given every 6 to 8 h and infused over 0.5, 3, or 4 h. The probability of target attainment (PTA) for a cumulative percentage of the dosing interval that the drug concentration exceeds the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (TMIC) of ≥50% was calculated at MICs ranging from 0.25 to 64 mg/liter. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age, weight, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were 5 ± 3 years, 17 ± 6.2 kg, and 118 ± 41 ml/min/1.73 m(2), respectively. A one-compartment model with zero-order input and first-order elimination best fit the pharmacokinetic data for both drugs. Weight was significantly associated with piperacillin clearance, and weight and sex were significantly associated with tazobactam clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters (mean ± SD) for piperacillin and tazobactam were as follows: clearance, 0.22 ± 0.07 and 0.19 ± 0.07 liter/h/kg, respectively; volume of distribution, 0.43 ± 0.16 and 0.37 ± 0.14 liter/kg, respectively. All extended-infusion regimens achieved PTAs of >90% at MICs of ≤16 mg/liter. Only the 3-h infusion regimens given every 6 h achieved PTAs of >90% at an MIC of 32 mg/liter. For susceptible bacterial pathogens, piperacillin-tazobactam doses of ≥80/10 mg/kg given every 8 h and infused over 4 h achieve adequate pharmacodynamic exposures in critically ill children.

  13. Single-dose pharmacokinetic studies of abiraterone acetate in men with hepatic or renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Marbury, Thomas; Lawitz, Eric; Stonerock, Robert; Gonzalez, Martha; Jiao, James; Breeding, Jim; Haqq, Christopher; Verboven, Peter; Stieltjes, Hans; Yu, Margaret; Molina, Arturo; Acharya, Milin; Chien, Caly; Tran, NamPhuong

    2014-07-01

    Three open-label, single-dose studies investigated the impact of hepatic or renal impairment on abiraterone acetate pharmacokinetics and safety/tolerability in non-cancer patients. Patients (n = 8 each group) with mild/moderate hepatic impairment or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and age-, BMI-matched healthy controls received a single oral 1,000 mg abiraterone acetate (tablet dose); while patients (n = 8 each) with severe hepatic impairment and matched healthy controls received 125- and 2,000-mg abiraterone acetate (suspension doses), respectively (systemic exposure of abiraterone acetate suspension is approximately half to that of tablet formulation). Blood was sampled at specified timepoints up to 72 or 96 hours postdose to measure plasma abiraterone concentrations. Abiraterone exposure was comparable between healthy controls and patients with mild hepatic impairment or ESRD, but increased by 4-fold in patients with moderate hepatic impairment. Despite a 16-fold reduction in dose, abiraterone exposure in patients with severe hepatic impairment was about 22% and 44% of the Cmax and AUC∞ of healthy controls, respectively. These results suggest that abiraterone pharmacokinetics were not changed markedly in patients with ESRD or mild hepatic impairment. However, the capacity to eliminate abiraterone was substantially compromised in patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment. A single-dose administration of abiraterone acetate was well-tolerated.

  14. Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics in Traumatic Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0373 TITLE: Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics in Traumatic Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Philip C...Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics In Traumatic Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0373 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 8 Title: Tranexamic Acid Mechanisms and Pharmacokinetics In Traumatic Injury (TAMPITI Trial

  15. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 suggests ubiquitous and frequent exposure. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats by oral and injection routes. Deuterated BPA was used to avoid issues of background contamination. Linear pharmacokinetics were observed in adult rats treated orally in the range of 0-200 {mu}g/kg bw. Evidence for enterohepatic recirculation of conjugated, but not aglycone, BPA was observed in adult rats. Significant inverse relationships were observed between postnatal age and measures of internal exposures to aglycone BPA and its elimination. In neonatal rats treated orally, internal exposures to aglycone BPA were substantially lower than from subcutaneous injection. The results reinforce the critical role for first-pass Phase II metabolism of BPA in gut and liver after oral exposure that attenuates internal exposure to the aglycone form in rats of all ages. The internal exposures to aglycone BPA observed in adult and neonatal rats following a single oral dose of 100 {mu}g/kg bw are inconsistent with effects mediated by classical estrogen receptors based on binding affinities. However, an impact on alternative estrogen signaling pathways that have higher receptor affinity cannot be excluded in neonatal rats. These findings emphasize the importance of matching aglycone BPA internal dosimetry with receptor affinities in experimental animal studies reporting toxicity.

  16. Pharmacokinetic analysis of topotecan after intra-vitreal injection. Implications for retinoblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Emiliano; Höcht, Christian; Chantada, Guillermo; Fandiño, Adriana; Navo, Elliot; Abramson, David H; Schaiquevich, Paula; Bramuglia, Guillermo F

    2010-07-01

    Topotecan is a promising drug with activity against retinoblastoma, however, attaining therapeutic concentrations in the vitreous humor is still a challenge for the treatment of vitreous seeds in retinoblastoma. Our aim was to characterize topotecan pharmacokinetics in vitreous and aqueous humor, and to assess the systemic exposure after intra-vitreal injection in rabbits as an alternative route for maximizing local drug exposure. Anesthetized rabbits were administered intra-vitreal injections of 5 microg of topotecan. Vitreous, aqueous, and blood samples were collected at pre-defined time points. A validated high-performance liquid chromatography assay was used to quantitate topotecan (lactone and carboxylate) concentrations. Topotecan pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in vitreous, aqueous and plasma using a compartmental analysis. Topotecan lactone concentrations in the vitreous of the injected eye were about 8 ng/mL 48 h after drug administration. The median maximum vitreous, aqueous and plasma total topotecan concentrations (C(max)) were 5.3, 0.68 and 0.21 microg/mL, respectively. The C(max) vitreous/aqueous of treated eyes and the C(max) vitreous/plasma were approximately 8 and 254, respectively. Total topotecan exposure (AUC) in the vitreous of the injected eye was 50 times greater than the total systemic exposure. These findings suggest that intra-vitreal administration of only 5 microg of topotecan reaches significant local levels over an extended period of time while minimizing systemic exposure in the rabbit. Intra-vitreal topotecan administration offers a promising alternative route for enhanced drug exposure in the vitreous humor with potential application for treatment of vitreal seeds in retinoblastoma while avoiding systemic toxicities.

  17. Pharmacokinetic changes in the elderly. Do they contribute to drug abuse and dependence?

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Fourie, J; Busto, U; Naranjo, C A

    1996-11-01

    . This may result in an impairment in O-demethylation of codeine to morphine and may lead to a decrease in the abuse and dependence potential of codeine. Conversely, those with a very rapid CYP2D6 catalytic activity may have an increased potential for codeine abuse and dependence. The clinical significance of age-related pharmacokinetic changes should be evaluated within the context of clinical practice. Most physicians are inclined to prescribe lower doses to the elderly, which may offset the potential impact of altered pharmacokinetics on the abuse and dependence potential of psychoactive agents. In summary, the available data are not sufficient for a definitive conclusion on whether the pharmacokinetic changes in the elderly translate to an increase in the abuse and dependence potential of alcohol, benzodiazepines or opioids. In particular, the data on age-associated changes in direct measures of abuse potential of these agents are missing. Future comparative systemic pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies assessing pertinent outcome measures on abuse and dependence potential of commonly used psychoactive drugs are required to resolve the ongoing controversy on risk factors for drug abuse and dependence in the elderly.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir During Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Best, Brookie M.; Burchett, Sandra; Li, Hong; Stek, Alice; Hu, Chengcheng; Wang, Jiajia; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Byroads, Mark; Watts, D. Heather; Smith, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Mirochnick, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tenofovir disoproxol fumarate (TDF) is increasingly used in HAART regimens of pregnant women, but limited data exist on pregnancy pharmacokinetics of chronically-dosed TDF. This study described tenofovir pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT P1026s is a prospective, non-blinded pharmacokinetic study of HIV-infected pregnant women that included a cohort receiving 300 mg TDF once daily. Steady-state 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles were measured at 2nd and 3rd trimester and postpartum, with maternal and umbilical cord samples at delivery. Tenofovir was measured by LC-MS. The target AUC was ≥ 1.99 mcg•hr/mL (non-pregnant historical control 10th percentile). Results Median tenofovir AUC was decreased during the 2nd (1.9 mcg•hr/mL) and 3rd (2.4 mcg•hr/mL, p=0.005) trimesters versus postpartum (3.0 mcg•hr/mL). Tenofovir AUC exceeded the target for 2/4 (50%) 2nd trimester; 27/37 (73%; 95% CI: 56%, 86%) 3rd trimester; and 27/32 (84%; 95% CI: 67%, 95%) postpartum women (p>0.05). Median 2nd/3rd trimester troughs were lower (39/54 ng/mL) than postpartum (61 ng/mL). Median 3rd trimester weight was heavier for subjects below target AUC versus those above target (97.9 vs. 74.2 kg, p = 0.006). Median ratio of cord blood to maternal concentrations was 0.88. No infants were HIV infected. Conclusions This study found lower tenofovir AUC and troughs during pregnancy. Transplacental passage with chronic TDF use during pregnancy was high. Standard TDF doses appear appropriate for most HIV-infected pregnant women but therapeutic drug monitoring with dose adjustment should be considered in pregnant women with high weight (> 90kg) or inadequate HIV RNA response. PMID:25959631

  19. Pharmacokinetic analysis of cefquinome in healthy chickens.

    PubMed

    Xie, W; Zhang, X; Wang, T; Du, S

    2013-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of cefquinome (CEQ) in chickens was determined after intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) administration of 2 mg/kg body weight. Plasma concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography assay with an ultraviolet detector at 265 nm wavelength. 2. Plasma concentration-time data after IV administration were best fitted by a two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters following IV injection were distribution half-life 0·43 ± 0·19 h, elimination half-life 1·29 ± 0·10 h, total body clearance 0·35 ± 0·04 l/kg/h, area under curve 5·33 ± 0·55 µg/h/ml and volume of distribution at steady state 0·49 ± 0·05 l/kg. 3. Plasma concentration-time data after IM administration were best described by a two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters after IM administration were absorption half-life 0·07 ± 0·02 h, distribution half-life 0·58 ± 0·27 h, elimination half-life 1·35 ± 0·20 h, peak concentration 3·04 ± 0·71 µg/ml and bioavailability 95·81 ± 5·81%. 4. Cefquinome kinetics in chicken and data from other species were summarised and analysed to provide a comprehensive understanding of CEQ pharmacokinetics.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of Allopurinol Riboside,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    095 Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of allopurinol riboside T"ere are no safe and effective oral drugs to treat leishmaniasis and Chagas ’ disease. Thc...leishmaniasis and Chagas ’ disease. 2 .3 typically require muLltiple parenteral doses. are e\\pen- [hese diseases occur in millions of people on a world- sive...40 ° C until analysis. Urine samples and perchloric allopurinol riboside were quantitated (in 85 determina acid extracts of plasma were analyzed for

  1. Pharmacokinetics and expert systems as aids for risk assessment in reproductive toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, D R; Jelovsek, F R

    1987-01-01

    A minimal approach to risk assessment in reproductive toxicology involves four components: hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure characterization, and risk characterization. In practice, risk assessment in reproductive toxicology has been reduced to arbitrary safety factors or mathematical models of the dose-response relationship. These approaches obscure biological differences across species rather than using this important and frequently accessible information. Two approaches that are formally capable of using biologically relevant information (pharmacokinetics and expert system shells) are explored as aids to risk assessment in reproductive toxicology. PMID:3447888

  2. The effects of nanoparticle drug loading on the pharmacokinetics of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Petschauer, Jennifer S.; Madden, Andrew J.; Kirschbrown, Whitney P.; Song, Gina; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in carrier-mediated agents, which include nanoparticles, nanosomes and conjugates, have revolutionized drug delivery capabilities over the past decade. While providing numerous advantages, such as greater solubility, duration of exposure and delivery to the site of action over their small-molecule counterparts, there is substantial variability in systemic clearance and distribution, tumor delivery and pharmacologic effects (efficacy and toxicity) of these agents. This review provides an overview of factors that affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of carrier-mediated agents in preclinical models and patients. PMID:25707978

  3. Pharmacokinetic profile of cocaine following intravenous administration in the female rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Parlaman, Joshua P.; Thompson, Barbara L.; Levitt, Pat; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2007-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure in a rabbit intravenous model has revealed selective disruption of brain development and pharmacological responsiveness. We therefore examined the pharmacokinetic properties of cocaine in this model. Dutch-belted rabbits were surgically implanted with a catheter in the carotid artery, allowed to recover, and then injected intravenously with a cocaine bolus. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations were measured in arterial blood plasma and analyzed by nonlinear regression and noncompartmental analyses. Peak cocaine concentration occurred by 30s, was transient, and distribution was rapid. The profile of cocaine in the rabbit is similar to that observed in humans using cocaine at recreational doses. PMID:17383635

  4. Interaction of licorice on glycyrrhizin pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Cantelli-Forti, G; Maffei, F; Hrelia, P; Bugamelli, F; Bernardi, M; D'Intino, P; Maranesi, M; Raggi, M A

    1994-01-01

    The effects of components of aqueous licorice root extract (LE) on the pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizin (G) and glycyrrhetic acid (GA) were investigated in rats and humans. The aim of this work was to define the role of pharmacokinetics in G toxicity. In the procedure, G and GA were detected in biological fluids by means of recently improved HPLC methods. Significantly lower G and GA plasma levels were found in rats and humans treated with LE compared to the levels obtained with those in which G alone was administered. The pharmacokinetic curves showed significant differences in the areas under the plasma-time curve (AUC), Cmax, and Tmax parameters. The data obtained from urine samples are in agreement with the above results and confirm a reduced bioavailability of G present in LE compared to pure G. This should be attributed to the interaction during intestinal absorption between the G constituent and the several components in LE. The modified bioavailability could explain the various clinical adverse effects resulting from the chronic oral administration of G alone as opposed to LE. PMID:7698088

  5. Clinical pharmacokinetics of levodopa in parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bianchine, J R; Shaw, G M

    1976-01-01

    Although levodopa has provided a major advance in the treatment of parkinsonism, its maximum benefits have not yet been realised, in part because of its complicated pharmacokinetics. This review summarises that available pharmacokinetic data involving levodopa, especially as it relates to therapeutic response of parkinsonian patients. A large number of factors, including protein intake, gastric emptying time, pyridoxine ingestion, and dopa decarboxylase activity, affect plasma levels of levodopa attained following oral administration of this drug. Other variables influence the rate of brain uptake of levodopa from the blood. Even so, plasma levodopa concentration correlates significantly with dosage size in a large parkinsonian population and also coincides with therapeutic response in many, but not all, patients. Therefore, in certain instances, valuable information may be derived by correlating clinical response with plasma levodopa concentration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of homovanillic acid, a major metabolite of dopamine, may have some value in predicting clinical response to levodopa. This relationship, however, has not been firmly established. Concentration of homovanillic acid or levodopa in body fluids may also be closely related to certain adverse side-effects, including abnormal involuntary movements, gastric discomfort and psychiatric disturbances. Evidence indicates that a clearer understanding of levodopa pharmacokinetics may improve the clinical management of parkinsonism.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Tyrosol Metabolites in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Hye; Kim, Yang-Ji; Kim, Min Jung; Ahn, Jiyun; Ha, Tae-Youl; Lee, Sang Hee; Jang, Young Jin; Jung, Chang Hwa

    2016-01-21

    Tyrosol is considered a potential antioxidant; however, little is known regarding the pharmacokinetics of its metabolites. To study the pharmacokinetics of tyrosol-derived metabolites after oral administration of a single dose of tyrosol, we attempted to identify tyrosol metabolites in rat plasma by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Two tyrosol metabolites (M1 and M2) were detected in the plasma. M1 was identified as tyrosol-4-sulfate (T4S) with an [M - H](-) ion at m/z 217. While M2 showed an [M - H](-) ion at m/z 151.0, its metabolite was not identified. Pharmacokinetic analysis of T4S and M2 showed rapid uptake after oral administration of tyrosol within 1 h. The metabolites were rapidly distributed in most organs and tissues and eliminated within 4 h. The greatest T4S deposition by tissue weight was observed in the liver, followed by the kidney and spleen, while M2 was most concentrated in the kidney followed by the liver and spleen. These findings indicate that T4S and M2 were distributed mainly in tissues with an abundant blood supply and were rapidly excreted in urine.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of oral terbinafine in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Younkin, T J; Davis, E G; Kukanich, B

    2016-11-24

    The primary study objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics of p.o. terbinafine alone to p.o. terbinafine administered with p.o. cimetidine in healthy adult horses. The second objective was to assess the pharmacokinetics of terbinafine when administered per rectum in two different suspensions at 30 mg/kg to adult horses. Six healthy adult horses were included in this crossover study. Plasma terbinafine concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The half-life (geometric mean) was 8.38 and 10.76 h, for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. The mean maximum plasma concentrations were 0.291 μg/mL at 1.54 h and 0.418 μg/mL at 1.28 h for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. Terbinafine with cimetidine had an average CMAX 44% higher and the relative F was 153% compared p.o. terbinafine alone, but was not statistically different (P > 0.05). Terbinafine was infrequently detected when administered per rectum in two different suspensions (water or olive oil). Minor adverse effects included oral irritation, fever, and colic. All resolved spontaneously. More pharmacokinetic studies are indicated assessing drug-drug interactions and using multiple dosing intervals to improve our knowledge of effective oral dosing, the potential for drug accumulation, and systemic adverse effect of terbinafine in horses.

  8. Predictive Performance of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Renally Cleared Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Johnson, TN; Xu, H; Cheung, SYA; Bui, KH; Li, J; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Predictive performance of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models of drugs predominantly eliminated through kidney in the pediatric population was evaluated. After optimization using adult clinical data, the verified PBPK models can predict 33 of 34 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children 1 month and older. More specifically, 10 of 11 of predicted clearance values were within 1.5‐fold of those observed in children between 1 month and 2 years old. The PopPK approach also predicted 19 of 21 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children. In summary, our analysis demonstrated both PBPK and PopPK adult models, after verification with additional adult pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and incorporation of known ontogeny of renal filtration, could be applied for dosing regimen recommendation in children 1 month and older for renally eliminated drugs in a first‐in‐pediatric study. PMID:27566992

  9. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  10. Exposure Nomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zissell, Ronald E.

    Correct exposure times may be determined from nomographs relating signal-to-noise ratio, exposure time, color, seeing, and magnitude. The equations needed to construct the nomographs are developed. Calibration techniques are discussed.

  11. [Pharmacokinetics and interactions of raltegravir].

    PubMed

    Placeres Alsina, Maria Mercè; Tuset Creus, Montse; Miró, José M

    2008-11-01

    Raltegravir is the first integrase inhibitor approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in pretreated adults with evidence of viral replication despite receiving antiretroviral therapy. Raltegravir is administered orally at a dose of 400 mg every 12 hours, with or without food. This drug is mainly eliminated through UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation and is not an inhibitor or inducer of the main liver cytochrome P450 isoenzymes; consequently there is virtually no risk of pharmacological interactions with most commonly used drugs such as methadone, azole antifungal agents or drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction. Studies of interaction with other antiretroviral agents show that raltegravir can be used in combination with tenofovir, efavirenz, atazanavir, ritonavir or tipranavir/ritonavir without the need for dose adjustments. When combined with rifampicin, the dose of raltegravir should be increased to 800 mg/12 h. Proton pump inhibitors increase plasma levels of raltegravir (a 3-fold increase in exposure or AUC levels), and consequently their combined use should be avoided as far as posible. Raltegravir is well tolerated and does not require dose adjustments in patients with severe renal impairment or mild-to-moderate liver impairment. There are no studies in patients with severe liver impairment.

  12. Effect of ginkgo biloba on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Blonk, Maren; Colbers, Angela; Poirters, Anne; Schouwenberg, Bas; Burger, David

    2012-10-01

    Medicinal herbs may cause clinically relevant drug interactions with antiretroviral agents. Ginkgo biloba extract is a popular herbal product among HIV-infected patients because of its positive effects on cognitive function. Raltegravir, an HIV integrase inhibitor, is increasingly being used as part of combined antiretroviral therapy. Clinical data on the potential inhibitory or inductive effect of ginkgo biloba on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir were lacking, and concomitant use was not recommended. We studied the effect of ginkgo biloba extract on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in an open-label, randomized, two-period, crossover phase I trial in 18 healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomly assigned to a regimen of 120 mg of ginkgo biloba twice daily for 15 days plus a single dose of raltegravir (400 mg) on day 15, a washout period, and 400 mg of raltegravir on day 36 or the test and reference treatments in reverse order. Pharmacokinetic sampling of raltegravir was performed up to 12 h after intake on an empty stomach. All subjects (9 male) completed the trial, and no serious adverse events were reported. Geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from dosing to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) and the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of raltegravir with ginkgo biloba versus raltegravir alone were 1.21 (0.93 to 1.58) and 1.44 (1.03 to 2.02). Ginkgo biloba did not reduce raltegravir exposure. The potential increase in the C(max) of raltegravir is probably of minor importance, given the large intersubject variability of raltegravir pharmacokinetics and its reported safety profile.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of EDP-420 after Ascending Single Oral Doses in Healthy Adult Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li-Juan; Wang, Michelle; Or, Yat Sun

    2009-01-01

    EDP-420 (EP-013420, S-013420) is a first-in-class bicyclolide (bridged bicyclic macrolide) currently in clinical development for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. It has good preclinical pharmacokinetic properties across multiple species and potent in vitro and in vivo activity against respiratory tract infection pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae, atypical organisms (e.g., Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila), and multidrug-resistant streptococci. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of an orally administered EDP-420 suspension in 40 healthy adult subjects were assessed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending single-dose study. Eligible subjects were sequentially randomized into one of five study groups (i.e., 100-, 200-, 400-, 800-, or 1,200-mg dosing groups) consisting of eight subjects (six active and two placebo) each. EDP-420 was well tolerated. There were no serious adverse events reported, nor were there any dose-limiting clinical or laboratory adverse events reported. EDP-420 was rapidly absorbed after a single oral dose. The mean plasma terminal half-life ranged from 15.6 to 20.1 h with low clearance. At the 400-mg dose, the area under the curve was 14.4 μg·h/ml, which well exceeded the required area under the concentration-time curve to cover common respiratory tract infection pathogens based on preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling. The long half-life and high systemic exposure of EDP-420 support once-daily dosing and may allow for shorter treatment durations compared to other macrolide antibiotics. Based on its human pharmacokinetic profiles, taken together with its in vitro/in vivo activity against common respiratory pathogens, EDP-420 warrants efficacy trials for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. PMID:19223626

  14. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based optimization of levofloxacin administration in the treatment of MDR-TB.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Samiksha; Van't Boveneind-Vrubleuskaya, Natasha; Akkerman, Onno W; de Lange, Wiel C M; van Soolingen, Dick; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Wilffert, Bob; Touw, Daniel J; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB has complicated TB treatment success. Among many factors that contribute to the development of resistance, low drug exposure is not the least important. This review summarizes the available information on pharmacokinetic properties of levofloxacin in relation to microbial susceptibilities, in order to optimize the dose and make general treatment recommendations. A total of 37 studies on adult (32 studies) and paediatric (5 studies) MDR-TB patients were included. Among the 32 adult studies, 19 were on susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to levofloxacin by MIC, 1 was on susceptibility of M. tuberculosis isolates to levofloxacin by MBC, 1 was on susceptibility of M. tuberculosis isolates to levofloxacin by mutant prevention concentration and 4 were on pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin, and 7 others were included. Likewise, out of five studies on children, two dealt with levofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters, one reviewed CSF concentrations and two dealt with background information. In adult MDR-TB patients, standard dosing of once-daily 1000 mg levofloxacin in TB treatment did not consistently attain the target concentration (i.e. fAUC/MIC >100 and fAUC/MBC >100) in 80% of the patients with MIC and MBC of 1 mg/L, leaving them at risk of developing drug resistance. However, with an MIC of 0.5 mg/L, 100% of the patients achieved the target concentration. Similarly, paediatric patients failed consistently in achieving given pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets due to age-related differences, demanding a shift towards once daily dosing of 15-20 mg/kg. Therefore, we recommend therapeutic drug monitoring for patients with strains having MICs of ≥0.5 mg/L and suggest revising the cut-off value from 2 to 1 mg/L.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of tilidine and naloxone in patients with severe hepatic impairment.

    PubMed

    Brennscheidt, Ulrich; Brunnmüller, Ulrike; Proppe, Dietfried; Thomann, Peter; Seiler, Klaus-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of tilidine (CAS 20380-58-9), naloxone (CAS 465-65-6) and tilidine metabolites after administration of a single oral dose of a solution containing 100 mg tilidine hydrochloride and 8 mg naloxone hydrochloride (equivalent to 1.44 ml Valoron N solution) to patients with severe hepatic impairment. The investigation was carried out as an open single-dose study in 8 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Patients qualified for study enrollment if they had a Child-Pugh score of > or = 7 and a mono-ethyl-glycine-xylidide (MEGX) 15-min test value < 50 ng/ ml. Blood samples were taken over a period of 28 h and analyzed for the prodrug tilidine, its active metabolite nortilidine, bisnortilidine, and naloxone (total and non-glucuronidated fraction). Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with data from a previous study performed in healthy volunteers. Tilidine, nortilidine and unconjugated naloxone pharmacokinetic parameters showed a high variability between patients. Compared to previous results obtained in healthy volunteers, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of nortilidine was reduced by 44%, whereas elimination half-life (t1/2) was prolonged by factor 2. The area under the curve (AUC) showed a slight reduction of approximately 20%. For total naloxone, no relevant change was observed. However, in contrast to the results obtained in healthy subjects, unconjugated naloxone could be measured in plasma from patients with cirrhosis, possibly due to a reduced glucuronidation capacity of the liver in these patients. In conclusion, severe hepatic impairment has a relatively minor influence on the exposure (AUC) to the active metabolite of tilidine (i.e., nortilidine). However, a straightforward interpretation of the results was confounded by pronounced variability in nortilidine pharmacokinetics. In individual patients with severely affected liver function, satisfactory analgesia with tilidine

  16. The Translation and the Translator of the Peshitta of Hosea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    This comprehensive examination of the Syriac Peshitta of Hosea (P-Hosea) is the first study of the Peshitta conducted via insights and methods from the discipline of Translation Studies. It uses in particular Andrew Chesterman's Causal Model and Gideon Toury's descriptive approach. Every translator leaves residue of his or her…

  17. Adding Statistical Machine Translation Adaptation to Computer-Assisted Translation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    on Telecommunications. Tehran, 2012, 822–826. Bertoldi, N.; Federico, M. Domain Adaptation for Statistical Machine Translation with Monolingual ...for Interactive Machine Translation. ICMI’11. Alicante, Spain: ACM, 2011, 197–200. 14 Haffari, G.; Sarkar, A. Active Learning for Multilingual

  18. Associations of high-dose melphalan pharmacokinetics and outcomes in the setting of a randomized cryotherapy trial.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yu Kyoung; Sborov, Douglas W; Lamprecht, Misty; Li, Junan; Wang, Jiang; Hade, Erinn M; Gao, Yue; Tackett, Karen; Williams, Nita; Benson, Don M; Efebera, Yvonne A; Rosko, Ashley E; Devine, Steven M; Poi, Ming; Hofmeister, Craig C; Phelps, Mitch A

    2017-02-04

    High dose melphalan followed by autologous stem cell transplantation remains standard of care for eligible patients with multiple myeloma, but disease response and toxicity, including severe mucositis, varies among patients. Our randomized trial investigated duration of cryotherapy (2 and 6 hours) for reduction of mucositis prevalence and severity and explored factors associated with variability in pharmacokinetics and outcomes from melphalan therapy. The results demonstrate 2-hour is at least as effective as 6-hour cryotherapy in decreasing severe mucositis. From a population pharmacokinetic model, we identified fat free mass, hematocrit, and creatinine clearance were significant covariates, as had been reported previously. Furthermore, we observed the rs4240803 SLC7A5 polymorphism was significantly associated with pharmacokinetic variability, and pharmacokinetics was associated with both mucositis and neutropenia. However, melphalan exposure was not associated with progression-free or overall survival in our dataset. These findings contribute to ongoing efforts to personalize melphalan dosing in transplant patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of trichloroethylene and its metabolites for use in risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, H J; Gentry, P R; Covington, T R; Gearhart, J M

    2000-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed that provides a comprehensive description of the kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites, trichloroethanol (TCOH), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), in the mouse, rat, and human for both oral and inhalation exposure. The model includes descriptions of the three principal target tissues for cancer identified in animal bioassays: liver, lung, and kidney. Cancer dose metrics provided in the model include the area under the concentration curve (AUC) for TCA and DCA in the plasma, the peak concentration and AUC for chloral in the tracheobronchial region of the lung, and the production of a thioacetylating intermediate from dichlorovinylcysteine in the kidney. Additional dose metrics provided for noncancer risk assessment include the peak concentrations and AUCs for TCE and TCOH in the blood, as well as the total metabolism of TCE divided by the body weight. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed on the model to evaluate its suitability for use in a pharmacokinetic risk assessment for TCE. Model predictions of TCE, TCA, DCA, and TCOH concentrations in rodents and humans are in good agreement with a variety of experimental data, suggesting that the model should provide a useful basis for evaluating cross-species differences in pharmacokinetics for these chemicals. In the case of the lung and kidney target tissues, however, only limited data are available for establishing cross-species pharmacokinetics. As a result, PBPK model calculations of target tissue dose for lung and kidney should be used with caution. PMID:10807559

  20. Ondansetron Exposure Changes in a Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Lara S; Zhang, Hongfei; Hebert, Mary F; Hankins, Gary D; Haas, David M; Caritis, Steve N; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-09-01

    Pregnancy results in many physiologic changes that can alter the pharmacokinetic profiles of medications used during pregnancy. One of the primary factors leading to these pharmacokinetic changes is altered activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Ondansetron is a substrate of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 (primary metabolic pathway), 2D6, and 1A2, all of which are altered during pregnancy. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron at three different gestational time points in a 26-year-old, pregnant, Caucasian woman with normal liver and kidney function, who was maintained on ondansetron 8 mg administered orally 3 times/day throughout her pregnancy. Serial plasma samples were collected from the subject over one 8-hour dosing interval at 14, 24, and 35 weeks' gestation (representing early-, mid-, and late-pregnancy time points, respectively). Ondansetron plasma concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Ondansetron area under the plasma concentration-time curve decreased progressively across gestation (634 ng hr/ml in early pregnancy, 553 ng hr/ml in mid-pregnancy, and 387 ng hr/ml in late pregnancy), with a corresponding increase in apparent oral clearance (12.6 L/hr in early-pregnancy, 14.5 L/hr in mid-pregnancy, and 20.7 L/hr in late-pregnancy). The decreased area under the plasma concentration-time curve and exposure to ondansetron across gestation is likely due to increased activity of CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 during pregnancy. We were not able to study this patient during the postpartum period; however, as with other CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 substrates, the apparent activities of these isoenzymes are likely return to baseline. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe ondansetron pharmacokinetics across gestation. Additional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data are needed to confirm our results and to evaluate clinical impact; however, in the meantime, clinicians should be aware of these pharmacokinetic changes in

  1. Statistical methods in translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shein-Chung; Tse, Siu-Keung; Lin, Min

    2008-12-01

    This study focuses on strategies and statistical considerations for assessment of translation in language (e.g. translation of case report forms in multinational clinical trials), information (e.g. translation of basic discoveries to the clinic) and technology (e.g. translation of Chinese diagnostic techniques to well-established clinical study endpoints) in pharmaceutical/clinical research and development. However, most of our efforts will be directed to statistical considerations for translation in information. Translational medicine has been defined as bench-to-bedside research, where a basic laboratory discovery becomes applicable to the diagnosis, treatment or prevention of a specific disease, and is brought forth by either a physicianscientist who works at the interface between the research laboratory and patient care, or by a team of basic and clinical science investigators. Statistics plays an important role in translational medicine to ensure that the translational process is accurate and reliable with certain statistical assurance. Statistical inference for the applicability of an animal model to a human model is also discussed. Strategies for selection of clinical study endpoints (e.g. absolute changes, relative changes, or responder-defined, based on either absolute or relative change) are reviewed.

  2. Translation: in retrospect and prospect.

    PubMed Central

    Woese, C R

    2001-01-01

    This review is occasioned by the fact that the problem of translation, which has simmered on the biological sidelines for the last 40 years, is about to erupt center stage--thanks to the recent spectacular advances in ribosome structure. This most complex, beautiful, and fascinating of cellular mechanisms, the translation apparatus, is also the most important. Translation not only defines gene expression, but it is the sine qua non without which modern (protein-based) cells would not have come into existence. Yet from the start, the problem of translation has been misunderstood--a reflection of the molecular perspective that dominated Biology of the last century. In that the our conception of translation will play a significant role in creating the structure that is 21st century Biology, it is critical that our current (and fundamentally flawed) view of translation be understood for what it is and be reformulated to become an all-embracing perspective about which 21st century Biology can develop. Therefore, the present review is both a retrospective and a plea to biologists to establish a new evolutionary, RNA-World-centered concept of translation. What is needed is an evolutionarily oriented perspective that, first and foremost, focuses on the nature (and origin) of a primitive translation apparatus, the apparatus that transformed an ancient evolutionary era of nucleic acid life, the RNA World, into the world of modern cells. PMID:11497425

  3. Translation as a Psycholinguistic Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zasyekin, Serhiy

    2010-01-01

    The article sketches the outlines of a theoretical framework for the analysis of translation of literary texts, viewed as psycho-semiotic phenomenon and based on evaluation of earlier attempts in this direction, and on the results of a psycholinguistic empirical study of translations. Central to this framework is the recent insight that the human…

  4. Knowledge Translation in Global Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pablos-Mendez, Ariel; Shademani, Ramesh

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the "know-do gap," present a definition of knowledge translation, and discuss its relative importance in bridging the know-do gap. Some of the underlying causes of the know-do gap are listed, along with ongoing efforts to address them. Knowledge translation is considered a cross-cutting, nonlinear process that involves not only recent…

  5. Translation as a Teaching Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Klaus

    This paper describes and explains a classroom exercise in French translation, with a view to promoting translation as an integral part of language instruction, particularly at the third-year college level when the student can be expected to have acquired an advanced knowledge of the parts of speech, of the grammatical distribution and their…

  6. Concurrent determination of bisphenol A pharmacokinetics in maternal and fetal rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Tucker A.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Roegge, Cindy S.; Callicott, Ralph J.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find a high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine (> 90%) in amounts consistent with aggregate exposure at levels below 1 μg/kg bw/d. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure concurrently the pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) deuterated BPA (d6) in maternal and fetal rhesus monkey serum, amniotic fluid, and placenta following intravenous injection in the dam (100 μg/kg bw). Internal exposures of the fetus to aglycone d6-BPA (serum AUC) were attenuated by maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism to less than half that in the dam. Levels of aglycone and conjugated d6-BPA measured in whole placenta were consistent with a role in metabolic detoxification. The monotonic elimination of aglycone d6-BPA from the fetal compartment accompanied by persistent conjugate levels provides further evidence arguing against the hypothesis that BPA conjugates are selectively deconjugated by either the placenta or fetus. These results also provide benchmarks to guide the interpretation of human cord blood, amniotic fluid, and placenta sampling and measurement strategies as a basis for estimating fetal exposures to BPA. This study in a non-human primate model provides additional pharmacokinetic data for use in PBPK modeling of perinatal exposures